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Sample records for heat stress effects

  1. Osmotic and Heat Stress Effects on Segmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Weiss

    Full Text Available During vertebrate embryonic development, early skin, muscle, and bone progenitor populations organize into segments known as somites. Defects in this conserved process of segmentation lead to skeletal and muscular deformities, such as congenital scoliosis, a curvature of the spine caused by vertebral defects. Environmental stresses such as hypoxia or heat shock produce segmentation defects, and significantly increase the penetrance and severity of vertebral defects in genetically susceptible individuals. Here we show that a brief exposure to a high osmolarity solution causes reproducible segmentation defects in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos. Both osmotic shock and heat shock produce border defects in a dose-dependent manner, with an increase in both frequency and severity of defects. We also show that osmotic treatment has a delayed effect on somite development, similar to that observed in heat shocked embryos. Our results establish osmotic shock as an alternate experimental model for stress, affecting segmentation in a manner comparable to other known environmental stressors. The similar effects of these two distinct environmental stressors support a model in which a variety of cellular stresses act through a related response pathway that leads to disturbances in the segmentation process.

  2. Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir OSHA-NIOSH ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  3. Effects of heat stress on baroreflex function in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Heat stress significantly reduces orthostatic tolerance in humans. The mechanism(s) causing this response remain unknown. The purpose of this review article is to present data pertaining to the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance in heat stressed individuals is a result of heat stress induced alterations in baroflex function. METHODS: In both normothermic and heat stressed conditions baroreflex responsiveness was assessed via pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. In addition, the effects of heat stress on post-synaptic vasoconstrictor responsiveness were assessed. RESULTS: Generally, whole body heating did not alter baroreflex sensitivity defined as the gain of the linear portion of the baroreflex curve around the operating point. However, whole body heating shifted the baroreflex curve to the prevailing (i.e. elevated) heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Finally, the heat stress impaired vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous administration of adrenergic agonists. CONCLUSION: Current data do not support the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance associated with heat stress in humans is due to impaired baroreflex responsiveness. This phenomenon may be partially due to the effects of heat stress on reducing vasoconstrictor responsiveness.

  4. Perceived heat stress and health effects on construction workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Priya; Rajiva, Ajit; Andhare, Dileep; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Tiwari, Abhiyant; Sheffield, Perry

    2015-01-01

    Increasing heat waves-particularly in urban areas where construction is most prevalent, highlight a need for heat exposure assessment of construction workers. This study aims to characterize the effects of heat on construction workers from a site in Gandhinagar. This study involved a mixed methods approach consisting of a cross sectional survey with anthropometric measurements (n = 219) and four focus groups with construction workers, as well as environmental measurements of heat stress exposure at a construction site. Survey data was collected in two seasons i.e., summer and winter months, and heat illness and symptoms were compared between the two time periods. Thematic coding of focus group data was used to identify vulnerability factors and coping mechanisms of the workers. Heat stress, recorded using a wet bulb globe temperature monitor, was compared to international safety standards. The survey findings suggest that heat-related symptoms increased in summer; 59% of all reports in summer were positive for symptoms (from Mild to Severe) as compared to 41% in winter. Focus groups revealed four dominant themes: (1) Non-occupational stressors compound work stressors; (2) workers were particularly attuned to the impact of heat on their health; (3) workers were aware of heat-related preventive measures; and (4) few resources were currently available to protect workers from heat stress. Working conditions often exceed international heat stress safety thresholds. Female workers and new employees might be at increased risk of illness or injury. This study suggests significant health impacts on construction workers from heat stress exposure in the workplace, showed that heat stress levels were higher than those prescribed by international standards and highlights the need for revision of work practices, increased protective measures, and possible development of indigenous work safety standards for heat exposure.

  5. Effect of heating method on stress-rupture life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizon, P. T.; Calfo, F. D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of radiant(furnace), resistance(electric current), burner(hot gas stream), and a combination of resistance and burner heating on intermediate time (100 to 300 hr) stress-rupture life and reduction of area was evaluated. All heating methods were studied using the nickel-based alloy Udimet 700 while all but burner heating were evaluated with the cobalt-based alloy Mar-M 509. Limited test results of eight other superalloys were also included in this study. Resistance heated specimens had about 20 to 30 percent of the stress-rupture life of radiant heated specimens. The limited burner heating data showed about a 50 percent life reduction as compared to the radiant heated tests. A metallurgical examination gave no explanation for these reductions.

  6. Heat Stress Effects on Growing-Finishing Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the factors that create heat stress, the response of the animals while under heat stress, and the signs of heat-stressed swine are essential to making rational decisions for the selection, design, and management of their environments. Heat stressors include combinations of environment...

  7. Analysis of creep effective stress in austenitic heat resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, In Duck; Nam, Ki Woo

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the comparison of calculated effective stress with experimental one in austenitic heat resistant steels, STS310J1TB and STS310S with and without a small amount of Nb and N. Based on a solute atoms diffusion model, contribution from soluble nitrogen to the high-temperature strength was numerically examined for austenitic heat-resisting Fe-Cr-Ni-N(STS310J1TB) and Fe-Cr-Ni(STS310S) alloys. The solute atmosphere dragging stress of dislocation was calculated in optional dislocation velocity of STS310J1TB and STS310S at 650 degree C, 675 degree C and 700 degree C. As a result of the numerical calculation, the solute atmosphere dragging stress of STS310J1TB was about 50 times larger than that of STS310S. When the temperature became high, the maximum value of solute atmosphere dragging stress was small and the velocity of moving dislocation was fast. From the relationship between the dislocation rate and the solute atmosphere dragging stress, the relation of both was proportional and the inclination is about 1 in the level with low velocity of moving dislocation. From above results, the mechanism of dislocation movement in STS310J1TB was the solute atmosphere dragging stress. The solute atmosphere dragging stress, which was calculated from the numerical calculation was close to the effect stress in stress relaxation tests

  8. Multiplied effect of heat and radiation in chemical stress relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masayuki

    1981-01-01

    About the deterioration of rubber due to radiation, useful knowledge can be obtained by the measurement of chemical stress relaxation. As an example, the rubber coating of cables in a reactor containment vessel is estimated to be irradiated by weak radiation at the temperature between 60 and 90 deg C for about 40 years. In such case, it is desirable to establish the method of accelerated test of the deterioration. The author showed previously that the law of time-dose rate conversion holds in the case of radiation. In this study, the chemical stress relaxation to rubber was measured by the simultaneous application of heat and radiation, and it was found that there was the multiplied effect of heat and radiation in the stress relaxation speed. Therefore the factor of multiplication of heat and radiation was proposed to describe quantitatively the degree of the multiplied effect. The chloroprene rubber used was offered by Hitachi Cable Co., Ltd. The experimental method and the results are reported. The multiplication of heat and radiation is not caused by the direct cut of molecular chains by radiation, instead, it is based on the temperature dependence of various reaction rates at which the activated species reached the cut of molecular chains through complex reaction mechanism and the temperature dependence of the diffusion rate of oxygen in rubber. (Kako, I.)

  9. Effect of heating rate on caustic stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indig, M.E.; Hoffman, N.J.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate effects of a large water leak into the sodium side of a steam generator in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC) at Canoga Park, California, is performing a series of tests in a Large Leak Test Rig (LLTR). This test series involves heating a large steam generator that possibly contains localized pockets of aqueous caustic retained from a previous sodium-water reaction. Such pockets of caustic solution could be in contact with welds and other components that contain residual stresses up to the yield point. The LMEC and General Electric (GE) ran a series of tests to evaluate the effect of heating rate on caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for alloys either used or considered for the LLTR. A summary of the temperatures and caustic concentration ranges that can result in caustic SCC for carbon steel and Type-304 stainless steel is given

  10. The effects of heat stress in Italian Holstein dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabucci, U; Biffani, S; Buggiotti, L; Vitali, A; Lacetera, N; Nardone, A

    2014-01-01

    The data set for this study comprised 1,488,474 test-day records for milk, fat, and protein yields and fat and protein percentages from 191,012 first-, second-, and third-parity Holstein cows from 484 farms. Data were collected from 2001 through 2007 and merged with meteorological data from 35 weather stations. A linear model (M1) was used to estimate the effects of the temperature-humidity index (THI) on production traits. Least squares means from M1 were used to detect the THI thresholds for milk production in all parities by using a 2-phase linear regression procedure (M2). A multiple-trait repeatability test-model (M3) was used to estimate variance components for all traits and a dummy regression variable (t) was defined to estimate the production decline caused by heat stress. Additionally, the estimated variance components and M3 were used to estimate traditional and heat-tolerance breeding values (estimated breeding values, EBV) for milk yield and protein percentages at parity 1. An analysis of data (M2) indicated that the daily THI at which milk production started to decline for the 3 parities and traits ranged from 65 to 76. These THI values can be achieved with different temperature/humidity combinations with a range of temperatures from 21 to 36°C and relative humidity values from 5 to 95%. The highest negative effect of THI was observed 4 d before test day over the 3 parities for all traits. The negative effect of THI on production traits indicates that first-parity cows are less sensitive to heat stress than multiparous cows. Over the parities, the general additive genetic variance decreased for protein content and increased for milk yield and fat and protein yield. Additive genetic variance for heat tolerance showed an increase from the first to third parity for milk, protein, and fat yield, and for protein percentage. Genetic correlations between general and heat stress effects were all unfavorable (from -0.24 to -0.56). Three EBV per trait were

  11. Effects of heat stress on gene expression in eggplant (Solanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... molecular shock protein, disease resistance protein, stress-related protein, enzymes related to ... The heat tolerant eggplant inbred line 05-4, bred by Vegetable ..... plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity was increased.

  12. The Effects of Heat Stress on Job Satisfaction, Job Performance and Occupational Stress in Casting Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghan; Mobinyzadeh; Habibi

    2016-01-01

    Background Job satisfaction, job performance, job stress and heat stress affect the productivity of workers. Objectives This research aimed to study the relationship between heat stress indices with job satisfaction, job performance and job stress in casting workers. Patients and Methods This descriptive-analytical cross sectional survey was performed during summer 2013 on one hund...

  13. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y. [Southern Medical University, Nanfang Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Guangzhou, China, Department of Anesthesia, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Y.; Chen, B. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China); Sun, X. [Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Su, L.; Liu, Z. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-25

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  14. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y.; Tang, Y.; Chen, B.; Sun, X.; Su, L.; Liu, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries

  15. Thermomechanical Stress in Cryopreservation Via Vitrification With Nanoparticle Heating as a Stress-Moderating Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David P; Bischof, John C; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on thermomechanical effects in cryopreservation associated with a novel approach of volumetric heating by means on nanoparticles in an alternating electromagnetic field. This approach is studied for the application of cryopreservation by vitrification, where the crystalline phase is completely avoided-the cornerstone of cryoinjury. Vitrification can be achieved by quickly cooling the material to cryogenic storage, where ice cannot form. Vitrification can be maintained at the end of the cryogenic protocol by quickly rewarming the material back to room temperature. The magnitude of the rewarming rates necessary to maintain vitrification is much higher than the magnitude of the cooling rates that are required to achieve it in the first place. The most common approach to achieve the required cooling and rewarming rates is by exposing the specimen's surface to a temperature-controlled environment. Due to the underlying principles of heat transfer, there is a size limit in the case of surface heating beyond which crystallization cannot be prevented at the center of the specimen. Furthermore, due to the underlying principles of solid mechanics, there is a size limit beyond which thermal expansion in the specimen can lead to structural damage and fractures. Volumetric heating during the rewarming phase of the cryogenic protocol can alleviate these size limitations. This study suggests that volumetric heating can reduce thermomechanical stress, when combined with an appropriate design of the thermal protocol. Without such design, this study suggests that the level of stress may still lead to structural damage even when volumetric heating is applied. This study proposes strategies to harness nanoparticles heating in order to reduce thermomechanical stress in cryopreservation by vitrification.

  16. Effect of gibberrelic acid on α-amylase activity in heat stressed mung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reading 7

    2012-06-28

    Jun 28, 2012 ... Gibberellic acid (GA3) is a plant growth hormone, responsible for growth, stress tolerance and ... inhibition of germination has been overcome (Jacobsen et al., 2002). ..... Effect of fluridone on free sugar level in heat stressed ...

  17. Drought stress had a predominant effect over heat stress on three tomato cultivars subjected to combined

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Rong; Yu, Xiaqing; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2017-01-01

    and relative water content of all cultivars significantly decreased under drought and combined stress as compared to control. The net photosynthesis and starch content were significantly lower under drought and combined stress than control in the three cultivars. Stomata and pore length of the three cultivars......BACKGROUND: Abiotic stresses due to environmental factors could adversely affect the growth and development of crops. Among the abiotic stresses, drought and heat stress are two critical threats to crop growth and sustainable agriculture worldwide. Considering global climate change, incidence...... of combined drought and heat stress is likely to increase. The aim of this study was to shed light on plant growth performance and leaf physiology of three tomatoes cultivars ('Arvento', 'LA1994' and 'LA2093') under control, drought, heat and combined stress. RESULTS: Shoot fresh and dry weight, leaf area...

  18. Effects of heat stress and starvation on clonal odontoblast-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morotomi, Takahiko; Kitamura, Chiaki; Toyono, Takashi; Okinaga, Toshinori; Washio, Ayako; Saito, Noriko; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Terashita, Masamichi; Anan, Hisashi

    2011-07-01

    Heat stress during restorative procedures, particularly under severe starvation conditions, can trigger damage to dental pulp. In the present study, we examined effects of heat stress on odontoblastic activity and inflammatory responses in an odontoblast-like cell line (KN-3) under serum-starved conditions. Viability, nuclear structures, and inflammatory responses of KN-3 cells were examined in culture medium containing 10% or 1% serum after exposure to heat stress at 43°C for 45 minutes. Gene expression of extracellular matrices, alkaline phosphatase activity, and detection of extracellular calcium deposition in cells exposed to heat stress were also examined. Reduced viability and apoptosis were transiently induced in KN-3 cells during the initial phases after heat stress; thereafter, cells recovered their viability. The cytotoxic effects of heat stress were enhanced under serum-starved conditions. Heat stress also strongly up-regulated expression of heat shock protein 25 as well as transient expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 in KN-3 cells. In contrast, expression of type-1 collagen, runt-related transcription factor 2, and dentin sialophosphoprotein were not inhibited by heat stress although starvation suppressed ALP activity and delayed progression of calcification. Odontoblast-like cells showed thermoresistance with transient inflammatory responses and without loss of calcification activity, and their thermoresistance and calcification activity were influenced by nutritional status. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Galacto-oligosaccharides exert a protective effect against heat stress in a Caco-2 cell model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varasteh, Soheil; Braber, Saskia; Garssen, Johan; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    Thermal stress can evoke a stress response and enhance the synthesis of heat shock proteins, while gut barrier dysfunction is considered as an important adverse effect of thermal stress. Considering the previously described effects of galacto-oligosaccharides, nowadays mainly used in infant

  20. Heat stress management program improving worker health and operational effectiveness: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Rosalyn G; Skelton, Scott B; Alvis, Kimberly L; Shane, Leigh A

    2013-03-01

    Heat stress monitoring is a vital component of an effective health and safety program when employees work in exceptionally warm environments. Workers at hazardous waste sites often wear personal protective equipment (PPE), which increases the body heat stress load. No specific Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations address heat stress; however, OSHA does provide several guidance documents to assist employers in addressing this serious workplace health hazard. This article describes a heat stress and surveillance plan implemented at a hazardous waste site as part of the overall health and safety program. The PPE requirement for work at this site, coupled with extreme environmental temperatures, made heat stress a significant concern. Occupational health nurses and industrial hygienists developed a monitoring program for heat stress designed to prevent the occurrence of significant heat-related illness in site workers. The program included worker education on the signs of heat-related illness and continuous physiologic monitoring to detect early signs of heat-related health problems. Biological monitoring data were collected before workers entered the exclusion zone and on exiting the zone following decontamination. Sixty-six site workers were monitored throughout site remediation. More than 1,700 biological monitoring data points were recorded. Outcomes included improved worker health and safety, and increased operational effectiveness. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Heart rate variability during exertional heat stress: effects of heat production and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouris, Andreas D; Bravi, Andrea; Wright-Beatty, Heather E; Green, Geoffrey; Seely, Andrew J; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-04-01

    We assessed the efficacy of different treatments (i.e., treatment with ice water immersion vs. natural recovery) and the effect of exercise intensities (i.e., low vs. high) for restoring heart rate variability (HRV) indices during recovery from exertional heat stress (EHS). Nine healthy adults (26 ± 3 years, 174.2 ± 3.8 cm, 74.6 ± 4.3 kg, 17.9 ± 2.8 % body fat, 57 ± 2 mL·kg·(-1) min(-1) peak oxygen uptake) completed four EHS sessions incorporating either walking (4.0-4.5 km·h(-1), 2 % incline) or jogging (~7.0 km·h(-1), 2 % incline) on a treadmill in a hot-dry environment (40 °C, 20-30 % relative humidity) while wearing a non-permeable rain poncho for a slow or fast rate of rectal temperature (T re) increase, respectively. Upon reaching a T re of 39.5 °C, participants recovered until T re returned to 38 °C either passively or with whole-body immersion in 2 °C water. A comprehensive panel of 93 HRV measures were computed from the time, frequency, time-frequency, scale-invariant, entropy and non-linear domains. Exertional heat stress significantly affected 60/93 HRV measures analysed. Analyses during recovery demonstrated that there were no significant differences between HRV measures that had been influenced by EHS at the end of passive recovery vs. whole-body cooling treatment (p > 0.05). Nevertheless, the cooling treatment required statistically significantly less time to reduce T re (p whole-body immersion in 2 °C water results in faster cooling, there were no observed differences in restoration of autonomic heart rate modulation as measured by HRV indices with whole-body cold-water immersion compared to passive recovery in thermoneutral conditions.

  2. Heat Stress in Tunisia: Effects on dairy cows and potential means ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heat Stress in Tunisia: Effects on dairy cows and potential means. ... The objectives of this work were to characterize the environmental conditions to which Holstein ... Maintaining cow performance under hot conditions requires the adoption of ...

  3. Phenotypic effects of salt and heat stress over three generations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léonie Suter

    Full Text Available Current and predicted environmental change will force many organisms to adapt to novel conditions, especially sessile organisms such as plants. It is therefore important to better understand how plants react to environmental stress and to what extent genotypes differ in such responses. It has been proposed that adaptation to novel conditions could be facilitated by heritable epigenetic changes induced by environmental stress, independent of genetic variation. Here we assessed phenotypic effects of heat and salt stress within and across three generations using four highly inbred Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes (Col, Cvi, Ler and Sha. Salt stress generally decreased fitness, but genotypes were differently affected, suggesting that susceptibility of A. thaliana to salt stress varies among genotypes. Heat stress at an early rosette stage had less detrimental effects but accelerated flowering in three out of four accessions. Additionally, we found three different modes of transgenerational effects on phenotypes, all harboring the potential of being adaptive: heat stress in previous generations induced faster rosette growth in Sha, both under heat and control conditions, resembling a tracking response, while in Cvi, the phenotypic variance of several traits increased, resembling diversified bet-hedging. Salt stress experienced in earlier generations altered plant architecture of Sha under salt but not control conditions, similar to transgenerational phenotypic plasticity. However, transgenerational phenotypic effects depended on the type of stress as well as on genotype, suggesting that such effects may not be a general response leading to adaptation to novel environmental conditions in A. thaliana.

  4. Effects of heat stress on bovine preimplantation embryos produced in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakatani, Miki

    2017-08-19

    Summer heat stress decreases the pregnancy rate in cattle and has been thought to be associated with the early embryonic death caused by the elevation of maternal body temperature. In vitro cultures have been widely used for the evaluation of effects of heat stress on oocytes, fertilization, preimplantation, and embryonic development. Susceptibility to heat stress is present in developmental stages from oocytes to cleavage-stage (before embryonic gene activation, EGA) embryos, leading to a consequent decrease in developmental competence. On the other hand, advanced-stage embryos such as morula or blastocysts have acquired thermotolerance. The mechanism for the developmental stage-dependent change in thermotolerance is considered to be the accumulation of antioxidants in embryos in response to heat-inducible production of reactive oxygen species. The supplementation of antioxidants to the culture media has been known to neutralize the detrimental effects of heat stress. Besides, EGA could be involved in acquisition of thermotolerance in later stages of embryos. Morulae or blastocysts can repair heat-induced unfolded proteins or prevent DNA damage occurring in processes such as apoptosis. Therefore, embryo transfer (ET) that can bypass the heat-sensitive stage could be a good solution to improve the pregnancy rate under heat stress. However, frozen-thawed ET could not improve the pregnancy rate as expected. Frozen-thawed blastocysts were more sensitive to heat stress and showed less proliferation upon heat exposure, compared to fresh blastocysts. Therefore, further research is required to improve the reduction in pregnancy rates due to summer heat stress.

  5. Invited review: heat stress effects during late gestation on dry cows and their calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, S; Dahl, G E

    2013-07-01

    In dairy cattle, late gestation is a critical period for fetal growth and physiological transition into the next lactation. Environmental factors, such as temperature and light, exert dramatic effects on the production, health, and well-being of animals during this period and after parturition. The aim of this review was to introduce effects of heat stress during late gestation on dairy cattle, and discuss the biological mechanisms that underlie the observed production and health responses in the dam and her fetus. Relative to cooled cows, cows that are heat stressed during late gestation have impaired mammary growth before parturition and decreased milk production in the subsequent lactation. In response to higher milk yield, cows cooled prepartum undergo a series of homeorhetic adaptations in early lactation to meet higher demand for milk synthesis compared with heat-stressed cows, but no direct effect of environmental heat stress on metabolism exists during the dry period. Prepartum cooling improves immune status of transition cows and evidence suggests that altered prolactin signaling in immune cells mediates the effects of heat stress on immune function. Late-gestation heat stress compromises placental development, which results in fetal hypoxia, malnutrition, and eventually fetal growth retardation. Maternal heat stress may also have carryover effects on the postnatal growth of offspring, but direct evidence is still lacking. Emerging evidence suggests that offspring from prepartum heat-stressed cows have compromised passive immunity and impaired cell-mediated immune function compared with those from cooled cows. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Heat stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.): Effects on grain growth and quality traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiertz, J.H.J.; Hamer, R.J.; Xu, H.; Primo-Martin, C.; Don, C.; Putten, P.E.L. van der

    2006-01-01

    Heat stress effects on grain dry mass and quality were studied in spring wheat genotypes (Triticum aestivum L.). Three cultivars were chosen with respect to heat tolerance: Lavett (genotype 1), selected for temperate growing conditions and two CIMMYT cultivars, Ciano-79 (genotype 2) and Attila

  7. Effect of heat stress on contractility of tissue-engineered artificial skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shunya; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Fujisato, Toshia

    2018-01-23

    The effects of heat stress on tissue like skeletal muscle have been widely studied. However, the mechanism responsible for the effect of heat stress is still unclear. A useful experimental tissue model is necessary because muscle function in cell culture may differ from native muscle and measuring its contractility is difficult. We previously reported three-dimensional tissue-engineered artificial skeletal muscle (TEM) that can be easily set in a measurement apparatus for quantitative evaluation of contractility. We have now applied TEM to the investigation of heat stress. We analyzed contractility immediately after thermal exposure at 39 °C for 24 or 48 h to evaluate the acute effects and after thermal exposure followed by normal culture to evaluate the aftereffects. Peak twitch contractile force and time-to-peak twitch were used as contractile parameters. Heat stress increased the TCF in the early stage (1 week) after normal culture; the TCF decreased temporarily in the middle to late stages (2-3 weeks). These results suggest that heat stress may affect both myoblast fusion and myotube differentiation in the early stage of TEM culture, but not myotube maturation in the late stage. The TCF increase rate with thermal exposure was significantly higher than that without thermal exposure. Although detailed analysis at the molecular level is necessary for further investigation, our artificial skeletal muscle may be a promising tool for heat stress investigation.

  8. Effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines, AMP-activated protein kinase, and heat shock signal molecules in dairy cows*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Cheng, Jian-bo; Shi, Bao-lu; Yang, Hong-jian; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jia-qi

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress affects feed intake, milk production, and endocrine status in dairy cows. The temperature-humidity index (THI) is employed as an index to evaluate the degree of heat stress in dairy cows. However, it is difficult to ascertain whether THI is the most appropriate measurement of heat stress in dairy cows. This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and heat shock signal molecules (heat shock transcription factor (HSF) and heat shock proteins (HSP)) in dairy cows and to research biomarkers to be used for better understanding the meaning of THI as a bioclimatic index. To achieve these objectives, two experiments were performed. The first experiment: eighteen lactating Holstein dairy cows were used. The treatments were: heat stress (HS, THI average=81.7, n=9) and cooling (CL, THI average=53.4, n=9). Samples of HS were obtained on August 16, 2013, and samples of CL were collected on April 7, 2014 in natural conditions. The second experiment: HS treatment cows (n=9) from the first experiment were fed for 8 weeks from August 16, 2013 to October 12, 2013. Samples for moderate heat stress, mild heat stress, and no heat stress were obtained, respectively, according to the physical alterations of the THI. Results showed that heat stress significantly increased the serum adiponectin, AMPK, HSF, HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90 (Pheat-stressed dairy cows. When heat stress treatment lasted 8 weeks, a higher expression of HSF and HSP70 was observed under moderate heat stress. Serum HSF and HSP70 are sensitive and accurate in heat stress and they could be potential indicators of animal response to heat stress. We recommend serum HSF and HSP70 as meaningful biomarkers to supplement the THI and evaluate moderate heat stress in dairy cows in the future. PMID:26055916

  9. Effects of Heat Stress on Metabolite Accumulation and Composition, and Nutritional Properties of Durum Wheat Grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria de Leonardis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum (L. subsp. turgidum (L. convar. durum (Desf. is momentous for human nutrition, and environmental stresses can strongly limit the expression of yield potential and affect the qualitative characteristics of the grain. The aim of this study was to determine how heat stress (five days at 37 °C applied five days after flowering affects the nutritional composition, antioxidant capacity and metabolic profile of the grain of two durum wheat genotypes: “Primadur”, an elite cultivar with high yellow index, and “T1303”, an anthocyanin-rich purple cultivar. Qualitative traits and metabolite evaluation (by gas chromatography linked to mass spectrometry were carried out on immature (14 days after flowering and mature seeds. The effects of heat stress were genotype-dependent. Although some metabolites (e.g., sucrose, glycerol increased in response to heat stress in both genotypes, clear differences were observed. Following the heat stress, there was a general increase in most of the analyzed metabolites in “Primadur”, with a general decrease in “T1303”. Heat shock applied early during seed development produced changes that were observed in immature seeds and also long-term effects that changed the qualitative and quantitative parameters of the mature grain. Therefore, short heat-stress treatments can affect the nutritional value of grain of different genotypes of durum wheat in different ways.

  10. Effects of late-gestation heat stress on immunity and performance of calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, G E; Tao, S; Monteiro, A P A

    2016-04-01

    Lactating cows that experience heat stress will have reduced dry matter intake and milk yield and shift metabolism, which ultimately reduces the efficiency of milk production. Dry cows that are heat stressed similarly experience lower intake, reduced mammary growth, and compromised immune function that ultimately results in a poorer transition into lactation and lower milk yield in the next lactation. A recent focus in our laboratory is on the effects of late gestation, in utero heat stress on calf survival and performance. We have completed a series of studies to examine preweaning growth and health, and later reproductive and productive responses, in an attempt to quantify acute and persistent effects of in utero heat strain. Late gestation heat stress results in calves with lower body weight at birth, shorter stature at weaning, and failure to achieve the same weight or height at 12 mo of age observed in calves from dams that are cooled when dry. A portion of the reduced growth may result from the lower immune status observed in calves heat stressed in utero, which begins with poorer apparent efficiency of immunoglobulin absorption and extends to lower survival rates through puberty. Heat-stressed calves, however, have permanent shifts in metabolism that are consistent with greater peripheral accumulation of energy and less lean growth relative to those from cooled dams. Comparing reproductive performance in calves heat stressed versus those cooled in utero, we observe that the cooled heifers require fewer services to attain pregnancy and become pregnant at an earlier age. Tracking the milk production in calves that were heat stressed in utero versus those cooled in late gestation revealed a significant reduction of yield in the first lactation, approximately 5 kg/d through 35 wk of lactation, despite similar body weight and condition score at calving. These observations indicate that a relatively brief period of heat stress in late gestation dramatically alters

  11. Effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines, AMP-activated protein kinase, and heat shock signal molecules in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Cheng, Jian-bo; Shi, Bao-lu; Yang, Hong-jian; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jia-qi

    2015-06-01

    Heat stress affects feed intake, milk production, and endocrine status in dairy cows. The temperature-humidity index (THI) is employed as an index to evaluate the degree of heat stress in dairy cows. However, it is difficult to ascertain whether THI is the most appropriate measurement of heat stress in dairy cows. This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and heat shock signal molecules (heat shock transcription factor (HSF) and heat shock proteins (HSP)) in dairy cows and to research biomarkers to be used for better understanding the meaning of THI as a bioclimatic index. To achieve these objectives, two experiments were performed. The first experiment: eighteen lactating Holstein dairy cows were used. The treatments were: heat stress (HS, THI average=81.7, n=9) and cooling (CL, THI average=53.4, n=9). Samples of HS were obtained on August 16, 2013, and samples of CL were collected on April 7, 2014 in natural conditions. The second experiment: HS treatment cows (n=9) from the first experiment were fed for 8 weeks from August 16, 2013 to October 12, 2013. Samples for moderate heat stress, mild heat stress, and no heat stress were obtained, respectively, according to the physical alterations of the THI. Results showed that heat stress significantly increased the serum adiponectin, AMPK, HSF, HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90 (Pdairy cows. When heat stress treatment lasted 8 weeks, a higher expression of HSF and HSP70 was observed under moderate heat stress. Serum HSF and HSP70 are sensitive and accurate in heat stress and they could be potential indicators of animal response to heat stress. We recommend serum HSF and HSP70 as meaningful biomarkers to supplement the THI and evaluate moderate heat stress in dairy cows in the future.

  12. The effects of acclimatization on blood clotting parameters in exertional heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesić, Zoran; Vukasinović-Vesić, Milica; Dincić, Dragan; Surbatović, Maja; Radaković, Sonja S

    2013-07-01

    Exertional heat stress is a common problem in military services. Considering the coagulation abnormalities are of major importance in development of severe heat stroke, we wanted to examine changes in hemostatic parameters in soldiers during exertional heat stress test as well as the effects of a 10-day passive or active acclimatization in a climatic chamber. A total of 40 male soldiers with high aerobic capacity performed exertional heat stress test (EHST) either in cool [20 degrees C, 16 degrees C wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT)], or hot (40 degrees C, 29 degrees C, (WBGT) environment, unacclimatized (U) or after 10 days of passive (P) or active (A) acclimatization. Physiological strain was measured by tympanic temperatures (Tty) and heart rates (HR). Platelet count (PC), antithrombin III (AT), and prothrombin time (PT) were assessed in blood samples collected before and immediately after the EHST. EHST in hot conditions induced physiological heat stress (increase in Tty and HR), with a significant increase in prothrombin time in the groups U and A. Platelet counts were significantly higher after the EHST compared to the basic levels in all the investigated groups, regardless environmental conditions and acclimatization state. Antithrombin levels were not affected by EHST whatsoever. In the trained soldiers, physiological heat stress caused mild changes in some serum parameters of blood clotting such as prothrombin time, while others such as antithrombin levels were not affected. Platelet counts were increased after EHST in all groups. A 10-day passive or active acclimatization in climatic chamber showed no effect on parameters investigated.

  13. Effects of heat stress on dynamic absorption process, tissue distribution and utilization efficiency of vitamin C in broilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guohua; Chen Guosheng; Cai Huiyi

    1998-01-01

    The experiment was conducted to determine the effects of heat stress on ascorbic acid nutritional physiology of broilers with radioisotope technology. 3 H-Vc was fed to broilers and then the blood, liver, kidney, breast muscle, and excreta were sampled to determine the dynamic absorption process, the tissue distribution and the utilization efficiency of vitamin C. The results indicated that the absorption, metabolism and mobilization of supplemented vitamin C in broilers with heat stress was faster than that in broilers without heat stress. However, the utilization efficiency of supplemented vitamin C in broilers with heat stress was not higher than that of broilers without heat stress

  14. Effects of heat stress on gene expression in eggplant ( Solanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to identify differentially expressed genes involved in heat shock response, cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) were used to study gene expression of eggplant seedlings subjected to 0, 6 and 12 h at 43°C. A total of 53 of over ...

  15. Effects of city expansion on heat stress under climate change conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Argüeso

    Full Text Available We examine the joint contribution of urban expansion and climate change on heat stress over the Sydney region. A Regional Climate Model was used to downscale present (1990-2009 and future (2040-2059 simulations from a Global Climate Model. The effects of urban surfaces on local temperature and vapor pressure were included. The role of urban expansion in modulating the climate change signal at local scales was investigated using a human heat-stress index combining temperature and vapor pressure. Urban expansion and climate change leads to increased risk of heat-stress conditions in the Sydney region, with substantially more frequent adverse conditions in urban areas. Impacts are particularly obvious in extreme values; daytime heat-stress impacts are more noticeable in the higher percentiles than in the mean values and the impact at night is more obvious in the lower percentiles than in the mean. Urban expansion enhances heat-stress increases due to climate change at night, but partly compensates its effects during the day. These differences are due to a stronger contribution from vapor pressure deficit during the day and from temperature increases during the night induced by urban surfaces. Our results highlight the inappropriateness of assessing human comfort determined using temperature changes alone and point to the likelihood that impacts of climate change assessed using models that lack urban surfaces probably underestimate future changes in terms of human comfort.

  16. Effects of heat stress on working populations when facing climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Karin; Kuklane, Kalev; Gao, Chuansi; Holmér, Ingvar

    2013-01-01

    It is accepted that the earth's climate is changing in an accelerating pace, with already documented implications for human health and the environment. This literature review provides an overview of existing research findings about the effects of heat stress on the working population in relation to climate change. In the light of climate change adaptation, the purpose of the literature review was to explore recent and previous research into the impacts of heat stress on humans in an occupational setting. Heat stress in the workplace has been researched extensively in the past however, in the contemporary context of climate change, information is lacking on its extent and implications. The main factors found to exacerbate heat stress in the current and future workplace are the urban 'heat island effect', physical work, individual differences, and the developing country context where technological fixes are often not applicable. There is also a lack of information on the effects on vulnerable groups such as elderly people and pregnant women. As increasing temperatures reduce work productivity, world economic productivity could be condensed, affecting developing countries in the tropical climate zone disproportionately. Future research is needed taking an interdisciplinary approach, including social, economic, environmental and technical aspects.

  17. Effects of heat shock protein 90 expression on pectoralis major oxidation in broilers exposed to acute heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y; Gu, X H

    2014-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) expression on pH, lipid peroxidation, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression of pectoralis major in broilers exposed to acute heat stress. In total, 90 male broilers were randomly allocated to 3 groups: control (CON), heat stress (HS), or geldanamycin treatment (GA). On d 41, the broilers in the GA group were injected intraperitoneally with GA (5 μg/kg of BW), and the broilers in the CON and HS groups were injected intraperitoneally with saline. Twenty-four hours later, the broilers in the CON group were moved to environmental chambers controlled at 22°C for 2 h, and the broilers in the HS and GA groups were moved to environmental chambers controlled at 40°C for 2 h. The pH values of the pectoralis major after 30 min and 24 h of chilling after slaughter of HS and GA broilers were significantly lower (P stress caused significant increases in sera corticosterone and lactic dehydrogenase, the activity of malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase, the expression of HSP90 and HSP70, and nuclear expression of GR protein in the pectoralis major (P stress induced a significant decrease in GR protein expression in the cytoplasm and GR mRNA expression. Furthermore, the low expression of HSP90 significantly increased levels of lactic dehydrogenase and malondialdehyde and GR protein expression in the cytoplasm under heat stress (P shock protein 90 was positively correlated with corticosterone and superoxide dismutase activities (P < 0.01), and HSP90 mRNA was negatively correlated with pH after chilling for 24 h. The results demonstrated that HSP90 plays a pivotal role in protecting cells from oxidation. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  18. Effects of Heat Acclimation on Photosynthesis, Antioxidant Enzyme Activities, and Gene Expression in Orchardgrass under Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Xin Zhao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to examine the effects of heat acclimation on enzymatic activity, transcription levels, the photosynthesis processes associated with thermostability in orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L..The stomatal conductance (Gs, net photosynthetic rate (Pn, and transpiration rates (Tr of both heat-acclimated (HA and non-acclimated (NA plants were drastically reduced during heat treatment [using a 5-day heat stress treatment (38/30 °C ‒ day/night followed by a 3-day recovery under control conditions (25/20 °C ‒ day/night, in order to consolidate the second cycle was permitted]. Water use efficiency increased more steeply in the HA (4.9 times versus the NA (1.8 times plants, and the intercellular CO2 concentration decreased gently in NA (10.9% and HA (25.3% plants after 20 d of treatments compared to 0 days’. Furthermore, heat-acclimated plants were able to maintain significant activity levels of superoxide disumutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, guaiacol peroxidase (POD, and transcription levels of genes encoding these enzymes; in addition, HA plants displayed lower malondialdehyde content and lower electrolyte leakage than NA plants. These results suggest that maintenance of activity and transcription levels of antioxidant enzymes as well as photosynthesis are associated with variable thermostability in HA and NA plants. This likely occurs through cellular membrane stabilization and improvements in water use efficiency in the photosynthetic process during heat stress. The association between antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression, both of which may vary with genetic variation in heat tolerance, is important to further understand the molecular mechanisms that contribute to heat tolerance.

  19. Effect of heat stress on reproductive performances of dairy cattle and buffaloes: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Dash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat stress has adverse effects on the reproductive performances of dairy cattle and buffaloes. The dairy sector is a more vulnerable to global warming and climate change. The temperature humidity index (THI is the widely used index to measure the magnitude of heat stress in animals. The bjective of this paper was to assess the decline in performances of reproductive traits such as service period, conception rate and pregnancy rate of dairy cattle and buffaloes with respect to increase in THI. The review stated that service period in cattle is affected by season of calving for which cows calved in summer had the longest service period. The conception rate and pregnancy rate in dairy cattle were found decreased above THI 72 while a significant decline in reproductive performances of buffaloes was observed above threshold THI 75. The non-heat stress zone (HSZ (October to March is favorable for optimum reproductive performance, while fertility is depressed in HSZ (April to September and critical HSZ (CHSZ (May and June. Heat stress in animals has been associated with reduced fertility through its deleterious impact on oocyte maturation and early embryo development. The management strategies viz., nutrition modification, environment modification and timed artificial insemination protocol are to be strictly operated to ameliorate the adverse effects of heat stress in cattle and buffaloes during CHSZ to improve their fertility. The identification of genes associated with heat tolerance, its incorporation into breeding program and the inclusion of THI covariate effects in selection index should be targeted for genetic evaluation of dairy animals in the hot climate.

  20. Effect of heat stress on reproductive performances of dairy cattle and buffaloes: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Soumya; Chakravarty, A K; Singh, Avtar; Upadhyay, Arpan; Singh, Manvendra; Yousuf, Saleem

    2016-03-01

    Heat stress has adverse effects on the reproductive performances of dairy cattle and buffaloes. The dairy sector is a more vulnerable to global warming and climate change. The temperature humidity index (THI) is the widely used index to measure the magnitude of heat stress in animals. The objective of this paper was to assess the decline in performances of reproductive traits such as service period, conception rate and pregnancy rate of dairy cattle and buffaloes with respect to increase in THI. The review stated that service period in cattle is affected by season of calving for which cows calved in summer had the longest service period. The conception rate and pregnancy rate in dairy cattle were found decreased above THI 72 while a significant decline in reproductive performances of buffaloes was observed above threshold THI 75. The non-heat stress zone (HSZ) (October to March) is favorable for optimum reproductive performance, while fertility is depressed in HSZ (April to September) and critical HSZ (CHSZ) (May and June). Heat stress in animals has been associated with reduced fertility through its deleterious impact on oocyte maturation and early embryo development. The management strategies viz., nutrition modification, environment modification and timed artificial insemination protocol are to be strictly operated to ameliorate the adverse effects of heat stress in cattle and buffaloes during CHSZ to improve their fertility. The identification of genes associated with heat tolerance, its incorporation into breeding program and the inclusion of THI covariate effects in selection index should be targeted for genetic evaluation of dairy animals in the hot climate.

  1. Effect of heat stress and genotype on water turnover in pregnant and lactating sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benlamlih, S.

    1988-01-01

    Studies on the effect of acute heat stress and on the influence of genotype on water turnover of pregnant and lactating ewes are described. Ewes exposed to acute heat stress during pregnancy and lactation maintained their body temperature within the same range as during the subsequent post-lactation period, but paradoxically the polypneic response was reduced during pregnancy. The drinking response to acute heat stress was markedly increased during pregnancy with a corresponding water diuresis. Thus, during acute heat stress, body temperature is maintained during pregnancy by the loss of heat to ingested water and probably also via increased sweating. Under natural environmental conditions, water turnover was higher in the sheep genotypes from the mountains (Timahdit) and the desert oases (Dman) than in the breeds from the Moroccan arid lands (Sardi and Beniguil). In all these genotypes, water turnover was lower during pregnancy than during lactation and the post-lactation period which occurred respectively in winter, spring and summer. Thus, the water demands during the summer are much higher than those for pregnancy during the winter months. (author). 7 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  2. Evaluating Effects of Heat Stress on Cognitive Function among Workers in a Hot Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloumi, Adel; Golbabaei, Farideh; Mahmood Khani, Somayeh; Kazemi, Zeinab; Hosseini, Mostafa; Abbasinia, Marzieh; Farhang Dehghan, Somayeh

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress, as one of the most common occupational health problems, can impair operators' cognitive processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of thermal stress on cognitive function among workers in a hot industry. In this cross-sectional study conducted in Malibel Saipa Company in 2013, workers were assigned into two groups: one group were exposed to heat stress (n=35), working in casting unit and the other group working in machining unit (n=35) with a normal air conditioning. Wet Bulb Globe Temperature was measured at three heights of ankle, abdomen, and head. In order to evaluate the effects of heat stress on attention and reaction time, Stroop tests 1, 2, and 3 were conducted before starting the work and during the work. A significant positive correlation was observed between WBGT and test duration (P=0.01) and reaction time of Stroop test 3 (P=0.047), and between number of errors in Stroop tests 1, 2, and 3, during the work (P= 0.001). Moreover, Stroop test 3 showed a significant higher score for both test duration and reaction time of workers in case group. RESULTS of the present study, conducted in a real work environment, confirmed the impairment of cognitive functions, including selective attention and reaction time, under heat stress conditions.

  3. Evaluating Effects of Heat Stress on Cognitive Function among Workers in a Hot Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Mazloumi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:Heat stress, as one of the most common occupational health problems, can impair operators' cognitive processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of thermal stress on cognitive function among workers in a hot industry. Methods: In this cross-sectional study conducted in Malibel Saipa Company in 2013, workers were assigned into two groups: one group were exposed to heat stress (n=35, working in casting unit and the other group working in machin-ing unit (n=35 with a normal air conditioning. Wet Bulb Globe Temperature was measured at three heights of ankle, abdomen, and head. In order to evalu-ate the effects of heat stress on attention and reaction time, Stroop tests 1, 2, and 3 were conducted before starting the work and during the work. Results: A significant positive correlation was observed between WBGT and test duration (P=0.01 and reaction time of Stroop test 3 (P=0.047, and be-tween number of errors in Stroop tests 1, 2, and 3, during the work (P= 0.001. Moreover, Stroop test 3 showed a significant higher score for both test dura-tion and reaction time of workers in case group. Conclusion: Results of the present study, conducted in a real work environment, confirmed the impairment of cognitive functions, including selective attention and reaction time, under heat stress conditions.

  4. Effects of Heat Stress on Construction Labor Productivity in Hong Kong: A Case Study of Rebar Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Wen; Chan, Albert P. C.

    2017-01-01

    Global warming is bringing more frequent and severe heat waves, and the result will be serious for vulnerable populations such as construction workers. Excessive heat stress has profound effects on physiological responses, which cause occupational injuries, fatalities and low productivity. Construction workers are particularly affected by heat stress, because of the body heat production caused by physically demanding tasks, and hot and humid working conditions. Field studies were conducted be...

  5. Effect of heat stress on blood rheology in different pigs breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Xavier; Baillot, Michelle; Connes, Philippe; Gourdine, Jean-Luc; Philibert, Lucien; Beltan, Eric; Chalabi, Tawfik; Renaudeau, David

    2014-01-01

    The main objectives of the present work were to test the effects of heat stress on blood rheology and to determine whether the responses can change according to the pig breeds. Thirty-six pigs from three pig's lines (n = 12 for each line) with assumed different tolerance to heat stress were compared: Large White (LW, little tolerance), Creole (CR, good tolerance) and LW × CR pigs (produced from a cross between LW and CR lines). In a first period, all pigs were exposed to a 9-d period of thermo-neutral environment (24°C; d-9 to d-1; P0). At the end of P0, six pigs from each line were slaughtered (n = 18). Then in a second period, the remaining pigs (6/breed; n = 18) were exposed to a 5-d period of heat stress (32°C; d + 1 -d + 5; P1) and thereafter slaughtered at d + 5. Rectal and skin temperatures, as well as respiratory rate, were recorded on d-1 and d + 5. At slaughter, blood was sampled for hematological and hemorheological measurements. Heat stress caused a rise of the skin temperature and respiratory rate without any changes in the rectal temperature or on the hematological and hemorheological parameters when all pigs' lines were considered. We observed a pig line effect on blood viscosity at high shear rate (375 s-1) and red blood cell deformability at 30 Pa with CR pigs having lower blood viscosity and higher red blood cell deformability than LW pigs. While the changes of blood viscosity under heat stress did not reach statistical significance in LW and CR lines, blood viscosity (at 375 s-1) increased above the temperate values in the LW × CR line. Red blood cell deformability at 30 Pa was higher in CR pigs exposed to heat stress compared to LW pigs in the same condition. In conclusion, thermal loading caused physiological stress but did not widely change the hematological and hemorheological profiles. Although some blood rheological parameters seem to vary with the pig breeds, the responses to heat stress are very similar.

  6. Heat stress effects on Holstein dairy cows' rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, R; Biffani, S; Chessa, S; Bozzi, R

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between temperature-humidity index (THI) and rumination time (RT) in order to possibly exploit it as a useful tool for animal welfare improvement. During summer 2015 (1 June to 31 August), data from an Italian Holstein dairy farm located in the North of Italy were collected along with environmental data (i.e. ambient temperature and relative humidity) recorded with a weather station installed inside the barn. Rumination data were collected through the Heatime® HR system (SCR Engineers Ltd., Hadarim, Netanya, Israel), an automatic system composed of a neck collar with a Tag that records the RT and activity of each cow. A significant negative correlation was observed between RT and THI. Mixed linear models were fitted, including animal and test day as random effects, and parity, milk production level and date of last calving as fixed effects. A statistically significant effect of THI on RT was identified, with RT decreasing as THI increased.

  7. Effect of Heat Stress on Concentrations of Faecal Cortisol Metabolites in Dairy Cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, A; Fischer-Tenhagen, C; Heuwieser, W

    2016-06-01

    The negative impact of heat stress on health and productivity of dairy cows is well known. Heat stress can be quantified with the temperature-humidity index (THI) and is defined as a THI ≥ 72. Additionally, animal welfare is affected in cows living under heat stress conditions. Finding a way to quantify heat stress in dairy cows has been of increasing interest over the past decades. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate concentrations of faecal glucocorticoid metabolites [i.e. 11,17-dioxoandrostanes (11,17-DOA)] as an indirect stress parameter in dairy cows without heat stress (DOA 0), with heat stress on a single day (acute heat stress, DOA 1) or with more than a single day of heat stress (chronic heat stress, DOA 2). Cows were housed in five farms under moderate European climates. Two statistical approaches (approach 1 and approach 2) were assessed. Using approach 1, concentrations of faecal 11,17-DOA were compared among DOA 0, DOA 1 and DOA 2 samples regardless of their origin (i.e. cow, unpaired comparison with a one-way anova). Using approach 2, a cow was considered as its own control; that is 11,17-DOA was treated as a cow-specific factor and only paired samples were included in the analysis for this approach (paired comparison with t-tests). In approach 1 (p = 0.006) and approach 2 (p = 0.038), 11,17-DOA values of cows under acute heat stress were higher compared to those of cows without heat stress. Our results also indicate that acute heat stress has to be considered as a confounder in studies measuring faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in cows to evaluate other stressful situations. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Effect of passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers versus non-smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyen, N. E.; Ganio, M. S.; Burchfield, J. M.; Tucker, M. A.; Gonzalez, M. A.; Dougherty, E. K.; Robinson, F. B.; Ridings, C. B.; Veilleux, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    In non-smokers, passive heat stress increases shear stress and vasodilation, decreasing arterial stiffness. Smokers, who reportedly have arterial dysfunction, may have similar improvements in arterial stiffness with passive heat stress. Therefore, we examined the effects of an acute bout of whole-body passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers vs. non-smokers. Thirteen smokers (8.8 ± 5.5 [median = 6] cigarettes per day for >4 years) and 13 non-smokers matched for age, mass, height, and exercise habits (27 ± 8 years; 78.8 ± 15.4 kg; 177.6 ± 6.7 cm) were passively heated to 1.5 °C core temperature ( T C) increase. At baseline and each 0.5 °C T C increase, peripheral (pPWV) and central pulse wave velocity (cPWV) were measured via Doppler ultrasound. No differences existed between smokers and non-smokers for any variables (all p > 0.05), except cPWV slightly increased from baseline (526.7 ± 81.7 cm · s-1) to 1.5 °C Δ T C (579.7 ± 69.8 cm · s-1; p 0.05). Changes in cPWV and pPWV during heating correlated ( p smokers (cPWV: r = -0.59; pPWV: r = -0.62) and non-smokers (cPWV: r = -0.45; pPWV: r = -0.77). Independent of smoking status, baseline stiffness appears to mediate the magnitude of heating-induced changes in arterial stiffness.

  9. The effect of air velocity on heat stress at increased air temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, B.; Wang, Xiaoshuai; Zhang, Guoqiang

    Increased air velocity is a frequently used method to reduce heat stress of farm animals housed in warm conditions. The main reason why the method works is that higher air velocity increases the convective heat release from the animals. Convective heat release from the animals is strongly related...... to the temperature difference between the surfaces of animals and the surrounding air, and this temperature difference declines when the air temperature approaches the animal body temperature. Consequently it can it by expected that the effect of air velocity decreases at increased air temperature. The literature...... on farm animals in warm conditions includes several thermal indices which incorporate the effect of air velocities. But, surprisingly none of them predicts a decreased influence of air velocity when the air temperature approaches the animal body temperature. This study reviewed published investigations...

  10. Short communication: Effect of heat stress on nonreturn rate of Italian Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffani, S; Bernabucci, U; Vitali, A; Lacetera, N; Nardone, A

    2016-07-01

    The data set consisted of 1,016,856 inseminations of 191,012 first, second, and third parity Holstein cows from 484 farms. Data were collected from year 2001 through 2007 and included meteorological data from 35 weather stations. Nonreturn rate at 56 d after first insemination (NR56) was considered. A logit model was used to estimate the effect of temperature-humidity index (THI) on reproduction across parities. Then, least squares means were used to detect the THI breakpoints using a 2-phase linear regression procedure. Finally, a multiple-trait threshold model was used to estimate variance components for NR56 in first and second parity cows. A dummy regression variable (t) was used to estimate NR56 decline due to heat stress. The NR56, both for first and second parity cows, was significantly (unfavorable) affected by THI from 4 d before 5 d after the insemination date. Additive genetic variances for NR56 increased from first to second parity both for general and heat stress effect. Genetic correlations between general and heat stress effects were -0.31 for first parity and -0.45 for second parity cows. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of adaptation and heat stress on reproductive performances of fat-tail Awassi rams in eastern mediterranean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abi Saab, S.; Darwish, W.Y.; Aad, P.; Sleiman, F.T.; Kallassy, N.; Aad, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Awassi fat-tail sheep is desired in the Middle East and Sahara for its hardiness and resistance. In this region, the adaptability of Awassi rams to elevated heat stress is controversial. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of ambient or testicular 43 deg C heat on semen characteristics. 12 Awassi rams of 1.2 to 2 years were allowed an initial adaptation period (P0), followed by two experimental phases (P1 and P2), each including a period of heat stress (HS1 and HS2) followed by a period of recovery from heat stress (R1and R2). Heat stress conditions were considered when ambient temperature (Group 2) or testicular environment (Group 3) reached 42 to 44 deg C. Control animals (Group 1) were exposed to ambient environmental conditions. Temperature-humidity index (THI) as a relationship of ambient temperature, wet and dry humidity effect along with respiration and pulse rate, body temperature and live body weight (BW) were measured weekly as adaptation parameters. Reproductive parameters assessed included scrotum circumference and testicular volume measured twice per heat stress period, whereas semen volume density,concentration and motility were measured twice weekly. Data were analyzed using the mixed procedure of SAS under a time series analysis model, with treatment and time nested within period as main effects, and treatment by time within period as interaction terms. Treatment means were separated using Fisher protected LSD. Results showed a THI of 25.7 during therest periods (R1 and R2), 30 during HS1 and 28 during HS2. BW decreased with ambient stress, whereas respiration rate increased during heat stress periods (HS1 and HS2). Testes volume decreased with both ambient and testicular heat stress, whereas testicular circumference was not affected by these conditions. Semen concentration decreased whereas semen volume increased with ambient but not testicular heat stress. Spermatozoa abnormalities increased in R1 following heat stress (HS1

  12. 21st Century Heat Stress Projections and their Effects on US Livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, E.; Buzan, J. R.; Krishnan, S.; Huber, M.

    2016-12-01

    In this study we aim to determine future yield changes in the United States for livestock caused by heat stress, under the high greenhouse gas emissions scenario, representative concentration pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5). We use CMIP5 output and the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble (CESM LENS), produced by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). We apply the HumanIndexMod, a diagnostic heat stress package, to calculate Temperature Humidity Index for Comfort (THIC) and wet bulb temperature (Buzan et al., 2015). THIC is used to assess an animal's behavioral changes as it is subjected to discomfort. Using output from our simulations with the HumanIndexMod, we utilized the agricultural livestock model of St. Pierre et al. (2003). THIC and wet bulb temperatures are all projected by climate models to increase by the end of the century. We found that increases in THIC and heat stress are caused by both temperature and humidity increases. We show the differences for dry matter intake loss and milk loss for the Dairy Cow Model as well as other yield related variables. These variables are estimated to decrease overall production for dairy cattle, finishing hogs, poultry and various livestock. By the end of the 21st century (2071-2100), dairy cow milk production decreases by 14%, and food intake decreases by 11% compared to the beginning of the century (2005-2034). 35% less weight is gained and 19% less food is consumed by hogs the end of the century compared to the beginning of the century. We estimate and discuss resulting yield losses for the livestock industries and the implications of these losses in the United States. These results indicate that the effect of heat stress on livestock production will be highest for dairy cows, finishing hogs, and poultry.References:Buzan, J.R., K. Oleson, and M. Huber. 2015. Implementation and comparison of a suite of heat stress metrics within the Community Land Model version 4.5. Geoscien. Model Devel. 8(2): 151-170. St

  13. Effects of Heat Stress Treatment on Age-dependent Unfolded Protein Response in Different Types of Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yuki; Matsunaga, Yutaka; Kitaoka, Yu; Hatta, Hideo

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and subsequently activated responses (mitochondrial/ER unfolded protein responses; UPRmt/UPRER), are involved in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia. To extend both basic and translational knowledge, we examined (i) whether age-induced mitochondrial and ER stress depend on skeletal muscle type in mice and (ii) whether heat stress treatment, a suggested strategy for sarcopenia, improves age-induced mitochondrial and ER stress. Aged (21-month-old) mice showed more severe mitochondrial stress and UPRmt than young (12-week-old) mice, based on increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial proteases, and mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase. The aged mice also showed ER stress and UPRER, based on decreased ER enzymes and increased ER stress-related cell death. These changes were much more evident in soleus muscle than in gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles. After daily heat stress treatment (40 °C chamber for 30 minutes per day) for 4 weeks, mice showed remarkable improvements in age-related changes in soleus muscle. Heat stress had only minor effects in gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles. Based on these findings, age-associated mitochondrial stress, ER stress, and UPRmt/ER vary qualitatively with skeletal muscle type. Our results suggest a molecular basis for the beneficial effects of heat stress on muscle atrophy with age in soleus muscle. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Features of heat stress control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    Heat stress is caused by hot environments and physical demands of work. It is further complicated by protective clothing requirements commonly found in the nuclear power industry. The resulting physiological strain is reflected in increased sweating, heart rate and body temperature. Uncontrolled exposures to heat stress will lead to decreased personnel performance and increased risk of accidents and heat disorders. The article describes major heat disorders, a method of heat stress evaluation, and some basic interventions to reduce the stress and strain of working in the heat

  15. Life span effects of Hypericum perforatum extracts on Caenorhabditis elegans under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıçgün, Hasan; Göksen, Gülden

    2012-10-01

    The beneficial effects of antioxidants in plants are mainly extrapolated from in vitro studies or short-term dietary supplementation studies. Due to cost and duration, relatively little is known about whether dietary antioxidants are beneficial in whole animals' life span or not. To address this question, under heat stress (35°C), Hypericum perforatum was extracted with petroleum ether and the nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to three different extract concentrations (1mg/mL, 0.1mg/mL, 0.01mg/mL) of H. perforatum. We report that Hypericum perforatum extracts did not increase life span and slow aging related increase in C. elegans. Moreover, one fraction (1mg/mL) increased declines of C. elegans life span and thermotolerance. Given this mounting evidence for life span role of H. perforatum in the presence of heat stress in vivo, the question whether H. perforatum acts as a prooxidant or an antioxidant in vivo under heat stress arises.

  16. Study of the effect induced by heating and irradiation stress on Salmonella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazouani, Sarra

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of exposure to a temperature of 55 degree for 30 min and to 2 kGy gamma irradiation dose (100 Gy/min) on the viability and gene expression of Salmonella. Our results indicate that the exposure to heat and irradiation showed levels of stress vary from one type of stress to another, a different serovars and even there is variability within the same serovars of different origins and isolation. They were able to induce a decrease in viability. The analysis of the differential expression of 16S rRNA genes by RT-PCR after exposure to stress showed that the level of mRNA expression of 16S rRNA is unstable during the exhibition, and may not be used as reference gene for the analysis of differential expression of genes of Salmonella.

  17. Drought priming effects on alleviating later damages of heat and drought stress in different wheat cultivars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendanha, Thayna; Hyldgaard, Benita; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    The ongoing change is climate; in particular the increase of drought and heat waves episodes are a major challenge in the prospect of food safety. Under many field conditions, plants are usually exposed to mild intermittent stress episodes rather than a terminal stress event. Previous, but limited...... studies suggest that plants subjected to early stress (primed) can be more resistant to future stress exposure than those not stressed during seedling stage. In our experiment we aimed to test if repeated mild drought stresses could improve heat and drought tolerance during anthesis heat and drought...... stresses in wheat cultivars. Two wheat cultivars, Gladius and Paragon, were grown in a fully controlled gravimetric platform and subjected to either no stress (control) or two (P) drought cycles during seedling stage, at three and five complete developed leaves. Each cycle consisted of withholding water...

  18. Effects of induction heating parameters on controlling residual stress in intermediate size pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybicki, E.F.; McGuire, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    Induction heating for stress improvement (IHSI) is a method for reducing the tensile weld induced stresses on the inner surfaces of the girth welded pipes. The process entails inductively heating the outside of a welded pipe while cooling the inner surface with flowing water. A 10-inch schedule 80 Type 304 stainless steel pipe was selected for this study. Residual stresses due to welding were first determined using a finite element computational model. 26 refs

  19. Effect of nutritional immunomodulation and heat stress during the dry period on subsequent performance of cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabris, Thiago F; Laporta, Jimena; Corra, Fabiana N; Torres, Yazielis M; Kirk, David J; McLean, Derek J; Chapman, J D; Dahl, Geoffrey E

    2017-08-01

    Heat stress in dairy cows during the dry period impairs milk yield in the next lactation. Feeding OmniGen-AF (OG; Phibro Animal Health Corp., Teaneck, NJ) to lactating cows during heat stress may increase dry matter intake (DMI) and lowers respiration rate (RR) and rectal temperature (RT), but the effects in dry cows are not known. We hypothesized that OG supplementation before, during, and after the dry period (approximately 160 d total) would overcome the effects of heat stress and improve cow performance in the next lactation. Cows were randomly assigned to OG or control (placebo) treatments for the last 60 d in milk (DIM), based on mature-equivalent milk yield in the previous lactation. Cows were dried off 45 d before expected calving and randomly assigned to heat stress (HT) or cooling (CL) treatments. Thus, cows received dietary supplementation during late lactation before they were exposed to either CL or HT. After dry-off, treatment groups included heat stress with placebo (HT, only shade, 56 g/d of placebo, n = 17), HT with OG supplementation (HTOG, 56 g/d of OG, n = 19), cooling with placebo (CL, shade, fans, and soakers, 56 g/d of placebo, n = 16), and CL with OG supplementation (CLOG, 56 g/d of OG, n = 11). After parturition, all cows were kept under the same CL system and management, and all cows continued to receive OG or control treatment until 60 DIM. Cooling cows during the dry period reduced afternoon RT (CL vs. HT; 38.9 ± 0.05 vs. 39.3 ± 0.05°C) and RR (CL vs. HT; 45 ± 1.6 vs. 77 ± 1.6 breaths/min). Respiration rate was also decreased by OG supplementation under HT conditions (HTOG vs. HT; 69.7 ± 1.6 vs. 77.2 ± 1.6 breaths/min). An interaction was observed between OG supplementation and HT; HTOG cows tended to have lower morning RT compared with HT cows. During the dry period, OG reduced DMI relative to control cows. Birth weight was greater in calves from CL cows (CL vs. HT; 40.6 ± 1.09 vs. 38.7 ± 1.09 kg). No differences were detected

  20. Gender and heat stress effects on hypothalamic gene expression and feed intake in broilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatlab, A.S.; Vesco, A.P. DEL; Goes, E.R.; Neto, A.R.O.; Soares, M.A.M.; Gasparino, E.

    2018-01-01

    Our study aims to evaluate gender and heat stress effects on animal performance and on the expression of five hypothalamic genes related to feed consumption: neuropeptide Y (NPY), ghrelin (GHRL), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPKα-1), and liver kinase B1 (LKB1). To assay these effects, 42-day-old male and female broilers were maintained in thermal comfort or were subjected to heat stress (HS, 38°C for 24 hours). All animals were fed with diets formulated to meet their nutritional requirements. Broilers subjected to HS showed lower weight gain (p=0.0065) and tended to have lower feed intake (p=0.0687) than broilers kept in comfortable conditions. We observed gender and heat stress interaction effects on NPY (p=0.0225), AMPKα-1 (p=0.0398), and POMC expression (p=0.0072). The highest NPY gene expression was observed in male broilers from the thermal comfort group. Male broilers exposed to HS showed the highest AMPKα-1 gene expression levels. Comparing POMC expression between males and females at the comfortable temperature, we observed that females showed higher POMC expression levels than male broilers. A gender effect was also observed on LKB1 and AMPKα-1 gene expression (p=0.0256 and p=0.0001, respectively); increased expression was observed in male broilers. Our results indicate that the expression of some hypothalamic genes related to food consumption may contribute to the observed differences in voluntary feed intake between animals of different gender exposed to different environmental conditions.

  1. Effects of Supplemental Levels of Fermentation Product on Lactation Performance in Dairy Cows under Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of different supplemental levels of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (SCFP; Original XP; Diamond V on lactation performance in Holstein dairy cows under heat stress. Eighty-one multiparous Holstein dairy cows were divided into 27 blocks of 3 cows each based on milk yield (23.6±0.20 kg/d, parity (2.88±0.91 and day in milk (204±46 d. The cows were randomly assigned within blocks to one of three treatments: 0 (control, 120, or 240 g/d of SCFP mixed with 240, 120, or 0 g of corn meal, respectively. The experiment was carried out during the summer season of 2014, starting from 14 July 2014 and lasting for 9 weeks with the first week as adaption period. During the experimental period, average daily temperature-humidity index (measured at 08:00, 14:00, and 20:00 was above 68, indicating that cows were exposed to heat stress throughout the study. Rectal temperatures tended to decrease linearly (p = 0.07 for cows supplemented with SCFP compared to the control cows at 14:30, but were not different at 06:30 (p>0.10. Dry matter intake was not affected by SCFP supplementation (p>0.10. Milk yield increased linearly (p0.10 was observed among the treatments in conversion of dietary crude protein to milk protein yield. In summary, supplementation of SCFP alleviated the negative effect of heat stress in lactating Holstein dairy cows and allowed cows to maintain higher milk production, feed efficiency and net energy balance. Effects of SCFP were dose-dependent and greater effects were observed from higher doses.

  2. Determining the effects of early gestation in utero heat stress on postnatal fasting heat production and circulating biomarkers associated with metabolism in growing pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study objective was to determine the effects of in utero heat stress (IUHS) on postnatal fasting heat production (FHP) in growing pigs. Based on our previous observation of increased postnatal core body temperature ‘set-point’ in IUHS pigs, we hypothesized that FHP would be greater during postna...

  3. Effect of acute heat stress and slaughter processing on poultry meat quality and postmortem carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R H; Liang, R R; Lin, H; Zhu, L X; Zhang, Y M; Mao, Y W; Dong, P C; Niu, L B; Zhang, M H; Luo, X

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of acute heat stress and slaughter processing on poultry meat quality and carbohydrate metabolism. Broilers (200) were randomly divided into 2 groups receiving heat stress (HS; 36°C for one h), compared to a non-stressed control (C). At slaughter, each group was further divided into 2 groups for slaughter processing (L = laboratory; F = commercial factory). L group breasts were removed immediately after bleeding without carcass scalding or defeathering, and stored at 4°C. F group broilers were scalded (60°C, 45 s) after bleeding and defeathering. Then the breasts were removed and cooled in ice water until the core temperature was ≤4°C. Rates of Pectoralis core temperature and pH decline were changed by slaughter processing, but only HS affected ultimate pH in group L. HS muscles had higher L* values (P  0.05). Sarcoplasmic protein solubility was higher in F processed birds (P < 0.05). HS decreased the solubility of myofibrillar and total protein in the L-slaughtered birds. Thus, HS caused a higher frequency of accelerated muscle glycolysis than controls. Factory processing (chilling) could not completely eliminate the effects of accelerated glycolysis caused by pre-slaughter HS. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  4. [The effect of heat stress on the cytoskeleton and cell cycle of human umbilical vein endothelial cell in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhiguo; Shao, Yu; Geng, Yan; Chen, Jinghe; Su, Lei

    2015-08-01

    To study the effect of heat stress on the cytoskeleton and cell cycle of human umbilical vein endothelial cell ( HUVEC ) in vitro. HUVEC was cultured in vitro in 5%CO(2) medium at 37 centigrade ( control group ) or 43 centigrade ( heat stress group ) for 1 hour. Coomassie brilliant blue R-250 staining was used to determine the effect of heat stress on the cytoskeleton. The cells in heat stress group were subsequently cultured at 37 centigradein 5%CO(2) medium after heat stress for 1 hour, and cell cycle of HUVEC was determined at 0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours with flow cytometry. Under light microscopy normal cytoskeleton was observed in control group, but thicker and shorter cytoskeleton was found after a rise of temperature, and stress fibers were found in heat stress group. The DNA content of HUVEC at all time points in G0/G1 stage was 38.07%-55.19% after heat stress. The DNA content in control group was 48.57%, and it was 54.06%, 55.19%, 48.23%, 38.07%, and 41.03% at 0, 6, 12, 18, 24 hours in G0/G1 stage in heat stress group. DNA content in S phase was 35.33%-48.18%. The DNA content in control group was 44.62%, and it was 35.33%, 39.50%, 42.50%, 48.18%, and 47.99% at 0, 6, 12, 18, 24 hours in S stage in heat stress group. DNA content in G2/M phase was 5.31%-13.75%. The DNA content in control group was 6.81, and it was 10.61%, 5.31%, 9.27%,13.75%, and 10.98% at 0, 6, 12, 18, 24 hours in G2/M stage in heat stress group. It was demonstrated that compared with control group, the DNA content in G0/G1 stage was significantly increased when the HUVEC were separated from heat stress within 6 hours, and it recovered at a similar level as control group at 12 hours. Heat stress can change the cytoskeleton of HUVEC, and cause stagnation at G0/G1 stage in cell cycle.

  5. Psychosocial Stress-Induced Analgesia: An Examination of Effects on Heat Pain Threshold and Tolerance and of Neuroendocrine Mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaab, Jens; Jiménez, Julia; Voneschen, Livia; Oschwald, Daniel; Meyer, Andrea H; Nater, Urs M; Krummenacher, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stress-induced analgesia (SIA) is an adaptive response of reduced nociception following demanding acute internal and external stressors. Although a psychobiological understanding of this phenomenon is of importance for stress-related psychiatric and pain conditions, comparably little is known about the psychobiological mechanisms of SIA in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute psychosocial stress on heat pain perception and its possible neuroendocrine mediation by salivary cortisol levels and α-amylase activity in healthy men. Employing an intra-individual assessment of heat pain parameters, acute psychosocial stress did not influence heat pain threshold but significantly, albeit slightly, increased heat pain tolerance. Using linear mixed-model analysis, this effect of psychosocial stress on heat pain tolerance was not mediated by increases of salivary cortisol and state anxiety levels or by the activity of α-amylase. These results show that while psychosocial stress is selectively analgesic for heat pain tolerance, this observed effect is not mediated by stress-induced increases of salivary cortisol and α-amylase activity, as proxies of both the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and the autonomic nervous system activation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Effect of heat stress on age at first calving of Japanese Black cows in Okinawa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Takuro

    2017-03-01

    Calving records from birth certificates of cows were analyzed to investigate the effect of heat stress on age at first calving (AFC) of Japanese Black cows. The data set covered 20 years (1990-2009) of calving records. Total number of records was 9279. Daily weather information from weather stations in the vicinity of the farms was used. Temperature-humidity index (THI) fitted to a linear model covered 30 days pre-insemination to 61 days post-insemination. Statistical analysis was conducted with procedures of SAS/STAT. Preliminary analysis showed that THI of the lowest temperature and humidity was most conducive to AFC. Covariance analysis, including main effect of sire, farm and year of insemination and covariates of THI on days showed that regression coefficients of THI on day -7, day -2 and day +31 were statistically significant. The estimated piecewise regression line showed different responses of AFC to THI on days: roof-shasped downward trend on day -7, hockey-stick shaped upward trend on day -2 and day +31. The difference among the estimated regression lines may be caused by direct and indirect factors on reproduction: indirect effect of reduced feed intake, failure of conception at previous insemination, direct effect of heat stress on oocyte and embryo development. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  7. Effects of post weld heat treatment and weld overlay on the residual stress and mechanical properties in dissimilar metal weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Ribeiro, Vladimir S.; Vilela, Alisson H.F.; Almeida, Camila R.O.; Rabello, Emerson G., E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: camilarezende.cr@gmail.com, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br, E-mail: vladimirsoler@hotmail.com, E-mail: ahfv02@outlook.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The object of this work is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe joint between carbon steel (A-106 Gr B) and stainless steel (A-312 TP316L) pipes and filler metals of Nickel alloy (82/182), which find wide application in the field of chemical, oil, petroleum industries, fossil fuel and nuclear power plant. A lot of the failures that have occurred in dissimilar metal welded are affected greatly by residual stresses. Residual stress is often a cause of premature failure of critical components under normal operation of welded components. Several methods have been tested and developed for removing the tensile residual stresses. The aim of the methods is to reduce the tensile stress state or to create compressive stresses at a predefined area, such as the inner surface of a welded pipe joint. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and weld overlay (WOL) are two of the residual stress mitigation methods which reduce the tensile residual stress, create compressive stresses and arrest crack initiation and crack growth. The technique used to substantially minimized or eliminated this failure development in the root weld is the post weld heat treatments (stress relief heat treatment) or the weld overlay. In this work was studied the effectiveness in reducing internal residual stress in dissimilar metal welded pipe joints subjected to post weld heat treatment and weld overlay, measurement by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. Also held was mechanical characterization of the welded pipe joint itself. (author)

  8. Effects of post weld heat treatment and weld overlay on the residual stress and mechanical properties in dissimilar metal weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Ribeiro, Vladimir S.; Vilela, Alisson H.F.; Almeida, Camila R.O.; Rabello, Emerson G.

    2017-01-01

    The object of this work is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe joint between carbon steel (A-106 Gr B) and stainless steel (A-312 TP316L) pipes and filler metals of Nickel alloy (82/182), which find wide application in the field of chemical, oil, petroleum industries, fossil fuel and nuclear power plant. A lot of the failures that have occurred in dissimilar metal welded are affected greatly by residual stresses. Residual stress is often a cause of premature failure of critical components under normal operation of welded components. Several methods have been tested and developed for removing the tensile residual stresses. The aim of the methods is to reduce the tensile stress state or to create compressive stresses at a predefined area, such as the inner surface of a welded pipe joint. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and weld overlay (WOL) are two of the residual stress mitigation methods which reduce the tensile residual stress, create compressive stresses and arrest crack initiation and crack growth. The technique used to substantially minimized or eliminated this failure development in the root weld is the post weld heat treatments (stress relief heat treatment) or the weld overlay. In this work was studied the effectiveness in reducing internal residual stress in dissimilar metal welded pipe joints subjected to post weld heat treatment and weld overlay, measurement by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. Also held was mechanical characterization of the welded pipe joint itself. (author)

  9. Effect of human skin grafts on whole-body heat loss during exercise heat stress: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganio, Matthew S; Gagnon, Daniel; Stapleton, Jill; Crandall, Craig G; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-01-01

    When exposed to heat stress, increases in cutaneous blood flow and sweating in well-healed grafted skin are severely attenuated, which could impair whole-body heat loss if skin grafts cover a large portion of total body surface area (TBSA). It is unknown to what extent whole-body heat loss is impaired when skin grafts cover a significant (eg, >50%) proportion of TBSA. The authors examined whole-body heat exchange during and after 60 min of cycling exercise in the heat (35°C; 25% relative humidity), at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (~400 W) in a woman (age, 36 years; mass, 78.2 kg) with well-healed (17+ years) skin grafts covering 75% of TBSA. Her responses were compared with two noninjured control subjects. Whole-body evaporative and dry heat exchange were measured by direct calorimetry. While exercising in the same ambient conditions and at the same rate of heat production, relative evaporative heat loss of nongrafted skin in the grafted subject (ie, evaporative heat loss per m) was nearly twice that of the control subjects. However, total rate of evaporative heat loss reached only 59% of the amount required for heat balance in the skin-grafted subject compared with 92 ± 3% in controls. Thus, the increase in core temperature was 2-fold greater for the grafted (1.22°C) vs control (0.61 ± 0.19°C) individuals. This case study demonstrates that a large area of grafted skin greatly diminishes maximum evaporative heat loss during exercise in the heat, making a compensable environment for control subjects uncompensable for skin-grafted individuals.

  10. Separate and combined effects of exposure to heat stress and mental fatigue on endurance exercise capacity in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Hidenori; Kaya, Mitsuharu; Tamaki, Akira; Watson, Phillip

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of exposure to pre-exercise heat stress and mental fatigue on endurance exercise capacity in a hot environment. Eight volunteers completed four cycle exercise trials at 80% maximum oxygen uptake until exhaustion in an environmental chamber maintained at 30 °C and 50% relative humidity. The four trials required them to complete a 90 min pre-exercise routine of either a seated rest (CON), a prolonged demanding cognitive task to induce mental fatigue (MF), warm water immersion at 40 °C during the last 30 min to induce increasing core temperature (WI), or a prolonged demanding cognitive task and warm water immersion at 40 °C during the last 30 min (MF + WI). Core temperature when starting exercise was higher following warm water immersion (~38 °C; WI and MF + WI) than with no water immersion (~36.8 °C; CON and MF, P fatigue when commencing exercise was higher following cognitive task (MF and MF + WI) than with no cognitive task (CON and WI; P stress or mental fatigue, and this response is synergistically increased during combined exposure to them.

  11. Heat stress effects on the cumulus cells surrounding the bovine oocyte during maturation: altered matrix metallopeptidase 9 and progesterone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, L A; Payton, R R; Gondro, C; Saxton, A M; Nagle, K A; Jenkins, B W; Schrick, F N; Edwards, J L

    2013-08-01

    When the effects of heat stress are detrimental during maturation, cumulus cells are intimately associated with the oocyte. To determine the extent to which heat stress affects these cells, in this study, transcriptome profiles of the cumulus that surrounded control and heat-stressed oocytes (41 °C during the first 12 h only and then shifted back to 38.5 °C) during in vitro maturation (IVM) were compared using Affymetrix bovine microarrays. The comparison of cumulus-derived profiles revealed a number of transcripts whose levels were increased (n=11) or decreased (n=13) ≥ twofold after heat stress exposure (P1.7-fold decrease in the protein levels of latent matrix metallopeptidase 9 (proMMP9). Heat-induced reductions in transcript levels were noted at 6 h IVM with reductions in proMMP9 protein levels at 18 h IVM (P=0.0002). Independent of temperature, proMMP9 levels at 24 h IVM were positively correlated with the development rate of blastocysts (R²=0.36; P=0.002). The production of progesterone increased during maturation; heat-induced increases were evident by 12 h IVM (P=0.002). Both MMP9 and progesterone are associated with the developmental competence of the oocyte; thus, it seems plausible for some of the negative consequences of heat stress on the cumulus-oocyte complex to be mediated through heat-induced perturbations occurring in the surrounding cumulus.

  12. Precooling and Warm-Up Effects on Time Trial Cycling During Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Horani, Ramzi A; Wingo, Jonathan E; Ng, Jason; Bishop, Phillip; Richardson, Mark

    2018-02-01

    Heat stress limits endurance exercise performance. Combining precooling and warm-up prior to endurance exercise in the heat may exploit the benefits of both strategies while avoiding the potential negative consequences of each. This study tested the hypothesis that precooling combined with warm-up improves time trial cycling performance in the heat relative to either treatment alone. Nine healthy men completed three 16.1-km time trials in 33°C after: 1) precooling (ice slurry and ice vest) alone (PREC); 2) warm-up alone (WU); or 3) PREC plus WU (COMBO). Tre was lower after PREC compared to WU throughout exercise and lower than COMBO for the first 12 km; COMBO was lower than WU for the first 4 km. Tsk during PREC was lower than COMBO and WU for the first 8 km, and lower in COMBO than WU for the first 4 km. PREC lowered pre-exercise heart rate relative to COMBO and WU (68 ± 10, 106 ± 12, 101 ± 13 bpm, respectively), but it increased similarly during exercise. Local sweat rate (SR) was lower in PREC (0.1 ± 0.1 mg · cm-2 · min-1) than COMBO (0.5 ± 0.2 mg · cm-2 · min-1) and WU (0.6 ± 0.2 mg · cm-2 · min-1) for the first 4 km. Treatments did not differentially affect performance (PREC = 31.9 ± 1.9 min, COMBO = 32.6 ± 2.7 min, WU = 33.1 ± 2.9 min). We conclude precooling alone or with warm-up mitigated thermal strain during exercise, but did not significantly improve 16.1-km cycling time trial performance.Al-horani RA, Wingo JE, Ng J, Bishop P, Richardson M. Precooling and warm-up effects on time trial cycling during heat stress. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2018; 89(2):87-93.

  13. Effect of Selenium, Zinc, Vitamin C and E on Boar Ejaculate Quality at Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Horký

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of experiment was to test effect of selected antioxidants (selenium, zinc, vitamin C and E to reduce the impact of heat stress at boars. In the experiment, boars of Duroc breed were tested. The first control group (n = 10 was not supplemented with antioxidants. The second experimental group (n = 10 was supplemented with antioxidants in the following quantities of 0.5 mg of selenium (seleno-methionine, 100 mg of zinc (zinc-methionine, 70 mg of vitamin E (alpha‑tocopherol and 350 mg of vitamin C (ascorbic acid per kilogram of their feed. The experiment was carried out for 120 days and took place in summer (June to September. During the experiment, average and maximum daily temperatures, where boars were stabled, were monitored. Average daily temperature ranged from 12 to 28 °C. Maximum temperature during the day was from 13 to 32 °C. The evaluation of the semen quality has revealed increased number of abnormal spermatozoa in the control group of boars by 39 % (P < 0.05. There were observed no significant changes at other monitored parameters (ejaculate volume, total count of produced sperm, motility and sperm concentration. The results show that the addition of selenium, zinc, vitamin C and E may reduce the effect of heat stress to some extent at breeding boars.

  14. The Effect of Air Velocity on the Prevention of Heat Stress in Iranian Veiled Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Some environmental factors such as the ambient temperature, radiant temperature, humidity and air velocity as well as clothing and activity level are effective to induce heat strain on the workers. Objectives The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of air velocity on Iranian veiled females at various exercise intensities and climatic conditions. Methods The current experimental study was conducted on 51 healthy veiled females with Islamic clothing (n = 30 in two hot-dry climatic chambers (wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT = 32 ± 0.1°C and WBGT = 30 ± 0.1°C, 40% relative humidity (RH without air velocity and (n = 21 with air velocity 0.31 m/s in sitting and light workload conditions, respectively, for 60 minutes. The WBGT, oral temperature and heart rate were measured simultaneously every five minutes during the heat exposure and resting state. Data were analyzed using correlation and line regression by SPSS ver. 16. Results In both groups, oral temperature and heart rate increased during heat exposure. The increase of oral temperature and heart rate were larger in the group with air velocity (sitting position, 37.05 ± 0.20°C, 98.30 ± 7.79 bpm, light workload, 37.34 ± 0.24°C, 124.08 ± 6.09 bpm compared those of the group without air velocity (sitting position, 36.70 ± 0.36°C, 69.74 ± 0.98 bpm, light workload, 36.71 ± 0.27°C, 110.78 ± 17.9 bpm. The difference in physiological strain index (PSI between resting and low workload were higher in with air velocity group than those of the group without air velocity. Conclusions The results showed that the heat stress increased by increasing air velocity and humidity in both groups. The air velocity with high humidity can be considered as a positive factor in the occurrence of heat strain. Therefore, the incidence of heat stress decreases with the increase of humidity and reduction of air velocity or with increase of air velocity and reduction of humidity in Iranian veiled

  15. The effect of texture, heat treatment and elongation rate on stress corrosion cracking in irradiated zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.; Stany, W.; Hellstrand, E.

    1979-03-01

    Irradiated zircaloy samples with different textures and heat treatments have been tested concerning stress corrosion. Irradiated samples of Zr-1Nb, pure Zr and beta quenched zircaloy have also been investigated. Stress-relieve annealled zircaloy is even after irradiation more sensitive to stress corrosion than recrystallized zircaloy. Zr-1Nb and beta quenched zircaloy are much more sinsitive to stress corrosion than the samples with different textures. As a rule irradiated zircaloy is sensitive to stress corrosion at stresses far below the yield point. The breaking stress decreases with the elongation rate. The extension of cracks is much faster in irradiated zircaloy than in unirradiated zircaloy. There is no simple failure criterium for irradiated zircaloy. However for a certain stress and a certain elongation rate the probability for a failure before this stress is reached with a constant elongation rate can be given. (E.R.)

  16. Timing Effects of Heat-Stress on Plant Ecophysiological Characteristics and Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Heckathorn, Scott A; Mainali, Kumar; Tripathee, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    Heat-waves with higher intensity and frequency and longer durations are expected in the future due to global warming, which could have dramatic impacts in agriculture, economy and ecology. This field study examined how plant responded to heat-stress (HS) treatment at different timing in naturally occurring vegetation. HS treatment (5 days at 40.5°C) were applied to 12 1 m 2 plots in restored prairie vegetation dominated by a warm-season C 4 grass, Andropogon gerardii , and a warm-season C 3 forb, Solidago canadensis , at different growing stages. During and after each heat stress (HS) treatment, temperature were monitored for air, canopy, and soil; net CO 2 assimilation ( A net ), quantum yield of photosystem II (Φ PSII ), stomatal conductance ( g s ), and internal CO 2 level ( C i ), specific leaf area (SLA), and chlorophyll content of the dominant species were measured. One week after the last HS treatment, all plots were harvested and the biomass of above-ground tissue and flower weight of the two dominant species were determined. HS decreased physiological performance and growth for both species, with S. canadensis being affected more than A. gerardii , indicated by negative HS effect on both physiological and growth responses for S. canadensis . There were significant timing effect of HS on the two species, with greater reductions in the net photosynthetic rate and productivity occurred when HS was applied at later-growing season. The reduction in aboveground productivity in S. canadensis but not A. gerardii could have important implications for plant community structure by increasing the competitive advantage of A. gerardii in this grassland. The present experiment showed that HS, though ephemeral, may promote long-term effects on plant community structure, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning of terrestrial biomes when more frequent and severe HS occur in the future.

  17. Fermentation products as feed additives mitigate some ill-effects of heat stress in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Bass, B E; Bandrick, M; Loving, C L; Brockmeier, S L; Looft, T; Trachsel, J; Madson, D M; Thomas, M; Casey, T A; Frank, J W; Stanton, T B; Allen, H K

    2017-01-01

    Heat stress (HS) may result in economic losses to pig producers across the USA and worldwide. Despite significant advancements in management practices, HS continues to be a challenge. In this study, an in-feed antibiotic (carbadox, CBX) and antibiotic alternatives ( [XPC], and [SGX] fermentation products) were evaluated in a standard pig starter diet as mitigations against the negative effects of HS in pigs. A total of 100 gilts were obtained at weaning (6.87 ± 0.82 kg BW, 19.36 ± 0.72 d of age) and randomly assigned to dietary treatments (2 rooms/treatment, 2 pens/room, 6 to 7 pigs/pen). After 4 wk of dietary acclimation, half of the pigs in each dietary group (1 room/dietary treatment) were exposed to repeated heat stress conditions (RHS; daily cycles of 19 h at 25°C and 5 h at 40°C, repeated for 9 d), and the remaining pigs were housed at constant thermal neutral temperature (25°C, [NHS]). Pigs subjected to RHS had elevated skin surface temperature ( treatment. Independent of diet, RHS pigs had significantly shorter ( stress resulted in decreased villus height to crypt depth ratio (V:C) in pigs fed with control diet with no added feed additive (NON) and CBX diets at d 3, whereas the pigs fed diets containing XPC or SGX showed no decrease. Transcriptional expression of genes involved in cellular stress (, , , ), tight junction integrity (, , ), and immune response (, , and ) were measured in the ileum mucosa. Pigs in all dietary treatments subjected to RHS had significantly higher ( natural killer () cell numbers or NK cell lytic activity. In conclusion, pigs subjected to RHS had decreased performance, and supplementation with fermentation products in the feed (XPC and SGX) protected pigs from injury to the jejunum mucosa.

  18. Effect of Simulated Heat Stress on Digestibility, Methane Emission and Metabolic Adaptability in Crossbred Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Yadav

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of simulated heat stress on digestibility and methane (CH4 emission. Four non-lactating crossbred cattle were exposed to 25°C, 30°C, 35°C, and 40°C temperature with a relative humidity of 40% to 50% in a climatic chamber from 10:00 hours to 15:00 hours every day for 27 days. The physiological responses were recorded at 15:00 hours every day. The blood samples were collected at 15:00 hours on 1st, 6th, 11th, 16th, and 21st days and serum was collected for biochemical analysis. After 21 days, fecal and feed samples were collected continuously for six days for the estimation of digestibility. In the last 48 hours gas samples were collected continuously to estimate CH4 emission. Heat stress in experimental animals at 35°C and 40°C was evident from an alteration (p<0.05 in rectal temperature, respiratory rate, pulse rate, water intake and serum thyroxin levels. The serum lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase activity and protein, urea, creatinine and triglyceride concentration changed (p<0.05, and body weight of the animals decreased (p<0.05 after temperature exposure at 40°C. The dry matter intake (DMI was lower (p<0.05 at 40°C exposure. The dry matter and neutral detergent fibre digestibilities were higher (p<0.05 at 35°C compared to 25°C and 30°C exposure whereas, organic matter (OM and acid detergent fibre digestibilities were higher (p<0.05 at 35°C than 40°C thermal exposure. The CH4 emission/kg DMI and organic matter intake (OMI declined (p<0.05 with increase in exposure temperature and reached its lowest levels at 40°C. It can be concluded from the present study that the digestibility and CH4 emission were affected by intensity of heat stress. Further studies are necessary with respect to ruminal microbial changes to justify the variation in the digestibility and CH4 emission during differential heat stress.

  19. Effects of hydration level and heat stress on thermoregulatory responses, hematological and blood rheological properties in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Xavier; Baillot, Michelle; Connes, Philippe; Bocage, Bruno; Renaudeau, David

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is one of the major limiting factors of production efficiency in the swine industry. The aims of the present study were 1) to observe if hemorheological and hematological parameters could be associated to physiological acclimation during the first days of heat stress exposure and 2) to determine if water restriction could modulate the effect of thermal heat stress on physiological, hematological and hemorheological parameters. Twelve Large White male pigs were divided into an ad libitum and a water restricted group. All pigs were submitted to one week at 24 °C (D-7 to D-1). Then, at D0, temperature was progressively increased until 32 °C and maintained during one week (D1 to D7). We performed daily measurements of water and feed intake. Physiological (i.e., skin temperature, rectal temperature, respiratory rate), hematological and hemorheological parameters were measured on D-6, D-5, D0, D1, D2 and D7. Water restriction had no effect on physiological, hematological and hemorheological parameters. The first days of heat stress caused an increase in the three physiological parameters followed by a reduction of these parameters suggesting a successful acclimation of pigs to heat stress. We showed an increase in hematocrit, red blood cell aggregation and red blood cell aggregation strength during heat stress. Further, we observed an important release of reticulocytes, an increase of red blood cell deformability and a reduction of feed intake and blood viscosity under heat stress. This study suggests that physiological acute adaptation to heat stress is accompanied by large hematological and hemorheological changes.

  20. Trans-generational effects of mild heat stress on the life history traits of an aphid parasitoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaeil, Ibrahim; Doury, Géraldine; Desouhant, Emmanuel; Dubois, Françoise; Prevost, Geneviève; Couty, Aude

    2013-01-01

    Temperature changes are common in nature and insects are particularly exposed and sensitive to such variations which can be potential stresses, ultimately affecting life history traits and overall fitness. Braconids have been widely used to study the effects of temperature on host-parasitoid interactions and the present work focused on the solitary endoparasitoid Aphidius ervi Haliday (Hymenoptera: Braconidae Aphidiidae), an efficient biological control agent commercially used against aphids such as the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae Thomas (Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). Contrary to previous studies using heat shocks at extreme temperatures, we evaluated the effects of mild heat stresses by transferring young parasitoid adults from the constant temperature of 20°C to either a warm (25°C) or hot (28°C) temperature, for either 1 h or 48 h. Such treatments are consistent with situations commonly experienced by parasitoids when moved from their rearing conditions to greenhouses or field conditions. The effects were evaluated both on the heat stressed A. ervi adults (G0) (immediate effects) and on their first generation (G1) progeny (trans-generational effects). G0 wasps' mortality was significantly affected by the temperature in interaction with the duration of the stress. Longevity of G0 wasps surviving the heat stress was negatively affected by the temperature and females lived longer than males. Heat stress applied to A. ervi parents also had consequences on their G1 progeny whose developmental time, rates of mummification and percentage of parasitoid completing total development were negatively affected. Surprisingly, the egg load at emergence of the G1 female progeny was increased when their mothers had been submitted to a mild heat stress of 25°C or 28°C. These results clearly demonstrate trans-generational phenotypic plasticity, showing that adaptation to thermal stresses may be achieved via maternal effects. This study also sheds light on the complexity

  1. Trans-generational effects of mild heat stress on the life history traits of an aphid parasitoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Ismaeil

    Full Text Available Temperature changes are common in nature and insects are particularly exposed and sensitive to such variations which can be potential stresses, ultimately affecting life history traits and overall fitness. Braconids have been widely used to study the effects of temperature on host-parasitoid interactions and the present work focused on the solitary endoparasitoid Aphidius ervi Haliday (Hymenoptera: Braconidae Aphidiidae, an efficient biological control agent commercially used against aphids such as the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae Thomas (Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae. Contrary to previous studies using heat shocks at extreme temperatures, we evaluated the effects of mild heat stresses by transferring young parasitoid adults from the constant temperature of 20°C to either a warm (25°C or hot (28°C temperature, for either 1 h or 48 h. Such treatments are consistent with situations commonly experienced by parasitoids when moved from their rearing conditions to greenhouses or field conditions. The effects were evaluated both on the heat stressed A. ervi adults (G0 (immediate effects and on their first generation (G1 progeny (trans-generational effects. G0 wasps' mortality was significantly affected by the temperature in interaction with the duration of the stress. Longevity of G0 wasps surviving the heat stress was negatively affected by the temperature and females lived longer than males. Heat stress applied to A. ervi parents also had consequences on their G1 progeny whose developmental time, rates of mummification and percentage of parasitoid completing total development were negatively affected. Surprisingly, the egg load at emergence of the G1 female progeny was increased when their mothers had been submitted to a mild heat stress of 25°C or 28°C. These results clearly demonstrate trans-generational phenotypic plasticity, showing that adaptation to thermal stresses may be achieved via maternal effects. This study also sheds light on

  2. Evaluating Effects of Heat Stress on Cognitive Function among Workers in a Hot Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Adel Mazloumi; Farideh Golbabaei; Somayeh Mahmood Khani; Zeinab Kazemi; Mostafa Hosseini; Marzieh Abbasinia; Somayeh Farhang Dehghan

    2014-01-01

    Background:Heat stress, as one of the most common occupational health problems, can impair operators' cognitive processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of thermal stress on cognitive function among workers in a hot industry. Methods: In this cross-sectional study conducted in Malibel Saipa Company in 2013, workers were assigned into two groups: one group were exposed to heat stress (n=35), working in casting unit and the other group working in machin-ing unit (n=35) wit...

  3. Effect of Heat Stress on Reproduction in Dairy Cows: Insights into the Cellular and Molecular Responses of the Oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Zvi

    2017-02-08

    Among the components of the female reproductive tract, the ovarian pool of follicles and their enclosed oocytes are highly sensitive to hyperthermia. Heat-induced alterations in small antral follicles can be expressed later as compromised maturation and developmental capacity of the ovulating oocyte. This review summarizes the most up-to-date information on the effects of heat stress on the oocyte with an emphasis on unclear points and open questions, some of which might involve new research directions, for instance, whether preantral follicles are heat resistant. The review focuses on the follicle-enclosed oocytes, provides new insights into the cellular and molecular responses of the oocyte to elevated temperature, points out the role of the follicle microenvironment, and discusses some mechanisms that might underlie oocyte impairment. Mechanisms include nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation, mitochondrial function, apoptotic pathways, and oxidative stress. Understanding the mechanism by which heat stress compromises fertility might enable development of new strategies to mitigate its effects.

  4. Protect Yourself from Heat Stress

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-07-19

    Heat stress can be a major concern for indoor and outdoor workers, especially during the hot summer months. Learn how to identify the symptoms and protect yourself from heat stress.  Created: 7/19/2016 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 7/19/2016.

  5. Modeling skin temperature to assess the effect of air velocity to mitigate heat stress among growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Bjarne; Pedersen, Poul; Morsing, Svend

    2017-01-01

    It is generally accepted that increased air velocity can help to mitigate heat stress in livestock housing, however, it is not fully clear how much it helps and significant uncertainties exists when the air temperature approaches the animal body temperature. This study aims to develop a skin...... temperature model to generated data for determining the potential effect of air velocity to mitigate heat stress among growing pigs housed in warm environment. The model calculates the skin temperature as function of body temperature, air temperature and the resistances for heat transfer from the body...

  6. Effect of heat treatment on bend stress relaxation of pure tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Kenta; Nogami, Shuhei; Fukuda, Makoto; Katakai, Yasuyuki; Hasegawa, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Bend stress relaxation test was performed on the pure tungsten after heat treatment for stress relief. • The BSR ratio of the heat treated specimen was larger than that of the as-received specimen at this temperature region. • Small reduction in the BSR ratio was observed at the temperatures of 500–800 °C. • The BSR ratio of the heat treated specimen decreased significantly at the temperatures of 900–1000 °C. • The BSR ratio decreased significantly in a short time below 0.1 h, and then decreased slowly. -- Abstract: Bend stress relaxation (BSR) tests at temperatures of 500, 600, 800, 900 and 1000 °C for 0.1, 0.5 and 1 h in vacuum were performed on the pure tungsten after heat treatment for stress relief at 900 °C for 1 h. The degree of stress relaxation increased with test temperature. The BSR ratio of the heat treated specimen was larger than that of the as-received specimen at this temperature region. Small reduction in the BSR ratio was observed at the temperatures of 500, 600 and 800 °C. The BSR ratio of the heat treated specimen decreased significantly at the temperatures of 900 and 1000 °C and it was close to that of the as-received specimen. The BSR ratio of the heat treated specimen and the as-received specimen exhibited similar trend of time-evolution. The stress was exponentially relaxed with increasing test time. The BSR ratio decreased significantly in a short time below 0.1 h, and then decreased slowly. Higher activation energy of stress relaxation evaluated by cross-cut method was obtained for the higher temperature

  7. Exogenous Application of Citric Acid Ameliorates the Adverse Effect of Heat Stress in Tall Fescue (Lolium arundinaceum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Longxing; Zhang, Zhifei; Xiang, Zuoxiang; Yang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Citric acid may be involved in plant response to high temperature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether exogenous citric acid could improve heat tolerance in a cool-season turfgrass species, tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum), and to determine the physiological mechanisms of citric acid effects on heat stress tolerance. The grasses were subjected to four citric acid levels (0, 0.2, 2, and 20 mM) and two temperature levels (25/20 and 35/30 ± 0.5°C, day/night) treatments in growth chambers. Heat stress increased an electrolyte leakage (EL) and malonaldehyde (MDA) content, while reduced plant growth, chlorophyll (Chl) content, photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), root activity and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; peroxidase, POD). External citric acid alleviated the detrimental effects of heat stress on tall fescue, which was evidenced by decreased EL and MDA content, and improved plant growth under stress conditions. Additionally, the reduction in Chl content, Fv/Fm, SOD, POD, CAT and root activity were ameliorated in citric acid treated plants under heat stressed conditions. High temperature induced the expression of heat shock protein (HSP) genes, which exhibited greater expression levels after citric acid treatment under heat stress. These results suggest that exogenous citric acid application may alleviate growth and physiological damage caused by high temperature. In addition, the exogenously applied citric acid might be responsible for maintaining membrane stability, root activity, and activation of antioxidant response and HSP genes which could contribute to the protective roles of citric acid in tall fescue responses to heat stress. PMID:26925085

  8. Exogenous Application of Citric Acid Ameliorates the Adverse Effect of Heat Stress in Tall Fescue (Lolium arundinaceum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Longxing; Zhang, Zhifei; Xiang, Zuoxiang; Yang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Citric acid may be involved in plant response to high temperature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether exogenous citric acid could improve heat tolerance in a cool-season turfgrass species, tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum), and to determine the physiological mechanisms of citric acid effects on heat stress tolerance. The grasses were subjected to four citric acid levels (0, 0.2, 2, and 20 mM) and two temperature levels (25/20 and 35/30 ± 0.5°C, day/night) treatments in growth chambers. Heat stress increased an electrolyte leakage (EL) and malonaldehyde (MDA) content, while reduced plant growth, chlorophyll (Chl) content, photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), root activity and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; peroxidase, POD). External citric acid alleviated the detrimental effects of heat stress on tall fescue, which was evidenced by decreased EL and MDA content, and improved plant growth under stress conditions. Additionally, the reduction in Chl content, Fv/Fm, SOD, POD, CAT and root activity were ameliorated in citric acid treated plants under heat stressed conditions. High temperature induced the expression of heat shock protein (HSP) genes, which exhibited greater expression levels after citric acid treatment under heat stress. These results suggest that exogenous citric acid application may alleviate growth and physiological damage caused by high temperature. In addition, the exogenously applied citric acid might be responsible for maintaining membrane stability, root activity, and activation of antioxidant response and HSP genes which could contribute to the protective roles of citric acid in tall fescue responses to heat stress.

  9. Exogenous Application of Citric Acid Ameliorates the Adverse Effect of Heat Stress in Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longxing eHu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Citric acid may be involved in plant response to high temperature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether exogenous citric acid could improve heat tolerance in a cool‐season turfgrass species, tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum, and to determine the physiological mechanisms of citric acid effects on heat stress tolerance. The grasses were subjected to four citric acid levels (0, 0.2, 2 and 20 mM and two temperature levels (25/20 and 35/30 ± 0.5 ̊C, day/night treatments in growth chambers. Heat stress increased an electrolyte leakage (EL and malonaldehyde (MDA content, while reduced plant growth, chlorophyll (Chl content, photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm, root activity and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; peroxidase, POD. External citric acid alleviated the detrimental effects of heat stress on tall fescue, which was evidenced by decreased EL and MDA content, and improved plant growth under stress conditions. Additionally, the reduction in Chl content, Fv/Fm, SOD, POD, CAT and root activity were ameliorated in citric acid treated plants under heat stressed conditions. High temperature induced the expression of heat shock protein (HSP genes, which exhibited greater expression levels after citric acid treatment under heat stress. These results suggest that exogenous citric acid application may alleviate growth and physiological damage caused by high temperature. In addition, the exogenously applied citric acid might be responsible for maintaining membrane stability, root activity, and activation of antioxidant response and HSP genes which could contribute to the protective roles of citric acid in tall fescue responses to heat stress.

  10. Immediate and residual effects of heat stress and restricted intake on milk protein and casein composition and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, F C; Barber, D G; Houlihan, A V; Poppi, D P

    2015-04-01

    The effects of heat stress on dairy production can be separated into 2 distinct causes: those effects that are mediated by the reduced voluntary feed intake associated with heat stress, and the direct physiological and metabolic effects of heat stress. To distinguish between these, and identify their effect on milk protein and casein concentration, mid-lactation Holstein-Friesian cows (n = 24) were housed in temperature-controlled chambers and either subjected to heat stress [HS; temperature-humidity index (THI) ~78] or kept in a THIheat-stressed cows (TN-R) for 7 d. A control group of cows was kept in a THIheat stress. Heat stress reduced the milk protein concentration, casein number, and casein concentration and increased the urea concentration in milk beyond the effects of restriction of intake. Under HS, the proportion in total casein of αS1-casein increased and the proportion of αS2-casein decreased. Because no effect of HS on milk fat or lactose concentration was found, these effects appeared to be the result of specific downregulation of mammary protein synthesis, and not a general reduction in mammary activity. No residual effects were found of HS or TN-R on milk production or composition after THIHeat-stressed cows had elevated blood concentrations of urea and Ca, compared with TN-R and TN-AL. Cows in TN-R had higher serum nonesterified fatty acid concentrations than cows in HS. It was proposed that HS and TN-R cows may mobilize different tissues as endogenous sources of energy. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of Lasting Effects of Heat Stress on Sperm Profile and Oxidative Status of Ram Semen and Epididymal Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Rose dos Santos Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher temperatures lead to an increase of testicular metabolism that results in spermatic damage. Oxidative stress is the main factor responsible for testicular damage caused by heat stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate lasting effects of heat stress on ejaculated sperm and immediate or long-term effects of heat stress on epididymal sperm. We observed decrease in motility and mass motility of ejaculated sperm, as well as an increase in the percentages of sperm showing major and minor defects, damaged plasma and acrosome membranes, and a decrease in the percentage of sperm with high mitochondrial membrane potential in the treated group until one spermatic cycle. An increased enzymatic activity of glutathione peroxidase and an increase of stressed cells were observed in ejaculated sperm of the treated group. A decrease in the percentage of epididymal sperm with high mitochondrial membrane potential was observed in the treated group. However, when comparing immediate and long-term effects, we observed an increase in the percentage of sperm with low mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, testicular heat stress induced oxidative stress that led to rescuable alterations after one spermatic cycle in ejaculated sperm and also after 30 days in epididymal sperm.

  12. Differences in Susceptibility to Heat Stress along the Chicken Intestine and the Protective Effects of Galacto-Oligosaccharides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Varasteh

    Full Text Available High ambient temperatures negatively affect the human well-being as well as animal welfare and production. The gastrointestinal tract is predominantly responsive to heat stress. The currently available information about the multifaceted response to heat stress within different parts of the intestine is limited, especially in avian species. Hence, this study aims to evaluate the heat stress-induced sequence of events in the intestines of chickens. Furthermore, the gut health-promoting effect of dietary galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS was investigated in these heat stress-exposed chickens. Chickens were fed a control diet or diet supplemented with 1% or 2.5% GOS (6 days prior to and during a temperature challenge for 5 days (38-39°C, 8h per day. The parameters measured in different parts of the intestines included the genes (qPCR HSF1, HSF3, HSP70, HSP90, E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-5, ZO-1, occludin, TLR-2, TLR-4, IL-6, IL-8, HO-1, HIF-1α and their associated proteins HSP70, HSP90 and pan-cadherin (western blots. In addition, IL-6 and IL-8 plasma concentrations were measured by ELISA. In the jejunum, HSF3, HSP70, HSP90, E-cadherin, claudin-5, ZO-1, TLR-4, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression and HSP70 protein expression were increased after heat stress exposure and a more pronounced increase in gene expression was observed in ileum after heat stress exposure, and in addition HSF1, claudin-1 and HIF-1α mRNA levels were upregulated. Furthermore, the IL-8 plasma levels were decreased in chickens exposed to heat stress. Interestingly, the heat stress-related effects in the jejunum were prevented in chickens fed a GOS diet, while dietary GOS did not alter these effects in ileum. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the differences in susceptibility to heat stress along the intestine, where the most obvious modification in gene expression is observed in ileum, while dietary GOS only prevent the heat stress-related changes in jejunum.

  13. The transgenerational effects of heat stress in the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei are negative and rapidly eliminated under direct selection for increased stress resistance in larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkink, Kristin L; Ituarte, Catherine M; Reynolds, Rose M; Cresko, William A; Phillips, Patrick C

    2014-12-01

    Parents encountering stress environments can influence the phenotype of their offspring in a form of transgenerational phenotypic plasticity that has the potential to be adaptive if offspring are thereby better able to deal with future stressors. Here, we test for the existence of anticipatory parental effects in the heat stress response in the highly polymorphic nematode Caenorhabditis remanei. Rather providing an anticipatory response, parents subject to a prior heat stress actually produce offspring that are less able to survive a severe heat shock. Selection on heat shock resistance within the larvae via experimental evolution leads to a loss of sensitivity (robustness) to environmental variation during both the parental and larval periods. Whole genome transcriptional analysis of both ancestor and selected lines shows that there is weak correspondence between genetic pathways induced via temperature shifts during parental and larval periods. Parental effects can evolve very rapidly via selection acting directly on offspring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intensity of heat stress in winter wheat—phenology compensates for the adverse effect of global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezaei, Ehsan Eyshi; Siebert, Stefan; Ewert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Higher temperatures during the growing season are likely to reduce crop yields with implications for crop production and food security. The negative impact of heat stress has also been predicted to increase even further for cereals such as wheat under climate change. Previous empirical modeling studies have focused on the magnitude and frequency of extreme events during the growth period but did not consider the effect of higher temperature on crop phenology. Based on an extensive set of climate and phenology observations for Germany and period 1951–2009, interpolated to 1 × 1 km resolution and provided as supplementary data to this article (available at stacks.iop.org/ERL/10/024012/mmedia), we demonstrate a strong relationship between the mean temperature in spring and the day of heading (DOH) of winter wheat. We show that the cooling effect due to the 14 days earlier DOH almost fully compensates for the adverse effect of global warming on frequency and magnitude of crop heat stress. Earlier heading caused by the warmer spring period can prevent exposure to extreme heat events around anthesis, which is the most sensitive growth stage to heat stress. Consequently, the intensity of heat stress around anthesis in winter crops cultivated in Germany may not increase under climate change even if the number and duration of extreme heat waves increase. However, this does not mean that global warning would not harm crop production because of other impacts, e.g. shortening of the grain filling period. Based on the trends for the last 34 years in Germany, heat stress (stress thermal time) around anthesis would be 59% higher in year 2009 if the effect of high temperatures on accelerating wheat phenology were ignored. We conclude that climate impact assessments need to consider both the effect of high temperature on grain set at anthesis but also on crop phenology. (letter)

  15. Intensity of heat stress in winter wheat—phenology compensates for the adverse effect of global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyshi Rezaei, Ehsan; Siebert, Stefan; Ewert, Frank

    2015-02-01

    Higher temperatures during the growing season are likely to reduce crop yields with implications for crop production and food security. The negative impact of heat stress has also been predicted to increase even further for cereals such as wheat under climate change. Previous empirical modeling studies have focused on the magnitude and frequency of extreme events during the growth period but did not consider the effect of higher temperature on crop phenology. Based on an extensive set of climate and phenology observations for Germany and period 1951-2009, interpolated to 1 × 1 km resolution and provided as supplementary data to this article (available at stacks.iop.org/ERL/10/024012/mmedia), we demonstrate a strong relationship between the mean temperature in spring and the day of heading (DOH) of winter wheat. We show that the cooling effect due to the 14 days earlier DOH almost fully compensates for the adverse effect of global warming on frequency and magnitude of crop heat stress. Earlier heading caused by the warmer spring period can prevent exposure to extreme heat events around anthesis, which is the most sensitive growth stage to heat stress. Consequently, the intensity of heat stress around anthesis in winter crops cultivated in Germany may not increase under climate change even if the number and duration of extreme heat waves increase. However, this does not mean that global warning would not harm crop production because of other impacts, e.g. shortening of the grain filling period. Based on the trends for the last 34 years in Germany, heat stress (stress thermal time) around anthesis would be 59% higher in year 2009 if the effect of high temperatures on accelerating wheat phenology were ignored. We conclude that climate impact assessments need to consider both the effect of high temperature on grain set at anthesis but also on crop phenology.

  16. Effect of Vitamin E and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Cryopreserved Sperm Quality in Bos taurus Bulls Under Testicular Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losano, João D A; Angrimani, Daniel S R; Dalmazzo, Andressa; Rocha, Carolina C; Brito, Maíra M; Perez, Eduardo G A; Tsunoda, Roberta H; Góes, Paola A A; Mendes, Camilla M; Assumpção, Mayra E O A; Barnabe, Valquiria H; Nichi, Marcilio

    2018-04-03

    Taurine bulls are highly susceptible to heat stress, leading to increased oxidative stress (OS) and impaired sperm viability. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) supplementation can be an alternative to improve semen quality, which also results in more sperm susceptibility to lipid peroxidation. Moreover, this deleterious effect can be exacerbated in animals affected by heat stress. Vitamin E is a key antioxidant that counteracts lipid peroxidation of sperm membrane caused by OS. Thus, combining PUFAs with vitamin E may improve sperm quality. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of interaction between PUFAs and vitamin E on sperm quality in Bos taurus bulls under testicular heat stress. Sixteen taurine bulls under testicular heat stress were randomly assigned in four groups: Control, Vitamin E, PUFA, and PUFA + Vitamin E. All groups lasted for 60 days. Samples were cryopreserved/thawed and analyzed for motility variables (CASA), membrane and acrosome integrity, mitochondrial activity, susceptibility to oxidative stress, DNA integrity, and sperm-binding capacity. Results showed that vitamin E had a beneficial effect on some sperm characteristics, whereas PUFA supplementation had an adverse effect when the two treatments were evaluated separately. Finally, the association between PUFAs and vitamin E did not improve sperm quality.

  17. Effects of heat stress on production, somatic cell score and conception rate in Holsteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiya, Koichi; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Shirai, Tatsuo; Osawa, Takefumi; Terawaki, Yoshinori; Nagamine, Yoshitaka; Masuda, Yutaka; Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effects of heat stress (HS) on production traits, somatic cell score (SCS) and conception rate at first insemination (CR) in Holsteins in Japan. We used a total of 228 242 records of milk, fat and protein yields, and SCS for the first three lactations, as well as of CR in heifers and in first- and second-lactation cows that had calved for the first time between 2000 and 2012. Records from 47 prefectural weather stations throughout Japan were used to calculate the temperature-humidity index (THI); areas were categorized into three regional groups: no HS (THI cows, CR was affected by the interaction between HS group and insemination month: with summer and early autumn insemination, there was a reduction in CR, and it was much larger in the mild- and moderate-HS groups than in the no-HS group. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  18. Timing effects of heat-stress on plant physiological characteristics and growth: a field study with prairie vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available More intense, more frequent, and longer heat-waves are expected in the future due to global warming, which could have dramatic agricultural, economic and ecological impacts. This field study examined how plant responded to heat-stress (HS treatment at different timing in naturally-occurring vegetation. HS treatment (5 days at 40.5 ºC were applied to 12 1m2 plots in restored prairie vegetation dominated by Andropogon gerardii (warm-season C4 grass and Solidago canadensis (warm-season C3 forb at different growing stages. During and after HS, air, canopy, and soil temperature were monitored; net CO2 assimilation (Pn, quantum yield of photosystem II (ФPSII, stomatal conductance (gs, and internal CO2 level (Ci of the dominant species were measured. One week after the last HS treatment, all plots were harvested and the biomass of above-ground tissue and flower weight of the two dominant species was determined. HS decreased physiological performance and growth for both species, with S. canadensis being affected more than A. gerardii, indicated by negative heat stress effect on both physiological and growth responses. There were significant timing effect of heat stress on the two species, with greater reductions in the photosynthesis and productivity occurred when heat stress was applied at later-growing season. The reduction in aboveground productivity in S. canadensis but not A. gerardii could have important implications for plant community structure by increasing the competitive advantage of A. gerardii in this grassland. The present experiment showed that heat stress, though ephemeral, may promote long-term effects on plant community structure, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning of terrestrial biomes when more frequent and severe heat stress occur in the future.

  19. The effect of heat stress on gene expression, synthesis of steroids, and apoptosis in bovine granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian; Wu, Jie; Luo, Man; Sun, Yu; Wang, Genlin

    2016-05-01

    Summer heat stress (HS) is a major contributing factor in low fertility in lactating dairy cows in hot environments. Heat stress inhibits ovarian follicular development leading to diminished reproductive efficiency of dairy cows during summer. Ovarian follicle development is a complex process. During follicle development, granulosa cells (GCs) replicate, secrete hormones, and support the growth of the oocyte. To obtain an overview of the effects of heat stress on GCs, digital gene expression profiling was employed to screen and identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs; false discovery rate (FDR) ≤ 0.001, fold change ≥2) of cultured GCs during heat stress. A total of 1211 DEGs including 175 upregulated and 1036 downregulated ones were identified, of which DEGs can be classified into Gene Ontology (GO) categories and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. The results suggested that heat stress triggers a dramatic and complex program of altered gene expression in GCs. We hypothesized that heat stress could induce the apoptosis and dysfunction of GCs. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to evaluate the expression of steroidogenic genes (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (Star), cytochrome P-450 (CYP11A1), CYP19A1, and steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1)) and apoptosis-related genes (caspase-3, BCL-2, and BAX). Radio immunoassay (RIA) was used to analyze the level of 17β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4). We also assessed the apoptosis of GCs by flow cytometry. Our data suggested that heat stress induced GC apoptosis through the BAX/BCL-2 pathway and reduced the steroidogenic gene messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and E2 synthesis. These results suggest that the decreased function of GCs may cause ovarian dysfunction and offer an improved understanding of the molecular mechanism responsible for the low fertility in cattle in summer.

  20. Ascorbic acid and citric flavonoids for broilers under heat stress: effects on performance and meat quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JEM Peña

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing doses of ascorbic acid (AA and citric flavonoids (quercetin and rutin on the performance and meat quality characteristics of broilers submitted to cyclic heat stress. Four-hundred one-day-old female Ross 308 were housed in 40 battery cages a in temperature controlled room. Treatments consisted of 0, 250, 500, and 1000 g/ton on of AA + citric flavonoids. Birds were fed ad libitum until 32 day of age. Beginning on day 14 post-hatch until the end of the experiment, in order to simulate cyclic heat stress, the temperature inside the room was increased to 32°C for 5 hours, and decreased until reaching the comfort temperature corresponding to the age of the animals. Birds were slaughtered at 33 days of age, and carcass and commercial cuts yields were determined. Thighs and boneless breast samples were collected and frozen for subsequent analyses of pH, cooking loss, shear force, color, and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS. Significant differences (p <0.05 were found for feed efficiency from 1 to 7 days of age, with the best values for the birds fed 0 and 250 g/ton on of AA + citric flavonoids. At the end of the experiment, there were no differences in other performance variables, carcass and parts yields, pH, shear force, color and TBARS. The meat of the birds supplemented with 250 g/ton on of product presented the lowest cooking loss.

  1. Effect of potassium chloride supplementation in drinking water on broiler performance under heat stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, T; Khalid, T; Mushtaq, T; Mirza, M A; Nadeem, A; Babar, M E; Ahmad, G

    2008-07-01

    The effect of water supplementation of KCl on performance of heat-stressed Hubbard broilers was evaluated in the present experiment. The 3 experimental treatments (i.e., control, 0.3 and 0.6% KCl) were allocated to 3 replicates of 15 birds each. The control group was kept on dugout tap water, whereas the other 2 groups were supplied water supplemented with 0.3 and 0.6% KCl (wt/vol) by supplementing 3 and 6 g of KCl, respectively, per liter of drinking water. Broilers were provided ad libitum access to feed and water for the experimental period of 7 to 42 d of age and kept in open-sided house. The birds were reared under continuous thermostress (minimum 28.2 +/- 1.02 and maximum 37.5 +/- 0.78 degrees C) environment. Supplementing drinking water with 0.6% KCl reduced panting-phase blood pH to 7.31 and significantly increased live BW gain by 14.5 (P = 0.036) and 7.9% (P = 0.029) at 28 and 42 d of age, respectively, relative to control. An improved (P = 0.04) feed:gain and lowered body temperature were noted in groups supplemented with 0.6% KCl as compared with control and 0.3% KCl. Enhanced physiological adaptation with 0.6% KCl was evidenced by a more favorable pH during the panting phase in the present study. These findings demonstrated a possibility of better broiler live performance through KCl supplementation under conditions of severe heat stress (35 to 38 degrees C).

  2. Effect of Morinda citrifolia (Noni)-enriched diet on hepatic heat shock protein and lipid metabolism-related genes in heat stressed broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat stress (HS) has been reported to alter fat deposition in broilers, however the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well-defined. The objectives of the current study were, therefore: (1) to determine the effects of acute (2 h) and chronic (3 weeks) HS on the expression of key molecular signa...

  3. Effect of heat stress on six beef breeds in the Zastron district: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was done to determine which factors had the greatest influence on a heifer's susceptibility to heat stress. Parameters tested were breed, coat colour, coat score, hide thickness, weight gain, respiration rate and body condition score. The study was conducted in the southeastern Free State. Afrikaner, Bonsmara ...

  4. Effect of heat stress on polyamine metabolism in proline-over-producing tobacco plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvikrová, Milena; Gemperlová, Lenka; Dobrá, Jana; Martincová, Olga; Prášil, I.T.; Gubiš, J.; Vaňková, Radomíra

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 182, Sp.Issue (2012), s. 49-58 ISSN 0168-9452 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC08013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Heat stress * Polyamines * Proline Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.922, year: 2012

  5. Molecular mechanisms of anti-aging hormetic effects of mild heat stress on human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh I S; Eskildsen-Helmond, Yvonne E G; Beedholm, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    of cellular responsiveness to mild and severe heat stress. Furthermore, we are also undertaking comparative studies using non-aging immortal cell lines, such as SV40-transformed human fibroblasts, spontaneous osteosarcoma cells, and telomerase-immortalized human bone marrow cells for establishing differences...

  6. Dietary supplementation of Zingiber officinale and Zingiber zerumbet to heat-stressed broiler chickens and its effect on heat shock protein 70 expression, blood parameters and body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasheimi, S R; Zulkifli, I; Somchit, M N; Zunita, Z; Loh, T C; Soleimani, A F; Tang, S C

    2013-08-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the effects of dietary supplementation of Zingiber officinale and Zingiber zerumbet and to heat-stressed broiler chickens on heat shock protein (HSP) 70 density, plasma corticosterone concentration (CORT), heterophil to lymphocyte ratio (HLR) and body temperature. Beginning from day 28, chicks were divided into five dietary groups: (i) basal diet (control), (ii) basal diet +1%Z. zerumbet powder (ZZ1%), (iii) basal diet +2%Z. zerumbet powder (ZZ2%), (iv) basal diet +1%Z. officinale powder (ZO1%) and (v) basal diet +2%Z. officinale powder (ZO2%). From day 35-42, heat stress was induced by exposing birds to 38±1°C and 80% RH for 2 h/day. Irrespective of diet, heat challenge elevated HSP70 expression, CORT and HLR on day 42. On day 42, following heat challenge, the ZZ1% birds showed lower body temperatures than those of control, ZO1% and ZO2%. Neither CORT nor HLR was significantly affected by diet. The ZO2% and ZZ2% diets enhanced HSP70 expression when compared to the control groups. We concluded that dietary supplementation of Z. officinale and Z. zerumbet powder may induce HSP70 reaction in broiler chickens exposed to heat stress. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Short communication: Effect of maternal heat stress in late gestation on blood hormones and metabolites of newborn calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J-R; Monteiro, A P A; Weng, X-S; Ahmed, B M; Laporta, J; Hayen, M J; Dahl, G E; Bernard, J K; Tao, S

    2016-08-01

    Maternal heat stress alters immune function of the offspring, as well as metabolism and future lactational performance, but its effect on the hormonal and metabolic responses of the neonate immediately after birth is still not clear. The objective of this study was to investigate the blood profiles of hormones and metabolites of calves born to cows that were cooled (CL) or heat-stressed (HS) during the dry period. Within 2 h after birth, but before colostrum feeding, blood samples were collected from calves [18 bulls (HS: n=10; CL: n=8) and 20 heifers (HS: n=10; CL: n=10)] born to CL or HS dry cows, and hematocrit and plasma concentrations of total protein, prolactin, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin, glucose, nonesterified fatty acid, and β-hydroxybutyrate were measured. Compared with CL, HS calves had lower hematocrit and tended to have lower plasma concentrations of insulin, prolactin, and insulin-like growth factor-I. However, maternal heat stress had no effect on plasma levels of total protein, glucose, fatty acid, and β-hydroxybutyrate immediately after birth. These results suggest that maternal heat stress desensitizes a calf's stress response and alters the fetal development by reducing the secretion of insulin-like growth factor-I, prolactin, and insulin. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Drivers and barriers to heat stress resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatvani-Kovacs, Gertrud; Belusko, Martin; Skinner, Natalie; Pockett, John; Boland, John

    2016-11-15

    Heatwaves are the most dangerous natural hazard to health in Australia. The frequency and intensity of heatwaves will increase due to climate change and urban heat island effects in cities, aggravating the negative impacts of heatwaves. Two approaches exist to develop population heat stress resilience. Firstly, the most vulnerable social groups can be identified and public health services can prepare for the increased morbidity. Secondly, the population level of adaptation and the heat stress resistance of the built environment can be increased. The evaluation of these measures and their efficiencies has been fragmented across research disciplines. This study explored the relationships between the elements of heat stress resilience and their potential demographic and housing drivers and barriers. The responses of a representative online survey (N=393) about heat stress resilience at home and work from Adelaide, South Australia were analysed. The empirical findings demonstrate that heat stress resistant buildings increased adaptation capacity and decreased the number of health problems. Air-conditioning increased dependence upon it, limited passive adaptation and only people living in homes with whole-house air-conditioning had less health problems during heatwaves. Tenants and respondents with pre-existing health conditions were the most vulnerable, particularly as those with health conditions were not aware of their vulnerability. The introduction of an Energy Performance Certificate is proposed and discussed as an effective incentive to increase the heat stress resistance of and the general knowledge about the built environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of cooling heat-stressed dairy cows during the dry period on insulin response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, S; Thompson, I M; Monteiro, A P A; Hayen, M J; Young, L J; Dahl, G E

    2012-09-01

    Heat stress (HT) during the dry period affects hepatic gene expression and adipose tissue mobilization during the transition period. In addition, it is postulated that HT may alter insulin action on peripheral tissues. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of cooling heat-stressed cows during the dry period on insulin effects on peripheral tissues during the transition period. Cows were dried off 46 d before expected calving and assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: HT (n = 16) or cooling (CL, n = 16). During the dry period, the average temperature-humidity index was 78, but CL cows were cooled with sprinklers and fans, whereas HT cows were not. After calving, all cows were housed and managed under the same conditions. Rectal temperatures were measured twice daily (0730 and 1430 h) and respiration rate recorded 3 times weekly during the dry period. Dry matter intake was recorded daily from dry-off to 42 d relative to calving (DRC). Body weight and body condition score were measured weekly from dry-off to 42 DRC. Milk yield and composition were recorded daily to 42 wk postpartum. Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) and insulin challenges (IC) were performed at dry-off, -14, 7, and 28 DRC in a subset of cows (HT, n = 8; CL, n = 8). Relative to HT, CL cows had lower rectal temperatures (39.3 vs. 39.0°C) in the afternoon and respiration rate (69 vs. 48 breath/min). Cows from the cooling treatment tended to consume more feed than HT cows prepartum and postpartum. Compared with HT, CL cows gained more weight before calving but lost more weight and body condition in early lactation. Cows from the cooling treatment produced more milk than HT cows (34.0 vs. 27.7 kg/d), but treatments did not affect milk composition. Treatments did not affect circulating insulin and metabolites prepartum, but CL cows had decreased glucose, increased nonesterified fatty acid, and tended to have lower insulin concentrations in plasma postpartum compared with HT cows. Cooling prepartum HT cows did not

  10. Effects of CO2 on the tolerance of photosynthesis to heat stress can be affected by photosynthetic pathway and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Heckathorn, Scott A; Hamilton, E William; Frantz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Determining effects of elevated CO2 and N on photosynthetic thermotolerance is critical for predicting plant responses to global warming. We grew Hordeum vulgare (barley, C3) and Zea mays (corn, C4) at current or elevated CO2 (370, 700 ppm) and limiting or optimal soil N (0.5, 7.5 mmol/L). We assessed thermotolerance of net photosynthesis (Pn), photosystem II efficiency in the light (Fv'/Fm'), photochemical quenching (qp), carboxylation efficiency (CE), and content of rubisco activase and major heat-shock proteins (HSPs). For barley, elevated CO2 had no effect on Pn, qp, and CE at both high and low N and only a positive effect on Fv'/Fm' at high N. However, for corn, Pn, Fv'/Fm', qp, and CE were decreased substantially by elevated CO2 under high and low N, with greater decreases at high N for all but qp. The negative effects of high CO2 during heat stress on photosynthesis were correlated with rubisco activase and HSPs content, which decreased with heat stress, especially for low-N corn. These results indicate that stimulatory effects of elevated CO2 at normal temperatures on photosynthesis and growth (only found for high-N barley) may be partly offset by neutral or negative effects during heat stress, especially for C4 species. Thus, CO2 and N effects on photosynthetic thermotolerance may contribute to changes in plant productivity, distribution, and diversity in future.

  11. Effects of Heat Stress on Construction Labor Productivity in Hong Kong: A Case Study of Rebar Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Wen; Chan, Albert P C

    2017-09-12

    Global warming is bringing more frequent and severe heat waves, and the result will be serious for vulnerable populations such as construction workers. Excessive heat stress has profound effects on physiological responses, which cause occupational injuries, fatalities and low productivity. Construction workers are particularly affected by heat stress, because of the body heat production caused by physically demanding tasks, and hot and humid working conditions. Field studies were conducted between August and September 2016 at two construction training grounds in Hong Kong. Onsite wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT), workers' heart rate (HR), and labor productivity were measured and monitored. Based on the 378 data sets of synchronized environmental, physiological, construction labor productivity (CLP), and personal variables, a CLP-heat stress model was established. It was found that WBGT, percentage of maximum HR, age, work duration, and alcohol drinking habits were determining factors for predicting the CLP (adjusted R ² = 0.68, p stress reduces CLP, with the percentage of direct work time decreasing by 0.33% when the WBGT increased by 1 °C. The findings in this study extend the existing practice notes by providing scientific data that may be of benefit to the industry in producing solid guidelines for working in hot weather.

  12. Effect of heat input on the microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 304L austenitic stainless steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul, E-mail: rahulunnikrishnannair@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Idury, K.S.N. Satish, E-mail: satishidury@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Ismail, T.P., E-mail: tpisma@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Bhadauria, Alok, E-mail: alokbhadauria1@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Shekhawat, S.K., E-mail: satishshekhawat@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB), Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Khatirkar, Rajesh K., E-mail: rajesh.khatirkar@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Sapate, Sanjay G., E-mail: sgsapate@yahoo.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high performance pressure vessels, nuclear, chemical, process and medical industry due to their very good corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. However, austenitic stainless steels are prone to sensitization when subjected to higher temperatures (673 K to 1173 K) during the manufacturing process (e.g. welding) and/or certain applications (e.g. pressure vessels). During sensitization, chromium in the matrix precipitates out as carbides and intermetallic compounds (sigma, chi and Laves phases) decreasing the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the present investigation, 304L austenitic stainless steel was subjected to different heat inputs by shielded metal arc welding process using a standard 308L electrode. The microstructural developments were characterized by using optical microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction, while the residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction using the sin{sup 2}ψ method. It was observed that even at the highest heat input, shielded metal arc welding process does not result in significant precipitation of carbides or intermetallic phases. The ferrite content and grain size increased with increase in heat input. The grain size variation in the fusion zone/heat affected zone was not effectively captured by optical microscopy. This study shows that electron backscattered diffraction is necessary to bring out changes in the grain size quantitatively in the fusion zone/heat affected zone as it can consider twin boundaries as a part of grain in the calculation of grain size. The residual stresses were compressive in nature for the lowest heat input, while they were tensile at the highest heat input near the weld bead. The significant feature of the welded region and the base metal was the presence of a very strong texture. The texture in the heat affected zone was almost random. - Highlights: • Effect of heat input on microstructure, residual

  13. Insight into the heat resistance of fish via blood: Effects of heat stress on metabolism, oxidative stress and antioxidant response of olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus and turbot Scophthalmus maximus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yunliang; Wu, Zhihao; Song, Zongcheng; Xiao, Peng; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Peijun; You, Feng

    2016-11-01

    High temperature has direct confinement on fish survival and growth, especially under the background of global warming. Selection of fish line with heat resistance is an important means to address this problem. In the present study, we analyzed the difference in heat resistance between families of olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus and turbot Scophthalmus maximus, two flatfish species occupying slightly different thermal niches. Then the chosen families were tested to determine their differential response to heat stress (ΔT = +8 °C and +12 °C) in blood, including anaerobic metabolism (lactate), oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation) and antioxidant enzymes. Results showed a difference in heat resistance between families of the two species. Among the chosen parameters, growth traits had a significant effect on contents of lactate and malondialdehyd (MDA), and activities of catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase in flounder (P heat-sensitive family of each species, levels of all studied parameters were lower and more stable in heat-resistant families after heat stress. What's more, heat resistance of fish significantly influenced contents of lactate and MDA and activity of CAT in flounder (P heat-resistance, being potentially valuable in fish breeding. However, these markers should be applied with more caution when there is a growth discrepancy between fish families. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effects of inbreeding and heat stress on male sterility in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Louise Dybdahl; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Bijlsma, Kuke

    2011-01-01

    in benign and stressful environments using Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism. Male sterility was compared in 21 inbred lines and five non-inbred control lines at 25.0 and 29.0 °C. The effect of inbreeding on sterility was significant only at 29.0 °C. This stress-induced increase in sterility...

  15. Effects of long-term heat stress and dietary restriction on the expression of genes of steroidogenic pathway and small heat-shock proteins in rat testicular tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkaya, F; Atli, M O; Guzeloglu, A; Kayis, S A; Yildirim, M E; Kurar, E; Yilmaz, R; Aydilek, N

    2017-08-01

    The aim was to investigate the effects of long-term heat stress and dietary restriction on the expression of certain genes involving in steroidogenic pathway and small heat-shock proteins (sHSPs) in rat testis. Sprague Dawley rats (n = 24) were equally divided into four groups. Group I and II were kept at an ambient temperature of 22°C, while Groups III and IV were reared at 38°C for 9 weeks. Feed was freely available for Group I and Group III, while Group II and Group IV were fed 60% of the diet consumed by their ad libitum counterparts. At the end of 9 weeks, testicles were collected under euthanasia. Total RNA was isolated from testis tissue samples. Expression profiles of the genes encoding androgen-binding protein, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, androgen receptor, luteinising hormone receptor, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cyclooxygenase-2 and sHSP genes were assessed at mRNA levels using qPCR. Long-term heat stress decreased the expression of StAR and HspB10 genes while dietary restriction upregulated StAR gene expression. The results suggested that long-term heat stress negatively affected the expression of StAR and HspB10 genes and the dietary restriction was able to reverse negative effect of heat stress on the expression of StAR gene in rat testis. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Heat Stress and feeding strategies in meat-type chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Syafwan, W.; Kwakkel, R.P.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2011-01-01

    Heat stress can induce hyperthermia in poultry. A reduction in heat load can be achieved by increasing the possibilities for dissipation, decreasing the level of heat production or by changing the thermal production pattern within a day. Strategies to reduce the negative effects of heat stress can

  17. Investigation of effect of post weld heat treatment conditions on residual stress for ITER blanket shield blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hun-Chea, E-mail: hcjung@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sa-Woong [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Hee [Division of Convergence Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Seung-Wook [Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Min-Su; Shim, Hee-Jin [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • PWHT for ITER blanket shield block should be performed for dimensional stability. • Investigation of the effect of PWHT conditions on properties was performed. • Instrumented indentation method for evaluation of properties was used. • Residual stress and hardness decreased with increasing PWHT temperature. • Optimization of PWHT conditions would be needed for satisfaction of requirement. - Abstract: The blanket shield block (SB) shall be required the tight tolerance because SB interfaces with many components, such as flexible support keypads, First Wall (FW) support contact surfaces, FW central bolt, electrical strap contact surfaces and attachment inserts for both FW and Vacuum Vessel (VV). In order to fulfil the tight tolerance requirement, stress relieving shall be performed for dimensional stability after cover welding operation. In this paper, effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) conditions, temperature and holding time, was investigated on the residual stress and hardness. The 316L Stainless Steel (SS) was prepared and welded by manual TIG welding by using filler material with 2.4 mm of diameter. Welded 316L SS plate was machined to prepare the specimen for PWHT. PWHT was implemented at 250, 300, 400 °C for 2 and 3 h (400 °C only) and residual stress after relaxation were determined. The evaluation of residual stress and hardness for each specimen was carried out by instrumented indentation technique. The residual stress and hardness were decreased with increasing the heat treatment temperature and holding time.

  18. Effect of heat treatment and composition on stress corrosion cracking of steam generation tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. P.; Hwang, S. S.; Kuk, I. H.; Kim, J. S.; Oh, C. Y.

    1998-01-01

    Effects of heat treatment and alloy composition on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator tubing materials have been studied in 40% NaOH at 315.deg.C at potential of +200mV above corrosion potential using C-ring specimen and reverse U bend specimen. The tubing materials used were commercial Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and laboratory alloys, Ni-χCr-10Fe. Commercial Alloy 600, Alloy 690 were mill annealed or thermally treated.Laboratory alloy Ni-χCr-10Fe, and some of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 were solution annealed. Polarization curves were measured to find out any relationship between SCC susceptibility and electrochemical behaviour. The variation in thermal treatment of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 had no effect on polarization behaviour probably due to small area fraction of carbide and Cr depletion zone near grain boundary. In anodic polarization curves, the first and second anodic peaks at about 170mV and about at 260mV, respectively, above corrosion potential were independent of Cr content, whereas the third peak at 750mV above corrosion potential and passive current density in-creased with Cr content. SCC susceptibility decreased with Cr content and thermal treatment producing semicontinuous grain boundary decoration. Examination of cross sectional area of C-ring specimen showed deep SCC cracks for the alloys with less than 17%Cr and many shallow attacks for alloy 690. The role of Cr content in steam generator tubing materials and grain boundary carbide on SCC were discussed

  19. Effect of heat stress on protein utilization and nutrient transporters in meat-type chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habashy, Walid S.; Milfort, Marie C.; Fuller, Alberta L.; Attia, Youssef A.; Rekaya, Romdhane; Aggrey, Samuel E.

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heat stress (HS) on digestibility of protein and fat and the expression of nutrient transporters in broilers. Forty-eight male Cobb500 chicks were used in this study. At day 14, birds were randomly divided into two groups and kept under either constant normal temperature (25 °C) or high temperature (35 °C) in individual cages. Five birds per treatment at 1 and 12 days post-treatment were euthanized, and Pectoralis major ( P. major) and ileum were sampled for gene expression analysis. At day 33, ileal contents were collected and used for digestibility analysis. The total consumption and retention of protein and fat were significantly lower in the HS group compared to the control group. Meanwhile, the retention of crude protein per BWG was significantly higher in the HS group compared to the control group. In P. major and ileum tissues at day 1, transporters FATP1 and SGLT1 were down-regulated in the HS group. Meanwhile, FABP1 and PepT1 were down-regulated only in the ileum of the HS group. The converse was shown in P. major. The nutrient transporter FABP1 at day 12 post-HS was down-regulated in the P. major and ileum, but GLUT1 and PepT2 were down-regulated only in the ileum, and PepT1 was down-regulated only in the P. major compared with the control group. These changes in nutrient transporters suggest that high ambient temperature might change the ileum and P. major lipids, glucose, and oligopeptide transporters.

  20. Effect of degree of lipomobilization on results of glucose test in dairy cows in heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cincović M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cows exposed to heat stress exhibit a decreased ability to mobilize lipids due to increased sensitivity to insulin, which is expressed in a decreased concentration of NEFA. However, certain cows can preserve the level of lipid mobilization after adapting to heat stress. We assumed that cows that have a preserved ability to mobilize lipids are less sensitive to insulin and that they have a lower tolerance for glucose. The aim of this work was to compare the results of an intravenous glucose tolerance test in cows that exhibited, in prolonged heat stress, a decreased (NEFA0.30 mmol/l ability for lipid mobilization. Glucose concentration and NEFA concentration were measured following intravenous application of glucose. The mean glycaemic index value did not differ statistically significantly between the two groups of cows at 10, 15 and 20 minutes after glucose application (p>0.05, but there was a tendency at 10 and 15 minutes for the glycaemia to be higher in cows with preserved lipomobilization (p<0.1. At 30, 60 and 90 minutes after glucose application, glycaemia was statistically significantly higher (p<0.01; p<0.05 and p<0.05 in the group of cows with preserved lipomobilization. The glycaemic index values (mmol/l shown in the same order (30, 60 and 90 minutes were as follows 9.91±0.21: 9.23±0.41; 5.41±0.5: 4.67±0.33 and 4.31±0.39: 3.47±0.37. The mean value for NEFA concentration in samples originating from the two experimental groups of cows did not differ statistically significantly following glucose application. The NEFA concentration showed a tendency to be higher in cows with preserved lipid mobilization in comparison with cows with decreased lipomobilization at 20 and 30 minutes after glucose application (p<0.1. Following the intravenous glucose tolerance test, NEFA and glucose concentrations were in a significant negative correlation, and that correlation was more expressed in cows with decreased lipomobilization. Cows with preserved

  1. Effect of heating produced by welding on the microstructure and on the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of AA7028 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calatayud, A.; Rodenas, M.; Ferrer, C.; Amigo, V.; Salvador, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    The microstructural and stress corrosion cracking changes due to welding are studied for the AA7028 aluminium alloy. Special attention is paid to the characterization of what is known as the white zone. The influence of the delay step between quenching and aging in a T73 treatment on the microstructure and on the characteristics of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is also studied. Finally the effect of thermal treatments applied on this zone after the welding is analysed. (Author) 7 refs

  2. Effect of heat stress on adipokines and some blood metabolites in goats from Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dawood, Amani

    2017-02-01

    To date and to the best of our knowledge, there have been no available data on the interaction between heat stress (HS) and secretion of adipokines and some blood metabolites in Baladi goats from Jordan. Therefore, this study aimed at evaluating the changes in leptin, adiponectin, non-ester fatty acid (NEFA) and beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) concentrations in Baladi goats under HS conditions in Jordan. Six goats were exposed to direct solar radiation versus six goats exposed to shade regimen. Blood samples were collected and serum concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, NEFA and BHB were measured. Ambient temperature, relative humidity (RH) and body weight (BW) were recorded. Results indicated that leptin and adiponectin concentrations were significantly increased under HS. The concentration of NEFA was significantly increased under HS at the 7th and 14th days of the experiment, while mean total concentration of NEFA was not significantly affected by HS. Neither weekly nor mean total concentrations of BHB were significantly affected by HS during the experimental period. In conclusion, HS is associated with changes in leptin and adiponectin concentrations in Baladi goats. Heat-stressed goats were able to keep their blood NEFA and BHB concentrations similar to those of thermo-neutral goats. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Response of Urban Systems to Climate Change in Europe: Heat Stress Exposure and the Effect on Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Catherine; Thomas, Bart; Grommen, Mart

    2015-04-01

    Climate change is driven by global processes such as the global ocean circulation and its variability over time leading to changing weather patterns on regional scales as well as changes in the severity and occurrence of extreme events such as heavy rain- and windstorms, floods, drought, heat waves, etc. The summer 2003 European heat wave was the hottest summer on record in Europe over the past centuries leading to health crises in several countries like France and caused up to 70.000 excess deaths over four months in Central and Western Europe. The main risks induced by global climate change in urbanised areas are considered to be overheating and resulting health effects, increased exposure to flood events, increased damage losses from extreme weather conditions but also shortages in the provision of life-sustaining services. Moreover, the cities themselves create specific or inherent risks and urban adaptation is often very demanding. As most of Europe's inhabitants live in cities, it is of particular relevance to examine the impact of climate variability on urban areas and their populations. The present study focusses on the identification of heat stress variables related to human health and the extraction of this information by processing daily temperature statistics of local urban climate simulations over multiple timeframes of 20 years and three different European cities based on recent, near future and far future global climate predictions. The analyses have been conducted in the framework of the NACLIM FP7 project funded by the European Commission involving local stakeholders such as the cities of Antwerp (Belgium), Berlin (Germany) and Almada (Portugal) represented by different climate and urban characteristics. Apart from the urban-rural temperature increment (urban heat island effect), additional heat stress parameters such as the average number of heat wave days together with their duration and intensities have been covered during this research. In a

  4. The effect of heat stress and other factors on total body water and some blood constituents in lactating goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, A.M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Goats mostly live in the desert or semidesert areas in egypt. Such areas are under adverse environmental conditions. They represent indispensable source of meat and milk for the natives of these areas . Few studies are carried out on goats in connection with their biochemical and physiological response to the high environmental temperature. The present investigation carried out was constructed to study the state of heat stress(35 C and 25% ) in nine Baladi lactating goats as compared with the reactions under mild conditions (15 C and 50% RH). Animals were Kept under each of these controlled conditions for 7 days - eight hours / day. The study included blood haemoglobin level, erythrocyte count, haematocrit value, serum activity of alkaline and acid phosphatases, creatinine, urea and prolactin. The effect of heat stress on body water content and water turnover rate using tritiated water diulation technique was studied

  5. Finite element calculation of stress induced heating of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, J.E.; Moazed, A.

    1976-01-01

    This research is concerned with the calculation of the amount of heat generated due to the development of mechanical stresses in superconducting composites. An emperical equation is used to define the amount of stress-induced heat generation per unit volume. The equation relates the maximum applied stress and the experimental measured hysteresis loop of the composite stress-strain diagram. It is utilized in a finite element program to calculate the total stress-induced heat generation for the superconductor. An example analysis of a solenoid indicates that the stress-induced heating can be of the same order of magnitude as eddy current effects

  6. Effect of gestational and lactational exposure to heat stress on performance in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Marco-Jiménez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive performance is greatly affected by environmental factors such as temperature. Heat stress (HS during pregnancy and lactation can influence not only foetal growth but also postnatal development of kits. The aim of this study was to test the effect of HS during gestation and lactation on postnatal growth till Spanish commercial liveweight. To investigate this, 32 primiparous non lactating rabbit does were exposed to 1 of 2 environmental treatments: high temperature (between 25 and 36°C, HS group; n=16 or thermoneutral conditions (between 14 and 20°C, TN group; n=16. Does were allowed to acclimate 30 d before the artificial insemination. At birth, kits were allocated into 4 groups: HS was only applied during gestation (G group; n=54; HS was applied during gestation and lactation period (GL group; n=85; HS was only applied during lactation period (L group; n=60; and TN was applied during gestation and lactation period (C group; n=77. All litters were kept under each experimental environment until weaning at day 30. Then, litters were moved to TN temperatures until slaughter at day 63. Compared with TN does, the HS does presented lower litter size (9.7 and 11.4; P<0.05, litter weight (503.0 vs. 630.5 g; P<0.05 and kit weight at birth (56.6 vs. 61.4 g; P<0.05, as well as a higher stillborn rate (25.4 vs. 9.9%; P<0.05. The kits from does subjected to HS during gestation (G group had similar postnatal growth compared to offspring from does gestated in TN conditions (C group, whereas kits from does that experienced HS during gestation and lactation (GL group and during their lactation (L group presented decreased postnatal growth. Together, these results demonstrate that kits from does that underwent HS during gestation did not alter postnatal growth until Spanish commercial liveweight, whereas HS during lactation resulted in decreased postnatal growth.

  7. Effect of heat stress on the gene expression of ion transporters/channels in the uterus of laying hens during eggshell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadoran, Shahab; Dehghani Samani, Amir; Hassanpour, Hossein

    2018-01-01

    Heat stress is a problem in laying hens as it decreases egg quality by decreasing eggshell mineralization. Heat stress alters gene expression, hence our aim was to investigate effects of heat stress on gene expression of ion transport elements involving in uterine mineralization (TRPV6, CALB1, ITPR3, SCNN1G, SLC4A4, KCNJ15, SLC4A9, and CLCN2) by real time quantitative PCR. Forty 23-week-old White Leghorn laying hens were housed in two rooms. The control group (n = 20) was maintained at 21-23 °C, and the heat stress group (n = 20) was exposed to 36-38 °C for 8 weeks. All parameters of egg quality including egg weight, surface area, volume, and eggshell weight, thickness, ash weight, and calcium content were decreased in the heat stress group compared to the control group (by 26.9%, 32.7%, 44.1%, 38.4%, 31.7%, 39.4%, and 11.1%, respectively). Total plasma calcium was decreased by 13.4%. Levels of ITPR3, SLC4A4, and SLC4A9 transcripts in the uterine lining were decreased in the heat stress group compared to the control group (by 61.4%, 66.1%, and 66.1%, respectively). CALB1 transcript level was increased (by 34.2 fold) in the heat stress group of hens compared to controls. TRPV6, SCNN1G, KCNJ15, and CLCN2 transcript levels did not significantly differ between control and heat stress groups of laying hens. It is concluded that the down-expression of ITPR3, SLC4A4, and SLC4A9 genes may impair transportation of Cl - , HCO 3 - , and Na + in eggshell mineralization during heat stress. Increased CALB1 gene expression may increase resistance of uterine cells to detrimental effects of heat stress.

  8. Effects of heat production on the temperature pattern and stresses on frictional hardening of cylindrical components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimovich, V.M.; Kratyuk, P.B.; Babei, Yu.I.; Maksimishin, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    Metal heating occurs during pulse hardening which influences the structure, state of strain, and physicomechanical properties, which in turn affects the viability. Difficulties exists in measuring the resulting temperature distributions because of the lag in existing methods. More accurate estimates of temperature distributions may often be obtained using theoretical methods, which involve solving coupled problems in the theory of elasticity and thermal conductivity. In this work, a planar contact case in thermoelasticity is considered for frictional hardening, in which the friction disk and the workpiece are represented as an elastic plunger and the body.It is assumed that the contact normal and tangential stresses are related by Coulomb's law. Also given is a method of solving which enables the definition of the thermoelastic state with a given accuracy in the contact region for high disk speeds. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Heat stress proteins in hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malo, D.; Tremblay, J.; Pang, S.C.; Schlager, G.; Hamet, P.

    1986-01-01

    It has been described that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are more sensitive to an acute environmental heat stress and that cultured cardiomyocytes from neonatal SHR are demonstrated to be more thermosensitive. In addition, chronically heat exposed spontaneously hypertensive mice leads to a decrease of blood pressure in these animals. Heat shock is known to induce the synthesis of a new set of proteins (HSP) in every cell tested. This ubiquitous response seems to be involved in the induction of a thermotolerant state. The synthesis of 70K HSP was observed in lymphocytes isolated from the spleen of chronically heated mice. They used lymphocytes, previously isolated on a ficoll gradient, to evaluate the HSP induction in normotensive (WKY) and hypertensive (SHR) rats. The heat shock was induced by exposing the lymphocytes at 46 0 C during 5 min in a hot water bath. The cells were then labeled with ( 75 Se)-methionine, washed, homogenized and separated on 5-30% SDS-polyacrylamide gel. Preliminary results suggest an abnormal pattern of induction of 70K and 90K HSP in hypertension. Heat sensitivity, thermotolerance and expression of HSP may, thus, be related to hypertension

  10. Effect of cold water and inverse lighting on growth performance of broiler chickens under extreme heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-oh; Park, Byung-sung; Hwangbo, Jong

    2015-07-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of provision of extreme heat stress diet (EHD), inverse lighting, cold water on growth performance of broiler chickens exposed to extreme heat stress. The chickens were divided into four treatment groups, (T1, T2, T3, T4) as given below: Ti (EHD 1, 10:00-19:00 dark, 19:00-10:00 light, cool water 9 degrees C); T2 (EHD 2, 10:00-19:00 dark, 19:00-10:00 light, cool water 9 degrees C); T3 (EHD 1, 09:00-18:00 dark, 18:00-09:00 light, cool water 141C); T4 (EHD 2, 09:00-18:00 dark, 18:00-09:00 light, cool water 14 degrees C. EHD 1 contained soybean oil, molasses, methionine and lysine; EHD 2 contained the same ingredients as EHD 1 with addition of vitamin C. Groups T1 and T2 were given cooler water than the othertwo groups, and displayed higher body weight increase and diet intake as compared to T3 and T4 (pstress diet, inverse lighting (10:00-19:00 dark, 19:00-10:00 light) with cold water at 9 degrees C under extreme heat stress could enhance growth performance of broiler chickens.

  11. Effects of face/head and whole body cooling during passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Hiroki; Namba, Mari; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Shibasaki, Manabu

    2017-06-01

    We herein investigated the effects of face/head and whole body cooling during passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing recorded by somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) at C4' and Fz electrodes. Fourteen healthy subjects received a median nerve stimulation at the left wrist. SEPs were recorded at normothermic baseline (Rest), when esophageal temperature had increased by ~1.2°C (heat stress: HS) during passive heating, face/head cooling during passive heating (face/head cooling: FHC), and after HS (whole body cooling: WBC). The latencies and amplitudes of P14, N20, P25, N35, P45, and N60 at C4' and P14, N18, P22, and N30 at Fz were evaluated. Latency indicated speed of the subcortical and cortical somatosensory processing, while amplitude reflected the strength of neural activity. Blood flow in the internal and common carotid arteries (ICA and CCA, respectively) and psychological comfort were recorded in each session. Increases in esophageal temperature due to HS significantly decreased the amplitude of N60, psychological comfort, and ICA blood flow in the HS session, and also shortened the latencies of SEPs (all, P body temperature. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation alleviates the negative effects of postanthesis heat stress on stem stored carbohydrates remobilization and grain starch accumulation in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiao; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai

    2012-01-01

    The potential role of pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation in alleviating the negative effects of post-anthesis heat stress on stem stored carbohydrate remobilization and grain starch accumulation in wheat was investigated. The treatments included no heat-stress (CC), heat stress at pre...... had much higher starch content, and caused less modified B-type starch granule size indicators than the CH plants. Our results indicated that, compared with the non-acclimated plants, the pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation effectively enhanced carbohydrate remobilization from stems to grains...

  13. Effects of polymer stresses on analogy between momentum and heat transfer in drag-reduced turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungyoun; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2018-03-01

    The effects of polymer stresses on the analogy between momentum and heat transfer are examined by using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of viscoelastic turbulent channel flows using a constant heat flux boundary condition. The Reynolds number based on the friction velocity and channel half height is 125, and the Prandtl number is 5. The polymer stress is modeled using the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Peterlin constitutive model, and low (15%), intermediate (34%), and high drag reduction (DR) (52%) cases are examined. The Colburn analogy is found to be inapplicable for viscoelastic turbulent flows, suggesting dissimilarity between the momentum and heat transfer at the macroscopic coefficient level. The mean temperature profile also shows behaviour different from the mean velocity profile in drag-reduced flows. In contrast to the dissimilarity in the mean profiles, the turbulent Prandtl number Prt predicted by the DNS is near unity. This implies that turbulent heat transfer is still analogous to turbulent momentum transfer in drag-reduced flows, as in Newtonian flow. An increase in DR is accompanied by an increase in the correlation coefficient ρuθ between the instantaneous fluctuations in the streamwise velocity u and temperature θ. The correlation coefficient between u' and wall-normal velocity fluctuations v', ρ-u v, exhibits a profile similar to that of ρ-θ v in drag-reduced and Newtonian flows. Finally, the budget analysis of the transport equations of turbulent heat flux shows a strong similarity between the turbulent momentum and heat transfer, which is consistent with the predictions of Prt near unity.

  14. Effect of short- and long-term heat stress on the conception risk of dairy cows under natural service and artificial insemination breeding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüller, L-K; Burfeind, O; Heuwieser, W

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this retrospective study were to examine the effect of heat stress on natural service and artificial insemination (AI) breeding methods. We investigated the influence of short- and long-term heat stress on the conception risk (CR) of dairy cows bred by natural service or by AI with frozen-thawed or fresh semen. In addition, the relationship between breeding method and parity was determined. Cows bred by AI with frozen-thawed semen exposed to long-term heat stress (mean temperature-humidity index ≥73 in the period 21d before breeding) were 63% less likely to get pregnant compared with cows not exposed to heat stress. Cows bred by AI with fresh semen were 80% less likely to get pregnant during periods of short-term heat stress than during periods without heat stress. Furthermore, multiparous cows bred by AI with frozen-thawed or fresh semen were 22 and 67% less likely to get pregnant, respectively, than primiparous cows. No influence of heat stress or parity was noted on the CR of cows bred by natural service. The present study indicates that the likelihood of dairy cows becoming pregnant is reduced by short- and long-term heat stress depending on the type of semen employed. In particular, CR of cows inseminated with fresh semen is negatively affected by short-term heat stress and CR of cows inseminated with frozen-thawed semen is negatively affected by long-term heat stress. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of cranial cooling during recovery on subsequent uncompensable heat stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Phillip J; Masbou, Anaïs T; Petersen, Stewart R; Cheung, Stephen S

    2015-08-01

    This study compared cranial (CC) with passive (CON) cooling during recovery on tolerance to subsequent exercise while wearing firefighting protective ensemble and self-contained breathing apparatus in a hot-humid environment. Eleven males (mean ± SD; age, 30.9 ± 9.2 years; peak oxygen consumption, 49.5 ± 5.1 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)) performed 2 × 20 min treadmill walks (5.6 km · h(-1), 4% incline) in 35 °C and 60% relative humidity. During a 20-min recovery (rest), participants sat and removed gloves, helmets, and flash hoods but otherwise remained encapsulated. A close-fitting liquid-perfused hood pumped 13 °C water at ∼ 500 mL · min(-1) through the head and neck (CC) or no cooling hood was worn (CON). During rest, neck temperature was lower in CC compared with CON from 4 min (CC: 35.73 ± 3.28 °C, CON: 37.66 ± 1.35 °C, p = 0.025) until the end (CC: 33.06 ± 4.70 °C, CON: 36.85 ± 1.63 °C, p = 0.014). Rectal temperature rose in both CC (0.11 ± 0.19 °C) and CON (0.26 ± 0.15 °C) during rest, with nonsignificant interaction between conditions (p = 0.076). Perceived thermal stress was lower (p = 0.006) from 5 min of CC (median: 3 (quartile 1: 3, quartile 3: 4)) until the end of rest compared with CON (median: 4 (quartile 1: 4, quartile 3: 4)). However, there were no significant differences (p = 0.906) in tolerance times during the second exercise between CC (16.55 ± 1.14 min) and CON (16.60 ± 1.31 min), nor were there any difference in rectal temperature at the start (CC: 38.30 ± 0.40 °C, CON: 38.40 ± 0.16 °C, p = 0.496) or at the end (CC: 38.82 ± 0.23 °C, CON: 39.07 ± 0.22 °C, p = 0.173). With high ambient heat and encapsulation, cranial and neck cooling during recovery decreases physiological strain and perceived thermal stress, but is ineffective in improving subsequent uncompensable heat stress tolerance.

  16. Evaluation of heat stress effects on production traits and somatic cell score of Holsteins in a temperate environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, H; Bormann, J; M'hamdi, N; Montaldo, H H; Gengler, N

    2013-03-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the degree of thermal stress exhibited by Holsteins under a continental temperate climate. Milk, fat, protein, and somatic cell count test-day records collected between 2000 and 2011 from 23,963 cows in 604 herds were combined with meteorological data from 14 public weather stations in Luxembourg. Daily values of 6 different thermal indices (TI) weighted in term of temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed were calculated by averaging hourly TI over 24h. Heat stress thresholds were first identified by a broken-line regression model. Regression models were thereafter applied to quantify milk production losses due to heat stress. The tipping points at which milk and protein yields declined were effectively identified. For fat yield, no valid threshold was identified for any of the studied TI. Daily fat yields tended to decrease steadily with increasing values of TI. Daily somatic cell score patterns were marked by increased values at both lowest and highest TI ranges, with a more pronounced reaction to cold stress for apparent temperature indices. Thresholds differed between TI and traits. For production traits, they ranged from 62 (TI(1)) to 80 (TI(3)) for temperature-humidity indices (THI) and from 16 (TI(5)) to 20 (TI(6)) for apparent temperature indices. Corresponding somatic cell score thresholds were higher and ranged from 66 (TI(1)) to 82 (TI(3)) and from 20 (TI(5)) to 23 (TI(6)), respectively. The largest milk decline per unit of mild, moderate, and extreme heat stress levels of 0.164, 0.356, and 0.955 kg, respectively, was observed when using the conventional THI (TI(1)). The highest yearly milk, fat, and protein losses of 54, 5.7, and 4.2 kg, respectively, were detected by TI(2), the THI index that is adjusted for wind speed and solar radiation. The latter index could be considered as the best indicator of heat stress to be used for forecast and herd management in a first step in temperate regions under

  17. Effect of the Evaporative Cooling on the Human Thermal Comfort and Heat Stress in a Greenhouse under Arid Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abdel-Ghany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal sensation and heat stress were evaluated in a plastic greenhouse, with and without evaporative cooling, under arid climatic conditions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Suitable thermal comfort and heat stress scales were selected for the evaluation. Experiments were conducted in hot sunny days to measure the required parameters (i.e., the dry and wet bulb temperatures, globe temperature, natural wet bulb temperature, and solar radiation flux in the greenhouse. The results showed that in the uncooled greenhouse, workers are exposed to strong heat stress and would feel very hot most of the day time; they are safe from heat stress risk and would feel comfortable during night. An efficient evaporative cooling is necessary during the day to reduce heat stress and to improve the comfort conditions and is not necessary at night. In the cooled greenhouse, workers can do any activity: except at around noon they should follow a proposed working schedule, in which the different types of work were scheduled along the daytimes based on the heat stress value. To avoid heat stress and to provide comfort conditions in the greenhouses, the optimum ranges of relative humidity and air temperature are 48–55% and 24–28°C, respectively.

  18. The alleviating effect of elevated CO2 on heat stress susceptibility of two wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Rosenqvist, Eva S. K.

    2013-01-01

    efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (Fv/Fm) and contents of pigments and carbohydrates in leaves were analysed before and during the stress treatments as well as after one day of recovery. Heat stress reduced PN and Fv/Fm in both wheat cultivars, but plants grown in elevated CO2 maintained...... higher PN and Fv/Fm in comparison to plants grown in ambient CO2. Heat stress reduced leaf chlorophyll contents and increased leaf sucrose contents in both cultivars grown at ambient and elevated CO2. The content of hexoses in the leaves increased mainly in the tolerant cultivar in response...... to the combination of elevated CO2 and heat stress. The results show that heat stress tolerance in wheat is related to cultivar origin, the phenological stage of the plants and can be alleviated by elevated CO2. This confirms the complex interrelation between environmental factors and genotypic traits that influence...

  19. Effects of rumen-protected γ-aminobutyric acid on performance and nutrient digestibility in heat-stressed dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J B; Bu, D P; Wang, J Q; Sun, X Z; Pan, L; Zhou, L Y; Liu, W

    2014-09-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of rumen-protected γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on performance and nutrient digestibility in heat-stressed dairy cows. Sixty Holstein dairy cows (141±15 d in milk, 35.9±4.3kg of milk/d, and parity 2.0±1.1) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments according to a completely randomized block design. Treatments consisted of 0 (control), 40, 80, or 120mg of true GABA/kg of dry matter (DM). The trial lasted 10wk. The average temperature-humidity indices at 0700, 1400, and 2200h were 78.4, 80.2, and 78.7, respectively. Rectal temperatures decreased linearly at 0700, 1400, and 2200h with increasing GABA concentration. Supplementation of GABA had no effect on respiration rates at any time point. Dry matter intake, energy-corrected milk, 4% fat-corrected milk, and milk fat yield tended to increase linearly with increasing GABA concentration. Supplementation of GABA affected, in a quadratic manner, milk protein and lactose concentrations, and milk protein yield, and the peak values were reached at a dose of 40mg of GABA/kg. Milk urea nitrogen concentration responded quadratically. Total solids content increased linearly with increasing GABA concentration. Supplementation of GABA had no effect on milk yield, lactose production, total solids, milk fat concentration, somatic cell score, or feed efficiency. Apparent total-tract digestibilities of DM, organic matter, crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber were similar among treatments. These results indicate that rumen-protected GABA supplementation to dairy cows can alleviate heat stress by reducing rectal temperature, increase DM intake and milk production, and improve milk composition. The appropriate supplemental GABA level for heat-stressed dairy cows is 40mg/kg of DM. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Effects of exogenous silicon on the pollination and fertility characteristics of hybrid rice under heat stress during anthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Yang; Chen, Dan; Luo, Hai-Wei; Yao, Yi-min; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Tsutomu, Matsui; Tian, Xiao-Hai

    2013-11-01

    Taking two medium-maturing indica rice hybrids Jinyou 63 and Shanyou 63 as test materials, this paper studied the effects of applying silicon fertilizer on the flag leaf chlorophyll content, photosynthetic properties, antioxidant enzyme activities, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, pollen vigor, anther acid invertase activity, pollination, and seed-setting of hybrid rice under the heat stress during anthesis. This study was conducted in pots and under growth chamber. Soluble solution of silicon fertilizer applied as Na2SiO3 x 9H2O was sprayed on the growing plants after early jointing stage, with three times successively and at an interval of one week. The pots were then moved into growth chamber to subject to normal temperature vs. high temperature (termed as heat stress) for five days. In treatment normal temperature, the average daily temperature was set at 26.6 degrees C, and the maximum daily temperature was set at 29.4 degres C; in treatment high temperature, the average and the maximum daily temperature were set at 33.2 degrees C and 40.1 degrees C, respectively. As compared with the control, applying silicon increased the flag leaf chlorophyll content significantly, improved the net photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, decreased the accumulative inter- cellular CO2 concentration, improved the leaf photosynthesis, reduced the MDA content, and improved the activities of SOD, POD and CAT under heat stress. In addition, applying silicon improved the anther acid invertase activity and the pollen vigor, increased the anther basal dehiscence width, total number of pollination per stigma, germinated number, germination rate of pollen, and percentage of florets with more than 10 germinated pollen grains, decreased the percentage of florets with fewer than 20 germinated pollen grains, and thus, alleviated the fertility loss of Jinyou 63 and Shanyou 63 under heat stress by 13.4% and 14.1%, respectively. It was suggested that spraying exogenous silicon in the

  1. Effect of Morinda citrifolia (Noni-Enriched Diet on Hepatic Heat Shock Protein and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Heat Stressed Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Flees

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Heat stress (HS has been reported to alter fat deposition in broilers, however the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well-defined. The objectives of the current study were, therefore: (1 to determine the effects of acute (2 h and chronic (3 weeks HS on the expression of key molecular signatures involved in hepatic lipogenic and lipolytic programs, and (2 to assess if diet supplementation with dried Noni medicinal plant (0.2% of the diet modulates these effects. Broilers (480 males, 1 d were randomly assigned to 12 environmental chambers, subjected to two environmental conditions (heat stress, HS, 35°C vs. thermoneutral condition, TN, 24°C and fed two diets (control vs. Noni in a 2 × 2 factorial design. Feed intake and body weights were recorded, and blood and liver samples were collected at 2 h and 3 weeks post-heat exposure. HS depressed feed intake, reduced body weight, and up regulated the hepatic expression of heat shock protein HSP60, HSP70, HSP90 as well as key lipogenic proteins (fatty acid synthase, FASN; acetyl co-A carboxylase alpha, ACCα and ATP citrate lyase, ACLY. HS down regulated the hepatic expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL and hepatic triacylglycerol lipase (LIPC, but up-regulated ATGL. Although it did not affect growth performance, Noni supplementation regulated the hepatic expression of lipogenic proteins in a time- and gene-specific manner. Prior to HS, Noni increased ACLY and FASN in the acute and chronic experimental conditions, respectively. During acute HS, Noni increased ACCα, but reduced FASN and ACLY expression. Under chronic HS, Noni up regulated ACCα and FASN but it down regulated ACLY. In vitro studies, using chicken hepatocyte cell lines, showed that HS down-regulated the expression of ACCα, FASN, and ACLY. Treatment with quercetin, one bioactive ingredient in Noni, up-regulated the expression of ACCα, FASN, and ACLY under TN conditions, but it appeared to down-regulate ACCα and increase ACLY

  2. Effect of Morinda citrifolia (Noni)-Enriched Diet on Hepatic Heat Shock Protein and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Heat Stressed Broiler Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flees, Joshua; Rajaei-Sharifabadi, Hossein; Greene, Elizabeth; Beer, Lesleigh; Hargis, Billy M; Ellestad, Laura; Porter, Tom; Donoghue, Annie; Bottje, Walter G; Dridi, Sami

    2017-01-01

    Heat stress (HS) has been reported to alter fat deposition in broilers, however the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well-defined. The objectives of the current study were, therefore: (1) to determine the effects of acute (2 h) and chronic (3 weeks) HS on the expression of key molecular signatures involved in hepatic lipogenic and lipolytic programs, and (2) to assess if diet supplementation with dried Noni medicinal plant (0.2% of the diet) modulates these effects. Broilers (480 males, 1 d) were randomly assigned to 12 environmental chambers, subjected to two environmental conditions (heat stress, HS, 35°C vs. thermoneutral condition, TN, 24°C) and fed two diets (control vs. Noni) in a 2 × 2 factorial design. Feed intake and body weights were recorded, and blood and liver samples were collected at 2 h and 3 weeks post-heat exposure. HS depressed feed intake, reduced body weight, and up regulated the hepatic expression of heat shock protein HSP60, HSP70, HSP90 as well as key lipogenic proteins (fatty acid synthase, FASN; acetyl co-A carboxylase alpha, ACCα and ATP citrate lyase, ACLY). HS down regulated the hepatic expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic triacylglycerol lipase (LIPC), but up-regulated ATGL. Although it did not affect growth performance, Noni supplementation regulated the hepatic expression of lipogenic proteins in a time- and gene-specific manner. Prior to HS, Noni increased ACLY and FASN in the acute and chronic experimental conditions, respectively. During acute HS, Noni increased ACCα, but reduced FASN and ACLY expression. Under chronic HS, Noni up regulated ACCα and FASN but it down regulated ACLY. In vitro studies, using chicken hepatocyte cell lines, showed that HS down-regulated the expression of ACCα, FASN, and ACLY. Treatment with quercetin, one bioactive ingredient in Noni, up-regulated the expression of ACCα, FASN, and ACLY under TN conditions, but it appeared to down-regulate ACCα and increase ACLY levels

  3. Effects of methionine supplementation on the expression of protein deposition-related genes in acute heat stress-exposed broilers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Del Vesco

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat stress and methionine supplementation on the gene expression of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I, growth hormone receptor (GHR, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and regulatory 1 (PI3KR1 in the liver, as well as the expression of the atrogin 1 and cathepsin L2 (CTSL2 genes in the breast muscle of broilers. Broilers from 1-21 and 22-42 days of age were divided into three treatments related to methionine supplementation as follows: without methionine supplementation (MD, recommended level of methionine (DL1, and excess supplementation of methionine (DL2. The animals were either maintained at a thermal comfort temperature or exposed to heat stress (HS (38°C for 24 hours, starting on day 20 or day 41 for experiments 1 and 2, respectively. The heat stress increased the body temperature at both ages. Starter period: The HS animals presented increased plasma creatinine content (P<0.0001 and the highest CTSL2 gene expression (P<0.0001. The methionine supplementation increased the IGF-I (P = 0.0144 and GHR (P = 0.0011 gene expression and decreased the CTSL2 (P = 0.0004 and atrogin 1 (P = 0.0012 gene expression. Grower period: Significant effects for the interaction between supplementation and environment were observed for GHR (P = 0.0252 and CTSL2 (P = 0.0011 gene expression. The highest GHR expression was observed in animals that remained in thermal comfort on the DL2 diet, and the lowest expression occurred in the HS animals fed the MD diet. For CTSL2, the HS animals fed the MD diet presented the highest CTSL2 gene expression, and the lowest expression was observed in the animals maintained at thermal comfort on DL1 and DL2 diets. Only methionine supplementation had effect on atrogin-1 gene expression (P<0.0001, with higher methionine content in the diet lower atrogin-1 gene expression was observed. Our results suggest that heat stress induces greater protein degradation and that

  4. Effect of heat treatments and minor elements on caustic stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kazuo; Kowaka, Masamichi

    1983-01-01

    The effect of heat treatments and minor elements (C, S, P, N) on caustic stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 stainless steel in boiling 34% NaOH solution at 393 K was studied. The results obtained as follows: (1) Susceptibility to IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking) in NaOH solution was increased with the intergranular precipitation of chromium carbides by the sensitizing heat treatments, but was not completely consistent with the susceptibility to IGC (intergranular corrosion) by Strauss test in H 2 SO 4 + CuSO 4 solution. (2) SCC in NaOH solution took place in three potential ranges of about -100 to +150 mV (vs SCE), -600 to -300 mV and -1100 to -900 mV. Transglanular cracking predominantly occurred in the first region and intergranular cracking occurred in the latter two regions. IGC occurred in the potential range of about -400 to 0 mV. No IGC was observed at corrosion potential. (3) Among minor elements carbon and sulfur had a detrimental effect on SCC, but no effect of phosphorus and nitrogen was almost observed on SCC in NaOH solution. (author)

  5. Beneficial effects of elevating cardiac preload on left-ventricular diastolic function and volume during heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brothers, R M; Pecini, Redi; Dalsgaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    via volume loading while heat stressed would 1) increase indices of left ventricular diastolic function, and 2) preserve left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) during a subsequent simulated hemorrhagic challenge induced by lower-body negative pressure (LBNP). Indices of left ventricular......Volume loading normalizes tolerance to a simulated hemorrhagic challenge in heat-stressed individuals, relative to when these individuals are thermoneutral. The mechanism(s) by which this occurs is unknown. This project tested two unique hypotheses; that is, the elevation of central blood volume...... diastolic function were evaluated in nine subjects during the following conditions: thermoneutral, heat stress, and heat stress after acute volume loading sufficient to return ventricular filling pressures toward thermoneutral levels. LVEDV was also measured in these subjects during the aforementioned...

  6. Sex Pheromones of C. elegans Males Prime the Female Reproductive System and Ameliorate the Effects of Heat Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Z Aprison

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pheromones are secreted molecules that mediate animal communications. These olfactory signals can have substantial effects on physiology and likely play important roles in organismal survival in natural habitats. Here we show that a blend of two ascaroside pheromones produced by C. elegans males primes the female reproductive system in part by improving sperm guidance toward oocytes. Worms have different physiological responses to different ratios of the same two molecules, revealing an efficient mechanism for increasing coding potential of a limited repertoire of molecular signals. The endogenous function of the male sex pheromones has an important side benefit. It substantially ameliorates the detrimental effects of prolonged heat stress on hermaphrodite reproduction because it increases the effectiveness with which surviving gametes are used following stress. Hermaphroditic species are expected to lose female-specific traits in the course of evolution. Our results suggest that some of these traits could have serendipitous utility due to their ability to counter the effects of stress. We propose that this is a general mechanism by which some mating-related functions could be retained in hermaphroditic species, despite their expected decay.

  7. Sex Pheromones of C. elegans Males Prime the Female Reproductive System and Ameliorate the Effects of Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprison, Erin Z.; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Pheromones are secreted molecules that mediate animal communications. These olfactory signals can have substantial effects on physiology and likely play important roles in organismal survival in natural habitats. Here we show that a blend of two ascaroside pheromones produced by C. elegans males primes the female reproductive system in part by improving sperm guidance toward oocytes. Worms have different physiological responses to different ratios of the same two molecules, revealing an efficient mechanism for increasing coding potential of a limited repertoire of molecular signals. The endogenous function of the male sex pheromones has an important side benefit. It substantially ameliorates the detrimental effects of prolonged heat stress on hermaphrodite reproduction because it increases the effectiveness with which surviving gametes are used following stress. Hermaphroditic species are expected to lose female-specific traits in the course of evolution. Our results suggest that some of these traits could have serendipitous utility due to their ability to counter the effects of stress. We propose that this is a general mechanism by which some mating-related functions could be retained in hermaphroditic species, despite their expected decay. PMID:26645097

  8. Effect of heat stress on the pattern of protein synthesis in wheat endosperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inwood, W.; Bernardin, J.

    1990-01-01

    The exposure of detached wheat heads (T. aestivum L. cv Cheyenne) to elevated temperatures resulted not only in the induction of a typical set of high and low molecular weight heat shock proteins (hsps), but also in a differential effect on the synthesis of wheat storage proteins in endosperm tissue when monitored by SDS PAGE of 35 S-labeled polypeptides. The synthesis of hsps in the endosperm had a rapid onset, reached a maximum rate within the first 2 hours at 40 degree C, and then steadily decreased during the next four hours. When heads were returned to 25 degree C after 3 hours at 40 degree C, hsp synthesis did not cease abruptly, but gradually declined over the next several hours. High molecular weight glutenin protein synthesis was drastically reduced with the same time course as heat shock protein synthesis was induced at 40 degree C. Conversely, the synthesis of gliadin proteins remained at a high level at 40 degree C. The synthesis rates for glutenin and gliadin proteins remained at low and high levels, respectively, for as long as the elevated temperature was maintained up to 7 hours

  9. Effect of Physical Load on Aerobic Exercise Performance during Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenefick, Robert W; Heavens, Kristen R; Luippold, Adam J; Charkoudian, Nisha; Schwartz, Steven A; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of increasing external loads on 5-km treadmill time trial (TT) performance in 20°C and 40°C environmental conditions and to construct an ecologically relevant performance prediction decision aid. Twenty-six male and four female volunteers (age, 23.5 ± 6.9 yr; weight, 76.0 ± 8.9 kg; height, 1.75 ± 0.07 m; V˙O2peak, 50.7 ± 4.5 mL·kg·min) participated in a counterbalanced, mixed-model design, with each subject assigned to a load group (20%, 30%, or 50% body mass (BM); n = 10 per group). Volunteers performed three, self-paced 5-km familiarization TT (treadmill) without external load. Each volunteer then performed a 5-km TT in each environment with loads of either 20% (n = 10), 30% (n = 10), or 50% (n = 10) of BM. 1) Loads of (20%, 30%, and 50% of BM) impaired 5-km TT performance compared with that when unloaded (P exercise trials, an ecologically valid decision aid was developed from self-paced data, in which pace (km·h) can be predicted for individual levels of heat, load, or heat + load in combination.

  10. Effect of mineral mixture and antioxidant supplementation on growth, reproductive performance and adaptive capability of Malpura ewes subjected to heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejian, V; Singh, A K; Sahoo, A; Naqvi, S M K

    2014-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of mineral and antioxidant supplementation on growth, reproductive performance and physiological adaptability of heat-stressed Malpura ewes. The study was conducted for a period of 21 days in 21 adult Malpura ewes. The ewes were randomly divided into three groups with seven animals each viz. GI (control; n = 7), GII (heat stress; n = 7) and GIII (heat stress + mineral and antioxidant supplementation; n = 7). The animals were stall fed ad libitum with the diet consisting of 70% roughage and 30% concentrate. GI ewes were maintained under normal controlled condition in the shed, while GII and GIII ewes were subjected to heat stress by exposing them to 42 °C in the climatic chamber. The parameters studied were feed intake (FI), water intake (WI), body weight, body condition score (BCS), physiological, biochemical and endocrine responses. Heat stress significantly altered FI, water intake, BCS, respiration rate and rectal temperature in the afternoon, oestrus duration, estradiol, progesterone, Hb, PCV, plasma glucose, total protein, cortisol, T3 and T4 levels while mineral and antioxidant supplementation ameliorated this heat stress effect on the parameters studied. Further, the adverse effect of heat stress on the productive and reproductive efficiency of Malpura ewes was reduced considerably by mineral mixture and antioxidant supplementation. This is evident from the non-significant difference in BCS, oestrus duration and plasma estradiol between GI and GIII in this study. Hence, it is very pertinent to conclude from this study that mineral mixture and antioxidant supplementation were able to protect Malpura ewes against heat stress. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Effect of heat stress and recovery on viability, oxidative damage, and heat shock protein expression in hepatic cells of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanting; Liu, Bo; Xie, Jun; Xu, Pao; Habte-Tsion, H-Michael; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of hyperthermia and recovery on cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and heat shock protein (HSP60, 70, and 90) mRNA expression in the hepatic cells of the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idellus. Triplicate groups of cultured cells were exposed to 30, 32, or 34 °C for 0.5 h and then immediately incubated at 27 °C in 5 % CO2 for 6, 12, 24, or 48 h. Hyperthermia stress greatly reduced cell viability and increased LDH release. Cell damage declined after recovery. Hyperthermia stress increased the lipid peroxide levels and reduced the antioxidant capacity (e.g., reduced SOD and T-AOC) of the cells. However, oxidative damage declined as the recovery period increased, and the levels of MDA, SOD, and T-AOC were restored. After cells were exposed to 32 °C, the expression of HSP60 after recovery for 1, 2, and 4 h (P recovery for 0.5 and 1 h (P recovery were significantly higher (P recovery period, the variations in HSP gene expression reflected the transition period from a state of cellular growth to one of the cellular repairs. In conclusion, hyperthermia depresses cell viability, induces oxidative damage, and increases HSP expression, which plays an important role during hyperthermic stress in grass carp hepatic cells.

  12. Effect of heat treatment conditions on stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy X-750 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Onimura, Kichiro; Sakamoto, Naruo; Sasaguri, Nobuya; Susukida, Hiroshi; Nakata, Hidenori.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve the resistance of the Alloy X-750 in high temperature and high purity water, the authors investigated the influence of heat treatment condition on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy. This paper describes results of the stress corrosion cracking test and some discussion on the mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water. The following results were obtained. (1) The stress corrosion cracking resistance of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water remarkably depended upon the heat treatment condition. The materials solution heat treated and aged within temperature ranges from 1065 to 1100 0 C and from 704 to 732 0 C, respectively, have a good resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. Especially, water cooling after the solution heat treatment gives an excellent resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. (2) Any correlations were not observed between the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water and grain boundary chromium depleted zones, precipitate free zones and the grain boundary segregation of impurity elements and so on. It appears that there are good correlations between the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy in the environment and the kinds, morphology and coherency of precipitates along the grain boundaries. (author)

  13. Water Replacement Schedules in Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londeree, Ben R.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Although early ingestion of cold water appears to lead to greater relief from heat stress during physical exertion than late ingestion, this difference is reduced toward the end of an hour's work in high heat and humidity. (CK)

  14. Effect of heat stress on rumen temperature of three breeds of cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, A. M.; Lees, J. C.; Lisle, A. T.; Sullivan, M. L.; Gaughan, J. B.

    2018-02-01

    Thirty-six steers (12 of each Angus, Charolais, and Brahman) with an initial BW of 318.5 ± 6.7 kg were used in a 130-day study. Two treatments were imposed: un-shaded and shaded (3 m2/animal; 90% solar block shade cloth). On day 1, steers were administered with rumen temperature boluses. Rumen temperatures ( T RUM) were obtained at 10 min intervals over the duration of the study to determine differences in T RUM between Bos indicus and Bos taurus cattle. Six feedlot pens (162 m2) were used with six steers (2/breed) per pen with three pens/treatment. Ambient dry bulb temperature ( T A; °C), relative humidity (RH; %), wind speed (WS; m/s) and direction, and solar radiation (SR; W/m2) were recorded at 10 min intervals. Rainfall (mm) was collected daily at 0900 h. From these data, black globe temperature (BGT; °C), temperature humidity index (THI), heat load index (HLI), and accumulated heat load (AHL) were calculated. Individual T RUM were converted to an hourly average and then mean hourly T RUM were converted to a mean within hour T RUM across the 130 days. Rumen temperatures were analyzed using an autoregressive repeated measures model. The model analyzed the effect of breed ( P < 0.0002), treatment ( P = 0.3543), time of day (hour, h; P < 0.0001), breed × treatment ( P < 0.3683), breed × h ( P < 0.0001), treatment × h ( P < 0.0001), breed × treatment × h ( P = 0.0029), pen within treatment ( P = 0.0195), and animal × breed × treatment within pen ( P = 0.1041). Furthermore, there were breed × treatment × hour differences in T RUM ( P = 0.0036), indicating that Bos indicus and Bos taurus regulate T RUM differently.

  15. Effects of Ascorbic Acid Injection in Incubated Eggs Submitted to Heat Stress on Incubation Parameters and Chick Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sgavioli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dose-dependent positive effects on hatchability and hatchling weight have been attributed to ascorbic acid (AA when eggs were submitted or not to intermittent heat stress during incubation. Fertile breeder (Cobb(r eggs were used to determine if the pre-incubation injection of AA in ovo affects the incubation and hatchling quality of egg incubated under thermoneutral or intermittent heat stress conditions. Eggs were not injected or injected with 0, 2,4, or 6% AA/100µL water and incubated at continuous thermoneutral (37.5ºC or hot (39.0ºC temperature. Eggshell temperature (EST increased in the second half of the incubation period in all experimental groups. The EST of non-injected eggs and of those injected with water was higher when incubated at 39°C than at 37.5°C, but EST was not different among eggs injected with AA. Egg mass loss and eggshell conductance were higher in the eggs incubated at 39°C than at 37.5°C.Hatchability was lower in the eggs injected with AA. Liver and yolk sac weights were higher, whereas heart and liver weights were lower in hatchlings from eggs incubated at 39°C; however, hatchling weight was not affected by incubation temperature. The results showed that AA doses affected egg conductive heat loss and hatchability, and that they did not minimize the effects of high incubation temperature on liver and heart development.

  16. Short communication: Effect of heat stress on markers of autophagy in the mammary gland during the dry period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgemuth, S E; Ramirez-Lee, Y; Tao, S; Monteiro, A P A; Ahmed, B M; Dahl, G E

    2016-06-01

    Heat stress (HT) during the dry period compromises mammary gland (MG) growth, thus negatively affecting subsequent milk yield. Cooling during the late dry period, when mammary tissue proliferates, is a common management practice. However, it neglects MG involution during the early dry period, a process that is accomplished by both apoptosis and autophagy. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of HT on MG autophagy during the early dry period. Holstein cows were dried off ~45d before expected calving and randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: HT or cooling (CL). All cows were housed in the same free stall barn during the dry period, but only the stall area for CL cows was equipped with soakers and fans. Rectal temperature and respiration rate were measured daily during the dry period. Mammary gland biopsies were collected from each cow 3d before dry-off and on d 3, 7, 14, and 22±2 after dry-off. Autophagy in the MG was determined by measuring protein expression of 2 autophagic markers, autophagy-related protein 7 and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3). The average temperature-humidity index during the dry period was 77.7, which indicated that HT and CL cows were exposed to significant heat stress. However, the cooling system effectively alleviated heat strain in CL cows by decreasing the rectal temperature (39.0 vs. 39.4°C) and respiration rate (47.3 vs. 71.2 breaths per minute) relative to HT cows. Protein expression of autophagy-related protein 7, a marker for early autophagosome formation, did not change within or between groups. In contrast, protein expression of LC3-II, a marker of autophagosomes, and its precursor LC3-I showed a dynamic expression pattern in MG from CL cows during the early dry period. Relative to HT cows, MG from CL cows displayed higher expression of LC3-I and LC3-II on d 7 and lower expression of LC3-II on d 14 and 22 after dry-off. Collectively, our data provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the impairment of

  17. Modeling heat stress effect on Holstein cows under hot and dry conditions: selection tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabaño, M J; Bachagha, K; Ramón, M; Díaz, C

    2014-12-01

    Data from milk recording of Holstein-Friesian cows together with weather information from 2 regions in Southern Spain were used to define the models that can better describe heat stress response for production traits and somatic cell score (SCS). Two sets of analyses were performed, one aimed at defining the population phenotypic response and the other at studying the genetic components. The first involved 2,514,762 test-day records from up to 5 lactations of 128,112 cows. Two models, one fitting a comfort threshold for temperature and a slope of decay after the threshold, and the other a cubic Legendre polynomial (LP) model were tested. Average (TAVE) and maximum daily temperatures were alternatively considered as covariates. The LP model using TAVE as covariate showed the best goodness of fit for all traits. Estimated rates of decay from this model for production at 25 and 34°C were 36 and 170, 3.8 and 3.0, and 3.9 and 8.2g/d per degree Celsius for milk, fat, and protein yield, respectively. In the second set of analyses, a sample of 280,958 test-day records from first lactations of 29,114 cows was used. Random regression models including quadratic or cubic LP regressions (TEM_) on TAVE or a fixed threshold and an unknown slope (DUMMY), including or not cubic regressions on days in milk (DIM3_), were tested. For milk and SCS, the best models were the DIM3_ models. In contrast, for fat and protein yield, the best model was TEM3. The DIM3DUMMY models showed similar performance to DIM3TEM3. The estimated genetic correlations between the same trait under cold and hot temperatures (ρ) indicated the existence of a large genotype by environment interaction for fat (ρ=0.53 for model TEM3) and protein yield (ρ around 0.6 for DIM3TEM3) and for SCS (ρ=0.64 for model DIM3TEM3), and a small genotype by environment interaction for milk (ρ over 0.8). The eigendecomposition of the additive genetic covariance matrix from model TEM3 showed the existence of a dominant

  18. THE EFFECT OF CICHORIUM INTYBUS L. ETHANOL EXTRACTION ON THE PATHOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL INDEXES OF THE LIVER AND KIDNEY OF BROILERS REARED UNDER HEAT STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khodadadi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of compounds with antioxidant properties as a source of phelanoeid compounds is highly recommendable in the poultry industry. Therefore, the effect of Cichorium intybus L. herb on pathobiochemical indexes of chicken under heat stress was studied. After exposure to heat stress (from day 21 to day 42 of growth, hydroalcoholic extraction was provided to 270 broiler chicks randomly divided into six groups and placed in two distinct poultry houses (heat stress and normal conditions. The three groups were recipient group of Cichorium intybus L. (1; recipient group of vitamin C (2 and control group (3. The birds in one of the houses were exposed to heat stress conditions (35 °C for 8 hours for a time period between 22 to 42 days and the birds in the other house were reared under normal conditions (20-22°C for the same time period. Blood samples collected from the birds showed that Cichorium intybus L. herb caused significant decrease in uric acid, Triglyceride, Alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total body clearance factors (CL- factors and right ventricular failure index (RVF and significant increase in K+ under heat stress condition (p< 0.05. Vitamin C caused significant decrease in uric acid, ALT, CL- factors and RVF index and significant increase in K+ and Na+ under heat stress condition (p< 0.05. A significant decrease in cholesterol and triglyceride in recipient group of Cichorium intybus L was observed compared to the recipient group of vitamin C under heat stress condition (p< 0.05. In a pathologic examination normal observations were in recipient group of Cichorium intybus L and recipient group of vitamin C compared to the control group. According to this study, use of Cichorium intybus L extract and vitamin C in chicken under heat stress induced improvement in liver, kidney activity and fat metabolism.

  19. Sensing the Heat Stress by Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cates Jordan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heat-shock response network controls the adaptation and survival of the cell against environmental stress. This network is highly conserved and is connected with many other signaling pathways. A key element of the heat-shock network is the heat-shock transcription factor-1 (HSF, which is transiently activated by elevated temperatures. HSF translocates to the nucleus upon elevated temperatures, forming homotrimeric complexes. The HSF homotrimers bind to the heat shock element on the DNA and control the expression of the hsp70 gene. The Hsp70 proteins protect cells from thermal stress. Thermal stress causes the unfolding of proteins, perturbing thus the pathways under their control. By binding to these proteins, Hsp70 allows them to refold and prevents their aggregation. The modulation of the activity of the hsp70-promoter by the intensity of the input stress is thus critical for cell's survival. The promoter activity starts from a basal level and rapidly increases once the stress is applied, reaches a maximum level and attenuates slowely back to the basal level. This phenomenon is the hallmark of many experimental studies and of all computational network analysis. Results The molecular construct used as a measure of the response to thermal stress is a Hsp70-GFP fusion gene transfected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. The time profile of the GFP protein depends on the transient activity, Transient(t, of the heat shock system. The function Transient(t depends on hsp70 promoter activity, transcriptional regulation and the translation initiation effects elicited by the heat stress. The GFP time profile is recorded using flow cytometry measurements, a technique that allows a quantitative measurement of the fluorescence of a large number of cells (104. The GFP responses to one and two heat shocks were measured for 261 conditions of different temperatures and durations. We found that: (i the response of the cell to two

  20. ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF THE ROOFING DESIGN ON HEAT STRESS IN DAIRY COW HOUSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Liberati

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A simulation model determining the heat flow exchange between housed animals and the roofing was developed considering various relevant factors: constructive materials, slope, height, orientation, latitude, external air temperature, solar load, animal position. Results show that the most important factor to reduce heat load is the insulation. For non-insulated roofing the slope and the orientation are the most relevant factors. Considering the total exchanged energy, the non insulated roof has a good nocturnal global behaviour.

  1. ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF THE ROOFING DESIGN ON HEAT STRESS IN DAIRY COW HOUSING

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Liberati

    2008-01-01

    A simulation model determining the heat flow exchange between housed animals and the roofing was developed considering various relevant factors: constructive materials, slope, height, orientation, latitude, external air temperature, solar load, animal position. Results show that the most important factor to reduce heat load is the insulation. For non-insulated roofing the slope and the orientation are the most relevant factors. Considering the total exchanged energy, the non insulated roof ha...

  2. Effect of patchouli alcohol on the regulation of heat shock-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Jiang, Linshu; Liu, Fenghua; Chen, Yuping; Xu, Lei; Li, Deyin; Ma, Yunfei; Li, Huanrong; Xu, Jianqin

    2016-08-01

    Purpose Patchouli alcohol (PA) is used to treat gastrointestinal dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the function of PA in the regulated process of oxidative stress in rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Materials and methods Oxidative stress was stimulated by exposing IEC-6 cells to heat shock (42 °C for 3 h). IEC-6 cells in treatment groups were pretreated with various concentrations of PA (10, 40, and 80 ng/mL) for 3 h before heat shock. Results Heat shock caused damage to the morphology of IEC-6 cells, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Moreover, mRNA and protein expression by target genes related to oxidative stress in heat shock were also altered. Specifically, the mRNA expression by HSP70, HSP90, GSH-px, NRF2 nd HO-1were all increased, and Nrf2 and Keap1 protein expression were increased after heat shock. However, pretreatment with PA weakened the level of damage to the cellular morphology, and decreased the MDA content caused by heat shock, indicating PA had cytoprotective activities. Pretreatment with PA at high dose significantly increased generation of intracellular ROS. Compared with the heat shock group alone, PA pretreatment significantly decreased the mRNA expression by HSP70, HSP90, SOD, CAT, GSH-px, KEAP1 and HO-1. Furthermore, the high dose of PA significantly increased Nrf2 protein expression, while both the intermediate and high dose of PA significantly increased HO-1 protein expression. Conclusion Heat-shock-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6 cells, and PA could alleviate the Nrf2-Keap1 cellular oxidative stress responses.

  3. The Effect of Being Aerobically Active vs. Inactive on Cutaneous Vascular Conductance during Local Heat Stress in an Older Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike H. Mitchell

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To test the hypothesis that long- term aerobically trained elderly individuals have a greater amount of bioavailable nitric oxide (NO and have a larger cutaneous vasodilation during local heat stress compared to their inactive elderly counterparts.Methods: Eight aerobically trained and 8 inactive older men (>60 years old participated in this study. NO bioavailability in blood and intradermal dialysate were measured with an ozone based chemiluminescence NO analyzer. Cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating was obtained using laser Doppler velocimetry.Results: Whole blood NO were similar in older- trained and inactive subjects (0.75 ± 0.56 and 0.38 ± 0.32 μM, respectively; Mann–Whitney, p = 0.153, as was intradermal dialysate NO before (7.82 ± 6.32 and 4.18 ± 1.89 μM, respectively and after local heating (7.16 ± 6.27 and 5.88 ± 3.97 μM, respectively, p = 0.354. The cutaneous vasodilator response of the older- inactive group was smaller than the older- trained group [Group-Time interaction, F(24, 264 = 12.0, p < 0.0001]. When compared to a young group the peak vasodilator response of the older- trained subjects was similar. However, the time to initial dilation was 3.1 and 2.2 times longer (p < 0.05 in older- inactive and older- trained subjects, respectively, compared to young subjects.Conclusions: Our data support the hypothesis that the age-related reductions in cutaneous vasodilation can possibly be restored by maintaining an aerobic training regimen (at least 3 years. However, some residual effects of aging remain, specifically a delayed cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating is still present in active older adults. We found no evidence for an increase in systemic or local NO-bioavailability with an extended commitment to aerobic fitness.

  4. The Effect of Being Aerobically Active vs. Inactive on Cutaneous Vascular Conductance during Local Heat Stress in an Older Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ulrike H; Burton, Samantha; Gordon, Christopher; Mack, Gary W

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that long- term aerobically trained elderly individuals have a greater amount of bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) and have a larger cutaneous vasodilation during local heat stress compared to their inactive elderly counterparts. Methods: Eight aerobically trained and 8 inactive older men (>60 years old) participated in this study. NO bioavailability in blood and intradermal dialysate were measured with an ozone based chemiluminescence NO analyzer. Cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating was obtained using laser Doppler velocimetry. Results: Whole blood NO were similar in older- trained and inactive subjects (0.75 ± 0.56 and 0.38 ± 0.32 μM, respectively; Mann-Whitney, p = 0.153), as was intradermal dialysate NO before (7.82 ± 6.32 and 4.18 ± 1.89 μM, respectively) and after local heating (7.16 ± 6.27 and 5.88 ± 3.97 μM, respectively, p = 0.354). The cutaneous vasodilator response of the older- inactive group was smaller than the older- trained group [Group-Time interaction, F (24, 264) = 12.0, p < 0.0001]. When compared to a young group the peak vasodilator response of the older- trained subjects was similar. However, the time to initial dilation was 3.1 and 2.2 times longer ( p < 0.05) in older- inactive and older- trained subjects, respectively, compared to young subjects. Conclusions: Our data support the hypothesis that the age-related reductions in cutaneous vasodilation can possibly be restored by maintaining an aerobic training regimen (at least 3 years). However, some residual effects of aging remain, specifically a delayed cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating is still present in active older adults. We found no evidence for an increase in systemic or local NO-bioavailability with an extended commitment to aerobic fitness.

  5. Thermotransduction and heat stress in dental structures during orthodontic debonding : Effectiveness of various cooling strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kley, Philipp; Frentzen, Matthias; Küpper, Katharina; Braun, Andreas; Kecsmar, Susann; Jäger, Andreas; Wolf, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have indicated possible thermal damage to pulpal tissue during orthodontic debonding. This study aimed to analyze the thermal loads acting upon dental structures and their transfer to the pulp during orthodontic debonding. Specific goals were to analyze temperature changes in local dental tissues, thermotransduction to the pulp cavity, and the effectiveness of common cooling strategies and of simulated intrapulpal circulation. Metal brackets were bonded to five extracted human molars and subsequently removed. While a carbide bur was applied to debond the residual composite from the tooth surface, various cooling strategies (no/air/water cooling) were employed with or without simulated intrapulpal circulation, accompanied by temperature measurements with a thermographic infrared camera on the enamel surface and with measuring probes in the pulp cavity. Appropriate evaluation software was used to calculate the enamel-to-pulp temperature gradients and for statistical analysis. Significant differences in temperature rise and heat development over time, both on the enamel surfaces and in the pulp cavities were found. The mean temperature rises associated with no/air/water cooling were 90.7/46.6/9.2 °C on the enamel surface versus 9/8/4.6 °C inside the pulp. However, thermotransduction from enamel to pulp remained below 10 % of the surface measurements in all groups. Simulated intrapulpal microcirculation was found to significantly reduce intrapulpal temperature levels. During debonding of residual bracket adhesives, provided that a carbide bur is properly used, our data indicate a low risk of reaching critical intrapulpal temperatures even in the absence of dedicated cooling and no risk if the instrumentation is accompanied by air or water cooling.

  6. Random regression models to account for the effect of genotype by environment interaction due to heat stress on the milk yield of Holstein cows under tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Mário L; Bignardi, Annaiza Braga; Pereira, Rodrigo Junqueira; Menéndez-Buxadera, Alberto; El Faro, Lenira

    2016-02-01

    The present study had the following objectives: to compare random regression models (RRM) considering the time-dependent (days in milk, DIM) and/or temperature × humidity-dependent (THI) covariate for genetic evaluation; to identify the effect of genotype by environment interaction (G×E) due to heat stress on milk yield; and to quantify the loss of milk yield due to heat stress across lactation of cows under tropical conditions. A total of 937,771 test-day records from 3603 first lactations of Brazilian Holstein cows obtained between 2007 and 2013 were analyzed. An important reduction in milk yield due to heat stress was observed for THI values above 66 (-0.23 kg/day/THI). Three phases of milk yield loss were identified during lactation, the most damaging one at the end of lactation (-0.27 kg/day/THI). Using the most complex RRM, the additive genetic variance could be altered simultaneously as a function of both DIM and THI values. This model could be recommended for the genetic evaluation taking into account the effect of G×E. The response to selection in the comfort zone (THI ≤ 66) is expected to be higher than that obtained in the heat stress zone (THI > 66) of the animals. The genetic correlations between milk yield in the comfort and heat stress zones were less than unity at opposite extremes of the environmental gradient. Thus, the best animals for milk yield in the comfort zone are not necessarily the best in the zone of heat stress and, therefore, G×E due to heat stress should not be neglected in the genetic evaluation.

  7. Occupational Heat Stress and Kidney Health: From Farms to Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerbass, Fabiana B; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Clark, William F; Sontrop, Jessica M; McIntyre, Christopher W; Moist, Louise

    2017-11-01

    Millions of workers around the world are exposed to high temperatures, intense physical activity, and lax labor practices that do not allow for sufficient rehydration breaks. The extent and consequences of heat exposure in different occupational settings, countries, and cultural contexts is not well studied. We conducted an in-depth review to examine the known effects of occupational heat stress on the kidney. We also examined methods of heat-stress assessment, strategies for prevention and mitigation, and the economic consequences of occupational heat stress. Our descriptive review summarizes emerging evidence that extreme occupational heat stress combined with chronic dehydration may contribute to the development of CKD and ultimately kidney failure. Rising global temperatures, coupled with decreasing access to clean drinking water, may exacerbate the effects of heat exposure in both outdoor and indoor workers who are exposed to chronic heat stress and recurrent dehydration. These changes create an urgent need for health researchers and industry to identify work practices that contribute to heat-stress nephropathy, and to test targeted, robust prevention and mitigation strategies. Preventing occupational heat stress presents a great challenge for a concerted multidisciplinary effort from employers, health authorities, engineers, researchers, and governments.

  8. Effect of heat stress on cardiac output and systemic vascular conductance during simulated hemorrhage to presyncope in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganio, Matthew S; Overgaard, Morten; Seifert, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    During moderate actual or simulated hemorrhage, as cardiac output decreases, reductions in systemic vascular conductance (SVC) maintain mean arterial pressure (MAP). Heat stress, however, compromises the control of MAP during simulated hemorrhage, and it remains unknown whether this response is due...... to a persistently high SVC and/or a low cardiac output. This study tested the hypothesis that an inadequate decrease in SVC is the primary contributing mechanism by which heat stress compromises blood pressure control during simulated hemorrhage. Simulated hemorrhage was imposed via lower body negative pressure...... normothermic is no longer adequate during a heat-stressed-simulated hemorrhage. The absence of a decrease in SVC at a time of profound reductions in MAP suggests that inadequate control of vascular conductance is a primary mechanism compromising blood pressure control during these conditions....

  9. Re-evaluating occupational heat stress in a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, June T; Sheffield, Perry E

    2014-10-01

    The potential consequences of occupational heat stress in a changing climate on workers, workplaces, and global economies are substantial. Occupational heat stress risk is projected to become particularly high in middle- and low-income tropical and subtropical regions, where optimal controls may not be readily available. This commentary presents occupational heat stress in the context of climate change, reviews its impacts, and reflects on implications for heat stress assessment and control. Future efforts should address limitations of existing heat stress assessment methods and generate economical, practical, and universal approaches that can incorporate data of varying levels of detail, depending on resources. Validation of these methods should be performed in a wider variety of environments, and data should be collected and analyzed centrally for both local and large-scale hazard assessments and to guide heat stress adaptation planning. Heat stress standards should take into account variability in worker acclimatization, other vulnerabilities, and workplace resources. The effectiveness of controls that are feasible and acceptable should be evaluated. Exposure scientists are needed, in collaboration with experts in other areas, to effectively prevent and control occupational heat stress in a changing climate. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  10. Effects of Coenzyme Q10 and Vitamin C on Growth Performance and Blood Components in Broiler Chickens under Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raeisi-Zeydabad S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out to study the effects of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 and vitamin C (VC on growth performance and blood biochemistry in broiler chickens under heat stress conditions. One of three levels of CoQ10 (0, 20, and 40 mg/kg of diet and one of two levels of VC (0 and 250 mg/kg of diet were supplemented to diets of chicks (from 1-42 d of age in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement. Each dietary treatment had four replicate pens (10 chicks/pen. In order to create chronic heat stress, the house temperature was set at an ambient temperature of 35±2°C for 8 hrs daily (09:00 to 17:00 between 25-42 d of age. Feed intake, body weight gain (BWG, and feed to gain ratio (F:G were recorded at d 10, 25 and 42. At the end of experiment, two chicks/pen were randomly selected to assess blood components. CoQ10 supplementation improved BWG and F:G during 11-25 days, 26-42 days, and the whole period of the experiment (P < 0.05, while VC supplementation improved BWG and F:G only during 11-25 d of age. Blood glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations were reduced (P < 0.05 by addition of CoQ10 to the diet. Both Supplementation of CoQ10 and VC together lowered heterophil (H count but increased lymphocyte (L count, thereby reducing H/L ratio (P < 0.05. Serum concentrations of corticosterone and T4 were positively affected by dietary supplementation of CoQ10 (P < 0.05, but no differences were obtained with addition of VC to the diet. In conclusion, our observations demonstrated that dietary supplementation of 40 mg/kg CoQ10 or 250 mg/kg VC improves the growth performance of broiler chickens under the heat stress.

  11. The effect of cooling management on blood flow to the dominant follicle and estrous cycle length at heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Hen; Ofer, Lior; Kaim, Moshe; Jacobi, Shamay; Shinder, Dima; Gershon, Eran

    2016-07-15

    The use of ultrasound imaging for the examination of reproductive organs has contributed substantially to the fertility management of dairy cows around the world. This method has many advantages such as noninvasiveness and immediate availability of information. Adding Doppler index to the ultrasound imaging examination, improved the estimation of blood volume and flow rate to the ovaries in general and to the dominant follicle in particular. The aim of this study was to examine changes in the blood flow to the dominant follicle and compare them to the follicular development throughout the cycle. We further set out to examine the effects of different types of cooling management during the summer on the changes in blood flow to the dominant follicle. For this purpose, 24 Israeli-Holstein dairy cows, under heat stress, were randomly assigned one of two groups: one was exposed to five cooling sessions per day (5CS) and the other to eight cooling sessions per day (8CS). Blood flow to the dominant follicle was measured daily using Doppler index throughout the estrous cycle. No differences in the preovulatory dominant follicle diameter were detected between the two cooling management regimens during the cycle. However, the length of the first follicular wave was significantly longer, whereas the second follicular wave was nonsignificantly shorter in the 5CS group as compared to the 8CS group. In addition, no difference in blood flow was found during the first 18 days of the cycle between the two groups. However, from Day 20 until ovulation a higher rate of blood flow was measured in the ovaries of cows cooled 8 times per day as compared to the 5CS group. No differences in progesterone levels were noted. Finally, the estrous cycle length was shorter in the 8CS group as compared to the 5CS group. Our data suggest that blood flow to the dominant follicle and estrous cycle length is affected by heat stress. Using the appropriate cooling management during heat stress can

  12. Drought and heat stress effects on soybean fatty acid composition and oil stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that oil concentration and fatty acid profile (composition) change with genotype, environment (mainly heat and drought), and geographical location. The changes in fatty acid composition under these conditions affect fatty acid stability, creating a challenge to oil proces...

  13. Comparison of Heat and Cold Stress Effects on Cardiovascular Mortality and Morbidity in Central European Urban and Rural Populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyncl, J.; Urban, Aleš; Kyselý, Jan; Davídkovová, Hana; Kříž, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 44 (2015), s. 86 ISSN 0300-5771. [IEA World Congress of Epidemiology (WCE) /20./. 17.08.2014-21.08.2014, Anchorage] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1985 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : heat stress * cold stress * Central Europe * cardiovascular mortality and morbidity Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology https://wce.confex.com/wce/2014/webprogram/Paper1480.html

  14. Detrimental effect of selection for milk yield on genetic tolerance to heat stress in purebred Zebu cattle: Genetic parameters and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, M L; Pereira, R J; Bignardi, A B; Filho, A E Vercesi; Menéndez-Buxadera, A; El Faro, L

    2015-12-01

    In an attempt to determine the possible detrimental effects of continuous selection for milk yield on the genetic tolerance of Zebu cattle to heat stress, genetic parameters and trends of the response to heat stress for 86,950 test-day (TD) milk yield records from 14,670 first lactations of purebred dairy Gir cows were estimated. A random regression model with regression on days in milk (DIM) and temperature-humidity index (THI) values was applied to the data. The most detrimental effect of THI on milk yield was observed in the stage of lactation with higher milk production, DIM 61 to 120 (-0.099kg/d per THI). Although modest variations were observed for the THI scale, a reduction in additive genetic variance as well as in permanent environmental and residual variance was observed with increasing THI values. The heritability estimates showed a slight increase with increasing THI values for any DIM. The correlations between additive genetic effects across the THI scale showed that, for most of the THI values, genotype by environment interactions due to heat stress were less important for the ranking of bulls. However, for extreme THI values, this type of genotype by environment interaction may lead to an important error in selection. As a result of the selection for milk yield practiced in the dairy Gir population for 3 decades, the genetic trend of cumulative milk yield was significantly positive for production in both high (51.81kg/yr) and low THI values (78.48kg/yr). However, the difference between the breeding values of animals at high and low THI may be considered alarming (355kg in 2011). The genetic trends observed for the regression coefficients related to general production level (intercept of the reaction norm) and specific ability to respond to heat stress (slope of the reaction norm) indicate that the dairy Gir population is heading toward a higher production level at the expense of lower tolerance to heat stress. These trends reflect the genetic

  15. The Alleviating Effect of Elevated CO2 on Heat Stress Susceptibility of Two Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Cultivars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanmugam, Sindhuja; Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2013-01-01

    This study analysed the alleviating effect of elevated CO2 on stress-induced decreases in photosynthesis and changes in carbohydrate metabolism in two wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.) of different origin. The plants were grown in ambient (400 μl l−1) and elevated (800 μl l−1) CO2 with a day...... in leaves were analysed before and during the stress treatments as well as after 1 day of recovery. Heat stress reduced PN and Fv/Fm in both wheat cultivars, but plants grown in elevated CO2 maintained higher PN and Fv/Fm in comparison with plants grown in ambient CO2. Heat stress reduced leaf chlorophyll...... to cultivar origin, the phenological stage of the plants and can be alleviated by elevated CO2. This confirms the complex interrelation between environmental factors and genotypic traits that influence crop performance under various climatic stresses....

  16. Effect of heat stress at anthesis on yield formation in winter wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváčová, Marcela; Klem, Karel; Smutná, P.; Škarpa, P.; Hlavinka, Petr; Novotná, Kateřina; Rapantová, Barbora; Trnka, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 3 (2017), s. 139-144 ISSN 1214-1178 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : high temperature stress * grain s number per spike * spike productivity * phytotron * Triticum aestivum L. Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 1.225, year: 2016

  17. Oxidative stress impairs the heat stress response and delays unfolded protein recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Adachi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental changes, air pollution and ozone depletion are increasing oxidative stress, and global warming threatens health by heat stress. We now face a high risk of simultaneous exposure to heat and oxidative stress. However, there have been few studies investigating their combined adverse effects on cell viability.Pretreatment of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 specifically and highly sensitized cells to heat stress, and enhanced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. H(2O(2 exposure impaired the HSP40/HSP70 induction as heat shock response (HSR and the unfolded protein recovery, and enhanced eIF2alpha phosphorylation and/or XBP1 splicing, land marks of ER stress. These H(2O(2-mediated effects mimicked enhanced heat sensitivity in HSF1 knockdown or knockout cells. Importantly, thermal preconditioning blocked H(2O(2-mediated inhibitory effects on refolding activity and rescued HSF1 +/+ MEFs, but neither blocked the effects nor rescued HSF1 -/- MEFs. These data strongly suggest that inhibition of HSR and refolding activity is crucial for H(2O(2-mediated enhanced heat sensitivity.H(2O(2 blocks HSR and refolding activity under heat stress, thereby leading to insufficient quality control and enhancing ER stress. These uncontrolled stress responses may enhance cell death. Our data thus highlight oxidative stress as a crucial factor affecting heat tolerance.

  18. Sensing the Heat Stress by Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cates Jordan; Graham Garrett C; Omattage Natalie; Pavesich Elizabeth; Setliff Ian; Shaw Jack; Smith Caitlin; Lipan Ovidiu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The heat-shock response network controls the adaptation and survival of the cell against environmental stress. This network is highly conserved and is connected with many other signaling pathways. A key element of the heat-shock network is the heat-shock transcription factor-1 (HSF), which is transiently activated by elevated temperatures. HSF translocates to the nucleus upon elevated temperatures, forming homotrimeric complexes. The HSF homotrimers bind to the heat shock ...

  19. Heat stress: Impact on livestock well-being and productivity and mitigation strategies to alleviate the negative effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat stress (HS) is a multi-factorial problem that negatively impacts livestock health and productivity and is closely linked with animal welfare. While HS may not be harmful when animals are able to adapt, the physiological changes that occur to ensure survival may impede the efficient conversion o...

  20. Heat- and cold-stress effects on cardiovascular mortality and morbidity among urban and rural populations in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, A.; Davídkovová, Hana; Kyselý, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2014), s. 1057-1068 ISSN 0020-7128 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 ; RVO:68378289 Keywords : heat and cold stress * cardiovascular disease * mortality * morbidity * urban and rural differences * Central Europe Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.246, year: 2014

  1. Investigating effect and efficiency of short term heat stress applied in food stuff decontamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ann Zahle

    broiler skin as food surface model. We employ advanced fluorescence based visualization methods including 2-photon excitation microscopy and second harmonic imaging microscopy for in-depth characterization of our surface model and of the damages and stress recovery strategies of our model bacteria...... of surviving organisms. In addition the nature of the changes induced in the foodstuff model is investigated in order to reveal possible influence on microbial growth subsequent to treatment. Methods. Because of their relevance in food industry, we employ Listeria and Salmonella as model bacteria and chicken...

  2. Effects of heat stress and probiotic supplementation on protein functionality and oxidative stability of ground chicken leg meat during display storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of heat stress and probiotic supplementation on protein functionality and oxidative stability of ground chicken leg meat during display storage. Two hundred and forty 1-day-old male chicks (5 bird per pen) were randomly subjected to four treatments...

  3. Heat Stress Control and Heat Casualty Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sawka, M. N; Wenger, C. B; Montain, S. J; Kolka, M. A; Bettencourt, B; Flinn, S; Gardner, J; Matthew, W. T; Lovell, M; Scott, C

    2003-01-01

    .... Understand the effect of fluid and electrolyte imbalances (para 4-7); h. Understand the methodology, needed equipment, use of, and correction procedures for the wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index (appendix P...

  4. Determination of the effects of organic antioxidants and fat sources on performance, carcass and bone characteristics of broilers under heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyyed javad Hosseini-vashan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Heat stress is one of the major environmental stressors that negatively influence feed intake, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio, nutrient digestion, absorption, and retention in the poultry production. In the two last decades, several researches were done to find approaches for decreasing the undesirable effects of high ambient temperatures. Supplementation of powder, extract and essence of some medicinal plants were proposed that could be used in poultry production to improve the performance, immune system and antioxidant status in heat stress condition. Turmeric powder is known as a natural antioxidant, because it has several antioxidant component specially curcumin that prevent the oxidative reaction and the free radicals production in the live body. On the other hand, some of by-products in food industry may also be used in heat stressed birds. Tomato pomace is a reachable source of vit E, C and A and several carotenoids specially lycopene that has antimutagenic, anticancer and antioxidant properties. Therefore the objective of this research was to investigate the effects of organic antioxidants including turmeric powder and tomato pomace and fat sources including soybean oil, canola oil and tallow on performance, carcass and bone characteristics of broilers under heat stress. Materials and Methods An experiment with factorial arrangement 3× 2× 2 (3 oils involved: canola, soybean, tallow, 2 turmeric powder (TRP levels involved 0.4, 0.8% and 2 tomato pomace (TP levels 3, 5 of TP% in a completely randomized design in heat stressed birds was done. Five hundred four one-d-old male Ross broilers were randomly allocated to 36 experimental units with 12 dietary treatments (3 replicates with 12 birds in each. The feed and water were supplied ad libitum. All diets were balanced to meet the nutrient requirement proposed by the Ross committee. A daily heat stressed (HS schedule (33oC for 5 h was applied from 29 to 42d of

  5. The specific heat loss combined with the thermoelastic effect for an experimental analysis of the mean stress influence on axial fatigue of stainless steel plain specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Meneghetti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The energy dissipated to the surroundings as heat in a unit volume of material per cycle, Q, was recently proposed by the authors as fatigue damage index and it was successfully applied to correlate fatigue data obtained by carrying out fully reversed stress- and strain-controlled fatigue tests on AISI 304L stainless steel plain and notched specimens. The use of the Q parameter to analyse the experimental results led to the definition of a scatter band having constant slope from the low- to the high-cycle fatigue regime. In this paper the energy approach is extended to analyse the influence of mean stress on the axial fatigue behaviour of unnotched cold drawn AISI 304L stainless steel bars. In view of this, stress controlled fatigue tests on plain specimens at different load ratios R (R=-1; R=0.1; R=0.5 were carried out. A new energy parameter is defined to account for the mean stress effect, which combines the specific heat loss Q and the relative temperature variation due to the thermoelastic effect corresponding to the achievement of the maximum stress level of the stress cycle. The new two-parameter approach was able to rationalise the mean stress effect observed experimentally. It is worth noting that the results found in the present contribution are meant to be specific for the material and testing condition investigated here.

  6. Mixed convection flow of couple stress nanofluid over oscillatory stretching sheet with heat absorption/generation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ullah Khan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to highlight the unsteady mixed convective couple stress nanoliquid flow passed through stretching surface. The flow is generated due to periodic oscillations of sheet. An appropriate set of dimensionless variables are used to reduce the independent variables in governing equations arising from mathematical modeling. An analytical solution has been computed by employing the technique of homotopy method. The outcomes of various sundry parameters like couple stress parameter, the ratio of angular velocity to stretching rate, thermophoresis parameter, Hartmann number, Prandtl number, heat source/sink parameter, Schmidt number described graphically and in tabular form. It is observed that the velocity profile increases by increasing mixed convection parameter and concentration buoyancy parameter. The temperature enhances for larger values of Hartmann number and Brownian. The concentration profile increases by increasing thermophoresis parameter. Results show that wall shear stress increases by increasing couple stress parameter and ratio of oscillating frequency to stretching rate. Keywords: Oscillatory surface, Couple stress fluid, Nanoparticles, Heat absorption/generation

  7. EFFECT OF VITAMIN ''C'' SUPPLEMENTATION ON SOME PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF OSTRICH EXPOSED TO EARLY HEAT STRESS OF TEMPERATURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELSAYED, M.A.; FARGHALY, H.A.M.; ABU-TALEB, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Twenty four ostrich (one week old), from the breeding flock in Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Egypt (April 2008), were used in this study. The effect of vitamin Cs upplementation on the physiological responses of ostrich exposed to high temperature at early age was investigated. All chicks were exposed to 24 hours light per day. The birds were fed starter ration ad libitum (22 % protein and 2680 K cal ME/kg). Birds were divided to equal three groups. The first group was fed the previous starter ration and exposed to normal ambient temperature (22 ± 1 0 C) (TN group) while the second group was fed the same starter diet and exposed to high environmental temperature (38 ± 1 0 C) (HS group). The third group was fed the previous starter diet by adding 250 mg of L-ascorbic acid/kg diet and exposed to high environmental temperature (38 ± 1 0 C) (VC group). Daily feed consumption and mortality percentage were determined. Blood hematological parameters such as total red blood cell counts (RBC), white blood cells counts (WBC), hemoglobin concentration (Hb), paced cell volume (PCV), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were determined. Also, some physiological blood parameters such as serum total protein (TP), albumin (Alb), globulin (Glob), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (Ph), uric acid (UA), creatinine (Cr) and triiodothyronine hormone (T 3 ) were measured. Also, A/G ratio was calculated. It was found that feed consumption was significantly decreased when bird was exposed to high ambient temperature while it was significantly elevated in VC group. Mortality percentage was significantly increased when birds were exposed to high environmental temperature while it was reduced with vitamin Cs upplemented. Both RBC and WBC counts and both of MCV, MCH and MCHC were significantly decreased due to heat stress condition while there were non-significant differences between TN and VC groups. Hb level was

  8. Effects of heat, cold, acid and bile salt adaptations on the stress tolerance and protein expression of kefir-isolated probiotic Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens M1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Ju; Tang, Hsin-Yu; Chiang, Ming-Lun

    2017-09-01

    Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens M1 is a probiotic strain isolated from Taiwanese kefir grains. The present study evaluated the effects of heat, cold, acid and bile salt adaptations on the stress tolerance of L. kefiranofaciens M1. The regulation of protein expression of L. kefiranofaciens M1 under these adaptation conditions was also investigated. The results showed that adaptation of L. kefiranofaciens M1 to heat, cold, acid and bile salts induced homologous tolerance and cross-protection against heterologous challenge. The extent of induced tolerance varied depending on the type and condition of stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that 27 proteins exhibited differences in expression between non-adapted and stress-adapted L. kefiranofaciens M1 cells. Among these proteins, three proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism (triosephosphate isomerase, enolase and NAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), two proteins involved in pH homeostasis (ATP synthase subunits AtpA and AtpB), two stress response proteins (chaperones DnaK and GroEL) and one translation-related protein (30S ribosomal protein S2) were up-regulated by three of the four adaptation treatments examined. The increased synthesis of these stress proteins might play a critical protective role in the cellular defense against heat, cold, acid and bile salt stresses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Heat- and cold-stress effects on cardiovascular mortality and morbidity among urban and rural populations in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Aleš; Davídkovová, Hana; Kyselý, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2014), s. 1057-1068 ISSN 0020-7128 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1985 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : heat and cold stress * cardiovascular disease * mortality * morbidity * urban and rural differences * Central Europe Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.246, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00484-013-0693-4#page-1

  10. Effects of dietary betaine supplementation subjected to heat stress on milk performances and physiology indices in dairy cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Ying, S J; An, W J; Lian, H; Zhou, G B; Han, Z Y

    2014-09-12

    This study aimed to determine whether feeding betaine to cows elevates their production performance during summer heat stress. Thirty-two lactating Holstein cows were randomly divided into 4 groups: the control group, which received a total mixed ration (TMR), and 3 experimental groups that received TMR blended with 10 g/day (group I), 15 g/day (group II), and 20 g/day (group III) betaine for 8 weeks. Milk and blood were sampled throughout the experimental period. The average maximum and minimum air temperatures were 28.3 and 24.1°C, respectively. The average temperature-humidity index was 78.6 units. The results showed that feeding betaine to cows increased feed intake, milk yield, milk lactose, milk protein, plasma cortisol, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and malondialdehyde levels (Pcows increases their milk performance and improves their antioxidant capacity; these processes help relieve the cow from heat stress. In conclusion, supplementing dairy cows with 15 g/day betaine generated the most positive influence on performance and productivity, and hence caused the greatest reduction in heat stress.

  11. Heat Stress in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Extreme Heat Older Adults (Aged 65+) Infants and Children Chronic Medical Conditions Low Income Athletes Outdoor Workers Pets Hot Weather Tips Warning Signs and Symptoms FAQs Social Media How to Stay Cool Missouri Cooling Centers Extreme ...

  12. effect of gamma radiation and heat stress on some biological aspects of Spodoptera Littoralis (Boisd)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazaa, M.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    the present study dealt with the effects of exposure of full - grown pupa of the cotton leaf worm, spodoptera littoralis (Boise) to different high temperatures and/or substerilizing doss of gamma radiation on certain biological and histological aspects of the parental (P 1 ) and first filial (F 1 ) generations. it included the effect on adult longevity and malformation, mating, insemination, fecundity and egg hatchability; beside larval survival till adult emergence and sex ratio of produced adults at different mating crosses between treated and untreated or treated other sex.special attention was given to inherited sterility as well as to the mating competitiveness ability of treated males. the histological changes in testes and ovaries of produced adults were included

  13. Modeling heat stress under different environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabaño, M J; Logar, B; Bormann, J; Minet, J; Vanrobays, M-L; Díaz, C; Tychon, B; Gengler, N; Hammami, H

    2016-05-01

    Renewed interest in heat stress effects on livestock productivity derives from climate change, which is expected to increase temperatures and the frequency of extreme weather events. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of temperature and humidity on milk production in highly selected dairy cattle populations across 3 European regions differing in climate and production systems to detect differences and similarities that can be used to optimize heat stress (HS) effect modeling. Milk, fat, and protein test day data from official milk recording for 1999 to 2010 in 4 Holstein populations located in the Walloon Region of Belgium (BEL), Luxembourg (LUX), Slovenia (SLO), and southern Spain (SPA) were merged with temperature and humidity data provided by the state meteorological agencies. After merging, the number of test day records/cows per trait ranged from 686,726/49,655 in SLO to 1,982,047/136,746 in BEL. Values for the daily average and maximum temperature-humidity index (THIavg and THImax) ranges for THIavg/THImax were largest in SLO (22-74/28-84) and shortest in SPA (39-76/46-83). Change point techniques were used to determine comfort thresholds, which differed across traits and climatic regions. Milk yield showed an inverted U-shaped pattern of response across the THI scale with a HS threshold around 73 THImax units. For fat and protein, thresholds were lower than for milk yield and were shifted around 6 THI units toward larger values in SPA compared with the other countries. Fat showed lower HS thresholds than protein traits in all countries. The traditional broken line model was compared with quadratic and cubic fits of the pattern of response in production to increasing heat loads. A cubic polynomial model allowing for individual variation in patterns of response and THIavg as heat load measure showed the best statistical features. Higher/lower producing animals showed less/more persistent production (quantity and quality) across the THI scale. The

  14. Heat stress management in hot mines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schutte, P

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available consequences of excessive levels of occupational heat stress were recognized by the South African gold mining industry when the first death from heat stroke occurred in 1924 (1). Steps to combat the heat stress hazard were taken almost immediately... currently used in the South African mining industry. In South African mines, work environments having a wet-bulb temperature in excess of 27.4 °C are considered to be ‘hot’ and necessitate the introduction of practices to safeguard miners...

  15. Transient thermal stress distribution in a circular pipe heated externally with a periodically moving heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özışık, Gülşah; Genç, M. Serdar; Yapıcı, Hüseyin

    2012-01-01

    This study presents the effects of periodically moving heat source on a circular steel pipe heated partly from its outer surface under stagnant ambient conditions. While the pipe is heated with this heat source applied on a certain section having a thickness of heat flux, the water flows through it to transfer heat. It is assumed that the flow is a fully-developed laminar flow. The heat source moves along from one end of the outer to the other end with a constant speed and then returns to the first end with the same speed. It is assumed that the heat transfer rate has a constant value, and that the thermo-physical properties of the steel do not change with temperature (elastic analysis). The numerical calculations have been performed individually for a wide range of thermal conductivity of steel and for different thicknesses of heat flux. The moving heat source produces the non-uniform temperature gradient and the non-uniform effective thermal stress, and when it arrives at the ends of the pipe, the temperature and effective thermal stress ratio profiles rise more excessively. The tangential component is more dominant in the effective thermal stress than the radial component. Highlights: ► Moving heat source produces non-uniform temperature gradients and thermal stresses. ► When moving heat source arrives at ends of pipe, temperature gradients rise excessively. ► With increasing of heat flux thickness and thermal conductivity, the temperature gradients reduce. ► Temperature gradients in thermal boundary layers slightly increase. ► Tangential component is more dominant in thermal stress than radial component.

  16. Effect of heat stress on body temperature in healthy early postpartum dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burfeind, O; Suthar, V S; Heuwieser, W

    2012-12-01

    Measurement of body temperature is the most common method for an early diagnosis of sick cows in fresh cow protocols currently used on dairy farms. Thresholds for fever range from 39.4 °C to 39.7 °C. Several studies attempted to describe normal temperature ranges for healthy dairy cows in the early puerperium. However, the definition of a healthy cow is variable within these studies. It is challenging to determine normal temperature ranges for healthy cows because body temperature is usually included in the definition. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to identify factors that influence body temperature in healthy dairy cows early postpartum and to determine normal temperature ranges for healthy cows that calved in a moderate (temperature humidity index: 59.8 ± 3.8) and a hot period (temperature humidity index: 74.1 ± 4.4), respectively, excluding body temperature from the definition of the health status. Furthermore, the prevalence of fever was calculated for both periods separately. A subset of 17 (moderate period) and 15 cows (hot period) were used for analysis. To ensure their uterine health only cows with a serum haptoglobin concentration ≤ 1.1 g/L were included in the analysis. Therefore, body temperature could be excluded from the definition. A vaginal temperature logger that measured vaginal temperature every 10 min was inserted from Day 2 to 10 after parturition. Additionally rectal temperature was measured twice daily. Day in milk (2 to 10), period (moderate and hot), and time of day had an effect on rectal and vaginal temperature. The prevalence of fever (≥ 39.5 °C) was 7.4% and 28.1% for rectal temperature in the moderate and hot period, respectively. For vaginal temperature (07.00 to 11.00 h) it was 10% and 33%, respectively, considering the same threshold and period. This study demonstrates that body temperature in the early puerperium is influenced by several factors (day in milk, climate, time of day). Therefore, these factors

  17. Feedlot cattle susceptibility to heat stress: an animal specific model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extreme effects of heat stress in a feedlot situation can cause losses exceeding 5% of all the cattle on feed in a single feedlot. These losses can be very devastating to a localized area of feedlot producers. Animal stress is a result of the combination of three different components: environm...

  18. Effect of heat stress on the expression profile of Hsp90 among Sahiwal (Bos indicus) and Frieswal (Bos indicus × Bos taurus) breed of cattle: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Rajib; Sajjanar, Basavaraj; Singh, Umesh; Kumar, Sushil; Singh, Rani; Sengar, G; Sharma, Arjava

    2014-02-25

    We evaluated the effect of thermal challenge on the expression profile of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) among Sahiwal (Bos indicus) and Frieswal (Bos indicus × Bos taurus) breeds of cattle. The present investigation was focused on the comparative studies on Hsp90 expression among Frieswal and Sahiwal under in vitro and environmental heat stress. Measured immediately after the in vitro heat shock to the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), the relative expression of Hsp90 mRNA was significantly (Pcows consistently recorded higher rectal temperatures than the Sahiwal breed. Further during this peak summer stress, Sahiwal showed significantly higher levels of mRNA transcripts as well as protein concentration compared to the Frieswal breed. Our findings also interestingly showed that, the cell viability of PBMC are significantly higher among the Sahiwal than Frieswal. Taken together, the experiments of both induced in vitro and environmental stress conditions indicate that, Sahiwal may express higher levels of Hsp90 then Frieswal to regulate their body temperature and increase cell survivality under heat stressed conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Drivers of self-reported heat stress in the Australian labour force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Kerstin K; Moss, Simon A; Garnett, Stephen T

    2017-01-01

    Heat stress causes reductions in well-being and health. As average annual temperatures increase, heat stress is expected to affect more people. While most research on heat stress has explored how exposure to heat affects functioning of the human organism, stress from heat can be manifest long before clinical symptoms are evident, with profound effects on behavior. Here we add to the little research conducted on these subclinical effects of environmental heat using results from an Australian-wide cross-sectional study of nearly 2000 respondents on their self-reported level of heat stress. Slightly less than half (47%) of the respondents perceived themselves as at least sometimes, often or very often stressed by heat during the previous 12 months. Health status and smoking behavior had the expected impact on self-reported perceived heat stress. There were also regional differences with people living in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales most likely to have reported to have felt heat stressed. People generally worried about climate change, who had been influenced by recent heat waves and who thought there was a relationship between climate change and health were also more likely to have been heat stressed. Surprisingly average maximum temperatures did not significantly explain heat stress but stress was greater among people who perceived the day of the survey as hotter than usual. Currently heat stress indices are largely based on monitoring the environment and physical limitations to people coping with heat. Our results suggest that psychological perceptions of heat need to be considered when predicting how people will be affected by heat under climate change and when developing heat relief and climate change adaptation plans, at work, at home or in public spaces. We further conclude that the perception of temperature and heat stress complements measures that assess heat exposure and heat strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prokaryotic expression of chicken interferon-γ fusion protein and its effect on expression of poultry heat shock protein 70 under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Yinglin; Qin, Feiyue; Guan, Xueting; Xu, Wei; Xu, Liangmei

    2017-06-01

    Interferons have attracted considerable attention due to their vital roles in the host immune response and low induction of antibiotic resistance. In this study, total RNA was extracted from spleen cells of chicken embryos inoculated with Newcastle disease vaccine, and the full-length chicken interferon-γ (ChIFN-γ) gene was amplified by RT-PCR. The full complementary DNA sequence of the ChIFN-γ gene was 495 bp long and was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pProEX™HT b . The plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli DH5α and the expression of ChIFN-γ was induced by isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside. Sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot results showed the expressed fusion protein had a molecular weight of approximately 18 kDa and was recognized by an anti-His mAb. Moreover, ChIFN-γ was found to demonstrate anti-viral activity in vitro. To test the in vivo function of ChIFN-γ in broilers under heat stress, a total of 100 broilers were randomly assigned to either a control group or a treated group, in which they were hypodermically injected with recombinant ChIFN-γ. Results demonstrated ChIFN-γ affects the messenger RNA expression levels of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in the heart and lung tissues, and decreases the concentration of HSP70 in serum. Therefore, we conclude recombinant ChIFN-γ can reduce heat stress to some extent in vivo. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  1. Neutron diffraction measurements for the determination of heat treatment effectiveness in generating compressive residual stress in an automotive crown gear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertini, G.; Fiori, F.; Girardin, E.; Giuliani, A.; Pyzalla, A.; Quadrini, E.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Thermal austenitizing and tempering treatments are being developed in automotive industry to prevent crack initiation and avoid crack propagation, especially in components where stress intensity factors influence the stress field and then the fatigue life of the component itself. This is the case of crown gears, where the teeth root undergoes frequently to cracking when tensile residual stresses are present at the surface, as typical loads are impulsive and very high. The sign reversal of these stresses is the aim of austenitizing and tempering treatments. In this work residual stress measurements carried out at HMI-BENSC are presented, in a UNI55Cr3 steel crown gear submitted to such kind of treatments, performed with a new multi-frequency induction technique whose effectiveness is checked. (author)

  2. Feeding time can alleviate negative effects of heat stress on performance, meat quality and health status of turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farghly, M F A; Alagawany, M; Abd El-Hack, M E

    2018-04-01

    1. A total of 180 one-day-old turkeys were randomly assigned to 6 equal groups to investigate the effect of feeding time on growth performance, carcass characteristics, meat quality, leg problems and physiological responses of growing turkeys under the high temperature conditions of summer. 2. Birds of the first group were ad libitum fed and were considered as the controls (C). The second group (T1) was given 80% of diet in the morning and 20% of diet in the afternoon, the third group (T2) was given 60% of diet in the morning and 40% of diet in the afternoon, the fourth group (T3) was given 40% of diet in the morning and 60% of diet in the afternoon, the fifth group (T4) was given 20% of diet in the morning and 80% of diet in the afternoon and the sixth group (T5) was given 100% of diet in the afternoon. 3. Body weight, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio were improved with T2, T3, T4 and T5 in comparison to control or T1 under heat stress conditions. No significant impacts on carcass traits and meat quality due to changing the time of feeding were seen, except for tenderness and juiciness. 4. Feeding in the afternoon (100%) decreased body temperature and tonic immobility test score, which were positively related with the health condition of the birds. 5. The incidence of leg problems, plumage condition and breast blisters were not significantly different among the experimental groups. 6. It is concluded that feeding turkeys mainly or totally in the afternoon (T4 and T5, birds were fed with 80% or 100% of the diet in the afternoon) can be used as a strategy and a managerial tool for improving growth rate, feed utilisation, carcass and meat quality, as well as health status of growing turkeys reared under hot climate conditions.

  3. Effect of Heat Stress on the Expression of GABA Receptor mRNA in the HPG Axis of Wenchang Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJ Xie

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We investigated the effect of heat stress (HS on the expression of the GABA receptor in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis of Wenchang chickens. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR was used to quantify the GABA receptor mRNA levels along the HPG axis of chickens under HS (40±0.5 °C for 1-6 weeks. Our results showed that the expression of GABAA and GABAB receptor at the mRNAs levels in the tissues of HPG axis exhibited fluctuation and variability. After HS, the mRNA level of GABAA receptor was significantly reduced in the hypothalamus of 1-week-old and in the pituitary of 3-week-old chickens, but significantly increased in the pituitary of 1-, 4-, and 5-week-old chickens. The GABAB receptor mRNA level significantly declined in the hypothalamus of 1-week-old and in the pituitary of 3-week-old chickens, but was significantly upregulated in the pituitary and testis of 1- and 2-week-old chickens. At other time points, the expressions of GABAA receptor and GABAB receptor showed no significant differences compared with control group. These results indicated that the levels of GABAA receptor and GABAB receptor mRNAs varied in different tissues of the HPG axis in chickens of different ages, displaying temporal and spatial variations. GABA receptor behaved as a positively-regulated gene by HS, i.e., its mRNA was increased by HS; similarly, it was a negatively-regulated gene by HS, when its expression was reduced by HS.

  4. Effects of different feeding time and frequency on metabolic conditions and milk production in heat-stressed dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamari, L.; Petrera, F.; Stefanini, L.; Abeni, F.

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects of three different feeding management (FM) schedules on physiological markers of heat stress (HS), metabolic conditions, milk yield and quality during the hot season in dairy cows. The study involved 27 mid-lactating cows, subdivided in three homogeneous groups differing in feeding time and frequency: total mixed ration (TMR) delivered once daily in the morning (M); twice daily, half in the morning and half in the evening (ME); once daily in the evening (E). During the trial, blood samples were collected in the morning (a.m.) and in the evening (p.m.), breathing rate (BR), rectal temperature (RT), and milk yield were recorded and individual milk samples were collected. Microclimate data indicated that cows were subjected to mild-moderate HS. During the hotter days, cows receiving M treatment showed higher values of RT (38.97 °C vs 38.68 °C and 38.62 °C, in ME and E) and BR (71.44 vs 66.52 and 65.26 breaths min-1, in ME and E), a.m. plasma glucose was lower in M (3.69 vs 3.83 and 3.83 mmol L-1, in ME and E) and a.m. plasma urea was lower in E (4.82 vs 5.48 and 5.35 mmol L-1, in M and ME). Milk yield was unaffected by FM, as well as milk composition and cheese-making properties. Only milk protein content and yield were higher in M (3.42 vs 3.36 and 3.27 g 100 mL-1; and 1.11 vs 1.08 and 1.02 kg day-1, for ME and E). Our results on cow physiology indicate that M seems a less suitable FM to match cow welfare during the summer season.

  5. The effect of air permeability characteristics of protective garments on the induced physiological strain under exercise-heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Yoram; Heled, Yuval; Ketko, Itay; Muginshtein, Jeni; Yanovich, Ran; Druyan, Amit; Moran, Daniel S

    2013-08-01

    The high values of thermal resistance (Rct) and/or vapor resistance (Ret) of chemical protective clothing (CPC) induce a considerable thermal stress. The present study compared the physiological strain induced by CPCs and evaluates the relative importance of the fabrics' Rct, Ret, and air permeability in determining heat strain. Twelve young (20-30 years) healthy, heat-acclimated male subjects were exposed fully encapsulated for 3h daily to an exercise-heat stress (35°C and 30% relative humidity, walking on a motor-driven treadmill at a pace of 5 km h(1) and a 4% inclination, in a work-rest cycle of 45 min work and 15 min rest). Two bipack CPCs (PC1 and PC2) were tested and the results were compared with those attained by two control suits-a standard cotton military BDU (CO1) and an impermeable material suit (CO2). The physiological burden imposed by the two bilayer garments was within the boundaries set by the control conditions. Overall, PC2 induced a lower strain, which was closer to CO1, whereas PC1 was closer to CO2. Air permeability of the PC2 cloth was almost three times higher than that of PC1, enabling a better heat dissipation and consequently a lower physiological strain. Furthermore, air permeability characteristic of the fabrics, which is associated with its construction and weave, significantly correlated with the physiological strain, whereas the correlation with Rct, Ret, and weight was poor. The results emphasize the importance of air permeability in reducing the physiological strain induced by CPCs.

  6. Investigation heat stress in small enterprise in Qom city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. hajizadeh

    2014-02-01

    .Conclusion: Heat stress in almost all of the studied workplaces are higher than the recommended limits, and the outdoor workshops had the highest thermal stress, although heat stress did not show a significant correlation with the studied strains.

  7. Effect of drought and combined drought and heat stress on polyamine metabolism in proline-over-producing tobacco plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvikrová, Milena; Gemperlová, Lenka; Martincová, Olga; Vaňková, Radomíra

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 2013 (2013), s. 7-15 ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC08013; GA ČR GA206/09/2062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Drought * Heat stress * Polyamines Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.352, year: 2013 http://gateway.isiknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord&UT=000329007000002

  8. Measures against heat stress in the city of Gelsenkirchen, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dütemeyer, Dirk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the near-surface atmosphere, heat waves during the summer cause situations that may lead to human-biometeorological impairment. Because of their high population density, overheated cities are particularly strongly affected by heat stress. In the future, due to the effects of climate change, heat stress will increase in terms of its intensity and spatial expansion in the areas of concern. Taking the example of the city of Gelsenkirchen, Germany, this article presents a method for the identification of areas requiring adaptation or protection. A scenario of the future increase of heat stress events is presented, based on data of the German climate change model STAR II. For the identification of areas requiring adaptation and protection, spatial analyses of the urban heat island, land use and demographic aspects were performed using GIS tools. The application and assessment of adaptation measures is investigated for an urban quarter using the microscale numerical model ENVI-met. Finally adaptation measures in urban planning against heat stress are discussed. The relevant urban planning adaptation measures, which are also important in view of climate change, not only involve heat stress reduction in the residential areas already affected, but also involve the protection and optimisation of existing favourable and compensation areas.

  9. The effects of floor heating on body temperature, water consumption, stress response and immune competence around parturition in loose-housed sows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, B M; Malmkvist, J; Pedersen, L J

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to study whether floor heating from 12 h after onset of nest building until 48 h after birth of the first piglet had any effect on measures related to body temperature, water consumption, stress response and immune competence in loose-housed sows (n = 23......). In conclusion, the present results indicate that floor heating for a limited period around parturition did not compromise physiological and immunological parameters, water intake and body temperature in loose-housed sows. The water intake peaked the day before parturition and the body temperature peaked...

  10. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  11. Effects of heat stress on respiratory burst, oxidative damage and SERPINH1 (HSP47) mRNA expression in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanni; Liu, Zhe; Li, Zhen; Shi, Haina; Kang, Yujun; Wang, Jianfu; Huang, Jinqiang; Jiang, Li

    2016-04-01

    For rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, high temperature is a major abiotic stress that limits its growth and productivity. In this study, spleen macrophage respiratory burst (RB), serum superoxide dismutase (SOD), serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and mRNA expression of the SERPINH1 (HSP47) gene in different tissues (liver, spleen, head kidney and heart) were measured in unstressed (18 °C) and heat-stressed (25 °C) fish. Spleen macrophage RB activity, serum SOD activity and MDA content all increased significantly (P mykiss. In practice, close attention should be given to temperature changes in O. mykiss production to reduce the effects of high temperature.

  12. Effect of different periods of chronic heat stress with or without vitamin C supplementation on bone and selected serum parameters of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh, Najmeh; Shomali, Tahoora; Nematollahi, Fahimeh; Ghahramani, Zahra; Ahrari Khafi, Mohammad Saeid; Namazi, Fatemeh

    2018-04-01

    This study evaluates the effect of different periods of chronic heat stress (CHS) on selected bone and serum parameters of broiler chickens with or without vitamin C administration. Ninety 23-day-old chickens were randomly allocated into seven groups: (1) control, (2) short-term CHS (5 days), (3) short-term CHS + vitamin C (12 g/100 l drinking water of a 50% product), (4) medium-term CHS (10 days), (5) medium-term CHS + vitamin C, (6) long-term CHS (20 days) and (7) long-term CHS + vitamin C. In heat-stressed groups the temperature was increased to 39 ± 1°C for 8 h/day. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were collected and shank, keel and tibia bones were removed. CHS was not associated with a drastic change in serum Ca and corticosterone, or bone characteristics (both cortical and trabecular bones in radiographical and histological evaluation), or birds' performance. Oxidative stress was present especially with short-term CHS. CHS, especially for short or medium periods, showed a tendency to increase serum vitamin C and administration of this vitamin did not make a significant change in its serum levels although it ameliorated oxidative stress. In conclusion, it seems that CHS is not associated with an appreciable change in broiler performance, bone characteristics, or selected serum parameters; and simultaneous vitamin C administration at the dosage of 12 g/100 l in drinking water has no beneficial effect apart from reducing oxidative stress especially in short-term chronically heat-stressed birds.

  13. Effectiveness of different strategies to prevent from heat stress in a group of dairy farms located in the Province of Padova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Cozzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat stress during the summer season is an important factor which can impair dairy cows physiology and productivity. A survey was carried out on a sample of 30 dairy farms of the Province of Padova to assess the effectiveness of different strategies for heat stress control. All farms used a fan cooling system but in those were a sprinkler device was also operating an increased milk yield was observed (+5.0%. Cows receiving the diet in two daily distributions (morning and evening increased DM intake (+9.0% and milk yield (+15.0% in comparison to animals fed once a day. No difference, instead, were observed in farms where cows were fed once a day in the morning or in the evening. A positive milk response (+8.1% was recorded in farms equipped with wide waterers at the exit of the milking parlour.

  14. A combined approach to heat stress effect on male fertility in Nasonia vitripennis: from the physiological consequences on spermatogenesis to the reproductive adjustment of females mated with stressed males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlène Chirault

    Full Text Available In recent years, several studies have shown a decline in reproductive success in males in both humans and wildlife. Research on male fertility has largely focused on vertebrates, although invertebrates constitute the vast majority of terrestrial biodiversity. The reduction of their reproductive capacities due to environmental stresses can have strong negative ecological impacts, and also dramatic consequences on world food production if it affects the reproductive success of biological control agents, such as parasitic wasps used to control crop pests. Here Nasonia vitripennis, a parasitic wasp of various fly species, was studied to test the effects of 24h-heat stress applied during the first pupal stage on male fertility. Results showed that only primary spermatocytes were present at the first pupal stage in all cysts of the testes. Heat stress caused a delay in spermatogenesis during development and a significant decrease in sperm stock at emergence. Females mated with these heat-stressed males showed a reduce sperm count stored in their spermatheca. Females did not appear to distinguish heat-stressed from control males and did not remate more frequently to compensate for the lack of sperm transferred. As a result, females mated with heat-stressed males produced a suboptimal lifetime offspring sex ratio compared to those mated with control males. This could further impact the population dynamics of this species. N. vitripennis appears to be an interesting biological model to study the mechanisms of subfertility and its consequence on female reproductive strategies and provides new research perspectives in both invertebrates and vertebrates.

  15. A combined approach to heat stress effect on male fertility in Nasonia vitripennis: from the physiological consequences on spermatogenesis to the reproductive adjustment of females mated with stressed males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirault, Marlène; Lucas, Christophe; Goubault, Marlène; Chevrier, Claude; Bressac, Christophe; Lécureuil, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have shown a decline in reproductive success in males in both humans and wildlife. Research on male fertility has largely focused on vertebrates, although invertebrates constitute the vast majority of terrestrial biodiversity. The reduction of their reproductive capacities due to environmental stresses can have strong negative ecological impacts, and also dramatic consequences on world food production if it affects the reproductive success of biological control agents, such as parasitic wasps used to control crop pests. Here Nasonia vitripennis, a parasitic wasp of various fly species, was studied to test the effects of 24h-heat stress applied during the first pupal stage on male fertility. Results showed that only primary spermatocytes were present at the first pupal stage in all cysts of the testes. Heat stress caused a delay in spermatogenesis during development and a significant decrease in sperm stock at emergence. Females mated with these heat-stressed males showed a reduce sperm count stored in their spermatheca. Females did not appear to distinguish heat-stressed from control males and did not remate more frequently to compensate for the lack of sperm transferred. As a result, females mated with heat-stressed males produced a suboptimal lifetime offspring sex ratio compared to those mated with control males. This could further impact the population dynamics of this species. N. vitripennis appears to be an interesting biological model to study the mechanisms of subfertility and its consequence on female reproductive strategies and provides new research perspectives in both invertebrates and vertebrates.

  16. Effect of γ-Aminobutyric Acid-producing Strain on Laying Performance, Egg Quality and Serum Enzyme Activity in Hy-Line Brown Hens under Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Z. Zhu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat-stress remains a costly issue for animal production, especially for poultry as they lack sweat glands, and alleviating heat-stress is necessary for ensuring animal production in hot environment. A high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-producer Lactobacillus strain was used to investigate the effect of dietary GABA-producer on laying performance and egg quality in heat-stressed Hy-line brown hens. Hy-Line brown hens (n = 1,164 at 280 days of age were randomly divided into 4 groups based on the amount of freeze-dried GABA-producer added to the basal diet as follows: i 0 mg/kg, ii 25 mg/kg, iii 50 mg/kg, and iv 100 mg/kg. All hens were subjected to heat-stress treatment through maintaining the temperature and the relative humidity at 28.83±3.85°C and 37% to 53.9%, respectively. During the experiment, laying rate, egg weight and feed intake of hens were recorded daily. At the 30th and 60th day after the start of the experiment, biochemical parameters, enzyme activity and immune activity in serum were measured. Egg production, average egg weight, average daily feed intake, feed conversion ratio and percentage of speckled egg, soft shell egg and misshaped egg were significantly improved (p<0.05 by the increasing supplementation of the dietary GABA-producer. Shape index, eggshell thickness, strength and weight were increased linearly with increasing GABA-producer supplementation. The level of calcium, phosphorus, glucose, total protein and albumin in serum of the hens fed GABA-producing strain supplemented diet was significantly higher (p<0.05 than that of the hens fed the basal diet, whereas cholesterol level was decreased. Compared with the basal diet, GABA-producer strain supplementation increased serum level of glutathione peroxidase (p = 0.009 and superoxide dismutase. In conclusion, GABA-producer played an important role in alleviating heat-stress, the isolated GABA-producer strain might be a potential natural and safe probiotic to use to

  17. Effect of γ-Aminobutyric Acid-producing Lactobacillus Strain on Laying Performance, Egg Quality and Serum Enzyme Activity in Hy-Line Brown Hens under Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y Z; Cheng, J L; Ren, M; Yin, L; Piao, X S

    2015-07-01

    Heat-stress remains a costly issue for animal production, especially for poultry as they lack sweat glands, and alleviating heat-stress is necessary for ensuring animal production in hot environment. A high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producer Lactobacillus strain was used to investigate the effect of dietary GABA-producer on laying performance and egg quality in heat-stressed Hy-line brown hens. Hy-Line brown hens (n = 1,164) at 280 days of age were randomly divided into 4 groups based on the amount of freeze-dried GABA-producer added to the basal diet as follows: i) 0 mg/kg, ii) 25 mg/kg, iii) 50 mg/kg, and iv) 100 mg/kg. All hens were subjected to heat-stress treatment through maintaining the temperature and the relative humidity at 28.83±3.85°C and 37% to 53.9%, respectively. During the experiment, laying rate, egg weight and feed intake of hens were recorded daily. At the 30th and 60th day after the start of the experiment, biochemical parameters, enzyme activity and immune activity in serum were measured. Egg production, average egg weight, average daily feed intake, feed conversion ratio and percentage of speckled egg, soft shell egg and misshaped egg were significantly improved (pGABA-producer. Shape index, eggshell thickness, strength and weight were increased linearly with increasing GABA-producer supplementation. The level of calcium, phosphorus, glucose, total protein and albumin in serum of the hens fed GABA-producing strain supplemented diet was significantly higher (plevel was decreased. Compared with the basal diet, GABA-producer strain supplementation increased serum level of glutathione peroxidase (p = 0.009) and superoxide dismutase. In conclusion, GABA-producer played an important role in alleviating heat-stress, the isolated GABA-producer strain might be a potential natural and safe probiotic to use to improve laying performance and egg quality in heat-stressed hens.

  18. Heat stress protection in abnormally hot environments.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schutte, PC

    1994-11-01

    Full Text Available The present report presents the findings of SIMRAC project GAP 045 entitled ‘Heat stress protection in abnormally hot environments’. It is intended as a reference to develop guidelines which, in turn would assist mine management in establishing safe...

  19. Potassium nutrition of heat-stressed lactating

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dairy cattle performance annually over a 5 month period. When Black Globe Temperature (BGT), an integrated measure of dry bulb air temperature, wind velocity and solar radiation, rises above 29"C, feed intake and produc- tion are reduced. Many responses to heat stress, such as increased respiration and sweating rates, ...

  20. Effects of Diet and Genetics on Growth Performance of Pigs in Response to Repeated Exposure to Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy M. Rauw

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heat stress (HS is one of the costliest issues in the U.S. pork industry. Aims of the present study were to determine the consequences of repeated exposure to HS on growth performance, and the effects of a high fiber diet, the genetic potential for high lean tissue accretion, and the genetic potential for residual feed intake (RFI on resilience to HS. Barrows (n = 97 from three genetic lines (commercial, high RFI, low RFI where subjected three times to a 4-day HS treatment (HS1, HS2, and HS3 which was preceded by a 9-day neutral (TN adaptation period (TN1 and alternated by 7-day periods of neutral temperatures (TN2, TN3, and TN4. Body weight gain (BWG, feed intake (FI, feed conversion efficiency (FCE, RFI, and the drop in BWG and FI between TN and HS were estimated for each period, and slaughter traits were measured at the end of TN4. Commercial pigs had lower FI when fed a high fiber diet compared to a regular diet (2.70 ± 0.08 vs. 2.96 ± 0.08 kg/d; P < 0.05, while no differences were found for BWG, RFI or FCE. HS reduced FI, BWG, and FCE, increased RFI, and resulted in leaner pigs that generate smaller carcasses at slaughter. In TN, commercial pigs grew faster than the low and high RFI pigs (1.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.720 ± 0.05 and 0.657 ± 0.07; P < 0.001 but growth rates were not significantly different between the lines during HS. Growth rates for the low RFI and high RFI pigs were similar both during TN and during HS. Pigs of interest for genetic improvement are those that are able to maintain growth rates during HS. Our results show that response in growth to HS was repeatable over subsequent 4-d HS cycles, which suggests the potential for including this response in the breeding index. The best performing animals during HS are likely those that are not highly superior for growth in TN.

  1. Effect Of Potassium Chloride, Vitamin E And Some Amino Acids Supplementation In Feed On Some Physiological Parameters Of Broiler Under Heat Stress Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELSAYED, M.A.; WAKWAK, M.M.; ABU-TALEB, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Hubbard broilers (240 of two weeks old) from the breeding flock in the Poultry Research Farm of Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Egypt, were used in this study. The effect of potassium chloride (KCl), vitamin E (VE) and some amino acids (proline + glycine) supplementations in feed on broiler performance under thermo neutral (TN) or heat stress conditions during May 2007 was investigated. All broilers chicks were exposed to 24 hrs light per day. The birds were fed starter diet for two weeks and followed by grower diet for two weeks ad libitum. Birds were divided into equal four groups (60 birds each). The first group (control) was fed the basal diet, while the second group was fed the same diet with adding 1 % proline + 1 % glycine. The third group was fed the diet with adding 250 mg VE/kg and the fourth group was fed the diet with adding 0.6 g KCl/kg. All groups were fed the previous diets for two weeks then subdivided to equal four sub-groups (30 birds each). The primary four groups were exposed to normal ambient temperature (TN conditions 22±1 0 C) while the other fourth groups were exposed to high environmental temperature (38±1 0 C) for 4 hours daily for 4 days (HS conditions) and then returned to normal temperature for one week then exposed to high environmental temperature (38±1 0 C) for 4 hours daily for 4 days. The individual body weight, feed intake at morning and before diet supplementation, body temperature and mortality percentage were recorded. Serum total protein, albumin, globulin, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, creatinine and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations were determined. It was found that after two weeks of additive supplementation and during thermo neutral condition period (TN), the control group showed the lowest value of feed consumption while under heat stress condition, the KCl group showed the highest value of feed consumption. At 1 st and 2 nd heat stress exposure periods, KCl group had the highest level of the

  2. Deficiency of heat shock transcription factor 1 suppresses heat stress-associated increase in slow soleus muscle mass of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Y; Egawa, T; Yokoyama, S; Nakai, A; Sugiura, T; Ohira, Y; Yoshioka, T; Goto, K

    2015-12-01

    Effects of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) deficiency on heat stress-associated increase in slow soleus muscle mass of mice were investigated. Both HSF1-null and wild-type mice were randomly assigned to control and heat-stressed groups. Mice in heat-stressed group were exposed to heat stress (41 °C for 60 min) in an incubator without anaesthesia. Significant increase in wet and dry weights, and protein content of soleus muscle in wild-type mice was observed seven days after the application of the heat stress. However, heat stress had no impact on soleus muscle mass in HSF1-null mice. Neither type of mice exhibited much effect of heat stress on HSF mRNA expression (HSF1, HSF2 and HSF4). On the other hand, heat stress upregulated heat shock proteins (HSPs) at the mRNA (HSP72) and protein (HSP72 and HSP110) levels in wild-type mice, but not in HSF1-null mice. The population of Pax7-positive nuclei relative to total myonuclei of soleus muscle in wild-type mice was significantly increased by heat stress, but not in HSF1-null mice. Furthermore, the absence of HSF1 gene suppressed heat stress-associated phosphorylation of Akt and p70 S6 kinase (p-p70S6K) in soleus muscle. Heat stress-associated increase in skeletal muscle mass may be induced by HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response that activates muscle satellite cells and Akt/p70S6K signalling pathway. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effects of exposure to short-term heat stress on male reproductive fitness in a soil arthropod.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zizzari, Z.V.; Ellers, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ambient temperature is a key environmental factor influencing a variety of aspects of the ecology and evolution of ectotherms. Reproductive traits have been suggested to be more sensitive to thermal stress than other life history traits. This study investigated the direct and indirect effects of

  4. Effects of heat stress and probiotic supplementation on protein functionality and oxidative stability of ground chicken leg meat during display storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Ji-Han; Yan, Feifei; Cheng, Heng-Wei; Brad Kim, Yuan H

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of heat stress and probiotic supplementation on protein functionality and oxidative stability of ground chicken leg during display storage. Two hundred and forty, 1-day-old male chicks (5 birds per pen) were subjected to four treatments in a 2 (thermoneutral condition at 21 °C and cyclic heat stress at 32-21-32 °C for 10 h day -1 ) × 2 (regular diet with 0 or 0.25 g kg -1 Bacillus subtilis) factorial design. Chickens were harvested at day 46, and pairs of whole legs were collected at 1 day postmortem. The chicken legs were deboned, ground, tray-packaged with oxygen-permeable film, and displayed for 3 days. Heat stress and probiotic supplementation had no impact on pH, water-holding capacity, color, protein functionality, lipid lipolysis and lipid/protein oxidation stability (P > 0.05). Display storage increased the pH and lipid oxidation of ground chicken legs (P chicken leg meat. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Effects of water restriction following feeding on nutrient digestibilities, milk yield and composition and blood hormones in lactating Holstein cows under heat stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ghassemi Nejad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of water restriction following feeding under heat stress conditions on nutrient digestibilities, milk yield and composition and some blood hormones in lactating Holstein cows were evaluated. The design was completely randomized with 30 high producing lactating Holstein cows (80.8±40.5 DIM which were assigned to two treatment groups (15 cows per treatment. Treatments were free access to water (FAW and 2 h water restriction (2hWR following feeding. Average temperature-humidity index (THI in the farm was over 80 throughout the experiment which defines heat stress conditions. Neutral detergent fibre, organic matter and ether extract digestibilities increased by water restriction (P0.05. Water intake was recorded daily during the digestibility period and was not different between FAW and 2hWR group (P>0.05. Fat corrected milk was higher in 2hWR group than FAW group (P0.05. Somatic cell counts were greater in 2hWR than FAW group (P0.05. Blood prolactin and growth hormone were higher in 2hWR group than the FAW group (P<0.05. It is concluded that water restriction for 2 hours following feeding improved nutrient digestibility of some dietary components and increased milk fat percentage in lactating Holstein cows under heat stress conditions.

  6. Joint Effect of Solar UVB and Heat Stress on the Seasonal Change of Egg Hatching Success in the Herbivorous False Spider Mite (Acari: Tenuipalpidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, M; Osakabe, M

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal population dynamics of an herbivorous mite has been documented in terms of the relationship between thermoresponses and temporal biological factors such as resource availability or predation risk. Although recent studies emphasize the deleterious effects of solar ultraviolet-B (UVB; 280-320 nm wavelengths) radiation on plant-dwelling mites, how UVB affects mite population remains largely unknown. On a wild shrub Viburnum erosum var. punctatum in Kyoto, an herbivorous false spider mite, Brevipalpus obovatus Donnadieu, occurs only in autumn. Females of this species lay one-third of their eggs on upper leaf surfaces. Oviposition on upper surfaces is beneficial for avoiding predation by phytoseiids, but exposes eggs to solar UVB and heat stress. To test the hypothesis that the seasonal occurrence of this mite is determined by interactions between solar UVB radiation and temperature, we examined variation in egg hatching success under near-ambient and UV-attenuated sunlight conditions from spring to autumn. The UV-attenuation significantly improved hatching success. However, most eggs died under heat stress regardless of UV treatments in July and August. We established a deterministic heat stress-cumulative UVB dose-egg hatching success response model, which we applied to meteorological data. The model analyses illustrated lower and higher survivability peaks in late May and October, respectively, which partly corresponded to data for annual field occurrence, indicating the importance of solar UVB radiation and heat stress as determinants of the seasonal occurrence of this mite. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Heat stress assessment in artistic glass units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'AMBROSIO Alfano, Francesca Romana; Palella, Boris Igor; Riccio, Giuseppe; Bartalini, Massimo; Strambi, Fabio; Malchaire, Jacques

    2018-04-07

    Heat stress in glass industry is mainly studied in large and highly mechanized manufacturing Units. To the contrary, few studies were carried out in small factories specialized in hand-made products. To stress the need of combined objective and medical surveys in these environments, this paper deals with a simultaneous climatic and physiological investigation of working conditions in artistic crystal glass factories in Tuscany (Italy). The microclimatic monitoring, through a continuous survey has been carried out in early spring. The main physiological parameters (metabolic rate, heart rate, tympanic temperature and water loss) were measured over the whole shifts. The results show that, despite the arduousness of the working conditions, the heat stress levels are physiologically tolerable. The predictions made using the PHS model at the Analysis level described in ISO 15265 agree closely to the observed values, validating the use of PHS model in these conditions. This model was then used to analyse what is likely to be the situation during the summer. It is concluded that the heat constraint will be very high and that some steps must be taken from the spring to monitor closely the exposed workers in the summer and take measures to prevent any heat accident.

  8. Can heavy metal pollution defend seed germination against heat stress? Effect of heavy metals (Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+)) on maize seed germination under high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Benliang; Yang, Kejun; Zhang, Yifei; Li, Zuotong

    2016-09-01

    Heavy metal pollution, as well as greenhouse effect, has become a serious threat today. Both heavy metal and heat stresses can arrest seed germination. What response can be expected for seed germination under both stress conditions? Here, the effects of heavy metals (Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+)) on maize seed germination were investigated at 20 °C and 40 °C. Compared with 20 °C, heat stress induced thermodormancy. However, this thermodormancy could be significantly alleviated by the addition of a low concentration of heavy metals. Heavy metals, as well as heat stress induced H2O2 accumulation in germinating seeds. Interestingly, this low concentration of heavy metal that promoted seed germination could be partly blocked by DMTU (a specific ROS scavenger), irrespective of temperature. Accordingly, H2O2 addition reinforced this promoting effect on seed germination, which was induced by a low concentration of heavy metal. Furthermore, we found that the NADPH oxidase derived ROS was required for seed germination promoted by the heavy metals. Subsequently, treatment of seeds with fluridone (a specific inhibitor of ABA) or ABA significantly alleviated or aggravated thermodormancy, respectively. However, this alleviation or aggravation could be partly attenuated by a low concentration of heavy metals. In addition, germination that was inhibited by high concentrations of heavy metals was also partly reversed by fluridone. The obtained results support the idea that heavy metal-mediated ROS and hormone interaction can finally affect the thermodormancy release or not. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. EFFECTS OF HEAT STRESS ON BLOOD ACID-BASE BALANCE AND MINERAL CONTENT IN GUINEA FOWLS WHEN DRINKING WATER TREATED WITH MAGNETIC FIELD WAS USED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata GŁOWIŃSKA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of 24-hour heat stress on blood acid-base balance parameters and mineral content in guinea fowls when drinking water treated with magnetic field was used. The maximum environmental temperature at the end of the present experiment was 32oC. The relative humidity was maintained at 55% (±2. Blood samples were collected from birds three times: in the 1st, 12th and 24th hour of stress. Exposure to heat stress significantly increased blood bicarbonate ion concentration (HCO3 -, content of buffer alkali (BB and decreased shortage of alkali (BE but only in the 12th hour of stress. In the level of oxygen pressure (pO2 and percentage of oxygen content (O2sat in the 12th and 24th hour of the experiment statistically high significant decrease occurred. In consequence of high environmental temperature the statistically significant decrease of sodium was found. No changes in the level of potassium and chlorine ions in guinea fowls watered magnetized water occurred.

  10. The Effects of Heat Stress on Selective Attention and Reaction Time among Workers of a Hot Industry: Application of Computerized Version of Stroop Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Golbabaei

    2015-04-01

    .Conclusion: According to the findings in present study, heat stress causes an increase in reaction time and a decrease in selective attention. Thus, heat can be assumed as a stressor in hot work environments and the heat should be taken into account while design of job and tasks which needed selective attention or reaction time.

  11. Calibration of Heat Stress Monitor and its Measurement Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Can

    2017-07-01

    Wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) equation is a heat stress index that gives information for the workers in the industrial areas. WBGT equation is described in ISO Standard 7243 (ISO 7243 in Hot environments—estimation of the heat stress on working man, based on the WBGT index, ISO, Geneva, 1982). WBGT is the result of the combined quantitative effects of the natural wet-bulb temperature, dry-bulb temperature, and air temperature. WBGT is a calculated parameter. WBGT uses input estimates, and heat stress monitor measures these quantities. In this study, the calibration method of a heat stress monitor is described, and the model function for measurement uncertainty is given. Sensitivity coefficients were derived according to GUM. Two-pressure humidity generators were used to generate a controlled environment. Heat stress monitor was calibrated inside of the generator. Two-pressure humidity generator, which is located in Turkish Standard Institution, was used as the reference device. This device is traceable to national standards. Two-pressure humidity generator includes reference temperature Pt-100 sensors. The reference sensor was sheltered with a wet wick for the calibration of natural wet-bulb thermometer. The reference sensor was centred into a black globe that has got 150 mm diameter for the calibration of the black globe thermometer.

  12. Alterations in reproductive hormones during heat stress in dairy cattle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alterations in reproductive hormones during heat stress in dairy cattle. ... Heat stress reduces the degree of dominance of the selected follicle and this can be seen as reduced steroidogenic capacity of its theca and ... from 32 Countries:.

  13. Induction of neutral trehalase Nth1 by heat and osmotic stress is controlled by STRE elements and Msn2/Msn4 transcription factors: variations of PKA effect during stress and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zähringer, H; Thevelein, J M; Nwaka, S

    2000-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae neutral trehalase, encoded by NTH1, controls trehalose hydrolysis in response to multiple stress conditions, including nutrient limitation. The presence of three stress responsive elements (STREs, CCCCT) in the NTH1 promoter suggested that the transcriptional activator proteins Msn2 and Msn4, as well as the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), control the stress-induced expression of Nth1. Here, we give direct evidence that Msn2/Msn4 and the STREs control the heat-, osmotic stress- and diauxic shift-dependent induction of Nth1. Disruption of MSN2 and MSN4 abolishes or significantly reduces the heat- and NaCl-induced increases in Nth1 activity and transcription. Stress-induced increases in activity of a lacZ reporter gene put under control of the NTH1 promoter is nearly absent in the double mutant. In all instances, basal expression is also reduced by about 50%. The trehalose concentration in the msn2 msn4 double mutant increases less during heat stress and drops more slowly during recovery than in wild-type cells. This shows that Msn2/Msn4-controlled expression of enzymes of trehalose synthesis and hydrolysis help to maintain trehalose concentration during stress. However, the Msn2/Msn4-independent mechanism exists for heat control of trehalose metabolism. Site-directed mutagenesis of the three STREs (CCCCT changed to CATCT) in NTH1 promoter fused to a reporter gene indicates that the relative proximity of STREs to each other is important for the function of NTH1. Elimination of the three STREs abolishes the stress-induced responses and reduces basal expression by 30%. Contrary to most STRE-regulated genes, the PKA effect on the induction of NTH1 by heat and sodium chloride is variable. During diauxic growth, NTH1 promoter-controlled reporter activity strongly increases, as opposed to the previously observed decrease in Nth1 activity, suggesting a tight but opposite control of the enzyme at the transcriptional and post-translational levels

  14. Residual stresses estimation in tubes after rapid heating of surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serikov, S.V.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented on estimation of residual stresses in tubes of steel types ShKh15, EhP836 and 12KIMF after heating by burning pyrotechnic substance inside tubes. External tube surface was heated up to 400-450 deg C under such treatment. Axial stresses distribution over tube wall thickness was determined for initial state, after routine heat treatment and after heating with the use of fireworks. Inner surface heating was shown to essentially decrease axial stresses in tubes

  15. Tank waste remediation system heat stress control program report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carls, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Protecting employees from heat stress within tank farms during the summer months is challenging. Work constraints typically experienced in tank farms complicate the measures taken to protect employees from heat stress. TWRS-Industrial Hygiene (IH) has endeavored to control heat stress injuries by anticipating, recognizing, evaluating and controlling the factors which lead or contribute to heat stress in Tank Farms. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program covers such areas as: employee and PIC training, communication of daily heat stress alerts to tank farm personnel, setting work/rest regimens, and the use of engineering and personal protective controls when applicable. The program has increased worker awareness of heat stress and prevention, established provisions for worker rest periods, increased drinking water availability to help ensure worker hydration, and allowed for the increased use of other protective controls to combat heat stress. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program is the cornerstone for controlling heat stress among tank farm employees. The program has made great strides since it's inception during the summer of 1994. Some improvements can still be made to enhance the program for the summer of 1996, such as: (1) procurement and use of personal heat stress monitoring equipment to ensure appropriate application of administrative controls, (2) decrease the need for use of containment tents and anti-contamination clothing, and (3) providing a wider variety of engineering and personal protective controls for heat stress prevention

  16. Physiological response of heat stressed broiler chickens to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of supplementing the drinking water of broilers reared under natural heat stress with ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), calcium chloride (CaCl2) and ascorbic acid (AA) on physiological response was investigated. A 200, one-day Arbor acre chicks were randomly allotted to five treatments in ...

  17. EFFECTS OF PALM VITAMIN E SUPPLEMENTATION ON EXERCISE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE IN THE HEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chee Keong

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of tocotrienol-rich palm vitamin E supplementation on exercise-induced lipid peroxidation and endurance performance in the heat. In a double blind, cross-over study, eighteen healthy, male recreational athletes completed two endurance running trials, until exhaustion, on a motorized treadmill at 70% VO2max on two separate occasions following a 6-week supplementation regimen of either tocotrienol-rich palm vitamin E (E or placebo (P. Both trials were conducted in the heat (31oC, 70% relative humidity. During the trials, rectal temperature (Trec, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE and oxygen uptake (VO2 were recorded. Blood samples were collected for the determination of plasma volume changes (PVC, malondialdehyde (MDA, creatine kinase (CK, total antioxidant status (TAS and vitamin E. After the supplementation regimen, serum alpha-tocopherol increased ~33% but serum concentrations of tocotrienols were negligible. No significant differences were evident in mean Trec, RPE, VO2 or in the time to exhaustion between the E-supplemented and the placebo- supplemented groups. Similarly, mean PVC, CK and TAS were also not different between the two groups. Resting plasma mean MDA concentration in the E-supplemented group was significantly lower than that in the placebo-supplemented group. At exhaustion, plasma mean MDA was higher than the resting values in both groups. Although tocotrienol-rich palm vitamin E supplementation decreased lipid peroxidation at rest and, to some extent, during exercise in the heat, as evident from the lower MDA levels, it however did not enhance endurance running performance or prevent exercise-induced muscle damage or influenced body core temperature or plasma volume changes during exercise in the heat

  18. Effect of Fenugreek Supplementation on Physiological Functions and Milk Traits o f Heat Stressed Lactating Baladi Goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Tarabany, A.A.; Teama, F.E.I.; Atta, M.A.A.

    2017-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to study the importance of supplementary fenugreek to the diet of lactating local goats in Egypt for ameliorative their some blood biochemical components, milk production and some milk components. Forty two lactating goats were used in the present study which lasted 5 months. The animals were divided randomly into three equal groups, the 1st group was fed basic ration without supplement (control), while the 2nd and the 3rd groups of animals were fed on the same basic ration with supplemented fenugreek at the rate of 50 and 100 g/head/day. Blood samples were withdrawn at the end of experiment to assess blood concentrations. Also, milk yield and some milk components were determined. The results showed that the addition of fenugreek at the rate of 100 g/ head/ day to the diet of lactating goats significantly increased the concentrations of total proteins, albumin, globulin , T4 hormone, total antioxidants and hemoglobin (Hb), red blood cells (RBC) and led to a significant decrease in the levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, wight blood cells (WBC) and T3 hormone in blood, while significantly increased milk yield and some milk components. It can be concluded that the addition of fenugreek at the rat of (100 g/ h/day) to heat stressed lactating Baladi goats led to modification of all blood components studied here in and led to amending the setraits, milk production and some milk components. Therefore, the use of the fenugreek in lactating stages can be recommended

  19. Effects of body-mapping-designed clothing on heat stress and running performance in a hot environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jiao; Li, Yi; Yao, Lei; Chen, Yajun; Guo, Yueping; Wong, Stephen H S; Ng, Frency S F; Hu, Junyan

    2017-10-01

    To investigate clothing-induced differences in human thermal response and running performance, eight male athletes participated in a repeated-measure study by wearing three sets of clothing (CloA, CloB, and CloC). CloA and CloB were body-mapping-designed with 11% and 7% increased capacity of heat dissipation respectively than CloC, the commonly used running clothing. The experiments were conducted by using steady-state running followed by an all-out performance running in a controlled hot environment. Participants' thermal responses such as core temperature (T c ), mean skin temperature ([Formula: see text]), heat storage (S), and the performance running time were measured. CloA resulted in shorter performance time than CloC (323.1 ± 10.4 s vs. 353.6 ± 13.2 s, p = 0.01), and induced the lowest [Formula: see text], smallest ΔT c , and smallest S in the resting and running phases. This study indicated that clothing made with different heat dissipation capacities affects athlete thermal responses and running performance in a hot environment. Practitioner Summary: A protocol that simulated the real situation in running competitions was used to investigate the effects of body-mapping-designed clothing on athletes' thermal responses and running performance. The findings confirmed the effects of optimised clothing with body-mapping design and advanced fabrics, and ensured the practical advantage of developed clothing on exercise performance.

  20. Factors of subjective heat stress of urban citizens in contexts of everyday life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz-Plapp, Tina; Hackenbruch, Julia; Schipper, Janus Willem

    2016-04-01

    Heat waves and the consequent heat stress of urban populations have a growing relevance in urban risk management and strategies of urban adaptation to climate change. In this context, social science studies on subjective experiencing of heat as stress by urban citizens are a new emerging field. To contribute to the understanding of self-reported subjective heat stress and its major determinants in a daily life perspective, we conducted a questionnaire survey with 323 respondents in Karlsruhe, Germany, after heat waves in July and August 2013. Statistical data analysis showed that subjective heat stress is an issue permeating everyday activities. Subjective heat stress at home was lower than at work and in general. Subjective heat stress in general, at home, and at work was determined by the health impairments experienced during the heat and the feeling of being helplessly exposed to the heat. For subjective heat stress at home, characteristics of the residential building and the built environment additionally played a role. Although the rate of implemented coping measures was rather high, coping measures showed no uniform effect for the subjective heat stress. We conclude that in terms of urban adaptation strategies, further research is needed to understand how various processes of daily social (work) life enable or limit individual coping and that communication strategies are important for building capacities to better cope with future heat waves.

  1. Intermittent hyperthyreosis. A heat stress syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulman, F G; Tal, E; Pfeifer, Y; Superstine, E [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Applied Pharmacology

    1975-09-01

    Intermittent hyperthyreosis occurs under various forms of stress, especially heat stress. The clinician may diagnose such cases as masked or apathetic hyperthyroidism or 'forme fruste' hyperthyreosis or thyroid autonomy. As most routine and standard tests may here yield inconsistent results, it is the patients' anamnesis which may provide the clue. Our Bioclimatology Unit has now seen over 100 cases in which thyroid hypersensitivity towards heat was the most prominent syndrome: 10-15% of weather-sensitive patients are affected. The patients complain before or during heat spells of such contradictory symptoms as insomnia, irritability, tension, tachycardia, palpitations, precordial pain, dyspnoe, flushes with sweating or chills, tremor, abdominal pain or diarrhea, polyuria or pollakisuria, weight loss in spite of ravenous appetite, fatigue, exhaustion, depression, adynamia, lack of concentration and confusion. Determination of urinary neurohormones allows a differential diagnosis, intermittent hyperthyreosis being characterized by three cardinal symptoms: tachycardia - every case with more than 80 pulse beats being suspect (not specific); urinary histamine - every case excreting more than 90 ..mu..g/day being suspect. Again the drawback of this test is its lack of specificity, as histamine may also be increased in cases of allergy and spondylitis; urinary thyroxine - every case excreting more than 20 ..mu..g/day T-4 being suspect. This is the only specific test. Therapy should make use of lithium carbonate and betablockers. Propyl thiouracil is rarely required.

  2. Effects of heat stress on the physiological parameters and productivity of hair sheep in tropical and coastal environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gesualdi Júnior

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was carried out with sheep during the finishing phase in a partial confinement system to evaluate the following physiological parameters: rectal temperature (RT, respiratory rate (RR, heart rate (HR, productive performance and carcass characteristics. Fourteen uncastrated sheep with an average initial age of 90 days belonging to two genetic groups were used. There were seven Santa Inês animals, whose average initial live weight (ILW was 23.65 kg, and seven F1 Dorper × St. Inês animals, with an ILW of 20.02 kg. The treatments were the two genetic groups and two times for the collection of the physiological parameters, at 09.00 h and 15.00 h. Evaluation took place once a week, in a shared stall, always following a 20-min grazing activity. The animals had daily access to a Megathyrsus maximus(Jacquin pasture, cultivar Masai, from 08.00 h to 17.00 h and their feed was placed in a trough, at a forage:concentrate ratio of 51:49 in the total dry matter. The concentrate consisted of 900 g/kg of ground corn and 100 g/kg of soybean meal, and the roughage supplied was alfalfa hay. There was no interaction between treatments for the studied variables. The physiological parameters were affected only by the time of day. The variables RR and RT were higher at 15.00 h, while the highest HR values were observed at 09.00 h. Neither of the two genetic groups differed for performance and carcass characteristics. Hair sheep belonging to close genetic groups show no differences in performance, carcass characteristics and physiological responses when subjected to heat stress.

  3. Interactive effects of maternal cigarette smoke, heat stress, hypoxia, and lipopolysaccharide on neonatal cardiorespiratory and cytokine responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Fiona B.; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Wilson, Richard J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure exhibits a strong epidemiological association with Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, but other environmental stressors, including infection, hyperthermia, and hypoxia, have also been postulated as important risk factors. This study examines whether maternal CS exposure causes maladaptations within homeostatic control networks by influencing the response to lipopolysaccharide, heat stress, and/or hypoxia in neonatal rats. Pregnant dams were exposed to CS or parallel sham treatments daily for the length of gestation. Offspring were studied at postnatal days 6–8 at ambient temperatures (Ta) of 33°C or 38°C. Within each group, rats were allocated to control, saline, or LPS (200 µg/kg) treatments. Cardiorespiratory patterns were examined using head-out plethysmography and ECG surface electrodes during normoxia and hypoxia (10% O2). Serum cytokine concentrations were quantified from samples taken at the end of each experiment. Our results suggest maternal CS exposure does not alter minute ventilation (V̇e) or heart rate (HR) response to infection or high temperature, but independently increases apnea frequency. CS also primes the inflammatory system to elicit a stronger cytokine response to bacterial insult. High Ta independently depresses V̇e but augments the hypoxia-induced increase in V̇e. Moreover, higher Ta increases HR during normoxia and hypoxia, and in the presence of an immune challenge, increases HR during normoxia, and reduces the increase normally associated with hypoxia. Thus, while most environmental risk factors increase the burden on the cardiorespiratory system in early life, hyperthermia and infection blunt the normal HR response to hypoxia, and gestational CS independently destabilizes breathing by increasing apneas. PMID:27733384

  4. Environmental heat stress enhances crystallization in urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawan, H.; Pratiwi, Q. C.; Sjarifah, I.; Atmojo, T. B.; Khotijah

    2018-03-01

    Over the past several decades, agriculture and plantations have been used as the main livelihood of most of the Karanganyar residents. However, these two sources of living are now replaced by industrial areas that employ thousands of people in that district. The development of this industry triggers multiple environmental impacts, including ecosystem and temperature changes. In consequence, there is an increase in air temperature that can cause a variety of diseases, especially in the workplace. According to the International Labour Organization (ILO) data in 2013, one worker dies every 15 second due to a work accident and 160 workers are suffering from the occupational disease. In Indonesia, the incidence of crystallization in urine is actually still unknown, but it is estimated that there are 170,000 cases annually. A high temperature or called heat stress is one among many factors causing this disease to appear. The workers in the textile industry, especially in the Finishing Department Kusumahadi Co. Ltd that exposed heat stress from the finishing machines and inadequate ventilation. This hot working climate causes the human body to adapt in the form of body cooling mechanism or called sweating This adaptation can cause an increase in sweat production and decrease the production of urine. If it is not followed by consuming the recommended amount of water intake, it can result in the precipitation of body salts that, in a long time, will cause crystallization in urine. The research used the analytic observational designs for a cross-sectional study. There were 34 samples collected from 57 finishing workers. The data were analyzed using Spearman correlation test. The results showed that heat stress (p=0,015) and water intake (p=0,034) has a significant correlation with crystallization in urine.

  5. Thermal stress evaluation of the Viking RTG heat shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadter, J.T.; Weiss, R.O.

    1976-03-01

    Thermal stress analyses of the Viking RTG heat shield are presented. The primary purpose of the analyses was to determine the effects of the end cap and the finite length of the heat shield on the peak tensile stress in the barrel wall. The SAAS III computer code was used to calculate the thermal stresses; axisymmetric and plane section analyses were performed for a variety of temperature distributions. The study consisted of three parts. In the first phase, the influence of the end cap on the barrel wall stresses was examined by parametrically varying the modulus of elasticity of the contact zone between the end cap and the barrel. The second phase was concerned with stresses occurring as a result of an orbital decay reentry trajectory, and the effects of the magnitude and shape of the axial temperature gradient. The final part of the study was concerned with the circumferentially nonuniform temperature distribution which develops during a side-on stable reentry. The last part includes a comparison of stresses generated for a hexagonal cross section with those generated for a circular cross section

  6. Effect Of Dried Whey Milk Supplement On Some Blood Biochemical And Immunological Indices In Relation To Growth Performance Of Heat Stressed Bovine baladi Calves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABDALLA, E.B.; EL-MASRY, K.A.; TEAMA, F.E.; EMARA, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    This experiment was carried out under hot environmental conditions, where temperature-humidity index was equivalent to 86 - 90 and 78 - 80 during day and night, respectively. Twelve bovine Baladi calves of 8 - 10 months old and 112 kg average initial live body weight were used in this study. The calves were divided into two groups of 6 animals each to study the effect of supplementation of dried whey milk on some blood biochemical and immunological indices and growth performance of calves under hot weather conditions of Egypt. The results showed that supplementation of dried whey milk to the diet of heat-stressed calves at the level of 150 g / calf / day reduced significantly each of respiration rate and rectal temperature as well as serum lipid concentrations and their fractions e.g. total cholesterol and phospholipids. Also, dried whey milk supplement caused a significant decline in both AST and ALT activities and reduced significantly alpha globulin concentration, while non-significant changes were observed in each of beta globulin, gamma globulin and immunoglobulin G. However, supplementing dried whey milk to growing calves increased significantly serum concentrations of total protein, albumin, calcium, phosphorous, T 3 and T 4 . Moreover, dried whey milk improved significantly both feed efficiency and daily gain of growing calves. It could be concluded that addition of dried whey milk to the diet reduced rectal temperature and respiration rate and induced an improvement in most blood biochemical parameters and growth performance of heat-stressed bovine Baladi calves.

  7. Effect of dietary γ-aminobutyric acid on laying performance, egg quality, immune activity and endocrine hormone in heat-stressed Roman hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zou, Xiao-Ting; Li, Hui; Dong, Xin-Yang; Zhao, Wenjing

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on laying performance, egg quality, digestive enzyme activity, hormone level and immune activities in Roman hens under heat stress. Roman hens (320 days old) were fed with 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mg/kg GABA, respectively during a 60-day experiment. Compared with control, supplementation of 50 mg/kg GABA improved the laying performance and egg quality by significantly increasing egg production, average egg weight and shell strength (P level. Anti-oxidation activity was improved by significantly increasing the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), but decreasing malondialdehyde level in serum (P level, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E(2) ), insulin, triiodothyronine (T(3) ) and free triiodothyronine (FT(3) ) levels, and IgG, IgA and complement (C3)activity in serum (P GABA improved laying performance and physical condition mainly by modulating hormone secretion, enhancing anti-oxidation and immune activity, and maintaining electrolyte balance. Fifty mg/kg was the optimum level for laying hens under heat stress in the present study. © 2011 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2011 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  8. Can intradermal administration of angiotensin II influence human heat loss responses during whole body heat stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D; Paull, Gabrielle; McGinn, Ryan; Foudil-bey, Imane; Akbari, Pegah; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-05-01

    It is unclear if angiotensin II, which can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress), modulates heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow and sweating. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II-induced increases in oxidative stress impair cutaneous perfusion and sweating during rest and exercise in the heat. Eleven young (24 ± 4 yr) healthy adults performed two 30-min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). The first and second exercises were followed by a 20- and 40-min recovery. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for continuous administration of either: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 μM angiotensin II, 3) 10 mM ascorbate (an antioxidant), or 4) a combination of 10 μM angiotensin II + 10 mM ascorbate. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweating (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at each skin site. Compared with control, angiotensin II reduced both CVC and sweating at baseline resting and during each recovery in the heat (all P 0.05). When ascorbate was coinfused with angiotensin II, the effect of angiotensin II on sweating was abolished (all P > 0.05); however, its effect on CVC at baseline resting and during each recovery remained intact (all P stress, while it impairs sweating through increasing oxidative stress during exposure to an ambient heat stress before and following exercise. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Heat stress and strain in exercise and sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherhood, John R

    2008-01-01

    Heat stress arising from the thermal environment is of concern to sports medicine and to sports administration because of the perceived risk of heat casualties, in particular heat stroke. Many sports organizations recommend environmental indices such as the WBGT for assessing risk and setting environmental limits for training and competition. But the limits are not justified by evidence. This article describes the nature of heat stress in sport and how it may be assessed objectively. Heat stress and the principal human responses to exercise heat stress are reviewed briefly. Metabolic heat production and the thermal environment provoke separate and largely independent physiological strains. Metabolic heat production drives body core temperature, and the thermal environment drives skin temperature; the combined stresses are integrated to drive sweat rate. Control of core temperature depends on adequate sweat production and the capacity of the environment to evaporate the sweat. The nature of exercise heat stress is demonstrated by rational analysis of the physical heat exchanges between the body and the environment. The principles of this analysis are applied to critical review of current practice in the assessment of heat stress in sport. The article concludes with discussion of research to establish methods for objective sport-specific assessment of heat stress.

  10. Effect of volume loading on the Frank-Starling relation during reductions in central blood volume in heat-stressed humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Wilson, T E; Seifert, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    During reductions in central blood volume while heat stressed, a greater decrease in stroke volume (SV) for a similar decrease in ventricular filling pressure, compared to normothermia, suggests that the heart is operating on a steeper portion of a Frank-Starling curve. If so, volume loading...... of heat-stressed individuals would shift the operating point to a flatter portion of the heat stress Frank-Starling curve thereby attenuating the reduction in SV during subsequent decreases in central blood volume. To investigate this hypothesis, right heart catheterization was performed in eight males...... from whom pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), central venous pressure and SV (via thermodilution) were obtained while central blood volume was reduced via lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) during normothermia, whole-body heating (increase in blood temperature 1 degrees C), and during whole...

  11. Effect of Thermal Mechanical Behaviors of Cu on Stress Distribution in Cu-Filled Through-Silicon Vias Under Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuewei; Ma, Limin; Wang, Yishu; Guo, Fu

    2018-01-01

    Through-silicon vias (TSV) are facing unexpected thermo-mechanical reliability problems due to the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between various materials in TSVs. During applications, thermal stresses induced by CTE mismatch will have a negative impact on other devices connecting with TSVs, even leading to failure. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the stress distribution evolution in the TSV structure under thermal loads. In this report, TSVs were heated to 450°C at different heating rates, then cooled down to room temperature after a 30-min dwelling. After heating treatment, TSV samples exhibited different Cu deformation behaviors, including Cu intrusion and protrusion. Based on the different Cu deformation behaviors, stress in Si around Cu vias of these samples was measured and analyzed. Results analyzed by Raman spectrums showed that the stress distribution changes were associated with Cu deformation behaviors. In the area near the Cu via, Cu protrusion behavior might aggravate the stress in Si obtained from the Raman measurement, while Cu intrusion might alleviate the stress. The possible reason was that in this area, the compressive stress σ_{θ } induced by thermal loads might be the dominant stress. In the area far from the Cu via, thermal loads tended to result in a tensile stress state in Si.

  12. Testing the responses of four wheat crop models to heat stress at anthesis and grain filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Asseng, Senthold; Liu, Leilei; Tang, Liang; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Higher temperatures caused by future climate change will bring more frequent heat stress events and pose an increasing risk to global wheat production. Crop models have been widely used to simulate future crop productivity but are rarely tested with observed heat stress experimental datasets. Four wheat models (DSSAT-CERES-Wheat, DSSAT-Nwheat, APSIM-Wheat, and WheatGrow) were evaluated with 4 years of environment-controlled phytotron experimental datasets with two wheat cultivars under heat stress at anthesis and grain filling stages. Heat stress at anthesis reduced observed grain numbers per unit area and individual grain size, while heat stress during grain filling mainly decreased the size of the individual grains. The observed impact of heat stress on grain filling duration, total aboveground biomass, grain yield, and grain protein concentration (GPC) varied depending on cultivar and accumulated heat stress. For every unit increase of heat degree days (HDD, degree days over 30 °C), grain filling duration was reduced by 0.30-0.60%, total aboveground biomass was reduced by 0.37-0.43%, and grain yield was reduced by 1.0-1.6%, but GPC was increased by 0.50% for cv Yangmai16 and 0.80% for cv Xumai30. The tested crop simulation models could reproduce some of the observed reductions in grain filling duration, final total aboveground biomass, and grain yield, as well as the observed increase in GPC due to heat stress. Most of the crop models tended to reproduce heat stress impacts better during grain filling than at anthesis. Some of the tested models require improvements in the response to heat stress during grain filling, but all models need improvements in simulating heat stress effects on grain set during anthesis. The observed significant genetic variability in the response of wheat to heat stress needs to be considered through cultivar parameters in future simulation studies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Transcriptomic analysis of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves during and after recovery from heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Tian; Wang, Jun-Fang; Cramer, Grant; Dai, Zhan-Wu; Duan, Wei; Xu, Hong-Guo; Wu, Ben-Hong; Fan, Pei-Ge; Wang, Li-Jun; Li, Shao-Hua

    2012-09-28

    Grapes are a major fruit crop around the world. Heat stress can significantly reduce grape yield and quality. Changes at the molecular level in response to heat stress and subsequent recovery are poorly understood. To elucidate the effect of heat stress and subsequent recovery on expression of genes by grape leaves representing the classic heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms, transcript abundance of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves was quantified using the Affymetrix Grape Genome oligonucleotide microarray (15,700 transcripts), followed by quantitative Real-Time PCR validation for some transcript profiles. We found that about 8% of the total probe sets were responsive to heat stress and/or to subsequent recovery in grape leaves. The heat stress and recovery responses were characterized by different transcriptional changes. The number of heat stress-regulated genes was almost twice the number of recovery-regulated genes. The responsive genes identified in this study belong to a large number of important traits and biological pathways, including cell rescue (i.e., antioxidant enzymes), protein fate (i.e., HSPs), primary and secondary metabolism, transcription factors, signal transduction, and development. We have identified some common genes and heat shock factors (HSFs) that were modulated differentially by heat stress and recovery. Most HSP genes were upregulated by heat stress but were downregulated by the recovery. On the other hand, some specific HSP genes or HSFs were uniquely responsive to heat stress or recovery. The effect of heat stress and recovery on grape appears to be associated with multiple processes and mechanisms including stress-related genes, transcription factors, and metabolism. Heat stress and recovery elicited common up- or downregulated genes as well as unique sets of responsive genes. Moreover, some genes were regulated in opposite directions by heat stress and recovery. The results indicated HSPs, especially small HSPs

  14. Transcriptomic analysis of grape (Vitis vinifera L. leaves during and after recovery from heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Guo-Tian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grapes are a major fruit crop around the world. Heat stress can significantly reduce grape yield and quality. Changes at the molecular level in response to heat stress and subsequent recovery are poorly understood. To elucidate the effect of heat stress and subsequent recovery on expression of genes by grape leaves representing the classic heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms, transcript abundance of grape (Vitis vinifera L. leaves was quantified using the Affymetrix Grape Genome oligonucleotide microarray (15,700 transcripts, followed by quantitative Real-Time PCR validation for some transcript profiles. Results We found that about 8% of the total probe sets were responsive to heat stress and/or to subsequent recovery in grape leaves. The heat stress and recovery responses were characterized by different transcriptional changes. The number of heat stress-regulated genes was almost twice the number of recovery-regulated genes. The responsive genes identified in this study belong to a large number of important traits and biological pathways, including cell rescue (i.e., antioxidant enzymes, protein fate (i.e., HSPs, primary and secondary metabolism, transcription factors, signal transduction, and development. We have identified some common genes and heat shock factors (HSFs that were modulated differentially by heat stress and recovery. Most HSP genes were upregulated by heat stress but were downregulated by the recovery. On the other hand, some specific HSP genes or HSFs were uniquely responsive to heat stress or recovery. Conclusion The effect of heat stress and recovery on grape appears to be associated with multiple processes and mechanisms including stress-related genes, transcription factors, and metabolism. Heat stress and recovery elicited common up- or downregulated genes as well as unique sets of responsive genes. Moreover, some genes were regulated in opposite directions by heat stress and recovery

  15. Heat Stress in a Climate Setting: A Framework for Reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Jonathan

    The proliferation of reanalysis models for the atmosphere in recent decades has allowed researchers to study Earth's past climate in great detail. While much work has gone into understanding key climate indicators such as surface temperature and precipitation trends, there have been few studies dealing with heat stress. As climate change grows increasingly exigent, it is becoming vitally important to understand the thermal impacts on biological systems. This study analyzed data from five reanalysis models (20CRv2, NARR, NNRA 1, NCEP DOE 2, and ERA-I) and found agreement in average surface temperature increases of 0.2-0.6°C per decade across the U.S. west coast and east coast since 1979. These trends were consistent with previous studies. Less agreement was found for the central U.S. The Temperature Humidity Index and the Heat Index were found to generally follow the temperature trends. An analysis of the role of moisture indicated that the effect of specific humidity on heat stress is dependent on climatology. Trends of heat stress over arid regions such as the desert southwest were found to be much more influenced by temperature trends than by moisture trends. In contrast, moisture seemed to play a stronger role in the more humid southeast. There appeared to be a more equal effect of temperature and moisture on heat stress in the northeast and Great Lake states. Perhaps equally as important, the study provides a framework to reduce computational time but allows for more rigorous statistical methods that are not available in the typical suite of software and programming languages to analyze climate data. Functionality was developed to infer daily extrema from six-hourly reanalysis data. A shapefile was used to aggregate the data according to prescribed geographic boundaries and reduce the load of data for statistical analysis. Time series decomposition was performed on the aggregated daily data to determine linear trends which were then mapped out to visualize

  16. Stress analysis of heated concrete using finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, P.; Gupta, A.; Marchertas, A.

    1994-01-01

    Described is a finite element analysis of concrete, which is subjected to rapid heating. Using thermal mass transport calculation, the moisture content, temperature and pore pressure distribution over space and time is obtained first. From these effects, stress at various points of the concrete are computed using the finite element method. Contribution to the stress formulation comes from three components, namely the thermal expansion, pore pressure, and the shrinkage of concrete due to moisture loss (from dehydration). The material properties of concrete are assumed to be homogeneous, elastic, and cracking is not taken into consideration. (orig.)

  17. Occupational Heat Stress Profiles in Selected Workplaces in India

    OpenAIRE

    Venugopal, Vidhya; Chinnadurai, Jeremiah S.; Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2016-01-01

    Health and productivity impacts from occupational heat stress have significant ramifications for the large workforce of India. This study profiled occupational heat stress impacts on the health and productivity of workers in select organized and unorganized Indian work sectors. During hotter and cooler seasons, Wet Bulb Globe Temperatures (WBGT) were used to quantify the risk of heat stress, according to International workplace guidelines. Questionnaires assessed workers' perceived health and...

  18. Reproductive Performance of Holstein Dairy Cows Grazing in Dry-summer Subtropical Climatic Conditions: Effect of Heat Stress and Heat Shock on Meiotic Competence and In vitro Fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavani, Krishna; Carvalhais, Isabel; Faheem, Marwa; Chaveiro, Antonio; Reis, Francisco Vieira; da Silva, Fernando Moreira

    2015-03-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate how environmental factors in a dry-summer subtropical climate in Terceira-Azores (situated in the North Atlantic Ocean: 38° 43' N 27° 12' W) can affect dairy cow (Holstein) fertility, as well as seasonal influence on in vitro oocytes maturation and embryos development. Impact of heat shock (HS) effects on in vitro oocyte's maturation and further embryo development after in vitro fertilization (IVF) was also evaluated. For such purpose the result of the first artificial insemination (AI) performed 60 to 90 days after calving of 6,300 cows were recorded for one year. In parallel, climatic data was obtained at different elevation points (n = 5) from 0 to 1,000 m and grazing points from 0 to 500 m, in Terceira island, and the temperature humidity index (THI) was calculated. For in vitro experiments, oocytes (n = 706) were collected weekly during all year, for meiotic maturation and IVF. Further, to evaluate HS effect, 891 oocytes were collected in the cold moths (December, January, February and March) and divided in three groups treated to HS for 24 h during in vitro maturation at: C (Control = 38.5°C), HS1 (39.5°C) and HS2 (40.5°C). Oocytes from each group were used for meiotic assessment and IVF. Cleavage, morula and blastocyst development were evaluated respectively on day 2, 6, and 9 after IVF. A negative correlation between cow's conception rate (CR) and THI in grazing points (-91.3%; p<0.001) was observed. Mean THI in warmer months (June, July, August and September) was 71.7±0.7 and the CR (40.2±1.5%) while in cold months THI was 62.8±0.2 and CR was 63.8±0.4%. A similar impact was obtained with in vitro results in which nuclear maturation rate (NMR) ranged from 78.4% (±8.0) to 44.3% (±8.1), while embryos development ranged from 53.8% (±5.8) to 36.3% (±3.3) in cold and warmer months respectively. In vitro HS results showed a significant decline (p<0.05) on NMR of oocytes for every 1°C rising temperature (78

  19. Reproductive Performance of Holstein Dairy Cows Grazing in Dry-summer Subtropical Climatic Conditions: Effect of Heat Stress and Heat Shock on Meiotic Competence and Fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Pavani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate how environmental factors in a dry-summer subtropical climate in Terceira-Azores (situated in the North Atlantic Ocean: 38° 43′ N 27° 12′ W can affect dairy cow (Holstein fertility, as well as seasonal influence on in vitro oocytes maturation and embryos development. Impact of heat shock (HS effects on in vitro oocyte’s maturation and further embryo development after in vitro fertilization (IVF was also evaluated. For such purpose the result of the first artificial insemination (AI performed 60 to 90 days after calving of 6,300 cows were recorded for one year. In parallel, climatic data was obtained at different elevation points (n = 5 from 0 to 1,000 m and grazing points from 0 to 500 m, in Terceira island, and the temperature humidity index (THI was calculated. For in vitro experiments, oocytes (n = 706 were collected weekly during all year, for meiotic maturation and IVF. Further, to evaluate HS effect, 891 oocytes were collected in the cold moths (December, January, February and March and divided in three groups treated to HS for 24 h during in vitro maturation at: C (Control = 38.5°C, HS1 (39.5°C and HS2 (40.5°C. Oocytes from each group were used for meiotic assessment and IVF. Cleavage, morula and blastocyst development were evaluated respectively on day 2, 6, and 9 after IVF. A negative correlation between cow’s conception rate (CR and THI in grazing points (−91.3%; p<0.001 was observed. Mean THI in warmer months (June, July, August and September was 71.7±0.7 and the CR (40.2±1.5% while in cold months THI was 62.8±0.2 and CR was 63.8±0.4%. A similar impact was obtained with in vitro results in which nuclear maturation rate (NMR ranged from 78.4% (±8.0 to 44.3% (±8.1, while embryos development ranged from 53.8% (±5.8 to 36.3% (±3.3 in cold and warmer months respectively. In vitro HS results showed a significant decline (p<0.05 on NMR of oocytes for every 1°C rising

  20. Effects of antagonists and heat on TRPM8 channel currents in dorsal root ganglion neuron activated by nociceptive cold stress and menthol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naziroğlu, Mustafa; Ozgül, Cemil

    2012-02-01

    Transient receptor potential ion channel melastatin subtype 8 (TRPM8) is activated by cold temperature and cooling agents, such as menthol and icilin. Compounds containing peppermint are reported to reduce symptoms of environmental cold stress such as cold allodynia in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron; however, the underlying mechanisms of action are unclear. We tested the effects of physiological heat (37°C), anthralic acid (ACA and 0.025 mM), 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB and 0.05) on noxious cold (10°C) and menthol (0.1 mM)-induced TRPM8 cation channel currents in the DRG neurons of rats. DRG neurons were freshly isolated from rats. In whole-cell patch clamp experiments, TRPM8 currents were consistently induced by noxious cold or menthol. TRPM8 channels current densities of the neurons were higher in cold and menthol groups than in control. When the physiological heat is introduced by chamber TRPM8 channel currents were inhibited by the heat. Noxious cold-induced Ca(2+) gates were blocked by the ACA although menthol-induced TRPM8 currents were not blocked by ACA and 2-APB. In conclusion, the results suggested that activation of TRPM8 either by menthol or nociceptive cold can activate TRPM8 channels although we observed the protective role of heat, ACA and 2-APB through a TRPM8 channel in nociceptive cold-activated DRG neurons. Since cold allodynia is a common feature of neuropathic pain and diseases of sensory neuron, our findings are relevant to the etiology of neuropathology in DRG neurons.

  1. Effects of feeding an immunomodulatory supplement to heat-stressed or actively cooled cows during late gestation on postnatal immunity, health, and growth of calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibiel, Amy L; Fabris, Thiago F; Corrá, Fabiana N; Torres, Yazielis M; McLean, Derek J; Chapman, James D; Kirk, David J; Dahl, Geoffrey E; Laporta, Jimena

    2017-09-01

    Heat stress during late gestation negatively affects the physiology, health, and productivity of dairy cows as well as the calves developing in utero. Providing cows with active cooling devices, such as fans and soakers, and supplementing cows with an immunomodulating feed additive, OmniGen-AF (OG; Phibro Animal Health Corporation), improves immune function and milk yield of cows. It is unknown if maternal supplementation of OG combined with active cooling during late gestation might benefit the developing calf as well. Herein we evaluated markers of innate immune function, including immune cell counts, acute phase proteins, and neutrophil function, of calves born to multiparous dams in a 2 × 2 factorial design. Dams were supplemented with OG or a bentonite control (NO) beginning at 60 d before dry off and exposed to heat stress with cooling (CL) or without active cooling (HT) during the dry period (∼46 d). At birth, calves were separated from their dams and fed 6.6 L of their dams' colostrum in 2 meals. Calf body weight and rectal temperature were recorded, and blood samples were collected at birth (before colostrum feeding) and at 10, 28, and 49 d of age. Calves born to either CL dams or OG dams were heavier at birth than calves born to HT or NO dams, respectively. Concentrations of serum amyloid A were higher in the blood of calves born to OG dams relative to NO and for HT calves relative to CL calves. In addition, calves born to cooled OG dams had greater concentrations of plasma haptoglobin than calves born to cooled control dams. Neutrophil function at 10 d of age was enhanced in calves born to cooled OG dams and lymphocyte counts were higher in calves born to OG dams. Together these results suggest that adding OG to maternal feed in combination with active cooling of cows during late gestation is effective in mitigating the negative effects of in utero heat stress on postnatal calf growth and immune competence. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science

  2. Effect of Olive Pulpe Levels in The Diet of Buffalo Calves on Physiological Body Functions and Productive Traits Under Heat Stress Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was planned to investigate the changes that occur in growth and some physiological traits in buffalo calves as a result of using olive pulp levels (20 or 40%) under different conditions in Egypt. The study was carried out on 30 male growing buffalo calves aged 14-16 months with average body weight 309 kg and including two experiments; the 1st was carried out under mild climate in winter season on 15 calves while the 2nd was conducted during heat stress conditions of summer season on another 15 calves. In each of the two periods, animals were divided into three equal groups (5 buffalo calves in each). The first group was considered as control to olive pulp levels of 0% . The second and third groups receive olive pulp with 20 and 40% of the ingredient ration, respectively. The results showed that heat stress conditions of hot period induced significant decreases in the levels of final live body weight (FLBW), daily body weight gain (DBWG), total body weight gain (TBWG), total protein, albumin, total lipids, total cholesterol, Ca, inorganic P and thyroid hormones level (T4 and T3). On the other hand, significant increase in urea-N, creatinine, GOT and GPT as compared with animals under mild conditions was recorded. Olive pulp levels in the diet affected significantly the total body gain, daily body weight gain, total cholesterol and thyroid hormones (T4 or T3). The values were lower in the group received 40% olive pulp than in the two groups received 0 and 20.0 % olive pulp. In addition, animals received 40% olive pulp showed significant increase in urea-N, creatinine, GPT, total lipids and Ca. It could be concluded that heat stress conditions of summer period induced significant depression in daily body weight gain and changed most blood components and thyroid hormones which related to physiological functions in buffalo calves. Concerning added olive pulp to the ration of buffalo calves, it could be concluded that daily body gain of buffalo calves

  3. In utero exposure to heat stress during late gestation has prolonged effects on the activity patterns and growth of dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, J; Fabris, T F; Skibiel, A L; Powell, J L; Hayen, M J; Horvath, K; Miller-Cushon, E K; Dahl, G E

    2017-04-01

    Exposure to heat stress during late gestation exerts negative carryover effects on the postnatal performance of the calf. In this study, we evaluated the health, growth, and activity patterns of calves born to cows exposed to heat stress (HT, provided only shade, n = 31) or cooling (CL, fans, soakers, and shade, n = 29) during late gestation (∼46 d, maternal dry period). Calves' body weight, rectal temperature, suckling reflex, and movement scores were recorded at birth, and calves were fed 6.6 L of maternal colostrum in 2 meals. Blood samples were collected at birth (before feeding), 24 h after birth, and at d 10 and 28 of age. Calves were housed in individual pens, fed pasteurized milk (6 L/d), and had ad libitum access to grain and water until weaning (49 d). Activity was assessed during the first week of life (wk 1), at weaning (wk 7), and in the first week postweaning (wk 8) using electronic data loggers. Health and body weight were monitored weekly. At birth, calves born to CL cows were heavier (41.9 vs. 39.1 ± 0.8 kg), their temperature was lower (38.9 vs. 39.3 ± 0.08°C), and they were more efficient at absorbing IgG than HT calves. Suckling reflex and movement score at birth were not different between groups, but calves born to CL cows spent more time (50 min/d) standing in the first week of life as a result of longer standing bouts. In wk 7 and 8, calves born to CL cows had less frequent standing bouts than HT heifers, but CL heifers maintained greater total daily standing time (36 min/d) due to longer (7 min/bout) standing bouts. All calves were healthy, but HT heifers tended to have higher (looser) fecal scores on d 10. Heifers born from CL cows gained 0.2 kg/d more from birth to weaning, weighed 4 kg more at weaning, and had greater concentrations of IGF-1 than HT calves, particularly on d 28. In utero heat stress during late gestation had immediate and prolonged effects on passive immunity, growth, and activity patterns in dairy calves. Copyright

  4. Thermal Aging Effects on Residual Stress and Residual Strain Distribution on Heat Affected Zone of Alloy 600 in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Junhyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW), consisting of Alloy 600, Alloy 182, and A508 Gr.3, has been widely used as a joining material of the reactor pressure vessel penetration nozzle and the steam generator tubing for pressurized water reactors (PWR) because of its good mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, and corrosion resistance. Residual tensile stress is mainly nominated as a cause of SCC in light water reactors by IAEA report. So, to relax the residual stress, post-weld heat treatment is required after manufacturing process such as welding. However, thermal treatment has a great effect on the microstructure and the chromium depletion profile on Alloy 600, so called sensitization. By this reason, HAZ on Alloy 600 is critical to crack. According to G.A. Young et al., Crack growth rates (CGR) in the Alloy 600 HAZ were about 30 times faster than those in the Alloy 600 base metal tested under the same conditions. And according to Z.P. Lu et al., CGR in the Alloy 600 HAZ can be more than 20 times higher than that in its base metal. There are some methods to measure the exact value of residual stress on the material surface. The most common way is X-ray diffraction method (XRD). The principle of XRD is based on lattice strains and depends on the changes in the spacing of the atomic planes in material. And there is a computer simulation method to estimate residual stress distribution which is called ANSYS. This study was conducted to investigate how thermal aging affects residual stress and residual strain distribution of Alloy 600 HAZ. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. According to preceding researches and this study, both the relaxation of residual stress and the change of residual strain follow as similar way, spreading out from concentrated region. The result of Vickers micro-hardness tester shows that tensile residual stresses are distributed broadly on the material aged by 15 years. Therefore, HT400{sub Y}15 material is weakest state for PWSCC. The

  5. Phosphorus limitation and heat stress decrease calcification in Emiliania huxleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerecht, Andrea C.; Šupraha, Luka; Langer, Gerald; Henderiks, Jorijntje

    2018-02-01

    Calcifying haptophytes (coccolithophores) sequester carbon in the form of organic and inorganic cellular components (coccoliths). We examined the effect of phosphorus (P) limitation and heat stress on particulate organic and inorganic carbon (calcite) production in the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Both environmental stressors are related to rising CO2 levels and affect carbon production in marine microalgae, which in turn impacts biogeochemical cycling. Using semi-continuous cultures, we show that P limitation and heat stress decrease the calcification rate in E. huxleyi. However, using batch cultures, we show that different culturing approaches (batch versus semi-continuous) induce different physiologies. This affects the ratio of particulate inorganic (PIC) to organic carbon (POC) and complicates general predictions on the effect of P limitation on the PIC  /  POC ratio. We found heat stress to increase P requirements in E. huxleyi, possibly leading to lower standing stocks in a warmer ocean, especially if this is linked to lower nutrient input. In summary, the predicted rise in global temperature and resulting decrease in nutrient availability may decrease CO2 sequestration by E. huxleyi through lower overall carbon production. Additionally, the export of carbon may be diminished by a decrease in calcification and a weaker coccolith ballasting effect.

  6. Phosphorus limitation and heat stress decrease calcification in Emiliania huxleyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Gerecht

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying haptophytes (coccolithophores sequester carbon in the form of organic and inorganic cellular components (coccoliths. We examined the effect of phosphorus (P limitation and heat stress on particulate organic and inorganic carbon (calcite production in the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Both environmental stressors are related to rising CO2 levels and affect carbon production in marine microalgae, which in turn impacts biogeochemical cycling. Using semi-continuous cultures, we show that P limitation and heat stress decrease the calcification rate in E. huxleyi. However, using batch cultures, we show that different culturing approaches (batch versus semi-continuous induce different physiologies. This affects the ratio of particulate inorganic (PIC to organic carbon (POC and complicates general predictions on the effect of P limitation on the PIC  ∕  POC ratio. We found heat stress to increase P requirements in E. huxleyi, possibly leading to lower standing stocks in a warmer ocean, especially if this is linked to lower nutrient input. In summary, the predicted rise in global temperature and resulting decrease in nutrient availability may decrease CO2 sequestration by E. huxleyi through lower overall carbon production. Additionally, the export of carbon may be diminished by a decrease in calcification and a weaker coccolith ballasting effect.

  7. Biologically Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Ameliorate Cold and Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique physical, chemical, and optical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have recently attracted much interest in the field of nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy. Because of the enormous potential of these nanoparticles, various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted for their synthesis. Synthetic antioxidants are dangerous to human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with effective antioxidative properties is essential. Although AuNPs have been studied for use in various biological applications, exploration of AuNPs as antioxidants capable of inhibiting oxidative stress induced by heat and cold stress is still warranted. Therefore, one goal of our study was to produce biocompatible AuNPs using biological methods that are simple, nontoxic, biocompatible, and environmentally friendly. Next, we aimed to assess the antioxidative effect of AuNPs against oxidative stress induced by cold and heat in Escherichia coli, which is a suitable model for stress responses involving AuNPs. The response of aerobically grown E. coli cells to cold and heat stress was found to be similar to the oxidative stress response. Upon exposure to cold and heat stress, the viability and metabolic activity of E. coli was significantly reduced compared to the control. In addition, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA and leakage of proteins and sugars were significantly elevated, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and adenosine triphosphate (ATP significantly lowered compared to in the control. Concomitantly, AuNPs ameliorated cold and heat-induced oxidative stress responses by increasing the expression of antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH, glutathione S-transferase (GST, super oxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT. These consistent physiology and biochemical data suggest that AuNPs can ameliorate cold and

  8. Heat stress monitoring system. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program involves the need to decontaminate and decommission buildings expeditiously and cost-effectively. Simultaneously, the health and safety of personnel involved in the D and D activities is of primary concern. Often, D and D workers must perform duties in inclement weather, and because they also frequently work in contaminated areas, they must wear personal protective clothing and/or respirators. Monitoring the health status of workers under these conditions is an important component of ensuring their safety. The MiniMitter VitalSense Telemetry System's heat stress monitoring system (HSMS) is designed to monitor the vital signs of individual workers as they perform work in conditions that might be conducive to heat exhaustion or heat stress. The HSMS provides real-time data on the physiological condition of workers which can be monitored to prevent heat stress or other adverse health situations. This system is particularly useful when workers are wearing personal protective clothing or respirators that make visual observation of their condition more difficult. The MiniMitter VitalSense Telemetry System can monitor up to four channels (e.g., heart rate, body activity, ear canal, and skin temperature) and ten workers from a single supervisory station. The monitors are interfaced with a portable computer that updates and records information on individual workers. This innovative technology, even though it costs more, is an attractive alternative to the traditional (baseline) technology, which measures environmental statistics and predicts the average worker's reaction to those environmental conditions without taking the physical condition of the individual worker into consideration. Although use of the improved technology might be justified purely on the basis of improved safety, it has the potential to pay for itself by reducing worker time lost caused by heat

  9. Relaxation of residual stress in MMC after combined plastic deformation and heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, G.; Ceretti, M.; Girardin, E.; Giuliani, A.; Manescu, A.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron Diffraction shows that plastic pre-deformation and heat treatments have opposite effects on the residual stress in Al-SiC p composites. The thermal micro residual stress is relaxed or even reversed by pre-strains above 0.2%, but restored by heat treatments. The sense of relaxation changes above 400 deg. C (the mixing temperature)

  10. Single and combined effects of vitamin C and oregano essential oil in diet, on growth performance, and blood parameters of broiler chicks reared under heat stress condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi, Shahab; Amjadian, Tahere; Norouzi, Shokufeh

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of adding vitamin C (VC), oregano essential oil (OR), or their combination in diet, on growth performance, and blood parameters of broiler chicks reared under heat stress (HS) condition (38 °C). One-day-old 240 male broilers were randomly assigned to four treatment groups, six replicates of ten birds each. The birds were fed with either a basal diet or a basal diet supplemented with either 200 mg L-ascorbic acid/kg of diet, 250 mg of oregano essential oil/kg of diet, or 200 mg L-ascorbic acid plus 250 mg of oregano essential oil/kg of diet. Average daily feed intake (ADFI), average daily gain (ADG), and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were obtained for 42 days of age and at the end of the experiment (day 42); birds were bled to determine some blood parameters and weighted for final body weight (BW). Feeding birds with diets supplemented with oregano essential oil and vitamin C in a single or combined form increased ADG ( P > 0.05). Also BW increased and feed efficiency decreased ( P vitamin C ( P > 0.05). Supplemental oregano essential oil and vitamin C in a combined form decreased the serum concentration of corticosterone, triglycerides, glucose, and MDA ( P vitamin C were seen in broiler chicks supplemented with vitamin C. From the results of the present experiment, it can be concluded that diet supplementation by combined oregano essential oil and vitamin C could have beneficial effects on some blood parameters of broiler chicks reared under heat stress condition.

  11. A spatial analysis of heat stress related emergency room visits in rural Southern Ontario during heat waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop-Williams, Katherine E; Berke, Olaf; Pearl, David L; Kelton, David F

    2015-08-06

    In Southern Ontario, climate change may have given rise to an increasing occurrence of heat waves since the year 2000, which can cause heat stress to the general public, and potentially have detrimental health consequences. Heat waves are defined as three consecutive days with temperatures of 32 °C and above. Heat stress is the level of discomfort. A variety of heat stress indices have been proposed to measure heat stress (e.g., the heat stress index (HSI)), and has been shown to predict increases in morbidity and/or mortality rates in humans and other species. Maps visualizing the distribution of heat stress can provide information about related health risks and insight for control strategies. Information to inform heat wave preparedness models in Ontario was previously only available for major metropolitan areas. Hospitals in communities of fewer than 100,000 individuals were recruited for a pilot study by telephone. The number of people visiting the emergency room or 24-hour urgent care service was collected for a total of 27 days, covering three heat waves and six 3-day control periods from 2010-2012. The heat stress index was spatially predicted using data from 37 weather stations across Southern Ontario by geostatistical kriging. Poisson regression modeling was applied to determine the rate of increased number of emergency room visits in rural hospitals with respect to the HSI. During a heat wave, the average rate of emergency room visits was 1.11 times higher than during a control period (IRR = 1.11, CI95% (IRR) = (1.07,1.15), p ≤ 0.001). In a univariable model, HSI was not a significant predictor of emergency room visits, but when accounting for the confounding effect of a spatial trend polynomial in the hospital location coordinates, a one unit increase in HSI predicted an increase in daily emergency rooms visits by 0.4% (IRR = 1.004, CI95%(IRR) = (1.0005,1.007), p = 0.024) across the region. One high-risk cluster and no low risk

  12. Elevatated CO2 alleviates heat stress tolerance in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Rosenqvist, Eva S. K.; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2014-01-01

    Title: The alleviating effect of elevated CO2 on heat stress susceptibility of two wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars Session: Plant response and adaptation to abiotic stress Sindhuja Shanmugam1, Katrine Heinsvig Kjaer2*, Carl-Otto Ottosen2, Eva Rosenqvist3, Dew Kumari Sharma3 and Bernd...... Wollenweber4 1Department of Bioenergy, Tamilnadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India. 2Department of Food Science, Aarhus University, Kirstinebjergvej 10, 5792 Årslev, Denmark 3Institute of Agricultural Sciences and Ecology, University of Copenhagen, Hojbakkegaard Allé 9, 2630 Taastrup, Denmark 4......Institute for Agroecology, Aarhus University, Forsøgsvej 1, 4200 Slagelse, Denmark *Presenting author This study analysed the alleviating effect of elevated CO2 on stress-induced decreases in photosynthesis and changes in carbohydrate metabolism in two wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.) of different...

  13. Morphology of the mitochondria in heat shock protein 60 deficient fibroblasts from mitochondrial myopathy patients : Effects of stress conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huckriede, A; Heikema, A; Sjollema, K; Briones, P; Agsteribbe, E

    1995-01-01

    We have described two mitochondrial (mt) myopathy patients with reduced activities of various mt enzymes associated with significantly decreased amounts of heat shock protein 60 (hsp60). Experimental evidence suggested that the lack of hsp60 was the primary defect. Since hsp60 is essential for the

  14. Physiological and proteome studies of responses to heat stress during grain filling in contrasting wheat cultivars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiao; Dinler, Burcu Seckin; Vignjevic, Marija

    2015-01-01

    compared to sensitive cultivars under heat stress. The tolerant cv. '810' and the sensitive cv. '1039' were selected for further proteome analysis of leaves. Proteins related to photosynthesis, glycolysis, stress defence, heat shock and ATP production were differently expressed in leaves of the tolerant...... and sensitive cultivar under heat stress in relation to the corresponding control. The abundance of proteins related to signal transduction, heat shock, photosynthesis, and antioxidants increased, while the abundance of proteins related to nitrogen metabolism decreased in the tolerant cv. '810' under heat......Experiments to explore physiological and biochemical differences of the effects of heat stress in ten wheat (Triticum aestivum L) cultivars have been performed. Based on the response of photosynthesis rates, cell membrane lipid peroxide concentrations and grain yield to heat, six cultivars were...

  15. Effects of heat stress on some reproductive parameters of male cavie (Cavia porcellus) and mitigation strategies using guava (Psidium guajava) leaves essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoula, Ferdinand; Guemdjo Tekam, Maryvonne; Kenfack, Augustave; Tadondjou Tchingo, Cyrille D'Alex; Nouboudem, Sandrine; Ngoumtsop, Herman; Tsafack, Borice; Teguia, Alexis; Kamtchouing, Pierre; Galeotti, Marco; Tchoumboue, Joseph

    2017-02-01

    Climate changes, particularly the increase of temperature are among the main causes behind the decline of fertility in humans as well as animals. In this study, the effects of heat stress on some reproductive parameters of male cavies and mitigation strategies using guava leaves essential oil (GLEO) were studied. For this purpose, 40 male cavies aged 2.5-3 months and weighing between 348 and 446g were divided into 4 groups of 10 animals each and subjected to the following temperatures: Ambient temperature (20-25°C) for the control group, 35°C for group 1, 45°C for group 2 and 45°C+100µl GLEO/kg body weight, administered by gavage to animals for group 3. Exposure time of heat was 7h per day for 60 days. Results reveal that the relative weights of testes, epididymis, vas deferens and seminal vesicles were hardly affected by the temperature levels considered (P>0.05). The mass and individual sperm motility was significantly lower (Pleaves essential oil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Heat stress causes substantial labour productivity loss in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Kerstin K.; Botzen, Wouter J. W.; Oppermann, Elspeth; Kjellstrom, Tord; Garnett, Stephen T.

    2015-07-01

    Heat stress at the workplace is an occupational health hazard that reduces labour productivity. Assessment of productivity loss resulting from climate change has so far been based on physiological models of heat exposure. These models suggest productivity may decrease by 11-27% by 2080 in hot regions such as Asia and the Caribbean, and globally by up to 20% in hot months by 2050. Using an approach derived from health economics, we describe self-reported estimates of work absenteeism and reductions in work performance caused by heat in Australia during 2013/2014. We found that the annual costs were US$655 per person across a representative sample of 1,726 employed Australians. This represents an annual economic burden of around US$6.2 billion (95% CI: 5.2-7.3 billion) for the Australian workforce. This amounts to 0.33 to 0.47% of Australia’s GDP. Although this was a period when many Australians experienced what is at present considered exceptional heat, our results suggest that adaptation measures to reduce heat effects should be adopted widely if severe economic impacts from labour productivity loss are to be avoided if heat waves become as frequent as predicted.

  17. Effect of different levels of vitamin C and L-carnitine on performance and some blood and immune parameters of broilers under heat stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Mirzapor Sarab

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: High Environmental temperature during summer months which leading to heat stress, is of great concern in all types of poultry production. Feed consumption, growth rate, hatchability, mortality, and other important traits governing the prosperity of the industry are adversely affected by severe heat stress. Literature suggests that the advantages of dietary L-carnitine and ascorbic acid have been particularly apparent under heat stress (8. L- carnitine is a zwitterionic compound synthesized in vivo from lysine and methonine, and is essential for the transport of long – chain fatty acid across the inner mitochondria membrane for β – oxidation and remove toxic accumulations of fatty acids from mitochondria (18. Vitamin C is an effective antioxidant, which is essential for collagen synthesis, helps to maintain various enzymes in their required reduced form, and participates in the biosynthesis of carnitine, norepinephrine and certain neuroendocrine peptides (11. Invertebrates, insects, most fishes, some birds, guinea-pigs, bats and primates are not able to synthesize ascorbic acid. Thus, these animals must depend upon a dietary supply of this vitamin C. In poultry, ascorbic acid has been demonstrated to be essential for growth (25. Materials and Methods: In this study, 396 of Ross 308 broiler chicks in a completely randomized design with 3 × 3 factorial arrangement with 4 replicates of 11 chicks in each replicate were used for 42 days. Treatments were 3 levels of vitamin C (0, 250 and 500 mg/ kg and 3 levels of L-carnitine (0, 50 and 100 mg kg. In the first 3 weeks of breeding, broilers were under normal temperature and heat stress was done from the beginning of forth week. Feed and water were provided ad-libitum. Performance parameters were recorded weekly. The 0.5 mL suspension of 5% SRBC was injected at 28 and 35 days of age in one bird of each pen. To determine the antibody titer, blood was collected 1 week after each

  18. The effect of hot days on occupational heat stress in the manufacturing industry: implications for workers' well-being and productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogačar, Tjaša; Casanueva, Ana; Kozjek, Katja; Ciuha, Urša; Mekjavić, Igor B.; Kajfež Bogataj, Lučka; Črepinšek, Zalika

    2018-03-01

    Climate change is expected to exacerbate heat stress at the workplace in temperate regions, such as Slovenia. It is therefore of paramount importance to study present and future summer heat conditions and analyze the impact of heat on workers. A set of climate indices based on summer mean (Tmean) and maximum (Tmax) air temperatures, such as the number of hot days (HD: Tmax above 30 °C), and Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) were used to account for heat conditions in Slovenia at six locations in the period 1981-2010. Observed trends (1961-2011) of Tmean and Tmax in July were positive, being larger in the eastern part of the country. Climate change projections showed an increase up to 4.5 °C for mean temperature and 35 days for HD by the end of the twenty-first century under the high emission scenario. The increase in WBGT was smaller, although sufficiently high to increase the frequency of days with a high risk of heat stress up to an average of a third of the summer days. A case study performed at a Slovenian automobile parts manufacturing plant revealed non-optimal working conditions during summer 2016 (WBGT mainly between 20 and 25 °C). A survey conducted on 400 workers revealed that 96% perceived the temperature conditions as unsuitable, and 56% experienced headaches and fatigue. Given these conditions and climate change projections, the escalating problem of heat is worrisome. The European Commission initiated a program of research within the Horizon 2020 program to develop a heat warning system for European workers and employers, which will incorporate case-specific solutions to mitigate heat stress.

  19. Heat stress in pregnant sows: Thermal responses and subsequent performance of sows and their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucy, Matthew C; Safranski, Timothy J

    2017-09-01

    Seasonal infertility is a significant problem in the swine industry, and may be influenced by photoperiod and heat stress. Heat stress during gestation in particular affects pregnancy, resulting in long-term developmental damage to the offspring. This review summarizes what is known about how heat stress on the pregnant sow affects lactation and her offspring. Sows responded to heat stress during gestation with increased rectal temperature, respiration rate, and skin temperature, and tended to reduce their activity-which may have changed their body composition, increasing the adipose-to-muscle ratio. Heat stress during gestation caused temporary insulin resistance during lactation, but this metabolic state did not seem to affect health, lactation, or rebreeding performance of the sow. Heat-stressed sows also presented with a shorter gestation period and reduced litter birth weight, although weaning weights are not affected when these sows are moved to thermoneutral conditions for lactation. The offspring of gestational heat-stressed sows, however, possessed unique phenotypes, including elevated body temperature, greater fat deposition, and impaired gonad development. Thus, gestational heat stress may significantly impact a herd through its effects on sows and their offspring. Further work is necessary to determine the magnitude of the effects across fa cilities and breeds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Quantifying Livestock Heat Stress Impacts in the Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman, D.; Rajagopalan, B.; Hopson, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Livestock heat stress, especially in regions of the developing world with limited adaptive capacity, has a largely unquantified impact on food supply. Though dominated by ambient air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation all affect heat stress, which can decrease livestock growth, milk production, reproduction rates, and mortality. Indices like the thermal-humidity index (THI) are used to quantify the heat stress experienced from climate variables. Livestock experience differing impacts at different index critical thresholds that are empirically determined and specific to species and breed. This lack of understanding has been highlighted in several studies with a limited knowledge of the critical thresholds of heat stress in native livestock breeds, as well as the current and future impact of heat stress,. As adaptation and mitigation strategies to climate change depend on a solid quantitative foundation, this knowledge gap has limited such efforts. To address the lack of study, we have investigated heat stress impacts in the pastoral system of Sub-Saharan West Africa. We used a stochastic weather generator to quantify both the historic and future variability of heat stress. This approach models temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation, the climate variables controlling heat stress. Incorporating large-scale climate as covariates into this framework provides a better historical fit and allows us to include future CMIP5 GCM projections to examine the climate change impacts on heat stress. Health and production data allow us to examine the influence of this variability on livestock directly, and are considered in conjunction with the confounding impacts of fodder and water access. This understanding provides useful information to decision makers looking to mitigate the impacts of climate change and can provide useful seasonal forecasts of heat stress risk. A comparison of the current and future heat stress conditions based on

  1. Stress-induced heating in commercial conductors and its possible influence on magnet performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easton, D.S.; Kroeger, D.M.; Moazed, A.

    1976-01-01

    Calorimetric measurements show that significant amounts of heat are generated when a multifilamentary composite conductor is stressed in tension to levels expected to occur in large, high-field magnet systems. When the stress on the conductor is repetitively cycled between zero and some maximum value, the amount of heat produced per cycle is constant after the first few cycles. Comparison is made between calorimetric determinations of heat injections and the work done on the specimen as indicated by stress-strain curves. Stress-strain curves for a number of commercial conductors indicate that the most important determinant of the magnitude of this effect is the choice of matrix material

  2. BREEDING AND GENETICS SYMPOSIUM: Resilience and lessons from studies in genetics of heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misztal, I

    2017-04-01

    Production environments are expected to change, mostly to a hotter climate but also possibly more extreme and drier. Can the current generation of farm animals cope with the changes or should it be specifically selected for changing conditions? In general, genetic selection produces animals with a smaller environmental footprint but also with smaller environmental flexibility. Some answers are coming from heat-stress research across species, with heat tolerance partly understood as a greater environmental flexibility. Specific studies in various species show the complexities of defining and selecting for heat tolerance. In Holsteins, the genetic component for effect of heat stress on production approximately doubles in second and quadruples in third parity. Cows with elevated body temperature have the greatest production under heat stress but probably are at risk for increased mortality. In hot but less intensive environments, the effect of heat stress on production is minimal, although the negative effect on fertility remains. Mortality peaks under heat stress and increases with parity. In Angus, the effect of heat stress is stronger only in selected regions, probably because of adaptation of calving seasons to local conditions and crossbreeding. Genetically, the direct effect shows variability because of heat stress, but the maternal effect does not, probably because dams shield calves from environmental challenges. In pigs, the effect of heat stress is strong for commercial farms but almost nothing for nucleus farms, which have lower pig density and better heat abatement. Under intensive management, heat stress is less evident in drier environments because of more efficient cooling. A genetic component of heat stress exists, but it is partly masked by improving management and selection based on data from elite farms. Genetic selection may provide superior identification of heat-tolerant animals, but a few cycles may be needed for clear results. Also, simple

  3. Transient Heating and Thermomechanical Stress Modeling of Ceramic HEPA Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogle, Brandon [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kelly, James [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haslam, Jeffrey [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-29

    The purpose of this report is to showcase an initial finite-element analysis model of a ceramic High-Efficiency Particulate (HEPA) Air filter design. Next generation HEPA filter assemblies are being developed at LLNL to withstand high-temperature fire scenarios by use of ceramics and advanced materials. The filters are meant for use in radiological and nuclear facilities, and are required to survive 500°C fires over an hour duration. During such conditions, however, collecting data under varying parameters can be challenging; therefore, a Finite Element Analysis model of the filter was conducted using COMSOL ® Multiphysics to analyze the effects of fire. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) modelling offers several opportunities: researchers can quickly and easily consider impacts of potential design changes, material selection, and flow characterization on filter performance. Specifically, this model provides stress references for the sealant at high temperatures. Modeling of full filter assemblies was deemed inefficient given the computational requirements, so a section of three tubes from the assembly was modeled. The model looked at the transient heating and thermomechanical stress development during a 500°C air flow at 6 CFM. Significant stresses were found at the ceramic-metal interfaces of the filter, and conservative temperature profiles at locations of interest were plotted. The model can be used for the development of sealants that minimize stresses at the ceramic-metal interface. Further work on the model would include the full filter assembly and consider heat losses to make more accurate predictions.

  4. Metabolomic profiling of heat stress: hardening and recovery of homeostasis in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Overgaard, Johannes; Bundy, Jacob G.

    2006-01-01

    Frequent exposure of terrestrial insects to temperature variation has led to the evolution of protective biochemical and physiological mechanisms, such as the heat shock response, which markedly increases the tolerance to heat stress. Insight into such mechanisms has, so far, mainly relied...... on selective studies of specific compounds or characteristics or studies at the genomic or proteomic levels. In the present study, we have used untargeted NMR metabolomic profiling to examine the biological response to heat stress in Drosophila melanogaster. The metabolite profile was analyzed during recovery...... after exposure to different thermal stress treatments and compared with untreated controls. Both moderate and severe heat stress gave clear effects on the metabolite profiles. The profiles clearly demonstrated that hardening by moderate heat stress led to a faster reestablishment of metabolite...

  5. Occupational Heat Stress Profiles in Selected Workplaces in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Vidhya; Chinnadurai, Jeremiah S; Lucas, Rebekah A I; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2015-12-29

    Health and productivity impacts from occupational heat stress have significant ramifications for the large workforce of India. This study profiled occupational heat stress impacts on the health and productivity of workers in select organized and unorganized Indian work sectors. During hotter and cooler seasons, Wet Bulb Globe Temperatures (WBGT) were used to quantify the risk of heat stress, according to International workplace guidelines. Questionnaires assessed workers' perceived health and productivity impacts from heat stress. A total of 442 workers from 18 Indian workplaces participated (22% and 78% from the organized and unorganized sector, respectively). Overall 82% and 42% of workers were exposed to higher than recommended WBGT during hotter and cooler periods, respectively. Workers with heavy workloads reported more heat-related health issues (chi square = 23.67, p ≤ 0.001) and reduced productivity (chi square = 15.82, p ≤ 0.001), especially the outdoor workers. Heat-rashes, dehydration, heat-syncope and urinogenital symptoms were self-reported health issues. Cited reasons for productivity losses were: extended-work hours due to fatigue/exhaustion, sickness/hospitalization and wages lost. Reducing workplace heat stress will benefit industries and workers via improving worker health and productivity. Adaptation and mitigation measures to tackle heat stress are imperative to protect the present and future workforce as climate change progresses.

  6. Occupational Heat Stress Profiles in Selected Workplaces in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Vidhya; Chinnadurai, Jeremiah S.; Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2015-01-01

    Health and productivity impacts from occupational heat stress have significant ramifications for the large workforce of India. This study profiled occupational heat stress impacts on the health and productivity of workers in select organized and unorganized Indian work sectors. During hotter and cooler seasons, Wet Bulb Globe Temperatures (WBGT) were used to quantify the risk of heat stress, according to International workplace guidelines. Questionnaires assessed workers’ perceived health and productivity impacts from heat stress. A total of 442 workers from 18 Indian workplaces participated (22% and 78% from the organized and unorganized sector, respectively). Overall 82% and 42% of workers were exposed to higher than recommended WBGT during hotter and cooler periods, respectively. Workers with heavy workloads reported more heat-related health issues (chi square = 23.67, p ≤ 0.001) and reduced productivity (chi square = 15.82, p ≤ 0.001), especially the outdoor workers. Heat-rashes, dehydration, heat-syncope and urinogenital symptoms were self-reported health issues. Cited reasons for productivity losses were: extended-work hours due to fatigue/exhaustion, sickness/hospitalization and wages lost. Reducing workplace heat stress will benefit industries and workers via improving worker health and productivity. Adaptation and mitigation measures to tackle heat stress are imperative to protect the present and future workforce as climate change progresses. PMID:26729144

  7. Effect of dietary vitamin E on broiler meat qualities, color, water-holding capacity and shear force value, under heat stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizawa, Yoshinori; Kubota, Masatoshi; Kadowaki, Motoni; Fujimura, Shinobu

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary vitamin E (VE) on broiler meat quality, especially focused on PSE (pale color, soft and exudative), under chronic heat stress (HS) conditions. Twenty-eight-day-old female Ross broilers were kept in independent cages with a controlled temperature of 24°C (normal temperature: NT) or 30°C (high temperature: HT). The NT chickens were fed basal feed. The HT chickens were fed basal feed (HT) or VE (200 mg/kg) added feed (HT + E). Broilers were weighed and slaughtered at 38 days old. The breast muscle was removed immediately and then the samples were used for determination of meat color, pH, water holding capacity (WHC) and shear force value (SFV). Body weight gain and feed intake were significantly decreased in the HT and HT + E groups compared to the NT group. VE supplementation did not affect the growth performance. Chronic HS at 30°C for 10 days may cause deterioration of meat quality such as PSE. The effects of chronic HS on meat quality were most significant in the toughness of broiler breast meat. Supplementation of VE in broiler feed would be effective to prevent the extent of PSE on broiler meat by chronic HS. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  8. Ultrasonic evaluation of heat treatment for stress relief in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittencourt, Marcelo de S.Q.; Lamy, Carlos A.; Goncalves Filho, Orlando J.A.; Payao Filho, Joao da C.

    2000-01-01

    Residual stresses in materials arise due to the manufacturing processes. As a consequence, in the nuclear area some components must suffer a stress relief treatment according to strict criteria. Although these treatments are carefully carried on, concern with nuclear safety is constantly growing. This work proposes a nondestructive ultrasonic method to guarantee the efficiency of the heat treatment. It was used a short peened steel plate with tensile and compressive stresses which was submitted to a stress relief treatment. The results show that the proposed ultrasonic method could be used to confirm the efficiency of the stress relief heat treatment. (author)

  9. Management of climatic heat stress risk in construction: a review of practices, methodologies, and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlinson, Steve; Yunyanjia, Andrea; Li, Baizhan; Chuanjingju, Carrie

    2014-05-01

    Climatic heat stress leads to accidents on construction sites brought about by a range of human factors emanating from heat induced illness, and fatigue leading to impaired capability, physical and mental. It is an occupational characteristic of construction work in many climates and the authors take the approach of re-engineering the whole safety management system rather than focusing on incremental improvement, which is current management practice in the construction industry. From a scientific viewpoint, climatic heat stress is determined by six key factors: (1) air temperature, (2) humidity, (3) radiant heat, and (4) wind speed indicating the environment, (5) metabolic heat generated by physical activities, and (6) "clothing effect" that moderates the heat exchange between the body and the environment. By making use of existing heat stress indices and heat stress management processes, heat stress risk on construction sites can be managed in three ways: (1) control of environmental heat stress exposure through use of an action-triggering threshold system, (2) control of continuous work time (CWT, referred by maximum allowable exposure duration) with mandatory work-rest regimens, and (3) enabling self-paced working through empowerment of employees. Existing heat stress practices and methodologies are critically reviewed and the authors propose a three-level methodology for an action-triggering, localized, simplified threshold system to facilitate effective decisions by frontline supervisors. The authors point out the need for "regional based" heat stress management practices that reflect unique climatic conditions, working practices and acclimatization propensity by local workers indifferent geographic regions. The authors set out the case for regional, rather than international, standards that account for this uniqueness and which are derived from site-based rather than laboratory-based research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effective geothermal heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelsen, Atle

    2006-01-01

    Scandinavia's currently largest geothermal heating project: the New Ahus hospital, is briefly presented. 300-400 wells on a field outside the hospital are constructed to store energy for both heating and cooling purposes

  11. Heat stress disorders and headache: a case of new daily persistent headache secondary to heat stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Di Lorenzo, C; Ambrosini, A; Coppola, G; Pierelli, F

    2009-01-01

    Headache is considered as a common symptom of heat stress disorders (HSD), but no forms of secondary headache from heat exposure are reported in the International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 Edition (ICHD-II). Heat-stroke (HS) is the HSD most severe condition, it may be divided into two forms: classic (due to a long period environmental heat exposure) and exertional (a severe condition caused by strenuous physical exercises in heat environmental conditions). Here we report the case...

  12. Effects of dietary selenium and vitamin E on immune response and biological blood parameters of broilers reared under thermoneutral or heat stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibian, Mahmood; Ghazi, Shahab; Moeini, Mohammad Mehdi; Abdolmohammadi, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    A study was conducted using 360 broiler chickens to evaluate the effects of dietary vitamin E (0, 125 and 250 mg/kg), selenium (Se, 0, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg), or their different combinations on immune response and blood biological parameters of broilers raised under either thermoneutral (TN, 23.9 °C constant) or heat stress (HS, 23.9 to 37 °C cycling) conditions. Humoral immunity was assessed by intravenous injection of 7 % sheep red blood cell (SRBC) followed by evaluation of serum for antibody titers in primary and secondary responses. Heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio also determined as an indicator of stress. Furthermore, at the end of the experiment, birds were bled for determination of some biological parameters. There was a significant reduction in body weight and feed intake, but the feed conversion ratio increased when the birds were exposed to HS ( P vitamin E and Se ( P > 0.05), whereas feed conversion was improved significantly by 125 mg/kg vitamin E ( P vitamin E resulted in improvement of primary and secondary antibody responses both in TN and HS broilers ( P Vitamin E and Se had interactive effects on anti-SRBC titers; however, no consistent differences were found between dietary levels during the study. The H/L ratio decreased by feeding vitamin E at both levels either under HS or TN conditions ( P < 0.05). The serum concentrations of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol were increased but serum HDL-cholesterol decreased in HS broilers ( P < 0.05).

  13. Short term post-partum heat stress in dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuquay, J. W.; Chapin, L. T.; Brown, W. H.

    1980-06-01

    Since many dairy cows calve during late summer, the objective was to determine if heat stress immediately post-partum would (1) alter metabolism, thus, increasing susceptibility to metabolic disorders, (2) affect lactation and/or (3) affect reproduction. Forty four cows, calving during late summer, were paired with one member of each pair stressed (HS) for the first 10 post-partum days in a hot barn. Controls (CC) were kept in a cooled section of the barn. Plasma drawn weekly for 7 weeks was analyzed in an autoanalyzer for calcium, inor. phosphorus, protein, glucose and cholesterol and by radioimmunoassay for cortisol and progesterone. Ovaries and uteri were palpated weekly. Rectal temperatures were significant higher for HS during the first 10 post-partum days. No significant effects on plasma constituents were observed during the 10-day treatment period. For the 7-week period, glucose and cholesterol were lower in HS, as were cyclic peaks of progesterone and cortisol. Both calcium and inorganic phosphorus remained clinically low for the 7 weeks, but no treatment effects were seen. Uteri of HS involuted more rapidly than the CC. Treatment did not affect reproductive efficiency. Lactation milk yields did not differ, but milk fat percent was lower in HS. Heat stress immediately post-partum altered lipid metabolism, but the animal's compensatory mechanisms prevented reduction in milk production or reproductive efficiency.

  14. Transient thermal stresses in an orthotropic finite rectangular plate due to arbitrary surface heat-generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The transient thermal stresses in an orthotropic finite rectangular plate due to arbitrary surface heat-generations on two edges are studied by means of the Airy stress function. The purposes of this paper are to present a method of determing the transient thermal stresses in an orthographic rectangular plate with four edges of distinct thermal boundary condition of the third kind which exactly satisfy the traction-free conditions of shear stress over all boundaries including four corners of the plate, and to consider the effects of the anisotropies of material properties and the convective heat transfer on the upper and lower surfaces on the thermal stress distribution. (orig.)

  15. Propofol alleviate oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in endothelial cells after heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li LI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the protective effect of propofol on endothelial cells during heat stress and its protective effect to mitochondra. Methods Heat stress model of human umbilical vein endothelial cell was established when cells were incubated at 43℃ for 2h, then further incubted at 37℃, 5%CO2 for 6h. The experimental group was subdivided into six groups, including 37℃ group, 37℃ plus intralipid group (negative control group, 37℃ plus propofol group, 43℃ plus propofol group, 43℃ plus intralipid group, H2O2 plus propofol group (positive control group; Pretreated with 50μmol/L propofol, 0.2ml intralipid or 25μmol/L H2O2 before heat stress at 43℃, while the cells in the control group were incubated at 37℃. Cell viability was tested by CCK-8. ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential and the changes in mitochondrial permeability transition pore were determined by flow cytometry. The level of ATP was detected by fluorescein-luciferase. The changes of caspase-9 and caspase-3 were analyzed by Caspase Activity Assay Kit. Results HUVESs cell viability and damage of mitochondra were significantly decreased after heat stress. Compared with 43℃ heat stress group, pretreatment with propofol induced the recovery of cell viability and the ROS levels were significantly decreased in HUVEC cells (P<0.05. Meanwhile, the number of cells representing the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (the proportion of JC-1 monomer was significantly decreased (P<0.05 by propofol. The average fluorescence intensity of calcein which representing the MPTP changes and intracellular ATP content was significantly increased (P<0.05. In addition, the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway mediated by caspase-9/3 was also inhibited. Conclusions Propofol have anti-oxidative, anti-apoptosis and mitochondria protective effect against endothelial cell injury during heat stress. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.06.04

  16. Effects of Favorable Alleles for Water-Soluble Carbohydrates at Grain Filling on Grain Weight under Drought and Heat Stresses in Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiaoping; Li, Runzhi; Jing, Ruilian

    2014-01-01

    Drought, heat and other abiotic stresses during grain filling can result in reductions in grain weight. Conserved water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) at early grain filling play an important role in partial compensation of reduced carbon supply. A diverse population of 262 historical winter wheat accessions was used in the present study. There were significant correlations between 1000-grain weight (TGW) and four types of WSC, viz. (1) total WSC at the mid-grain filling stage (14 days after flowering) produced by leaves and non-leaf organs; (2) WSC contributed by current leaf assimilation during the mid-grain filling; (3) WSC in non-leaf organs at the mid-grain filling, excluding the current leaf assimilation; and (4) WSC used for respiration and remobilization during the mid-grain filling. Association and favorable allele analyses of 209 genome-wide SSR markers and the four types of WSC were conducted using a mixed linear model. Seven novel favorable WSC alleles exhibited positive individual contributions to TGW, which were verified under 16 environments. Dosage effects of pyramided favorable WSC alleles and significantly linear correlations between the number of favorable WSC alleles and TGW were observed. Our results suggested that pyramiding more favorable WSC alleles was effective for improving both WSC and grain weight in future wheat breeding programs. PMID:25036550

  17. Heat stress intervention research in construction: gaps and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Chan, Albert Ping-Chuen

    2017-06-08

    Developing heat stress interventions for construction workers has received mounting concerns in recent years. However, limited efforts have been exerted to elaborate the rationale, methodology, and practicality of heat stress intervention in the construction industry. This study aims to review previous heat stress intervention research in construction, to identify the major research gaps in methodological issues, and to offer detailed recommendations for future studies. A total of 35 peer-reviewed journal papers have been identified to develop administrative, environmental or personal engineering interventions to safeguard construction workers. It was found that methodological limitations, such as arbitrary sampling methods and unreliable instruments, could be the major obstacle in undertaking heat stress intervention research. To bridge the identified research gaps, this study then refined a research framework for conducting heat stress intervention studies in the construction industry. The proposed research strategy provides researchers and practitioners with fresh insights into expanding multidisciplinary research areas and solving practical problems in the management of heat stress. The proposed research framework may foster the development of heat stress intervention research in construction, which further aids researchers, practitioners, and policymakers in formulating proper intervention strategies.

  18. Single Electrode Heat Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Broers, G. H. J.

    1977-01-01

    The heat evolution at a single irreversibly working electrode is treated onthe basis of the Brønsted heat principle. The resulting equation is analogous to the expression for the total heat evolution in a galvanic cellwith the exception that –DeltaS is substituted by the Peltier entropy, Delta......SP, of theelectrode reaction. eta is the overvoltage at the electrode. This equation is appliedto a high temperature carbonate fuel cell. It is shown that the Peltier entropyterm by far exceeds the heat production due to the irreversible losses, and thatthe main part of heat evolved at the cathode is reabsorbed...

  19. Physiological effects after exposure to heat : A brief literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, C.P.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Many employees are exposed to heat stress during their work. Although the direct effects of heat are well reported, the long term physiological effects occurring after heat exposure are hardly described. The present manuscript addresses these issues in the form of a brief literature review. Repeated

  20. Heat shock and prolonged heat stress attenuate neurotoxin and sporulation gene expression in group I Clostridium botulinum strain ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Katja; Mascher, Gerald; Somervuo, Panu; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    Foodborne pathogenic bacteria are exposed to a number of environmental stresses during food processing, storage, and preparation, and in the human body. In order to improve the safety of food, the understanding of molecular stress response mechanisms foodborne pathogens employ is essential. Many response mechanisms that are activated during heat shock may cross-protect bacteria against other environmental stresses. To better understand the molecular mechanisms Clostridium botulinum, the causative agent of botulism, utilizes during acute heat stress and during adaptation to stressfully high temperature, the C. botulinum Group I strain ATCC 3502 was grown in continuous culture at 39°C and exposed to heat shock at 45°C, followed by prolonged heat stress at 45°C to allow adaptation of the culture to the high temperature. Growth in continuous culture was performed to exclude secondary growth phase effects or other environmental impacts on bacterial gene transcription. Changes in global gene expression profiles were studied using DNA microarray hybridization. During acute heat stress, Class I and III heat shock genes as well as members of the SOS regulon were activated. The neurotoxin gene botA and genes encoding the neurotoxin-associated proteins were suppressed throughout the study. Prolonged heat stress led to suppression of the sporulation machinery whereas genes related to chemotaxis and motility were activated. Induced expression of a large proportion of prophage genes was detected, suggesting an important role of acquired genes in the stress resistance of C. botulinum. Finally, changes in the expression of a large number of genes related to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism indicated remodeling of the cellular metabolism.

  1. Carcass and meat quality traits of rabbits under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeferino, C P; Komiyama, C M; Fernandes, S; Sartori, J R; Teixeira, P S S; Moura, A S A M T

    2013-03-01

    Rabbits are very sensitive to heat stress because they have difficulty eliminating excess body heat. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of heat stress on slaughter weight, dressing percentage and carcass and meat quality traits of rabbits from two genetic groups. Ninety-six weaned rabbits were used: half were from the Botucatu genetic group and half were crossbreds between New Zealand White sires and Botucatu does. They were assigned to a completely randomized design in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (two genetic groups and three ambient temperatures: 18°C, 25°C and 30°C) and kept under controlled conditions in three environmental chambers from 5 to 10 weeks of age. Slaughter took place at 10 weeks, on 2 consecutive days. Meat quality measurements were made in the longissimus muscle. Actual average ambient temperature and relative humidity in the three chambers were 18.4°C and 63.9%, 24.4°C and 80.2% and 29.6°C and 75.9%, respectively. Purebred rabbits were heavier at slaughter and had heavier commercial and reference carcasses than crossbreds at 30°C; however, no differences between genetic groups for these traits were found at lower temperatures. No genetic group × ambient temperature interaction was detected for any other carcass or meat quality traits. The percentages of distal parts of legs, skin and carcass forepart were higher in crossbred rabbits, indicating a lower degree of maturity at slaughter in this group. The percentage of thoracic viscera was higher in the purebreds. Lightness of the longissimus muscle was higher in the purebreds, whereas redness was higher in the crossbreds. Slaughter, commercial and reference carcass weights and the percentages of thoracic viscera, liver and kidneys were negatively related with ambient temperature. Commercial and reference carcass yields, and the percentage of distal parts of legs, on the other hand, had a positive linear relationship with ambient temperature. Meat redness and

  2. Effect of vibrational stress and spaceflight on regulation of heat shock proteins hsp70 and hsp27 in human lymphocytes (Jurkat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubano, L. A.; Lewis, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Heat shock protein levels are increased in cells as a result of exposure to stress. To determine whether heat shock protein regulation could be used to evaluate stress in cells during spaceflight, the response of Jurkat cells to spaceflight and simulated space shuttle launch vibration was investigated by evaluating hsp70 and hsp27 gene expression. Gene expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using mRNA extracted from vibrated, nonvibrated, space-flown, and ground control cells. Results indicate that mechanical stresses of vibration and low gravity do not up-regulate the mRNA for hsp70, although the gene encoding hsp27 is up-regulated by spaceflight but not by vibration. In ground controls, the mRNA for hsp70 and hsp27 increased with time in culture. We conclude that hsp70 gene expression is a useful indicator of stress related to culture density but is not an indicator of the stresses of launch vibration or microgravity. Up-regulation of hsp27 gene expression in microgravity is a new finding.

  3. Blood amino acids profile responding to heat stress in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effects of heat stress on milk protein and blood amino acid profile in dairy cows. Methods Twelve dairy cows with the similar parity, days in milk and milk yield were randomly divided into two groups with six cows raised in summer and others in autumn, respectively. Constant managerial conditions and diets were maintained during the experiment. Measurements and samples for heat stress and no heat stress were obtained according to the physical alterations of the temperature-humidity index. Results Results showed that heat stress significantly reduced the milk protein content (p<0.05. Heat stress tended to decrease milk yield (p = 0.09. Furthermore, heat stress decreased dry matter intake, the concentration of blood glucose and insulin, and glutathione peroxidase activity, while increased levels of non-esterified fatty acid and malondialdehyde (p<0.05. Additionally, the concentrations of blood Thr involved in immune response were increased under heat stress (p<0.05. The concentration of blood Ala, Glu, Asp, and Gly, associated with gluconeogenesis, were also increased under heat stress (p<0.05. However, the concentration of blood Lys that promotes milk protein synthesis was decreased under heat stress (p<0.05. Conclusion In conclusion, this study revealed that more amino acids were required for maintenance but not for milk protein synthesis under heat stress, and the decreased availability of amino acids for milk protein synthesis may be attributed to competition of immune response and gluconeogenesis.

  4. Medical screening and evaluation for heat stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenney, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    Wide interindividual variation exists with respect to heat tolerance, making it difficult to predict individual responses. However, several general physical and physiological characteristics are associated with excessive strain and early exhaustion during work in the heat. Included among these correlates of heat intolerance are a medical history of heat illness, acclimation state, age, body composition and size, aerobic fitness level, hypertension, and drug and alcohol use. The approach of choice for medical evaluation for heat exposure is a two-stage evaluation. First, the examining physician should be encouraged to screen out those workers whose characteristics increase their risk of heat intolerance. Secondly, a short exercise test is proposed which accurately predicts relative heat tolerance across a working population. This test is recommended as an adjunct screening test at the examining physician's disgression

  5. Evaluation of cellular effects of fine particulate matter from combustion of solid fuels used for indoor heating on the Navajo Nation using a stratified oxidative stress response model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Champion, Wyatt M.; Imam, Jemal; Sidhu, Damansher; Salazar, Joseph R.; Majestic, Brian J.; Montoya, Lupita D.

    2018-06-01

    Communities in the Navajo Nation face public health burdens caused in part by the combustion of wood and coal for indoor heating using stoves that are old or in disrepair. Wood and coal combustion emits particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter combustion-derived PM2.5 on Navajo Nation residents. This study tested the hypothesis that PM2.5 generated from solid fuel combustion in stoves commonly used by Navajo residents would induce stratified oxidative stress responses ranging from activation of antioxidant defense to inflammation and cell death in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7). PM2.5 emitted from burning Ponderosa Pine (PP) and Utah Juniper (UJ) wood and Black Mesa (BM) and Fruitland (FR) coal in a stove representative of those widely used by Navajo residents were collected, and their aqueous suspensions used for cellular exposure. PM from combustion of wood had significantly more elemental carbon (EC) (15%) and soluble Ni (0.0029%) than the samples from coal combustion (EC: 3%; Ni: 0.0019%) and was also a stronger activator of antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (11-fold increase vs. control) than that from coal (5-fold increase). Only PM from PP-wood (12-fold) and BM-coal (3-fold) increased the release of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha. Among all samples, PP-wood consistently had the strongest oxidative stress and inflammatory effects. PM components, i.e. low-volatility organic carbon, EC, Cu, Ni and K were positively correlated with the cellular responses. Results showed that, at the concentrations tested, emissions from all fuels did not have significant cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that PM2.5 emitted from combustion of wood and coal commonly used by Navajo residents may negatively impact the health of this community.

  6. Aspergillus oryzae AoSO is a novel component of stress granules upon heat stress in filamentous fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Ting Huang

    Full Text Available Stress granules are a type of cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP granule formed in response to the inhibition of translation initiation, which typically occurs when cells are exposed to stress. Stress granules are conserved in eukaryotes; however, in filamentous fungi, including Aspergillus oryzae, stress granules have not yet been defined. For this reason, here we investigated the formation and localization of stress granules in A. oryzae cells exposed to various stresses using an EGFP fusion protein of AoPab1, a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pab1p, as a stress granule marker. Localization analysis showed that AoPab1 was evenly distributed throughout the cytoplasm under normal growth conditions, and accumulated as cytoplasmic foci mainly at the hyphal tip in response to stress. AoSO, a homolog of Neurospora crassa SO, which is necessary for hyphal fusion, colocalized with stress granules in cells exposed to heat stress. The formation of cytoplasmic foci of AoSO was blocked by treatment with cycloheximide, a known inhibitor of stress granule formation. Deletion of the Aoso gene had effects on the formation and localization of stress granules in response to heat stress. Our results suggest that AoSO is a novel component of stress granules specific to filamentous fungi. The authors would specially like to thank Hiroyuki Nakano and Kei Saeki for generously providing experimental and insightful opinions.

  7. Neuroprotection against oxidative stress by serum from heat acclimated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beit-Yannai, E; Trembovler, V; Horowitz, M; Lazarovici, P; Kohen, R; Shohami, E

    1998-09-25

    Exposure of PC12 cells, to 1% serum derived from normothermic (CON) rats resulted in 79% cell death. Sister cultures treated with 1% serum derived from heat acclimated (ACC) rats, were neuroprotected and expressed a significant reduction in cell death. In PC12 cells exposed to a free radical generator causing an oxidative stress, 90% cell death was measured in CON serum treated cultures, while ACC serum treated cultures were neuroprotected. Xanthine oxidase activity and uric acid (UA) levels were lower in ACC serum compared to CON. Addition of UA to both sera abolished the difference in cell viability, and toxicity of ACC serum reached that of CON. These findings suggest a causal relationship between the lower levels of UA in ACC and the neuroprotective effect observed. The present study proposes heat acclimation as an experimental and/or clinical tool for the achievement of neuroprotection.

  8. Effect of core body temperature, time of day, and climate conditions on behavioral patterns of lactating dairy cows experiencing mild to moderate heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J D; Hall, L W; Collier, R J; Smith, J F

    2015-01-01

    Cattle show several responses to heat load, including spending more time standing. Little is known about what benefit this may provide for the animals. Data from 3 separate cooling management trials were analyzed to investigate the relationship between behavioral patterns in lactating dairy cows experiencing mild to moderate heat stress and their body temperature. Cows (n=157) were each fitted with a leg data logger that measured position and an intravaginal data logger that measures core body temperature (CBT). Ambient conditions were also collected. All data were standardized to 5-min intervals, and information was divided into several categories: when standing and lying bouts were initiated and the continuance of each bout (7,963 lying and 6,276 standing bouts). In one location, cows were continuously subjected to heat-stress levels according to temperature-humidity index (THI) range (THI≥72). The THI range for the other 2 locations was below and above a heat-stress threshold of 72 THI. Overall and regardless of period of day, cows stood up at greater CBT compared with continuing to stand or switching to a lying position. In contrast, cows lay down at lower CBT compared with continuing to lie or switching to a standing position, and lying bouts lasted longer when cows had lower CBT. Standing bouts also lasted longer when cattle had greater CBT, and they were less likely to lie down (less than 50% of lying bouts initiated) when their body temperature was over 38.8°C. Also, cow standing behavior was affected once THI reached 68. Increasing CBT decreased lying duration and increased standing duration. A CBT of 38.93°C marked a 50% likelihood a cow would be standing. This is the first physiological evidence that standing may help cool cows and provides insight into a communally observed behavioral response to heat. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tolerence for work-induced heat stress in men wearing liquidcooled garments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockley, W. V.; Roth, H. P.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation of the heat tolerance in men unable to dispose of metabolic heat as fast as it is produced within the body is discussed. Examinations were made of (a) the effect of work rate (metabolic rate) on tolerance time when body heat storage rate is a fixed quantity, and (b) tolerance time as a function of metabolic rate when heat loss is terminated after a thermal quasi-equilibrium was attained under comfortable conditions of heat transfer. The nature of the physiological mechanisms involved in such heat stress situations, and the possibility of using prediction techniques to establish standard procedures in emergencies involving cooling system failures are also discussed.

  10. Development of stress correction formulae for heat formed steel plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Kyun Lim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The heating process such as line heating, triangular heating and so on is widely used in plate forming of shell plates found in bow and stern area of outer shell in a ship. Local shrinkage during heating process is main physical phenomenon used in plate forming process. As it is well appreciated, the heated plate undergoes the change in material and mechanical properties around heated area due to the harsh thermal process. It is, therefore, important to investigate the changes of physical and mechanical properties due to heating process in order to use them plate the design stage of shell plates. This study is concerned with the development of formula of plastic hardening constitutive equation for steel plate on which line heating is applied. In this study the stress correction formula for the heated plate has been developed based on the numerical simulation of tension test with varying plate thickness and heating speed through the regression analysis of multiple variable case. It has been seen the developed formula shows very good agreement with results of numerical simulation. This paper ends with usefulness of the present formula in examining the structural characteristic of ship's hull. Keywords: Heat input, Heat transfer analysis, Line heating, Shell plate, Stress correction, Thermo-elasto-plastic analysis

  11. Effects of Satureja khuzistanica essential oils in drinking water on mortality, production performance, water intake, and organ weights in broiler chickens reared under heat stress condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravinia, H

    2015-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to examine the effects on mortality, production performance, water intake (WI), and organ weight of Satureja khuzistanica essential oil (SkEO) using 720 1-day-old Arian broiler chicks in a 42-day trial. Experimental treatments were addition of 0 (control(-)), 200, 300, 400, and 500 mg/L SkEO or 500 mg/L polysorbate 80 (control(+)) into drinking water. The birds were kept under natural ambient temperatures 4 to 6 °C above standard recommendation from days 22 to 42 of age. Addition of SkEO into drinking water at 200 and 500 mg/L decreased weight gain (P  0.05). Supplementation of drinking water with 200, 300, 400, and 500 mg/L SkEO resulted in a 0.47, 4.40, 8.60, and 12.93% decrease in WI, respectively, from days 1 to 42 of age. The calculated European broiler index was greater for the birds received 400 mg/L of SkEO in their drinking water compared with that of the other birds (P water for heat-stressed broiler chickens improves economic efficiency possibly by promoting digestion process, creating miniscule improvement in FCR and lowered mortality rate.

  12. Age, smoking habits, heat stress, and their interactive effects with carbon monoxide and peroxyacetyl nitrate on man's aerobic power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, P.B.; Drinkwater, B.L.; Horvath, S.M.; Ruhling, R.O.; Gliner, J.A.; Sutton, J.C.; Bolduan, N.W.

    1972-10-01

    The interactive effects of age, smoking habits, and heat stress with carbon monoxide and peroxyacetyl nitrate inhalation on human aerobic power were examined. The subjects included 16 healthy middle-aged males (40-57 years); nine were nonsmokers and seven were smokers. There was no significant change in maximum aerobic power related to the presence of either air pollutant, although total working time was lowered at a temperature of 25/sup 0/C for subjects breathing 50 ppM CO. Older nonsmokers did show a decrement in maximum aerobic power while breathing 50 ppM CO, while older smokers failed to show any change. This difference, however, was related to the initial carboxyhemoglobin levels of the smokers who, when breathing this level of CO, showed only a 14 percent increase in COHb over the initial level as compared to a 200 percent increase in the nonsmokers. Smoking habits were the most influential factor affecting cardiorespiratory responses to maximal exercise in older men. Regardless of ambient conditions, smokers showed a significantly lower (27 percent) aerobic power than nonsmokers. They were also breathing closer to their maximal breathing capacities throughout the exercise period and showed a higher respiratory exchange ratio. The maximum aerobic power of nonsmokers was only 6 percent less than that of younger nonsmokers working under similar conditions, while the aerobic power of the older smokers was 26 percent lower than that of young smokers (24 years).

  13. Expression of HSPs: an adaptive mechanism during long-term heat stress in goats ( Capra hircus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangi, Satyaveer Singh; Gupta, Mahesh; Dangi, Saroj K.; Chouhan, Vikrant Singh; Maurya, V. P.; Kumar, Puneet; Singh, Gyanendra; Sarkar, Mihir

    2015-08-01

    Menacing global rise in surface temperature compelled more focus of research over understanding heat stress response mechanism of animals and mitigation of heat stress. Twenty-four goats divided into four groups ( n = 6) such as NHS (non-heat-stressed), HS (heat-stressed), HS + VC (heat-stressed administered with vitamin C), and HS + VE + Se (heat-stressed administered with vitamin E and selenium). Except NHS group, other groups were exposed to repeated heat stress (42 °C) for 6 h on 16 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected at the end of heat exposure on days 1, 6, 11, and 16. When groups compared between days, expression of all heat shock proteins (HSPs) showed a similar pattern as first peak on day 1, reached to basal level on the sixth day, and followed by second peak on day 16. The relative messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of HSP 60, HSP70, and HSP90 was observed highest ( P < 0.05) in HS group, followed by antioxidant-administered group on days 1 and 16, which signifies that antioxidants have dampening effect on HSP expression. HSP105/110 expression was highest ( P < 0.05) on day 16. We conclude that HSP expression pattern is at least two-peak phenomenon, i.e., primary window of HSP protection on the first day followed by second window of protection on day 16. HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90 play an important role during the initial phase of heat stress acclimation whereas HSP105/110 joins this cascade at later phase. Antioxidants may possibly attenuate the HSP expression by reducing the oxidative stress.

  14. A review of heat stress and its management in the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waner, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of heat stress on plant operator performance is discussed. Sources of heat stress are reviewed, in particular, those unique to the Nuclear Power Industry. Measurement techniques correlating environmental conditions with physiological responses are covered, along with suggested assessment indices to establish criteria for worker health and safety. Available major countermeasures are described and include those categorized as, procedural, personal support systems, and plant betterment/engineering programs. Data, recommended standards, and industry practices are presented as viable guidelines along with references and information resources to assist the reader in establishing and implementing programs for managing heat stress

  15. Ocular blood flow decreases during passive heat stress in resting humans

    OpenAIRE

    Ikemura, Tsukasa; Miyaji, Akane; Kashima, Hideaki; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Background Heat stress induces various physiological changes and so could influence ocular circulation. This study examined the effect of heat stress on ocular blood flow. Findings Ocular blood flow, end-tidal carbon dioxide (P ETCO2) and blood pressure were measured for 12 healthy subjects wearing water-perfused tube-lined suits under two conditions of water circulation: (1) at 35°C (normothermia) for 30 min and (2) at 50°C for 90 min (passive heat stress). The blood-flow velocities in the s...

  16. Proteomics analysis of alfalfa response to heat stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Li

    Full Text Available The proteome responses to heat stress have not been well understood. In this study, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Huaiyin seedlings were exposed to 25 °C (control and 40 °C (heat stress in growth chambers, and leaves were collected at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment, respectively. The morphological, physiological and proteomic processes were negatively affected under heat stress. Proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE, and differentially expressed protein spots were identified by mass spectrometry (MS. Totally, 81 differentially expressed proteins were identified successfully by MALDI-TOF/TOF. These proteins were categorized into nine classes: including metabolism, energy, protein synthesis, protein destination/storage, transporters, intracellular traffic, cell structure, signal transduction and disease/defence. Five proteins were further analyzed for mRNA levels. The results of the proteomics analyses provide a better understanding of the molecular basis of heat-stress responses in alfalfa.

  17. Heat transfer and thermal stress analysis in grooved tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANSYS (1997) computer code has been used to analyse the thermal ... The numerical method is used succesfully to solve the governing equations ... thermal stress is an important criterion for consideration in the design of new compact heat.

  18. Complexity in modeling of residual stresses and strains during polymerization of bone cement: effects of conversion, constraint, heat transfer, and viscoelastic property changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2006-12-15

    Aseptic loosening of cemented joint prostheses remains a significant concern in orthopedic biomaterials. One possible contributor to cement loosening is the development of porosity, residual stresses, and local fracture of the cement that may arise from the in-situ polymerization of the cement. In-situ polymerization of acrylic bone cement is a complex set of interacting processes that involve polymerization reactions, heat generation and transfer, full or partial mechanical constraint, evolution of conversion- and temperature-dependent viscoelastic material properties, and thermal and conversion-driven changes in the density of the cement. Interactions between heat transfer and polymerization can lead to polymerization fronts moving through the material. Density changes during polymerization can, in the presence of mechanical constraint, lead to the development of locally high residual strain energy and residual stresses. This study models the interactions during bone cement polymerization and determines how residual stresses develop in cement and incorporates temperature and conversion-dependent viscoelastic behavior. The results show that the presence of polymerization fronts in bone cement result in locally high residual strain energies. A novel heredity integral approach is presented to track residual stresses incorporating conversion and temperature dependent material property changes. Finally, the relative contribution of thermal- and conversion-dependent strains to residual stresses is evaluated and it is found that the conversion-based strains are the major contributor to the overall behavior. This framework provides the basis for understanding the complex development of residual stresses and can be used as the basis for developing more complex models of cement behavior.

  19. Exploring Heat Stress Relief Measures among the Australian Labour Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Kerstin K; Mathew, Supriya; Garnett, Stephen T

    2018-02-26

    Australia experiences frequent heat waves and generally high average temperatures throughout the continent with substantial impacts on human health and the economy. People adapt to heat by adopting various relief measures in their daily lives including changing their behaviour. Many labour intensive outdoor industries implement standards for heat stress management for their workforce. However, little is known about how people cope with heat at their workplaces apart from studies targeting some specific industries where labourers are exposed to extreme heat. Here, we analysed responses from 1719 people in the Australian labour force to self-reported heat stress and associated coping mechanisms. Three quarters of respondents experienced heat stress at their workplace with fatigue and headache being the two most frequently stated symptoms. Almost all of those who were affected by heat would hydrate (88%), 67% would cool, and 44% would rest as a strategy for coping with heat. About 10% intended to change their jobs because of heat stress in the workplace. We found differences in heat relief measures across gender, education, health, level of physical intensity of job, and time spent working outside. People working in jobs that were not very demanding physically were more likely to choose cooling down as a relief measure, while those in labour intensive jobs and jobs that required considerable time outside were more likely to rest. This has potential consequences for their productivity and work schedules. Heat affects work in Australia in many types of industry with impact dependent on workforce acclimatisation, yet public awareness and work relief plans are often limited to outdoor and labour intensive industries. Industries and various levels of government in all sectors need to implement standards for heat management specific to climate zones to help people cope better with high temperatures as well as plan strategies in anticipation of projected temperature

  20. Exploring Heat Stress Relief Measures among the Australian Labour Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin K. Zander

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Australia experiences frequent heat waves and generally high average temperatures throughout the continent with substantial impacts on human health and the economy. People adapt to heat by adopting various relief measures in their daily lives including changing their behaviour. Many labour intensive outdoor industries implement standards for heat stress management for their workforce. However, little is known about how people cope with heat at their workplaces apart from studies targeting some specific industries where labourers are exposed to extreme heat. Here, we analysed responses from 1719 people in the Australian labour force to self-reported heat stress and associated coping mechanisms. Three quarters of respondents experienced heat stress at their workplace with fatigue and headache being the two most frequently stated symptoms. Almost all of those who were affected by heat would hydrate (88%, 67% would cool, and 44% would rest as a strategy for coping with heat. About 10% intended to change their jobs because of heat stress in the workplace. We found differences in heat relief measures across gender, education, health, level of physical intensity of job, and time spent working outside. People working in jobs that were not very demanding physically were more likely to choose cooling down as a relief measure, while those in labour intensive jobs and jobs that required considerable time outside were more likely to rest. This has potential consequences for their productivity and work schedules. Heat affects work in Australia in many types of industry with impact dependent on workforce acclimatisation, yet public awareness and work relief plans are often limited to outdoor and labour intensive industries. Industries and various levels of government in all sectors need to implement standards for heat management specific to climate zones to help people cope better with high temperatures as well as plan strategies in anticipation of projected

  1. Thermotolerance and responses to short duration heat stress in tropical and temperate species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marias, D.; Meinzer, F. C.; Still, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature and heat waves are predicted to increase throughout the 21st century in both tropical and temperate regions. Tropical species are vulnerable to heat stress because of the higher radiation load and the narrower distribution of temperatures typically experienced compared to extratropical species. Germinant seedlings are also vulnerable to heat stress because they inhabit the boundary layer close to the soil surface where intense heating occurs. We quantified the effect of leaf age and heat stress duration (45 min, 90 min) on leaf thermotolerance and whole plant physiological responses to heat stress in Coffea arabica (COAR) saplings. We also evaluated leaf thermotolerance and whole plant responses to heat stress of seedlings in two populations each of Pinus ponderosa (PIPO) and Pseudotsuga menziesii (PSME) from contrasting climates. Thermotolerance of detached leaves/needles was evaluated using chlorophyll fluorescence (FV/FM, FO) and electrolyte leakage. After exposure of whole plants to a simulated heat wave in a growth chamber, we monitored FV/FM, photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (gs), non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs), and carbon isotope ratios (δ13C). In COAR, thermotolerance and rate of recovery increased with leaf age. Following heat treatment, reductions in A and gs led to reduced intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) and increased leaf temperatures. NSC results suggested that starch was converted to sugars for recovery from heat stress and phloem transport was inhibited. Plants failed to flower in both heat stress duration treatments. In PIPO and PSME, heat treatment induced significant reductions in FV/FM and A. NSC results suggested that starch was converted to glucose + fructose to aid recovery from heat-induced damage. Populations from drier sites had greater δ13C values than those from wetter sites, consistent with higher iWUE of populations from drier climates. Thermotolerance and heat stress responses appeared to be

  2. Are adult life history traits in oriental fruit moth affected by a mild pupal heat stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jincheng; Cheng, Xiongbin; Hoffmann, Ary A; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2017-10-01

    Thermal stress at one life stage can affect fitness at a later stage in ectotherms with complex life cycles. Most relevant studies have focused on extreme stress levels, but here we also show substantial fitness effects in a moth when pupae are exposed to a relatively mild and sublethal heat stress. We consider the impact of a 35°C heat stress of 2h in three geographically separate populations of the oriental fruit moth (OFM, Grapholita molesta) from northern, middle and southern China. Heat stress negatively affected fecundity but increased adult heat resistance and adult longevity. Fitness effects were mostly consistent across populations but there were also some population differences. In the Shenyang population from northern China, there was a hormetic effect of heat on female longevity not evident in the other populations. Adults from all populations had higher LT 50 s due to heat stress after pupal exposure to the sublethal stress. These results highlight that the pupal stage is a particularly sensitive window for development and they have implications for seasonal adaptation in uncertain environments as well as changes in pest dynamics under climate warming. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermometry, calorimetry, and mean body temperature during heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Glen P; Jay, Ollie

    2013-10-01

    Heat balance in humans is maintained at near constant levels through the adjustment of physiological mechanisms that attain a balance between the heat produced within the body and the heat lost to the environment. Heat balance is easily disturbed during changes in metabolic heat production due to physical activity and/or exposure to a warmer environment. Under such conditions, elevations of skin blood flow and sweating occur via a hypothalamic negative feedback loop to maintain an enhanced rate of dry and evaporative heat loss. Body heat storage and changes in core temperature are a direct result of a thermal imbalance between the rate of heat production and the rate of total heat dissipation to the surrounding environment. The derivation of the change in body heat content is of fundamental importance to the physiologist assessing the exposure of the human body to environmental conditions that result in thermal imbalance. It is generally accepted that the concurrent measurement of the total heat generated by the body and the total heat dissipated to the ambient environment is the most accurate means whereby the change in body heat content can be attained. However, in the absence of calorimetric methods, thermometry is often used to estimate the change in body heat content. This review examines heat exchange during challenges to heat balance associated with progressive elevations in environmental heat load and metabolic rate during exercise. Further, we evaluate the physiological responses associated with heat stress and discuss the thermal and nonthermal influences on the body's ability to dissipate heat from a heat balance perspective.

  4. Effect of natural betaine on estimates of semen quality in mature AI boars during summer heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezón, F A; Stewart, K R; Schinckel, A P; Barnes, W; Boyd, R D; Wilcock, P; Woodliff, J

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of supplemental dietary betaine at three concentrations (0.0%, 0.63% and 1.26%) on semen characteristics, quality and quality after storage on boars. The trial was conducted between 22 July and 1 October 2014 in a boar stud located in Oklahoma. Boars were blocked by age within genetic line and randomly allotted to receive 0% (CON, n (line T)=22, n (line L)=10), 0.63% (BET-0.63%, n (line T)=21, n (line L)=6) or 1.26% (BET-1.26%, n (line T)=23, n (line L)=7). The diets containing betaine were fed over 10 weeks, to ensure supplemental betaine product (96% betaine) daily intakes of 16.34 and 32.68g, for the BET-0.63% and BET-1.26% diets, respectively. Serum homocysteine concentrations were less for animals with betaine treatments (P=0.016). Rectal temperatures of the boars were unaffected by betaine diets. Betaine tended to increase total sperm in the ejaculates when collectively compared with data of the control animals (P=0.093). Sperm morphology analysis indicated there was a greater percent of sperm with distal midpiece reflex (P=0.009) and tail (P=0.035) abnormalities in boars fed the BET-1.26% than boars fed the BET-0.63% diet. Betaine concentration in the seminal plasma was greater in boars with betaine treatments, with animals being fed the 0.63% and 1.26% diets having 59.2% and 54.5% greater betaine concentrations in seminal plasma as compared with boars of the control group (P=0.046). In conclusion, betaine supplementation at 0.63% and 1.26% tended to increase sperm concentration in the ejaculates by 6% and 13%, respectively, with no negative impacts on semen quality when 0.63% of betaine was included in the diet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Heat stress and recovery of photosystem II efficiency in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars acclimated to different growth temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Sabibul; Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The effect of heat stress on photosystem II (PS II) efficiency and post-stress recovery was studied in four wheat cultivars using chlorophyll fluorescence. The main aim was to examine the cultivar differences in relation to inhibition and recovery of PSII functionality after heat stress...... and 25 °C) and subjected to heat stress (40 °C) for two days at early tillering and three days at anthesis and early grain development stages. The plants were returned to their original growth conditions after heat stress and recovery was observed for three days. The maximum photochemical efficiency (Fv...... heat tolerance characteristics as compared to the other three cultivars. The largest decrease in Fv/Fm and F′q/F′m after heat stress occurred in the cultivar PWS7, which did not recover completely after 72 h. All cultivars grown at 25 °C had a slightly increased heat tolerance and better recovery...

  6. Leaf Proteome Analysis Reveals Prospective Drought and Heat Stress Response Mechanisms in Soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aayudh Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drought and heat are among the major abiotic stresses that affect soybean crops worldwide. During the current investigation, the effect of drought, heat, and drought plus heat stresses was compared in the leaves of two soybean varieties, Surge and Davison, combining 2D-DIGE proteomic data with physiology and biochemical analyses. We demonstrated how 25 differentially expressed photosynthesis-related proteins affect RuBisCO regulation, electron transport, Calvin cycle, and carbon fixation during drought and heat stress. We also observed higher abundance of heat stress-induced EF-Tu protein in Surge. It is possible that EF-Tu might have activated heat tolerance mechanisms in the soybean. Higher level expressions of heat shock-related protein seem to be regulating the heat tolerance mechanisms. This study identifies the differential expression of various abiotic stress-responsive proteins that regulate various molecular processes and signaling cascades. One inevitable outcome from the biochemical and proteomics assays of this study is that increase of ROS levels during drought stress does not show significant changes at the phenotypic level in Davison and this seems to be due to a higher amount of carbonic anhydrase accumulation in the cell which aids the cell to become more resistant to cytotoxic concentrations of H2O2.

  7. Heat stress mortality and desired adaptation responses of healthcare system in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błażejczyk, Anna; Błażejczyk, Krzysztof; Baranowski, Jarosław; Kuchcik, Magdalena

    2018-03-01

    Heat stress is one of the environmental factors influencing the health of individuals and the wider population. There is a large body of research to document significant increases in mortality and morbidity during heat waves all over the world. This paper presents key results of research dealing with heat-related mortality (HRM) in various cities in Poland which cover about 25% of the country's population. Daily mortality and weather data reports for the years 1991-2000 were used. The intensity of heat stress was assessed by the universal thermal climate index (UTCI). The research considers also the projections of future bioclimate to the end of twenty-first century. Brain storming discussions were applied to find necessary adaptation strategies of healthcare system (HCS) in Poland, to minimise negative effects of heat stress. In general, in days with strong and very strong heat stress, ones must expect increase in mortality (in relation to no thermal stress days) of 12 and 47%, respectively. Because of projected rise in global temperature and heat stress frequency, we must expect significant increase in HRM to the end of twenty-first century of even 165% in comparison to present days. The results of research show necessity of urgent implementation of adaptation strategies to heat in HCS.

  8. Heat transfer and thermal stress analysis in grooved tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heat transfer and thermal stresses, induced by temperature differencesin the internally grooved tubes of heat transfer equipment, have been analysed numerically. The analysis has been conducted for four different kinds of internally grooved tubes and three different mean inlet water velocities. Constant temperature was ...

  9. Effect of dietary supplementation with Rhizopus oryzae or Chrysonilia crassa on growth performance, blood profile, intestinal microbial population, and carcass traits in broilers exposed to heat stress

    OpenAIRE

    S. Sugiharto; T. Yudiarti; I. Isroli; E. Widiastuti; F. D. Putra

    2017-01-01

    Dietary supplementation of additives has recently been part of strategies to deal with the detrimental effects of heat stress (HS) on the performance and carcass traits in broiler chicks. This study aimed to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation with the fungi Rhizopus oryzae or Chrysonilia crassa on growth, blood profile, intestinal microbial population and carcass traits in broiler chicks subjected to HS. R. oryzae and C. crassa are filamentous fungi isolated from...

  10. Heat stress affects male reproduction in a parasitoid wasp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Manh; Bressac, Christophe; Chevrier, Claude

    2013-03-01

    In insects, reproductive success and survival are affected by temperature. Reproduction is more sensitive than other physiological traits. While the effects of heat stress on females are well known, the effects on males are less clear. Hymenopteran parasitoids are valuable for studying the consequences of heat stress on male reproduction. In these species, through arrhenotoquous parthenogenesis, the sex ratio of the offspring is directly dependent on the sperm stock acquired by females during copulation. In the lab, heat temperature treatments (32-44°C) were applied for 3 days in the pupal stage of Anisopteromalus calandrae males, and development was completed at 30°C. Three different effects were observed depending on the temperature: mortality above 42°C, sterility of emerging males at 40°C, and sub-fertility at 38°C. This sub-fertility is characterized by a dramatic decrease in male sperm supplies, of up to 7% compared to control males. In the course of ageing, the sperm stock of sub-fertile males increases but never reaches the level of control males. Survival was significantly higher in control (30°C) males than those treated at 38°C. Male mating ability was similar whatever the treatment (control and 38°C), but females mated with 38°C-treated males stored 100 times less sperm on average than those mated with control males. The offspring sex ratio of females mated with 38°C-treated males was strongly male biased. The physiological mechanisms are as yet unknown. The relationship between temperature, sperm stock and sex ratio should be taken into account in the management of parasitoids for integrated pest management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recovery of normal testicular temperature after scrotal heat stress in rams assessed by infrared thermography and its effects on seminal characteristics and testosterone blood serum concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Maíra Bianchi Rodrigues; Andrade, André Furugen Cesar de; Arruda, Rubens Paes de; Batissaco, Leonardo; Florez-Rodriguez, Shirley Andrea; Oliveira, Bruna Marcele Martins de; Torres, Mariana Andrade; Lançoni, Renata; Ravagnani, Gisele Mouro; Prado Filho, Roberto Romano do; Vellone, Vinícius Silva; Losano, João Diego de Agostini; Franci, Celso Rodrigues; Nichi, Marcílio; Celeghini, Eneiva Carla Carvalho

    2016-08-01

    Reestablishment of testicular normal temperature after testicular heat stress is unknown and its effect varies widely. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of scrotal insulation (IN) on testicular temperature and its relation to semen quality and testosterone blood serum concentration. For this, 33 rams were used; 17 submitted to IN for 72 hours (using bags involving the testes) and 16 not submitted to IN (control group). The experiment was performed between August and December 2013 in Pirassununga, Brazil (21°56″13″ South/47°28'24″ West). Seminal characteristics, testosterone blood serum concentration, rectal temperature (RT), respiratory frequency, scrotal superficies mean temperature (SSMT), and eye area mean temperature (EAMT) were analyzed 7 days before IN and 21, 35, 49, 63, and 90 days afterward. Scrotal superficies mean temperature and EAMT were measured by thermography camera FLIR T620. Testosterone was evaluated by radioimmunoassay. Analysis of variance was used to determine the main effects of treatment, time, and treatment-by-time interaction using PROC MIXED of SAS software adding command REPEAT. Pearson correlation test was used to verify correlation between SSMT, EAMT, RT, and respiratory frequency. Significant difference was considered when P ≤ 0.05. At the end of IN, SSMT was higher (P blood serum concentration was lesser in insulated rams (P = 0.03). Thus, the difference of 1.12 °C between RT and testicular temperature impacts semen quality and testosterone blood serum concentration. Moreover, this study shows that rams can recover testes temperature efficiently toward IN and that infrared thermography is an efficient tool to identify differences on SSMT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prostaglandin E synthase interacts with inducible heat shock protein 70 after heat stress in bovine primary dermal fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Constanze; Viergutz, Torsten; Schwerin, Manfred; Weitzel, Joachim M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to heat stress in dairy cows leads to undesired side effects that are reflected by complex alterations in endocrine parameters, such as reduced progesterone, estradiol, and thyroid hormone concentrations. These endocrine maladaptation leads to failure to resume cyclicity, a poor uterine environment and inappropriate immune responses in postpartum dairy cows. Prostaglandins (PG's) are lipid mediators, which serve as signal molecules in response to various external stimuli as well as to cell-specific internal signal molecules. A central role in PG synthesis plays prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) that catalyzes the isomerization of PGH2 to PGE2 .The present study was conducted to investigate heat stress associated PGES expression. Expression of PGES and inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), as a putative chaperonic protein, was studied in bovine primary fibroblasts under different heat shock conditions. Bovine primary fibroblasts produce PGE2 at homoiothermical norm temperature (38.5°C in bovine), but reduce PGE2 production rates under extreme heat stress (at 45°C for 6 h). By contrast, PGE2 production rates are maintained after a milder heat stress (at 41.5°C for 6 h). PGE2 synthesis is abolished by application of cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, indicating de novo synthesis. Heat stress increases HSP70 but not PGES protein concentrations. HSP70 physically interacts with PGES and the PGES-HSP70 complex did not dissociate upon heat stress at 45°C even after returning the cells to 37°C. The PGE2 production negatively correlates with the portion of PGES-HSP70 complex. These results suggest a protein interaction between HSP70 and PGES in dermal fibroblast cells. Blockage of PGES protein by HSP70 seems to interfere with the regulatory processes essential for cellular adaptive protection. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  13. Chinese Herbal Medicines as Potential Agents for Alleviation of Heat Stress in Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokryazdan, Parisa; Jahromi, Mohammad Faseleh; Md Saadand, Salwani; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Idrus, Zulkifli; Zhou, Hailong; Diao, Xiao Ping; Liang, Juan Boo

    2017-01-01

    Heat stress negatively affects the productivity of chickens in commercial poultry farms in humid tropics. In this study, the concentrations and types of the antioxidant compounds of eight Chinese herbal medicines, which have previously demonstrated promising effects on suppressing heat stress as a mixture, were investigated using reversed-phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography, spectrophotometry, Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry, and Gas-Liquid Chromatography. Our results provided the levels of phenolic compounds, total amounts of sugars, and total unsaturated fatty acids in the herbal extracts. Apart from the detection and quantification of the active ingredients of herbs that have the potential to mitigate heat stress in poultry, results of this study also provide useful data for developing an efficient and accurate formulation of the herbs' mixtures in order to induce positive effects against heat stress in in vivo studies.

  14. Chinese Herbal Medicines as Potential Agents for Alleviation of Heat Stress in Poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Shokryazdan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat stress negatively affects the productivity of chickens in commercial poultry farms in humid tropics. In this study, the concentrations and types of the antioxidant compounds of eight Chinese herbal medicines, which have previously demonstrated promising effects on suppressing heat stress as a mixture, were investigated using reversed-phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography, spectrophotometry, Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry, and Gas-Liquid Chromatography. Our results provided the levels of phenolic compounds, total amounts of sugars, and total unsaturated fatty acids in the herbal extracts. Apart from the detection and quantification of the active ingredients of herbs that have the potential to mitigate heat stress in poultry, results of this study also provide useful data for developing an efficient and accurate formulation of the herbs’ mixtures in order to induce positive effects against heat stress in in vivo studies.

  15. The interactive association between heat shock factor 1 and heat shock proteins in primary myocardial cells subjected to heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shu; Chen, Hongbo; Cheng, Yanfen; Nasir, Mohammad Abdel; Kemper, Nicole; Bao, Endong

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a heat shock transcription factor that rapidly induces heat shock gene transcription following thermal stress. In this study, we subjected primary neonatal rat myocardial cells to heat stress in vitro to create a model system for investigating the trends in expression and association between various heat shock proteins (HSPs) and HSF1 under adverse environmental conditions. After the cells were subjected to heat stress at 42˚C for different periods of time, HSP and HSF1 mRNA and protein levels were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis in the heat-stressed cells. The HSF1 expression levels significantly increased in the cells following 120 min of exposure to heat stess compared to the levels observed at the beginning of heat stress exposure. HSP90 followed a similar trend in expression to HSF1, whereas HSP70 followed an opposite trend. However, no significant changes were observed in the crystallin, alpha B (CRYAB, also known as HSP beta-5) expression levels during the 480‑min period of exposure to heat stress. The interaction between the HSPs and HSF1 was analyzed by STRING 9.1, and it was found that HSF1 interacted with HSP90 and HSP70, and that it did not play a role in regulating CRYAB expression. Based on our findings, HSP70 may suppress HSF1 in rat myocardial cells under conditions of heat stress. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HSF1 is not the key factor for all HSPs, and this was particularly the case for CRYAB.

  16. Differential response of Aspen and Birch trees to heat stress under elevated carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph N.T. Darbah; Thomas D. Sharkey; Carlo Calfapietra; David F. Karnosky

    2010-01-01

    The effect of high temperature on photosynthesis of isoprene-emitting (aspen) and non-isoprene-emitting (birch) trees were measured under elevated CO2 and ambient conditions. Aspen trees tolerated heat better than birch trees and elevated CO2 protected photosynthesis of both species against moderate heat stress. Elevated CO...

  17. Heat transfer and thermal stress analysis in fluid-structure coupled field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ming-Jian; Pan, Jun-Hua; Ni, Ming-Jiu; Zhang, Nian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this work, three-dimensional simulation on conjugate heat transfer in a fluid-structure coupled field was carried out. The structure considered is from the dual-coolant lithium-lead (DCLL) blanket, which is the key technology of International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The model was developed based on finite element-finite volume method and was employed to investigate mechanical behaviours of Flow Channel Insert (FCI) and heat transfer in the blanket under nuclear reaction. Temperature distribution, thermal deformation and thermal stresses were calculated in this work, and the effects of thermal conductivity, convection heat transfer coefficient and flow velocity were analyzed. Results show that temperature gradients and thermal stresses of FCI decrease when FCI has better heat conductivity. Higher convection heat transfer coefficient will result in lower temperature, thermal deformations and stresses in FCI. Analysis in this work could be a theoretical basis of blanket optimization. - Highlights: • We use FVM and FEM to investigate FCI structural safety considering heat transfer and FSI effects. • Higher convective heat transfer coefficient is beneficial for the FCI structural safety without much affect to bulk flow temperature. • Smaller FCI thermal conductivity can better prevent heat leakage into helium, yet will increase FCI temperature gradient and thermal stress. • Three-dimensional simulation on conjugate heat transfer in a fluid-structure coupled field was carried out

  18. Practical Considerations for Thermal Stresses Induced by Surface Heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid surface heating can induce large stresses in solids. A relatively simple model, assuming full constraint in two dimensions and no constraint in the third dimension, can adequately model stresses in a wide variety of situations. This paper derives this simple model, and supports it with criteria for its validity. Phenomena that are considered include non-zero penetration depths for the heat deposition, spatial non-uniformity in the surface heating, and elastic waves. Models for each of these cases, using simplified geometries, are used to develop quantitative limits for their applicability

  19. Effect of feeding Rumen-protected capsule containing niacin, K2SO4, vitamin C, and gamma-aminobutyric acid on heat stress and performance of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, W J; Zhen, L; Zhang, J X; Lian, S; Si, H F; Guo, J R; Yang, H M

    2017-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of supplemental rumen-protected capsule (RPC) on animal performance, serological indicators, and serum heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) of lactating Holstein cows under heat stress (HS). During summer months, 30 healthy multiparous lactating Holstein cows with a parity number of 3.1 ± 0.44, 70 ± 15 d in milk, an average body weight of 622 ± 62kg, and an average milk yield of 32.28 ± 0.96kg/d, were used. The cows were randomly allocated to two groups: a control group and an RPC-supplemented group (0.13373kg K 2 SO 4 , 0.02488kg vitamin C, 0.021148kg niacin, and 0.044784kggamma-aminobutyric acid per cow). During the 42-d experiment, ambient air temperature and relative humidity inside and outside the barn were recorded hourly every day for the determination of temperature-humidity index (THI). Milk and blood samples were collected every week, and body weight and body condition scoring were measured on day 0. Based on the THI values, the animals had moderate HS. On day 42, the RPC group had lower HSP70, adrenocorticotropic hormone (P = 0.0001), lactate dehydrogenase (P = 0.0338), and IL-6 (P = 0.0724) levels than the control group, with no significant differences in creatine kinase, glucocorticoid, or IL-2 levels. Milk yield, energy-corrected milk, and dry matter intake were higher in RPC than in the control group (P = 0.0196). There were no significant differences in milk fat or daily protein levels between the two groups; however, daily protein and milk fat levels were higher in the RPC group than in the control group (P = 0.0114 and P = 0.0665, respectively). Somatic cell counts were no different between the two groups. In conclusion, RPC may alleviate HS and improve dairy cow performance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Mechanistic electronic model to simulate and predict the effect of heat stress on the functional genomics of HO-1 system: Vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Yogender; Karan, Bhuwan Mohan; Das, Barda Nand; Sinha, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-05-01

    The present work is concerned to model the molecular signalling pathway for vasodilation and to predict the resting young human forearm blood flow under heat stress. The mechanistic electronic modelling technique has been designed and implemented using MULTISIM 8.0 and an assumption of 1V/ degrees C for prediction of forearm blood flow and the digital logic has been used to design the molecular signalling pathway for vasodilation. The minimum forearm blood flow has been observed at 35 degrees C (0 ml 100 ml(-1)min(-1)) and the maximum at 42 degrees C (18.7 ml 100 ml(-1)min(-1)) environmental temperature with respect to the base value of 2 ml 100 ml(-1)min(-1). This model may also enable to identify many therapeutic targets that can be used in the treatment of inflammations and disorders due to heat-related illnesses. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inorganic zinc supplementation modulates heat shock and immune response in heat stressed peripheral blood mononuclear cells of periparturient dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Aasif Ahmad; Aggarwal, Anjali; B, Indu; Aarif, Ovais

    2017-06-01

    Thermal stress in India is one of the major constraints affecting dairy cattle productivity. Every attempt should be made to ameliorate the heat and calving related stress in high producing dairy cows for higher economic returns. In the current study, inorganic zinc was tried to alleviate the adverse effects of thermal stress in periparturient cows. Twelve cows, six each of Sahiwal and Karan Fries (KF) in their second parity with confirmed pregnancy were chosen for the experiment. The blood samples were collected periparturiently on three occasions viz. -21, 0 and +21 days relative to calving. The in vitro study was conducted after isolating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from whole blood. The cultured PBMC were subjected to three different levels of exposures viz. 37°C as control, 42°C to induce thermal stress and 42°C + zinc to ameliorate the adverse effects of high temperature. Heat shock lead to a significant (Pheat shock proteins (HSP). HSP was more on the day of calving as well. KF showed more HSP concentration than Sahiwal breed indicating the heat bearing capacity of later. Zinc treatment to thermally stressed PBMC caused a fall in the HSP concentration in both the breeds during periparturient period. Moreover, heat stress increased significantly (PHeat and calving related stress caused a fall in the IL-12 levels which increased significantly (Pcows. The study could help to alleviate the heat stress and potentiate immunity by providing mineral supplements in periparturient dairy cattle habituating tropics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Environmental heat stress, hyperammonemia and nucleotide metabolism during intermittent exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Rasmussen, Peter; Drust, Barry

    2006-01-01

    ) followed by five 15 s all-out sprints. Control trials were conducted in a 20°C environment while heat stress trials were performed at an ambient temperature of 40°C. Muscle biopsies and venous blood samples were obtained at rest, after 40 min of exercise and following the maximal sprints. Following......Abstract  This study investigated the influence of environmental heat stress on ammonia (NH3) accumulation in relation to nucleotide metabolism and fatigue during intermittent exercise. Eight males performed 40 min of intermittent exercise (15 s at 306±22 W alternating with 15 s of unloaded cycling...... exercise with heat stress, the core and muscle temperatures peaked at 39.5±0.2 and 40.2±0.2°C to be ~ 1°C higher (Pheat stress trial (P

  3. Radiant heat loss, an unexploited path for heat stress reduction in shaded cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, A; Horovitz, T

    2012-06-01

    Reducing thermal radiation on shaded animals reduces heat stress independently of other means of stress relief. Radiant heat exchange was estimated as a function of climate, shade structure, and animal density. Body surface portion exposed to radiant sources in shaded environments was determined by geometrical relations to determine angles of view of radiation sources (roof underside, sky, sun-exposed ground, shaded ground) on the animal's surface. The relative representation of environment radiation sources on the body surface was determined. Animal thermal radiation balance was derived from radiant heat gained from radiation sources (including surrounding animals) and that lost from the animal surface. The animal environment was assumed to have different shade dimensions and temperatures. These were summed to the radiant heat balance of the cow. The data formed served to estimate the effect of changes in intensity of radiation sources, roof and shaded surface dimensions, and animal density on radiant heat balance (Rbal) of cattle. Roof height effect was expressed by effect of roof temperature on Rbal. Roof underside temperature (35 to 75°C) effect on Rbal was reduced by roof height. If roof height were 4m, an increase in its underside temperature from 35 to 75°C would increase mean Rbal from -63 to -2 W·m⁻², whereas if roof height were 10 m, Rbal would only increase from -99 to -88 W·m⁻². A hot ground temperature increase from 35 to 65°C reduced mean Rbal heat loss from -45 to 3 W·m⁻². Increasing the surface of the shaded area had only a minor effect on Rbal and on the effect of hot ground on Rbal. Increasing shade roof height reduced the effect of roof temperature on Rbal to minor levels when height was > 8m. Increasing the roof height from 4 to 10 m decreased Rbal from -32 to -94 W·m⁻². Increasing indirect radiation from 100 to 500 W·m⁻² was associated with an increase in Rbal from -135 to +23 W·m⁻². Their combined effects were lower

  4. Mild heat stress at a young age in Drosophila melanogaster leads to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    effect on stress resistance later in life, and on longevity. ... bouts of mild heat stress (3 h at 34°C) at a young age (days 2, 4 and 6 post-eclosion) or held under .... The mortality during the investigated lifespan .... at least during early senescence.

  5. Using Experts to Validate an Animal Specific Heat Stress Model for Feedlot Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extreme effects of heat stress in a feedlot situation can cause losses exceeding 5% of all the cattle on feed in a single feedlot. These losses can be very devastating to a localized area of feedlot producers. Animal stress is a result of the combination of three different components: environm...

  6. Heat transfer and structure stress analysis of micro packaging component of high power light emitting diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chih-Neng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the heat transfer and structural stress analysis of the micro- scale packaging structure of a high-power light emitting diode. The thermal-effect and thermal-stress of light emitting diode are determined numerically. Light emitting diode is attached to the silicon substrate through the wire bonding process by using epoxy as die bond material. The silicon substrate is etched with holes at the bottom and filled with high conductivity copper material. The chip temperature and structure stress increase with input power consumption. The micro light emitting diode is mounted on the heat sink to increase the heat dissipation performance, to decrease chip temperature, to enhance the material structure reliability and safety, and to avoid structure failure as well. This paper has successfully used the finite element method to the micro-scale light emitting diode heat transfer and stress concentration at the edges through etched holes.

  7. Lipocalin 2 regulation by thermal stresses: Protective role of Lcn2/NGAL against cold and heat stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi; Halabian, Raheleh; Roushandeh, Amaneh Mohammadi; Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Masroori, Nasser; Ebrahimi, Majid; Nikogoftar, Mahin; Rouhbakhsh, Mehdi; Bahmani, Parisa; Najafabadi, Ali Jahanian; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2009-01-01

    Environmental temperature variations are the most common stresses experienced by a wide range of organisms. Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2/NGAL) is expressed in various normal and pathologic conditions. However, its precise functions have not been fully determined. Here we report the induction of Lcn2 by thermal stresses in vivo, and its role following exposure to cold and heat stresses in vitro. Induction of Lcn2 in liver, heart and kidney was detected by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry following exposure of mice to heat and cold stresses. When CHO and HEK293T cells overexpressing NGAL were exposed to cold stress, cell proliferation was higher compared to controls. Down-regulatrion of NGAL by siRNA in A549 cells resulted in less proliferation when exposed to cold stress compared to control cells. The number of apoptotic cells and expression of pro-apoptotic proteins were lower in the NGAL overexpressing CHO and HEK293T cells, but were higher in the siRNA-transfected A549 cells compared to controls, indicating that NGAL protects cells against cold stress. Following exposure of the cells to heat stress, ectopic expression of NGAL protected cells while addition of exogenous recombinant NGAL to the cell culture medium exacerbated the toxicity of heat stress specially when there was low or no endogenous expression of NGAL. It had a dual effect on apoptosis following heat stress. NGAL also increased the expression of HO-1. Lcn2/NGAL may have the potential to improve cell proliferation and preservation particularly to prevent cold ischemia injury of transplanted organs or for treatment of some cancers by hyperthermia.

  8. Lipocalin 2 regulation by thermal stresses: Protective role of Lcn2/NGAL against cold and heat stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi, E-mail: roudkenar@ibto.ir [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Halabian, Raheleh [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roushandeh, Amaneh Mohammadi [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourani, Mohammad Reza [Chemical Injury Research Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masroori, Nasser [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, Majid [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chemical Injury Research Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikogoftar, Mahin; Rouhbakhsh, Mehdi; Bahmani, Parisa [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafabadi, Ali Jahanian [Department of Molecular Biology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-01

    Environmental temperature variations are the most common stresses experienced by a wide range of organisms. Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2/NGAL) is expressed in various normal and pathologic conditions. However, its precise functions have not been fully determined. Here we report the induction of Lcn2 by thermal stresses in vivo, and its role following exposure to cold and heat stresses in vitro. Induction of Lcn2 in liver, heart and kidney was detected by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry following exposure of mice to heat and cold stresses. When CHO and HEK293T cells overexpressing NGAL were exposed to cold stress, cell proliferation was higher compared to controls. Down-regulatrion of NGAL by siRNA in A549 cells resulted in less proliferation when exposed to cold stress compared to control cells. The number of apoptotic cells and expression of pro-apoptotic proteins were lower in the NGAL overexpressing CHO and HEK293T cells, but were higher in the siRNA-transfected A549 cells compared to controls, indicating that NGAL protects cells against cold stress. Following exposure of the cells to heat stress, ectopic expression of NGAL protected cells while addition of exogenous recombinant NGAL to the cell culture medium exacerbated the toxicity of heat stress specially when there was low or no endogenous expression of NGAL. It had a dual effect on apoptosis following heat stress. NGAL also increased the expression of HO-1. Lcn2/NGAL may have the potential to improve cell proliferation and preservation particularly to prevent cold ischemia injury of transplanted organs or for treatment of some cancers by hyperthermia.

  9. Radiation effects on heat transfer in heat exchangers, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yasuo; Watanabe, Kenji; Taira, Tatsuji.

    1980-01-01

    In a high temperature gas-cooled reactor system, in which the working fluid exchanges heat at high temperature near 1000 deg C, the heat transfer acceleration by positively utilizing the radiation heat transfer between solid surfaces should be considered. This paper reports on the results of experiment and analysis for the effects of radiant heat on the heat transfer performance at elevated temperature by applying the heat transfer-accelerating method using radiators to the heat exchanger with tube bundle composed of two channels of heating and heated sides. As the test heat exchangers, a parallel counter flow exchanger and the cross flow exchanger simulating helical tubes were employed, and the results studied on the characteristics of each heat exchanger are described. The plates placed in parallel to flow in every space of the tube bundle arranged in a matrix were used as the heat transfer accelerator. The effects of acceleration with the plates were the increase of heat transmission from 12 to 24% and 12 to 38% in the parallel flow and cross flow heat exchangers, respectively. Also, it was clarified that the theoretical analysis, in which it was assumed that the region within pitch S and two radiator plates, with a heat-transferring tube placed at the center, is the minimum domain for calculation, and that the heat exchange by radiation occurs only between the domain and the adjacent domains, can estimate the heat transfer-accelerating effect and the temperature distribution in a heat exchanger with sufficient accuracy. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Comparison of heat strain recovery in different anti-heat stress clothing ensembles after work to exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yijie; Yi, Wen; Chan, Albert P C; Chan, Daniel W M

    2017-10-01

    A hot environment combined with physically demanding tasks can subject workers to a higher risk of heat stress. A series of regulations and guidelines have been proposed to design appropriate anti-heat stress work uniform to reduce body heat strain. The present study aimed to examine heat strain recovery in different anti-heat stress clothing ensembles after work to exhaustion in the heat. 10 healthy males performed intermittent treadmill running/walking to exhaustion, followed by 30min passive recovery sitting in a climatic chamber, which simulated the hot and humid outdoor environment (34°C temperature, 60% relative humidity, 0.3m/s air velocity, and 450W/m 2 solar radiation). The participants took part in five wear trials in counter-balanced order, including Sportswear, CIC Uniform, NEW Uniform, ICEBANK Cooling Vest, and NEW Cooling Vest, which have different levels of cooling capacity. Core temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, sweat loss, ratings of perceived exertion, and thermal sensations were measured throughout the entire heat exposure period. Physiological heat strain indices, including the physiological strain index (PhSI) and the perceptual strain index (PeSI), were used as a yardstick to quantify and compare the rate of recovery. Significantly lower physiological strain was observed in the newly developed NEW Uniform and NEW Cooling Vest groups compared with the commonly worn CIC Uniform group during recovery. At the end of the recovery period, participants in NEW Cooling Vest achieved the highest recovery (42.18% in PhSI and 81.08% in PeSI), followed by ICEBANK Cooling Vest, Sportswear, NEW Uniform, and CIC Uniform. The cooling capacity of anti-heat stress clothing ensembles and the recovery time significantly affect the rate of recovery in PhSI and PeSI, which may benefit the industry by formulating the appropriate work-rest schedule by considering the clothing effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reductions in labour capacity from heat stress under climate warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, John P.; Stouffer, Ronald J.; John, Jasmin G.

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental aspect of greenhouse-gas-induced warming is a global-scale increase in absolute humidity. Under continued warming, this response has been shown to pose increasingly severe limitations on human activity in tropical and mid-latitudes during peak months of heat stress. One heat-stress metric with broad occupational health applications is wet-bulb globe temperature. We combine wet-bulb globe temperatures from global climate historical reanalysis and Earth System Model (ESM2M) projections with industrial and military guidelines for an acclimated individual's occupational capacity to safely perform sustained labour under environmental heat stress (labour capacity)--here defined as a global population-weighted metric temporally fixed at the 2010 distribution. We estimate that environmental heat stress has reduced labour capacity to 90% in peak months over the past few decades. ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to 80% in peak months by 2050. Under the highest scenario considered (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5), ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to less than 40% by 2200 in peak months, with most tropical and mid-latitudes experiencing extreme climatological heat stress. Uncertainties and caveats associated with these projections include climate sensitivity, climate warming patterns, CO2 emissions, future population distributions, and technological and societal change.

  12. Modeling Exposure to Heat Stress with a Simple Urban Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hoffmann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As a first step in modeling health-related urban well-being (UrbWellth, a mathematical model is constructed that dynamically simulates heat stress exposure of commuters in an idealized city. This is done by coupling the Simple Urban Radiation Model (SURM, which computes the mean radiant temperature ( T m r t , with a newly developed multi-class multi-mode traffic model. Simulation results with parameters chosen for the city of Hamburg for a hot summer day show that commuters are potentially most exposed to heat stress in the early afternoon when T m r t has its maximum. Varying the morphology with respect to street width and building height shows that a more compact city configuration reduces T m r t and therefore the exposure to heat stress. The impact resulting from changes in the city structure on traffic is simulated to determine the time spent outside during the commute. While the time in traffic jams increases for compact cities, the total commuting time decreases due to shorter distances between home and work place. Concerning adaptation measures, it is shown that increases in the albedo of the urban surfaces lead to an increase in daytime heat stress. Dramatic increases in heat stress exposure are found when both, wall and street albedo, are increased.

  13. Palliative effects of extra virgin olive oil, gallic acid, and lemongrass oil dietary supplementation on growth performance, digestibility, carcass traits, and antioxidant status of heat-stressed growing New Zealand White rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sagheer, Adham A; Daader, Ahmed H; Gabr, Hassan A; Abd El-Moniem, Elham A

    2017-03-01

    This study explored the effects of supplemental dietary extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), gallic acid (GA), or lemongrass essential oil (LGEO) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, carcass traits, lipid peroxidation, hematological, and antioxidative status in growing rabbits under heat stress conditions. A total of 48 male growing New Zealand White rabbits were randomly divided into four equal groups, which received a basal diet without any supplementation or supplemented with 15 g EVOO, 500 mg GA, or 400 mg LGEO/kg of diet, for eight consecutive weeks. Results revealed that the overall mean of temperature humidity index was 84.67 ± 0.35, reflecting a state of severe heat stress. Moreover, dietary supplementation with EVOO, GA, or LGEO significantly increased live body weight and daily body weight gain but decreased both feed conversion ratio and daily water consumption. Additionally, a significant increase in both organic matter and crude protein digestibility besides a remarkable elevation in the nutritive values of digestible crude protein, total digestible nutrients, and digestible energy, as well as an increase in the numbers of WBCs, lymphocytes, and heterophils was significant in EVOO-supplemented rabbits. Supplementation with EVOO, GA, or LGEO in the heat-stressed growing rabbit's diet enhanced catalase activity and reduced glutathione content, whereas EVOO-treated rabbits had the highest values. Also, malondialdehyde activity was reduced in response to all tested additives. In conclusion, these findings suggested that addition of EVOO, GA, or LGEO in growing rabbit's diet could be used effectively to alleviate negative impacts of heat stress load on performance, nutrient digestibility, oxidative status, and hemato-biochemical features. Furthermore, among these additives, EVOO achieved the best effects.

  14. Residual stresses and their mechanisms of production at circumferential weld by heat-sink welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yukio; Nakacho, Keiji; Ohkubo, Katsumi; Shimizu, Tsubasa.

    1983-01-01

    In the previous report, the authors showed effectiveness of the heat-sink welding (water cooling) to accomplish this end by conducting theoretical analysis and an experiment on residual stresses in the 4B pipe of SUS 304 by the conventional welding and the heat-sink welding at a certain standard heat-input condition. In this research, different pipe sizes and varied heat-input are applied. The welding residual stresses by the conventional welding and the heat-sink welding are obtained by the theoretical analysis and their production mechanisms are clarified. Hence the influence of the above changes of conditions on effectiveness of the heat-sink welding is investigated. The main results are summarized as follow. (1) In case of this pipes such as 2B and 4B pipes, it is important to minimize heat-input per one pass (especially for latter half passes) in order to improve the effectiveness of the heat-sink welding. The effectiveness can be predicted either by theoretical analysis of the temperature distribution history with consideration of the characteristic of heat transfer under spray-watering or by experimental measurement. (2) In case of 24B pipes, thick pipes, it is desirable to minimize heat-input for the first half passes, by which the heat-sink welding becomes more effective. In addition, no matter whether the conventional welding or the heat-sink welding, it is important to prevent angular distorsion which produces tensile axial stresses on the inner surface of the pipe in the weld zone. Possible measures to meet these requirements are to apply restraining jigs, to minimize the section area of the groove (ex. application of the narrow gap arc welding), and to change continuous welding to skip one. (J.P.N.)

  15. Stress analysis of HTR-10 steam generator heat exchanging tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Jianling; Zhang Xiaohang; Yin Dejian; Fu Jiyang

    2001-01-01

    Steam Generator (SG) heat exchanging tubes of 10 MW High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR-10) are protective screens between the primary loop of helium with radioactivity and the secondary loop of feeding water and steam without radioactivity. Water and steam will enter into the primary loop when rupture of the heat exchanging tubes occurs, which lead to increase of the primary loop pressure and discharge of radioactive materials. Therefore it is important to guarantee the integrity of the tubes. The tube structure is spiral tube with small bending radius, which make it impossible to test with volumetric in-service detection. For such kind of spiral tube, using LBB concept to guarantee the integrity of the tubes is an important option. The author conducts stress analysis and calculation of HTR-10 SG heat exchanging tubes using the FEM code of piping stress analysis, PIPESTRESS. The maximum stress and the dangerous positions are obtained

  16. Heat and drought stresses in crops and approaches for their mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamaoui, Mouna; Jemo, Martin; Datla, Raju; Bekkaoui, Faouzi

    2018-02-01

    Drought and heat are major abiotic stresses that reduce crop productivity and weaken global food security, especially given the current and growing impacts of climate change and increases in the occurrence and severity of both stress factors. Plants have developed dynamic responses at the morphological, physiological and biochemical levels allowing them to escape and/or adapt to unfavourable environmental conditions. Nevertheless, even the mildest heat and drought stress negatively affects crop yield. Further, several independent studies have shown that increased temperature and drought can reduce crop yields by as much as 50%. Response to stress is complex and involves several factors including signaling, transcription factors, hormones, and secondary metabolites. The reproductive phase of development, leading to the grain production is shown to be more sensitive to heat stress in several crops. Advances coming from biotechnology including progress in genomics and information technology may mitigate the detrimental effects of heat and drought through the use of agronomic management practices and the development of crop varieties with increased productivity under stress. This review presents recent progress in key areas relevant to plant drought and heat tolerance. Furthermore, an overview and implications of physiological, biochemical and genetic aspects in the context of heat and drought are presented. Potential strategies to improve crop productivity are discussed.

  17. Heat and Drought Stresses in Crops and Approaches for Their Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouna Lamaoui

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Drought and heat are major abiotic stresses that reduce crop productivity and weaken global food security, especially given the current and growing impacts of climate change and increases in the occurrence and severity of both stress factors. Plants have developed dynamic responses at the morphological, physiological and biochemical levels allowing them to escape and/or adapt to unfavorable environmental conditions. Nevertheless, even the mildest heat and drought stress negatively affects crop yield. Further, several independent studies have shown that increased temperature and drought can reduce crop yields by as much as 50%. Response to stress is complex and involves several factors including signaling, transcription factors, hormones, and secondary metabolites. The reproductive phase of development, leading to the grain production is shown to be more sensitive to heat stress in several crops. Advances coming from biotechnology including progress in genomics and information technology may mitigate the detrimental effects of heat and drought through the use of agronomic management practices and the development of crop varieties with increased productivity under stress. This review presents recent progress in key areas relevant to plant drought and heat tolerance. Furthermore, an overview and implications of physiological, biochemical and genetic aspects in the context of heat and drought are presented. Potential strategies to improve crop productivity are discussed.

  18. Prediction of strongly-heated gas flows in a vertical tube using explicit algebraic stress/heat-flux models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seong Gu; Park, Seung O.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides the assessment of prediction performance of explicit algebraic stress and heat-flux models under conditions of mixed convective gas flows in a strongly-heated vertical tube. Two explicit algebraic stress models and four algebraic heat-flux models are selected for assessment. Eight combinations of explicit algebraic stress and heat-flux models are used in predicting the flows experimentally studied by Shehata and McEligot (IJHMT 41(1998) p.4333) in which property variation was significant. Among the various model combinations, the Wallin and Johansson (JFM 403(2000) p. 89) explicit algebraic stress model-Abe, Kondo, and Nagano (IJHFF 17(1996) p. 228) algebraic heat-flux model combination is found to perform best. We also found that the dimensionless wall distance y + should be calculated based on the local property rather than the property at the wall for property-variation flows. When the buoyancy or the property variation effects are so strong that the flow may relaminarize, the choice of the basic platform two-equation model is a most important factor in improving the predictions

  19. Management of Heat and Cold Stress - Guidance to NATO Medical Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Soldiers with UCHS Arm Immersion Cooling Device. To use, Soldiers place their forearms in the cool water, covering the area from the fingers to...UCHS. 1.7 MICROCLIMATE AND OTHER COOLING TECHNOLOGIES  Microclimate cooling systems are effective in alleviating heat stress and...systems are effective in reducing heat strain and in some environments are felt to be as effective as water- cooled devices. In addition, air- cooled vests

  20. Effect of dietary supplementation with Rhizopus oryzae or Chrysonilia crassa on growth performance, blood profile, intestinal microbial population, and carcass traits in broilers exposed to heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sugiharto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dietary supplementation of additives has recently been part of strategies to deal with the detrimental effects of heat stress (HS on the performance and carcass traits in broiler chicks. This study aimed to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation with the fungi Rhizopus oryzae or Chrysonilia crassa on growth, blood profile, intestinal microbial population and carcass traits in broiler chicks subjected to HS. R. oryzae and C. crassa are filamentous fungi isolated from the ileum of indigenous Indonesian chickens which exhibited probiotic and antioxidant properties. Two hundred and forty 21-day-old male broiler chicks were randomly allotted into six groups, including birds reared under normal temperature (28 ± 2 °C (CONT, birds reared under HS conditions (35 ± 2 °C (HS-CONT, birds reared under HS and provided with commercial anti-stress formula (HS-VIT, birds reared under HS and provided with R. oryzae (HS-RO, birds reared under HS and provided with C. crassa (HS-CC and birds reared under HS and provided with rice bran (HS-RB. Body weight gain was highest (P < 0. 01 and lowest (P < 0. 01 in CONT and HS-CONT birds, respectively. The heart was heavier (P < 0. 05 in CONT than in HS-CONT and HS-VIT birds. CONT birds had heavier duodenum (P < 0. 05 and jejunum (P < 0. 01 than other birds. Eosinophils was higher (P < 0. 05 in HS-CC than in other birds. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL was higher (P < 0. 05 in HS-CONT than in CONT, HS-VIT and HS-CC birds. Total triglyceride was highest (P < 0. 05 and lowest (P < 0. 05 in HS-RB and HS-RO birds, respectively. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT was higher (P < 0. 05 in HS-CONT than in other HS birds. Total protein was lowest and highest (P < 0. 05 in CONT and HS-CONT birds, respectively. Albumin was higher (P < 0. 05 in HS-CONT and HS-VIT than in HS-RO birds. Globulin was lower (P < 0. 05 in CONT than in HS

  1. The Impact of Urban Growth and Climate Change on Heat Stress in an Australian City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S.; Mcalpine, C. A.; Thatcher, M. J.; Salazar, A.; Watson, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Over half of the world's population lives in urban areas. Most people will therefore be exposed to climate change in an urban environment. One of the climate risks facing urban residents is heat stress, which can lead to illness and death. Urban residents are at increased risk of heat stress due to the urban heat island effect. The urban heat island is a modification of the urban environment and increases temperatures on average by 2°C, though the increase can be much higher, up to 8°C when wind speeds and cloud cover are low. The urban heat island is also expected to increase in the future due to urban growth and intensification, further exacerbating urban heat stress. Climate change alters the urban heat island due to changes in weather (wind speed and cloudiness) and evapotranspiration. Future urban heat stress will therefore be affected by urban growth and climate change. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of urban growth and climate change on the urban heat island and heat stress in Brisbane, Australia. We used CCAM, the conformal cubic atmospheric model developed by the CSIRO, to examine temperatures in Brisbane using scenarios of urban growth and climate change. We downscaled the urban climate using CCAM, based on bias corrected Sea Surface Temperatures from the ACCESS1.0 projection of future climate. We used Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 for the periods 1990 - 2000, 2049 - 2060 and 2089 - 2090 with current land use and an urban growth scenario. The present day climatology was verified using weather station data from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. We compared the urban heat island of the present day with the urban heat island with climate change to determine if climate change altered the heat island. We also calculated heat stress using wet-bulb globe temperature and apparent temperature for the climate change and base case scenarios. We found the urban growth scenario increased present day temperatures by 0.5°C in the

  2. On the use of wearable physiological monitors to assess heat strain during occupational heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notley, Sean R; Flouris, Andreas D; Kenny, Glen P

    2018-05-04

    Workers in many industries are required to perform arduous work in high heat stress conditions, which can lead to rapid increases in body temperature that elevate the risk of heat-related illness or even death. Traditionally, effort to mitigate work-related heat injury has been directed to the assessment of environmental heat stress (e.g., wet-bulb globe temperature), rather than the associated physiological strain responses (e.g., heart rate, skin and core temperatures). However, since a workers physiological response to a given heat stress is modified independently by inter-individual factors (e.g., age, sex, chronic disease, others) and intra-individual factors both within (e.g., medication use, fitness, acclimation and hydration state, others) and beyond a workers control (e.g., shift duration, illness, others), it becomes challenging to protect workers on an individual basis from heat-related injury without assessing those physiological responses. Recent advancements in wearable technology have made it possible to monitor one or more physiological indices of heat strain. Nonetheless, information on the utility of the wearable systems available for assessing occupational heat strain is unavailable. This communication is therefore directed at identifying the physiological indices of heat strain that may be quantified in the workplace and evaluating the wearable monitoring systems available for assessing those responses. Finally, emphasis is directed to the barriers associated with implementing these devices to assist in mitigating work-related heat injury. This information is fundamental for protecting worker health and could also be utilized to prevent heat illnesses in vulnerable people during leisure or athletic activities in the heat.

  3. Impact of heat stress on the emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, phenolic BVOC and green leaf volatiles from several tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleist, E.; Mentel, T. F.; Andres, S.; Bohne, A.; Folkers, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Rudich, Y.; Springer, M.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2012-07-01

    Changes in the biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from European beech, Palestine oak, Scots pine, and Norway spruce exposed to heat stress were measured in a laboratory setup. In general, heat stress decreased the de novo emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC. Decreasing emission strength with heat stress was independent of the tree species and whether the de novo emissions being constitutive or induced by biotic stress. In contrast, heat stress induced emissions of green leaf volatiles. It also amplified the release of monoterpenes stored in resin ducts of conifers probably due to heat-induced damage of these resin ducts. The increased release of monoterpenes could be strong and long lasting. But, despite of such strong monoterpene emission pulses, the net effect of heat stress on BVOC emissions from conifers can be an overall decrease. In particular during insect attack on conifers the plants showed de novo emissions of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC which exceeded constitutive monoterpene emissions from pools. The heat stress induced decrease of these de novo emissions was larger than the increased release caused by damage of resin ducts. We project that global change induced heat waves may cause increased BVOC emissions only in cases where the respective areas are predominantly covered with conifers that do not emit high amounts of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC. Otherwise the overall effect of heat stress will be a decrease in BVOC emissions.

  4. Age, splanchnic vasoconstriction, and heat stress during tilting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minson, C. T.; Wladkowski, S. L.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Kenney, W. L.

    1999-01-01

    During upright tilting, blood is translocated to the dependent veins of the legs and compensatory circulatory adjustments are necessary to maintain arterial pressure. For examination of the effect of age on these responses, seven young (23 +/- 1 yr) and seven older (70 +/- 3 yr) men were head-up tilted to 60 degrees in a thermoneutral condition and during passive heating with water-perfused suits. Measurements included heart rate (HR), cardiac output (Qc; acetylene rebreathing technique), central venous pressure (CVP), blood pressures, forearm blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography), splanchnic and renal blood flows (indocyanine green and p-aminohippurate clearance), and esophageal and mean skin temperatures. In response to tilting in the thermoneutral condition, CVP and stroke volume decreased to a greater extent in the young men, but HR increased more, such that the fall in Qc was similar between the two groups in the upright posture. The rise in splanchnic vascular resistance (SVR) was greater in the older men, but the young men increased forearm vascular resistance (FVR) to a greater extent than the older men. The fall in Qc during combined heat stress and tilting was greater in the young compared with older men. Only four of the young men versus six of the older men were able to finish the second tilt without becoming presyncopal. In summary, the older men relied on a greater increase in SVR to compensate for a reduced ability to constrict the skin and muscle circulations (as determined by changes in FVR) during head-up tilting.

  5. Combined effects of chemical reaction and temperature dependent heat source on MHD mixed convective flow of a couple-stress fluid in a vertical wavy porous space with travelling thermal waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuraj R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is developed to examine the effect of chemical reaction on MHD mixed convective heat and mass transfer flow of a couple-stress fluid in vertical porous space in the presence of temperature dependent heat source with travelling thermal waves. The dimensionless governing equations are assumed to be made up of two parts: a mean part corresponding to the fully developed mean flow, and a small perturbed part, using amplitude as a small parameter. The analytical solution of perturbed part have been carried out by using the long-wave approximation. The expressions for the zeroth-order and the first order solutions are obtained and the results of the heat and mass transfer characteristics are presented graphically for various values of parameters entering into the problem. It is noted that velocity of the fluid increases with the increase of the couple stress parameter and increasing the chemical reaction parameter leads suppress the velocity of the fluid. Cross velocity decreases with an increase of the phase angle. The increase of the chemical reaction parameter and Schmidt number lead to decrease the fluid concentration. The hydrodynamic case for a non-porous space in the absence of the temperature dependent heat source for Newtonian fluid can be captured as a limiting case of our analysis by taking, and α1→0, Da→∞, a→∞.

  6. Transcriptional profile of breast muscle in heat stressed layers is similar to that of broiler chickens at control temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Imran; de Koning, Dirk-Jan; Hocking, Paul M

    2017-09-20

    In recent years, the commercial importance of changes in muscle function of broiler chickens and of the corresponding effects on meat quality has increased. Furthermore, broilers are more sensitive to heat stress during transport and at high ambient temperatures than smaller egg-laying chickens. We hypothesised that heat stress would amplify muscle damage and expression of genes that are involved in such changes and, thus, lead to the identification of pathways and networks associated with broiler muscle and meat quality traits. Broiler and layer chickens were exposed to control or high ambient temperatures to characterise differences in gene expression between the two genotypes and the two environments. Whole-genome expression studies in breast muscles of broiler and layer chickens were conducted before and after heat stress; 2213 differentially-expressed genes were detected based on a significant (P heat-stressed layers. Expression of these genes was further increased in heat-stressed broilers. Differences in gene expression between broiler and layer chickens under control and heat stress conditions suggest that damage of breast muscles in broilers at normal ambient temperatures is similar to that in heat-stressed layers and is amplified when broilers are exposed to heat stress. The patterns of gene expression of the two genotypes under heat stress were almost the polar opposite of each other, which is consistent with the conclusion that broiler chickens were not able to cope with heat stress by dissipating their body heat. The differentially expressed gene networks and pathways were consistent with the pathological changes that are observed in the breast muscle of heat-stressed broilers.

  7. Ocular blood flow decreases during passive heat stress in resting humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Tsukasa; Miyaji, Akane; Kashima, Hideaki; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2013-12-06

    Heat stress induces various physiological changes and so could influence ocular circulation. This study examined the effect of heat stress on ocular blood flow. Ocular blood flow, end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO2) and blood pressure were measured for 12 healthy subjects wearing water-perfused tube-lined suits under two conditions of water circulation: (1) at 35 °C (normothermia) for 30 min and (2) at 50 °C for 90 min (passive heat stress). The blood-flow velocities in the superior temporal retinal arteriole (STRA), superior nasal retinal arteriole (SNRA), and the retinal and choroidal vessels (RCV) were measured using laser-speckle flowgraphy. Blood flow in the STRA and SNRA was calculated from the integral of a cross-sectional map of blood velocity. PETCO2 was clamped at the normothermia level by adding 5% CO2 to the inspired gas. Passive heat stress had no effect on the subjects' blood pressures. The blood-flow velocity in the RCV was significantly lower after 30, 60 and 90 min of passive heat stress than the normothermic level, with a peak decrease of 18 ± 3% (mean ± SE) at 90 min. Blood flow in the STRA and SNRA decreased significantly after 90 min of passive heat stress conditions, with peak decreases of 14 ± 3% and 14 ± 4%, respectively. The findings of this study suggest that passive heat stress decreases ocular blood flow irrespective of the blood pressure or arterial partial pressure of CO2.

  8. Differential expression pattern of heat shock protein 70 gene in tissues and heat stress phenotypes in goats during peak heat stress period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, P K; Kaushik, R; Ramachandran, N

    2016-07-01

    It has been established that the synthesis of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is temperature-dependent. The Hsp70 response is considered as a cellular thermometer in response to heat stress and other stimuli. The variation in Hsp70 gene expression has been positively correlated with thermotolerance in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, rodents and human. Goats have a wide range of ecological adaptability due to their anatomical and physiological characteristics; however, the productivity of the individual declines during thermal stress. The present study was carried out to analyze the expression of heat shock proteins in different tissues and to contrast heat stress phenotypes in response to chronic heat stress. The investigation has been carried out in Jamunapari, Barbari, Jakhrana and Sirohi goats. These breeds differ in size, coat colour and production performance. The heat stress assessment in goats was carried out at a temperature humidity index (THI) ranging from 85.36-89.80 over the period. Phenotyping for heat stress susceptibility was carried out by combining respiration rate (RR) and heart rate (HR). Based on the distribution of RR and HR over the breeds in the population, individual animals were recognized as heat stress-susceptible (HSS) and heat stress-tolerant (HST). Based on their physiological responses, the selected animals were slaughtered for tissue collection during peak heat stress periods. The tissue samples from different organs such as liver, spleen, heart, testis, brain and lungs were collected and stored at -70 °C for future use. Hsp70 concentrations were analyzed from tissue extract with ELISA. mRNA expression levels were evaluated using the SYBR green method. Kidney, liver and heart had 1.5-2.0-fold higher Hsp70 concentrations as compared to other organs in the tissue extracts. Similarly, the gene expression pattern of Hsp70 in different organs indicated that the liver, spleen, brain and kidney exhibited 5.94, 4.96, 5

  9. Geographical influence of heat stress on milk production of Holstein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To model the influence of heat stress on milk production of Holstein dairy herds on pasture in South Africa, the maximum entropy (Maxent) modelling technique was used in a novel approach to model and map optimal milk-producing areas. Geographical locations of farms with top milk-producing Holstein herds on pasture ...

  10. Genetic solutions to infertility caused by heat stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reproductive function in mammals is very susceptible to disruption by heat stress. In lactating dairy cows, for example, pregnancy rates per insemination can be as low as 10-15% in the summer vs. 25-40% in cool weather. Reduced fertility in females is caused by a combination of 1) the negative cons...

  11. Managing heat and immune stress in athletes with evidence-based strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, David B; Guy, Joshua H; Edwards, Andrew M

    2014-09-01

    Heat and immune stress can affect athletes in a wide range of sports and environmental conditions. The classical thermoregulatory model of heat stress has been well characterized, as has a wide range of practical strategies largely centered on cooling and heat-acclimation training. In the last decade evidence has emerged of an inflammatory pathway that can also contribute to heat stress. Studies are now addressing the complex and dynamic interplay between hyperthermia, the coagulation cascade, and a systemic inflammatory response occurring after transient damage to the gastrointestinal tract. Damage to the intestinal mucosal membrane increases permeability, resulting in leakage of endotoxins into the circulation. Practical strategies that target both thermoregulatory and inflammatory causes of heat stress include precooling; short-term heat-acclimation training; nutritional countermeasures including hydration, energy replacement, and probiotic supplementation; pacing strategies during events; and postevent cooling measures. Cooperation between international, national, and local sporting organizations is required to ensure that heat-management policies and strategies are implemented effectively to promote athletes' well-being and performance.

  12. Transient thermal stresses in composite hollow circular cylinder due to partial heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goshima, Takahito; Miyao, Kaju

    1979-01-01

    Clad materials are adopted for the machines and structures used in contact with high temperature, corrosive atmosphere in view of their strength and economy. Large thermal stress sometimes arises in clad cylinders due to uneaven temperature field and the difference in linear thermal expansion. Vessels are often heated uneavenly, and shearing stress occurs, which is not observed in uniform heating. In this study, infinitely long, concentric cylinders of two layers were analyzed, when the internal heat changing in stepped state is generated in cylindrical form. The unsteady thermal stress occurred was determined, using thermo-elastic potential and stress functions, and assuming the thermal properties and elastic modulus of materials as constant regardless of the temperature. Laplace transformation was used, and the basic equations for thermo-elastic displacement were employed as the basis of calculation. The analysis of the temperature distribution and stress is explained. Numerical calculation was carried out on the example of an internal cylinder of SUS 304 stainless steel and an external cylinder of mild steel. The maximum shearing stress occurred in the direction of 40 deg from the heat source, and was affected largely by the position of heat generation. The effect became remarkable as time elapsed. (Kako, I.)

  13. Residual stress improvement for pipe weld by means of induction heating pre-flawed pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umemoto, T.; Yoshida, K.; Okamoto, A.

    1980-01-01

    The intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) has been found in type 304 stainless steel piping of several BWR plants. It is already well known that IGSCC is most likely to occur when three essential factors, material sensitization, high tensile stress and corrosive environment, are present. If the welding residual stress is sufficiently high (200 to approximately 400 MPa) in the inside piping surface near the welded joint, then it may be one of the biggest contributors to IGSCC. If the residual stress is reduced or reversed by some way, the IGSCC will be effectively mitigated. In this paper a method to improve the residual stress named IHSI (Induction Heating Stress Improvement) is explained. IHSI aims to improve the condition of residual stress in the inside pipe surface using the thermal stress induced by the temperature difference in pipe wall, that is produced when the pipe is heated from the outside surface by an induction heating coil and cooled on the inside surface by water simultaneously. This method becomes more attractive when it can be successfully applied to in-service piping which might have some pre-flaw. In order to verify the validity of IHSI for such piping, some experiments and calculations using finite element method were conducted. These results are mainly discussed in this paper from the view-points of residual stress, flaw behaviour during IHSI and material deterioration. (author)

  14. Heat stress related dairy cow mortality during heat waves and control periods in rural Southern Ontario from 2010?2012

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop-Williams, Katherine E.; Berke, Olaf; Pearl, David L.; Hand, Karen; Kelton, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heat stress is a physiological response to extreme environmental heat such as heat waves. Heat stress can result in mortality in dairy cows when extreme heat is both rapidly changing and has a long duration. As a result of climate change, heat waves, which are defined as 3 days of temperatures of 32 ?C or above, are an increasingly frequent extreme weather phenomenon in Southern Ontario. Heat waves are increasing the risk for on-farm dairy cow mortality in Southern Ontario. Heat st...

  15. A study on the mechanical stress relieving and safety assessment without post-weld heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jijin; Chen Ligong; Ni Chunzhen

    2007-01-01

    For full welded body valve, the temperature of grommet cannot exceed 150 deg. C in order to prevent it from damaging and assure the tightness and the service life of valve. Therefore, post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) cannot be used to relieve the residual stresses. In this study, the effect of the mechanical stress relieving (MSR) treatment on the residual stresses was studied by the finite element method and experimental work. A pressure and time diagram of MSR treatment was established. A two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element model was used to simulate the residual stresses field. Before and after MSR treatment, the residual stresses on the outer surface were measured by the blind hole drilling method. Finally, the fracture toughness behaviors of weld zone (WZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) were investigated in terms of crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) according to BS7448 and DNV-OS-C401 fracture toughness tests standards. The safety of the valve in active service was assessed without PWHT. Through comparison and analysis, the axial residual stresses and the hoop residual stresses on the outer surface of valve are mainly tensile. The peak value of tensile stress occurs nearer to the outer surface of the valve. MSR treatment can decrease the peak value of axial residual stresses and hoop residual stresses on the outer surface obviously and make the residual stresses distribution more uniform. The safety of the valve in active service is reliable without PWHT

  16. Various Wolbachia genotypes differently influence host Drosophila dopamine metabolism and survival under heat stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntenko, Nataly Е; Ilinsky, Yury Yu; Adonyeva, Natalya V; Burdina, Elena V; Bykov, Roman A; Menshanov, Petr N; Rauschenbach, Inga Yu

    2017-12-28

    One of the most widespread prokaryotic symbionts of invertebrates is the intracellular bacteria of Wolbachia genus which can be found in about 50% of insect species. Wolbachia causes both parasitic and mutualistic effects on its host that include manipulating the host reproductive systems in order to increase their transmission through the female germline, and increasing the host fitness. One of the mechanisms, promoting adaptation in biological organisms, is a non-specific neuroendocrine stress reaction. In insects, this reaction includes catecholamines, dopamine, serotonin and octopamine, which act as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and neurohormones. The level of dopamine metabolism correlates with heat stress resistance in Drosophila adults. To examine Wolbachia effect on Drosophila survival under heat stress and dopamine metabolism we used five strains carrying the nuclear background of interbred Bi90 strain and cytoplasmic backgrounds with different genotype variants of Wolbachia (produced by 20 backcrosses of Bi90 males with appropriate source of Wolbachia). Non-infected Bi90 strain (treated with tetracycline for 3 generations) was used as a control group. We demonstrated that two of five investigated Wolbachia variants promote changes in Drosophila heat stress resistance and activity of enzymes that produce and degrade dopamine, alkaline phosphatase and dopamine-dependent arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase. What is especially interesting, wMelCS genotype of Wolbachia increases stress resistance and the intensity of dopamine metabolism, whereas wMelPop strain decreases them. wMel, wMel2 and wMel4 genotypes of Wolbachia do not show any effect on the survival under heat stress or dopamine metabolism. L-DOPA treatment, known to increase the dopamine content in Drosophila, levels the difference in survival under heat stress between all studied groups. The genotype of symbiont determines the effect that the symbiont has on the stress resistance of the host

  17. Ability to Discriminate Between Sustainable and Unsustainable Heat Stress Exposures-Part 2: Physiological Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón-Villalba, Ximena P; Wu, Yougui; Ashley, Candi D; Bernard, Thomas E

    2017-07-01

    There are times when it is not practical to assess heat stress using environmental metrics and metabolic rate, and heat strain may provide an alternative approach. Heat strain indicators have been used for decades as tools for monitoring physiological responses to work in hot environments. Common indicators of heat strain are body core temperature (assessed here as rectal temperature Tre), heart rate (HR), and average skin temperature (Tsk). Data collected from progressive heat stress trials were used to (1) demonstrate if physiological heat strain indicators (PHSIs) at the upper limit of Sustainable heat stress were below generally accepted limits; (2) suggest values for PHSIs that demonstrate a Sustainable level of heat stress; (3) suggest alternative PHSIs; and (4) determine if metabolic rate was an effect modifier. Two previous progressive heat stress studies included 176 trials with 352 pairs of Sustainable and Unsustainable exposures over a range of relative humidities and metabolic rates using 29 participants. To assess the discrimination ability of PHSIs, conditional logistic regression and stepwise logistic regression were used to find the best combinations of predictors of Unsustainable exposures. The accuracy of the models was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curves. Current recommendations for physiological heat strain limits were associated with probabilities of Unsustainable greater than 0.5. Screening limits for Sustainable heat stress were Tre of 37.5°C, HR of 105 bpm, and Tsk of 35.8°C. Tsk alone resulted in an area under the curve of 0.85 and the combination of Tsk and HR (area under the curve = 0.88) performed the best. The adjustment for metabolic rate was statistically significant for physiological strain index or ∆Tre-sk as main predictors, but its effect modification was negligible and could be ignored. Based on the receiver operating characteristic curve, PHSIs (Tre, HR, and Tsk) can accurately predict Unsustainable heat

  18. Study of heat exchange in cooling systems of heat-stressed structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikulin, A. V.; Yaroslavtsev, N. L.; Zemlyanaya, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing working parameters of the cycle of gas-turbine engines, complicating design of gas-turbine plants, as well as growing aerodynamic, thermal, static, and dynamic loads, necessitate the development of promising cooling systems for heat-stressed structures. This work is devoted to an experimental study of heat exchange in ducts equipped with systems of inclined and cross walls (fins). It has been found that an increase in the Reynolds number Re from 3000 to 20000 leads to a decrease in the heat exchange, which is characterized by the relative Nusselt number overline{Nu}, by 19-30% at the angle of inclination of the walls φ = 0, 40°, 50°, and 90° if the length of the walls x w is comparable to the spacing b s and by 12-15% at φ = 30° and 90° if x w ≫ b s. If cross walls are used in cooling ducts, the length of the walls x w plays the governing role; an increase in this characteristic from 1.22 × 10-3 to 3.14 × 10-3 m leads to an increase in the intensity of heat exchange by 30-40% and to a decrease in the capacity of the entire system of the walls. It has been shown that, on surfaces with wavy fins, the intensity of heat exchange is closest to that determined in the models under study. For example, values of the Colborne criterion StPr2/3 for ducts equipped with wavy fins and for the models under study differ only slightly (by 2-20% depending on the value of the angle φ). However, the difference for surfaces with short plate fins and ducts equipped with inclined walls is high (30-40%). This is due to the design features of these surfaces and to the severe effect of the inlet portion on heat exchange, since the surfaces are characterized by a higher ratio of the duct length to the hydraulic diameter L/d h at small fin thicknesses ((0.1-0.15) × 10-3 m). The experimental results can be used in developing designs of nozzle and rotor blades of high-temperature gas turbines in gas-turbine engines and plants.

  19. Heterotrophy promotes the re-establishment of photosynthate translocation in a symbiotic coral after heat stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Pascale; Gori, Andrea; Maguer, Jean François; Hoogenboom, Mia; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine

    2016-12-01

    Symbiotic scleractinian corals are particularly affected by climate change stress and respond by bleaching (losing their symbiotic dinoflagellate partners). Recently, the energetic status of corals is emerging as a particularly important factor that determines the corals’ vulnerability to heat stress. However, detailed studies of coral energetic that trace the flow of carbon from symbionts to host are still sparse. The present study thus investigates the impact of heat stress on the nutritional interactions between dinoflagellates and coral Stylophora pistillata maintained under auto- and heterotrophy. First, we demonstrated that the percentage of autotrophic carbon retained in the symbionts was significantly higher during heat stress than under non-stressful conditions, in both fed and unfed colonies. This higher photosynthate retention in symbionts translated into lower rates of carbon translocation, which required the coral host to use tissue energy reserves to sustain its respiratory needs. As calcification rates were positively correlated to carbon translocation, a significant decrease in skeletal growth was observed during heat stress. This study also provides evidence that heterotrophic nutrient supply enhances the re-establishment of normal nutritional exchanges between the two symbiotic partners in the coral S. pistillata, but it did not mitigate the effects of temperature stress on coral calcification.

  20. Analysis of Heat Stress and the Indoor Climate Control Requirements for Movable Refuge Chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaoli; Guo, Chenxin; Lin, Yaolin; Wang, Haiqiao; Liu, Heqing

    2016-05-20

    Movable refuge chambers are a new kind of rescue device for underground mining, which is believed to have a potential positive impact on reducing the rate of fatalities. It is likely to be hot and humid inside a movable refuge chamber due to the metabolism of trapped miners, heat generated by equipment and heat transferred from outside. To investigate the heat stress experienced by miners trapped in a movable refuge chamber, the predicted heat strain (PHS) model was used to simulate the heat transfer process between the person and the thermal environment. The variations of heat stress with the temperature and humidity inside the refuge chamber were analyzed. The effects of air temperature outside the refuge chamber and the overall heat transfer coefficient of the refuge chamber shell on the heat stress inside the refuge chamber was also investigated. The relationship between the limit of exposure duration and the air temperature and humidity was numerically analyzed to determine the upper limits of temperature and humidity inside a refuge chamber. Air temperature of 32 °C and relative humidity of 70% are recommended as the design standard for internal thermal environment control of movable refuge chambers.

  1. Analysis of Heat Stress and the Indoor Climate Control Requirements for Movable Refuge Chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Hao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Movable refuge chambers are a new kind of rescue device for underground mining, which is believed to have a potential positive impact on reducing the rate of fatalities. It is likely to be hot and humid inside a movable refuge chamber due to the metabolism of trapped miners, heat generated by equipment and heat transferred from outside. To investigate the heat stress experienced by miners trapped in a movable refuge chamber, the predicted heat strain (PHS model was used to simulate the heat transfer process between the person and the thermal environment. The variations of heat stress with the temperature and humidity inside the refuge chamber were analyzed. The effects of air temperature outside the refuge chamber and the overall heat transfer coefficient of the refuge chamber shell on the heat stress inside the refuge chamber was also investigated. The relationship between the limit of exposure duration and the air temperature and humidity was numerically analyzed to determine the upper limits of temperature and humidity inside a refuge chamber. Air temperature of 32 °C and relative humidity of 70% are recommended as the design standard for internal thermal environment control of movable refuge chambers.

  2. Heat shock proteins in relation to heat stress tolerance of creeping bentgrass at different N levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kehua; Zhang, Xunzhong; Goatley, Mike; Ervin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is a primary factor causing summer bentgrass decline. Changes in gene expression at the transcriptional and/or translational level are thought to be a fundamental mechanism in plant response to environmental stresses. Heat stress redirects protein synthesis in higher plants and results in stress protein synthesis, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs). The goal of this work was to analyze the expression pattern of major HSPs in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) during different heat stress periods and to study the influence of nitrogen (N) on the HSP expression patterns. A growth chamber study on 'Penn-A4' creeping bentgrass subjected to 38/28°C day/night for 50 days, was conducted with four nitrate rates (no N-0, low N-2.5, medium N-7.5, and high N-12.5 kg N ha-1) applied biweekly. Visual turfgrass quality (TQ), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), shoot electrolyte leakage (ShEL), and root viability (RV) were monitored, along with the expression pattern of HSPs. There was no difference in measured parameters between treatments until week seven, except TQ at week five. At week seven, grass at medium N had better TQ, NDVI, and Fv/Fm accompanied by lower ShEL and higher RV, suggesting a major role in improved heat tolerance. All the investigated HSPs (HSP101, HSP90, HSP70, and sHSPs) were up-regulated by heat stress. Their expression patterns indicated cooperation between different HSPs and their roles in bentgrass thermotolerance. In addition, their production seems to be resource dependent. This study could further improve our understanding about how different N levels affect bentgrass thermotolerance.

  3. Traits in Spring Wheat Cultivars Associated with Yield Loss Caused by a Heat Stress Episode after Anthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vignjevic, Marija; Wang, Xiao; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2015-01-01

    with heat tolerance. Fifteen spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars were grown in pots under semifield conditions, and heat stress (35/26 °C) and control treatments (20/12 °C) were applied in growth chambers for 5 days starting 14 days after flowering. The heat stress treatment reduced final yield...... in the grain-filling period was negatively correlated with grain nitrogen yield (r = −0.60). A positive correlation (r = 0.73) was found between the treatment effect on green leaf area (GLA) and the reduction in yield resulting from heat stress. The amount of stem water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC...

  4. Development of technique to apply induction heating stress improvement to recirculation inlet nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Kunihiko; Nihei, Kenichi; Ootaka, Minoru

    2009-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have been found in the primary loop recirculation (PLR) systems of boiling water reactors (BWR). Residual stress in welding heat-affected zone is one of the factors of SCC, and the residual stress improvement is one of the most effective methods to prevent SCC. Induction heating stress improvement (IHSI) is one of the techniques to improve reduce residual stress. However, it is difficult to apply IHSI to the place such as the recirculation inlet nozzle where the flow stagnates. In this present study, the technique to apply IHSI to the recirculation inlet nozzle was developed using water jet which blowed into the crevice between the nozzle safe end and the thermal sleeve. (author)

  5. Antioxidant properties of the mung bean flavonoids on alleviating heat stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Cao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is a widespread belief in Asian countries that mung bean soup (MBS may afford a protective effect against heat stress. Lack of evidence supports MBS conferring a benefit in addition to water. RESULTS: Here we show that vitexin and isovitexin are the major antioxidant components in mungbean (more than 96% of them existing in the bean seed coat, and both of them could be absorbed via gavage into rat plasma. In the plasma of rats fed with mungbean coat extract before or after exposure to heat stress, the levels of malonaldehyde and activities of lactate dehydrogenase and nitric oxide synthase were remarkably reduced; the levels of total antioxidant capacity and glutathione (a quantitative assessment of oxidative stress were significantly enhanced. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that MBS can play additional roles to prevent heat stress injury. Characterization of the mechanisms underlying mungbean beneficial effects should help in the design of diet therapy strategies to alleviate heat stress, as well as provide reference for searching natural medicines against oxidative stress induced diseases.

  6. Practices for Alleviating Heat Stress of Dairy Cows in Humid Continental Climates: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournel, Sébastien; Ouellet, Véronique; Charbonneau, Édith

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary The severity of heat stress issues on dairy cows will increase as global warming progresses. Fortunately, major advances in environmental management, including fans, misters, sprinklers, and cooled waterbeds, can attenuate the effects of thermal stress on cow health, production, and reproduction. These cooling systems were, however, tested in subtropical areas and their efficiency in northern regions is uncertain. This article assesses the potential of existing technologies to cool cows in humid continental climates through calculation of heat stress indices. Abstract Heat stress negatively affects the health and performance of dairy cows, resulting in considerable economic losses for the industry. In future years, climate change will exacerbate these losses by making the climate warmer. Physical modification of the environment is considered to be the primary means of reducing adverse effects of hot weather conditions. At present, to reduce stressful heat exposure and to cool cows, dairy farms rely on shade screens and various forms of forced convection and evaporative cooling that may include fans and misters, feed-line sprinklers, and tunnel- or cross-ventilated buildings. However, these systems have been mainly tested in subtropical areas and thus their efficiency in humid continental climates, such as in the province of Québec, Canada, is unclear. Therefore, this study reviewed the available cooling applications and assessed their potential for northern regions. Thermal stress indices such as the temperature-humidity index (THI) were used to evaluate the different cooling strategies. PMID:28468329

  7. Fast in situ X-ray diffraction phase and stress analysis during complete heat treatment cycles of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A. da S.; Hirsch, T.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents results obtained with a method for time and temperature resolved analysis of changes in phase composition and stresses/residual stresses during complete heat treatment cycles of steel, including quenching. Sample temperatures of up to 930 deg. C could be reached with a specially designed furnace, where fast cooling of the samples was realized by gas quenching. Measurements for phase and stress analysis could be performed with an acquisition rate of at least one value every 3 s. Results concerning residual stress relaxation during heating, and stress/residual stress development during quenching are presented and discussed for AISI E52100 ball bearing steel. The observed stress development during quenching followed the expected transformation behavior with some deviations that could be explained through the effects of surface decarburization. The system developed proved to be a suitable tool for characterizing phase and stress changes that occur during heat treatment of steels, as a function of time and temperature

  8. Resveratrol induces antioxidant and heat shock protein mRNA expression in response to heat stress in black-boned chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L L; He, J H; Xie, H B; Yang, Y S; Li, J C; Zou, Y

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary resveratrol at 0, 200, 400, or 600 mg/kg of diet on the performance, immune organ growth index, serum parameters, and expression levels of heat shock protein (Hsp) 27, Hsp70, and Hsp90 mRNA in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus, and spleen of 42-d-old female black-boned chickens exposed to heat stress at 37 ± 2°C for 15 d. The results showed that heat stress reduced daily feed intake and BW gain; decreased serum glutathione (GSH), growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels; and inhibited GSH peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities compared with birds subjected to thermo-neutral circumstances. Chickens that were fed diets supplemented with resveratrol exhibited a linear increase in feed intake and BW gain (P stress. In contrast, serum malonaldehyde concentrations were decreased (P stress also reduced (P stress and coincided with an increase in supplemental resveratrol levels. The expression of Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90 mRNA in the bursa of Fabricius and spleen were increased (P stress compared with no heat stress. Resveratrol attenuated the heat stress-induced overexpression of Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90 mRNA in the bursa of Fabricius and spleen and increased the low expression of Hsp27 and Hsp90 mRNA in thymus upon heat stress. The results suggest that supplemental resveratrol improves growth performance and reduces oxidative stress in heat-stressed black-boned chickens by increasing serum growth hormone concentrations and modulating the expression of heat shock genes in organs of the immune system.

  9. Influence of Turmeric Rhizome Powder diets on decreasing oxidative stress caused by heat stress inbroiler model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Javad Hosseini-Vashan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS increases during oxidative stress conditions, which stimulates diabetes, inflammatory reactions, rheumatism and anemia. Some antioxidant properties of turmeric rhizome powder (TRP were revealed by previous researchers. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of TRP on decreasing effects of oxidative stress resulted from heat stress in broiler chickens.   Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two-hundred-sixty-four 1-day-old broilers were divided into 3 dietary treatments. The dietary treatments involved 0(control, 0.4 and 0.8% turmeric rhizome powder (cases. In order to create oxidative stress, the ambient temperature was daily raised from 21 to 33oc for 5 hours (11a.m-4p.m throughout the 28th-42nd days. Blood lipids, Glutathione peroxidase (GPx ,superoxide dismutase (SOD, and Tiobarbituric acid reaction score (TBARS were determined at the end of the experiment.   Results: The results revealed that total cholesterol and triglyceride were not affected. The 0.4 TRP diet decreased blood LDL (46.7±3.01 compared to basal group (52.0±2.17. HDL increased in broilers fed 0.8% TRP (74.0 ± 3.87 compared to chickens with basal diet (63.7± 2.98. Enzyme activity of GPx improved in broilers fed TRP diets (225.9± 11.52 as compared to chickens with basal diet(183.1± 8.52 however, the TRP diet did not affect enzyme activity of SOD (P > 0.05. The TBARS index decreased in broilers fed TRP (0.76 ± 0.0052 in basal vs.0.49 ± 0.0032 in 0.8% TRP.   Conclusion: The major bioactive component of TRP is Curcumin that can improve the antioxidant properties under oxidative stress and high ambient temperature.

  10. Salicylic acid alleviates decreases in photosynthesis under heat stress and accelerates recovery in grapevine leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Jian-Shan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the effect of salicylic acid (SA on photosynthesis of plants including grapevines has been investigated, very little is yet known about the effects of SA on carbon assimilation and several components of PSII electron transport (donor side, reaction center and acceptor side. In this study, the impact of SA pretreatment on photosynthesis was evaluated in the leaves of young grapevines before heat stress (25°C, during heat stress (43°C for 5 h, and through the following recovery period (25°C. Photosynthetic measures included gas exchange parameters, PSII electron transport, energy dissipation, and Rubisco activation state. The levels of heat shock proteins (HSPs in the chloroplast were also investigated. Results SA did not significantly (P Pn of leaves before heat stress. But, SA did alleviate declines in Pn and Rubisco activition state, and did not alter negative changes in PSII parameters (donor side, acceptor side and reaction center QA under heat stress. Following heat treatment, the recovery of Pn in SA-treated leaves was accelerated compared with the control (H2O-treated leaves, and, donor and acceptor parameters of PSII in SA-treated leaves recovered to normal levels more rapidly than in the controls. Rubisco, however, was not significantly (P Conclusion SA pretreatment alleviated the heat stress induced decrease in Pn mainly through maintaining higher Rubisco activition state, and it accelerated the recovery of Pn mainly through effects on PSII function. These effects of SA may be related in part to enhanced levels of HSP21.

  11. Continuous fever-range heat stress induces thermotolerance in odontoblast-lineage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morotomi, Takahiko; Kitamura, Chiaki; Okinaga, Toshinori; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Sakagami, Ryuji; Anan, Hisashi

    2014-07-01

    Heat shock during restorative procedures can trigger damage to the pulpodentin complex. While severe heat shock has toxic effects, fever-range heat stress exerts beneficial effects on several cells and tissues. In this study, we examined whether continuous fever-range heat stress (CFHS) has beneficial effects on thermotolerance in the rat clonal dental pulp cell line with odontoblastic properties, KN-3. KN-3 cells were cultured at 41°C for various periods, and the expression level of several proteins was assessed by Western blot analysis. After pre-heat-treatment at 41°C for various periods, KN-3 cells were exposed to lethal severe heat shock (LSHS) at 49°C for 10min, and cell viability was examined using the MTS assay. Additionally, the expression level of odontoblast differentiation makers in surviving cells was examined by Western blot analysis. CFHS increased the expression levels of several heat shock proteins (HSPs) in KN-3 cells, and induced transient cell cycle arrest. KN-3 cells, not pre-heated or exposed to CFHS for 1 or 3h, died after exposure to LSHS. In contrast, KN-3 cells exposed to CFHS for 12h were transiently lower on day 1, but increased on day 3 after LSHS. The surviving cells expressed odontoblast differentiation markers, dentine sialoprotein and dentine matrix protein-1. These results suggest that CFHS for 12h improves tolerance to LSHS by inducing HSPs expression and cell cycle arrest in KN-3 cells. The appropriate pretreatment with continuous fever-range heat stress can provide protection against lethal heat shock in KN-3 cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Blood Biochemistry and Plasma Corticosterone Concentration in Broiler Chickens Under Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvis Alexander Díaz López

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High ambient temperatures cause susceptibility to heat stress in broiler chickens, generating metabolic changes. This paper seeks to determine the changes in blood biochemistry and plasma corticosterone concentration, as well as in glucose, total protein, albumin, globulin, sodium, chlorine, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, and calcium in broiler chickens under chronic heat stress and at ambient temperature conditions at the Colombian Amazonian piedmont. 21-days-old male chickens of two lines were studied, distributed in an unrestricted random design, in a two-factor scheme, with four treatments. Five repetitions per treatment were performed, and 25 animals per experimental unit examined. Broilers were fed a basic diet of corn and soybean meal with 3,100 kcal ME and 19.5% protein until they reached 42 days of age. The line factor had no effect on the evaluated variables (p ≥ 0.05. However, there was statistically significant difference (p ≤ 0.05 in all variables when concentrations of metabolites in broilers under chronic heat stress were compared to those of chickens exposed to ambient temperatures at the Colombian Amazon piedmont. In conclusion, blood biochemistry suffered significant changes under both experimental temperatures, with more physiological detriment in broilers under chronic heat stress. Concentration of corticosterone became the most sensitive and consistent indicator of the physiological condition of chronic heat stress.

  13. Urban heat stress: novel survey suggests health and fitness as future avenue for research and adaptation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Christian; Honold, Jasmin; Lauf, Steffen; Lakes, Tobia

    2017-04-01

    Extreme heat has tremendous adverse effects on human health. Heat stress is expected to further increase due to urbanization, an aging population, and global warming. Previous research has identified correlations between extreme heat and mortality. However, the underlying physical, behavioral, environmental, and social risk factors remain largely unknown and comprehensive quantitative investigation on an individual level is lacking. We conducted a new cross-sectional household questionnaire survey to analyze individual heat impairment (self-assessed and reported symptoms) and a large set of potential risk factors in the city of Berlin, Germany. This unique dataset (n = 474) allows for the investigation of new relationships, especially between health/fitness and urban heat stress. Our analysis found previously undocumented associations, leading us to generate new hypotheses for future research: various health/fitness variables returned the strongest associations with individual heat stress. Our primary hypothesis is that age, the most commonly used risk factor, is outperformed by health/fitness as a dominant risk factor. Related variables seem to more accurately represent humans’ cardiovascular capacity to handle elevated temperature. Among them, active travel was associated with reduced heat stress. We observed statistical associations for heat exposure regarding the individual living space but not for the neighborhood environment. Heat stress research should further investigate individual risk factors of heat stress using quantitative methodologies. It should focus more on health and fitness and systematically explore their role in adaptation strategies. The potential of health and fitness to reduce urban heat stress risk means that encouraging active travel could be an effective adaptation strategy. Through reduced CO2 emissions from urban transport, societies could reap double rewards by addressing two root causes of urban heat stress: population health and

  14. Radiation and Heat Stress Impact on Plasma Levels of Thyroid Hormones, Lipid Fractions, Glucose and Liver Glycogen in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Fattah, K.I.; Abou-Safi, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    Since Egypt is classified as a hot country, the present work has been directed to study the combined effect of heat stress and gamma radiation exposure on blood thyroid hormonal levels and some other parameters. Four groups of rats were served as: control, whole-body gamma irradiated (6Gy), exposed to ambient heat stress (38 C-40 C) and a group exposed to heat stress and irradiation. Four time intervals 1, 3, 5 and 7 days were determined for heat stress or exposure to heat followed by irradiation. Blood samples and liver specimens were taken at the end of each time interval in the third group and after one hour of irradiation in the second and fourth groups. To detect the radiation effects after the different periods of heat stress, plasma levels of thyroid hormones (T3 and T4), lipid fractions (triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol), glucose and liver glycogen content were determined. The results revealed that exposure to heat and ionizing radiation leads to a decrease in the levels of thyroid hormones, which was mostly pronounced in the T3 levels. Plasma glucose levels showed significant elevations in both, the heat-stressed group and the heat-treated then irradiated group. While, liver glycogen content exhibited similar elevations only during the 1st, 3 rd and 5 th days of heating followed by irradiation treatment as compared to the heat stressed group. Yet, it showed significant declines in comparison with both control and irradiated groups. Enormous increments in all determined plasma lipid fractions were induced by heat stress and / or gamma radiation

  15. Apoptosis in response to heat stress is positively associated with heat-shock protein 90 expression in chicken myocardial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wu, Hong; Tang, Shu; Li, Qiao-Ning; Xu, Jiao; Zhang, Miao; Su, Ya-Nan; Yin, Bin; Zhao, Qi-Ling; Kemper, Nicole; Hartung, Joerg; Bao, En-Dong

    2017-06-30

    To determine heat-shock protein (Hsp)90 expression is connected with cellular apoptotic response to heat stress and its mechanism, chicken ( Gallus gallus ) primary myocardial cells were treated with the Hsp90 promoter, aspirin, and its inhibitor, geldanamycin (GA), before heat stress. Cellular viability, heat-stressed apoptosis and reactive oxygen species level under different treatments were measured, and the expression of key proteins of the signaling pathway related to Hsp90 and their colocalization with Hsp90 were detected. The results showed that aspirin treatment increased the expression of protein kinase B (Akt), the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 and p-IKKα/β and the colocalization of Akt and STAT-3 with Hsp90 during heat stress, which was accompanied by improved viability and low apoptosis. GA significantly inhibited Akt expression and p-IKKα/β level, but not STAT-3 quantity, while the colocalization of Akt and STAT-3 with Hsp90 was weakened, followed by lower cell viability and higher apoptosis. Aspirin after GA treatment partially improved the stress response and apoptosis rate of tested cells caused by the recovery of Akt expression and colocalization, rather than the level of STAT-3 (including its co-localization with Hsp90) and p-IKKα/β. Therefore, Hsp90 expression has a positive effect on cellular capacity to resist heat-stressed injury and apoptosis. Moreover, inhibition of Hsp90 before stress partially attenuated its positive effects.

  16. Reef calcifiers are adapted to episodic heat stress but vulnerable to sustained warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhr, Marleen; Reymond, Claire E; Rieder, Vera; Hallock, Pamela; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Westphal, Hildegard; Kucera, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Shallow marine ecosystems naturally experience fluctuating physicochemical conditions across spatial and temporal scales. Widespread coral-bleaching events, induced by prolonged heat stress, highlight the importance of how the duration and frequency of thermal stress influence the adaptive physiology of photosymbiotic calcifiers. Large benthic foraminifera harboring algal endosymbionts are major tropical carbonate producers and bioindicators of ecosystem health. Like corals, they are sensitive to thermal stress and bleach at temperatures temporarily occurring in their natural habitat and projected to happen more frequently. However, their thermal tolerance has been studied so far only by chronic exposure, so how they respond under more realistic episodic heat-event scenarios remains unknown. Here, we determined the physiological responses of Amphistegina gibbosa, an abundant western Atlantic foraminifera, to four different treatments--control, single, episodic, and chronic exposure to the same thermal stress (32°C)--in controlled laboratory cultures. Exposure to chronic thermal stress reduced motility and growth, while antioxidant capacity was elevated, and photosymbiont variables (coloration, oxygen-production rates, chlorophyll a concentration) indicated extensive bleaching. In contrast, single- and episodic-stress treatments were associated with higher motility and growth, while photosymbiont variables remained stable. The effects of single and episodic heat events were similar, except for the presumable occurrence of reproduction, which seemed to be suppressed by both episodic and chronic stress. The otherwise different responses between treatments with thermal fluctuations and chronic stress indicate adaptation to thermal peaks, but not to chronic exposure expected to ensue when baseline temperatures are elevated by climate change. This firstly implies that marine habitats with a history of fluctuating thermal stress potentially support resilient

  17. Palm kernel cake extract exerts hepatoprotective activity in heat-induced oxidative stress in chicken hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoueian, Ehsan; Abdullah, Norhani; Idrus, Zulkifli; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Goh, Yong Meng; Shakeri, Majid; Oskoueian, Armin

    2014-10-02

    Palm kernel cake (PKC), the most abundant by-product of oil palm industry is believed to contain bioactive compounds with hepatoprotective potential. These compounds may serve as hepatoprotective agents which could help the poultry industry to alleviate adverse effects of heat stress on liver function in chickens. This study was performed to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of PKC extract in heat-induced oxidative stress in chicken hepatocytes. The nature of the active metabolites and elucidation of the possible mechanism involved were also investigated. The PKC extract possessed free radical scavenging activity with values significantly (p < 0.05) lower than silymarin as the reference antioxidant. Heat-induced oxidative stress in chicken hepatocyte impaired the total protein, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity significantly (p < 0.05). Treatment of heat-induced hepatocytes with PKC extract (125 μg/ml) and silymarin as positive control increased these values significantly (p < 0.05). The real time PCR and western blot analyses revealed the significant (p < 0.05) up-regulation of oxidative stress biomarkers including TNF-like, IFN-γ and IL-1β genes; NF-κB, COX-2, iNOS and Hsp70 proteins expression upon heat stress in chicken hepatocytes. The PKC extract and silymarin were able to alleviate the expression of all of these biomarkers in heat-induced chicken hepatocytes. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of PKC extract showed the presence of fatty acids, phenolic compounds, sugar derivatives and other organic compounds such as furfural which could be responsible for the observed hepatoprotective activity. Palm kernel cake extract could be a potential agent to protect hepatocytes function under heat induced oxidative stress.

  18. Heat stress and occupational health and safety – spatial and temporal differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażejczyk Krzysztof

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of climatic health hazards on the general population has been discussed in many studies but limited focus is placed on developing a relationship between climate and its effects on occupational health. Long working hours with high physical activity can cause health problems for workers ranging from mild heat cramps to severe heat stroke leading to death. The paper presents the possible risk of heat hazard to outdoor workers, using the example of Warsaw. The heat stress hazard, defined by WBGT values above 26 and 28°C and UTCI above 32 and 38°C, is assessed from two perspectives: its spatial distribution on a local scale and its temporal changes during the 21st century due to climate change. City centre and industrial districts were identified as the places with the greatest heat stress hazard. The number of heat stress days in a year (as predicted for the 21st century is increasing, meaning that heat-related illnesses are more likely to have a direct impact on workers’ health.

  19. Practices for Alleviating Heat Stress of Dairy Cows in Humid Continental Climates: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Fournel, S?bastien; Ouellet, V?ronique; Charbonneau, ?dith

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary The severity of heat stress issues on dairy cows will increase as global warming progresses. Fortunately, major advances in environmental management, including fans, misters, sprinklers, and cooled waterbeds, can attenuate the effects of thermal stress on cow health, production, and reproduction. These cooling systems were, however, tested in subtropical areas and their efficiency in northern regions is uncertain. This article assesses the potential of existing technologies to ...

  20. Heat stress and public health: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovats, R Sari; Hajat, Shakoor

    2008-01-01

    Heat is an environmental and occupational hazard. The prevention of deaths in the community caused by extreme high temperatures (heat waves) is now an issue of public health concern. The risk of heat-related mortality increases with natural aging, but persons with particular social and/or physical vulnerability are also at risk. Important differences in vulnerability exist between populations, depending on climate, culture, infrastructure (housing), and other factors. Public health measures include health promotion and heat wave warning systems, but the effectiveness of acute measures in response to heat waves has not yet been formally evaluated. Climate change will increase the frequency and the intensity of heat waves, and a range of measures, including improvements to housing, management of chronic diseases, and institutional care of the elderly and the vulnerable, will need to be developed to reduce health impacts.

  1. Stress relaxation in tempered glass caused by heat soak testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Jens; Hilcken, Jonas; Aronen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Heat soak testing of tempered glass is a thermal process required after the tempering process itself to bring glasses of commercial soda-lime-silica-glass to failure that are contaminated with nickel sulphide inclusions, diameter 50 mm to 500 mm typically. Thus, the tests avoid a so-called "spont...... of commercial soda-lime-silica glass, it causes stress relaxation in tempered glass and the fracture pattern of the glass changes accordingly, especially thin glasses are affected. Based on the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Model, this paper comprises the theoretical background of the stress...

  2. Accelerating action of stresses on crystallization kinetics in silicon ion-implanted layers during pulsed heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the effect of stressed in ion-implanted layers on kinetics of amorphous phase transformations is performed. The suggested model of accounting stresses including concentration ones is based on the locality of action of interstitial addition atoms and on general structural inhomogeneity of amorphous semiconductor leading to the formation of areas of the facilitated phase transition. Accounting of effect of energy variation of silicon atoms interaction on probability of displacement events and atoms building in lattice points or atomic bonds disintegration allows one to trace the accelerating action of introduced by ion implantation stresses on the kinetics of layer crystallization during pulsed heating

  3. Effect of heat treatment on residual stress and wear behaviors of the TiNi/Ti2Ni based laser cladding composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yang-Feng; Li, Jun; Lv, Ying-Hao; Hu, Lie-Feng

    2017-12-01

    The TiNi/Ti2Ni based composite coatings reinforced by TiC and TiB2 were prepared on Ti6Al4V at different circumstance temperatures (25 °C, 400 °C, 600 °C, and 800 °C) by laser cladding, then were preserved for 3 h. Macromorphologies and microstructures of the coatings were examined through an optical microscope (OM), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Residual stresses along the depth direction of the coatings were measured by the nanoindentation method, and wear behaviors of the coatings were also investigated using an ultra-functional wear testing machine. Results showed that the coatings were mainly composed of TiNi/Ti2Ni as the matrix and TiC/TiB2 as the reinforcement. A small amount of Cr2Ti was formed in the coatings prepared at 400 °C and 600 °C. Besides that, Ti3Al was also observed in the coating prepared at 800 °C. The tensile stress existed in the coatings prepared at 25 °C, 400 °C and 600 °C when the coating prepared at 800 °C was regarded as the stress-free reference. The average residual stress in the surface of coating prepared at 25 °C reached the largest value of about 2.79 GPa and presented a decreasing tendency with increasing the circumstance temperature (1.03 GPa at 400 °C, 0.52 GPa at 600 °C, and 0 GPa at 800 °C). It revealed that the rise in circumstance temperature contributed to the reduction in cracking susceptibility in the laser cladding coating. However, the wear volumes of the coatings were increased with increasing the circumstance temperature (0.1912 mm3 at 25 °C, 0.2828 mm3 at 400 °C, 0.3732 mm3 at 600 °C, and 0.6073 mm3 at 800 °C) due to the weakening in strain-hardening effect and the reduction in reinforcement density. The wear mechanism of the coatings was transformed from the single brittle-debonding into the combination of micro-cutting and brittle-debonding when the circumstance temperature was changed from room temperature to

  4. Heat stress control in the TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] defueling and decontamination activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schork, J.S.; Parfitt, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the initial stages of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling and decontamination activities for the reactor building, it was realized that the high levels of loose radioactive contamination would require the use of extensive protective clothing by entry personnel. While there was no doubt that layered protective clothing protects workers from becoming contaminated, it was recognized that these same layers of clothing would impose a very significant heat stress burden. To prevent the potentially serious consequences of a severe reaction to heat stress by workers in the hostile environment of the TMI-2 reactor building and yet maintain the reasonable work productivity necessary to perform the recovery adequately, an effective program of controlling worker exposure to heat stress had to be developed. Body-cooling devices produce a flow of cool air, which is introduced close to the skin to remove body heat through convection and increased sweat evaporation. The cooling effect produced by the Vortex tube successfully protected the workers from heat stress, however, there were several logistical and operational problems that hindered extensive use of these devices. The last type of cooling garment examined was the frozen water garment (FWG) developed by Elizier Kamon at the Pennsylvania State University as part of an Electric Power Research Institute research grant. Personal protection, i.e., body cooling, engineering controls, and administrative controls, have been implemented successfully

  5. The influence of heat stress on metabolic status of cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvat Jožef

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is considered that high air temperature and humidity during the summer are the main factors which adversely affect both the health and production-reproductive performance of high yielding dairy cows. The resulting heath stress leads to a series of changes in endocrine regulation of homeostasis. The changes in hormonal status reflect in some way to the indicators of metabolic status of the cows. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of heat stress on metabolic status of cows. The experiment was carried out on 20 cows of Holstein-Friesian breed during the summer, in the period from 18th to 45th day of lactation. During the performance of the experiment, the value of heat index (THI was determined hourly and then the value of average morning (from 10 pm the previous day to 9 am the current day, afternoon (from 10 am to 9 pm the current day and all-day THI was calculated. Blood sampling was carried out on the 1st, 2nd, 8th, 11th, 14th, 18th, 25th, 29th and 37th day of the experiment, in the morning and the afternoon. On the basis of hourly THI values, whole experimental period was divided into three periods: period A during which the cows were exposed to a extreme high heat stress (THI≥78 at least 7 hours in 24 hours; period B during which the cows were exposed to a moderate heat stress (72≥THI≤78 at least 7 hours in 24 hours; period C during which the cows were not exposed to a heat stress (THI≤72 in 24 hours. The average daily THI in period A (73,25±0,89 was significantly higher (p<0,01, individually in regard to period B (71,45±0,96 and period C (65,41±2,09. THI was significantly higher in the period B than in the period C (p<0,01. Significantly lower blood glucose value (p<0,05 during the afternoon period in the cows exposed to the extreme heat stress (3,02±0,31 mmol/L in regard to the morning period (3,14±0,41 mmol/L points to the fact that in such conditions, metabolism redirects to use of glucose as an

  6. Perspectives on deciphering mechanisms underlying plant heat stress response and thermotolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Lucia Bokszczanin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is a major threat for agriculture and food safety and in many cases the negative effects are already apparent. The current challenge of basic and applied plant science is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of heat stress response and thermotolerance in detail and use this information to identify genotypes that will withstand unfavorable environmental conditions. Nowadays X-omics approaches complement the findings of previous targeted studies and highlight the complexity of heat stress response mechanisms giving information for so far unrecognized genes, proteins and metabolites as potential key players of thermotolerance. Even more, roles of epigenetic mechanisms and the involvement of small RNAs in thermotolerance are currently emerging and thus open new directions of yet unexplored areas of plant heat stress response. In parallel it is emerging that although the whole plant is vulnerable to heat, specific organs are particularly sensitive to elevated temperatures. This has redirected research from the vegetative to generative tissues. The sexual reproduction phase is considered as the most sensitive to heat and specifically pollen exhibits the highest sensitivity and frequently an elevation of the temperature just a few degrees above the optimum during pollen development can have detrimental effects for crop production. Compared to our knowledge on heat stress response of vegetative tissues, the information on pollen is still scarce. Nowadays, several techniques for high-throughput X-omics approaches provide major tools to explore the principles of pollen heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms in specific genotypes. The collection of such information will provide an excellent support for improvement of breeding programs to facilitate the development of tolerant cultivars. The review aims at describing the current knowledge of thermotolerance mechanisms and the technical advances which will foster new insights into

  7. Association between human and animal thermal comfort indices and physiological heat stress indicators in dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, L; Kézér, F L; Ruff, F; Szenci, O; Jurkovich, V

    2018-06-06

    Warm summer episodes have a significant effect on the overall health and well-being of young cattle; however, it is not known which temperature measure should be used for estimating heat stress in dairy calves. In this study, generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to estimate the relationships between thermal comfort indices and animal-based heat stress indicators in sixteen Holstein bull calves that were housed in individual calf hutches. Data were collected under continental weather characteristics over a 5-day period: day 1 (lower-temperature day), days 2 and 3 (heat stress days), and a 2-day post-stress period. Relative humidity, ambient temperature, the heat index, the humidex and five different temperature-humidity indices (THI) were used as thermal indices. Physiological variables monitored included respiratory rate, rectal temperature, ear skin temperature and heart rate. The heat index and the humidex measuring human thermal comfort were more closely associated with physiological measures than were the ambient temperature or the THIs (in case of heat index: R 2 = 0.87 for respiratory rate, R 2 = 0.63 for rectal temperature, R 2 = 0.70 for ear skin temperature, and R 2 = 0.78 for heart rate, respectively; in case of humidex: R 2 = 0.85 for respiratory rate, R 2 = 0.60 for rectal temperature, R 2 = 0.68 for ear skin temperature, and R 2 = 0.75 for heart rate, respectively). Based on our results, parameters of human outdoor comfort seem better to estimate heat stress in dairy calves in a continental region than those of THIs or ambient temperature. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Heat stress presenting with encephalopathy and MRI findings of diffuse cerebral injury and hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Waldo R; Varghese, Shaun; Savitz, Sean; Wu, Tzu Ching

    2013-06-17

    Heat stress results in multiorgan failure and CNS injury. There a few case reports in the literature on the neurological consequences of heat stress. We describe a patient with heat stress presenting with encephalopathy and bilateral cerebral, cerebellar, and thalamic lesions and intraventricular hemorrhage on MRI. Heat stress should be in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with encephalopathy and elevated serum inflammatory markers especially if the history suggests a preceding episode of hyperthermia.

  9. The shifting influence of drought and heat stress for crops in northeast Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobell, David B; Hammer, Graeme L; Chenu, Karine; Zheng, Bangyou; McLean, Greg; Chapman, Scott C

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of drought environment types (ETs) has proven useful for breeding crops for drought-prone regions. Here, we consider how changes in climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) concentrations will affect drought ET frequencies in sorghum and wheat systems of northeast Australia. We also modify APSIM (the Agricultural Production Systems Simulator) to incorporate extreme heat effects on grain number and weight, and then evaluate changes in the occurrence of heat-induced yield losses of more than 10%, as well as the co-occurrence of drought and heat. More than six million simulations spanning representative locations, soil types, management systems, and 33 climate projections led to three key findings. First, the projected frequency of drought decreased slightly for most climate projections for both sorghum and wheat, but for different reasons. In sorghum, warming exacerbated drought stresses by raising the atmospheric vapor pressure deficit and reducing transpiration efficiency (TE), but an increase in TE due to elevated CO2 more than offset these effects. In wheat, warming reduced drought stress during spring by hastening development through winter and reducing exposure to terminal drought. Elevated CO2 increased TE but also raised radiation-use efficiency and overall growth rates and water use, thereby offsetting much of the drought reduction from warming. Second, adding explicit effects of heat on grain number and grain size often switched projected yield impacts from positive to negative. Finally, although average yield losses associated with drought will remain generally higher than that for heat stress for the next half century, the relative importance of heat is steadily growing. This trend, as well as the likely high degree of genetic variability in heat tolerance, suggests that more emphasis on heat tolerance is warranted in breeding programs. At the same time, work on drought tolerance should continue with an emphasis on drought that co

  10. Heat priming induces trans-generational tolerance to high temperature stress in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao eWang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat plants are very sensitive to high temperature stress during grain filling. Effects of heat priming applied to the first generation on tolerance of the successive generation to post-anthesis high temperature stress were investigated. Compared with the progeny of non-heat primed plants (NH, the progeny of heat-primed plants (PH possessed higher grain yield, leaf photosynthesis and activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower cell membrane damage under high temperature stress. In the transcriptome profile, 1430 probes showed obvious difference in expression between PH and NH. These genes were related to signal transduction, transcription, energy, defense, and protein destination and storage, respectively. The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1 which was involved in histone demethylation related to epigenetic modification was up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. The proteome analysis indicated that the proteins involved in photosynthesis, energy production and protein destination and storage were up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. In short, thermos-tolerance was induced through heritable epigenetic alternation and signaling transduction, both processes further triggered prompt modifications of defense related responses in anti-oxidation, transcription, energy production, and protein destination and storage in the progeny of the primed plants under high temperature stress. It was concluded that trans-generation thermo-tolerance was induced by heat priming in the first generation, and this might be an effective measure to cope with severe high-temperature stresses during key growth stages in wheat production.

  11. A Virtual Rat for Simulating Environmental and Exertional Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    unsuitable for accurately determin- ing the spatiotemporal temperature distribution in the animal due to heat stress and for performing mechanistic analysis ...possible in the original experiments. Finally, we performed additional simu- lations using the virtual rat to facilitate comparative analysis of the...capability of the virtual rat to account for the circadian rhythmicity in core temperatures during an in- crease in the external temperature from 22

  12. Heat stress during the Black Saturday event in Melbourne, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Stephanie J.; Vihma, Timo; Pezza, Alexandre B.

    2015-06-01

    The Black Saturday bushfire event of February 7, 2009, devastated the state of Victoria, Australia, resulting in 173 deaths. On this day, the maximum temperature in Melbourne (state capital of Victoria, population 4 million people) exceeded 46 °C, there were wind gusts of over 80 km h-1 and the relative humidity dropped below 5 %. We investigated the severe meteorological conditions of Black Saturday and the risk of heat stress and dehydration for the residents of Melbourne. This was through the analysis of weather station data, air pollution data, the apparent temperature (AT) and the COMfort FormulA human energy budget model. A very strong pressure gradient caused hot and dry air to be advected to Melbourne from the desert interior of Australia creating the extreme weather conditions. The AT showed that on Black Saturday, heat stress conditions were present, though underrepresented due to assumptions in the AT formula. Further investigation into the human energy budget revealed that the conditions required a sweating rate of 1.4 kg h-1 to prevent heat accumulation into the body. If sweating stopped, hyperthermia could occur in 15 min. Sensitivity tests indicated that the dry air and strong winds on Black Saturday helped to release latent heat, but the required sweating rate was virtually unattainable for an average person and would result in intense dehydration. Air particulates were at dangerous concentrations in Melbourne on Black Saturday, further intensifying the stresses to the human body. In the future, we recommend that the AT is not used as a thermal comfort measure as it underestimates the physical stress people experience.

  13. Does low-protein diet improve broiler performance under heat stress conditions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RL Furlan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition for broilers under high temperatures is extremely important for brazilian broiler chicken industry because the amounts of consumed nutrients and environmental temperature have great effects on bird performance and carcass quality. Among diet nutrients, protein has the highest heat increment; thus, during many years, diets with low protein level were recommended in order to reduce heat production in broiler chickens under heat stress. However, reports have shown that low-protein diets have negative effects on broiler performance when environmental temperature is high, because during heat stress, low food intake associated to a low diet protein induce amino acid deficiencies. Other studies have shown that broilers fed low-protein diets increase their energy requirement for maintenance with higher heat production. Thus, with the growth of broiler industry in tropical areas more challenges need to be faced by the farmers. So, both the ambient and nutritional conditions ought to be well managed to avoid negative effects on poultry production once they can affect the metabolism (body heat production under low temperature and body heat dissipation under high temperature with consequence on poultry performance (meat and eggs.

  14. HEATING AND ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT ACTIVATE ANTI-STRESS GENE FUNCTIONS IN HUMANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Fadeevitch Semenkov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available All types of cell stress are accompanied by the activation of anti-stress genes that can suppress ROS synthesis. We hypothesized that different environmental factors would affect organisms through the activation of anti-stress genes by autologous serum (AS proteins, followed by the synthesis of molecules that increase cell resistance to oxidative stress. The goal of this work was to study the influence of AS on ROS production by peripheral blood neutrophils isolated from donors in different age groups. Neutrophils were isolated from 59 donors (38-94 years old. AS was heated at 100˚C for 30 sec. or irradiated by ultraviolet light (UV at 200-280 nm and 8 W for 10 min. Neutrophils were exposed to heat shock at 42˚C for 1 min. (short-term heating stress or 43˚C for 10 min., followed by the determination of the chemiluminescence reaction induced by zymosan. AS can increase or decrease ROS production by neutrophils depending on the structure of the proteins in the serum; these structures can be changed by heating or UV treatment and the temperature of their interaction (4˚C or 37˚C. We propose that the effect of environmental factors on AS proteins can cause an adverse increase in oxidative stress levels due to the functional reduction of anti-stress genes. We found a negative correlation between the quantity of intracellular Hsp70 and levels of intracellular ROS production following 10 minutes of heat shock at 43°C. Short-term heating stress (1 minute at 42°C was followed by a prominent reduction in ROS production. This effect may be a result of the impact of the hormone adrenaline on the functions of anti-stress genes. Indeed, the same effect was observed after treatment of the neutrophils with adrenaline at concentrations of 10-4 M and 10-5 M. In contrast, dexamethasone from the other stress hormone group did not evoke the same effect at the same concentrations.

  15. The effects of water replacement by oral rehydration fluids with or without betaine supplementation on performance, acid-base balance, and water retention of heat-stressed broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, M A M; Downing, J

    2011-01-01

    Exposing broilers to a high temperature increases water and electrolyte K(+) and Na(+) excretion, which negatively affects the heat dissipation capacity and acid-base homeostasis, resulting in losses in growth performance. In this experiment, the efficacy of providing oral rehydration therapy and betaine on growth performance, acid-base balance, and water and electrolyte retention was evaluated. A total of 432 one-day-old broiler chicks (Cobb) were allocated to 72 metabolic cages and reared to 31 d of age under standard conditions. From 32 to 41 d of age, chicks were exposed to heat stress (ambient temperature, 32°C) and high RH (80 to 100% RH) for 9 h daily. The ameliorative effects of a 3 × 3 factorial array of treatments administered via drinking water were evaluated in 8 replicates of 6 chicks per cage for each treatment. Two oral rehydration therapy (ORT) fluids, based on either citrate or bicarbonate salts, were added to tap water. In addition, betaine was added to tap water at an inclusion rate of 0, 500, or 1,000 mg/L to complete the array of 9 liquid-based treatments. Growth performance was assessed at 32, 35, and 41 d of age. From 32 to 35 d of age, chicks receiving ORT fluids exhibited improved growth performance, water balance, and electrolyte (K(+), Na(+)) retention. In addition, the physiological response to stress was attenuated, as indicated by lower heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratios and blood glucose concentrations relative to the negative controls. The addition of betaine at an inclusion rate of 500 mg/L improved BW gain. From d 36 to 41, treatments did not significantly influence growth performance, which suggests that chicks receiving tap water were able to compensate and adapt to the heat-stress conditions. The results demonstrate that the beneficial effects of providing ORT fluids and 500 mg of betaine/L were observed only during the first 4 d of heat exposure. After this period, adaptation to the heat appears to occur, and none of the

  16. Ascorbic acid and heat stress in domestic chicken nutrition: A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... acid at required levels, especially under heat stress, improves growth, egg production, egg shell strength, fertility within(male and females) and hatchability of poultry eggs. The depressant effect of high temperature on performance often compels the technique of supplementing poultry diets to ensure optimum production.

  17. Muscle blood flow and muscle metabolism during exercise and heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bodil; Savard, G; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    The effect of heat stress on blood flow and metabolism in an exercising leg was studied in seven subjects walking uphill (12-17%) at 5 km/h on a treadmill for 90 min or until exhaustion. The first 30 min of exercise were performed in a cool environment (18-21 degrees C); then subjects moved...

  18. Patterns of Gene Expression Associated with Recovery and Injury in Heat-stressed Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-03

    renal failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, myocardial in- jury, hepatocellular injury, intestinal ischemia, pancreatic injury, and hemorrhagic...pathways are involved in the observed cardiomyopathy. Results and discussion To induce the pathophysiological effects of heat stress, we placed conscious...Table S2). The incidence and severity of lesions, such as car- diomyopathy and chronic progressive nephropathy, were generally minimal and consistent

  19. Cows exposed to heat stress during fetal life exhibit improved thermal tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, B M S; Younas, U; Asar, T O; Dikmen, S; Hansen, P J; Dahl, G E

    2017-08-01

    Maternal heat stress during late gestation affects calf function during postnatal life. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether calves that experience heat stress in utero have altered thermoregulatory responses to acute heat stress later in life. Specifically, the hypothesis was that heat stress in utero would improve the response to acute heat stress at maturity. Females were born to dams exposed to heat stress or cooled during late gestation preceding their birth. All animals were raised postnatally under identical management. Twelve lactating Holstein cows that were exposed to in utero heat stress (HT) and 12 that were exposed to in utero control (CON) were used. A heat stress challenge was conducted in 3 blocks using 4 HT and 4 CON cows matched according to milk yield, stage of lactation, and parity. Each challenge consisted of transfer from a barn with shade and evaporative cooling to one with shade but no additional cooling for 48 h. The challenge was replicated twice for each block. Sweating rate, respiration rate, rectal temperature (RT), and skin temperature were measured on each cow at 0900, 1100, 1300, 1500, and 1700 h for 2 consecutive days. Mean ambient temperature across 6 challenge days was 26.15 ± 4.75°C. Tendencies for differences at 1700 h were observed between treatments for RT (HT: 39.5 ± 0.1; CON: 39.6 ± 0.1°C; = 0.065), however, there was no difference in respiration rate (HT: 77.6 ± 1.6; CON: 79.5 ± 1.6 bpm; = 0.85). Sweating rate for shaved skin (HT: 29.4 ± 2.0; CON: 36.0 ± 2.0 g/mh; = 0.057) and for non-shaved skin (HT: 22.5 ± 1.5; CON: 29.2 ± 1.2 g/mh; = 0.01) differed between groups. However, there was no effect on skin temperature at the shaved location (HT: 36.2 ± 0.2; CON: 36.0 ± 0.2°C; = 0.81), but there was a tendency for differences for the non-shaved area (HT: 35.4 ± 0.2; CON: 34.9 ± 0.2°C; = 0.097). Cows that underwent in utero heat stress had greater skin temperature at 1700 h vs. in utero

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with thermoregulation in lactating dairy cows exposed to heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen, S; Wang, X-z; Ortega, M S; Cole, J B; Null, D J; Hansen, P J

    2015-12-01

    Dairy cows with increased rectal temperature experience lower milk yield and fertility. Rectal temperature during heat stress is heritable, so genetic selection for body temperature regulation could reduce effects of heat stress on production. One aim of the study was to validate the relationship between genotype and heat tolerance for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with resistance to heat stress. A second aim was to identify new SNPs associated with heat stress resistance. Thermotolerance was assessed in lactating Holsteins during the summer by measuring rectal temperature (a direct measurement of body temperature regulation; n = 435), respiration rate (an indirect measurement of body temperature regulation, n = 450) and sweating rate (the major evaporative cooling mechanism in cattle, n = 455). The association between genotype and thermotolerance was evaluated for 19 SNPs previously associated with rectal temperature from a genomewide analysis study (GWAS), four SNPs previously associated with change in milk yield during heat stress from GWAS, 2 candidate gene SNPs previously associated with rectal temperature and respiration rate during heat stress (ATPA1A and HSP70A) and 66 SNPs in genes previously shown to be associated with reproduction, production or health traits in Holsteins. For SNPs previously associated with heat tolerance, regions of BTA4, BTA6 and BTA24 were associated with rectal temperature; regions of BTA6 and BTA24 were associated with respiration rate; and regions of BTA5, BTA26 and BTA29 were associated with sweating rate. New SNPs were identified for rectal temperature (n = 12), respiration rate (n = 8) and sweating rate (n = 3) from among those previously associated with production, reproduction or health traits. The SNP that explained the most variation were PGR and ASL for rectal temperature, ACAT2 and HSD17B7 for respiration rate, and ARL6IP1 and SERPINE2 for sweating rate. ARL6IP1 was associated with all three

  1. Heat in the city. An inventory of knowledge and knowledge deficiencies regarding heat stress in Dutch cities and options for its mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcedo Rahola, B.; Mulder, K. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Van Oppen, P. [Stichting Bouwresearch SBR, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-03-15

    This report gives an overview of heat stress problems in urban areas of the Netherlands and various options for mitigating this stress. Climate change is causing more occurrences of heat waves. Urban areas in particular will suffer the most, as they are warmer than the countryside. What is known about the magnitude of heat stress in Dutch urban areas? What are the consequences? What research is needed to clarify its effects? Which options in particular could do with further study in order to prevent fatalities, maintain comfort levels and avoid increases in energy consumption for summer cooling? This report aims at identifying: the foreseeable problems of urban heat in the Netherlands; the specifics (geographic, cultural, economic, technological) that apply to the Netherlands; the most promising options for mitigating urban heat; and the priorities for further research.

  2. Seasonal heat stress: Clinical implications and hormone treatments for the fertility of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rensis, F; Garcia-Ispierto, I; López-Gatius, F

    2015-09-15

    Heat stress has consequences on both the physiology and reproductive performance of cows, but the most dramatic effect for dairy producers is the decrease produced in fertility. The effects of heat stress on fertility include an increased number of days open, reduced conception rate, and larger number of cows suffering different types of anestrus. Once becomes pregnant, heat stress affects also the reproductive success of the cow through its direct effects on the ovary, uterus, gametes, embryo, and early fetus. This article reviews current knowledge of the effects of heat stress on fertility in dairy cows and the hormonal strategies used to mitigate these effects at the farm level. Administration of GnRH at the moment of artificial insemination can improve the conception rate. Breeding synchronization protocols for fixed-time insemination may reduce the calving conception interval and the number of services per conception. Progesterone-based protocols seem resolve better the reproductive disorders related to a hot environment (anestrus) than GnRH-based protocols. The use of combinations of GnRH, eCG, and hCG in progesterone-based protocols can improve results. Progesterone supplementation during the late embryonic and/or early fetal period would be useful in curtailing pregnancy losses, mainly in single pregnancies, whereas a more positive effect of treatment with GnRH than progesterone has been found in twin pregnancies. Melatonin therapy is emerging as a promising strategy to improve the natural reproductive performance of cows suffering conditions of heat stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of heat stress in UK dairy cattle and impact on milk yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, Robert J H; Mead, Naomi E; Willett, Kate M; Parker, David E

    2014-01-01

    Much as humans suffer from heat-stress during periods of high temperature and humidity, so do dairy cattle. Using a temperature-humidity index (THI), we investigate the effect of past heatwaves in the UK on heat-stress in dairy herds. Daily THI data derived from routine meteorological observations show that during the summer, there has been an average of typically 1 day per year per station over the past 40 years when the THI has exceeded the threshold for the onset of mild heat-stress in dairy cattle. However, during the heatwaves of 2003 and 2006, this threshold was exceeded on typically 5 days on average in the Midlands, south and east of England. Most dairy cattle are in the west and north of the country and so did not experience the severest heat. Milk yield data in the south-west of England show that a few herds experienced decreases in yields during 2003 and 2006. We used the 11-member regional climate model ensemble with the A1B scenario from UKCP09 to investigate the possible future change in days exceeding the THI threshold for the onset of mild heat-stress. The number of days where the THI exceeds this threshold could increase to over 20 days yr −1 in southern parts of England by the end of the century. (letters)

  4. Temporal patterns of cardiac performance and genes encoding heat shock proteins and metabolic sensors of an intertidal limpet Cellana toreuma during sublethal heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu; Han, Guo-dong; Dong, Yun-wei

    2014-04-01

    Intertidal invertebrates develop effective physiological adaptations to cope with the rapidly changing thermal environment in the intertidal zone. In the present study, the temporal patterns of heart rate, protein carbonyl groups, and genes encoding heat shock proteins (hsp70 and hsp90) and metabolic sensors (ampkα, ampkβ and sirt1) were measured to study the effect of sublethal heat stress on the cardiac function, oxidative stress, heat shock response and cellular metabolism of an intertidal limpet Cellana toreuma. All the physiological parameters are sensitive to temperature and duration of heat stress. Spearman correlation analysis revealed that the correlations between heart rate and levels of heat shock proteins mRNA and metabolic sensors mRNA were statistically significant. These results further suggest that cardiac function plays crucial roles in cellular energy metabolism and heat shock responses. The significant increase of protein carbonyl groups at 34°C after 4h exposure indicated that the failure of cardiac function and the increase of anaerobic metabolism partly leads to the increase of protein carbonyl groups. Generally, the physiological responses to heat stress are sensitive to temperature and are energy-consumptive, as indicated by the upregulation of metabolic sensors mRNA. However, the upregulation of heat shock proteins and metabolic sensors at the post-transcriptional level and related functions need to be confirmed in further experiments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Systems Biology Approach to Heat Stress, Heat Injury and Heat Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    stroke [3, 11, 12], leading to severe encephalopathy , rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, myocardial injury...heart, kidney, and liver failure are increased by 40% in Service members with a history of heat stroke [5, 6]. Indeed, there is an urgent need for...other organs at high risk for injury, such as liver and kidney [24, 25]. 2.1 Utility of the computational model Molecular indicators of heat

  6. Acute heat stress induces differential gene expressions in the testes of a broiler-type strain of Taiwan country chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Han; Cheng, Chuen-Yu; Tang, Pin-Chi; Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Hsin-Hsin; Lee, Yen-Pai; Huang, San-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The expression of testicular genes following acute heat stress has been reported in layer-type roosters, but few similar studies have been conducted on broilers. This study investigated the effect of acute heat stress on the gene expression in the testes of a broiler-type strain of Taiwan country chickens. Roosters were subjected to acute heat stress (38°C) for 4 h, and then exposed to 25°C, with testes collected 0, 2, and 6 h after the cessation of heat stress, using non-heat-stressed roosters as controls (n = 3 roosters per group). The body temperature and respiratory rate increased significantly (pstress. The numbers of apoptotic cells increased 2 h after the acute heat stress (79 ± 7 vs. 322 ± 192, control vs. heat stress; pstressed chickens from those of the controls, including genes involved in the response to stimulus, protein metabolism, signal transduction, cell adhesion, transcription, and apoptosis. The mRNA expressions of upregulated genes, including HSP25, HSP90AA1, HSPA2, and LPAR2, and of downregulated genes, including CDH5, CTNNA3, EHF, CIRBP, SLA, and NTF3, were confirmed through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Moreover, numerous transcripts in the testes exhibited distinct expressions between the heat-stressed broiler-type and layer-type chickens. We concluded that the transcriptional responses of testes to acute heat stress may differ between the broiler-type and layer-type roosters. Whether the differential expression patterns associate with the heat-tolerance in the strains require a further exploration.

  7. [Regulation of heat shock gene expression in response to stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuz, D G

    2017-01-01

    Heat shock (HS) genes, or stress genes, code for a number of proteins that collectively form the most ancient and universal stress defense system. The system determines the cell capability of adaptation to various adverse factors and performs a variety of auxiliary functions in normal physiological conditions. Common stress factors, such as higher temperatures, hypoxia, heavy metals, and others, suppress transcription and translation for the majority of genes, while HS genes are upregulated. Transcription of HS genes is controlled by transcription factors of the HS factor (HSF) family. Certain HSFs are activated on exposure to higher temperatures or other adverse factors to ensure stress-induced HS gene expression, while other HSFs are specifically activated at particular developmental stages. The regulation of the main mammalian stress-inducible factor HSF1 and Drosophila melanogaster HSF includes many components, such as a variety of early warning signals indicative of abnormal cell activity (e.g., increases in intracellular ceramide, cytosolic calcium ions, or partly denatured proteins); protein kinases, which phosphorylate HSFs at various Ser residues; acetyltransferases; and regulatory proteins, such as SUMO and HSBP1. Transcription factors other than HSFs are also involved in activating HS gene transcription; the set includes D. melanogaster GAF, mammalian Sp1 and NF-Y, and other factors. Transcription of several stress genes coding for molecular chaperones of the glucose-regulated protein (GRP) family is predominantly regulated by another stress-detecting system, which is known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) system and is activated in response to massive protein misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial matrix. A translational fine tuning of HS protein expression occurs via changing the phosphorylation status of several proteins involved in translation initiation. In addition, specific signal sequences in the 5'-UTRs of some HS

  8. Age-related oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity in heat-stressed broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vesco, A P; Khatlab, A S; Goes, E S R; Utsunomiya, K S; Vieira, J S; Oliveira Neto, A R; Gasparino, E

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of acute heat stress (HS) and age on the redox state in broilers aged 21 and 42 days. We evaluated the expression of genes related to antioxidant capacity, the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in the liver, as well as oxidative stress markers in the liver and plasma. The experiment had a completely randomized factorial design with two thermal environments (thermoneutral and HS, 38°C for 24 h) and two ages (21 and 42 days). Twenty-one-day-old animals exposed to HS showed the highest thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) (PAge influenced the expression of the thioredoxin (Trx) (P=0.0090), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (P=0.0194), glutathione reductase (GSR) (Page and environment on the liver content of Glutathione (GSH) (Page had higher plasma creatinine content (0.05 v. 0.01 mg/dl) and higher aspartate aminotransferase activity (546.50 v. 230.67 U/l) than chickens at 21 days of age. Our results suggest that under HS conditions, in which there is higher H2O2 production, 21-day-old broilers have greater antioxidant capacity than 42-day-old animals.

  9. Protective effects of red grape (Vitis vinifera) juice through restoration of antioxidant defense, endocrine swing and Hsf1, Hsp72 levels in heat stress induced testicular dysregulation of Wister rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Soma; Sarkar, Mrinmoy; Dey, Sananda; Kumar Bhunia, Sujay; Ranjan Koley, Alok; Giri, Biplab

    2018-01-01

    Ability of red grape juice (RGJ), a known antioxidant, on testis of adult Wister rat to protect from oxidative stress induced damages by heat stress has been investigated in this study. Heat stress was induced maintaining body and testicular temperature at 43°C for 30min/day for 15 days using a hyperthermia induction chamber. Four groups of rats (n=6 per group) comprising of Group-I (control) -kept at 32°C, Group-II -exposed to heat stress alone, Group-III received RGJ (0.8ml/rat/day) alone and Group-IV -exposed to heat stress and received RGJ at same dose. Analysis of blood and testicular tissue exhibited significant reduction in serum testosterone, testicular superoxide dismutase, testicular catalase and testicular glutathione (all p rise in the level of serum corticosteroid, testicular lipid peroxidase and the apoptotic enzyme caspase-3 of testis (all p < 0.001) were observed along with substantial increase in testicular Hsp72 and Hsf-1, and decrease in 17β-HSD3 were noted in heat stressed rats compared to controls. In Group-IV rats, RGJ administration could restore these parameters to normal levels. The signs of retention were clear in Group-IV rats and found to be significantly different as compared to that of the Group-II rats. In testicular histology of rats exposed to heat stress alone revealed remarkable germ cell degeneration and tubular deformations which were prevented by RGJ treatment (Group-IV). The reduced number of sperm level in Group-II also restored in RGJ treatment (Group-IV). The above results indicate that consumption of RGJ may substantially protect testis from heat stress induce dysfunctions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intake, physiological parameters and behavior of Angus and Nellore bulls subjected to heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ériton Egidio Lisboa Valente

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetics differences between breeds may determine the tolerance to high temperature, effect dry matter intake and consequently cattle performance. The effect of temperature and humidity index (THI on diurnal, nocturnal and daily intake, water intake, physiologic parameters and behavior of Nellore (B. indicus and Angus (B. taurus bulls were evaluated. Eight Angus and eight Nellore young bulls (337±7.4 kg and 16 months of age were allocated in two climate-controlled rooms for 32 days. In the period 1, all bulls were housed in thermoneutral conditions (TN, THI = 72.6 for 10 days. In period 2 (10 days, four Angus and four Nellore bulls were subjected to low heat stress (LHS, THI = 76.4 in daytime, and four Angus and four Nellore bulls were subjected to high heat stress (HHS, THI = 81.5 in daytime. The diurnal and daily dry matter intake (DMI of Nellore were not affected (P>0.05 by heat stress. However, Angus bulls decreased diurnal DMI by 24% and daily DMI decreased (P<0.05 by 15% on HHS. In TN Angus bulls had higher (P<0.05 daily DMI (36.2 g/kg of BW than Nellore (29.1 g/kg of BW, but in HHS they had similar (P>0.05 daily DMI (31.6 and 30.2 g/kg of BW, respectively. We observed an increase (P<0.05 in respiratory frequency, but water intake was not affected (P>0.05 by heat stress. The heart rate decreased (P<0.05 with heat stress. No differences were found (P>0.05 in feeding behavior. Therefore, THI stress threshold should distinct for Angus and Nellore bulls. The use of feed intake information may improve the prediction of thermic discomfort on specific climate condition. 

  11. Analysis of residual stress relief mechanisms in post-weld heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Pingsha; Song, Shaopin; Zhang, Jinmiao

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a recent study on weld residual stress relief mechanisms associated with furnace-based uniform post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). Both finite element and analytical methods are used to quantitatively examine how plastic deformation and creep relaxation contribute to residual stress relief process at different stages of PWHT process. The key contribution of this work to an improved understanding of furnace based uniform PWHT can be summarized as follows: (1)Plastic deformation induced stress relief during PWHT can be analytically expressed by the change in material elastic deformation capacity (or elastic deformation limit) measured in terms of material yield strength to Young's modulus ratio, which has a rather limited role in overall residual stress relief during furnace based uniform PWHT. (2)The most dominant stress relief mechanism is creep strain induced stress relaxation, as expected. However, a rapid creep strain development accompanied by a rapid residual stress reduction during heating stage before reaching PWHT temperature is shown to contribute to most of the stress relief seen in overall PWHT process, suggesting PWHT hold time can be significantly reduced as far as residual stress relief is concerned. (3)A simple engineering scheme for estimating residual stress reduction is proposed based on this study by relating material type, PWHT temperature, and component wall thickness. - Highlights: • The paper clarified effects of plastic deformation and creep relaxation on weld residual stress relief during uniform PWHT. • Creep strain development is far more important than plastic strain, mostly completed even before hold time starts. • Plastic strain development is insignificant and be analytically described by a material elastic deformation capacity parameter. • An engineering estimation scheme is proposed for determining residual stress reduction resulted from furnace based PWHT

  12. Heat induced fracturing of rock in an existing uniaxial stress field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, J.; Stephansson, O.; Bjarnason, B.; Hakami, H.; Herdocia, A.; Mattila, U.; Singh, U.

    1986-01-01

    This study was initiated under the premise that it may be possible to determine the state of stress in the earth's crust by heat induced fracturing of the rock surrounding a borehole. The theory involved is superficially simple, involving the superposition of the stress field around a borehole due to the existing virgin stresses and the uniform stress field of thermally loaded rock as induced by a heater. Since the heat stress field is uniform, varying only in magnitude and gradient as a function of heater input, fracturing should be controlled by the non-uniform virgin stress field. To determine if the method was, in fact, feasible, a series of laboratory test were conducted. These tests consisted of physically loading center drilled cubes of rock, 0.3 m on a side, uniaxially from 0 to 25 MPa. The blocks were then thermally loaded with a nominally rated 3.7 kW heater until failure occurred. Results from these laboratory tests were then compared to analytical studies of the problem, i.e., finite element and discrete theoretical analysis. Overall, results were such that the method is likely eliminated as a stress measurement technique. The immediate development of a thermal compressive zone on the borehole wall overlaps the tensile zone created by the uniaxial stress field, forcing the failure is thus controlled largely by the power input of the heater, being retarded by the small compressive stresses genrated by the uniaxial stress field. This small retardation effect is of such low magnitude that the retardation effect is of such low magnitude that the fracture time is relatively insensitive to the local virgin stress field. (authors)

  13. Effect of volume loading on the Frank-Starling relation during reductions in central blood volume in heat-stressed humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Wilson, T E; Seifert, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    -body heating after intravascular volume expansion. Volume expansion was accomplished by administration of a combination of a synthetic colloid (HES 130/0.4, Voluven) and saline. Before LBNP, SV was not affected by heating (122 +/- 30 ml; mean +/- s.d.) compared to normothermia (110 +/- 20 ml; P = 0...

  14. The long-term effects of a life-prolonging heat treatment on the Drosophila melanogaster transcriptome suggest that heat shock proteins extend lifespan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Peter; Loeschcke, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Heat-induced hormesis, i.e. the beneficial effect of mild heat-induced stress, increases the average lifespan of many organisms. This effect, which depends on the heat shock factor, decreases the log mortality rate weeks after the stress has ceased. To identify candidate genes that mediate......-treated flies. Several hsp70 probe sets were up-regulated 1.7–2-fold in the mildly stressed flies weeks after the last heat treatment (P shock protein, Hsp70, is reported to return to normal levels of expression shortly after heat stress. We...... conclude that the heat shock response, and Hsp70 in particular, may be central to the heat-induced increase in the average lifespan in flies that are exposed to mild heat stress early in life....

  15. Kidney Diseases in Agricultural Communities: A Case Against Heat-Stress Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chula Herath

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of the 21st century has seen the emergence of a new chronic tubulo-interstitial kidney disease of uncertain cause among agricultural communities in Central America and Sri Lanka. Despite many similarities in demography, presentation, clinical features, and renal histopathology in affected individuals in these regions, a toxic etiology has been considered mainly in Sri Lanka, whereas the predominant hypothesis in Central America has been that recu