WorldWideScience

Sample records for heat rate improvement

  1. Higher flow rates improve heating during hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Matthew J; Picotte, Robert J; Wante, Mark J; Rajeshkumar, Barur R; Whalen, Giles F; Lambert, Laura A

    2014-12-01

    Heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) kills cancer cells via thermal injury and improved chemotherapeutic cytotoxicity. We hypothesize that higher HIPEC flow rates improve peritoneal heating and HIPEC efficacy. (1) A HIPEC-model (30.8 L cooler with attached extracorporeal pump) was filled with 37°C water containing a suspended 1 L saline bag (SB) wrapped in a cooling sleeve, creating a constant heat sink. (2) HIPECs were performed in a swine model. Inflow, outflow, and peritoneal temperatures were monitored as flow rates varied. (3) Flow rates and temperatures during 20 HIPECs were reviewed. Higher flow rates decreased time required to increase water bath (WB) and SB temperature to 43°C. With a constant heat sink, the minimum flow rate required to reach 43°C in the WB was 1.75 L/min. Higher flow rates lead to greater temperature gradients between the WB and SB. In the swine model, the minimum flow rate required to reach 43°C outflow was 2.5-3.0 L/min. Higher flows led to more rapid heating of the peritoneum and greater peritoneal/outflow temperature gradients. Increased flow during clinical HIPEC suggested improved peritoneal heating with lower average visceral temperatures. There is a minimum flow rate required to reach goal temperature during HIPEC. Flow rate is an important variable in achieving and maintaining goal temperatures during HIPEC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Flash-Fire Propensity and Heat-Release Rate Studies of Improved Fire Resistant Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewell, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-six improved fire resistant materials were tested for flash-fire propensity and heat release rate properties. The tests were conducted to obtain a descriptive index based on the production of ignitable gases during the thermal degradation process and on the response of the materials under a specific heat load.

  3. An examination of heat rate improvements due to waste heat integration in an oxycombustion pulverized coal power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Joshua M.

    Oxyfuel, or oxycombustion, technology has been proposed as one carbon capture technology for coal-fired power plants. An oxycombustion plant would fire coal in an oxidizer consisting primarily of CO2, oxygen, and water vapor. Flue gas with high CO2 concentrations is produced and can be compressed for sequestration. Since this compression generates large amounts of heat, it was theorized that this heat could be utilized elsewhere in the plant. Process models of the oxycombustion boiler, steam cycle, and compressors were created in ASPEN Plus and Excel to test this hypothesis. Using these models, heat from compression stages was integrated to the flue gas recirculation heater, feedwater heaters, and to a fluidized bed coal dryer. All possible combinations of these heat sinks were examined, with improvements in coal flow rate, Qcoal, net power, and unit heat rate being noted. These improvements would help offset the large efficiency impacts inherent to oxycombustion technology.

  4. The usage of waste heat recovery units with improved heat engineering rates: theory and experimental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebotarev, Victor; Koroleva, Alla; Pirozhnikova, Anastasia

    2017-10-01

    Use of recuperator in heat producing plants for utilization of natural gas combustion products allows to achieve the saving of gas fuel and also provides for environmental sanitation. Decrease of the volumes of natural gas combustion due to utilization of heat provides not only for reduction of harmful agents in the combustion products discharged into the atmosphere, but also creates conditions for increase of energy saving in heating processes of heat producing plants due to air overheating in the recuperator. Grapho-analytical method of determination of energy saving and reduction of discharges of combustion products into the atmosphere is represented in the article. Multifunctional diagram is developed, allowing to determine simultaneously savings from reduction of volumes of natural gas combusted and from reduction of amounts of harmful agents in the combustion products discharged into the atmosphere. Calculation of natural gas economy for heat producing plant taking into consideration certain capacity is carried out.

  5. Improved solar heating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1980-05-16

    An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

  6. Improved Thin, Flexible Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Gernert, Nelson J.; Sarraf, David B.; Wollen, Peter J.; Surina, Frank C.; Fale, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Flexible heat pipes of an improved type are fabricated as layers of different materials laminated together into vacuum- tight sheets or tapes. In comparison with prior flexible heat pipes, these flexible heat pipes are less susceptible to leakage. Other advantages of these flexible heat pipes, relative to prior flexible heat pipes, include high reliability and greater ease and lower cost of fabrication. Because these heat pipes are very thin, they are highly flexible. When coated on outside surfaces with adhesives, these flexible heat pipes can be applied, like common adhesive tapes, to the surfaces of heat sinks and objects to be cooled, even if those surfaces are curved.

  7. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  8. Coal-Fired Power Plant Heat Rate Reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    View a report that identifies systems and equipment in coal-fired power plants where efficiency improvements can be realized, and provides estimates of the resulting net plant heat rate reductions and costs for implementation.

  9. An environmental rating for heat pump equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, P.J.

    1992-12-31

    The major federal and state regulatory trends that may affect heat pump markets are reviewed. Then the confluence of federal and state regulation, and what that may mean for heat pump markets, is discussed. The conclusion reached, and therefore the assumption for the rest of the paper, is that state regulators will increasingly be managing the environmental impacts associated with alternative heating, cooling, and water heating methods within the framework of Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The input needs of IRP are reviewed, and some shortcomings of existing rating procedures for providing the IRP inputs are identified. Finally, the paper concludes with a brief suggestion on course of action.

  10. Methodology for DSC calibration in high heating rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Isidoro Braga

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC technique in advanced polymer materials characterization, the new methodology called DSC in high heating rates was developed. The heating rate during conventional DSC experiments varying from 10 to 20ºC.min-¹, sample mass from 10 to 15mg and standard aluminum sample pan weighting, approximately, 27mg. In order to contribute to a better comprehension of DSC behavior in different heating rates, this work correlates as high heating rate influences to the thermal events in DSC experiments. Samples of metallic standard (In, Pb, Sn and Zn with masses varying from 0.570mg to 20.9mg were analyzed in multiples sample heating rate from 4 to 324°C. min-¹. In order to make properly all those experiments, a precise and careful temperature and enthalpy calibrations were performed and deeply discussed. Thus, this work shows a DSC methodology able to generate good and reliable results on experiments under any researcher choice heating rates to characterize the advanced materials used, for example, for aerospace industry. Also it helps the DSC users to find in their available instruments, already installed, a better and more accurate DSC test results, improving in just one shot the analysis sensitivity and resolution. Polypropylene melting and enthalpy thermal events are also studied using both the conventional DSC method and high heating rate method.

  11. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF HEATING RATE PRODUCT AT HIGH HEAT TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Akhmedova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods of computing and mathematical modeling are all widely used in the study of various heat exchange processes that provide the ability to study the dynamics of the processes, as well as to conduct a reasonable search for the optimal technological parameters of heat treatment.This work is devoted to the identification of correlations among the factors that have the greatest effect on the rate of heating of the product at hightemperature heat sterilization in a stream of hot air, which are chosen as the temperature difference (between the most and least warming up points and speed cans during heat sterilization.As a result of the experimental data warming of the central and peripheral layers compote of apples in a 3 liter pot at high-temperature heat treatment in a stream of hot air obtained by the regression equation in the form of a seconddegree polynomial, taking into account the effects of pair interaction of these parameters. 

  12. Effect of water activity and heating rate on Staphylococcus aureus heat resistance in walnut shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihui; Kou, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Shuang; Cheng, Teng; Wang, Shaojin

    2018-02-02

    Water activity (a w ) and heating rate have shown important effects on the thermo-tolerance of pathogens in low moisture foods during thermal treatments. In this study, three strains were selected to compare the heat resistance in walnut shell powder and finally the most heat resistant S. aureus ATCC 25923 was chosen to investigate the influence of a w and heating rate using a heating block system (HBS). The results showed that S. aureus ATCC 25923 became more thermo-tolerant at lower a w . The D-values of S. aureus ATCC 25923 increased with decreasing water activity and heating rates (<1°C/min). A significant increase in heat resistance of S. aureus ATCC 25923 in walnut shell powder was observed only for the heating rates of 0.2 and 0.5°C/min but not at 1, 5 and 10°C/min. There was a rapid reduction of S. aureus ATCC 25923 at elevated temperatures from 26 to 56°C at a heating rate of 0.1°C/min. The inactivation under non-isothermal conditions was better fitted by Weibull distribution (R 2 =0.97 to 0.99) than first-order kinetics (R 2 =0.88 to 0.98). These results suggest that an appropriate increase in moisture content of in-shell walnuts and heating rate during thermal process can improve the inactivation efficiency of pathogens in low moisture foods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Standby Rates for Combined Heat and Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedano, Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Selecky, James [Brubaker & Associates, Inc., Chesterfield, MO (United States); Iverson, Kathryn [Brubaker & Associates, Inc., Chesterfield, MO (United States); Al-Jabir, Ali [Brubaker & Associates, Inc., Chesterfield, MO (United States); Garland, Patricia [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Improvements in technology, low natural gas prices, and more flexible and positive attitudes in government and utilities are making distributed generation more viable. With more distributed generation, notably combined heat and power, comes an increase in the importance of standby rates, the cost of services utilities provide when customer generation is not operating or is insufficient to meet full load. This work looks at existing utility standby tariffs in five states. It uses these existing rates and terms to showcase practices that demonstrate a sound application of regulatory principles and ones that do not. The paper also addresses areas for improvement in standby rates.

  14. Radiative heating rates near the stratospheric fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, G. M.; Newell, R. E.; Danielsen, E. F.

    1984-01-01

    Radiative heating rates are computed for various sets of conditions thought to be appropriate to the stratospheric fountain region: with and without a layer of cirrus cloud between 100 and 150 mbar; with standard ozone and with decreased ozone in the lower stratosphere, again with and without the cirrus cloud; and with different temperatures in the tropopause region. The presence of the cloud decreases the radiative cooling below the cloud in the upper troposphere and increases the cooling above it in the lower stratosphere. The cloud is heated at the base and cooled at the top and thus radiatively destabilized; overall it gains energy by radiation. Decreasing ozone above the cloud also tends to cool the lower stratosphere. The net effect is a tendency for vertical convergence and horizontal divergence in the cloud region. High resolution profiles of temperature, ozone, and cloudiness within the fountain region are required in order to assess the final balance of the various processes.

  15. Heat Acclimation Improves Exercise Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    test concluded after four to seven stages. Gas exchange was continuously measured by open- circuit spirometry . During the last 30 s of each stage a...continuously measured by open-circuit spirometry . Time-trial performance. After a brief warm-up (5 min at 40% of maximal power on cycle ergometer...cardiac performance (maximal cardiac output and maximal stroke volume) following a period of chronic heat stress is also supported by several animal

  16. Improving Process Heating System Performance v3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-04-11

    Improving Process Heating System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry is a development of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) and the Industrial Heating Equipment Association (IHEA). The AMO and IHEA undertook this project as part of an series of sourcebook publications developed by AMO on energy-consuming industrial systems, and opportunities to improve performance. Other topics in this series include compressed air systems, pumping systems, fan systems, steam systems, and motors and drives

  17. A SINDA '85 nodal heat transfer rate calculation user subroutine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheston, Derrick J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a subroutine, GETQ, which was developed to compute the heat transfer rates through all conductors attached to a node within a SINDA '85 thermal submodel. The subroutine was written for version 2.3 of SINDA '85. Upon calling GETQ, the user supplies the submodel name and node number which the heat transfer rate computation is desired. The returned heat transfer rate values are broken down into linear, nonlinear, source and combined heat loads.

  18. Heat release rate of wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. M. Stark; R. H. White; C. M. Clemons

    1997-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites are becoming more important as a material that fulfills recycling needs. In this study, fire performance tests were conducted on several compositions of wood and plastic materials using the Ohio State University rate of heat release apparatus. Test results included five-minute average heat release rate in kW/m2 (HRR avg) and maximum heat release...

  19. Assessment of heating rate and non-uniform heating in domestic microwave ovens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchai, Krishnamoorthy; Birla, Sohan L; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyamkondan

    2012-01-01

    Due to the inherent nature of standing wave patterns of microwaves inside a domestic microwave oven cavity and varying dielectric properties of different food components, microwave heating produces non-uniform distribution of energy inside the food. Non-uniform heating is a major food safety concern in not-ready-to-eat (NRTE) microwaveable foods. In this study, we present a method for assessing heating rate and non-uniform heating in domestic microwave ovens. In this study a custom designed container was used to assess heating rate and non-uniform heating of a range of microwave ovens using a hedgehog of 30 T-type thermocouples. The mean and standard deviation of heating rate along the radial distance and sector of the container were measured and analyzed. The effect of the location of rings and sectors was analyzed using ANOVA to identify the best location for placing food on the turntable. The study suggested that the best location to place food in a microwave oven is not at the center but near the edge of the turntable assuming uniform heating is desired. The effect of rated power and cavity size on heating rate and non-uniform heating was also studied for a range of microwave ovens. As the rated power and cavity size increases, heating rate increases while non-uniform heating decreases. Sectors in the container also influenced heating rate (p microwave ovens were inconsistent in producing the same heating patterns between the two replications that were performed 4 h apart.

  20. Improving efficiency of heat recovery steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Gas Turbine Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSGs) are widely used in cogeneration and combined cycle plants. Single pressure HRSGs are preferred in small capacity units, while larger units can justify multiple pressure level steam generation, which improves the efficiency of energy recovery. This paper reviews a few methods of improving the efficiency of single and multiple pressure HRSGs, which may be of interest to consultants and plant engineers, who are planning new cogeneration projects.

  1. Study of Electrophysical Intrastratal Gasification at Different Coal Heating Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larionov Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental instrumental multi-method research, electrophysical ihtrastratal gasification of antracite with further definition of quantitative syngas composition and its combustion heat design at different heating rates. It was stated that concentration of carbon dioxide CO2, hydrogen H2 decreases with heating rate increase in received syngas, and there is rise of carbon monoxide CO concentration. The results of the research showed that heating rate increase leads to a small rise of combustion heat as decrease of H2 and CH4 concentration is compensated with increase of CO.

  2. Improved Heat Treatment Of Steel Alloy 4340

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lawrence B.

    1993-01-01

    New process takes significantly less time than prior heat-treatment processes. Involves placing steel plate directly in furnace and heat-treating. Plate then quenched in slowly moving oil to reduce stresses. Any deflection then pressed out. Possible uses of 4340 steel include new and improved bulletproof vests for military and police personnel and armor for bulletproof automobiles for military, police, diplomatic, and private users. Also used in other military land vehicles as tanks and in both military and civilian aircraft. Lighter armorplate enables land vehicles and aircraft to attain greater speed and maneuverability, consume less fuel, and afford better protection from snipers or terrorists.

  3. Heat exchangers selection, rating, and thermal design

    CERN Document Server

    Kakaç, Sadik; Pramuanjaroenkij, Anchasa

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Bestselling Second EditionThe first edition of this work gathered in one place the essence of important information formerly scattered throughout the literature. The second edition adds the following new information: introductory material on heat transfer enhancement; an application of the Bell-Delaware method; new correlation for calculating heat transfer and friction coefficients for chevron-type plates; revision of many of the solved examples and the addition of several new ones.-MEMagazine

  4. Reaction rate in a heat bath

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, Maurice René Michel

    1992-01-01

    We show in detail how the presence of a heat bath of photons effectively gives charged particles in the final state of a decay process a temperature-dependent mass, and changes the effective strength of the force responsible for the decay. At low temperature, gauge invariance causes both these effects to be largely cancelled by absorption of photons from the heat bath and by stimulated emission into it, but at high temperature the temperature-dependent mass is the dominant feature.

  5. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second annual technical report entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, and includes work performed during the period February 16, 1986 to February 15, 1987. The program is conducted for NASA under contract NAS3-24384. The objective is the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. The fabrication methods used are to be adaptable for mass production of such parts on an economically sound basis. Injection molding is the forming method selected. This objective is to be accomplished in a two-phase program: (1) to achieve a 20 percent improvement in strength and a 100 percent increase in Weibull modulus of the baseline material; and (2) to produce a complex shaped part, a gas turbine rotor, for example, with the improved mechanical properties attained in the first phase. Eight tasks are included in the first phase covering the characterization of the properties of a baseline material, the improvement of those properties and the fabrication of complex shaped parts. Activities during the first contract year concentrated on two of these areas: fabrication and characterization of the baseline material (Task 1) and improvement of material and processes (Task 7). Activities during the second contract year included an MOR bar matrix study to improve mechanical properties (Task 2), materials and process improvements (Task 7), and a Ford-funded task to mold a turbocharger rotor with an improved material (Task 8).

  6. The global joule heat production rate and the AE index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, S.; Ahn, B.-H.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1985-01-01

    The degree of accuracy with which the AE index may be used as a measure of the joule heat production rate is evaluated for a typical substorm event on March 18, 1978, by estimating the global joule heat production rate as a function of time on the basis of data obtained from the IMS's six meridian chains. It is found that, although the AE index is statistically linearly related to the global joule heat production rate, caution is required when one assumes that details of AE index time variations during individual events are representative of those of the joule heat production rate.

  7. Charring rate of wood exposed to a constant heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. H. White; H. C. Tran

    1996-01-01

    A critical factor in the fire endurance of a wood member is its rate of charring. Most available charring rate data have been obtained using the time-temperature curves of the standard fire resistance tests (ASTM E 119 and ISO 834) to define the fire exposure. The increased use of heat release calorimeters using exposures of constant heat flux levels has broadened the...

  8. Sensors measure surface ablation rate of reentry vehicle heat shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russel, J. M., III

    1966-01-01

    Sensors measure surface erosion rate of ablating material in reentry vehicle heat shield. Each sensor, which is placed at precise depths in the heat shield is activated when the ablator surface erodes to the location of a sensing point. Sensor depth and activation time determine ablator surface erosion rate.

  9. Heat pump having improved defrost system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang C.; Mei, Viung C.; Murphy, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger.

  10. Burning rate of solid wood measured in a heat release rate calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. C. Tran; R. H. White

    1992-01-01

    Burning rate is a key factor in modeling fire growth and fire endurance of wood structures. This study investigated the burning rate of selected wood materials as determined by heat release, mass loss and charring rates. Thick samples of redwood, southern pine, red oak and basswood were tested in a heat release rate calorimeter. Results on ignitability and average beat...

  11. Cooking utensil with improved heat retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Thomas F.; Benson, David K.; Burch, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A cooking utensil with improved heat retention includes an inner pot received within an outer pot and separated in a closely spaced-apart relationship to form a volume or chamber therebetween. The chamber is evacuated and sealed with foil leaves at the upper edges of the inner and outer pot. The vacuum created between the inner and outer pot, along with the minimum of thermal contact between the inner and outer pot, and the reduced radiative heat transfer due to low emissivity coatings on the inner and outer pot, provide for a highly insulated cooking utensil. Any combination of a plurality of mechanisms for selectively disabling and re-enabling the insulating properties of the pot are provided within the chamber. These mechanisms may include: a hydrogen gas producing and reabsorbing device such as a metal hydride, a plurality of metal contacts which can be adjusted to bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot, and a plurality of bimetallic switches which can selectively bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot. In addition, phase change materials with superior heat retention characteristics may be provided within the cooking utensil. Further, automatic and programmable control of the cooking utensil can be provided through a microprocessor and associated hardware for controlling the vacuum disable/enable mechanisms to automatically cook and save food.

  12. Modelling of elastic heat conductors via objective rate equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morro, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    A thermoelastic solid is modelled by letting the heat flux be given by a rate equation. As any constitutive property, the rate equation has to be objective and consistent with thermodynamics. Accordingly, firstly a theorem is given that characterizes objective time derivatives. This allows the known objective time derivatives to be viewed as particular elements of the set so specified. Next the thermodynamic consistency is established for the constitutive models involving objective time derivatives within appropriate sets. It emerges that the thermodynamic consistency holds provided the stress contains additively terms quadratic in the heat flux vector in a form that is related to the derivative adopted for the rate of the heat flux.

  13. Complex Heat Exchangers for Improved Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bran, Gabriela Alejandra

    After a detailed literature review, it was determined that there was a need for a more comprehensive study on the transient behavior of heat exchangers. Computational power was not readily available when most of the work on transient heat exchangers was done (1956 - 1986), so most of these solutions have restrictions, or very specific assumptions. More recently, authors have obtained numerical solutions for more general problems (2003 - 2013), but they have investigated very specific conditions, and cases. For a more complex heat exchanger (i.e. with heat generation), the transient solutions from literature are no longer valid. There was a need to develop a numerical model that relaxes the restrictions of current solutions to explore conditions that have not been explored. A one dimensional transient heat exchanger model was developed. There are no restrictions on the fluids and wall conditions. The model is able to obtain a numerical solution for a wide range of fluid properties and mass flow rates. Another innovative characteristic of the numerical model is that the boundary and initial conditions are not limited to constant values. The boundary conditions can be a function of time (i.e. sinusoidal signal), and the initial conditions can be a function of position. Four different cases were explored in this work. In the first case, the start-up of a system was investigated where the whole system is assumed to be at the same temperature. In the second case, the new steady state in case one gets disrupted by a smaller inlet temperature step change. In the third case, the new steady state in case one gets disrupted by a step change in one of the mass flow rates. The response of these three cases show that there are different transient behaviors, and they depend on the conditions imposed on the system. The fourth case is a system that has a sinusoidal time varying inlet temperature for one of the flows. The results show that the sinusoidal behavior at the inlet

  14. Molecular investigations on grain filling rate under terminal heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular investigations on grain filling rate under terminal heat stress in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Girish Chandra Pandey, Jagadish Rane, Sindhu Sareen, Priyanka Siwach, NK Singh, Ratan Tiwari ...

  15. Heating rate of egg albumin solution and its change during Ohmic heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, T; Uemura, K; Noguchi, A

    1998-01-01

    Ohmic heating of egg albumin solution (10 w/v%) was examined at 50-10 kHz under a constant 10 V/cm. The heating rate of the solution was almost constant and increased slightly as the frequency increased. The gel formation was observed at about 75 degrees C and the heating rate increased above this temperature irrespective of the frequency used. The solution and gel showed almost the same impedance at the examined temperature (20-90 degrees C) and frequency (10 Hz-100 kHz). When the concentration of egg albumin was reduced to 2 w/v%, no gel was formed and a constant heating rate at over 75 degrees C was observed. The breaking strength of the gels showed little difference among the gels prepared by boiling water or Ohmic heating. These results suggest that the liquid components are not compartmentalized in the gel and that the sudden increase of heating rate above 75 degrees C was caused by the reduction of heat transfer of the gel at its phase change to the gel. Ohmic heating was also applied to the fresh egg white at the same conditions as that of the egg albumin solution. The fresh egg white did not show any sudden increase of heating rate until it reached 90 degrees C. However, the homogenized fresh egg white and its soluble part separated beforehand showed a slightly reduced heating rate and a sudden increase at about 60 degrees C. These results suggest that the gelatinous component of fresh egg white such as ovomucin represses the transfer of generated heat during Ohmic heating.

  16. Passive heat acclimation improves skeletal muscle contractility in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racinais, S; Wilson, M G; Périard, J D

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of repeated passive heat exposure (i.e., acclimation) on muscle contractility in humans. Fourteen nonheat-acclimated males completed two trials including electrically evoked twitches and voluntary contractions in thermoneutral conditions [Cool: 24°C, 40% relative humidity (RH)] and hot ambient conditions in the hyperthermic state (Hot: 44-50°C, 50% RH) on consecutive days in a counterbalanced order. Rectal temperature was ~36.5°C in Cool and was maintained at ~39°C throughout Hot. Both trials were repeated after 11 days of passive heat acclimation (1 h per day, 48-50°C, 50% RH). Heat acclimation decreased core temperature in Cool (-0.2°C, P rate in Hot (+0.7 liter/h, P heat acclimation improved skeletal muscle contractility as evidenced by an increase in evoked peak twitch amplitude both in Cool (20.5 ± 3.6 vs. 22.0 ± 4.0 N·m) and Hot (20.5 ± 4.7 vs. 22.0 ± 4.0 N·m) (+9%, P heat acclimation improves skeletal muscle contractile function during electrically evoked and voluntary muscle contractions of different intensities both in Cool and Hot. These results suggest that repeated heat exposure may have important implications to passively maintain or even improve muscle function in a variety of performance and clinical settings. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Solar transition region and coronal response to heating rate perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariska, John T.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of Doppler shifts in UV emission lines formed in the solar transition region show continual plasma downflows and impulsive plasma upflows. Using numerical simulations, the authors examine the conjecture that areas of downflowing plasma are the base regions of coronal loops in which the heating is gradually decreasing and that areas of upflowing plasma are the base regions of coronal loops in which the heating rate is gradually increasing. Beginning with a coronal loop in equilibrium, the heating rate is reduced on time scales of 100, 1000, and 2000 s to 10 percent and 1 percent of the initial value, and the loop is allowed to evolve to a new equilibrium. The heating rate for the cooled models is then increased back to the initial value on the same time scales. While significant mass motions do develop in the simulations, both the emission measure and the velocity at 100,000 K do not show the characteristics present in UV observations.

  18. Design and demonstration of heat pipe cooling for NASP and evaluation of heating methods at high heating rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation of two heating methods for demonstration of NASP leading edge heat pipe technology was conducted. The heating methods were and rf induction heated plasma jet and direct rf induction. Tests were conducted to determine coupling from the argon plasma jet on a surface physically similar to a heat pipe. A molybdenum tipped calorimeter was fabricated and installed in an rf induction heated plasma jet for the test. The calorimetric measurements indicated a maximum power coupling of approximately 500 W/cm{sup 2} with the rf plasma jet. The effect of change in gas composition on the heating rate was investigated using helium. An alternative to the plasma heating of a heat pipe tip, an rf concentrator was evaluated for coupling to the hemispherical tip of a heat pipe. A refractory metal heat pipe was designed, fabricated, and tested for the evaluation. The heat pipe was designed for operation at 1400 to 1900 K with power input to 1000 W/cm{sup 2} over a hemispherical nose tip. Power input of 800 W/cm{sup 2} was demonstrated using the rf concentrator. 2 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Heating and cooling rates and their effects upon heart rate in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... rates increase with increasing body temperature, and for all body temperatures heart rates were greater during heating than during cooling. This suggests that the cardiovascular system plays a role in the heat exchange of the tortoises, but further study is required to completely understand the thermoregulatory process.

  20. Development of a Field Demonstration for Cost-Effective Low-Grade Heat Recovery and Use Technology Designed to Improve Efficiency and Reduce Water Usage Rates for a Coal-Fired Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Russell [Southern Company Services, Incorporated, Birmingham, AL (United States); Dombrowski, K. [AECOM Technical Services, Austin, TX (United States); Bernau, M. [AECOM Technical Services, Austin, TX (United States); Morett, D. [AECOM Technical Services, Austin, TX (United States); Maxson, A. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Hume, S. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-06-30

    Coal-based power generation systems provide reliable, low-cost power to the domestic energy sector. These systems consume large amounts of fuel and water to produce electricity and are the target of pending regulations that may require reductions in water use and improvements in thermal efficiency. While efficiency of coal-based generation has improved over time, coal power plants often do not utilize the low-grade heat contained in the flue gas and require large volumes of water for the steam cycle make-up, environmental controls, and for process cooling and heating. Low-grade heat recovery is particularly challenging for coal-fired applications, due in large part to the condensation of acid as the flue gas cools and the resulting potential corrosion of the heat recovery materials. Such systems have also not been of significant interest as recent investments on coal power plants have primarily been for environmental controls due to more stringent regulations. Also, in many regions, fuel cost is still a pass-through to the consumer, reducing the motivation for efficiency improvements. Therefore, a commercial system combining low-grade heat-recovery technologies and associated end uses to cost effectively improve efficiency and/or reduce water consumption has not yet been widely applied. However, pressures from potential new regulations and from water shortages may drive new interest, particularly in the U.S. In an effort to address this issue, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sought to identify and promote technologies to achieve this goal.

  1. Heat transfer and heating rate of food stuffs in commercial shop ovens

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heat transfer and heating rate of food stuffs in commercial shop ovens. P NAVANEETHAKRISHNAN. ∗. , P S S SRINIVASAN and. S DHANDAPANI. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kongu Engineering College,. Perundurai 638 052 e-mail: pnkmech@gmail.com, pnkmech@yahoo.co.in. MS received 24 May 2006; ...

  2. Luminaries-level structure improvement of LEDs for heat dissipation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heat dissipation enhancement of LED luminaries is of great significance to the large-scale application of LED. Luminaries-level structure improvement by the method of boring through-hole is adopted to intensify heat dissipation. Furthermore, the natural convection heat transfer process of LED luminaries is simulated by ...

  3. Optimal Allocation of Heat Exchanger Inventory Associated with Fixed Power Output or Fixed Heat Transfer Rate Input

    OpenAIRE

    COSTEA M.; Petrescu, S; K. Le Saos; Michel Feidt

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal distribution of the heat transfer surface area or conductance among the Stirling engine heat exchangers when the minimum of the total heat transfer surface area of the heat exchangers is sought. The optimization procedure must fulfill one of the following constraints: (1) fixed power output of the engine, (2) fixed heat transfer rate available at the source, or (3) fixed power output and heat transfer rate at the source. Internal and exter...

  4. Atomic recombination rate determination through heat-transfer measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.; Anderson, L. A.; Sheldahl, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental demonstration is presented which shows that under suitable conditions the volume recombination coefficient can be determined by measuring the heat transfer rate into the wall of a cylinder through which a dissociated stream is passing. The experimental results obtained are in agreement with those of other investigators.

  5. Molecular investigations on grain filling rate under terminal heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ezedom Theresa

    2013-07-10

    Jul 10, 2013 ... of determination (R2) was recorded 0.10 and 0.06, respectively. This indicates that the two markers were associated with the differences in grain filling (dGFR) rate as indicator for heat tolerance. Xbarc04 (Figure 1) and. Xgwm314 have their locus position on chromosomes 5B and 3D, respectively (Table 2).

  6. Molecular investigations on grain filling rate under terminal heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ezedom Theresa

    2013-07-10

    Jul 10, 2013 ... Grain yield under post anthesis high temperature stress is largely influenced by grain filling rate (GFR). To investigate ... 75% of the progenies showed no difference while 25% showed significant difference in GFR under high temperature .... timely (normal) and late (terminal heat stress) conditions. Data on.

  7. Long-term heating to improve receiver performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzmaier, Greg C.; Cable, Robert; Newmarker, Marc

    2017-06-01

    The buildup of hydrogen in the heat transfer fluid (HTF) that circulates through components of parabolic trough power plants decreases receiver thermal efficiency, and ultimately, it decreases plant performance and electricity output. The generation and occurrence of hydrogen in the HTF provides the driving force for hydrogen to permeate from the HTF through the absorber tube wall and into the receiver annulus. Getters adsorb hydrogen from the annulus volume until they saturate and are no longer able to maintain low hydrogen pressure. The increase in hydrogen pressure within the annulus significantly degrades thermal performance of the receiver and decreases overall power-plant efficiency. NREL and Acciona Energy North America (Acciona) are developing a method to control the levels of dissolved hydrogen in the circulating HTF. The basic approach is to remove hydrogen from the expansion tanks of the HTF subsystem at a rate that maintains hydrogen in the circulating HTF to a target level. Full-plant steady-state models developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) predict that if hydrogen is removed from the HTF within the expansion tanks, the HTF that circulates through the collector field remains essentially free of hydrogen until the HTF returns to the power block in the hot headers. One of the key findings of our modeling is the prediction that hydrogen will reverse-permeate out of the receiver annulus if dissolved hydrogen in the HTF is kept sufficiently low. To test this prediction, we performed extended heating of an in-service receiver that initially had high levels of hydrogen in its annulus. The heating was performed using NREL's receiver test stand. Results of our testing showed that receiver heat loss steadily decreased with daily heating, resulting in a corresponding improvement in receiver thermal efficiency.

  8. Long-Term Heating to Improve Receiver Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatzmaier, Greg C.; Cable, Robert; Newmarker, Marc

    2017-06-27

    The buildup of hydrogen in the heat transfer fluid (HTF) that circulates through components of parabolic trough power plants decreases receiver thermal efficiency, and ultimately, it decreases plant performance and electricity output. The generation and occurrence of hydrogen in the HTF provides the driving force for hydrogen to permeate from the HTF through the absorber tube wall and into the receiver annulus. Getters adsorb hydrogen from the annulus volume until they saturate and are no longer able to maintain low hydrogen pressure. The increase in hydrogen pressure within the annulus significantly degrades thermal performance of the receiver and decreases overall power-plant efficiency. NREL and Acciona Energy North America (Acciona) are developing a method to control the levels of dissolved hydrogen in the circulating HTF. The basic approach is to remove hydrogen from the expansion tanks of the HTF subsystem at a rate that maintains hydrogen in the circulating HTF to a target level. Full-plant steady-state models developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) predict that if hydrogen is removed from the HTF within the expansion tanks, the HTF that circulates through the collector field remains essentially free of hydrogen until the HTF returns to the power block in the hot headers. One of the key findings of our modeling is the prediction that hydrogen will reverse-permeate out of the receiver annulus if dissolved hydrogen in the HTF is kept sufficiently low. To test this prediction, we performed extended heating of an in-service receiver that initially had high levels of hydrogen in its annulus. The heating was performed using NREL's receiver test stand. Results of our testing showed that receiver heat loss steadily decreased with daily heating, resulting in a corresponding improvement in receiver thermal efficiency.

  9. Cold drink ingestion improves exercise endurance capacity in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason K W; Shirreffs, Susan M; Maughan, Ronald J

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the effect of drink temperature on cycling capacity in the heat. On two separate trials, eight males cycled at 66 +/- 2% VO2peak (mean +/- SD) to exhaustion in hot (35.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C) and humid (60 +/- 1%) environments. Participants ingested three 300-mL aliquots of either a cold (4 degrees C) or a warm (37 degrees C) drink during 30 min of seated rest before exercise and 100 mL of the same drink every 10 min during exercise. Rectal and skin temperatures, heart rate, and sweat rate were recorded. Ratings of thermal sensation and perceived exertion were assessed. Exercise time was longer (P drink (63.8 +/- 4.3 min) than with the warm drink (52.0 +/- 4.1 min). Rectal temperature fell by 0.5 +/- 0.1 degrees C (P drinks. There was no effect of drink temperature on mean skin temperature at rest (P = 0.870), but mean skin temperature was lower from 20 min during exercise with ingestion of the cold drink than with the warm drink (P drink than with the warm drink (P Drink temperature influenced sweat rate (1.22 +/- 0.34 and 1.40 +/- 0.41 L x h(-1) for the cold and the warm drink, respectively; P drink was ingested. Compared with a drink at 37 degrees C, the ingestion of a cold drink before and during exercise in the heat reduced physiological strain (reduced heat accumulation) during exercise, leading to an improved endurance capacity (23 +/- 6%).

  10. Oxygen Ion Heat Rate within Alfvenic Turbulence in the Cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Singh, Nagendra; Chandler, Michael O.

    2009-01-01

    The role that the cleft/cusp has in ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling makes it a dynamic and important region. It is directly exposed to the solar wind, making it possible for the entry of electromagnetic energy and precipitating electrons and ions from dayside reconnection and other dayside events. It is also a significant source of ionospheric plasma, contributing largely to the mass loading of the magnetosphere with large fluxes of outflowing ions. Crossing the cusp/cleft near 5100 km, the Polar instruments observe the common correlation of downward Poynting flux, ion energization, soft electron precipitation, broadband extremely low-frequency (BB-ELF) emissions, and density depletions. The dominant power in the BB-ELF emissions is now identified to be from spatially broad, low frequency Alfv nic structures. For a cusp crossing, we determine using the Electric Field Investigation (EFI), that the electric and magnetic field fluctuations are Alfv nic and the electric field gradients satisfy the inequality for stochastic acceleration. With all the Polar 1996 horizontal crossings of the cusp, we determine the O+ heating rate using the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) and Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI). We then compare this heating rate to other heating rates assuming the electric field gradient criteria exceeds the limit for stochastic acceleration for the remaining crossings. The comparison suggests that a stochastic acceleration mechanism is operational and the heating is controlled by the transverse spatial scale of the Alfvenic waves.

  11. Improved sulphate removal rates at increased sulphide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improved sulphate removal rates at increased sulphide concentration in the sulphidogenic bioreactor. ... The results of three investigations operating a continuous reactor, a column reactor and batch-test reactors have shown that increased sulphide concentrations have resulted in improved biological sulphate reduction.

  12. The bounds of the heat production rate within the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsui, A. T.

    1979-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to the evaluation of the lower and upper bounds of the global heat production rate within planetary interiors. The approach is based on the relationship between the internal energy change and the volume change of a planetary object. For illustration, the approach is applied to the moon. Using an average global surface heat flux of 18 erg/sq cm-sec, and assuming constancy of the lunar radius during the past 3.2 billion years. the lunar heat release within the past 3.2 billion years is estimated at (30 to 40) x 10 to the tenth erg/cu cm. This is equivalent to the present day uranium concentration of 35 to 50 ppb provided the radiogenic isotopes are of the same proportion as that given by Toksoz et al. (1978).

  13. Genomic Selection Improves Heat Tolerance in Dairy Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, J B; Douglas, M L; Williams, S R O; Wales, W J; Marett, L C; Nguyen, T T T; Reich, C M; Hayes, B J

    2016-09-29

    Dairy products are a key source of valuable proteins and fats for many millions of people worldwide. Dairy cattle are highly susceptible to heat-stress induced decline in milk production, and as the frequency and duration of heat-stress events increases, the long term security of nutrition from dairy products is threatened. Identification of dairy cattle more tolerant of heat stress conditions would be an important progression towards breeding better adapted dairy herds to future climates. Breeding for heat tolerance could be accelerated with genomic selection, using genome wide DNA markers that predict tolerance to heat stress. Here we demonstrate the value of genomic predictions for heat tolerance in cohorts of Holstein cows predicted to be heat tolerant and heat susceptible using controlled-climate chambers simulating a moderate heatwave event. Not only was the heat challenge stimulated decline in milk production less in cows genomically predicted to be heat-tolerant, physiological indicators such as rectal and intra-vaginal temperatures had reduced increases over the 4 day heat challenge. This demonstrates that genomic selection for heat tolerance in dairy cattle is a step towards securing a valuable source of nutrition and improving animal welfare facing a future with predicted increases in heat stress events.

  14. The technological raw material heating furnaces operation efficiency improving issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramonov, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    The issue of fuel oil applying efficiency improving in the technological raw material heating furnaces by means of its combustion intensification is considered in the paper. The technical and economic optimization problem of the fuel oil heating before combustion is solved. The fuel oil heating optimal temperature defining method and algorithm analytically considering the correlation of thermal, operating parameters and discounted costs for the heating furnace were developed. The obtained optimization functionality provides the heating furnace appropriate thermal indices achievement at minimum discounted costs. The carried out research results prove the expediency of the proposed solutions using.

  15. 40 CFR 75.36 - Missing data procedures for heat input rate determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....36 Missing data procedures for heat input rate determinations. (a) When hourly heat input rate is... the heat input rate calculation shall be provided according to § 75.31 or § 75.33, as applicable. When... heat input rate calculations in accordance with paragraphs (b) and (d) of this section. (b) During the...

  16. Improved district heating substation efficiency with a new control strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Jonas; Delsing, Jerker; van Deventer, Jan [Div. of EISLAB, Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Luleaa University of Technology, 97187 Luleaa (Sweden)

    2010-06-15

    In this paper, we describe a new alternative control approach for indirectly connected district heating substations. Simulations results showed that the new approach results in an increased {delta} T across the substation. Results were obtained for both ideal and non-ideal operation of the system, meaning that less water must be pumped through the district heating network, and a higher overall fuel efficiency can be obtained in the district heating power plants. When a higher fuel efficiency is achieved, the usage of primary fuel sources can be reduced. Improved efficiency also increases the effective heat transfer capacity of a district heating network, allowing more customers to be connected to an existing network without increasing the heating plant or network capacity. Also, if combined heat and power plants are used to produce the heat, the increased {delta} T will result in a further improved overall fuel efficiency, as more electricity can be produced with colder cooling water. The idea behind the new control method is to consider the temperature of the water supplying the district heating substation with heat, often referred to as the primary supply temperature. This represents a logical next step, as currently, the only parameter generally taken into account or measured when controlling the temperature level of the radiator circuit is the local outdoor temperature. In this paper we show how the primary supply temperature together with thermodynamic knowledge of the building can be used to maximize the {delta} T across the district heating substation. (author)

  17. Heating and cooling rates and their etTects upon heart rate in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-03-16

    Mar 16, 1988 ... have investigated aspects of thermoregulation, but the results obtained are contradictory, and no heart rate measurements were done. The purpose of this study was to investigate the heating and cooling rates of the angulate tortoise, Chersina angulata, in the eastern Cape Province,. South Africa.

  18. Particle loading rates for HVAC filters, heat exchangers, and ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, M S; Siegel, J A

    2008-06-01

    The rate at which airborne particulate matter deposits onto heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) components is important from both indoor air quality (IAQ) and energy perspectives. This modeling study predicts size-resolved particle mass loading rates for residential and commercial filters, heat exchangers (i.e. coils), and supply and return ducts. A parametric analysis evaluated the impact of different outdoor particle distributions, indoor emission sources, HVAC airflows, filtration efficiencies, coils, and duct system complexities. The median predicted residential and commercial loading rates were 2.97 and 130 g/m(2) month for the filter loading rates, 0.756 and 4.35 g/m(2) month for the coil loading rates, 0.0051 and 1.00 g/month for the supply duct loading rates, and 0.262 g/month for the commercial return duct loading rates. Loading rates are more dependent on outdoor particle distributions, indoor sources, HVAC operation strategy, and filtration than other considered parameters. The results presented herein, once validated, can be used to estimate filter changing and coil cleaning schedules, energy implications of filter and coil loading, and IAQ impacts associated with deposited particles. The results in this paper suggest important factors that lead to particle deposition on HVAC components in residential and commercial buildings. This knowledge informs the development and comparison of control strategies to limit particle deposition. The predicted mass loading rates allow for the assessment of pressure drop and indoor air quality consequences that result from particle mass loading onto HVAC system components.

  19. Base fluid in improving heat transfer for EV car battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin-Abdun, Nazih A.; Razlan, Zuradzman M.; Shahriman, A. B.; Wan, Khairunizam; Hazry, D.; Ahmed, S. Faiz; Adnan, Nazrul H.; Heng, R.; Kamarudin, H.; Zunaidi, I.

    2015-05-01

    This study examined the effects of base fluid (as coolants) channeling inside the heat exchanger in the process of the increase in thermal conductivity between EV car battery and the heat exchanger. The analysis showed that secondary cooling system by means of water has advantages in improving the heat transfer process and reducing the electric power loss on the form of thermal energy from batteries. This leads to the increase in the efficiency of the EV car battery, hence also positively reflecting the performance of the EV car. The present work, analysis is performed to assess the design and use of heat exchanger in increasing the performance efficiency of the EV car battery. This provides a preface to the use this design for nano-fluids which increase and improve from heat transfer.

  20. Analysis of Water Recovery Rate from the Heat Melt Compactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Hegde, U.; Gokoglu, S.

    2013-01-01

    any remaining free water in the trash by evaporation. The temperature settings of the heated surfaces are usually kept above the saturation temperature of water but below the melting temperature of the plastic in the waste during this step to avoid any encapsulation of wet trash which would reduce the amount of recovered water by blocking the vapor escape. In this paper, we analyze the water recovery rate during Phase B where the trash is heated and water leaves the waste chamber as vapor, for operation of the HMC in reduced gravity. We pursue a quasi-one-dimensional model with and without sidewall heating to determine the water recovery rate and the trash drying time. The influences of the trash thermal properties, the amount of water loading, and the distribution of the water in the trash on the water recovery rates are determined.

  1. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Harry C.; Fang, Ho T.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a four year program to improve the strength and reliability of injection-molded silicon nitride are summarized. Statistically designed processing experiments were performed to identify and optimize critical processing parameters and compositions. Process improvements were monitored by strength testing at room and elevated temperatures, and microstructural characterization by optical, scanning electron microscopes, and scanning transmission electron microscope. Processing modifications resulted in a 20 percent strength and 72 percent Weibull slope improvement of the baseline material. Additional sintering aids screening and optimization experiments succeeded in developing a new composition (GN-10) capable of 581.2 MPa at 1399 C. A SiC whisker toughened composite using this material as a matrix achieved a room temperature toughness of 6.9 MPa m(exp .5) by the Chevron notched bar technique. Exploratory experiments were conducted on injection molding of turbocharger rotors.

  2. Dissociation rate of bromine diatomics in an argon heat bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razner, R.; Hopkins, D.

    1973-01-01

    The evolution of a collection of 300 K bromine diatomics embedded in a heat bath of argon atoms at 1800 K was studied by computer, and a dissociation-rate constant for the reaction Br2 + BR + Ar yields Br + Ar was determined. Previously published probability distributions for energy and angular momentum transfers in classical three-dimensional Br2-Ar collisions were used in conjunction with a newly developed Monte Carlo scheme for this purpose. Results are compared with experimental shock-tube data and the predictions of several other theoretical models. A departure from equilibrium is obtained which is significantly greater than that predicted by any of these other theories.

  3. Efficiency improvements by geothermal heat integration in a lignocellulosic biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohel, M Imroz; Jack, Michael

    2010-12-01

    In an integrated geothermal biorefinery, low-grade geothermal heat is used as process heat to allow the co-products of biofuel production to become available for higher-value uses. In this paper we consider integrating geothermal heat into a biochemical lignocellulosic biorefinery so that the lignin-enriched residue can be used either as a feedstock for chemicals and materials or for on-site electricity generation. Depending on the relative economic value of these two uses, we can maximize revenue of a biorefinery by judicious distribution of the lignin-enriched residue between these two options. We quantify the performance improvement from integrating geothermal energy for an optimized system. We then use a thermodynamic argument to show that integrating geothermal heat into a biorefinery represents an improvement in overall resource utilization efficiency in all cases considered. Finally, possible future technologies for electricity generation are considered which could improve this efficiency further. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Improved reliability of residential heat pumps; Foerbaettrad driftsaekerhet hos villavaermepumpar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haglund Stignor, Caroline; Larsson, Kristin; Jensen, Sara; Larsson, Johan; Berg, Johan; Lidbom, Peter; Rolfsman, Lennart

    2012-07-01

    Today, heat pump heating systems are common in Swedish single-family houses. Many owners are pleased with their installation, but statistics show that a certain number of heat pumps break every year, resulting in high costs for both insurance companies and owners. On behalf of Laensfoersaekringars Forskningsfond, SP Energy Technology has studied the cause of the most common failures for residential heat pumps. The objective of the study was to suggest what measures to be taken to reduce the number of failures, i.e. improving the reliability of heat pumps. The methods used were analysis of public failure statistics and sales statistics and interviews with heat pump manufacturers, installers, service representatives and assessors at Laensfoersaekringar. In addition, heat pump manuals have been examined and literature searches for various methods for durability tests have been performed. Based on the outcome from the interviews the most common failures were categorized by if they; 1. Could have been prevented by better operation and maintenance of the heat pump. 2. Caused by a poorly performed installation. 3. Could have been prevented if certain parameters had been measured, recorded and followed up. 4. Are due to poor quality of components or systems. However, the results show that many of the common failures fall into several different categories and therefore, different types of measures must be taken to improve the operational reliability of residential heat pumps. The interviews tell that failures often are caused by poor installation, neglected maintenance and surveillance, and poor quality of standard components or that components are used outside their declared operating range. The quality of the installations could be improved by increasing installers' knowledge about heat pumps and by requiring that an installation protocol shall be filled-in. It is also important that the owner of the heat pump performs the preventive maintenance recommended by the

  5. Solar Flux Deposition And Heating Rates In Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2009-09-01

    We discuss here the solar downward net flux in the 0.25 - 2.5 µm range in the atmosphere of Jupiter and the associated heating rates under a number of vertical cloud structure scenarios focusing in the effect of clouds and hazes. Our numerical model is based in the doubling-adding technique to solve the radiative transfer equation and it includes gas absorption by CH4, NH3 and H2, in addition to Rayleigh scattering by a mixture of H2 plus He. Four paradigmatic Jovian regions have been considered (hot-spots, belts, zones and Polar Regions). The hot-spots are the most transparent regions with downward net fluxes of 2.5±0.5 Wm-2 at the 6 bar level. The maximum solar heating is 0.04±0.01 K/day and occurs above 1 bar. Belts and zones characterization result in a maximum net downward flux of 0.5 Wm-2 at 2 bar and 0.015 Wm-2 at 6 bar. Heating is concentrated in the stratospheric and tropospheric hazes. Finally, Polar Regions are also explored and the results point to a considerable stratospheric heating of 0.04±0.02 K/day. In all, these calculations suggest that the role of the direct solar forcing in the Jovian atmospheric dynamics is limited to the upper 1 - 2 bar of the atmosphere except in the hot-spot areas. Acknowledgments: This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  6. Heat and mass transfer rates during flow of dissociated hydrogen gas over graphite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, V. K.; Sharma, O. P.

    1986-01-01

    To improve upon the performance of chemical rockets, the nuclear reactor has been applied to a rocket propulsion system using hydrogen gas as working fluid and a graphite-composite forming a part of the structure. Under the boundary layer approximation, theoretical predictions of skin friction coefficient, surface heat transfer rate and surface regression rate have been made for laminar/turbulent dissociated hydrogen gas flowing over a flat graphite surface. The external stream is assumed to be frozen. The analysis is restricted to Mach numbers low enough to deal with the situation of only surface-reaction between hydrogen and graphite. Empirical correlations of displacement thickness, local skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local non-dimensional heat transfer rate have been obtained. The magnitude of the surface regression rate is found low enough to ensure the use of graphite as a linear or a component of the system over an extended period without loss of performance.

  7. Maximum orbit plane change with heat-transfer-rate considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. Y.; Hull, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    Two aerodynamic maneuvers are considered for maximizing the plane change of a circular orbit: gliding flight with a maximum thrust segment to regain lost energy (aeroglide) and constant altitude cruise with the thrust being used to cancel the drag and maintain a high energy level (aerocruise). In both cases, the stagnation heating rate is limited. For aeroglide, the controls are the angle of attack, the bank angle, the time at which the burn begins, and the length of the burn. For aerocruise, the maneuver is divided into three segments: descent, cruise, and ascent. During descent the thrust is zero, and the controls are the angle of attack and the bank angle. During cruise, the only control is the assumed-constant angle of attack. During ascent, a maximum thrust segment is used to restore lost energy, and the controls are the angle of attack and bank angle. The optimization problems are solved with a nonlinear programming code known as GRG2. Numerical results for the Maneuverable Re-entry Research Vehicle with a heating-rate limit of 100 Btu/ft(2)-s show that aerocruise gives a maximum plane change of 2 deg, which is only 1 deg larger than that of aeroglide. On the other hand, even though aerocruise requires two thrust levels, the cruise characteristics of constant altitude, velocity, thrust, and angle of attack are easy to control.

  8. Evaluation of radiative heating rate profiles in eight GCMs using A-train satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, Gregory; Waliser, D. E.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Jiang, X.; Li, J.-L.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we take advantage of two modeling experiments and A-train satellite observations to characterize the impact of cloud biases in the vertical distribution of radiative heating rates in eight general circulation models General Circulation Models (GCMs). We compare the modeled vertical distribution of clouds against the GCM-Oriented Cloud-Aerosols Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations Cloud Product (CALIPSO-GOCCP) using a simulator approach. Although the overall pattern of modeled zonal cloud frequency profiles is relatively good (r=0.92 for the multi-model mean), we show two main systematic biases in the cloud frequency profiles: a positive bias above 7km (up to 10%), particularly in the tropics; and a negative bias below 3km (up to -10%), which reaches a maximum over the stratocumulus cloud regions. Using radiative heating rate profiles calculated with constraints from CloudSat, CALIPSO and other satellite observations, we show that the excess of clouds in the upper troposphere (>7km) results in excess infrared and solar heating in the vicinity of the clouds as well as more infrared heating for the entire column below the cloud. On the other hand, the lack of clouds in the lower troposphere reduces the infrared cooling near the missing cloud levels and increases the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor below. The global radiative heating rate between 50°S and 50°N is too warm in the models (-0.81K/day vs. -1.01K/day). The representation of clouds in GCMs remains challenging, but reducing the cloud biases would lead to an improvement of the heating rate profiles, which in turn would help in improving other aspects of models' simulations such as the dynamics, cloud feedbacks and surface-atmosphere interactions.

  9. Thermal sensation, rate of temperature change, and the heat dissipation design for tablet computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Hedge, Alan; Cosley, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Past research has shown that the rate of change of skin surface temperature can affect thermal sensation. This study investigated users' thermal responses to a tablet heating surface with different heat pads and different temperature change rates. The test conditions included: A. keeping the surface at a constant 42 °C, B. increasing the surface temperature from 38 °C to 42 °C at a rate of 0.02 °C/s in progressive intervals, C. increasing the temperature at 0.15 °C/s in progressive intervals, and D. Heating two left and right side pads alternately from 38 °C to 42 °C at 0.15 °C/s in progressive intervals. Overall results showed the lowest temperature change rate of 0.02 °C/s was most preferred in terms of thermal comfort. The findings suggest a potential to improve user thermal experience by dissipating tablet computer heat at a lower temperature change rate, or by alternating the dissipation areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Study of the Al-Si-X system by different cooling rates and heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Suarez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The solidification behavior of the Al-12.6% Si (A1, the hypereutectic Al-20%Si (A2 and the Al-20%Si-1.5% Fe-0.5%Mn (A3 (in wt. (% alloys, at different cooling rates is reported and discussed. The cooling rates ranged between 0.93 °C/s and 190 °C/s when cast in sand and copper wedge-shaped molds, respectively. A spheroidization heat treatment was carried out to the alloys in the as-cast condition at 540 °C for 11 hours and quench in water with a subsequent heat treatment at 170 °C for 5 hours with the purpose of improving the mechanical properties. The samples were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and mechanically by tensile test, in order to evaluate the response of the heat treatment on the different starting microstructures and mechanical properties. It was found that alloys cooled at rates greater than 10.8 °C/s had a smaller particle size and better distribution, also showed a greater response to spheroidization heat treatment of all silicon (Si phases. The spheroidization heat treatment caused an increase in the ultimate tensile stress (UTS and elongation when compared with the alloys in the as-cast condition. The highest UTS value of 174 MPa was obtained for the (A1 alloy.

  11. Effect of the rate of temperature increase on water quality during heating in electromagnetic- and gas-heated pans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Ken

    2004-04-01

    More rapid increases in the pH value and hardness during electromagnetic heating of a pan of water were observed than when the pan was heated by LNG or LPG. The water quality changed universally in several tap water samples across Japan. This quality change was closely correlated with the rate of temperature increase, irrespective of heating by electromagnetic induction, LNG or LPG.

  12. The Relationship between the Heat Disorder Incidence Rate and Heat Stress Indices at Yamanashi Prefecture in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Shin Akatsuka; Tadashi Uno; Masahiro Horiuchi

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the risk of heat disorder in daily life has increased dramatically because the thermal environment has been deteriorating. The main objective of this study was to examine regional differences in the relationship between heat disorder incidence rate and heat stress indices at Yamanashi Prefecture, Japan. Daily maximum air temperature and daily maximum WBGT were used as heat stress indices in each region. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to examine the regional difference...

  13. Studi Pengaruh Operating Heat Rate Terhadap Efisiensi Kinerja Pltu Labuhan Angin Sibolga

    OpenAIRE

    Simanjuntak, Sari Manna

    2017-01-01

    130402104 Heat rate merupakan ukuran keandalan dari suatu unit pembangkit. Heat rate didefinisikan sebagai jumlah energi bahan bakar yang dibutuhkan untuk menghasilkan listrik sebesar 1 kWh. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengevaluasi kinerja PLTU dari pengaruh beban terhadap pemakaian konsumsi spesifik bahan bakar, heat rate dan efisiensi termal pada PLTU Labuhan Angin Sibolga. Perhitungan nilai heat rate dilakukan dengan menggunakan metode langsung atau sering dikenal den...

  14. 40 CFR 75.83 - Calculation of Hg mass emissions and heat input rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input rate. 75.83 Section 75.83 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Calculation of Hg mass emissions and heat input rate. The owner or operator shall calculate Hg mass emissions and heat input rate in accordance with the procedures in sections 9.1 through 9.3 of appendix F to...

  15. Atmospheric solar heating rate in the water vapor bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1986-01-01

    The total absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in clear atmospheres is parameterized as a simple function of the scaled water vapor amount. For applications to cloudy and hazy atmospheres, the flux-weighted k-distribution functions are computed for individual absorption bands and for the total near-infrared region. The parameterization is based upon monochromatic calculations and follows essentially the scaling approximation of Chou and Arking, but the effect of temperature variation with height is taken into account in order to enhance the accuracy. Furthermore, the spectral range is extended to cover the two weak bands centered at 0.72 and 0.82 micron. Comparisons with monochromatic calculations show that the atmospheric heating rate and the surface radiation can be accurately computed from the parameterization. Comparisons are also made with other parameterizations. It is found that the absorption of solar radiation can be computed reasonably well using the Goody band model and the Curtis-Godson approximation.

  16. Extreme learning machine: a new alternative for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijian; Li, Hao; Tang, Xindong; Zhang, Xinyu; Lin, Fan; Cheng, Kewei

    2016-01-01

    Heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial indicators for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, the direct determination requires complex detection devices and a series of standard experiments, wasting too much time and manpower. To address this problem, we previously used artificial neural networks and support vector machine to develop precise knowledge-based models for predicting the heat collection rates and heat loss coefficients of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters, setting the properties measured by "portable test instruments" as the independent variables. A robust software for determination was also developed. However, in previous results, the prediction accuracy of heat loss coefficients can still be improved compared to those of heat collection rates. Also, in practical applications, even a small reduction in root mean square errors (RMSEs) can sometimes significantly improve the evaluation and business processes. As a further study, in this short report, we show that using a novel and fast machine learning algorithm-extreme learning machine can generate better predicted results for heat loss coefficient, which reduces the average RMSEs to 0.67 in testing.

  17. Pyrolysis mechanism of macerals at a low heating rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.; Yuan, J.; Xu, Y. [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Thermal Energy Engineering Research Institute

    1998-02-01

    Pyrolysis of macerals at a low heating rate was studied using DTA technology. The process of the pyrolysis was analyzed using a combined differential and integral method. The results showed that the process was quite complicated and cannot be described as a one-step reaction. However, there was a definite dividing point for the process, corresponding to the temperature of the maximum weight loss rate, T{sub m}. Based on the assumption that the pyrolysis reaction consisted of two steps, it was found that the rates of both steps are controlled by diffusion of different mechanism. The former step is Anti-Jander three dimension, the later ZLT equation. The activation energies of the two steps are also different, the former is larger than the later. The reasons causing the change of activation energy in the two steps were discussed by comparing the change of pososity in pyrolysis. The macerals showed similar pyrolysis mechanism but different activation energies. Usually the activation energy for inertinite was the lowest. The activation energy was affected by rank and increased with increasing rank. 10 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Analysis of Effect of Heat Pipe Parameters in Minimising the Entropy Generation Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Rakesh Hari; Chandrasekharan Muraleedharan

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer and fluid flow in the heat pipe system result in thermodynamic irreversibility generating entropy. The minimum entropy generation principle can be used for optimum design of flat heat pipe. The objective of the present work is to minimise the total entropy generation rate as the objective function with different parameters of the flat heat pipe subjected to some constraints. These constraints constitute the limitations on the heat transport capacity of the heat pipe. This physic...

  19. Neck-cooling improves repeated sprint performance in the heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eSunderland

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effect of neck-cooling during exercise on repeated sprint ability in a hot environment. Seven team-sport playing males completed two experimental trials involving repeated sprint exercise (5 x 6 s before and after two 45 min bouts of a football specific intermittent treadmill protocol in the heat (33.0  0.2 ºC; 53 ± 2% relative humidity. Participants wore a neck-cooling collar in one of the trials (CC. Mean power output and peak power output declined over time in both trials but were higher in CC (540 ± 99 v 507 ± 122W, d = 0.32; 719 ± 158 v 680 ± 182 W, d = 0.24 respectively. The improved power output was particularly pronounced (d = 0.51 – 0.88 after the 2nd 45 min bout but the CC had no effect on % fatigue. The collar lowered neck temperature and the thermal sensation of the neck (P 0.05. There were no trial differences but interaction effects were demonstrated for prolactin concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE. Prolactin concentration was initially higher in the collar cold trial and then was lower from 45 minutes onwards (interaction trial x time P=0.04. RPE was lower during the football intermittent treadmill protocol in the collar cold trial (interaction trial x time P = 0.01. Neck-cooling during exercise improves repeated sprint performance in a hot environment without altering physiological or neuroendocrinological responses. RPE is reduced and may partially explain the performance improvement.

  20. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Österlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular...... stress response, which facilitates the cell recovery from many forms of stress, e.g., heat stress. In S. cerevisiae, HSR is regulated mainly by the transcription factor heat shock factor (Hsf1p) and many of its targets are genes coding for molecular chaperones that promote protein folding and prevent......, human insulin precursor was only improved slightly and this only by high level over-expression of HSF1-R206S, supporting our previous findings that the production of this protein in S. cerevisiae is not limited by secretion. Our results provide an effective strategy to improve protein secretion...

  1. Research of Heating Rates Influence on Layer Coal Gasification of Krasnogorsky And Borodinsky Coal Deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankovskiy Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research of heating rate influence on coal samples gasification process of Krasnogorsky and Borodinsky coal deposit ranks A and 2B was done to define optimal heating mode in high intensification of dispersal of inflammable gases conditions. Abundance ratio of carbon monoxide and nitrogen monoxide, water vapor, carbon dioxide at four values of heating rate within the range of 5 to 30 K/min. with further definition of optimal heating rate of coals was stated.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of radiative heating and cooling rates in planetary atmospheres: general linearization and adjoint approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E. A.

    2002-01-01

    Radiative heating and cooling provide primary source and ultimate sink of energy driving lower planetary atmospheres. Evaluating the sensitivities of atmospheric dynamics models on these primary atmospheric parameters requires knowing how heating and cooling rates depend on these same parameters. We discuss two approaches that make it possible to directly compute the sensitivities of heating and cooling rates in parallel with evaluation of heating and cooling rates themselves.

  3. Memory behaviors of entropy production rates in heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Nan; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2018-02-01

    Based on the relaxation time approximation and first-order expansion, memory behaviors in heat conduction are found between the macroscopic and Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon (BGS) entropy production rates with exponentially decaying memory kernels. In the frameworks of classical irreversible thermodynamics (CIT) and BGS statistical mechanics, the memory dependency on the integrated history is unidirectional, while for the extended irreversible thermodynamics (EIT) and BGS entropy production rates, the memory dependences are bidirectional and coexist with the linear terms. When macroscopic and microscopic relaxation times satisfy a specific relationship, the entropic memory dependences will be eliminated. There also exist initial effects in entropic memory behaviors, which decay exponentially. The second-order term are also discussed, which can be understood as the global non-equilibrium degree. The effects of the second-order term are consisted of three parts: memory dependency, initial value and linear term. The corresponding memory kernels are still exponential and the initial effects of the global non-equilibrium degree also decay exponentially.

  4. Performance improvement of optical fiber coupler with electric heating versus gas heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Cijun; Gao, Chengde; Nie, Yi; Peng, Shuping

    2010-08-20

    Gas heating has been widely used in the process of fused biconical tapering. However, as the instability and asymmetric flame temperature of gas heating exist, the performance of the optical devices fabricated by this method was affected. To overcome the problems resulting from gas combustion, an electric heater is designed and manufactured using a metal-ceramic (MoSi(2)) as a heating material. Our experimental data show that the fused-taper machine with an electric heater has improved the performance of optical devices by increasing the consistency of the extinction ratio, excess loss, and the splitting ratio over that of the previous gas heating mode. Microcrystallizations and microcracks were observed at the fused region of the polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber coupler and at the taper region with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy respectively. The distribution of the microcrystallizations and microcracks are nonuniform along the fiber with gas heating, while their distribution is rather uniform with electric heating. These findings show that the novel optical fiber coupler with an electric heater has improved the performance of optical fiber devices by affecting the consistency of the optical parameters and micromorphology of the surface of PM fiber.

  5. Dissolution and Precipitation Behaviour during Continuous Heating of Al–Mg–Si Alloys in a Wide Range of Heating Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Osten

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the dissolution and precipitation behaviour of four different aluminium alloys (EN AW-6005A, EN AW-6082, EN AW-6016, and EN AW-6181 in four different initial heat treatment conditions (T4, T6, overaged, and soft annealed was investigated during heating in a wide dynamic range. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC was used to record heating curves between 20 and 600 °C. Heating rates were studied from 0.01 K/s to 5 K/s. We paid particular attention to control baseline stability, generating flat baselines and allowing accurate quantitative evaluation of the resulting DSC curves. As the heating rate increases, the individual dissolution and precipitation reactions shift to higher temperatures. The reactions during heating are significantly superimposed and partially run simultaneously. In addition, precipitation and dissolution reactions are increasingly suppressed as the heating rate increases, whereby exothermic precipitation reactions are suppressed earlier than endothermic dissolution reactions. Integrating the heating curves allowed the enthalpy levels of the different initial microstructural conditions to be quantified. Referring to time–temperature–austenitisation diagrams for steels, continuous heating dissolution diagrams for aluminium alloys were constructed to summarise the results in graphical form. These diagrams may support process optimisation in heat treatment shops.

  6. Dissolution and Precipitation Behaviour during Continuous Heating of Al–Mg–Si Alloys in a Wide Range of Heating Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osten, Julia; Milkereit, Benjamin; Schick, Christoph; Kessler, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the dissolution and precipitation behaviour of four different aluminium alloys (EN AW-6005A, EN AW-6082, EN AW-6016, and EN AW-6181) in four different initial heat treatment conditions (T4, T6, overaged, and soft annealed) was investigated during heating in a wide dynamic range. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to record heating curves between 20 and 600 °C. Heating rates were studied from 0.01 K/s to 5 K/s. We paid particular attention to control baseline stability, generating flat baselines and allowing accurate quantitative evaluation of the resulting DSC curves. As the heating rate increases, the individual dissolution and precipitation reactions shift to higher temperatures. The reactions during heating are significantly superimposed and partially run simultaneously. In addition, precipitation and dissolution reactions are increasingly suppressed as the heating rate increases, whereby exothermic precipitation reactions are suppressed earlier than endothermic dissolution reactions. Integrating the heating curves allowed the enthalpy levels of the different initial microstructural conditions to be quantified. Referring to time–temperature–austenitisation diagrams for steels, continuous heating dissolution diagrams for aluminium alloys were constructed to summarise the results in graphical form. These diagrams may support process optimisation in heat treatment shops.

  7. An application of data mining in district heating substations for improving energy performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Puning; Zhou, Zhigang; Chen, Xin; Liu, Jing

    2017-11-01

    Automatic meter reading system is capable of collecting and storing a huge number of district heating (DH) data. However, the data obtained are rarely fully utilized. Data mining is a promising technology to discover potential interesting knowledge from vast data. This paper applies data mining methods to analyse the massive data for improving energy performance of DH substation. The technical approach contains three steps: data selection, cluster analysis and association rule mining (ARM). Two-heating-season data of a substation are used for case study. Cluster analysis identifies six distinct heating patterns based on the primary heat of the substation. ARM reveals that secondary pressure difference and secondary flow rate have a strong correlation. Using the discovered rules, a fault occurring in remote flow meter installed at secondary network is detected accurately. The application demonstrates that data mining techniques can effectively extrapolate potential useful knowledge to better understand substation operation strategies and improve substation energy performance.

  8. An application of data mining in district heating substations for improving energy performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Puning

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic meter reading system is capable of collecting and storing a huge number of district heating (DH data. However, the data obtained are rarely fully utilized. Data mining is a promising technology to discover potential interesting knowledge from vast data. This paper applies data mining methods to analyse the massive data for improving energy performance of DH substation. The technical approach contains three steps: data selection, cluster analysis and association rule mining (ARM. Two-heating-season data of a substation are used for case study. Cluster analysis identifies six distinct heating patterns based on the primary heat of the substation. ARM reveals that secondary pressure difference and secondary flow rate have a strong correlation. Using the discovered rules, a fault occurring in remote flow meter installed at secondary network is detected accurately. The application demonstrates that data mining techniques can effectively extrapolate potential useful knowledge to better understand substation operation strategies and improve substation energy performance.

  9. Improving reservoir history matching of EM heated heavy oil reservoirs via cross-well seismic tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Katterbauer, Klemens

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced recovery methods have become significant in the industry\\'s drive to increase recovery rates from oil and gas reservoirs. For heavy oil reservoirs, the immobility of the oil at reservoir temperatures, caused by its high viscosity, limits the recovery rates and strains the economic viability of these fields. While thermal recovery methods, such as steam injection or THAI, have extensively been applied in the field, their success has so far been limited due to prohibitive heat losses and the difficulty in controlling the combustion process. Electromagnetic (EM) heating via high-frequency EM radiation has attracted attention due to its wide applicability in different environments, its efficiency, and the improved controllability of the heating process. While becoming a promising technology for heavy oil recovery, its effect on overall reservoir production and fluid displacements are poorly understood. Reservoir history matching has become a vital tool for the oil & gas industry to increase recovery rates. Limited research has been undertaken so far to capture the nonlinear reservoir dynamics and significantly varying flow rates for thermally heated heavy oil reservoir that may notably change production rates and render conventional history matching frameworks more challenging. We present a new history matching framework for EM heated heavy oil reservoirs incorporating cross-well seismic imaging. Interfacing an EM heating solver to a reservoir simulator via Andrade’s equation, we couple the system to an ensemble Kalman filter based history matching framework incorporating a cross-well seismic survey module. With increasing power levels and heating applied to the heavy oil reservoirs, reservoir dynamics change considerably and may lead to widely differing production forecasts and increased uncertainty. We have shown that the incorporation of seismic observations into the EnKF framework can significantly enhance reservoir simulations, decrease forecasting

  10. Nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.; Williford, R.E.; Christensen, J.A.

    1982-03-03

    A nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer between fuel material and cladding is described. The element consists of an outer cladding tube divided into an upper fuel section containing a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material, slightly smaller in diameter than the inner surface of the cladding tube and a small lower accumulator section, the cladding tube being which is filled with a low molecular weight gas to transfer heat from fuel material to cladding during irradiation. A plurality of essentially vertical grooves in the fuel section extend downward and communicate with the accumulator section. The radial depth of the grooves is sufficient to provide a thermal gradient between the hot fuel surface and the relatively cooler cladding surface to allow thermal segregation to take place between the low molecular weight heat transfer gas and high molecular weight fission product gases produced by the fuel material during irradiation.

  11. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1999-01-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

  12. Heat transfer and heating rate of food stuffs in commercial shop ovens

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The CFD analysis of flow and temperature distribution in heating ovens used in bakery shop, to keep the foodstuffs warm, is attempted using finite element technique. The oven is modelled as a two-dimensional steady state natural convection heat transfer problem. Effects of heater location and total heat input on ...

  13. Combined Space and Water Heating: Next Steps to Improved Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenbauer, B. [NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Bohac, D. [NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Huelman, P. [NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-07-13

    A combined space- and water-heating (combi) system uses a high-efficiency direct-vent burner that eliminates safety issues associated with natural draft appliances. Past research with these systems shows that using condensing water heaters or boilers with hydronic air handling units can provide both space and water heating with efficiencies of 90% or higher. Improved controls have the potential to reduce complexity and improve upon the measured performance. This project demonstrates that controls can significantly benefit these first-generation systems. Laboratory tests and daily load/performance models showed that the set point temperature reset control produced a 2.1%-4.3% (20-40 therms/year) savings for storage and hybrid water heater combi systems operated in moderate-load homes.

  14. Heat storage rate and acute fatigue in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.O.C. Rodrigues

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal environmental stress can anticipate acute fatigue during exercise at a fixed intensity (%VO2max. Controversy exists about whether this anticipation is caused by the absolute internal temperature (Tint, ºC, by the heat storage rate (HSR, cal/min or by both mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to study acute fatigue (total exercise time, TET during thermal stress by determining Tint and HSR from abdominal temperature. Thermal environmental stress was controlled in an environmental chamber and determined as wet bulb globe temperature (ºC, with three environmental temperatures being studied: cold (18ºC, thermoneutral (23.1ºC or hot (29.4ºC. Six untrained male Wistar rats weighing 260-360 g were used. The animals were submitted to exercise at the same time of day in the three environments and at two treadmill velocities (21 and 24 m/min until exhaustion. After implantation of a temperature sensor and treadmill adaptation, the animals were submitted to a Latin square experimental design using a 2 x 3 factorial scheme (velocity and environment, with the level of significance set at P<0.05. The results showed that the higher the velocity and the ambient temperature, the lower was the TET, with these two factors being independent. This result indicated that fatigue was independently affected by both the increase in exercise intensity and the thermal environmental stress. Fatigue developed at different Tint and HSR showed the best inverse relationship with TET. We conclude that HSR was the main anticipating factor of fatigue.

  15. Heating rate effect on thermoluminescence glow curves of LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Gonzalez, P.R., E-mail: pedro.gonzalez@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N, C.P. 52750, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Azorin, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Furetta, C. [Touro University Rome, Division of Touro College New York, Circne Gianicolense 15-17, 00153 Rome (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    The influence of heating rate on the thermoluminescence (TL) property of LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE was analyzed. The activation energy and the frequency factor as a function of the heating rate were determined. The kinetic parameters and their dependence on the heating rate were evaluated using the sequential quadratic programming glow curve deconvolution (SQPGCD). The results showed that as the heating rate increases, the peak intensity at the maximum (I{sub M}) decreases and shifts to higher temperature; similar behavior of the kinetics parameters was observed. - Highlights: >Heating rate influence on the thermoluminescence (TL) property of LiF:Mg,Cu,P was analyzed. > The kinetic parameters, activation energy and frequency factor were evaluated using the sequential quadratic programming glow curve deconvolution. > The peak intensity at the maximum (I{sub M}) of the glow curves decreases. > Shifts to higher temperature were observed as the heating rate increased. > Similar behavior of the kinetics parameters was noticed.

  16. A Simple Rate Law Experiment Using a Custom-Built Isothermal Heat Conduction Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadso, Lars; Li, Xi.

    2008-01-01

    Most processes (whether physical, chemical, or biological) produce or consume heat: measuring thermal power (the heat production rate) is therefore a typical method of studying processes. Here we describe the design of a simple isothermal heat conduction calorimeter built for use in teaching; we also provide an example of its use in simultaneously…

  17. Fabrication and heating rate study of microscopic surface electrode ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniilidis, N.; Narayanan, S.; Möller, S. A.; Clark, R.; Lee, T. E.; Leek, P. J.; Wallraff, A.; Schulz, St.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Häffner, H.

    2011-01-01

    We report heating rate measurements in a microfabricated gold-on-sapphire surface electrode ion trap with a trapping height of approximately 240 μm. Using the Doppler recooling method, we characterize the trap heating rates over an extended region of the trap. The noise spectral density of the trap falls in the range of noise spectra reported in ion traps at room temperature. We find that during the first months of operation, the heating rates increase by approximately one order of magnitude. The increase in heating rates is largest in the ion-loading region of the trap, providing a strong hint that surface contamination plays a major role for excessive heating rates. We discuss data found in the literature and the possible relation of anomalous heating to sources of noise and dissipation in other systems, namely impurity atoms adsorbed onto metal surfaces and amorphous dielectrics.

  18. Simultaneous optimization of the cavity heat load and trip rates in linacs using a genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balša Terzić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a genetic algorithm-based optimization is used to simultaneously minimize two competing objectives guiding the operation of the Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility linacs: cavity heat load and radio frequency cavity trip rates. The results represent a significant improvement to the standard linac energy management tool and thereby could lead to a more efficient Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility configuration. This study also serves as a proof of principle of how a genetic algorithm can be used for optimizing other linac-based machines.

  19. Recent Heat Transfer Improvements to the RELAP5-3D Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemke, Richard A; Davis, Cliff B; Oh, Chang

    2007-05-01

    The heat transfer section of the RELAP5-3D computer program has been recently improved. The improvements are as follows: (1) the general cladding rupture model was modified (more than one heat structure segment connected to the hydrodynamic volume and heat structure geometry’s internal gap pressure), (2) the cladding rupture model was modified for reflood, and (3) the heat transfer minor edits/plots were extended to include radiation/enclosure heat flux and generation (internal heat source).

  20. EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF PULVERIZED COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2000-01-01

    This final technical report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96224 during the period September 24, 1996 to September 23, 1999 which covers the entire performance period of the project. During this period, modification, alignment, and calibration of the measurement system, measurement of devolatilization time-scales for single coal particles subjected to a range of heating rates and temperature data at these time-scales, and analysis of the temperature data to understand the effect of heating rates on coal thermal properties were carried out. A new thermodynamic model was developed to predict the heat transfer behavior for single coal particles using one approach based on the analogy for thermal property of polymers. Results of this model suggest that bituminous coal particles behave like polymers during rapid heating on the order of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} K/s. At these heating rates during the early stages of heating, the vibrational part of the heat capacity of the coal molecules appears to be still frozen but during the transition from heat-up to devolatilization, the heat capacity appears to attain a sudden jump in its value as in the case of polymers. There are a few data available in the coal literature for low heating rate experiments (10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} K/s) conducted by UTRC, our industrial partner, in this project. These data were obtained for a longer heating duration on the order of several seconds as opposed to the 10 milliseconds heating time of the single particle experiments discussed above. The polymer analogy model was modified to include longer heating time on the order of several seconds to test these data. However, the model failed to predict these low heating rate data. It should be noted that UTRC's work showed reasonably good agreement with Merrick model heat capacity predictions at these low heating rates, but at higher heating rates UTRC observed that coal thermal response was heat flux dependent. It is concluded

  1. Improving Survey Response Rates in Online Panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Jin; Nielsen, Christian Videbæk

    2016-01-01

    experiment among 6,162 members of an online survey panel, this article shows how low-cost incentives and cost-free text appeal interventions may impact the survey response rate in online panels. The experimental treatments comprise (a) a cash prize lottery incentive, (b) two donation incentives equating......Identifying ways to efficiently maximize the response rate to surveys is important to survey-based research. However, evidence on the response rate effect of donation incentives and especially altruistic and egotistic-type text appeal interventions is sparse and ambiguous. By a randomized survey...... survey response with a monetary donation to a good cause, (c) an egotistic-type text appeal, and (d) an altruistic-type text appeal. Relative to a control group, we find higher response rates among the recipients of the egotistic-type text appeal and the lottery incentive. Donation incentives yield lower...

  2. Induction-heating MOCVD reactor with significantly improved heating efficiency and reduced harmful magnetic coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Kuang-Hui

    2018-02-23

    In a conventional induction-heating III-nitride metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, the induction coil is outside the chamber. Therefore, the magnetic field does not couple with the susceptor well, leading to compromised heating efficiency and harmful coupling with the gas inlet and thus possible overheating. Hence, the gas inlet has to be at a minimum distance away from the susceptor. Because of the elongated flow path, premature reactions can be more severe, particularly between Al- and B-containing precursors and NH3. Here, we propose a structure that can significantly improve the heating efficiency and allow the gas inlet to be closer to the susceptor. Specifically, the induction coil is designed to surround the vertical cylinder of a T-shaped susceptor comprising the cylinder and a top horizontal plate holding the wafer substrate within the reactor. Therefore, the cylinder coupled most magnetic field to serve as the thermal source for the plate. Furthermore, the plate can block and thus significantly reduce the uncoupled magnetic field above the susceptor, thereby allowing the gas inlet to be closer. The results show approximately 140% and 2.6 times increase in the heating and susceptor coupling efficiencies, respectively, as well as a 90% reduction in the harmful magnetic flux on the gas inlet.

  3. Heat generation rates in lithium thionyl chloride cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, H.

    1982-01-01

    An empirical equation that is useful for good first approximation in thermal modeling is presented. Indications and measurements of electrochemical heat effects were investigated. The particular cells of interest are of the D size, with spiral wound configuration and were instrumented with a thermocouple. It is found that cathode limited cells can explode on reversal at moderate temperatures.

  4. Analytical Improvements in PV Degradation Rate Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined accurately. For non-spectrally corrected data several complete seasonal cycles (typically 3-5 years) are required to obtain reasonably accurate degradation rates. In a rapidly evolving industry such a time span is often unacceptable and the need exists to determine degradation rates accurately in a shorter period of time. Occurrence of outliers and data shifts are two examples of analytical problems leading to greater uncertainty and therefore to longer observation times. In this paper we compare three methodologies of data analysis for robustness in the presence of outliers, data shifts and shorter measurement time periods.

  5. Improving Survey Response Rates in Online Panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Jin; Nielsen, Christian Videbæk

    2016-01-01

    experiment among 6,162 members of an online survey panel, this article shows how low-cost incentives and cost-free text appeal interventions may impact the survey response rate in online panels. The experimental treatments comprise (a) a cash prize lottery incentive, (b) two donation incentives equating...... survey response with a monetary donation to a good cause, (c) an egotistic-type text appeal, and (d) an altruistic-type text appeal. Relative to a control group, we find higher response rates among the recipients of the egotistic-type text appeal and the lottery incentive. Donation incentives yield lower...

  6. Convective Heat Transfer Scaling of Ignition Delay and Burning Rate with Heat Flux and Stretch Rate in the Equivalent Low Stretch Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    To better evaluate the buoyant contributions to the convective cooling (or heating) inherent in normal-gravity material flammability test methods, we derive a convective heat transfer correlation that can be used to account for the forced convective stretch effects on the net radiant heat flux for both ignition delay time and burning rate. The Equivalent Low Stretch Apparatus (ELSA) uses an inverted cone heater to minimize buoyant effects while at the same time providing a forced stagnation flow on the sample, which ignites and burns as a ceiling fire. Ignition delay and burning rate data is correlated with incident heat flux and convective heat transfer and compared to results from other test methods and fuel geometries using similarity to determine the equivalent stretch rates and thus convective cooling (or heating) rates for those geometries. With this correlation methodology, buoyant effects inherent in normal gravity material flammability test methods can be estimated, to better apply the test results to low stretch environments relevant to spacecraft material selection.

  7. Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting surimi as affected by nano-scaled fish bone and heating rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tao; Park, Jae W

    2015-08-01

    Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting (PW) surimi were investigated at various heating rates with the use of nano-scaled fish bone (NFB) and calcium chloride. Addition of NFB and slow heating improved gel strength significantly. Activity of endogenous transglutaminase (ETGase) from PW surimi was markedly induced by both NFB calcium and calcium chloride, showing an optimal temperature at 30°C. Initial storage modulus increased as NFB calcium concentration increased and the same trend was maintained throughout the temperature sweep. Rheograms with temperature sweep at slow heating rate (1°C/min) exhibited two peaks at ∼ 35°C and ∼ 70°C. However, no peak was observed during temperature sweep from 20 to 90°C at fast heating rate (20°C/min). Protein patterns of surimi gels were affected by both heating rate and NFB calcium concentration. Under slow heating, myosin heavy chain intensity decreased with NFB calcium concentration, indicating formation of ε-(γ-glutamyl) lysine cross-links by ETGase and NFB calcium ion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Data Fusion for Improved Respiration Rate Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra Atul; Nemati Shamim; Clifford GariD

    2010-01-01

    We present an application of a modified Kalman-Filter (KF) framework for data fusion to the estimation of respiratory rate from multiple physiological sources which is robust to background noise. A novel index of the underlying signal quality of respiratory signals is presented and then used to modify the noise covariance matrix of the KF which discounts the effect of noisy data. The signal quality index, together with the KF innovation sequence, is also used to weight multiple independent e...

  9. Novel Wick Structures for Improved Heat Pipe Performance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Heat pipes are commonly used for transporting heat over relatively long distances with very low temperature drop. One of the limitations of heat pipes is the...

  10. Analysis of Effect of Heat Pipe Parameters in Minimising the Entropy Generation Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Hari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer and fluid flow in the heat pipe system result in thermodynamic irreversibility generating entropy. The minimum entropy generation principle can be used for optimum design of flat heat pipe. The objective of the present work is to minimise the total entropy generation rate as the objective function with different parameters of the flat heat pipe subjected to some constraints. These constraints constitute the limitations on the heat transport capacity of the heat pipe. This physical nonlinear programming problem with nonlinear constraints is solved using LINGO 15.0 software, which enables finding optimum values for the independent design variables for which entropy generation is minimum. The effect of heat load, length, and sink temperature on design variables and corresponding entropy generation is studied. The second law analysis using minimum entropy generation principle is found to be effective in designing performance enhanced heat pipe.

  11. Does Experience Rating Improve Obstetric Practices?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaral-Garcia, Sofia; Bertoli, Paola; Grembi, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    is associated with a decrease in the probability of performing a C-section from 2.3 to 3.7 percentage points (7–11.6%) with no consequences for medical complications or neonatal outcomes. The impact can be explained by a reduction in the discretion of obstetric decision-making rather than by patient cream......Using inpatient discharge records from the Italian region of Piedmont, we estimate the impact of an increase in malpractice pressure brought about by experience-rated liability insurance on obstetric practices. Our identification strategy exploits the exogenous location of public hospitals in court...

  12. Mixing rates and vertical heat fluxes north of Svalbard from Arctic winter to spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Amelie; Fer, Ilker; Sundfjord, Arild; Peterson, Algot K.

    2017-06-01

    Mixing and heat flux rates collected in the Eurasian Basin north of Svalbard during the N-ICE2015 drift expedition are presented. The observations cover the deep Nansen Basin, the Svalbard continental slope, and the shallow Yermak Plateau from winter to summer. Mean quiescent winter heat flux values in the Nansen Basin are 2 W m-2 at the ice-ocean interface, 3 W m-2 in the pycnocline, and 1 W m-2 below the pycnocline. Large heat fluxes exceeding 300 W m-2 are observed in the late spring close to the surface over the Yermak Plateau. The data consisting of 588 microstructure profiles and 50 days of high-resolution under-ice turbulence measurements are used to quantify the impact of several forcing factors on turbulent dissipation and heat flux rates. Wind forcing increases turbulent dissipation seven times in the upper 50 m, and doubles heat fluxes at the ice-ocean interface. The presence of warm Atlantic Water close to the surface increases the temperature gradient in the water column, leading to enhanced heat flux rates within the pycnocline. Steep topography consistently enhances dissipation rates by a factor of four and episodically increases heat flux at depth. It is, however, the combination of storms and shallow Atlantic Water that leads to the highest heat flux rates observed: ice-ocean interface heat fluxes average 100 W m-2 during peak events and are associated with rapid basal sea ice melt, reaching 25 cm/d.

  13. Combined Space and Water Heating: Next Steps to Improved Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenbauer, B. [NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Bohac, D. [NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Huelman, P. [NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-07-13

    A combined space- and water-heating (combi) system uses a high-efficiency direct-vent burner that eliminates safety issues associated with natural draft appliances. Past research with these systems shows that using condensing water heaters or boilers with hydronic air handling units can provide both space and water heating with efficiencies of 90% or higher. Improved controls have the potential to reduce complexity and improve upon the measured performance. This project demonstrates that controls can significantly benefit these first-generation systems. Laboratory tests and daily load/performance models showed that the set point temperature reset control produced a 2.1%–4.3% (20–40 therms/year) savings for storage and hybrid water heater combi systems operated in moderate-load homes. The full modulation control showed additional savings over set point control (in high-load homes almost doubling the savings: 4%–5% over the no-control case). At the time of installation the reset control can be implemented for $200–$400, which would provide paybacks of 6–25 years for low-load houses and 3–15 years for high-load houses. Full modulation implementation costs would be similar to the outdoor reset and would provide paybacks of 5-½–20 years for low-load houses and 2-½–10 years for high-load houses.

  14. Does Experience Rating Improve Obstetric Practices?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaral-Garcia, Sofia; Bertoli, Paola; Grembi, Veronica

    Using data from 2002 to 2009 inpatient discharge records on deliveries in the Italian region of Piedmont, we assess the impact of an increase in malpractice pressure on obstetric practices, as identified by the introduction of experience-rated malpractice liability insurance. Our identification...... in the probability of performing a C-section from 2.3 to 3.7 percentage points (7% to 11.6% at the mean value of C-section) with no consequences for a broadly defined measure of complications or neonatal outcomes. We show that these results are robust to the different methodologies and can be explained...... by a reduction in the discretion of obstetric decision making rather than by patient cream skimming.Using data from 2002 to 2009 inpatient discharge records on deliveries in the Italian region of Piedmont, we assess the impact of an increase in malpractice pressure on obstetric practices, as identified...

  15. Does Experience Rating Improve Obstetric Practices?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaral-Garcia, Sofia; Bertoli, Paola; Grembi, Veronica

    Using data from 2002 to 2009 inpatient discharge records on deliveries in the Italian region of Piedmont, we assess the impact of an increase in malpractice pressure on obstetric practices, as identied by the introduction of experience-rated malpractice liability insurance. Our identication...... in the probability of performing a C-section from 2.3 to 3.7 percentage points (7% to 11.6% at the mean value of C-section) with no consequences for a broadly defined measure of complications or neonatal outcomes. We show that these results are robust to the different methodologies and can be explained...... by a reduction in the discretion of obstetric decision making rather than by patient cream skimming....

  16. Biomass Pyrolysis: Comments on Some Sources of Confusions in the Definitions of Temperatures and Heating Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Lédé

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomass pyrolysis is usually characterized on the basis of temperature and heating rate. Unfortunately, these parameters are badly defined in processing reactors as well as in laboratory devices. From the results of simplified models, the present paper points out the significant mistakes that can be made when assuming that the actual temperature and heating rate of reacting biomass particles are the same as those of the external heating medium. The difficulties in defining these two parameters are underlined in both cases of a heat source temperature supposed to be constant or to increase with time.

  17. Prediction of the heat transfer rate of a single layer wire-on-tube type heat exchanger using ANFIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayati, Mohsen [Electrical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Razi University, Tagh-E-Bostan, Kermanshah 67149 (Iran); Computational Intelligence Research Center, Razi University, Tagh-E-Bostan, Kermanshah 67149 (Iran); Rezaei, Abbas; Seifi, Majid [Electrical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Razi University, Tagh-E-Bostan, Kermanshah 67149 (Iran)

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, we applied an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model for prediction of the heat transfer rate of the wire-on-tube type heat exchanger. Limited experimental data was used for training and testing ANFIS configuration with the help of hybrid learning algorithm consisting of backpropagation and least-squares estimation. The predicted values are found to be in good agreement with the actual values from the experiments with mean relative error less than 2.55%. Also, we compared the proposed ANFIS model to an ANN approach. Results show that the ANFIS model has more accuracy in comparison to ANN approach. Therefore, we can use ANFIS model to predict the performances of thermal systems in engineering applications, such as modeling heat exchangers for heat transfer analysis. (author)

  18. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    but rely on the concentration of hydrogen. The model ... first-order rate law. Lehmhus and Rausch (2004) have annealed TiH2 pow- der in air and argon. In argon, the powder does not develop a surface layer and as a result, a small amount of hydro- gen is lost ... rate effect on the thermal decomposition behaviour of TiH2.

  19. Viscous heating effect on deactivation of helminth eggs in ventilated improved pit sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, D; Foutch, G L; Smay, J; Archer, C; Buckley, C A

    2015-01-01

    Viscous heating by extrusion of faecal material obtained from ventilated improved pit (VIP) latrines can be used to deactivate soil-transmitted helminth (STH) eggs by increasing the temperature of faecal sludge uniformly. Viscous heating can deactivate STH eggs present in sludge to make the material safer to transport, dispose of, or use in agricultural applications or as an energy source. The mechanical energy required to generate the shear rate can originate from any source. No other heat source or additive is required. Here we determined a baseline for the deactivation of STH eggs using viscous heating. To characterize equipment performance, three parameters were investigated: (1) minimum temperature required for deactivation; (2) local maximum temperatures for various flow rates and moisture contents (MCs); and (3) thermal efficiency. Excess water is undesirable since low viscosities require extended residence time and increased energy input. The minimum temperature to achieve greater than 90% helminth egg deactivation is 70 °C. For the laboratory-scale equipment tested, the maximum allowable mass flow rate for VIP sludge with 77% MC was found to be 3.6 g/s.

  20. The effect of heating rate on the surface chemistry of NiTi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undisz, Andreas; Hanke, Robert; Freiberg, Katharina E; Hoffmann, Volker; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The impact of the heating rate on the Ni content at the surface of the oxide layer of biomedical NiTi is explored. Heat treatment emulating common shape-setting procedures was performed by means of conventional and inductive heating for similar annealing time and temperature, applying various heating rates from ~0.25 K s(-1) to 250 K s(-1). A glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy method was established and employed to evaluate concentration profiles of Ni, Ti and O in the near-surface region at high resolution. The Ni content at the surface of the differently treated samples varies significantly, with maximum surface Ni concentrations of ~20 at.% at the lowest and ~1.5 at.% at the highest heating rate, i.e. the total amount of Ni contained in the surface region of the oxide layer decreases by >15 times. Consequently, the heating rate is a determinant for the biomedical characteristics of NiTi, especially since Ni available at the surface of the oxide layer may affect the hemocompatibility and be released promptly after surgical application of a respective implant. Furthermore, apparently contradictory results presented in the literature reporting surface Ni concentrations of ~3 at.% to >20 at.% after heat treatment are consistently explained considering the ascertained effect of the heating rate. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Heat stress effects on farrowing rate in sows: genetic parameter estimation using within-line and crossbred models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemhof, S; Kause, A; Knol, E F; Van Arendonk, J A M; Misztal, I

    2012-07-01

    The pork supply chain values steady and undisturbed piglet production. Fertilization and maintaining gestation in warm and hot climates is a challenge that can be potentially improved by selection. The objective of this study was to estimate 1) genetic variation for farrowing rate of sows in 2 dam lines and their reciprocal cross; 2) genetic variation for farrowing rate heat tolerance, which can be defined as the random regression slope of farrowing rate against increasing temperature at day of insemination, and the genetic correlation between farrowing rate and heat tolerance; 3) genetic correlation between farrowing rate in purebreds and crossbreds; and 4) genetic correlation between heat tolerance in purebreds and crossbreds. The estimates were based on 93,969 first insemination records per cycle from 24,456 sows inseminated between January 2003 and July 2008. These sows originated from a Dutch purebred Yorkshire dam line (D), an International purebred Large White dam line (ILW), and from their reciprocal crosses (RC) raised in Spain and Portugal. Within-line and crossbred models were used for variance component estimation. Heritability estimates for farrowing rate were 0.06, 0.07, and 0.02 using within-line models for D, ILW, and RC, respectively, and 0.07, 0.07, and 0.10 using the crossbred model, respectively. For farrowing rate, purebred-crossbred genetic correlations were 0.57 between D and RC and 0.50 between ILW and RC. When including heat tolerance in the within-line model, heritability estimates for farrowing rate were 0.05, 0.08, and 0.03 for D, ILW, and RC, respectively. Heritability for heat tolerance at 29.3°C was 0.04, 0.02, and 0.05 for D, ILW, and RC, respectively. Genetic correlations between farrowing rate and heat tolerance tended to be negative in crossbreds and ILW-line sows, implying selection for increased levels of production traits, such as growth and reproductive output, is likely to increase environmental sensitivity. This study shows

  2. Computer simulation of metal wire explosion under high rate heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolnikov, K. P.; Kryzhevich, D. S.; Korchuganov, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Synchronous electric explosion of metal wires and synthesis of bicomponent nanoparticles were investigated on the base of molecular dynamics method. Copper and nickel nanosized crystallites of cylindrical shape were chosen as conductors for explosion. The embedded atom approximation was used for calculation of the interatomic interactions. The agglomeration process after explosion metal wires was the main mechanism for particle synthesis. The distribution of chemical elements was non-uniform over the cross section of the bicomponent particles. The copper concentration in the surface region was higher than in the bulk of the synthesized particle. By varying the loading parameters (heating temperature, the distance between the wires) one can control the size and internal structure of the synthesized bicomponent nanoparticles. The obtained results showed that the method of molecular dynamics can be effectively used to determine the optimal technological mode of nanoparticle synthesis on the base of electric explosion of metal wires.

  3. CAFFEINE IMPROVES HEART RATE WITHOUT IMPROVING SEPSIS SURVIVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauzá, Gustavo; Remick, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Caffeine is consumed on a daily basis for its nervous system stimulant properties and is a global adenosine receptor antagonist. Since adenosine receptors have been found to play a major role in regulating the immune response to a septic insult, we investigated if caffeine consumption prior to a septic insult would alter immunological and physiological responses, as well as survival. Methods Two separate experimental designs were employed, both using outbred female ICR mice. In the first experiment mice were administered 20mg/kg of caffeine (equal to 2–3 cups of coffee for a human) or normal saline intraperitoneally at the time of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Immunological parameters including cytokines and local cell recruitment measured. In the second experiment caffeine (10mg/kg/hr) was delivered continuously for 24 hours via a subcutaneous infusion pump placed the day prior to CLP and hemodynamic parameters were examined. In both experiments survival was followed for five days. Results A single dose of caffeine at the initiation of sepsis did not alter survival. This single dose of caffeine did significantly increase in plasma levels of the chemokine KC six hours after the onset of sepsis compared to septic mice given normal saline. There were no changes in IL-6 or IL-10 levels in the caffeine groups. Peritoneal lavages performed 24 hours post-CLP showed no difference in the levels of IL-6, TNF, KC, MIP-1, IL-10 or the IL-1 receptor antagonist between caffeine and normal saline treated mice. Additionally, the lavages yielded similar numbers of cells (4.1×106 vehicle vs. 6.9×106 caffeine) and bacterial colony forming units (CFU, 4.1 million CFU vehicle vs. 2.8 million CFU caffeine). In the infusion group, caffeine also did not alter survival. However, caffeine infusion did increase heart rate prior to CLP, and prevented the decline in heart rate after CLP. Conclusion Caffeine increased heart rate in mice but does not impact cytokine

  4. Effect of heat rate constraint on minimum-fuel synergetic plane change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mease, Kenneth D.; Utashima, Masayoshi

    1991-01-01

    The synergetic plane change offers substantial fuel savings over the pure-propulsive alternative for certain noncoplanar orbital transfers. On the other hand, the thermal environment for a synergetic plane change vehicle can be quite severe. The minimum-fuel controls are computed approximately by parametrizing the controls and solving the resulting nonlinear programming problem. By considering several different levels of heat rate constraint, we characterize how the control strategy should be modified in order to keep the heat rate below the specified limit. Flight on the heat rate constraint boundary at high angle of attack is the key characteristic.

  5. Influence of heating rate on the condensational instability. [in outer layers of solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Mariska, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis and numerical simulation are used to determine the effect that various heating rates have on the linear and nonlinear evolution of a typical plasma within a solar magnetic flux tube subject to the condensational instability. It is found that linear stability depends strongly on the heating rate. The results of numerical simulations of the nonlinear evolution of the condensational instability in a solar magnetic flux tube are presented. Different heating rates lead to quite different nonlinear evolutions, as evidenced by the behavior of the global internal energy.

  6. Inverse problem of estimating transient heat transfer rate on external wall of forced convection pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wen-Lih; Yang, Yu-Ching; Chang, Win-Jin; Lee, Haw-Long [Clean Energy Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kun Shan University, Yung-Kang City, Tainan 710-03 (China)

    2008-08-15

    In this study, a conjugate gradient method based inverse algorithm is applied to estimate the unknown space and time dependent heat transfer rate on the external wall of a pipe system using temperature measurements. It is assumed that no prior information is available on the functional form of the unknown heat transfer rate; hence, the procedure is classified as function estimation in the inverse calculation. The accuracy of the inverse analysis is examined by using simulated exact and inexact temperature measurements. Results show that an excellent estimation of the space and time dependent heat transfer rate can be obtained for the test case considered in this study. (author)

  7. Improving the performance of district heating systems by utilization of local heat boosters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falcone, A.; Dominkovic, D. F.; Pedersen, A. S.

    District Heating (DH) plays an important role into the Danish energy green transition towards the future sustainable energy systems. The new, 4 th generation district heating network, the so called Low Temperature District Heating (LTDH), tends to lower the supply temperature of the heat down to ...

  8. Effect of heating rate on intercritical annealing of low-carbon cold-rolled steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Larrin

    A study was performed on the effect of heating rate on transformations during intercritical annealing of cold-rolled low-carbon sheet steels. Two sets of experiments were developed: 1) a series of alloys (1020, 1019M, 15B25) with two different cold reductions (nominally 40 and 60 pct) were heated at different rates and transformation temperatures were determined using analysis of dilatometry and metallography of intercritically annealed samples, allowing the study of the impact of composition and cold work on transformation behavior with different heating rates. 2) A cold-rolled C-Mn-Nb steel was tested with different heating rates selected for different degrees of recrystallization during austenite formation to test the impact of ferrite recrystallization on austenite formation. Heat treated samples were analyzed with SEM, EBSD, dilatometry, and microhardness to study the changes in transformation behavior. The results of this study were extended by adding step heating tests, heat treatments with an intercritical hold, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements of Mn distribution. Austenite transformation temperatures increased logarithmically with heating rate. Greater degrees of cold work led to reduced transformation temperatures across all heating rates because the energy of cold work increased the driving force for austenite formation. The relative effects of alloying additions on transformation temperatures remained with increasing heating rate. Rapid heating minimized ferrite recrystallization and pearlite spheroidization. Austenite formation occurred preferentially in recovered ferrite regions as opposed to recrystallized ferrite boundaries. Martensite was evenly distributed in slowly heated steels because austenite formed on recrystallized, equiaxed, ferrite boundaries. With rapid heating, austenite formed in directionally-oriented recovered ferrite which increased the degree of banding. The greatest degree of banding was found with

  9. Improved Differential Evolution for Combined Heat and Power Economic Dispatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, C.; Basu, M.; Panigrahi, C. K.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an improved differential evolution to solve non-smooth non-convex combined heat and power economic dispatch (CHPED) problem. Valve-point loading and prohibited operating zones of conventional thermal generators are taken into account. Differential evolution (DE) exploits the differences of randomly sampled pairs of objective vectors for its mutation process. Consequently the variation between vectors will outfit the objective function toward the optimization process and therefore provides efficient global optimization capability. However, although DE is shown to be precise, fast as well as robust, its search efficiency will be impaired during solution process with fast descending diversity of population. This paper proposes Gaussian random variable instead of scaling factor which improves search efficiency. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been verified on four test systems. The results of the proposed approach are compared with those obtained by other evolutionary methods. It is found that the proposed improved differential evolution based approach is able to provide better solution.

  10. Study on heat transfer rate of an osmotic heat pipe. 3rd Report. Estimation of heat transport limits; Shinto heat pipe no netsuyuso ni kansuru kenkyu. 3. Netsuyuso genkai no yosoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipposhi, S.; Imura, H. [Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Konya, K. [Oji Paper Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yamamura, H. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1998-07-25

    This paper describes an experimental and theoretical study on the heat transport limits of an osmotic heat pipe operated under the atmospheric pressure, using aqueous polyethylene glycol 600 solution (0.1 - 1.0 kmol/m{sup 3}) as the working fluid and 18 tubular-type acetyl cellulose osmotic membranes. As a result, the correlation between the heat transport rate and the osmotic area was revealed, and the effects of the physical properties of the solution and the geometry (i.e. inside diameters of the flow lines, etc.) of the osmotic heat pipe on the heat transport rate were theoretically investigated. Also, the heat transport rate of the present osmotic heat pipe is about 85% compared with that under such an ideal condition that the solution of the average concentration is assumed to be filled in the solution loop. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Estimation of shutdown heat generation rates in GHARR-1 due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fission products decay power and residual fission power generated after shutdown of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) by reactivity insertion accident were estimated by solution of the decay and residual heat equations. A Matlab program code was developed to simulate the heat generation rates by fission product ...

  12. Approximate Method of Calculating Heating Rates at General Three-Dimensional Stagnation Points During Atmospheric Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, H. H., II

    1982-01-01

    An approximate method for calculating heating rates at general three dimensional stagnation points is presented. The application of the method for making stagnation point heating calculations during atmospheric entry is described. Comparisons with results from boundary layer calculations indicate that the method should provide an accurate method for engineering type design and analysis applications.

  13. Improving Heat Health Resilience through Urban Infrastructure Planning and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    This webinar will explore ways in which public health and environmental agencies can collaborate to reduce the heat island effect, increase resilience to extreme heat events, and help each other further their respective missions.

  14. Heated humidification improves clinical outcomes, compared to a heat and moisture exchanger in children with tracheostomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, David G; Asher, M Innes; Rubin, Bruce K; Stewart, Alistair; Byrnes, Catherine A

    2014-01-01

    The upper airway humidifies and warms inspired gases before they reach the trachea, a process bypassed by the insertion of a tracheostomy, necessitating humidification of inspired gases. The optimal method of humidification is not known. We conducted a short-term 20-hour study and a long-term 10-week randomized crossover study comparing a heated humidifier (HH) to a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) in children with established tracheostomies. Subjects were assessed for clinical events, clinical examination findings, airway cytokine levels, and airway secretion viscoelasticity. For the short-term study, 15 children were recruited; for the long-term study, 14 children were recruited. Children using the HH had decreased respiratory examination score (P < .001) but no change in clinical events over the short term. There was a decrease in acute clinical events (P = .008) in the long-term study. No differences were found in airway secretion viscoelasticity results or cytokine levels in either study, but these sample numbers were limited. Over 20 hours use, HH, compared to HME, improved work of breathing. Over a longer 10 week treatment period HH resulted in decreased adverse clinical events.

  15. Average Rate of Heat-Related Hospitalizations in 23 States, 2001-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This map shows the 2001–2010 average rate of hospitalizations classified as “heat-related” by medical professionals in 23 states that participate in CDC’s...

  16. Effects of heat input rates on T-1 and T-1A steel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. A.; Olsen, M. G.; Worden, S. W.

    1967-01-01

    Technology of T-1 and T-1A steels is emphasized in investigation of their weld-fabrication. Welding heat input rate, production weldment circumstances, and standards of welding control are considered.

  17. An analysis of representative heating load lines for residential HSPF ratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, C. Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shen, Bo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shrestha, Som S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report describes an analysis to investigate representative heating loads for single-family detached homes using current EnergyPlus simulations (DOE 2014a). Hourly delivered load results are used to determine binned load lines using US Department of Energy (DOE) residential prototype building models (DOE 2014b) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The selected residential single-family prototype buildings are based on the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC 2006) in the DOE climate regions. The resulting load lines are compared with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) Standard 210/240 (AHRI 2008) minimum and maximum design heating requirement (DHR) load lines of the heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF) ratings procedure for each region. The results indicate that a heating load line closer to the maximum DHR load line, and with a lower zero load ambient temperature, is more representative of heating loads predicted for EnergyPlus prototype residential buildings than the minimum DHR load line presently used to determine HSPF ratings. An alternative heating load line equation was developed and compared to binned load lines obtained from the EnergyPlus simulation results. The effect on HSPF of the alternative heating load line was evaluated for single-speed and two-capacity heat pumps, and an average HSPF reduction of 16% was found. The alternative heating load line relationship is tied to the rated cooling capacity of the heat pump based on EnergyPlus autosizing, which is more representative of the house load characteristics than the rated heating capacity. The alternative heating load line equation was found to be independent of climate for the six DOE climate regions investigated, provided an adjustable zero load ambient temperature is used. For Region IV, the default DOE climate region used for HSPF ratings, the higher load line results in an ~28

  18. Improving heating uniformity of pathological tissue specimens inside a domestic microwave oven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Osama A; Kandil, Ahmed H; El Bialy, Ahmed M; Hassaballa, Iman A

    2013-01-01

    A 3D coupled electromagnetic thermal model was developed using COMSOL 4.0 to predict the electromagnetic field distribution and temperature profile in pathological tissue samples immersed in a reagent inside the oven cavity. The effect of the volume of reagent on the mean heating rate and heating uniformity within the tissue sample was investigated. Also, the effect of using a water load, as a method of temperature control, is emphasized. A well insulated K type thermocouple connected to a PC is used for model validation. Good agreement is found between experimental and simulated temperature profiles. Results show that as the volume of reagent increases, the mean heating rate decreases and temperature homogeneity increases. Also, it is possible to minimize overshooting temperature values inside the tissue sample and enhance tissue uniformity by about 27% using 100 ml of water load and 42.26% using 150 ml. Domestic microwave oven is a low cost economical tool that can speed up tissue processing steps. Achieving uniform heating inside the microwave oven is the key factor for improving workflow inside pathological labs and maintaining tissue quality and integrity.

  19. Mounting improves heat-sink contact with beryllia washer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    To conduct heat away from electrical components that must be electrically insulated from a metal heat sink, a metal washer and a coil spring are placed between one end of the electrical component and the beryllia washer mounted on the heat sink. The thermal paths are formed by the component lead and base, the metal and beryllia washers, and the compressed spring.

  20. Quality Rating and Improvement System State Evaluations and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A quality rating and improvement system (QRIS) is a method used by states and local jurisdictions to assess the level of quality of child care and early education programs, improve quality, and convey quality ratings to parents and other consumers. A typical QRIS incorporates the following components: quality standards for participating providers;…

  1. Changes in heart rate variability during the induction and decay of heat acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouris, Andreas D; Poirier, Martin P; Bravi, Andrea; Wright-Beatty, Heather E; Herry, Christophe; Seely, Andrew J; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the changes in core temperature, heart rate, and heart rate variability (HRV) during the induction and decay of heat acclimation. Ten males (23 ± 3 years; 79.5 ± 3.5 kg; 15.2 ± 4.5 percent body fat; 51.13 ± 4.61 mLO(2)∙kg(-1)∙min(-1) peak oxygen uptake) underwent a 14-day heat acclimation protocol comprising of 90-min cycling at ~50 % peak oxygen uptake at 40 °C and ~20 % relative humidity. Core temperature, heart rate, and 102 HRV measures were recorded during a heat tolerance test conducted at baseline (day 0) and at the end of the induction (day 14) and decay (day 28) phases. Heat acclimation resulted in significantly reduced core temperature [rectal (χ (2) = 1298.14, p rate (χ (2) = 1230.17, p heat acclimation-induced reductions in rectal temperature, esophageal temperature, and heart rate, respectively, were lost. Heat acclimation was accompanied by profound and broad changes in HRV: at the end of the induction phase, 75 of the 102 variability measures computed were significantly different (p Heat acclimation is accompanied by reduced core temperature, significant bradycardia, and marked alterations in HRV, which we interpret as being related to vagal dominance. The observed changes in core temperature persist for at least 2 weeks of non-exposure to heat, while the changes in heart rate and HRV decay faster and are only partly evident after 2 weeks of non-exposure to heat.

  2. Dilatometric and hardness analysis of C45 steel tempering with different heating-up rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kulawik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of technological processes of heat treatment or welding, involving multiple heat source transitions, requires considering the phenomenon of tempering. In work have been presented results of dilatometric research of hardened C45 steel subjected to tempering. The analysis of the influence of heating rate at the kinetic determined from dilatometric curves has been made. There have also been estimated quantities of transformation expansions and thermal expansion coefficients of hardening and tempering structures (austenite, ferrite, pearlite, martensite and sorbite. The analysis of tempering time influence on the hardness of tempered steel has been made. Functions associating hardness with tempering time (rate of heating-up in technological processes based on short-timed action of a heat source (eg. laser treatment have been suggested.

  3. IMPROVED MANUFACTURING CANNED "COMPOTE CHERRY" USING COMBINED HEAT TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Demirova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the development of new modes of heat sterilization compote cherry using stepwise heating in a stream of hot air and hot water dushevaniem air cooled rotating container. Revealed that the modes provide commercial sterility of finished products, reducing the length of the heat treatment and the quality of the finished product. Are some of the modes of heat sterilization step of cherry compote in a stream of heated air and water dushevaniem air-cooled rotating container.

  4. Effects of particle size and heating rate on swelling characteristics of a bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, D.; Xu, M.; Liu, X.; Wang, Q.; Gao, X. [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2006-02-15

    A size-classified bituminous coal was pyrolyzed in a laboratory drop tube furnace at different heating rates. The effects of coal particle size and heating rate on particle swelling properties were investigated. The results show that coal particles undergo obvious swelling during pyrolysis, leading to the formation of a large number of char cenospheres with a large central void surrounded by a thin shell. Analyses indicate this is caused by high concentrations of vitrinite present in coal samples. At the same heating rate, the extent of swelling increases with deceasing particle size and the difference in swelling decreases with increasing particle size. Since finer coal samples contain higher content of vitrinite, the observed phenomena are considered to be the result of the different content of vitrinite in these samples. The reason is that coal particles containing more vitrinite early undergo a softening and deformation stage and swell significantly during pyrolysis. When the heating rate increases the swelling of coal particle sin the same size range firstly increases and then decreases, which implies that an optimum heating rate at which coal particles swell most must exist. Reasonable explanation for this effect of heating rate on particle swelling are provided in the present study. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Modeling the influence of potassium content and heating rate on biomass pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Surup, Gerrit; Shapiro, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    . The shrinking particle model considers internal and external heat transfer limitations and incorporates catalytic effects of potassium on the product yields. Modeling parameters were tuned with experimentally determined char yields at high heating rates (>200 K s−1) using a wire mesh reactor, a single particle...... burner, and a drop tube reactor. The experimental data demonstrated that heating rate and potassium content have significant effects on the char yield. The importance of shrinkage on the devolatilization time becomes greater with increasing particle size, but showed little influence on the char yields....

  6. Solid motor aft closure insulation erosion. [heat flux correlation for rate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfl, E.; Landsbaum, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    The erosion rate of aft closure insulation in a number of large solid propellant motors was empirically analyzed by correlating the average ablation rate with a number of variables that had previously been demonstrated to affect heat flux. The main correlating parameter was a heat flux based on the simplified Bartz heat transfer coefficient corrected for two-dimensional effects. A multiplying group contained terms related to port-to-throat ratio, local wall angle, grain geometry and nozzle cant angle. The resulting equation gave a good correlation and is a useful design tool.

  7. Measurement of Ion Motional Heating Rates over a Range of Trap Frequencies and Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzewicz, C D; Chiaverini, J

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the motional heating rate of a trapped ion at different trap frequencies and temperatures between $\\sim$0.6 and 1.5 MHz and $\\sim$4 and 295 K. Additionally, we examine the possible effect of adsorbed surface contaminants with boiling points below $\\sim$105$^{\\circ}$C by measuring the ion heating rate before and after locally baking our ion trap chip under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. We compare the heating rates presented here to those calculated from available electric-field noise models. We can tightly constrain a subset of these models based on their expected frequency and temperature scaling interdependence. Discrepancies between the measured results and predicted values point to the need for refinement of theoretical noise models in order to more fully understand the mechanisms behind motional trapped-ion heating.

  8. Parameter study of r-process lanthanide production and heating rates in kilonovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.

    2015-04-01

    Explosive r-process nucleosynthesis in material ejected during compact object mergers may lead to radioactively powered transients called kilonovae. The timescale and peak luminosity of these transients are sensitive to the composition of the material after nuclear burning ceases, as the composition determines the local heating rate from nuclear decays and the opacity. The presence of lanthanides in the ejecta can drastically increase the opacity. We use the new general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet to run a parameter study of r-process nucleosynthesis for a range of initial electron fractions Ye, initial entropies s, and density decay timescales τ. We find that the ejecta is lanthanide-free for Ye >~ 0 . 22 - 0 . 3 , depending on s and τ. The heating rate is insensitive to s and τ, but certain, larger values of Ye lead to reduced heating rates, because single nuclides dominate the heating. With a simple model we estimate the luminosity, time, and effective temperature at the peak of the light curve. Since the opacity is much lower in the lanthanide-free case, we find the luminosity peaks much earlier at ~ 1 day vs. ~ 15 days in the lanthanide-rich cases. Although there is significant variation in the heating rate with Ye, changes in the heating rate do not mitigate the effect of the lanthanides. This research is partially supported by NSF under Award Numbers AST-1333520 and AST-1205732.

  9. The heating rate in the tropical tropopause region; Die Erwaermungsrate in der tropischen Tropopausenregion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, Ulrich

    2010-07-01

    The major part of the movement of air masses from the troposphere to the stratosphere takes place in the tropics. The conveyed air mass is transported with the Brewer-Dobson circulation poleward and therefore influences the global stratospheric composition. An important cause variable for the transport of air through the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is the radiative heating, which is investigated in this work. The influence of trace gases, temperature, and cloudiness on the heating rate is quantified, especially the effect of the overlap of several cloud layers is discussed. The heating rate in the tropics is simulated for one year. Regional differences of the heating rate profile appear between convective and stably stratified regions. By means of trace gas concentrations, temperature, and heating rates it is determined that an enhanced transport of air through the TTL took place between January and April 2007. The comparison with previous works shows that accurate input data sets of trace gases, temperature, and cloudiness and exact methods for the simulation of the radiative transfer are indispensable for modeling of the heating rate with the required accuracy. (orig.)

  10. Melting and crystallization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate: effect of heating/cooling rates on phase transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Maria Ramos Wellen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe studied the crystallization and melting phenomena of poly (3- hydroxybutyrate (PHB, a biodegradable and biocompatible semi-crystalline thermoplastic, obtained from renewable resources. Its high crystallinity motivated several studies on crystallization and melting behavior, and also on ways to increase the amorphous polymer fraction. The effect of heating and cooling rates on the crystallization and melting of commercial PHB was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. Several rates, ranging from 2.5 to 20 °C min–1, were used to study the phase changes during heating/cooling/reheating cycles. The results showed that PHB partially crystallizes from the melt during the cooling cycle and partially cold crystallizes on reheating, and that the relative amount of polymer crystallizing in each stage strongly depends on the cooling rate. The melt and cold crystallization temperatures, as well as the rates of phase change, depend strongly on the cooling and heating rates.

  11. Influence of heat transfer rates on pressurization of liquid/slush hydrogen propellant tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmal, G. P.; Hochstein, J. I.; Hardy, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    A multi-dimensional computational model of the pressurization process in liquid/slush hydrogen tank is developed and used to study the influence of heat flux rates at the ullage boundaries on the process. The new model computes these rates and performs an energy balance for the tank wall whereas previous multi-dimensional models required a priori specification of the boundary heat flux rates. Analyses of both liquid hydrogen and slush hydrogen pressurization were performed to expose differences between the two processes. Graphical displays are presented to establish the dependence of pressurization time, pressurant mass required, and other parameters of interest on ullage boundary heat flux rates and pressurant mass flow rate. Detailed velocity fields and temperature distributions are presented for selected cases to further illuminate the details of the pressurization process. It is demonstrated that ullage boundary heat flux rates do significantly effect the pressurization process and that minimizing heat loss from the ullage and maximizing pressurant flow rate minimizes the mass of pressurant gas required to pressurize the tank. It is further demonstrated that proper dimensionless scaling of pressure and time permit all the pressure histories examined during this study to be displayed as a single curve.

  12. Improvement of heat transfer by means of ultrasound: Application to a double-tube heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legay, M; Simony, B; Boldo, P; Gondrexon, N; Le Person, S; Bontemps, A

    2012-11-01

    A new kind of ultrasonically-assisted heat exchanger has been designed, built and studied. It can be seen as a vibrating heat exchanger. A comprehensive description of the overall experimental set-up is provided, i.e. of the test rig and the acquisition system. Data acquisition and processing are explained step-by-step with a detailed example of graph obtained and how, from these experimental data, energy balance is calculated on the heat exchanger. It is demonstrated that ultrasound can be used efficiently as a heat transfer enhancement technique, even in such complex systems as heat exchangers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Isothermal calorimeter for measurements of time-dependent heat generation rate in individual supercapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteshari, Obaidallah; Lau, Jonathan; Krishnan, Atindra; Dunn, Bruce; Pilon, Laurent

    2018-01-01

    Heat generation in electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) may lead to temperature rise and reduce their lifetime and performance. This study aims to measure the time-dependent heat generation rate in individual carbon electrode of EDLCs under various charging conditions. First, the design, fabrication, and validation of an isothermal calorimeter are presented. The calorimeter consisted of two thermoelectric heat flux sensors connected to a data acquisition system, two identical and cold plates fed with a circulating coolant, and an electrochemical test section connected to a potentiostat/galvanostat system. The EDLC cells consisted of two identical activated carbon electrodes and a separator immersed in an electrolyte. Measurements were performed on three cells with different electrolytes under galvanostatic cycling for different current density and polarity. The measured time-averaged irreversible heat generation rate was in excellent agreement with predictions for Joule heating. The reversible heat generation rate in the positive electrode was exothermic during charging and endothermic during discharging. By contrast, the negative electrode featured both exothermic and endothermic heat generation during both charging and discharging. The results of this study can be used to validate existing thermal models, to develop thermal management strategies, and to gain insight into physicochemical phenomena taking place during operation.

  14. Heat dissipation of high rate Li-SOCl sub 2 primary cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. I.; Halpert, G.; Deligiannis, E.

    1986-01-01

    The heat dissipation problem occurring in the lithium thionyl chloride cells discharged at relatively high rates under normal discharge conditions is examined. Four heat flow paths were identified, and the thermal resistances of the relating cell components along each flow path were accordingly calculated. From the thermal resistance network analysis, it was demonstrated that about 90 percent of the total heat produced within the cell should be dissipated along the radial direction in a spirally wound cell. In addition, the threshold value of the heat generation rate at which cell internal temperature could be maintained below 100 C, was calculated from total thermal resistance and found to be 2.9 W. However, these calculations were made only at the cell components' level, and the transient nature of the heat accumulation and dissipation was not considered. A simple transient model based on the lumped-heat-capacity concept was developed to predict the time-dependent cell temperature at different discharge rates. The overall objective was to examine the influence of cell design variable from the heat removal point of view under normal discharge conditions and to make recommendations to build more efficient lithium cells.

  15. Liquid-Infused Smooth Surface for Improved Condensation Heat Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Hirotaka; Tenjimbayashi, Mizuki; Moriya, Takeo; Yoshikawa, Ryohei; Sasaki, Kaichi; Togasawa, Ryo; Yamazaki, Taku; Manabe, Kengo; Shiratori, Seimei

    2017-09-12

    Control of vapor condensation properties is a promising approach to manage a crucial part of energy infrastructure conditions. Heat transfer by vapor condensation on superhydrophobic coatings has garnered attention, because dropwise condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces with rough structures leads to favorable heat-transfer performance. However, pinned condensed water droplets within the rough structure and a high thermodynamic energy barrier for nucleation of superhydrophobic surfaces limit their heat-transfer increase. Recently, slippery liquid-infused surfaces (SLIPS) have been investigated, because of their high water sliding ability and surface smoothness originating from the liquid layer. However, even on SLIPS, condensed water droplets are eventually pinned to degrade their heat-transfer properties after extended use, because the rough base layer is exposed as infused liquid is lost. Herein, we report a liquid-infused smooth surface named "SPLASH" (surface with π electron interaction liquid adsorption, smoothness, and hydrophobicity) to overcome the problems derived from the rough structures in previous approaches to obtain stable, high heat-transfer performance. The SPLASH displayed a maximum condensation heat-transfer coefficient that was 175% higher than that of an uncoated substrate. The SPLASH also showed higher heat-transfer performance and more stable dropwise condensation than superhydrophobic surfaces and SLIPS from the viewpoints of condensed water droplet mobility and the thermodynamic energy barrier for nucleation. The effects of liquid-infused surface roughness and liquid viscosity on condensation heat transfer were investigated to compare heat-transfer performance. This research will aid industrial applications using vapor condensation.

  16. Heating capabilities of the Hotline and Autoline at low flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoor, Joerg; Weber, Ingo; Macko, Stephan; Heussen, Nicole; Rossaint, Rolf

    2006-04-01

    At low flow rates, fluid warmers using coaxial warming tubes are superior in preventing heat loss. This laboratory investigation was performed in order to compare the heating capabilities of two coaxial fluid warmers. The Hotline and the Autoline were investigated by using normal saline at various flow rates (10-99 ml x h(-1)). Final infusion temperatures were measured six times in a row at the end of the tubing by using a rapid-response thermometer. Final temperatures were compared with those of infusions, which passed through disposable i.v. tubing covered and warmed using an 'off label' convective air warming system (WarmTouch). Measurements were performed at two different room temperatures (20 and 24 degrees C). Each group was analyzed with respect to differences between various flow rates as well as differences between the groups at comparable flow rates by using a three-way anova with multiple comparisons according to Tukey's procedure. Significance was defined at P flow rates efficiently above 34 degrees C, with the Hotline being more effective than the Autoline (P flow rates (10-60 and 80 ml x h(-1)), the Autoline demonstrated lower infusion temperatures throughout elevated room temperature at flow rates between 20 and 90 ml x h(-1). Both devices heated infusions more efficiently compared with 'off label used' convective air warmer (each with P flow rates. However, the heating capability of the Hotline was superior and can further be increased at low flow rates by increasing the room temperature.

  17. Short-Term, Low-Volume Training Improves Heat Acclimatization in an Operational Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyne Charlot

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Personnel who travel to areas with a hot climate (WBGT > 27°C may suffer from the heat (physiological strain, thermal discomfort, increased probability of heat illness, making them partially or fully inoperative. Performing physical activities during heat acclimatization is known to improve this process (i.e., improve measures of acclimatization for the same duration of acclimation. However, it is unknown whether such training would be efficient in an operative context, characterized by a high volume of work-related physical activity. Thirty French soldiers (Training group, T performed a short (5 days, progressive, moderate (from three to five 8-min running sets at 50% of the speed at VO2max for 32–56 min aerobic training program upon arriving at their base in United Arab Emirates (~40°C and 12% RH. A control group (30 soldiers; No Training, NT continued to perform their usual outdoor military activities (~6 h.d−1. A field heat stress test (HST; three 8-min running sets at 50% of the speed at VO2max was performed, before and after the heat acclimatization period, to assess physiological and subjective changes. Rectal temperature, heart rate (HR, thermal discomfort at rest and at the end of exercise, rates of perceived exertion (RPE, and sweat loss and osmolality decreased following heat acclimatization in both groups. However, the decreases in the T group were larger than those in the NT group for HR at the end of exercise (−20 ± 13 vs. −13 ± 6 bpm, respectively, p = 0.044, thermal discomfort at rest (−2.6 ± 2.7 vs. −1.4 ± 2.1 cm, respectively, p = 0.013 and at the end of exercise (−2.6 ± 1.9 vs. −1.6 ± 1.7 cm, respectively, p = 0.037 and RPE (−2.3 ± 1.8 vs. −1.3 ± 1.7, respectively, p = 0.035. Thus, we showed that adding short (<60 min, daily, moderate-intensity training sessions during a professional mission in a hot and dry environment accelerated several heat-acclimatization-induced changes at rest and during

  18. Short-Term, Low-Volume Training Improves Heat Acclimatization in an Operational Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlot, Keyne; Tardo-Dino, Pierre-Emmanuel; Buchet, Jean-François; Koulmann, Nathalie; Bourdon, Stéphanie; Lepetit, Benoit; Roslonski, Martin; Jousseaume, Loïc; Malgoyre, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Personnel who travel to areas with a hot climate (WBGT > 27°C) may suffer from the heat (physiological strain, thermal discomfort, increased probability of heat illness), making them partially or fully inoperative. Performing physical activities during heat acclimatization is known to improve this process (i.e., improve measures of acclimatization for the same duration of acclimation). However, it is unknown whether such training would be efficient in an operative context, characterized by a high volume of work-related physical activity. Thirty French soldiers (Training group, T) performed a short (5 days), progressive, moderate (from three to five 8-min running sets at 50% of the speed at VO2max for 32-56 min) aerobic training program upon arriving at their base in United Arab Emirates (~40°C and 12% RH). A control group (30 soldiers; No Training, NT) continued to perform their usual outdoor military activities (~6 h.d-1). A field heat stress test (HST; three 8-min running sets at 50% of the speed at VO2max) was performed, before and after the heat acclimatization period, to assess physiological and subjective changes. Rectal temperature, heart rate (HR), thermal discomfort at rest and at the end of exercise, rates of perceived exertion (RPE), and sweat loss and osmolality decreased following heat acclimatization in both groups. However, the decreases in the T group were larger than those in the NT group for HR at the end of exercise (-20 ± 13 vs. -13 ± 6 bpm, respectively, p = 0.044), thermal discomfort at rest (-2.6 ± 2.7 vs. -1.4 ± 2.1 cm, respectively, p = 0.013) and at the end of exercise (-2.6 ± 1.9 vs. -1.6 ± 1.7 cm, respectively, p = 0.037) and RPE (-2.3 ± 1.8 vs. -1.3 ± 1.7, respectively, p = 0.035). Thus, we showed that adding short (<60 min), daily, moderate-intensity training sessions during a professional mission in a hot and dry environment accelerated several heat-acclimatization-induced changes at rest and during exercise in only 5 days.

  19. A simple parameterization for the height of maximum ozone heating rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Can; Li, Jiangnan; Liu, Renqiang; Liu, Cuiping

    2017-12-01

    It is well-known that the height of the maximum ozone heating rate is much higher than the height of the maximum ozone concentration in the stratosphere. However, it lacks an analytical expression to explain it. A simple theoretical model has been proposed to calculate the height of maximum ozone heating rate and further understand this phenomenon. Strong absorption of ozone causes the incoming solar flux to be largely attenuated before reaching the location of the maximum ozone concentration. By comparing with the exact radiative transfer calculations, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate produced by the theoretical model are generally very close to the true values. When the cosine of solar zenith angle μ0 = 1.0 , in US Standard atmosphere, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate by the theoretical model are 41.4 km in the band 0.204-0.233 μm, 47.9 km in the band 0.233-0.270 μm, 44.5 km in the band 0.270-0.286 μm, 37.1 km in the band 0.286-0.303 μm, and 30.2 km in the band 0.303-0.323 μm, respectively. The location of the maximum ozone heating rate is sensitive to the solar spectral range. In band 1, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate by the theoretical model are 52.3 km for μ0 = 0.1 , 47.1 km for μ0 = 0.3 , 44.6 km for μ0 = 0.5 , 43.1 km for μ0 = 0.7 , 41.9 km for μ0 = 0.9 , 41.4 km for μ0 = 1.0 in US Standard atmosphere, respectively. This model also illustrates that the location of the maximum ozone heating rate is sensitive to the solar zenith angle.

  20. The Effect of Heat Treatments and Coatings on the Outgassing Rate of Stainless Steel Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamum, Md Abdullah A. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A, [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Stutzman, Marcy L. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Adderley, Philip A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Poelker, Matthew [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 deg C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 deg C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 deg C heat treatment (3.5 x 10{sup 12} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7 x 10{ sup -13} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel. An evaluation of coating composition suggests the presence of elemental titanium which could provide pumping and lead to an artificially low outgassing rate. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

  1. Assessment of CFD Hypersonic Turbulent Heating Rates for Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William A.; Oliver, A. Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent CFD codes are assessed for the prediction of convective heat transfer rates at turbulent, hypersonic conditions. Algebraic turbulence models are used within the DPLR and LAURA CFD codes. The benchmark heat transfer rates are derived from thermocouple measurements of the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery windward tiles during the STS-119 and STS-128 entries. The thermocouples were located underneath the reaction-cured glass coating on the thermal protection tiles. Boundary layer transition flight experiments conducted during both of those entries promoted turbulent flow at unusually high Mach numbers, with the present analysis considering Mach 10{15. Similar prior comparisons of CFD predictions directly to the flight temperature measurements were unsatisfactory, showing diverging trends between prediction and measurement for Mach numbers greater than 11. In the prior work, surface temperatures and convective heat transfer rates had been assumed to be in radiative equilibrium. The present work employs a one-dimensional time-accurate conduction analysis to relate measured temperatures to surface heat transfer rates, removing heat soak lag from the flight data, in order to better assess the predictive accuracy of the numerical models. The turbulent CFD shows good agreement for turbulent fuselage flow up to Mach 13. But on the wing in the wake of the boundary layer trip, the inclusion of tile conduction effects does not explain the prior observed discrepancy in trends between simulation and experiment; the flight heat transfer measurements are roughly constant over Mach 11-15, versus an increasing trend with Mach number from the CFD.

  2. Improving the engineering strength of heat strengthened glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, YM

    2016-01-01

    Although glass is increasingly used as a structural material, glass is not produced to strength standards, like steel and concrete. Of the three types of glass: annealed, heat strengthened and fully tempered, only heat strengthened glass has the properties to function as a safe structural material.

  3. Improving Heat Transfer Performance of Printed Circuit Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzel, Donald V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will explore the ability of printed circuit boards laminated with a Carbon Core Laminate to transfer heat vs. standard printed circuit boards that use only thick layers of copper. The paper will compare the differences in heat transfer performance of printed circuit boards with and without CCL.

  4. THE EFFECT OF WATER CONTENT UPON THE RATE OF HEAT DENATURATION OF CRYSTALLIZABLE EGG ALBUMIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, H A

    1933-09-20

    1. The denaturation rate of partially dried crystallizable egg albumin is greatly decreased by decreasing its water content. 2. The temperature of denaturation, defined as the temperature at which half of the protein becomes insoluble in distilled water after a definite time of heating, is a linear function of the relative humidity with which the protein is in equilibrium. 3. By applying the Arrhenius equation it is shown that the rate of heat denaturation at a given temperature is an exponential function of the relative humidity. 4. The application of the observed relations to the analysis of the mechanism of thermal death of microorganisms is suggested. 5. The water content of native and heat-denatured egg albumin is determined as a function of the relative humidity of water vapor. It is shown that the heat-denatured modification takes up approximately 80 per cent as much water at all relative humidities as does native egg albumin.

  5. Pyrolysis polygeneration of poplar wood: Effect of heating rate and pyrolysis temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyu; Li, Yanjun; Cen, Kehui; Luo, Min; Li, Hongyan; Lu, Bin

    2016-10-01

    The pyrolysis of poplar wood were comprehensively investigated at different pyrolysis temperatures (400, 450, 500, 550, and 600°C) and at different heating rates (10, 30, and 50°C/min). The results showed that BET surface area of biochar, the HHV of non-condensable gas and bio-oil reached the maximum values of 411.06m(2)/g, 14.56MJ/m(3), and 14.39MJ/kg, under the condition of 600°C and 30°C/min, 600°C and 50°C/min, and 550°C and 50°C/min, respectively. It was conducive to obtain high mass and energy yield of bio-oil at 500°C and higher heating rate, while lower pyrolysis temperature and heating rate contributed towards obtaining both higher mass yield and energy yield of biochar. However, higher pyrolysis temperature and heating rate contributed to obtain both higher mass yield and energy yield of the non-condensable gas. In general, compared to the heating rate, the pyrolysis temperature had more effect on the product properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Baroreceptor unloading does not limit forearm sweat rate during severe passive heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlader, Zachary J; Gagnon, Daniel; Lucas, Rebekah A I; Pearson, James; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-02-15

    This study tested the hypothesis that sweat rate during passive heat stress is limited by baroreceptor unloading associated with heat stress. Two protocols were performed in which healthy subjects underwent passive heat stress that elicited an increase in intestinal temperature of ∼1.8°C. Upon attaining this level of hyperthermia, in protocol 1 (n = 10, 3 females) a bolus (19 ml/kg) of warm (∼38°C) isotonic saline was rapidly (5-10 min) infused intravenously to elevate central venous pressure (CVP), while in protocol 2 (n = 11, 5 females) phenylephrine was infused intravenously (60-120 μg/min) to return mean arterial pressure (MAP) to normothermic levels. In protocol 1, heat stress reduced CVP from 3.9 ± 1.9 mmHg (normothermia) to -0.6 ± 1.4 mmHg (P 0.999). Sweat rate was elevated by heat stress (1.21 ± 0.44 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)) but remained unchanged during rapid saline infusion (1.26 ± 0.47 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P = 0.5), whereas cutaneous vascular conductance increased from 77 ± 10 to 101 ± 20% of local heating max (P = 0.029). In protocol 2, MAP was reduced with heat stress from 85 ± 7 mmHg to 76 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.048). Although phenylephrine infusion returned MAP to normothermic levels (88 ± 7 mmHg; P > 0.999), sweat rate remained unchanged during phenylephrine infusion (1.39 ± 0.22 vs. 1.41 ± 0.24 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1); P > 0.999). These data indicate that both cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptor unloading do not limit increases in sweat rate during passive heat stress. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Heat transfer enhancement in a lithium-ion cell through improved material-level thermal transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishwakarma, Vivek [University of Texas at Arlington; Waghela, Chirag [University of Texas at Arlington; Wei, Zi [University of Texas at Arlington; Prasher, Ravi [University of Texas at Arlington; Nagpure, Shrikant C [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL; Liu, Fuqiang [University of Texas at Arlington; Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Jain, Ankur [University of Texas at Arlington

    2016-09-25

    We report that while Li-ion cells offer excellent electrochemical performance for several applications including electric vehicles, they also exhibit poor thermal transport characteristics, resulting in reduced performance, overheating and thermal runaway. Inadequate heat removal from Li-ion cells originates from poor thermal conductivity within the cell. This paper identifies the rate-limiting material-level process that dominates overall thermal conduction in a Li-ion cell. Results indicate that thermal characteristics of a Li-ion cell are largely dominated by heat transfer across the cathode-separator interface rather than heat transfer through the materials themselves. This interfacial thermal resistance contributes around 88% of total thermal resistance in the cell. Measured value of interfacial resistance is close to that obtained from theoretical models that account for weak adhesion and large acoustic mismatch between cathode and separator. Further, to address this problem, an amine-based chemical bridging of the interface is carried out. This is shown to result in in four-times lower interfacial thermal resistance without deterioration in electrochemical performance, thereby increasing effective thermal conductivity by three-fold. This improvement is expected to reduce peak temperature rise during operation by 60%. Finally, by identifying and addressing the material-level root cause of poor thermal transport in Li-ion cells, this work may contribute towards improved thermal performance of Li-ion cells.

  8. Heat transfer enhancement in a lithium-ion cell through improved material-level thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Vivek; Waghela, Chirag; Wei, Zi; Prasher, Ravi; Nagpure, Shrikant C.; Li, Jianlin; Liu, Fuqiang; Daniel, Claus; Jain, Ankur

    2015-12-01

    While Li-ion cells offer excellent electrochemical performance for several applications including electric vehicles, they also exhibit poor thermal transport characteristics, resulting in reduced performance, overheating and thermal runaway. Inadequate heat removal from Li-ion cells originates from poor thermal conductivity within the cell. This paper identifies the rate-limiting material-level process that dominates overall thermal conduction in a Li-ion cell. Results indicate that thermal characteristics of a Li-ion cell are largely dominated by heat transfer across the cathode-separator interface rather than heat transfer through the materials themselves. This interfacial thermal resistance contributes around 88% of total thermal resistance in the cell. Measured value of interfacial resistance is close to that obtained from theoretical models that account for weak adhesion and large acoustic mismatch between cathode and separator. Further, to address this problem, an amine-based chemical bridging of the interface is carried out. This is shown to result in in four-times lower interfacial thermal resistance without deterioration in electrochemical performance, thereby increasing effective thermal conductivity by three-fold. This improvement is expected to reduce peak temperature rise during operation by 60%. By identifying and addressing the material-level root cause of poor thermal transport in Li-ion cells, this work may contributes towards improved thermal performance of Li-ion cells.

  9. Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat Transfer Rate Using a Thin-Skin Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the design and use of a thin metallic calorimeter for measuring heat transfer rate (also called heat flux). Thermocouples are attached to the unexposed surface of the calorimeter. A one-dimensional heat flow analysis is used for calculating the heat transfer rate from the temperature measurements. Applications include aerodynamic heating, laser and radiation power measurements, and fire safety testing. 1.2 Advantages 1.2.1 Simplicity of ConstructionThe calorimeter may be constructed from a number of materials. The size and shape can often be made to match the actual application. Thermocouples may be attached to the metal by spot, electron beam, or laser welding. 1.2.2 Heat transfer rate distributions may be obtained if metals with low thermal conductivity, such as some stainless steels, are used. 1.2.3 The calorimeters can be fabricated with smooth surfaces, without insulators or plugs and the attendant temperature discontinuities, to provide more realistic flow conditions for ...

  10. Improving Completion Rates in Adult Education through Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Mariager-Anderson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Dropout is a serious problem within education. This article reports on an intervention project, titled "New Roles for the Teacher--Increased Completion Rates Through Social Responsibility," which sought to reduce nonattendance and drop-out rates in the Danish adult educational system by improving teachers' competences. This goal was…

  11. Various methods to improve heat transfer in exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, Zitek; Vaclav, Valenta

    2015-05-01

    The University of West Bohemia in Pilsen (Department of Power System Engineering) is working on the selection of effective heat exchangers. Conventional shell and tube heat exchangers use simple segmental baffles. It can be replaced by helical baffles, which increase the heat transfer efficiency and reduce pressure losses. Their usage is demonstrated in the primary circuit of IV. generation MSR (Molten Salt Reactors). For high-temperature reactors we consider the use of compact desk heat exchangers, which are small, which allows the integral configuration of reactor. We design them from graphite composites, which allow up to 1000°C and are usable as exchangers: salt-salt or salt-acid (e.g. for the hydrogen production). In the paper there are shown thermo-physical properties of salts, material properties and principles of calculations.

  12. Assembly of opto-electronic module with improved heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Benson; Fortier, Paul Francis; Freitag, Ladd William; Galli, Gary T.; Guindon, Francois; Johnson, Glen Walden; Letourneau, Martial; Sherman, John H.; Tetreault, Real

    2004-11-23

    A heat sink for a transceiver optoelectronic module including dual direct heat paths and a structure which encloses a number of chips having a central web which electrically isolates transmitter and receiver chips from each other. A retainer for an optical coupler having a port into which epoxy is poured. An overmolded base for an optoelectronic module having epoxy flow controller members built thereon. Assembly methods for an optoelectronic module including gap setting and variation of a TAB bonding process.

  13. Identification of existing waste heat recovery and process improvement technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, R.L.; Dodge, R.E.; Smith, S.A.; Ames, K.R.

    1984-03-01

    General information is provided on waste heat recovery opportunities. The currently available equipment for high- and low-temperature applications are described. Other equipment related to wasteheat recovery equipment such as components, instruments and controls, and cleaning equipment is discussed briefly. A description of the microcomputer data base is included. Suppliers of waste heat equipment are mentioned throughout the report, with specific contacts, addresses, and telephone numbers provided in an Appendix.

  14. Shortwave radiative heating rate profiles in hazy and clear atmosphere: a sensitivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppler, Lionel; Fischer, Jürgen; Ravetta, François; Pelon, Jacques; Preusker, René

    2010-05-01

    Aerosols have an impact on shortwave heating rate profiles (additional heating or cooling). In this survey, we quantify the impact of several key-parameters on the heating rate profiles of the atmosphere with and without aerosols. These key-parameters are: (1) the atmospheric model (tropical, midlatitude summer or winter, US Standard), (2) the integrated water vapor amount (IWV ), (3) the ground surface (flat and rough ocean, isotropic surface albedo for land), (4) the aerosol composition (dusts, soots or maritimes mixtures with respect to the OPAC-database classification), (5) the aerosol optical depth and (6) vertical postion, and (7) the single-scattering albedo (?o) of the aerosol mixture. This study enables us to evaluate which parameters are most important to take into account in a radiative energy budget of the atmosphere and will be useful for a future study: the retrieval of heating rates profiles from satellite data (CALIPSO, MODIS, MERIS) over the Mediterranean Sea. All the heating rates are computed by using the vector irradiances computed at each pressure level in the spectral interval 0.2 - 3.6μm (shortwave) by the 1D radiative transfer model for atmosphere and ocean: MOMO (Matrix-Operator MOdel) of the Institute for Space Science, FU Berlin 1

  15. Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behavior, kinetic parameters and products properties of moso bamboo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyu; Zhou, Jianbin; Zhang, Qisheng

    2014-10-01

    Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behaviors, kinetic parameters, and products properties of moso bamboo were investigated in this study. Pyrolysis experiments were performed up to 700 °C at heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30 °C/min using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a lab-scale fixed bed pyrolysis reactor. The results show that the onset and offset temperatures of the main devolatilization stage of thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) curves obviously shift toward the high-temperature range, and the activation energy values increase with increasing heating rate. The heating rate has different effects on the pyrolysis products properties, including biochar (element content, proximate analysis, specific surface area, heating value), bio-oil (water content, chemical composition), and non-condensable gas. The solid yields from the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor are noticeably different from those of TGA mainly because the thermal hysteresis of the sample in the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor is more thorough. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Existing and Past Methods of Test and Rating Standards Related to Integrated Heat Pump Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, Wayne R. [Sentech, Inc.

    2010-07-01

    This report evaluates existing and past US methods of test and rating standards related to electrically operated air, water, and ground source air conditioners and heat pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and under in capacity, that potentiality incorporate a potable water heating function. Two AHRI (formerly ARI) standards and three DOE waivers were identified as directly related. Six other AHRI standards related to the test and rating of base units were identified as of interest, as they would form the basis of any new comprehensive test procedure. Numerous other AHRI and ASHRAE component test standards were also identified as perhaps being of help in developing a comprehensive test procedure.

  17. Using microwave heating to improve the desorption efficiency of high molecular weight VOC from beaded activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Shariaty, Pooya; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2015-04-07

    Incomplete regeneration of activated carbon loaded with organic compounds results in heel build-up that reduces the useful life of the adsorbent. In this study, microwave heating was tested as a regeneration method for beaded activated carbon (BAC) loaded with n-dodecane, a high molecular weight volatile organic compound. Energy consumption and desorption efficiency for microwave-heating regeneration were compared with conductive-heating regeneration. The minimum energy needed to completely regenerate the adsorbent (100% desorption efficiency) using microwave regeneration was 6% of that needed with conductive heating regeneration, owing to more rapid heating rates and lower heat loss. Analyses of adsorbent pore size distribution and surface chemistry confirmed that neither heating method altered the physical/chemical properties of the BAC. Additionally, gas chromatography (with flame ionization detector) confirmed that neither regeneration method detectably altered the adsorbate composition during desorption. By demonstrating improvements in energy consumption and desorption efficiency and showing stable adsorbate and adsorbent properties, this paper suggests that microwave heating is an attractive method for activated carbon regeneration particularly when high-affinity VOC adsorbates are present.

  18. Heat shock response in yeast involves changes in both transcription rates and mRNA stabilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Castells-Roca

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the heat stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by determining mRNA levels and transcription rates for the whole transcriptome after a shift from 25 °C to 37 °C. Using an established mathematical algorithm, theoretical mRNA decay rates have also been calculated from the experimental data. We have verified the mathematical predictions for selected genes by determining their mRNA decay rates at different times during heat stress response using the regulatable tetO promoter. This study indicates that the yeast response to heat shock is not only due to changes in transcription rates, but also to changes in the mRNA stabilities. mRNA stability is affected in 62% of the yeast genes and it is particularly important in shaping the mRNA profile of the genes belonging to the environmental stress response. In most cases, changes in transcription rates and mRNA stabilities are homodirectional for both parameters, although some interesting cases of antagonist behavior are found. The statistical analysis of gene targets and sequence motifs within the clusters of genes with similar behaviors shows that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulons apparently contribute to the general heat stress response by means of transcriptional factors and RNA binding proteins.

  19. Enhancement of Heat Exchanger Control Using Improved PID Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishna G.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Proportional, Integral and Derivative (PID controllers are widely used in industrial applications. Their popularity comes from their robust performance and also from their functional simplicity. Temperature control of double tube heat exchanger system is presented and ant colony algorithm for optimizing PID parameters of temperature controller is presented in this paper on the basis of conventional PID controller. Temperature controller based on ant colony optimization for double tube heat exchanger is designed. Simulation results show that, for the case of heat exchanger system, ACO-PID is good model and generalize well. The closed loop unit step response obtained with the proposed PID compares favorably with the one achieved using a conventional PID controller with dynamic closed-loop simulation. More important, the proposed approach takes a fraction of the time spent by the standard technique, without the need of perturbing the closed-loop system.

  20. Effect of surface catalytic activity on stagnation heat-transfer rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was made to determine the effect heterogeneous catalytic surface reactions have on heat-transfer rates in highly frozen low-density stagnation-point boundary layers. Data were obtained in arc-heated facilities that were capable of producing large percentages of chemical energy frozen in a supersonic freestream. The heat-transfer rate to a silicon-dioxide surface was reduced to a minimum value of only one-third of the value obtained on relatively active nickel and platinum surfaces. This is the result of its low catalytic efficiency. Ionization energy was recovered on both the active and the inactive surfaces, indicating that this energy either was released many times faster than the recombination energy or was not controlled by the surface composition.

  1. Improved exercise capacity in the heat followed by coconut water consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Laitano

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of prior ingestion of coconut water on fluid retention and exercise capacity in the heat as well as signs of gastrointestinal distress. Eight physically active men were recruited (age 23 ± 3 years, height 176 ± 6 cm, body mass 78 ± 7 kg and performed three exercise capacity trials on a cycle ergometer in the heat (34 ± 1°C after the ingestion of one of the following drinks: a plain water (PW, b flavored drink (FD, and c coconut water (CW. Ingestion of CWresulted in a longer time to exhaustion (p=0.029. Likewise, participants achieved a higher heart rate in the CW session when compared to the other trials (PW 183 ± 5 bpm, FD 184 ± 8 bpm, and CW 189 ± 8 bpm, p<0.05 and a reduced urine output after the coconut water ingestion (PW 214 ± 85 ml, FD 267 ± 90 ml, and CW 161 ± 73 ml, p<0.05 indicating a higher fluid retention of coconut water in comparison to plain water and the flavored drink. These results demonstrate that previous ingestion of coconut water improves exercise capacity in the heat and provide a reduced urine output in comparison to plain water and flavored drink. Also there is no evidence for GI distress.

  2. Effect of pyrolysis pressure and heating rate on radiata pine char structure and apparent gasification reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Cetin; R. Gupta; B. Moghtaderi [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). Discipline of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of Engineering

    2005-07-01

    The knowledge of biomass char gasification kinetics has considerable importance in the design of advanced biomass gasifiers, some of which operate at high pressure. The char gasification kinetics themselves are influenced by char structure. In this study, the effects of pyrolysis pressure and heating rate on the char structure were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, digital cinematography, and surface area analysis. Char samples were prepared at pressures between 1 and 20 bar, temperatures ranging from 800 to 1000{degree}C, and heating rates between 20 and 500{degree}C/s. Our results indicate that pyrolysis conditions have a notable impact on the biomass char morphology. Pyrolysis pressure, in particular, was found to influence the size and the shape of char particles while high heating rates led to plastic deformation of particles (i.e. melting) resulting in smooth surfaces and large cavities. The global gasification reactivities of char samples were also determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) technique. Char reactivities were found to increase with increasing pyrolysis heating rates and decreasing pyrolysis pressure. 22 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. The influence of SPS heating rates on the synthesis reaction of tantalum diboride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Laszkiewicz-Łukasik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available TaB2 is a material from the Ultra High Temperature Ceramics group and is rather unexplored because it is difficult to procure the raw materials and to densify TaB2. Using SPS technique to realize reactive sintering processes of powders mixture according to the reaction Ta + 2B → TaB2 makes it possible to achieve TaB2 in one technological step. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of heating rates on the synthesis reaction and on the multistage densification mechanisms during SPS processes. The mixture was sintered at constant parameters of 2200 °C, 48 MPa for 5 min with the usage of heating rates from 50 °C/min up to 400 °C/min. The densification processes were studied through analyzing the shrinkage of powder compacts during SPS (Spark Plasma Sintering processes. The comparison of the densification curves indicates that the reactions do not proceed completely at slow heating rates. Namely, too low heating rates contribute to the sintering of tantalum before the synthesis reaction and demonstrate the presence of boron in liquid state. The best material obtained in this study has Young's modulus 571 GPa, Vickers hardness 20.7 GPa (HV1 and indentation fracture toughness KIC 4.7 MPa m1/2.

  4. Time dependent heat transfer rates in high Reynolds number hypersonic flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Time dependent heat transfer rates have been calculated from time dependent temperature measurements in the vicinity of shock-wave boundary-layer interactions due to conical compression ramps on an axisymmetric body. The basic model is a cylindrical body with a 10 degree conical nose. Four conical ramps, 20, 25, 30, and 35 degrees serve as shock wave generators. Flowfield surveys have been made in the vicinity of the conical ramp vertex, the separation point, and the reattachment point. A significant effort was made to characterize the natural frequencies and relative powers of the resulting fluctuations in heat transfer rates. This research effort, sponsored jointly by NASA and the Air Force, was conducted in the Air Force Flight Dynamics Directorate High Reynolds Facility. The nominal freestream Mach number was 6, and the freestream Reynolds numbers ranged from 2.2 million/ft to 30.0 million/ft. Experimental results quantify temperature response and the resulting heat transfer rates as a function of ramp angle and Reynolds number. The temperature response within the flowfield appears to be steady-state for all compression ramp angles and all Reynolds numbers, and hence, the heat transfer rates appear to be steady-state.

  5. The influence of SPS heating rates on the synthesis reaction of tantalum diboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laszkiewicz-Lukasik, J.; Jaworska, L.; Putyra, P.; Klimczyk, P.; Garzel, G.

    2016-07-01

    TaB2 is a material from the Ultra High Temperature Ceramics group and is rather unexplored because it is difficult to procure the raw materials and to densify TaB2. Using SPS technique to realize reactive sintering processes of powders mixture according to the reaction Ta+2B→TaB2 makes it possible to achieve TaB2 in one technological step. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of heating rates on the synthesis reaction and on the multistage densification mechanisms during SPS processes. The mixture was sintered at constant parameters of 2200°C, 48MPa for 5min with the usage of heating rates from 50°C/min up to 400°C/min. The densification processes were studied through analyzing the shrinkage of powder compacts during SPS (Spark Plasma Sintering) processes. The comparison of the densification curves indicates that the reactions do not proceed completely at slow heating rates. Namely, too low heating rates contribute to the sintering of tantalum before the synthesis reaction and demonstrate the presence of boron in liquid state. The best material obtained in this study has Young's modulus 571GPa, Vickers hardness 20.7GPa (HV1) and indentation fracture toughness KIC 4.7MPam1/2. (Author)

  6. Analysis of transient heat conduction in a PWR fuel rod by an improved lumped parameter approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dourado, Eneida Regina G. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cotta, Renato M. [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Mecanica; Jian, Su, E-mail: eneidadourado@gmail.com, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: cotta@mecanica.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to analyze transient heat conduction in a nuclear fuel rod by an improved lumped parameter approach. One-dimensional transient heat conduction is considered, with the circumferential symmetry assumed and the axial conduction neglected. The thermal conductivity and specific heat in the fuel pellet are considered temperature dependent, while the thermophysical properties of the cladding are considered constant. Hermite approximation for integration is used to obtain the average temperature and heat flux in the radial direction. Significant improvement over the classical lumped parameter formulation has been achieved. The proposed model can be also used in dynamic analysis of PWR and nuclear power plant simulators. (author)

  7. Shut-down dose rate analyses for the ITER electron cyclotron-heating upper launcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinhorst, Bastian; Serikov, Arkady; Fischer, Ulrich; Lu, Lei [Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology INR (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Germany); Spaeh, Peter; Strauss, Dirk [Institute for Applied Materials IAM (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The electron cyclotron resonance heating upper launcher (ECHUL) is going to be installed in the upper port of the ITER tokamak thermonuclear fusion reactor for plasma mode stabilization (neoclassical tearing modes and the sawtooth instability). The paper reports the latest neutronic modeling and analyses which have been performed for the ITER reference front steering launcher design. It focuses on the port accessibility after reactor shut-down for which dose rate (SDDR) distributions on a fine regular mesh grid were calculated. The results are compared to those obtained for the ITER Dummy Upper Port. The calculations showed that the heterogeneous ECHUL design gives rise to enhanced radiation streaming as compared to the homogenous dummy upper port. Therefore the used launcher geometry was upgraded to a more recent development stage. The inter-comparison shows a significant improvement of the launchers shielding properties but also the necessity to further upgrade the shielding performance. Furthermore, the analysis for the homogenous dummy upper port, which represents optimal shielding inside the launcher, demonstrates that the shielding upgrade also needs to include the launcher's environment.

  8. Using AlN-Coated Heat Sink to Improve the Heat Dissipation of LED Packages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Ming-Der

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study optimizes aluminum nitride (AlN ceramics, in order to enhance the thermal performance of light-emitting diode (LED packages. AlN coatings are grown on copper/ aluminum substrates as a heat interface material, using an electrostatic spraying process. The effect of the deposition parameters on the coatings is determined. The thermal performance of AlN coated Cu/Al substrates is evaluated in terms of the heat dissipated and compared by measuring the LED case temperature. The structure and properties of the coating are also examined a scanning electron microscopy (SEM. In sum, the thermal performance of the LED is increased and good heat resistance characteristics are obtained. The results show that using AlN ceramic coating on a copper/aluminum substrate increases the thermal performance.

  9. Effect of low and high heating rates on reaction path of Ni(V)/Al multilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maj, Łukasz, E-mail: l.maj@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Morgiel, Jerzy; Szlezynger, Maciej [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Bała, Piotr; Cios, Grzegorz [AGH University of Science and Technology, Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, 30 Kawiory St., 30-055 Kraków (Poland)

    2017-06-01

    The effect of heating rates of Ni(V)/Al NanoFoils{sup ®} was investigated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Ni(V)/Al were subjected to heating by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in-situ TEM or electric pulse. Local chemical analysis was carried out using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Phase analysis was done with X-ray diffractions (XRD) and selected area electron diffractions (SAED). The experiments showed that slow heating in DSC results in development of separate exothermic effects at ∼230 °C, ∼280 °C and ∼390 °C, corresponding to precipitation of Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} and NiAl phases, respectively, i.e. like in vanadium free Ni/Al multilayers. Further heating to 700 °C allowed to obtain a single phase NiAl foil. The average grain size (g.s.) of NiAl phase produced in the DSC heat treated foil was comparable with the Ni(V)/Al multilayer period (∼50 nm), whereas in the case of reaction initiated with electric pulse the g.s. was in the micrometer range. Upon slow heating vanadium tends to segregate to zones parallel to the original multilayer internal interfaces, while in SHS process vanadium-rich phases precipitates at grain boundaries of the NiAl phase. - Highlights: • Peaks in DSC heating of Ni(V)/Al were explained by in-situ TEM observations. • Nucleation of Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} and NiAl at slow heating of Ni(V)/Al was documented. • Near surface NiAl obtained from NanoFoil show Ag precipitates at grain boundaries.

  10. Influence of Heating Rate on Annealing and Reverse Transformation Behavior of TRIP Steels Having Martensite as Starting Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong In; Choi, Yong Hoon; Ryu, Joo Hyun; Lee, Sea Woong; Lee, Kyooyoung; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2017-11-01

    The influence of heating rate on the annealing and transformation behavior is investigated in TRIP steel having martensite as the starting microstructure. A higher heating rate preserves the hierarchical structure of the initial microstructure before starting the reverse transformation. As the heating rate increases, the reversely transformed austenite has a propensity to develop a fine lath morphology, a consequence of the retention of pre-existing austenite and its growth along the lath boundary.

  11. [Analysing heart rate variability to improve the monitoring of pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butruille, Laura; De Jonckheere, Julien; Jeanne, Mathieu; Tavernier, Benoît; Logier, Régis

    2016-12-01

    An innovative technique based on the analysis of instantaneous heart rate variability helps to improve the prevention and management of pain and discomfort. Simple to implement, this non-invasive technique is based on the continuous recording of the electrocardiograph signal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Quality Rating and Improvement Systems and Children's Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Lieny; Buettner, Cynthia K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing enriched learning environments is important to stimulating children's development in early childhood. Early child-care policymakers in many states in the US have adopted Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) as a way to verify quality of child care and to support children's school readiness. Objective: The purpose of…

  13. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915 measured samples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08.

  14. Smoke Movement in an Atrium with a Fire with Low Rate of Heat Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Brohus, Henrik; Petersen, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Results from small-scale experiments on smoke movement in an atrium are given, both with and without a vertical temperature gradient, and expressions for the smoke movement are developed on the basis of these experiments. Comparisons with a general analytical expression used for calculating...... the height to the location of the smoke layer are given. Furthermore, the paper discusses the air movement in a typical atrium exposed to different internal and external heat loads to elaborate on the use of the "flow element" expressions developed for smoke movement from a fire with a low rate of heat...

  15. Improving thermal performance of an existing UK district heat network: a case for temperature optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tunzi, Michele; Boukhanouf, Rabah; Li, Hongwei

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents results of a research study into improving energy performance of small-scale district heat network through water supply and return temperature optimization technique. The case study involves establishing the baseline heat demand of the estate’s buildings, benchmarking...... the existing heat network operating parameters, and defining the optimum supply and return temperature. A stepwise temperature optimization technique of plate radiators heat emitters was applied to control the buildings indoor thermal comfort using night set back temperature strategy of 21/18 °C....... It was established that the heat network return temperature could be lowered from the current measured average of 55 °C to 35.6 °C, resulting in overall reduction of heat distribution losses and fuel consumption of 10% and 9% respectively. Hence, the study demonstrates the potential of operating existing heat...

  16. New configurations of a heat recovery absorption heat pump integrated with a natural gas boiler for boiler efficiency improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Ming [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Yin, Hongxi [Southeast University, Nanjing, China

    2014-11-01

    Conventional natural gas-fired boilers exhaust flue gas direct to the atmosphere at 150 200 C, which, at such temperatures, contains large amount of energy and results in relatively low thermal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80%. Although condensing boilers for recovering the heat in the flue gas have been developed over the past 40 years, their present market share is still less than 25%. The major reason for this relatively slow acceptance is the limited improvement in the thermal efficiency of condensing boilers. In the condensing boiler, the temperature of the hot water return at the range of 50 60 C, which is used to cool the flue gas, is very close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas. Therefore, the latent heat, the majority of the waste heat in the flue gas, which is contained in the water vapor, cannot be recovered. This paper presents a new approach to improve boiler thermal efficiency by integrating absorption heat pumps with natural gas boilers for waste heat recovery (HRAHP). Three configurations of HRAHPs are introduced and discussed. The three configurations are modeled in detail to illustrate the significant thermal efficiency improvement they attain. Further, for conceptual proof and validation, an existing hot water-driven absorption chiller is operated as a heat pump at operating conditions similar to one of the devised configurations. An overall system performance and economic analysis are provided for decision-making and as evidence of the potential benefits. These three configurations of HRAHP provide a pathway to achieving realistic high-efficiency natural gas boilers for applications with process fluid return temperatures higher than or close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas.

  17. Evaluation of induced activity, decay heat and dose rate distribution after shutdown in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maki, Koichi [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Research Lab.; Satoh, Satoshi; Hayashi, Katsumi; Yamada, Koubun; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Iida, Hiromasa

    1997-03-01

    Induced activity, decay heat and dose rate distributions after shutdown were estimated for 1MWa/m{sup 2} operation in ITER. The activity in the inboard blanket one day after shutdown is 1.5x10{sup 11}Bq/cm{sup 3}, and the average decay heating rate 0.01w/cm{sup 3}. The dose rate outside the 120cm thick concrete biological shield is two order higher than the design criterion of 5{mu}Sv/h. This indicates that the biological shield thickness should be enhanced by 50cm in concrete, that is, total thickness 170cm for workers to enter the reactor room and to perform maintenance. (author)

  18. The Effect of Particle Concentration on the Heating Rate of Ferrofluids for Magnetic Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaescu I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex magnetic susceptibility χ(f = χ′(f - i χ″(f, of a ferrofluid sample with magnetite particles dispersed in kerosene and stabilized with oleic acid, over the range 0.1 GHz to 6 GHz, was determined. The initial sample has been successively diluted with kerosene (with a dilution rate of 2/3, thus obtaining further three samples. Using the complex magnetic susceptibility measurements of each sample, the frequency field and particle concentration dependencies of the heating rate of the ferrofluid samples, were analyzed. The results show the possibility of using the heating rate of ferrofluid samples with different particle concentrations, in hyperthermia applications.

  19. Improvement of stability of Nb3Sn superconductors by introducing high specific heat substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X. [Fermilab; Li, P. [Fermilab; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab; Peng, X. [Unlisted, US, OH

    2018-01-08

    High-J c Nb3Sn conductors have low stability against perturbations, which accounts for the slow training rates of high-field Nb3Sn magnets. While it is known that adding substances with high specific heat (C) into Nb3Sn wires can increase their overall specific heat and thus improve their stability, there has not been a practical method that is compatible with the fabrication of long-length conductors. In this work, we put forward a scheme to introduce such substances to distributed-barrier Nb3Sn wires, which adds minimum difficulty to the wire manufacturing process. Multifilamentary wires using a mixture of Cu and high-C Gd2O3 powders have been successfully fabricated along this line. Measurements showed that addition of Gd2O3 had no negative effects on residual resitivity ratio or non-Cu J c, and that flux jumps were remarkably reduced, and minimum quench energy values at 4.2 K, 14 T were increased by a factor of three, indicating that stability was significantly improved. We also discussed the influences of the positioning of high-C substances and their thermal diffusivity on their effectiveness in reducing the superconductor temperature rise against perturbations. Based on these results, we proposed an optimized conductor architecture to maximize the effectiveness of this approach.

  20. Stagnation-point heat-transfer rate predictions at aeroassist flight conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Jones, Jim J.; Rochelle, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The results are presented for the stagnation-point heat-transfer rates used in the design process of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle over its entire aeropass trajectory. The prediction methods used in this investigation demonstrate the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques to a wide range of flight conditions and their usefulness in a design process. The heating rates were computed by a viscous-shock-layer (VSL) code at the lower altitudes and by a Navier-Stokes (N-S) code for the higher altitude cases. For both methods, finite-rate chemically reacting gas was considered, and a temperature-dependent wall-catalysis model was used. The wall temperature for each case was assumed to be radiative equilibrium temperature, based on total heating. The radiative heating was estimated by using a correlation equation. Wall slip was included in the N-S calculation method, and this method implicitly accounts for shock slip. The N-S/VSL combination of projection methods was established by comparison with the published benchmark flow-field code LAURA results at lower altitudes, and the direct simulation Monte Carlo results at higher altitude cases. To obtain the design heating rate over the entire forward face of the vehicle, a boundary-layer method (BLIMP code) that employs reacting chemistry and surface catalysis was used. The ratio of the VSL or N-S method prediction to that obtained from the boundary-layer method code at the stagnation point is used to define an adjustment factor, which accounts for the errors involved in using the boundary-layer method.

  1. Study on heat transport rate of an osmotic heat pipe. Effects of the initial concentration on the heat transport limits; Shinto heat pipe no netsu yuso ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. Shoki nodo no netsu yuso genkai ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipposhi, S.; Imura, H. [Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-01-25

    This paper describes an experimental study on. the effects of an initial concentration on a maximum heat transport rate of an osmotic heat pipe operated under the atmospheric pressure. The working fluid was aqueous polyethylene glycol 600 solution and the 18 tubular-type osmosis membranes made of acetyl cellulose were used. The initial concentration was varied from 0.1 to 1.0 kmol/ m{sup 3} with 0.1 kmol/m{sup 3} step. As a result, it is shown that the optimum initial concentration exists for the maximum heat transport rate in the osmotic heat pipe. In addition, the concentrations in the solution riser and downcomer are related to the initial concentration. 11 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Occurrence Rates and Heating Effects of Tangential and Rotational Discontinuities as Obtained from Three-dimensional Simulation of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Yang, Liping; Wang, Xin; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Linghua

    2015-05-01

    MHD discontinuities are ubiquitous in the solar wind and are often found at the origin of turbulence intermittency. They may also play a key role in the turbulence dissipation and heating of the solar wind. The tangential discontinuities (TDs) and rotational discontinuities (RDs) are the two most important types of discontinuities. Recently, the connection between turbulence intermittency and proton thermodynamics has been observationally investigated. Here, we present numerical results from a three-dimensional MHD simulation with pressure anisotropy and we define new methods for identifying and distinguishing TDs and RDs. Three statistical results obtained for the relative occurrence rates and heating effects are highlighted: (1) RDs tend to take up the majority of the discontinuities along with time; (2) the thermal states embedding TDs tend to be associated with extreme plasma parameters or instabilities while RDs do not; (3) TDs have a higher average T as well as perpendicular temperature {{T}\\bot }. The simulation shows that TDs and RDs evolve and contribute to solar wind heating differently. These results will improve our understanding of the mechanisms that generate discontinuities and cause plasma heating.

  3. Finite-Rate Ablation Boundary Conditions for Carbon-Phenolic Heat-Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.-K.; Milos, Frank S.

    2003-01-01

    A formulation of finite-rate ablation surface boundary conditions, including oxidation, nitridation, and sublimation of carbonaceous material with pyrolysis gas injection, has been developed based on surface species mass conservation. These surface boundary conditions are discretized and integrated with a Navier-Stokes solver. This numerical procedure can predict aerothermal heating, chemical species concentration, and carbonaceous material ablation rate over the heatshield surface of re-entry space vehicles. In this study, the gas-gas and gas-surface interactions are established for air flow over a carbon-phenolic heatshield. Two finite-rate gas-surface interaction models are considered in the present study. The first model is based on the work of Park, and the second model includes the kinetics suggested by Zhluktov and Abe. Nineteen gas phase chemical reactions and four gas-surface interactions are considered in the present model. There is a total of fourteen gas phase chemical species, including five species for air and nine species for ablation products. Three test cases are studied in this paper. The first case is a graphite test model in the arc-jet stream; the second is a light weight Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator at the Stardust re-entry peak heating conditions, and the third is a fully dense carbon-phenolic heatshield at the peak heating point of a proposed Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle. Predictions based on both finite-rate gas- surface interaction models are compared with those obtained using B' tables, which were created based on the chemical equilibrium assumption. Stagnation point convective heat fluxes predicted using Park's finite-rate model are far below those obtained from chemical equilibrium B' tables and Zhluktov's model. Recession predictions from Zhluktov's model are generally lower than those obtained from Park's model and chemical equilibrium B' tables. The effect of species mass diffusion on predicted ablation rate is also

  4. The effect of sampling rate on interpretation of the temporal characteristics of radiative and convective heating in wildland flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Frankman; Brent W. Webb; Bret W. Butler; Daniel Jimenez; Michael Harrington

    2012-01-01

    Time-resolved radiative and convective heating measurements were collected on a prescribed burn in coniferous fuels at a sampling frequency of 500 Hz. Evaluation of the data in the time and frequency domain indicate that this sampling rate was sufficient to capture the temporal fluctuations of radiative and convective heating. The convective heating signal contained...

  5. A dilatometric study of the phase transformations in 300 and 350 maraging steels during continuous heating rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Gomes de Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influences of the chemical composition and heating rate have been studied in 300 and 350 maraging steels using dilatometry. For these tests, heating was carried out with heating rates of 1, 10 and 28 °C/s. The results have shown that the precipitation mechanism for both materials in the studied range is by lattice diffusion. Furthermore, Co and Ti contents influence strongly the precipitation. The lattice diffusion mechanism in the martensite reversion is influenced by Ni and Co contents and heating rate. For small heating rates ( ~1 °C/s this mechanism prevails in the 300 maraging steel while for the 350 maraging steel has a minor importance. The mechanism of martensite reversion for 350 maraging steel in the studied range is mainly by shear mechanism. For higher heating rates (~28 ºC/s the shear mechanism prevails in both maraging steels.

  6. Improving urban district heating systems and assessing the efficiency of the energy usage therein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, M. E.; Sharapov, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    The report describes issues in connection with improving urban district heating systems from combined heat power plants (CHPs), to propose the ways for improving the reliability and the efficiency of the energy usage (often referred to as “energy efficiency”) in such systems. The main direction of such urban district heating systems improvement suggests transition to combined heating systems that include structural elements of both centralized and decentralized systems. Such systems provide the basic part of thermal power via highly efficient methods for extracting thermal power plants turbines steam, while peak loads are covered by decentralized peak thermal power sources to be mounted at consumers’ locations, with the peak sources being also reserve thermal power sources. The methodology was developed for assessing energy efficiency of the combined district heating systems, implemented as a computer software product capable of comparatively calculating saving on reference fuel for the system.

  7. The effect of wind on the rate of heat loss from avian cup-shaped nests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caragh B Heenan

    Full Text Available Forced convection can significantly influence the heat loss from birds and their offspring but effects may be reduced by using sheltered micro-sites such as cavities or constructing nests. The structural and thermal properties of the nests of two species, the spiny-cheeked honeyeater (Acanthagenys rufogularis and yellow-throated miner (Manorina flavigula, were measured in relation to three wind speeds. Nest dimensions differ between the two species, despite the similar body mass of the incubating adults, however nest conductance is comparable. As wind speed increases, so does the rate of heat loss from the nests of both species, and further still during incubation recesses. The significance of forced convection through the nest is a near-doubling in heat production required by the parent, even when incubating at relatively low wind speeds. This provides confirmation that selecting a sheltered nest site is important for avian reproductive success.

  8. Torrefaction of invasive alien plants: Influence of heating rate and other conversion parameters on mass yield and higher heating value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundike, Jhonnah; Collard, François-Xavier; Görgens, Johann F

    2016-06-01

    With the aim of controlling their proliferation, two invasive alien plants, Lantana camara (LC) and Mimosa pigra (MP), both widespread in Africa, were considered for torrefaction for renewable energy applications. Using thermogravimetric analysis, the influence of heating rate (HR: 2.18-19.82°Cmin(-1)) together with variable temperature and hold time on char yield and HHV (in a bomb calorimeter) were determined. Statistically significant effects of HR on HHV with optima at 10.5°Cmin(-1) for LC and 20°Cmin(-1) for MP were obtained. Increases of HHV up to 0.8MJkg(-1) or energy yield greater than 10%, together with a 3-fold reduction in torrefaction conversion time could be achieved by optimisation of HR. Analysis of the torrefaction volatiles by TG-MS showed that not only hemicelluloses, but also lignin conversion, could influence the optimum HR value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute limb heating improves macro- and microvascular dilator function in the leg of aged humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Steven A; Gagnon, Daniel; Adams, Amy N; Cramer, Matthew N; Kouda, Ken; Crandall, Craig G

    2017-01-01

    Local heating of an extremity increases blood flow and vascular shear stress throughout the arterial tree. Local heating acutely improves macrovascular dilator function in the upper limbs of young healthy adults through a shear stress-dependent mechanism but has no such effect in the lower limbs of this age group. The effect of acute limb heating on dilator function within the atherosclerotic prone vasculature of the lower limbs of aged adults is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that acute lower limb heating improves macro- and microvascular dilator function within the leg vasculature of aged adults. Nine young and nine aged adults immersed their lower limbs at a depth of ~33 cm into a heated (~42°C) circulated water bath for 45 min. Before and 30 min after heating, macro (flow-mediated dilation)- and microvascular (reactive hyperemia) dilator functions were assessed in the lower limb, following 5 min of arterial occlusion, via Doppler ultrasound. Compared with preheat, macrovascular dilator function was unchanged following heating in young adults (P = 0.6) but was improved in aged adults (P = 0.04). Similarly, microvascular dilator function, as assessed by peak reactive hyperemia, was unchanged following heating in young adults (P = 0.1) but was improved in aged adults (P age dependent manner. We demonstrate that lower limb heating acutely improves macro- and microvascular dilator function within the atherosclerotic prone vasculature of the leg in aged adults. These findings provide evidence for a potential therapeutic use of chronic lower limb heating to improve vascular health in primary aging and various disease conditions. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Resistive polymer versus forced-air warming: comparable heat transfer and core rewarming rates in volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberger, Oliver; Held, Christine; Stadelmann, Karin; Mayer, Nikolaus; Hunkeler, Corinne; Sessler, Daniel I; Kurz, Andrea

    2008-11-01

    Mild perioperative hypothermia increases the risk of several severe complications. Perioperative patient warming to preserve normothermia has thus become routine, with forced-air warming being used most often. In previous studies, various resistive warming systems have shown mixed results in comparison with forced-air. Recently, a polymer-based resistive patient warming system has been developed. We compared the efficacy of a standard forced-air warming system with the resistive polymer system in volunteers. Eight healthy volunteers participated, each on two separate study days. Unanesthetized volunteers were cooled to a core temperature (tympanic membrane) of 34 degrees C by application of forced-air at 10 degrees C and a circulating-water mattress at 4 degrees C. Meperidine and buspirone were administered to prevent shivering. In a randomly designated order, volunteers were then rewarmed (until their core temperatures reached 36 degrees C) with one of the following active warming systems: (1) forced-air warming (Bair Hugger warming cover #300, blower #750, Arizant, Eden Prairie, MN); or (2) polymer fiber resistive warming (HotDog whole body blanket, HotDog standard controller, Augustine Biomedical, Eden Prairie, MN). The alternate system was used on the second study day. Metabolic heat production, cutaneous heat loss, and core temperature were measured. Metabolic heat production and cutaneous heat loss were similar with each system. After a 30-min delay, core temperature increased nearly linearly by 0.98 (95% confidence interval 0.91-1.04) degrees C/h with forced-air and by 0.92 (0.85-1.00) degrees C/h with resistive heating (P = 0.4). Heating efficacy and core rewarming rates were similar with full-body forced-air and full-body resistive polymer heating in healthy volunteers.

  11. Effects of Adiabatic Heating on the High Strain Rate Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorini, Chris; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2017-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are increasingly being used in aerospace structures that are expected to experience complex dynamic loading conditions throughout their lifetime. As such, a detailed understanding of the high strain rate behavior of the constituents, particularly the strain rate, temperature, and pressure dependent polymer matrix, is paramount. In this paper, preliminary efforts in modeling experimentally observed temperature rises due to plastic deformation in PMCs subjected to dynamic loading are presented. To this end, an existing isothermal viscoplastic polymer constitutive formulation is extended to model adiabatic conditions by incorporating temperature dependent elastic properties and modifying the components of the inelastic strain rate tensor to explicitly depend on temperature. It is demonstrated that the modified polymer constitutive model is capable of capturing strain rate and temperature dependent yield as well as thermal softening associated with the conversion of plastic work to heat at high rates of strain. The modified constitutive model is then embedded within a strength of materials based micromechanics framework to investigate the manifestation of matrix thermal softening, due to the conversion of plastic work to heat, on the high strain rate response of a T700Epon 862 (T700E862) unidirectional composite. Adiabatic model predictions for high strain rate composite longitudinal tensile, transverse tensile, and in-plane shear loading are presented. Results show a substantial deviation from isothermal conditions; significant thermal softening is observed for matrix dominated deformation modes (transverse tension and in-plane shear), highlighting the importance of accounting for the conversion of plastic work to heat in the polymer matrix in the high strain rate analysis of PMC structures.

  12. Heating circulation pump disassembly process improved with augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegeltija Srđan S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to introduce possibilities of implementation of augmented reality (AR concept in disassembly process. Basic concept of AR implementation in various applications, as well as developed concept in disassembly system is presented. Main objective of this paper was to test the influence of implementation of AR in disassembly process with the goal to shorten overall duration of disassembly process. In this paper the experimental setup of developed concept in disassembly system for heating circulation pump that was conducted in laboratory conditions is shown, and conclusions are presented.

  13. Rheology and microstructure of binary mixed gel of rice bran protein-whey: effect of heating rate and whey addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafe, Ali; Vahedi, Elnaz; Hasan-Sarei, Azadeh Ghorbani

    2016-08-01

    Rice bran protein (RBP) is a valuable plant protein which has unique nutritional and hypoallergenic properties. Whey proteins have wide applications in the food industry, such as in dairy, meat and bakery products. Whey protein concentrate (WPC), RBP and their mixtures at different ratios (1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10 w/w) were heated from 20 to 90 °C at different heating rates (0.5, 1, 5 and 10 °C min(-1) ). The storage modulus (G') and gelling point (Tgel ) of WPC were higher than those of RBP, indicating the good ability of WPC to develop stiffer networks. By increasing the proportion of WPC in mixed systems, G' was increased and Tgel was reduced. Nevertheless, the elasticity of all binary mixtures was lower than that of WPC alone. Tgel and the final G' of RBP-WPC blends were increased by raising the heating rate. The RBP-WPC mixtures developed more elastic gels than RBP alone at different heating rates. RBP had a fibrillar and lentil-like structure whose fibril assembly had smaller structures than those of WPC. The gelling structure of the mixed gel of WPC-RBP was improved by adding WPC. Indeed, by adding WPC, gels tended to show syneresis and had lower water-holding capacity. Furthermore, the gel structure was produced by adding WPC to the non-gelling RBP, which is compatible with whey and can be applied as a functional food for infants and/or adults. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Genetic component of sensitivity to heat stress for nonreturn rate of Brazilian Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, M L; Bignardi, A B; Stefani, G; El Faro, L

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were: 1) to investigate variation in the genetic component of heat stress for nonreturn rate at 56 days after first artificial insemination (NR56); 2) to identify and characterize the genotype by environment interaction (G × E) due to heat stress for NR56 of Brazilian Holstein cattle. A linear random regression model (reaction norm model) was applied to 51,748 NR56 records of 28,595 heifers and multiparous cows. The decline in NR56 due to heat stress was more pronounced in milking cows compared to heifers. The age of females at first artificial insemination and temperature-humidity index (THI) exerted an important influence on the genetic parameters of NR56. Several evidence of G × E on NR56 were found as the high slope/intercept ratio and frequent intersection of reaction norms. Additionally, the genetic correlation between NR56 at opposite extremes of the THI scale reached estimates below zero, indicating that few of the same genes are responsible for NR56 under conditions of thermoneutrality and heat stress. The genetic evaluation and selection for NR56 in Holstein cattle reared under (sub)tropical conditions should therefore take into consideration the genetic variation on age at insemination and G × E due to heat stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ITER Generic Diagnostic Upper Port Plug Nuclear Heating and Personnel Dose Rate Assesment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell E. Feder and Mahmoud Z. Youssef

    2009-01-28

    Neutronics analysis to find nuclear heating rates and personnel dose rates were conducted in support of the integration of diagnostics in to the ITER Upper Port Plugs. Simplified shielding models of the Visible-Infrared diagnostic and of a large aperture diagnostic were incorporated in to the ITER global CAD model. Results for these systems are representative of typical designs with maximum shielding and a small aperture (Vis-IR) and minimal shielding with a large aperture. The neutronics discrete-ordinates code ATTILA® and SEVERIAN® (the ATTILA parallel processing version) was used. Material properties and the 500 MW D-T volume source were taken from the ITER “Brand Model” MCNP benchmark model. A biased quadrature set equivelant to Sn=32 and a scattering degree of Pn=3 were used along with a 46-neutron and 21-gamma FENDL energy subgrouping. Total nuclear heating (neutron plug gamma heating) in the upper port plugs ranged between 380 and 350 kW for the Vis-IR and Large Aperture cases. The Large Aperture model exhibited lower total heating but much higher peak volumetric heating on the upper port plug structure. Personnel dose rates are calculated in a three step process involving a neutron-only transport calculation, the generation of activation volume sources at pre-defined time steps and finally gamma transport analyses are run for selected time steps. ANSI-ANS 6.1.1 1977 Flux-to-Dose conversion factors were used. Dose rates were evaluated for 1 full year of 500 MW DT operation which is comprised of 3000 1800-second pulses. After one year the machine is shut down for maintenance and personnel are permitted to access the diagnostic interspace after 2-weeks if dose rates are below 100 μSv/hr. Dose rates in the Visible-IR diagnostic model after one day of shutdown were 130 μSv/hr but fell below the limit to 90 μSv/hr 2-weeks later. The Large Aperture style shielding model exhibited higher and more persistent dose rates. After 1-day the dose rate was 230

  16. Nonlocal heat transport and improved target design for x-ray heating studies at x-ray free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoidn, Oliver; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2018-01-01

    The extremely high-power densities and short durations of single pulses of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) have opened new opportunities in atomic physics, where complex excitation-relaxation chains allow for high ionization states in atomic and molecular systems, and in dense plasma physics, where XFEL heating of solid-density targets can create unique dense states of matter having temperatures on the order of the Fermi energy. We focus here on the latter phenomena, with special emphasis on the problem of optimum target design to achieve high x-ray heating into the warm dense matter (WDM) state. We report fully three-dimensional simulations of the incident x-ray pulse and the resulting multielectron relaxation cascade to model the spatial energy density deposition in multicomponent targets, with particular focus on the effects of nonlocal heat transport due to the motion of high energy photoelectrons and Auger electrons. We find that nanoscale high-Z /low-Z multicomponent targets can give much improved energy density deposition in lower-Z materials, with enhancements reaching a factor of 100. This has three important benefits. First, it greatly enlarges the thermodynamic parameter space in XFEL x-ray heating studies of lower-Z materials. Second, it allows the use of higher probe photon energies, enabling higher-information content x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements such as in two-color XFEL operations. Third, while this is merely one step toward optimization of x-ray heating target design, the demonstration of the importance of nonlocal heat transport establishes important common ground between XFEL-based x-ray heating studies and more traditional laser plasma methods.

  17. Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Stem Cells Improve Heat Tolerance and Hypothalamic Damage in Heat Stressed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Shu Tseng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heatstroke is characterized by excessive hyperthermia associated with systemic inflammatory responses, which leads to multiple organ failure, in which brain disorders predominate. This definition can be almost fulfilled by a mouse model of heatstroke used in the present study. Unanesthetized mice were exposed to whole body heating (41.2°C for 1 hour and then returned to room temperature (26°C for recovery. Immediately after termination of whole body heating, heated mice displayed excessive hyperthermia (body core temperature ~42.5°C. Four hours after termination of heat stress, heated mice displayed (i systemic inflammation; (ii ischemic, hypoxic, and oxidative damage to the hypothalamus; (iii hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis impairment (reflected by plasma levels of both adrenocorticotrophic-hormone and corticosterone; (iv decreased fractional survival; and (v thermoregulatory deficits (e.g., they became hypothermia when they were exposed to room temperature. These heatstroke reactions can be significantly attenuated by human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells therapy. Our data suggest that human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells therapy may improve outcomes of heatstroke in mice by reducing systemic inflammation as well as hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis impairment.

  18. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Pressure and Heat Rate Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    vonEckroth, Wulf; Struchen, Leah; Trovillion, Tom; Perez, Ravael; Nereolich, Shaun; Parlier, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Main Flame Deflector (MFD) at Launch Complex 39A was instrumented with sensors to measure heat rates, pressures, and temperatures on the last three Space Shuttle launches. Because the SRB plume is hot and erosive, a robust Tungsten Piston Calorimeter was developed to compliment the measurements made by off-the-shelf sensors. Witness materials were installed and their melting and erosion response to the Mach 2 / 4500 F / 4-second duration plume was observed. The data show that the specification document used for the design of the MFD thermal protection system over-predicted heat rates by a factor of 3 and under-predicted pressures by a factor of 2. These findings will be used to baseline NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics models and develop innovative MFD designs for the Space Launch System (SLS) before this vehicle becomes operational in 2017.

  19. [Improvement strategy to increase vaccination rates in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggendorf, H; Freynik, P; Hofmann, F

    2011-08-01

    Vaccination rates in adolescents in Germany are not sufficient. An intervention programme, which has been launched by the community health centre in Essen, should significantly increase vaccination coverage. In 2001 the Children and Youth Health Service at the Community Health Centre in Essen implemented a specific strategy to improve vaccination rates in adolescents. Vaccination rates were determined by control of vaccination certificates of all 6 (th) graders in Essen (n=5 589). After control of vaccination records the parents got a written, individual vaccination counselling for their child as well as a referral to the paediatrician to get the missing vaccinations. After 6 months the vaccination certificates were looked at again and vaccination coverage was determined. At the initial vaccination record control of 6 (th) graders in 2001 only 15% of the students, who presented their vaccination certificate, had an appropriate age related immunisation status. 84% of the students had had the tetanus/diphtheria and polio booster. But only 43% had been given a second measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) immunisation and only 24% had a complete hepatitis B coverage. The intervention programme (e. g., individual vaccination counselling) improved vaccination rates for hepatitis B and MMR by 16%. From 2001 to 2008 vaccination coverage in this age group could be improved from 43% to 87% for the second MMR vaccination and from 24% to 85% for hepatitis B. A remarkable improvement in vaccination coverage in children and adolescents could be achieved by a single, individual, written vaccination reminder. As a prerequisite a good cooperation between schools/paediatricians and the health authorities is needed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Study on Urban Heat Island Intensity Level Identification Based on an Improved Restricted Boltzmann Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal infrared remote sensing has become one of the main technology methods used for urban heat island research. When applying urban land surface temperature inversion of the thermal infrared band, problems with intensity level division arise because the method is subjective. However, this method is one of the few that performs heat island intensity level identification. This paper will build an intensity level identifier for an urban heat island, by using weak supervision and thought-based learning in an improved, restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM model. The identifier automatically initializes the annotation and optimizes the model parameters sequentially until the target identifier is completed. The algorithm needs very little information about the weak labeling of the target training sample and generates an urban heat island intensity spatial distribution map. This study can provide reliable decision-making support for urban ecological planning and effective protection of urban ecological security. The experimental results showed the following: (1 The heat island effect in Wuhan is existent and intense. Heat island areas are widely distributed. The largest heat island area is in Wuhan, followed by the sub-green island. The total area encompassed by heat island and strong island levels accounts for 54.16% of the land in Wuhan. (2 Partially based on improved RBM identification, this method meets the research demands of determining the spatial distribution characteristics of the internal heat island effect; its identification accuracy is superior to that of comparable methods.

  1. Performance improvement of air source heat pump by using gas-injected rotary compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B. L.; Liu, X. R.; Ding, Y. C.; Shi, W. X.

    2017-08-01

    Rotary compressor is most widely used in small capacity refrigeration and heat pump systems. For the air source heat pump, the heating capacity and the COP will be obviously degraded when it is utilized in low temperature ambient. Gas injection is an effective method to enhance its performance under those situations, which has been well applied in air source heat pump with scroll compressor. However, the development of the gas injection technology in rotary compressor is relatively slow due to limited performance improvement. In this research, the essential reason constraining the improvement of the gas injection on the rotary compressor and its heat pump system is identified. Two new injection structures for rotary compressors has been put forward to overcome the drawback of traditional injection structures. Based on a verified numerical model, the thermodynamic performance of air source heat pumps with the new gas-injected rotary compressor are investigated. The results indicate that, compared to the air source heat pump with the traditional gas injected rotary compressor, the new injection structures both can enhance heating capacity and COP of the air source heat pump obviously.

  2. Improved Bit Rate Control for Real-Time MPEG Watermarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranata Sugiri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The alteration of compressed video bitstream due to embedding of digital watermark tends to produce unpredictable video bit rate variations which may in turn lead to video playback buffer overflow/underflow or transmission bandwidth violation problems. This paper presents a novel bit rate control technique for real-time MPEG watermarking applications. In our experiments, spread spectrum watermarks are embedded in the quantized DCT domain without requantization and motion reestimation to achieve fast watermarking. The proposed bit rate control scheme evaluates the combined bit lengths of a set of multiple watermarked VLC codewords, and successively replaces watermarked VLC codewords having the largest increase in bit length with their corresponding unmarked VLC codewords until a target bit length is achieved. The proposed method offers flexibility and scalability, which are neglected by similar works reported in the literature. Experimental results show that the proposed bit rate control scheme is effective in meeting the bit rate targets and capable of improving the watermark detection robustness for different video contents compressed at different bit rates.

  3. The Calculation Methods of the Specific Fuel Rate in Combined Heat and Electricity Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Chuchueva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses a specific fuel rate in combined heat and electricity production using CHP technology. There are two objectives for calculation of specific fuel rate: a CHP technical efficiency estimate, b increasing CHP competitiveness at electricity and district heat markets. Currently, development of a number of thermo-dynamical methods of calculation solves the first problem while to solve the second one there is a number of developed economical methods of calculation. In Russia despite a decade of the wholesale electricity market progress the CHP market offers are still tightly connected with technical efficiency rate. To estimate the technical efficiency rate is widely used the least effective thermo-dynamical method – so called “physical” method”. The paper formulates a problem statement that is the specific fuel rate calculation and reviews the most widely applied methods. The review consists of two parts: in the first the Russian methods are discussed, and in the second one the methods widely used in the countries with highly developed electricity and district heat markets. A new thermo-dynamical method to calculate the specific fuel rate is introduced, which uses the linear characteristic curves of a steam turbine. The developed method allows us to take into consideration the energy inequality of the CHP products. Another advantages of this new method are calculation simplicity and small number of input data. To compare the effectiveness of different methods were introduced comparison rules and also calculations were performed. The comparison of thermo-dynamical methods shows that the most effective methods are an exergy method and also the method that takes into consideration the reduced generation of electricity (work method. Calculation complexity and large number of input data are main disadvantages of these methods. The comparison of economical methods shows that the most effective from stated point of view are a

  4. Improving inferior vena cava filter retrieval rates with the define, measure, analyze, improve, control methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutphin, Patrick D; Reis, Stephen P; McKune, Angie; Ravanzo, Maria; Kalva, Sanjeeva P; Pillai, Anil K

    2015-04-01

    To design a sustainable process to improve optional inferior vena cava (IVC) filter retrieval rates based on the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control (DMAIC) methodology of the Six Sigma process improvement paradigm. DMAIC, an acronym for Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control, was employed to design and implement a quality improvement project to increase IVC filter retrieval rates at a tertiary academic hospital. Retrievable IVC filters were placed in 139 patients over a 2-year period. The baseline IVC filter retrieval rate (n = 51) was reviewed through a retrospective analysis, and two strategies were devised to improve the filter retrieval rate: (a) mailing of letters to clinicians and patients for patients who had filters placed within 8 months of implementation of the project (n = 43) and (b) a prospective automated scheduling of a clinic visit at 4 weeks after filter placement for all new patients (n = 45). The effectiveness of these strategies was assessed by measuring the filter retrieval rates and estimated increase in revenue to interventional radiology. IVC filter retrieval rates increased from a baseline of 8% to 40% with the mailing of letters and to 52% with the automated scheduling of a clinic visit 4 weeks after IVC filter placement. The estimated revenue per 100 IVC filters placed increased from $2,249 to $10,518 with the mailing of letters and to $17,022 with the automated scheduling of a clinic visit. Using the DMAIC methodology, a simple and sustainable quality improvement intervention was devised that markedly improved IVC filter retrieval rates in eligible patients. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-heating probe instrument and method for measuring high temperature melting volume change rate of material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junwei; Wang, Zhiping; Lu, Yang; Cheng, Bo

    2013-03-01

    The castings defects are affected by the melting volume change rate of material. The change rate has an important effect on running safety of the high temperature thermal storage chamber, too. But the characteristics of existing measuring installations are complex structure, troublesome operation and low precision. In order to measure the melting volume change rate of material accurately and conveniently, a self-designed measuring instrument, self-heating probe instrument, and measuring method are described. Temperature in heating cavity is controlled by PID temperature controller; melting volume change rate υ and molten density are calculated based on the melt volume which is measured by the instrument. Positive and negative υ represent expansion and shrinkage of the sample volume after melting, respectively. Taking eutectic LiF+CaF2 for example, its melting volume change rate and melting density at 1 123 K are -20.6% and 2 651 kg·m-3 measured by this instrument, which is only 0.71% smaller than literature value. Density and melting volume change rate of industry pure aluminum at 973 K and analysis pure NaCl at 1 123 K are detected by the instrument too. The measure results are agreed with report values. Measuring error sources are analyzed and several improving measures are proposed. In theory, the measuring errors of the change rate and molten density which are measured by the self-designed instrument is nearly 1/20-1/50 of that measured by the refitted mandril thermal expansion instrument. The self-designed instrument and method have the advantages of simple structure, being easy to operate, extensive applicability for material, relatively high accuracy, and most importantly, temperature and sample vapor pressure have little effect on the measurement accuracy. The presented instrument and method solve the problems of complicated structure and procedures, and large measuring errors for the samples with high vapor pressure by existing installations.

  6. Improving the turbine district heating installations of single-circuit nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondurov, E. P.; Kruglikov, P. A.; Smolkin, Yu. V.

    2015-10-01

    Ways for improving the turbine district heating installations of single-circuit nuclear power plants are considered as a possible approach to improving the nuclear power plant energy efficiency. The results of thermal tests carried out at one of single-circuit NPPs in Russia with a view to reveal the possibilities of improving the existing heat-transfer equipment of the turbine district heating installation without making significant investments in it were taken as a basis for the analysis. The tests have shown that there is certain energy saving potential in some individual units and elements in the turbine district heating installation's process circuit. A significant amount of thermal energy can be obtained only by decreasing the intermediate circuit temperature at the inlet to the heater of the first district-heating extraction. The taking of this measure will also lead to an additional amount of generated electricity because during operation with the partially loaded first heater, the necessary amount of heat has to be obtained from the peaking heater by reducing live steam. An additional amount of thermal energy can also be obtained by eliminating leaks through the bypass control valves. The possibility of achieving smaller consumption of electric energy for power plant auxiliaries by taking measures on reducing the available head in the intermediate circuit installation's pump unit is demonstrated. Partial cutting of pump impellers and dismantling of control valves are regarded to be the most efficient methods. The latter is attributed to qualitative control of the turbine district heating installation's thermal load. Adjustment of the noncondensable gas removal system will make it possible to improve the performance of the turbine district heating installation's heat-transfer equipment owing to bringing the heat-transfer coefficients in the heaters to the design level. The obtained results can be used for estimating the energy saving potential at other

  7. State of the art on nuclear heating measurement methods and expected improvements in zero power research reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Guillou Mael

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the recent methodological advances suitable for nuclear heating measurements in zero power research reactors. This bibliographical work is part of an experimental approach currently in progress at CEA Cadarache, aiming at optimizing photon heating measurements in low-power research reactors. It provides an overview of the application fields of the most widely used detectors, namely thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs and optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters. Starting from the methodology currently implemented at CEA, the expected improvements relate to the experimental determination of the neutron component, which is a key point conditioning the accuracy of photon heating measurements in mixed n–γ field. A recently developed methodology based on the use of 7Li and 6Li-enriched TLDs, precalibrated both in photon and neutron fields, is a promising approach to deconvolute the two components of nuclear heating. We also investigate the different methods of optical fiber dosimetry, with a view to assess the feasibility of online photon heating measurements, whose primary benefit is to overcome constraints related to the withdrawal of dosimeters from the reactor immediately after irradiation. Moreover, a fibered setup could allow measuring the instantaneous dose rate during irradiation, as well as the delayed photon dose after reactor shutdown. Some insights from potential further developments are given. Obviously, any improvement of the technique has to lead to a measurement uncertainty at least equal to that of the currently used methodology (∼5% at 1σ.

  8. Influence of inlet velocity of air and solid particle feed rate on holdup mass and heat transfer characteristics in cyclone heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mothilal, T. [T. J. S. Engineering College, Gummidipoond (India); Pitchandi, K. [Sri Venkateswara College of Engineering, Sriperumbudur (India)

    2015-10-15

    Present work elaborates the effect of inlet velocity of air and solid particle feed rate on holdup mass and heat transfer characteristics in a cyclone heat exchanger. The RNG k-ε turbulence model was adopted for modeling high turbulence flow and Discrete phase model (DPM) to track solid particles in a cyclone heat exchanger by ANSYS FLUENT software. The effect of inlet air velocity (5 to 25 m/s) and inlet solid particle feed rate of (0.2 to 2.5 g/s) at different particle diameter (300 to 500 μm) on holdup mass and heat transfer rate in cyclone heat exchanger was studied at air inlet temperature of 473 K. Results show that holdup mass and heat transfer rate increase with increase in inlet air velocity and inlet solid particle feed rate. Influence of solid particle feed rate on holdup mass has more significance. Experimental setup was built for high efficiency cyclone. Good agreement was found between experimental and simulation pressure drop. Empirical correlation was derived for dimensionless holdup mass and Nusselt number based on CFD data by regression technique. Correlation predicts dimensional holdup mass with +5% to -8% errors of experimental data and Nusselt number with +9% to -3%.

  9. Conception rate of artificially inseminated Holstein cows affected by cloudy vaginal mucus, under intense heat conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Mellado

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to obtain prevalence estimates of cloudy vaginal mucus in artificially inseminated Holstein cows raised under intense heat, in order to assess the effect of meteorological conditions on its occurrence during estrus and to determine its effect on conception rate. In a first study, an association was established between the occurrence of cloudy vaginal mucus during estrus and the conception rate of inseminated cows (18,620 services, raised under intense heat (mean annual temperature of 22°C, at highly technified farms, in the arid region of northern Mexico. In a second study, data from these large dairy operations were used to assess the effect of meteorological conditions throughout the year on the occurrence of cloudy vaginal mucus during artificial insemination (76,899 estruses. The overall rate of estruses with cloudy vaginal mucus was 21.4% (16,470/76,899; 95% confidence interval = 21.1-21.7%. The conception rate of cows with clean vaginal mucus was higher than that of cows with abnormal mucus (30.6 vs. 22%. Prevalence of estruses with cloudy vaginal mucus was strongly dependent on high ambient temperature and markedly higher in May and June. Acceptable conception rates in high milk-yielding Holstein cows can only be obtained with cows showing clear and translucid mucus at artificial insemination.

  10. Improved boundary layer heat transfer calculations near a stagnation point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyung Hwan

    1990-01-01

    A thermal design of a solar receiver has been developed for the solutions of problems involving phase-change thermal energy storage and natural convection loss. Two dimensional axisymmetrical solidification and melting of materials contained between two concentric cylinders of finite length has been studied for thermal energy storage analysis. For calculation of free convection loss inside receiver cavity, two dimensional axisymmetrical, laminar, transient free convection including radiation effects has been studied using integral/finite difference method. Finite difference equations are derived for the above analysis subject to constant or variable material properties, initial conditions, and boundary conditions. The validity of the analyses has been substantiated by comparing results of the present general method with available analytic solutions or numerical results reported in the literature. Both explicit and implicit schemes are tested in phase change analysis with different number of nodes ranging from 4 to 18. The above numerical methods have been applied to the existing solar receiver analyzing computer code as additional subroutines. The results were computed for one of the proposed Brayton cycle solar receiver models running under the actual environmental conditions. Effect of thermal energy storage on the thermal behavior of the receiver has been estimated. Due to the thermal energy storage, about 65% reduction on working gas outlet temperature fluctuation has been obtained; however, maximum temperature of thermal energy storage containment has been increased about 18%. Also, effect of natural convection inside a receiver cavity on the receiver heat transfer has been analyzed. The finding indicated that thermal stratification occurs during the sun time resulting in higher receiver temperatures at the outlet section of the gas tube, and lower temperatures at the inlet section of the gas tube when compared with the results with no natural convection. Due

  11. Management Strategies Aiming to Improve Horse Welfare Reduce Embryonic Death Rates in Mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malschitzky, E; Pimentel, A M; Garbade, P; Jobim, Mim; Gregory, R M; Mattos, R C

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effect of management strategies aiming to improve animal well-being on pregnancy and embryonic death (ED) rates. Breeding records of a cohort of 1206 Thoroughbred mares brought to a stallion station facility, to be bred with the stallions housed there, were evaluated during ten breeding seasons. Mares were blocked according to management strategies in two groups: Stress and Relax. Strategies used to improve animal well-being (Relax group) were as follows: stopping the teasing routine, reducing or eliminating stall confinement, reducing the number of mares per group and maintaining herd stability during the breeding season. In barren mares, the pregnancy rate was higher in the Relax group (91.8%) when compared to the observed in Stress group (84.7%). However, no difference in pregnancy rates were observed (Stress = 85.2% vs. Relax = 86.2) in foaling mares. ED rate was higher in barren and foaling mares of the Stress group mares (25.5% and 26.8%, respectively) compared with the Relax group (16.1% and 14.7%, respectively). No significant differences were observed on foal heat pregnancy rate between groups; yet, the embryo loss on foal heat was significant reduced in Relax mares (Relax = 8.7% vs Stress = 24.5%). In conclusion, management strategies aimed to reduce social stress can reduce early pregnancy losses and the average cycles per pregnancy, improving reproductive performance in mares. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Statistical properties of Joule heating rate, electric field and conductances at high latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Aikio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Statistical properties of Joule heating rate, electric field and conductances in the high latitude ionosphere are studied by a unique one-month measurement made by the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar in Tromsø (66.6 cgmlat from 6 March to 6 April 2006. The data are from the same season (close to vernal equinox and from similar sunspot conditions (about 1.5 years before the sunspot minimum providing an excellent set of data to study the MLT and Kp dependence of parameters with high temporal and spatial resolution. All the parameters show a clear MLT variation, which is different for low and high Kp conditions. Our results indicate that the response of morning sector conductances and conductance ratios to increased magnetic activity is stronger than that of the evening sector. The co-location of Pedersen conductance maximum and electric field maximum in the morning sector produces the largest Joule heating rates 03–05 MLT for Kp≥3. In the evening sector, a smaller maximum occurs at 18 MLT. Minimum Joule heating rates in the nightside are statistically observed at 23 MLT, which is the location of the electric Harang discontinuity. An important outcome of the paper are the fitted functions for the Joule heating rate as a function of electric field magnitude, separately for four MLT sectors and two activity levels (Kp<3 and Kp≥3. In addition to the squared electric field, the fit includes a linear term to study the possible anticorrelation or correlation between electric field and conductance. In the midday sector, positive correlation is found as well as in the morning sector for the high activity case. In the midnight and evening sectors, anticorrelation between electric field and conductance is obtained, i.e. high electric fields are associated with low conductances. This is expected to occur in the return current regions adjacent to auroral arcs as a result of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling, as discussed by Aikio et al. (2004 In

  13. Statistical properties of Joule heating rate, electric field and conductances at high latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Aikio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Statistical properties of Joule heating rate, electric field and conductances in the high latitude ionosphere are studied by a unique one-month measurement made by the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar in Tromsø (66.6 cgmlat from 6 March to 6 April 2006. The data are from the same season (close to vernal equinox and from similar sunspot conditions (about 1.5 years before the sunspot minimum providing an excellent set of data to study the MLT and Kp dependence of parameters with high temporal and spatial resolution.

    All the parameters show a clear MLT variation, which is different for low and high Kp conditions. Our results indicate that the response of morning sector conductances and conductance ratios to increased magnetic activity is stronger than that of the evening sector. The co-location of Pedersen conductance maximum and electric field maximum in the morning sector produces the largest Joule heating rates 03–05 MLT for Kp≥3. In the evening sector, a smaller maximum occurs at 18 MLT. Minimum Joule heating rates in the nightside are statistically observed at 23 MLT, which is the location of the electric Harang discontinuity.

    An important outcome of the paper are the fitted functions for the Joule heating rate as a function of electric field magnitude, separately for four MLT sectors and two activity levels (Kp<3 and Kp≥3. In addition to the squared electric field, the fit includes a linear term to study the possible anticorrelation or correlation between electric field and conductance. In the midday sector, positive correlation is found as well as in the morning sector for the high activity case. In the midnight and evening sectors, anticorrelation between electric field and conductance is obtained, i.e. high electric fields are associated with low conductances. This is expected to occur in the return current regions adjacent to

  14. Effect of team training on improving MRI study completion rates and no-show rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbash, Alexander; Yucel, Kent; Yuh, William; Doros, Gheorghe; Ajam, Amna; Lang, Elvira; Pauker, Stephen; Mayr, Nina

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a high-cost imaging modality, and an optimized encounter ideally provides high-quality care, patient satisfaction, and capacity utilization. Our purpose was to assess the effectiveness of team training and its impact on patient show-up and completion rates for their MRI examinations. A total of 97,712 patient visits from three tertiary academic medical centers over 1-year intervals were evaluated, totaling 49,733 visits at baseline and 47,979 after training. Each center's MRI team received team training skill training including advanced communication and team training techniques training. This training included onsite instruction including case simulation with scenarios requiring appropriate behavioral and communicative interventions. Orientation and training also utilized customized online tools and proctoring. The study completion rate and patient show-up rate during consecutive year-long intervals before and after team training were compared to assess its effectiveness. Two-sided chi-square tests for proportions using were applied at a 0.05 significance level. Despite differing no-show rates (5-22.2%) and study incompletion rates (0.7-3.7%) at the three academic centers, the combined patients' data showed significant (P < 0.0001) improvement in the patients' no-show rates (combined decreases from 11.2% to 8.7%) and incompletion rates (combined decreases from 2.3% to 1.4%). Our preliminary results suggest training of the imaging team can improve the no-show and incompletion rates of the MRI service, positively affecting throughput and utilization. Team training can be readily implemented and may help address the needs of the current cost-conscious and consumer-sensitive healthcare environment. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;44:1040-1047. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Molecular dynamics study on the effect of boundary heating rate on the phase change characteristics of thin film liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim, E-mail: nasim@me.buet.ac.bd.com; Morshed, A. K. M. Monjur, E-mail: shavik@me.buet.ac.bd.com; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle, E-mail: rabbi35.me10@gmail.com; Haque, Mominul, E-mail: mominulmarup@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET) Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    In this study, theoretical investigation of thin film liquid phase change phenomena under different boundary heating rates has been conducted with the help of molecular dynamics simulation. To do this, the case of argon boiling over a platinum surface has been considered. The study has been conducted to get a better understanding of the nano-scale physics of evaporation/boiling for a three phase system with particular emphasis on the effect of boundary heating rate. The simulation domain consisted of liquid and vapor argon atoms placed over a platinum wall. Initially the whole system was brought to an equilibrium state at 90 K with the help of equilibrium molecular dynamics and then the temperature of the bottom wall was increased to a higher temperature (250 K/130 K) over a finite heating period. Depending on the heating period, the boundary heating rate has been varied in the range of 1600×10{sup 9} K/s to 8×10{sup 9} K/s. The variations of argon region temperature, pressure, net evaporation number with respect to time under different boundary heating rates have been determined and discussed. The heat fluxes normal to platinum wall for different cases were also calculated and compared with theoretical upper limit of maximum possible heat transfer to elucidate the effect of boundary heating rate.

  16. Liquid-Phase Heat-Release Rates of the Systems Hydrazine-Nitric Acid and Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine-Nitric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Dezso; Feiler, Charles E.

    1960-01-01

    The initial rates of heat release produced by the reactions of hydrazine and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine with nitric acid were determined in a bomb calorimeter under conditions of forced mixing. Fuel-oxidant weight ratio and injection velocity were varied. The rate of heat release apparently depended on the interfacial area between the propellants. Above a narrow range of injection velocities representing a critical amount of interfacial area, the rates reached a maximum and were almost constant with injection velocity. The maximum rate for hydrazine was about 70 percent greater than that for unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine. The total heat released did not vary with mixture ratio over the range studied.

  17. Internal stress-induced melting below melting temperature at high-rate laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yong Seok; Levitas, Valery I.

    2014-06-01

    In this Letter, continuum thermodynamic and phase field approaches (PFAs) predicted internal stress-induced reduction in melting temperature for laser-irradiated heating of a nanolayer. Internal stresses appear due to thermal strain under constrained conditions and completely relax during melting, producing an additional thermodynamic driving force for melting. Thermodynamic melting temperature for Al reduces from 933.67 K for a stress-free condition down to 898.1 K for uniaxial strain and to 920.8 K for plane strain. Our PFA simulations demonstrated barrierless surface-induced melt nucleation below these temperatures and propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other at the temperatures very close to the corresponding predicted thermodynamic equilibrium temperatures for the heating rate Q ≤1.51×1010K/s. At higher heating rates, kinetic superheating competes with a reduction in melting temperature and melting under uniaxial strain occurs at 902.1 K for Q = 1.51 × 1011 K/s and 936.9 K for Q = 1.46 × 1012 K/s.

  18. Internal stress-induced melting below melting temperature at high-rate laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yong Seok, E-mail: yshwang@iastate.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Levitas, Valery I., E-mail: vlevitas@iastate.edu [Departments of Aerospace Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Material Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    In this Letter, continuum thermodynamic and phase field approaches (PFAs) predicted internal stress-induced reduction in melting temperature for laser-irradiated heating of a nanolayer. Internal stresses appear due to thermal strain under constrained conditions and completely relax during melting, producing an additional thermodynamic driving force for melting. Thermodynamic melting temperature for Al reduces from 933.67 K for a stress-free condition down to 898.1 K for uniaxial strain and to 920.8 K for plane strain. Our PFA simulations demonstrated barrierless surface-induced melt nucleation below these temperatures and propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other at the temperatures very close to the corresponding predicted thermodynamic equilibrium temperatures for the heating rate Q≤1.51×10{sup 10}K/s. At higher heating rates, kinetic superheating competes with a reduction in melting temperature and melting under uniaxial strain occurs at 902.1 K for Q = 1.51 × 10{sup 11 }K/s and 936.9 K for Q = 1.46 × 10{sup 12 }K/s.

  19. Effects of NaCl on metabolic heat evolution rates by barley roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criddle, R. S.; Hansen, L. D.; Breidenbach, R. W.; Ward, M. R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of salinity stress on metabolic heat output of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) root tips was measured by isothermal microcalorimetry. Several varieties differing in tolerance to salinity were compared and differences quantified. Two levels of inhibition by increasing salt were found. Following the transition from the initial rate of the first level, inhibition remained at about 50% with further increases in salt concentration up to 150 millimolar. The concentration of salt required to inhibit to this level was cultivar dependent. At highter concentrations (>150 millimolar) of salt, metabolism was further decreased. This decrease was not cultivar dependent. The decreased rate of metabolic heat output at the first transition could be correlated with decreases in uptake of NO3-, NH4+, and Pi that occurred as the salt concentration was increased. The high degree of dependence of the inhibition of metabolic heat output on NaCl concentration points to a highly cooperative reaction responsible for the general inhibition of metabolism and nutrient uptake. The time required to attain the first level of salt inhibition is less than 20 minutes. Inhibition of root tips was not reversible by washing with salt free solutions. In addition to revealing these features of salt inhibition, isothermal microcalorimetry is a promising method for convenient and rapid determination of varietal differences in response to increasing salinity.

  20. Improved estimates of ocean heat content from 1960 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lijing; Trenberth, Kevin E; Fasullo, John; Boyer, Tim; Abraham, John; Zhu, Jiang

    2017-03-01

    Earth's energy imbalance (EEI) drives the ongoing global warming and can best be assessed across the historical record (that is, since 1960) from ocean heat content (OHC) changes. An accurate assessment of OHC is a challenge, mainly because of insufficient and irregular data coverage. We provide updated OHC estimates with the goal of minimizing associated sampling error. We performed a subsample test, in which subsets of data during the data-rich Argo era are colocated with locations of earlier ocean observations, to quantify this error. Our results provide a new OHC estimate with an unbiased mean sampling error and with variability on decadal and multidecadal time scales (signal) that can be reliably distinguished from sampling error (noise) with signal-to-noise ratios higher than 3. The inferred integrated EEI is greater than that reported in previous assessments and is consistent with a reconstruction of the radiative imbalance at the top of atmosphere starting in 1985. We found that changes in OHC are relatively small before about 1980; since then, OHC has increased fairly steadily and, since 1990, has increasingly involved deeper layers of the ocean. In addition, OHC changes in six major oceans are reliable on decadal time scales. All ocean basins examined have experienced significant warming since 1998, with the greatest warming in the southern oceans, the tropical/subtropical Pacific Ocean, and the tropical/subtropical Atlantic Ocean. This new look at OHC and EEI changes over time provides greater confidence than previously possible, and the data sets produced are a valuable resource for further study.

  1. Additive Effects of Heating and Exercise on Baroreflex Control of Heart Rate in Healthy Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peçanha, Tiago; Forjaz, Claudia Lucia de Moraes; Low, David Andrew

    2017-08-31

    This study assessed the additive effects of passive heating and exercise on cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS) and heart rate variability (HRV). Twelve healthy young men (25±1 yrs, 23.8±0.5 kg/m(2)) randomly underwent two experimental sessions: heat stress (HS; whole-body heat stress using a tube-lined suit to increase core temperature by ~1°C) and normothermia (NT). Each session was composed of a: pre-intervention rest (REST1); HS or NT interventions; post-intervention rest (REST2); and 14 min of cycling exercise [7 min at 40%HRreserve (EX1) and 7 min at 60%HRreserve (EX2)]. Heart rate and finger blood pressure were continuously recorded. cBRS was assessed using the sequence (cBRSSEQ) and transfer function (cBRSTF) methods. HRV was assessed using the indices SDNN (standard deviation of RR intervals) and RMSSD (root mean square of successive RR intervals). cBRS and HRV were not different between sessions during EX1 and EX2 (i.e. matched heart rate conditions: EX1=116±3 vs. 114±3, EX2=143±4 vs. 142±3 bpm; but different workloads: EX1=50±9 vs. 114±8, EX2=106±10 vs. 165±8 Watts; for HS and NT, respectively; Pheart rates), cBRS and HRV were significantly reduced in HS (cBRSSEQ = 1.6±0.3 vs. 0.6±0.1 ms/mmHg, P<0.01; SDNN = 2.3±0.1 vs. 1.3±0.2 ms, P<0.01). In conclusion, in conditions matched by HR, the addition of heat stress to exercise does not affect cBRS and HRV. Alternatively, in workload-matched conditions, the addition of heat to exercise results in reduced cBRS and HRV compared to exercise in normothermia. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  2. Adolescent Vaccines: Latest Recommendations, Addressing Barriers, and Improving Vaccine Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kathleen C

    2017-07-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends that the Tdap, HPV, and meningitis vaccines be administered to youth beginning between the ages of 11 and 12. The school nurse, knowledgeable about vaccine schedules and the rationale for the schedules, is in a unique position to advocate for all adolescent vaccines and their timely administration through addressing parent-guardian concerns and supporting other healthcare providers in completing the adolescent vaccines. This article reviews current recommendations for adolescent vaccinations and the actions needed to improve vaccination rates with a focus on Human Papillomavirus vaccine, the vaccine with the lowest completion rates among this age group. Additionally, school nurses are introduced to Middle School Health Starts Here, a program for school nurses designed to address the whole child as students progress from 5th grade to middle school. Public policy issues including school mandates, along with possible barriers to vaccine completion in adolescents, are discussed.

  3. Devolatilization kinetics of woody biomass at short residence times and high heating rates and peak temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Joakim M.; Gadsbøll, Rasmus; Thomsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    This work combines experimental and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results to derive global kinetics for biomass (pine wood) devolatilization during heating rates on the order of 105Ks-1, bulk flow peak temperatures between 1405 and 1667K, and particle residence times below 0.1s. Experiments ...... faster kinetics than found in the literature, leading to predicted residence times required for full conversion one order of magnitude lower than when compared to thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) derived kinetics.......This work combines experimental and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results to derive global kinetics for biomass (pine wood) devolatilization during heating rates on the order of 105Ks-1, bulk flow peak temperatures between 1405 and 1667K, and particle residence times below 0.1s. Experiments...... were conducted on a laboratory laminar entrained flow reactor (LFR) using solid fuel feed rates on the order of 10-20mgh-1. Employing a simple single step first order (SFOR) mechanism with an Arrhenius type rate expression, the best fit of the pyrolysis kinetics was found to be: A=18.9×103s-1, Ea=21305...

  4. Improvements in plant growth rate using underwater discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, K.; Takahata, J.; Watanabe, S.; Satta, N.; Yamada, O.; Fujio, T.; Sasaki, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The drainage water from plant pots was irradiated by plasma and then recycled to irrigate plants for improving the growth rate by supplying nutrients to plants and inactivating the bacteria in the bed-soil. Brassica rapa var. perviridis (Chinese cabbage; Brassica campestris) plants were cultivated in pots filled with artificial soil, which included the use of chicken droppings as a fertiliser. The water was recycled once per day from a drainage water pool and added to the bed-soil in the pots. A magnetic compression type pulsed power generator was used to produce underwater discharge with repetition rate of 250 pps. The plasma irradiation times were set as 10 and 20 minutes per day over 28 days of cultivation. The experimental results showed that the growth rate increased significantly with plasma irradiation into the drainage water. The growth rate increased with the plasma irradiation time. The nitrogen concentration of the leaves increased as a result of plasma irradiation based on chlorophyll content analysis. The bacteria in the drainage water were inactivated by the plasma irradiation.

  5. Sales Growth Rate Forecasting Using Improved PSO and SVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate forecast of the sales growth rate plays a decisive role in determining the amount of advertising investment. In this study, we present a preclassification and later regression based method optimized by improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO for sales growth rate forecasting. We use support vector machine (SVM as a classification model. The nonlinear relationship in sales growth rate forecasting is efficiently represented by SVM, while IPSO is optimizing the training parameters of SVM. IPSO addresses issues of traditional PSO, such as relapsing into local optimum, slow convergence speed, and low convergence precision in the later evolution. We performed two experiments; firstly, three classic benchmark functions are used to verify the validity of the IPSO algorithm against PSO. Having shown IPSO outperform PSO in convergence speed, precision, and escaping local optima, in our second experiment, we apply IPSO to the proposed model. The sales growth rate forecasting cases are used to testify the forecasting performance of proposed model. According to the requirements and industry knowledge, the sample data was first classified to obtain types of the test samples. Next, the values of the test samples were forecast using the SVM regression algorithm. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model has good forecasting performance.

  6. Stage-specific heat effects: timing and duration of heat waves alter demographic rates of a global insect pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Rudolf, Volker H W; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2015-12-01

    The frequency and duration of periods with high temperatures are expected to increase under global warming. Thus, even short-lived organisms are increasingly likely to experience periods of hot temperatures at some point of their life-cycle. Despite recent progress, it remains unclear how various temperature experiences during the life-cycle of organisms affect demographic traits. We simulated hot days (daily mean temperature of 30 °C) increasingly experienced under field conditions and investigated how the timing and duration of such hot days during the life cycle of Plutella xylostella affects adult traits. We show that hot days experienced during some life stages (but not all) altered adult lifespan, fecundity, and oviposition patterns. Importantly, the effects of hot days were contingent on which stage was affected, and these stage-specific effects were not always additive. Thus, adults that experience different temporal patterns of hot periods (i.e., changes in timing and duration) during their life-cycle often had different demographic rates and reproductive patterns. These results indicate that we cannot predict the effects of current and future climate on natural populations by simply focusing on changes in the mean temperature. Instead, we need to incorporate the temporal patterns of heat events relative to the life-cycle of organisms to describe population dynamics and how they will respond to future climate change.

  7. STEADY-STATE HEAT REJECTION RATES FOR A COAXIAL BOREHOLE HEAT EXCHANGER DURING PASSIVE AND ACTIVE COOLING DETERMINED WITH THE NOVEL STEP THERMAL RESPONSE TEST METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Macenić

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available At three locations in Zagreb, classical and extended thermal response test (TRT was conducted on installed coaxial heat exchangers. With classic TR test, thermogeological properties of the ground and thermal resistance of the borehole were determined at each location. It is seen that thermal conductivity of the ground varies, due to difference in geological profile of the sites. In addition, experimental research of steady-state thermal response step test (SSTRST was carried out to determine heat rejection rates for passive and active cooling in steady state regime. Results showed that heat rejection rate is only between 8-11 W/m, which indicates that coaxial system is not suitable for passive cooling demands. Furthermore, the heat pump in passive cooling mode uses additional plate heat exchanger where there is additional temperature drop of working fluid by approximately 1,5 °C. Therefore, steady-state rejection rate for passive cooling is even lower for a real case project. Coaxial heat exchanger should be always designed for an active cooling regime with an operation of a heat pump compressor in a classical vapour compression refrigeration cycle.

  8. Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat-Transfer Rate Using a Thermal Capacitance (Slug) Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the measurement of heat transfer rate using a thermal capacitance-type calorimeter which assumes one-dimensional heat conduction into a cylindrical piece of material (slug) with known physical properties. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. Note 1—For information see Test Methods E 285, E 422, E 458, E 459, and E 511.

  9. Technology and operational considerations for low-heat-rate trajectories. [of future winged earth reentry vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, K. E.; Eldred, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    A broad parametric study which examines several critical aspects of low-heat-rate entry trajectories is performed. Low planform loadings associated with future winged earth-entry vehicles coupled with the potential application of metallic thermal protection systems (TPS) suggest that such trajectories are of particular interest. Studied are three heating conditions - reference, stagnation, and windward centerline, for both laminar and turbulent flow; configuration-related factors including planform loading and hypersonic angle of attack; and mission-related factors such as cross-range and orbit inclination. Results indicate benefits in the design of TPS to be gained by utilizing moderate angles of attack as opposed to high-lift coefficient, high angles of attack, during entry. An assessment of design and technology implications is made.

  10. Cable Insulation Scheme to Improve Heat Transfer to Superfluid Helium in Nb-Ti Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    La China, M

    2008-01-01

    In superconducting magnets operating at high heat loads as the ones for interaction region of particle colliders or for fast cycling synchrotrons, the limited heat transfer capability of state-of-the-art electrical insulation may constitute a heavy limitation to performance. In the LHC main magnets, Nb-Ti epoxy-free insulation, composed of polyimide tapes, has proved to be permeable to superfluid helium, however the heat flux is rather limited. After a review of the standard insulation scheme for Nb-Ti and of the associated heat transfer mechanisms, we show the existence of a large margin available to improve insulation permeability.We propose a possible way to profit of such a margin in order to increase significantly the maximum heat flux drainable from an all polyimide insulated Nb-Ti coil, as it is used in modern accelerator magnets.

  11. Design and simulation of heat exchangers using Aspen HYSYS, and Aspen exchanger design and rating for paddy drying application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaun, J.; Kamin, N. H.; Wong, K. H.; Tham, H. J.; Kong, V. V.; Farajpourlar, M.

    2016-06-01

    Air heating unit is one of the most important parts in paddy drying to ensure the efficiency of a drying process. In addition, an optimized air heating unit does not only promise a good paddy quality, but also save more for the operating cost. This study determined the suitable and best specifications heating unit to heat air for paddy drying in the LAMB dryer. In this study, Aspen HYSYS v7.3 was used to obtain the minimum flow rate of hot water needed. The resulting data obtained from Aspen HYSYS v7.3 were used in Aspen Exchanger Design and Rating (EDR) to generate heat exchanger design and costs. The designs include shell and tubes and plate heat exchanger. The heat exchanger was designed in order to produce various drying temperatures of 40, 50, 60 and 70°C of air with different flow rate, 300, 2500 and 5000 LPM. The optimum condition for the heat exchanger were found to be plate heat exchanger with 0.6 mm plate thickness, 198.75 mm plate width, 554.8 mm plate length and 11 numbers of plates operating at 5000 LPM air flow rate.

  12. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines. II - Pressureless sintering and mechanical properties of injection molded silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Thomas J.; Baer, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    The influence on density and strength of pressureless sintering in vacuum and argon environments has been evaluated with injection molded SiC materials. Main effects and two factor interactions of sintering (cycle variables temperature, time, heating rate, and atmosphere) were assessed. An improved understanding of the influence of the processing flaws and sintering conditions has been obtained. Strength and density have improved from a baseline level of 299 MPa (43.3 Ksi) and 94 pct of theoretical density to values greater than 483 MPa (70 Ksi) and 97 pct.

  13. Improvement on control system of the JT-60 radio frequency heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinozaki, Shin-ichi; Moriyama, Shinichi; Hiranai, Shinichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Sato, Fumiaki [Nippon Advanced Technology Co., Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    On the JT-60 radio frequency (RF) heating system, the decrease in the activity ratio was a problem because of the deterioration of the control system. To improve the reliability, we replaced CAMAC system for a power injection control system, which was a main cause of the trouble, with the microprocessor system. And, a function of computer supported programming function of RF power injection form was introduced, which contributed to reduce a load of operators. Furthermore, personal computers with network communication were introduced to improve a maintenance ability of the control system. As a result, the activity ratio of the RF heating system was improved significantly. (author)

  14. Calculations of Solar Shortwave Heating Rates due to Black Carbon and Ozone Absorption Using in Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Swartz, W. H.; Spackman, J. R.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Aikin, K. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Bui, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the solar heating rates in ambient air due to absorption by black-carbon (BC) containing particles and ozone are presented as calculated from airborne observations made in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) in January-February 2006. The method uses airborne in situ observations of BC particles, ozone and actinic flux. Total BC mass is obtained along the flight track by summing the masses of individually detected BC particles in the range 90 to 600-nm volume-equivalent diameter, which includes most of the BC mass. Ozone mixing ratios and upwelling and partial downwelling solar actinic fluxes were measured concurrently with BC mass. Two estimates used for the BC wavelength-dependent absorption cross section yielded similar heating rates. For mean altitudes of 16.5, 17.5, and 18.5 km (0.5 km) in the tropics, average BC heating rates were near 0.0002 K/d. Observed BC coatings on individual particles approximately double derived BC heating rates. Ozone heating rates exceeded BC heating rates by approximately a factor of 100 on average and at least a factor of 4, suggesting that BC heating rates in this region are negligible in comparison.

  15. Study on heat transport rate of an osmotic heat pipe. 2nd Report. Flow in a membrane module; Shinto heat pipe no netsuyuso ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. Maku module nai no ryudo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipposhi, S.; Imura, H. [Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-05-25

    An osmotic heat pipe is a top beat mode heat pipe driven by an osmotic force. Therefore, a concentration and a solution flow rate in a membrane module of the osmotic heat pipe are especially of great importance for the heat transport. Thus, the flow in the membrane module is7investigated in detail. As a result, with a ratio of a concentration on the membrane wall to a mixed mean concentration derived semi-theoretically, correlations for the mixed mean concentration, the concentration on the wall and the solution flow rate along the channel in the membrane module were proposed, which can correlate the experimental data from reference (2) within {+-}20% errors. In addition, a method of increasing in the osmotic pumping rate and heat transport rate was proposed. 3 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Method of Heat Treating Aluminum-Lithium Alloy to Improve Formability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn Kurgan (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method is provided for heat treating aluminum-lithium alloys to improve their formability. The alloy is heated to a first temperature, maintained at the first temperature for a first time period, heated at the conclusion of the first time period to a second temperature, maintained at the second temperature for a second time period, actively cooled at the conclusion of the second time period to a third temperature, maintained at the third temperature for a third time period, and then passively cooled at the conclusion of the third time period to room temperature.

  17. Numerical Studies on Heat Release Rate in Room Fire on Liquid Fuel under Different Ventilation Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat release rate (HRR of the design fire is the most important parameter in assessing building fire hazards. However, HRR in room fire was only studied by computational fluid dynamics (CFD in most of the projects determining fire safety provisions by performance-based design. In contrast to ten years ago, officers in the Far East are now having better knowledge of CFD. Two common questions are raised on CFD-predicted results on describing free boundaries; and on computing grid size. In this work, predicting HRR by the CFD model was justified with experimental room pool fire data reported earlier. The software fire dynamics simulator (FDS version 5 was selected as the CFD simulation tool. Prescribed input heating rate based on the experimental results was used with the liquid fuel model in FDS. Five different free boundary conditions were investigated to predict HRR. Grid sensitivity study was carried out using one stretched mesh and multiple uniform meshes with different grid sizes. As it is difficult to have the entire set of CFD predicted results agreed with experiments, macroscopic flow parameters on the mass flow rate through door opening predicted by CFD were also justified by another four conditions with different ventilation factors.

  18. Improving the Efficiency of an Ideal Heat Engine: The Quantum Afterburner

    OpenAIRE

    Scully, Marlan O.

    2001-01-01

    By using a laser and maser in tandem, it is possible to obtain laser action in the hot exhaust gases involved in heat engine operation. Such a "quantum afterburner" involves the internal quantum states of working gas atoms or molecules as well as the techniques of cavity quantum electrodynamics and is therefore in the domain of quantum thermodynamics. As an example, it is shown that Otto cycle engine performance can be improved beyond that of the "ideal" Otto heat engine.

  19. Heat exchange equipment and valve design and operability improvement. NE-Volume 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K.P [ed.] [Holtec International, Cherry Hill, NJ (United States); Niyogi, K.K. [ed.

    1994-12-31

    The papers contained in this volume were presented at the Maurice Holtz Memorial Sessions on Heat Exchanger Equipment and Valve Design and Operability Improvement, as part of the 1994 International Joint Power Generation Conference and Exhibition, October 2--6, in Phoenix, Arizona. These eight papers deal with two types of components--heat exchangers and valves, both of which are used in practically all sensors of the nuclear industry.

  20. Policy considerations for improving influenza vaccination rates among pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollard, Elizabeth K; Guenzel, Nicholas; Brown, Peggy A; Keeler, Heidi J; Cramer, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    Influenza exposure during pregnancy can cause severe health problems for both the mother and her offspring, including an increased risk of mortality. Influenza vaccination during all trimesters of pregnancy is safe and effective, and recommended by professional organizations such as the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Despite these recommendations, the U.S. vaccination rates remain low in this high-risk population. A policy analysis based on the five-part method identified by Teitelbaum and Wilensky () addresses factors to consider in identifying the best voluntary policy options to improve the vaccination rates. The authors provide discussion of the background, landscape, and stakeholder interests and the pros and cons of two voluntary policy options to increase vaccination. The policy options include: (a) financial incentives for providers and (b) an education emphasis for providers and staff. The authors conclude that based on considerations of cost, provider preference, and practicality of implementation, a continuing educational intervention is the preferred policy venue to increase vaccination rates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The influence of temperature and heating rate on the slow pyrolysis of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P.T.; Besler, Serpil [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Fuel and Energy

    1996-10-01

    The slow pyrolysis of biomass in the form of pine wood was investigated in a static batch reactor at pyrolysis temperatures from 300 to 720{sup o}C and heating rates from 5 to 80 K min{sup -1}. The compositions and properties of the derived gases, pyrolytic oils and solid char were determined in relation to pyrolysis temperatures and heating rates. In addition, the wood and the major components of the wood - cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin - were pyrolysed in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) under the same experimental conditions as in the static batch reactor. The static batch reactor results showed that as the pyrolysis temperature was increased, the percentage mass of solid char decreased, while gas and oil products increased. There was a small effect of heating rate on product yield. The lower temperature regime of decomposition of wood showed that mainly H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and CO were evolved and at the higher temperature regime, the main decomposition products were oil, H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}, hydrocarbon gases and lower concentrations of CO and CO{sub 2}. Fourier transformation infra-red spectroscopy and elemental analysis of the oils showed they were highly oxygenated. The TGA results for wood showed two main regimes of weight loss, the lower temperature regime could be correlated with the decomposition of hemicellulose and the initial stages of cellulose decomposition whilst the upper temperature regime correlated mainly with the later stages of cellulose decomposition. Lignin thermal decomposition occurred throughout the temperature range of pyrolysis. (author)

  2. Optimization of Heat Exchangers with Dimpled Surfaces to Improve the Performance in Thermoelectric Generators Using a Kriging Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Tao; Yang, Xue; Deng, Yadong; Su, Chuqi

    2017-05-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) have become a topic of interest for vehicle exhaust energy recovery. Electrical power generation is deeply influenced by temperature differences, temperature uniformity and topological structures of TEGs. When the dimpled surfaces are adopted in heat exchangers, the heat transfer rates can be augmented with a minimal pressure drop. However, the temperature distribution shows a large gradient along the flow direction which has adverse effects on the power generation. In the current study, the heat exchanger performance was studied in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The dimple depth, dimple print diameter, and channel height were chosen as design variables. The objective function was defined as a combination of average temperature, temperature uniformity and pressure loss. The optimal Latin hypercube method was used to determine the experiment points as a method of design of the experiment in order to analyze the sensitivity of the design variables. A Kriging surrogate model was built and verified according to the database resulting from the CFD simulation. A multi-island genetic algorithm was used to optimize the structure in the heat exchanger based on the surrogate model. The results showed that the average temperature of the heat exchanger was most sensitive to the dimple depth. The pressure loss and temperature uniformity were most sensitive to the parameter of channel rear height, h 2. With an optimal design of channel structure, the temperature uniformity can be greatly improved compared with the initial exchanger, and the additional pressure loss also increased.

  3. Increasing fMRI sampling rate improves Granger causality estimates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Hsuan Lin

    Full Text Available Estimation of causal interactions between brain areas is necessary for elucidating large-scale functional brain networks underlying behavior and cognition. Granger causality analysis of time series data can quantitatively estimate directional information flow between brain regions. Here, we show that such estimates are significantly improved when the temporal sampling rate of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is increased 20-fold. Specifically, healthy volunteers performed a simple visuomotor task during blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD contrast based whole-head inverse imaging (InI. Granger causality analysis based on raw InI BOLD data sampled at 100-ms resolution detected the expected causal relations, whereas when the data were downsampled to the temporal resolution of 2 s typically used in echo-planar fMRI, the causality could not be detected. An additional control analysis, in which we SINC interpolated additional data points to the downsampled time series at 0.1-s intervals, confirmed that the improvements achieved with the real InI data were not explainable by the increased time-series length alone. We therefore conclude that the high-temporal resolution of InI improves the Granger causality connectivity analysis of the human brain.

  4. Aerobrake heating rate sensitivity study for the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, W. C.; Ting, P. C.; Mueller, S. R.; Colovin, J. E.; Bouslog, S. A.; Curry, D. M.; Scott, C. D.

    1989-01-01

    The sensitivities associated with the prediction of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle's aerothermodynamic environment are presently evaluated in order to assess the heating-rate uncertainties of the AFE's aerobrake component, as a function of time in various trajectories, and as a function of distance around the aerobrake. Relative importance is evaluated by means of the Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure for such areas of uncertainty as the trajectory parameters, the catalycity of the thermal-protection tiles, the nose radius variation/surface pressure distribution, and viscous interaction effects.

  5. Conventional and microwave-assisted pyrolysis of biomass under different heating rates

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, C; Budarin, VL; Gronnow, MJ; De Bruyn, M; Onwudili, JA; Clark, JH; Williams, PT

    2014-01-01

    Biomass was subjected to conventional and microwave pyrolysis, to determine the influence of each process on the yield and composition of the derived gas, oil and char products. The influence of pyrolysis temperature and heating rate for the conventional pyrolysis and the microwave power was investigated. Two major stages of gas release were observed during biomass pyrolysis, the first being CO/CO and the second one CH/H. This two-stage gas release was much more obvious for the conventional p...

  6. Thermal Analysis On The Kinetics Of Magnesium-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxides In Different Heating Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Y.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal decomposition of magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxides (LDHs was investigated by thermogravimetry analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC methods in argon environment. The influence of heating rates (including 2.5, 5, 10, 15 and 20K/min on the thermal behavior of LDHs was revealed. By the methods of Kissinger and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, the thermal kinetic parameters of activation energy and pre-exponential factor for the exothermic processes under non-isothermal conditions were calculated using the analysis of corresponding DSC curves.

  7. Effect of heating rate on toxicity of pyrolysis gases from some synthetic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Soriano, J. A.; Kosola, K. L.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of heating rate on the toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from some synthetic polymers was investigate, using a screening test method. The synthetic polymers were polyethylene, polystyrene, polymethyl methacrylate, polycarbonate, ABS, polyaryl sulfone, polyether sulfone, and polyphenylene sulfide. The toxicants from the sulfur-containing polymers appeared to act more rapidly than the toxicants from the other polymers. It is not known whether this effect is due primarily to differences in concentration or in the nature of the toxicants. The carbon monoxide concentrations found do not account for the observed results.

  8. Short communication: Effect of heat stress on nonreturn rate of Italian Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffani, S; Bernabucci, U; Vitali, A; Lacetera, N; Nardone, A

    2016-07-01

    The data set consisted of 1,016,856 inseminations of 191,012 first, second, and third parity Holstein cows from 484 farms. Data were collected from year 2001 through 2007 and included meteorological data from 35 weather stations. Nonreturn rate at 56 d after first insemination (NR56) was considered. A logit model was used to estimate the effect of temperature-humidity index (THI) on reproduction across parities. Then, least squares means were used to detect the THI breakpoints using a 2-phase linear regression procedure. Finally, a multiple-trait threshold model was used to estimate variance components for NR56 in first and second parity cows. A dummy regression variable (t) was used to estimate NR56 decline due to heat stress. The NR56, both for first and second parity cows, was significantly (unfavorable) affected by THI from 4 d before 5 d after the insemination date. Additive genetic variances for NR56 increased from first to second parity both for general and heat stress effect. Genetic correlations between general and heat stress effects were -0.31 for first parity and -0.45 for second parity cows. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An improvement of airflow and heat transfer performance of multi-coil condensers by different coil configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tzong-Shing; Wu, Wu-Chieh; Chuah, Yew-Khoy; Wang, Sheng-Kai [Department of Energy and Refrigerating Air-Conditioning Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, 1, Sec.3, Chung-Hsiao E. Rd., Taipei 106 (China)

    2010-11-15

    Mal-distribution of airflow is an important factor for the performance of air-cooled multi-coil air-cooled condensers. This study is an attempt to investigate the effects of different included angles between the coils of the condenser. It has been found in this study that it can be a mean to improve the performance of multi-coil condensers without using larger heat transfer surfaces. A commercially used four-coil condenser of an air-cooled water chiller was used as the base case in the tests and analysis. The results show that the variation of the included angle can increase the airflow rate by 7.85%, which corresponds to 5.29% increase in heat transfer. The improvements were found to be due to the reduction of the stagnant flow regions of the heat exchanger coils, and more even flow distribution through the coils. Test data were used to verify the computer model of the four-coil heat exchanger. The same tested fan performance characteristic was used in all of the analyses. The research results are important as air-cooled condensing units can be designed to better performance merely by changing the configuration of the coil arrangements. (author)

  10. Fitness-related differences in the rate of whole-body evaporative heat loss in exercising men are heat-load dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Dallon T; Notley, Sean R; Louie, Jeffrey C; Poirier, Martin P; Kenny, Glen P

    2018-01-01

    What is the central question of this study? Aerobic fitness modulates heat loss, but the heat-load threshold at which fitness-related differences in heat loss occur in young healthy men remains unclear. What is the main finding and its importance? We demonstrate using direct calorimetry that aerobic fitness modulates heat loss in a heat-load-dependent manner, with fitness-related differences occurring between young men who have low and high fitness when the heat load is ∼≥500 W. Although aerobic fitness has been known for some time to modulate heat loss, our findings define the precise heat-load threshold at which fitness-related differences occur. The effect of aerobic fitness (defined as rate of peak oxygen consumption) on heat loss during exercise is thought to be related to the level of heat stress. However, it remains unclear at what combined exercise and environmental (net) heat-load threshold these fitness-related differences occur. To identify this, we assessed whole-body heat exchange (dry and evaporative) by direct calorimetry in young (22 ± 3 years) men matched for physical characteristics with low (Low-fit; 39.8 ± 2.5 ml O2  kg-1  min-1 ), moderate (Mod-fit; 50.9 ± 1.2 ml O2  kg-1  min-1 ) and high aerobic fitness (High-fit; 62.0 ± 4.4 ml O2  kg-1  min-1 ; each n = 8), during three 30 min bouts of cycling in dry heat (40°C, 12% relative humidity) at increasing rates of metabolic heat production of 300 (Ex1), 400 (Ex2) and 500 W (Ex3), each followed by a 15 min recovery period. Each group was exposed to a similar net heat load (metabolic plus ∼100 W dry heat gain; P = 0.83) during each exercise bout [∼400 (Ex1), ∼500 (Ex2) and ∼600 W (Ex3); P fit (Ex2, 466 ± 21 W; Ex3, 557 ± 26 W) compared with the Low-fit group (Ex2, 439 ± 22 W; Ex3, 511 ± 20 W) during Ex2 and Ex3 (P ≤ 0.03). Conversely, evaporative heat loss for the Mod-fit group did not differ from either the High-fit or Low

  11. Heated apple juice supplemented with onion has greatly improved nutritional quality and browning index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bonggi; Seo, Jeong Dae; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Choon Young

    2016-06-15

    Although fruit juices are very popular, enzymatic browning occurs easily. Browning of fruit juice deteriorates nutrition value and product quality due to oxidation of polyphenol compounds. Therefore, development of natural food additives that reduce browning will be beneficial for improving quality of fruit juices. Onion has been reported to be a potent natural anti-browning agent. Here, we compared unheated and heated apple juices pre-supplemented with onion with respect to browning and nutritional quality. The unheated apple juice supplemented with onion showed reduced browning as well as increased total soluble solid, total phenol concentration, radical scavenging activities, and ferric reducing and copper chelating activities without any change in flavonoid concentration. On the other hand, heated juice supplemented with onion not only showed improved values for these parameters but also markedly increased flavonoid concentration. Thus, we conclude that application of heating and onion addition together may greatly improve quality of apple juice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental investigation on heat transfer rate of Co–Mn ferrofluids in external magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margabandhu M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Manganese substituted cobalt ferrite (Co1–xMnxFe2O4 with x = 0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 nanopowders were synthesized by chemical coprecipitation method. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles were investigated by various characterization techniques, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA. The XRD results confirmed the presence of cubic spinel structure of the prepared powders and the average crystallite size of magnetic particles ranging from 23 to 45 nm. The VSM results showed that the magnetic properties varied with an increase in substituted manganese while SEM analysis showed the change in the morphology of obtained magnetic nanoparticles. The TG/DTA analysis indicated the formation of crystalline structure of the synthesized samples. The heat transfer rate was measured in specially prepared magnetic nanofluids (nanoparticles dispersed in carrier fluid transformer oil as a function of time and temperature in presence of external magnetic fields. The experimental analysis indicated enhanced heat transfer rate of the magnetic nanofluids which depended upon the strength of external magnetic field and chemical composition.

  13. The influence of annealing temperature and heating rate on thermoluminescence properties of nanocrystalline calcium borate powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengku Kamarnl Bahri, T. N. H.; Hussin, R.; Ahmad, N. E.

    2017-10-01

    We have reported the influence of annealing temperature and heating rate on thermoluminescence (TL) properties of nanocrystalline calcium borate, CaB2O4, powder synthesized by solution combustion method. Powder X-ray diffraction experiments were carried out on CaB2O4 to get the crystal phase and size. The samples were annealed using the TLD oven and exposed to cobalt-60 source. TL glow curves were measured and recorded using a Harshaw model 3500 TLD reader. The crystal phase confirmed one major phase of CaB2O4 with 27 nm in size. CaB2O4 has a simple glow curve with only one and a well defined peak at around 150 °C. TL intensity was higher after annealing the material before irradiation which indicated the importance of annealing. It was found that an annealing temperature at 300 °C for one hour and the heating rate of 10 °C s-1 was the best procedure to produce high TL intensity.

  14. Measurement uncertainties when determining heat rate, isentropic efficiency and swallowing capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snygg, U.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of the project was to determine the uncertainties when calculating heat rate, isentropic efficiencies and swallowing capacities of power plants. Normally when a power plant is constructed, the supplier also guarantee some performance values, e.g. heat rate. When the plant is built and running under normal conditions, an evaluation is done and the guarantee values are checked. Different measured parameters influence the calculated value differently, and therefore a sensitivity factor can be defined as the sensitivity of a calculated value when the measured value is changing. The product of this factor and the uncertainty of the measured parameter gives an error of the calculated value. For every measured parameter, the above given factor has to be determined and then the root square sum gives the overall uncertainty of the calculated parameter. To receive acceptable data during the evaluation of the plant, a test code is to be followed. The test code also gives guidelines how big the errors of the measurements are. In this study, ASME PTC6 and DIN 1943 were used. The results show that not only the test code was of vital importance, but also the distribution of the power output of the HP-IP turbines contra LP turbines. A higher inlet pressure of the LP turbine gives a smaller uncertainty of the isentropic efficiency. An increase from 6 to 13 bar will lower the uncertainty 1.5 times. 10 refs, 24 figs, 23 tabs, 5 appendixes

  15. How to improve the success rate of mouse cloning technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, Nguyen Van; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-02-01

    It has now been 13 years since the first cloned mammal Dolly the sheep was generated from somatic cells using nuclear transfer (SCNT). Since then, this technique has been considered an important tool not only for animal reproduction but also for regenerative medicine. However, the success rate is still very low and the mechanisms involved in genomic reprogramming are not yet clear. Moreover, the NT technique requires donated fresh oocyte, which raises ethical problems for production of human cloned embryo. For this reason, the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for genomic reprogramming and for regenerative medicine is currently a hot topic in this field. However, we believe that the NT approach remains the only valid way for the study of reproduction and basic biology. For example, only the NT approach can reveal dynamic and global modifications in the epigenome without using genetic modification, and it can generate offspring from a single cell or even a frozen dead body. Thanks to much hard work by many groups, cloning success rates are increasing slightly year by year, and NT cloning is now becoming a more applicable method. This review describes how to improve the efficiency of cloning, the establishment of clone-derived embryonic stem cells and further applications.

  16. Influenza vaccination of healthcare workers: institutional strategies for improving rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonsson, Kristina; Summers-Bean, Chris; Connolly, Allison

    2004-01-01

    The nosocomial transmission of influenza has been well documented since the 1970s with both direct and indirect effects of outbreaks in healthcare settings. Outbreaks can directly increase morbidity among patients and residents of long-term care facilities. Indirect effects include disruption of normal operations of healthcare institutions, shortages of healthcare workers (HCWs), fewer elective admissions, and income loss due to absenteeism. Influenza vaccination of United States HCWs remains below 40% despite the availability of a safe, effective vaccine and a long-standing recommendation for vaccination of HCWs. New strategies to improve the rate of influenza vaccination among HCWs are needed as the percentage of those receiving yearly vaccination has changed little in the past 20 years. Increasing HCW influenza vaccination coverage calls for a paradigm shift, institutions should view vaccination of HCWs as a crucial part of a comprehensive infection control program designed to protect patients and staff. Administrators of hospitals, long-term care facilities, and other health agencies should respond to this challenge by developing programs to improve yearly influenza vaccination of their staff Such efforts would put these employees into compliance with national recommendations and also benefit the institution by reducing absenteeism, nosocomial influenza transmission, and the associated economic losses and disruption of routine operations.

  17. Heat

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Is it possible to make heat by rubbing your hands together? Why does an ice cube melt when you hold it? In this title, students will conduct experiments to help them understand what heat is. Kids will also investigate concepts such as which materials are good at conducting heat and which are the best insulators. Using everyday items that can easily be found around the house, students will transform into scientists as they carry out step-by-step experiments to answer interesting questions. Along the way, children will pick up important scientific skills. Heat includes seven experiments with detailed, age-appropriate instructions, surprising facts and background information, a "conclusions" section to pull all the concepts in the book together, and a glossary of science words. Colorful, dynamic designs and images truly put the FUN into FUN-damental Experiments.

  18. Approach for an improved experimental evaluation of the specific absorption rate in magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iacob, N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics (Romania); Schinteie, G.; Palade, P.; Kuncser, V., E-mail: kuncser@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics (Romania)

    2015-04-15

    A new methodology for the accurate determination of the specific absorption rate of ferrofluids with magnetite nanoparticles of average size of about 10 nm subjected to alternative current magnetic fields is proposed. A simple numerical compensation of the heating rates by the cooling rates obtained at similar temperatures is employed. Comparisons of the as-obtained adiabatic heating curves with theoretical evaluations are discussed.

  19. Power density of piezoelectric transformers improved using a contact heat transfer structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei Wei; Chen, Li Juan; Pan, Cheng Liang; Liu, Yong Bin; Feng, Zhi Hua

    2012-01-01

    Based on contact heat transfer, a novel method to increase power density of piezoelectric transformers is proposed. A heat transfer structure is realized by directly attaching a dissipater to the piezoelectric transformer plate. By maintaining the vibration mode of the transformer and limiting additional energy losses from the contact interface, an appropriate design can improve power density of the transformer on a large scale, resulting from effective suppression of its working temperature rise. A prototype device was fabricated from a rectangular piezoelectric transformer, a copper heat transfer sheet, a thermal grease insulation pad, and an aluminum heat radiator. The experimental results show the transformer maintains a maximum power density of 135 W/cm(3) and an efficiency of 90.8% with a temperature rise of less than 10 °C after more than 36 h, without notable changes in performance. © 2012 IEEE

  20. Impact of waste heat recovery systems on energy efficiency improvement of a heavy-duty diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Zheshu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The increase of ship’s energy utilization efficiency and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions have been high lightened in recent years and have become an increasingly important subject for ship designers and owners. The International Maritime Organization (IMO is seeking measures to reduce the CO2 emissions from ships, and their proposed energy efficiency design index (EEDI and energy efficiency operational indicator (EEOI aim at ensuring that future vessels will be more efficient. Waste heat recovery can be employed not only to improve energy utilization efficiency but also to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, a typical conceptual large container ship employing a low speed marine diesel engine as the main propulsion machinery is introduced and three possible types of waste heat recovery systems are designed. To calculate the EEDI and EEOI of the given large container ship, two software packages are developed. From the viewpoint of operation and maintenance, lowering the ship speed and improving container load rate can greatly reduce EEOI and further reduce total fuel consumption. Although the large container ship itself can reach the IMO requirements of EEDI at the first stage with a reduction factor 10% under the reference line value, the proposed waste heat recovery systems can improve the ship EEDI reduction factor to 20% under the reference line value.

  1. Impact of waste heat recovery systems on energy efficiency improvement of a heavy-duty diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zheshu; Chen, Hua; Zhang, Yong

    2017-09-01

    The increase of ship's energy utilization efficiency and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions have been high lightened in recent years and have become an increasingly important subject for ship designers and owners. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is seeking measures to reduce the CO2 emissions from ships, and their proposed energy efficiency design index (EEDI) and energy efficiency operational indicator (EEOI) aim at ensuring that future vessels will be more efficient. Waste heat recovery can be employed not only to improve energy utilization efficiency but also to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, a typical conceptual large container ship employing a low speed marine diesel engine as the main propulsion machinery is introduced and three possible types of waste heat recovery systems are designed. To calculate the EEDI and EEOI of the given large container ship, two software packages are developed. From the viewpoint of operation and maintenance, lowering the ship speed and improving container load rate can greatly reduce EEOI and further reduce total fuel consumption. Although the large container ship itself can reach the IMO requirements of EEDI at the first stage with a reduction factor 10% under the reference line value, the proposed waste heat recovery systems can improve the ship EEDI reduction factor to 20% under the reference line value.

  2. Improving the installation of renewable heating technology in UK social housing properties through user centred design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Natalie; Haines, Victoria; Lilley, Debra

    2015-11-01

    Social housing organisations are increasingly installing renewable energy technologies, particularly for the provision of heating and hot water. To meet carbon reduction targets, uptake and installation must allow occupants to use the technology effectively. This paper describes research which investigated the service of installing heat pumps into UK social housing properties, from both landlords' and tenants' experiences. Adopting a user centred design approach, the research was in three phases: an exploration study to investigate landlords' and tenants' experiences of heat pump installation and use; refinement and development of the requirements for improved service delivery, primarily technology introduction and control; and the development and initial evaluation of an information leaflet as a key touchpoint in the service delivery. Recommendations for improved service delivery, to enable heat pumps to be accepted and used more effectively, are presented, as well as reflection on the process of applying user centred design in this context. In a relatively immature area of industry, installations to date have been heavily focused on technical aspects. This paper provides an insight into the human aspects of the service delivery of heat pumps in social housing, providing designers and social housing landlords with insight about how to improve the service.

  3. The effect of temperature and heating rate on char properties obtained from solar pyrolysis of beech wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kuo; Minh, Doan Pham; Gauthier, Daniel; Weiss-Hortala, Elsa; Nzihou, Ange; Flamant, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Char samples were produced from pyrolysis in a lab-scale solar reactor. The pyrolysis of beech wood was carried out at temperatures ranging from 600 to 2000°C, with heating rates from 5 to 450°C/s. CHNS, scanning electron microscopy analysis, X-ray diffractometry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption were employed to investigate the effect of temperature and heating rate on char composition and structure. The results indicated that char structure was more and more ordered with temperature increase and heating rate decrease (higher than 50°C/s). The surface area and pore volume firstly increased with temperature and reached maximum at 1200°C then reduced significantly at 2000°C. Besides, they firstly increased with heating rate and then decreased slightly at heating rate of 450°C/s when final temperature was no lower than 1200°C. Char reactivity measured by TGA analysis was found to correlate with the evolution of char surface area and pore volume with temperature and heating rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High heating rate decomposition dynamics of copper oxide by nanocalorimetry-coupled time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Feng; DeLisio, Jeffery B.; Nguyen, Nam; Zachariah, Michael R.; LaVan, David A.

    2017-12-01

    The thermodynamics and evolved gases were measured during the rapid decomposition of copper oxide (CuO) thin film at rates exceeding 100,000 K/s. CuO decomposes to release oxygen when heated and serves as an oxidizer in reactive composites and chemical looping combustion. Other instruments have shown either one or two decomposition steps during heating. We have confirmed that CuO decomposes by two steps at both slower and higher heating rates. The decomposition path influences the reaction course in reactive Al/CuO/Al composites, and full understanding is important in designing reactive mixtures and other new reactive materials.

  5. Effect of Heating Rate on Accelerated Carbide Spheroidisation (ASR in 100CrMnSi6-4 Bearing Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauserova D.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Typical processing routes for bearing steels include a soft annealing stage, the purpose of which is to obtain a microstructure containing globular carbides in ferritic matrix. A newly developed process called ASR cuts the carbide spheroidisation times several fold, producing considerably finer globular carbides than conventional soft annealing. The present paper explores the effect of the heating rate and temperature on the accelerated carbide spheroidisation process and on the resulting hardness. Accelerated spheroidisation was achieved by thermal cycling for several minutes around various temperatures close to the transformation temperature at various heating rates applied by induction heating.

  6. Losartan improves heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence in heart failure due to ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Murat; Arslan, Uğur; Türkoğlu, Sedat; Balcioğlu, Serhat; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-12-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence are known to be disturbed and associated with excess mortality in heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate whether losartan, when added on top of beta-blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) therapy, could improve these indices in patients with systolic heart failure. Seventy-seven patients (mean age 60.4 +/- 8.0, 80.5% male) with ischemic cardiomyopathy (mean ejection fraction 34.5 +/- 4.4%) and New York Heart Association Class II-III heart failure symptoms, already receiving a beta-blocker and an ACEI, were randomly assigned to either open-label losartan (losartan group) or no additional drug (control group) in a 2:1 ratio and the patients were followed for 12 weeks. The HRV and heart rate turbulence indices were calculated from 24-hour Holter recordings both at the beginning and at the end of follow-up. The baseline clinical characteristics, HRV, and heart rate turbulence indices were similar in the 2 groups. At 12 weeks of follow-up, all HRV parameters except pNN50 increased (SDNN: 113.2 +/- 34.2 versus 127.8 +/- 24.1, P = .001; SDANN: 101.5 +/- 31.7 versus 115.2 +/- 22.0, P = .001; triangular index: 29.9 +/- 11.1 versus 34.2 +/- 7.9, P = .008; RMSSD: 29.1 +/- 20.2 versus 34.3 +/- 23.0, P = .009; NN50: 5015.3 +/- 5554.9 versus 6446.7 +/- 6101.1, P = .024; NN50: 5.65 +/- 6.41 versus 7.24 +/- 6.99, P = .089; SDNNi: 45.1 +/- 13.3 versus 50.3 +/- 14.5, P = .004), turbulence onset decreased (-0. 61 +/- 1.70 versus -1.24 +/- 1.31, P = .003) and turbulence slope increased (4.107 +/- 3.881 versus 5.940 +/- 4.281, P = .004) significantly in the losartan group as compared with controls. A 12-week-long losartan therapy significantly improved HRV and heart rate turbulence in patients with Class II-III heart failure and ischemic cardiomyopathy already on beta-blockers and ACEI.

  7. Improvement of radio frequency (RF) heating uniformity on low moisture foods with Polyetherimide (PEI) blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Shi, Huojie; Tang, Juming; Li, Feng; Wang, Shaojin

    2015-08-01

    Radio frequency (RF) heating is rapid, volumetric, and can penetrate most food packaging material. Thus, it is suited for in-packaged food pasteurization applications. However, the non-uniform heating problem needs to be resolved. In this study, a method of adding Polyetherimide (PEI) cylindrical blocks on top of and at the bottom of peanut butter samples in a cylindrical jar (d=10cm, h=5cm) was evaluated to improve RF heating uniformity. A computer simulation model built with COMSOL Multiphysics® was used for heating pattern prediction, and a new temperature uniformity index was proposed to suitably evaluate pasteurization process heating uniformity. Results showed that a pair of PEI blocks with a diameter of 8cm among all five diameters (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10cm) added to the cold spots of a given peanut butter sample could make the sample reach the best heating uniformity. Furthermore, the best height of PEI blocks with a diameter of 8cm that allows the sample to be heated most uniformly was found to be 1.3cm after sweeping from 0.1 to 2.3cm with a step of 0.1cm. Simulation results also showed that the combination of PEI surrounding and the addition of 8cm diameter PEI blocks could further control the temperature distribution range in peanut butter within 7.1°C when the peanut butter was heated from 23 to 70°C. The newly developed temperature uniformity index provided a more reasonable evaluation on heating uniformity of pasteurization process than the traditional uniformity index. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Eutectoid Steel Under Cyclic Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Soma; Subhani, Amir Raza; Show, Bijay Kumar; Maity, Joydeep

    2017-07-01

    A systematic study has been carried out to ascertain the effect of cooling rate on structure and mechanical properties of eutectoid steel subjected to a novel incomplete austenitization-based cyclic heat treatment process up to 4 cycles. Each cycle consists of a short-duration holding (6 min) at 775 °C (above A1) followed by cooling at different rates (furnace cooling, forced air cooling and ice-brine quenching). Microstructure and properties are found to be strongly dependent on cooling rate. In pearlitic transformation regime, lamellar disintegration completes in 61 h and 48 min for cyclic furnace cooling. This leads to a spheroidized structure possessing a lower hardness and strength than that obtained in as-received annealed condition. On contrary, lamellar disintegration does not occur for cyclic forced air cooling with high air flow rate (78 m3 h-1). Rather, a novel microstructure consisting of submicroscopic cementite particles in a `interweaved pearlite' matrix is developed after 4 cycles. This provides an enhancement in hardness (395 HV), yield strength (473 MPa) and UTS (830 MPa) along with retention of a reasonable ductility (%Elongation = 19) as compared to as-received annealed condition (hardness = 222 HV, YS = 358 MPa, UTS = 740 MPa, %Elongation = 21).

  9. An improved mechanistic critical heat flux model for subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Based on the bubble coalescence adjacent to the heated wall as a flow structure for CHF condition, Chang and Lee developed a mechanistic critical heat flux (CHF) model for subcooled flow boiling. In this paper, improvements of Chang-Lee model are implemented with more solid theoretical bases for subcooled and low-quality flow boiling in tubes. Nedderman-Shearer`s equations for the skin friction factor and universal velocity profile models are employed. Slip effect of movable bubbly layer is implemented to improve the predictability of low mass flow. Also, mechanistic subcooled flow boiling model is used to predict the flow quality and void fraction. The performance of the present model is verified using the KAIST CHF database of water in uniformly heated tubes. It is found that the present model can give a satisfactory agreement with experimental data within less than 9% RMS error. 9 refs., 5 figs. (Author)

  10. Last Improvements of the CALMOS Calorimeter Dedicated to Thermal Neutron Flux and Nuclear Heating Measurements inside the OSIRIS Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcreff, H.; Salmon, L.; Lepeltier, V.; Guyot, J. M.; Bouard, E.

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear heating inside an MTR reactor needs to be known in order to design and to run irradiation experiments which have to fulfill target temperature constraints. To improve the nuclear heating knowledge, an innovative calorimetric system CALMOS has been studied, manufactured and tested for the 70MWth OSIRIS reactor operated by CEA. This device is based on a mobile calorimetric probe which can be inserted in any in-core experimental location and can be moved axially from the bottom of the core to 1000 mm above the core mid-plane. Obtained results and advantages brought by the first CALMOS-1 equipment have been already presented. However, some difficulties appeared with this first version. A thermal limitation in cells did not allow to monitor nuclear heating up to the 70 MW nominal power, and some significant discrepancies were observed at high heating rates between results deduced from the calibration and those obtained by the "zero method". Taking this feedback into account, the new CALMOS-2 calorimeter has been designed both for extending the heating range up to 13W.g-1 and for improving the "zero method" measurement thanks to the implementation of a 4-wires technique. In addition, the new calorimeter has been designed as a real operational measurement system, well suited to characterize and to follow the radiation field evolution throughout the reactor cycle. To meet this requirement, a programmable system associated with a specific software allows automatic complete cell mobility in the core, the data acquisition and the measurements processing. This paper presents the analysis of results collected during the 2015 comprehensive measurement campaign. The 4-wires technique was tested up to around a 4 W.g-1 heating level and allowed to quantify discrepancies between "zero" and calibration methods. Thermal neutron flux and nuclear heating measurements from CALMOS-1 and CALMOS-2 are compared. Thermal neutron flux distributions, obtained with the Self-Power Neutron

  11. Last Improvements of the CALMOS Calorimeter Dedicated to Thermal Neutron Flux and Nuclear Heating Measurements inside the OSIRIS Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carcreff H.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear heating inside an MTR reactor needs to be known in order to design and to run irradiation experiments which have to fulfill target temperature constraints. To improve the nuclear heating knowledge, an innovative calorimetric system CALMOS has been studied, manufactured and tested for the 70MWth OSIRIS reactor operated by CEA. This device is based on a mobile calorimetric probe which can be inserted in any in-core experimental location and can be moved axially from the bottom of the core to 1000 mm above the core mid-plane. Obtained results and advantages brought by the first CALMOS-1 equipment have been already presented. However, some difficulties appeared with this first version. A thermal limitation in cells did not allow to monitor nuclear heating up to the 70 MW nominal power, and some significant discrepancies were observed at high heating rates between results deduced from the calibration and those obtained by the “zero method”. Taking this feedback into account, the new CALMOS-2 calorimeter has been designed both for extending the heating range up to 13W.g-1 and for improving the “zero method” measurement thanks to the implementation of a 4-wires technique. In addition, the new calorimeter has been designed as a real operational measurement system, well suited to characterize and to follow the radiation field evolution throughout the reactor cycle. To meet this requirement, a programmable system associated with a specific software allows automatic complete cell mobility in the core, the data acquisition and the measurements processing. This paper presents the analysis of results collected during the 2015 comprehensive measurement campaign. The 4-wires technique was tested up to around a 4 W.g-1 heating level and allowed to quantify discrepancies between “zero” and calibration methods. Thermal neutron flux and nuclear heating measurements from CALMOS-1 and CALMOS-2 are compared. Thermal neutron flux distributions

  12. On the potential for BECCS efficiency improvement through heat recovery from both post-combustion and oxy-combustion facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, N Mac; Fajardy, M

    2016-10-20

    In order to mitigate climate change to no more than 2 °C, it is well understood that it will be necessary to directly remove significant quantities of CO 2 , with bioenergy CCS (BECCS) regarded as a promising technology. However, BECCS will likely be more costly and less efficient at power generation than conventional CCS. Thus, approaches to improve BECCS performance and reduce costs are of importance to facilitate the deployment of this key technology. In this study, the impact of biomass co-firing rate and biomass moisture content on BECCS efficiency with both post- and oxy-combustion CO 2 capture technologies was evaluated. It was found that post-combustion capture BECCS (PCC-BECCS) facilities will be appreciably less efficient than oxy-combustion capture BECCS (OCC-BECCS) facilities. Consequently, PCC-BECCS have the potential to be more carbon negative than OCC-BECCS per unit electricity generated. It was further observed that the biomass moisture content plays an important role in determining the BECCS facilities' efficiency. This will in turn affect the enthalpic content of the BECCS plant exhaust and implies that exhaust gas heat recovery may be an attractive option at higher rates of co-firing. It was found that there is the potential for the recovery of approximately 2.5 GJ heat per t CO 2 at a temperature of 100 °C from both PCC-BECCS and OCC-BECCS. On- and off-site applications for this recovered heat are discussed, considering boiler feedwater pre-heating, solvent regeneration and district heating cases.

  13. Improved magnetic induction heating of nanoferrites for hyperthermia applications: Correlation with colloidal stability and magneto-structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khot, V.M., E-mail: wish_khot@yahoo.co.in [Center for Interdisciplinary Research, D. Y. Patil University, Kolhapur 416006 (India); Salunkhe, A.B. [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule University of Pune (India); Ruso, J.M. [Soft Matter and Molecular Biophysics Group, Applied Physics Department, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pawar, S.H. [Center for Interdisciplinary Research, D. Y. Patil University, Kolhapur 416006 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Nanoferrites with compositions Mn{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Co{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Ni{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (MZF, CZF and NZF respectively) coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were prepared in a single step. These nanoparticles are highly water dispersible with zeta potential values between 14 and 21 mV. Magnetic induction heating characteristics of these NPs have been studied as a function of magnetic field amplitude from 6.7 to 26.7 kA m{sup −1} (at fixed frequency 265 kHz) and concentration of nanoparticles. Notable enhancement in specific absorption rate (334.5 W g{sup −1}) by CZF nanoparticles has been observed. This enhanced induction heating properties have been studied and correlated with colloidal stability and magnetostructural properties such as tuned magnetic anisotropy arising from zinc substitution. Cytotoxicity of synthesized mixed ferrites has been evaluated in vitro on HeLa cell lines using MTT assay to explore their use as heating agents in magnetic hyperthermia. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoferrites (sizes 8–12 nm) with improved specific absorption rate (334.5 W g{sup −1}) at lowest particle concentration have been prepared • The results have been explained by correlating colloidal stability and magnetostructural properties such as magnetocrystalline anisotropy. • It has been shown that substitution of zinc tunes anisotropy of cobalt iron oxide within the value optimized previously in achieving high throughput in magnetic induction heating. • In vitro cytotoxicity proves nanoparticles are non-toxic suggesting their use as a potential heating agent in hyperthermia therapy.

  14. Gamma ray heating rates due to chromium isotopes in stellar core during late stages of high mass stars (>10M⊙

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi Jameel-Un

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma ray heating rates are thought to play a crucial role during the pre-supernova stage of high mass stars. Gamma ray heating rates, due to β±-decay and electron (positron capture on chromium isotopes, are calculated using proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation theory. The electron capture significantly affects the lepton fraction (Ye and accelerates the core contraction. The gamma rays emitted as a result of weak processes heat the core and tend to hinder the cooling and contraction due to electron capture and neutrino emission. The emitted gamma rays tend to produce enormous entropy and set the convection to play its role at this stage. The gamma heating rates, on 50-60Cr, are calculated for the density range 10 < ρ (g.cm-3 < 1011 and temperature range 107 < T (K < 3.0×1010.

  15. Internal friction between fluid particles of MHD tangent hyperbolic fluid with heat generation: Using coefficients improved by Cash and Karp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahuddin, T.; Khan, Imad; Malik, M. Y.; Khan, Mair; Hussain, Arif; Awais, Muhammad

    2017-05-01

    The present work examines the internal resistance between fluid particles of tangent hyperbolic fluid flow due to a non-linear stretching sheet with heat generation. Using similarity transformations, the governing system of partial differential equations is transformed into a coupled non-linear ordinary differential system with variable coefficients. Unlike the current analytical works on the flow problems in the literature, the main concern here is to numerically work out and find the solution by using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg coefficients improved by Cash and Karp (Naseer et al., Alexandria Eng. J. 53, 747 (2014)). To determine the relevant physical features of numerous mechanisms acting on the deliberated problem, it is sufficient to have the velocity profile and temperature field and also the drag force and heat transfer rate all as given in the current paper.

  16. The Measurement of the Specific Latent Heat of Fusion of Ice: Two Improved Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, S. Y.; Chun, C. K. W.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests two methods for measuring the specific latent heat of ice fusion for high school physics laboratories. The first method is an ice calorimeter which is made from simple materials. The second method improves the thermal contact and allows for a more accurate measurement. Lists instructions for both methods. (Author/YDS)

  17. Development of a water boil-off spent-fuel calorimeter system. [To measure decay heat generation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creer, J.M.; Shupe, J.W. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    A calorimeter system was developed to measure decay heat generation rates of unmodified spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear reactors. The system was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested using the following specifications: capacity of one BWR or PWR spent fuel assembly; decay heat generation range 0.1 to 2.5 kW; measurement time of < 12 h; and an accuracy of +-10% or better. The system was acceptance tested using a dc reference heater to simulate spent fuel assembly heat generation rates. Results of these tests indicated that the system could be used to measure heat generation rates between 0.5 and 2.5 kW within +- 5%. Measurements of heat generation rates of approx. 0.1 kW were obtained within +- 15%. The calorimeter system has the potential to permit measurements of heat generation rates of spent fuel assemblies and other devices in the 12- to 14-kW range. Results of calorimetry of a Turkey Point spent fuel assembly indicated that the assembly was generating approx. 1.55 kW.

  18. Integration and software for thermal test of heat rate sensors. [space shuttle external tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.; Shrider, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    A minicomputer controlled radiant test facility is described which was developed and calibrated in an effort to verify analytical thermal models of instrumentation islands installed aboard the space shuttle external tank to measure thermal flight parameters during ascent. Software was provided for the facility as well as for development tests on the SRB actuator tail stock. Additional testing was conducted with the test facility to determine the temperature and heat flux rate and loads required to effect a change of color in the ET tank external paint. This requirement resulted from the review of photographs taken of the ET at separation from the orbiter which showed that 75% of the external tank paint coating had not changed color from its original white color. The paint on the remaining 25% of the tank was either brown or black, indicating that it had degraded due to heating or that the spray on form insulation had receded in these areas. The operational capability of the facility as well as the various tests which were conducted and their results are discussed.

  19. Empirical correction of XBT fall rate and its impact on heat content analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, M.; Le Traon, P. Y.; Reverdin, G.

    2011-02-01

    We used a collocation method between XBT and CTD/OSD (Ocean Station Data including bottle cast and low resolution CTD) from WOD05 (1°×2°×15 days) to statistically correct the XBT fall rate. An analysis of the annual median bias on depth showed that it is necessary to apply a thermal correction linked to probe calibration error, a second order correction on the depth as well as a depth offset representing measurement errors during XBT deployment. We had to separate data in several categories: shallow and deep XBT and deployment sea temperatures (below or above 10 °C). We also processed separately XBT measurements close to Japan between 1968 and 1985 due to large regional biases. Once the corrections have been applied, the analysis of heat content signal is derived from corrected XBT. From this analysis, we confirm that the maximum heat content in the top 700 m found during the 70's in early papers can be explained by the XBT biases. In addition, a trend of 0.32.1022 J/year is observed between the period 1970 and 2008.

  20. Improving the attrition rate of Lanthipeptide discovery for commercial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Mengxin; Smith, Leif

    2017-12-01

    Lanthipeptides are a class of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides. Lanthipeptides with antimicrobial activity are referred to as lantibiotics. Lantibiotics are generally active against Gram-positive bacteria. However, some modifications have expanded their activity toward Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, additional functions aside from antibacterial activities have been reported for lanthipeptides. Areas covered: This review provides a synopsis of current anthipeptide research for potential therapeutics. The review highlights the current tools used for identifying lanthipeptides from genomic sequencing data. It also describes the current approaches that have been used to overcome the limitations in the purification and isolation of lanthipeptides. The status of lanthipeptides in terms of potential applications and approaches that are currently being done to promote the development of lanthipeptides as novel therapeutics are also discussed. Expert opinion: Significant improvements have been made to promote the discovery of new lanthipeptides, while, simultaneously, tools have been developed to promote their production and isolation. Lanthipeptides are showing significant promise for treating bacterial infections, as well as for new applications as anticancer and antiviral agents, or as a novel treatment for pain management. At the current rate of lanthipeptide discovery and isolation of the products, it is likely several new applications will be discovered.

  1. Short-term heat acclimation improves the determinants of endurance performance and 5-km running performance in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Carl A; Richardson, Alan J; Watt, Peter W; Willmott, Ashley G B; Gibson, Oliver R; Maxwell, Neil S

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of 5 days of controlled short-term heat acclimation (STHA) on the determinants of endurance performance and 5-km performance in runners, relative to the impairment afforded by moderate heat stress. A control group (CON), matched for total work and power output (2.7 W·kg -1 ), differentiated thermal and exercise contributions of STHA on exercise performance. Seventeen participants (10 STHA, 7 CON) completed graded exercise tests (GXTs) in cool (13 °C, 50% relative humidity (RH), pre-training) and hot conditions (32 °C, 60% RH, pre- and post-training), as well as 5-km time trials (TTs) in the heat, pre- and post-training. STHA reduced resting (p = 0.01) and exercising (p = 0.04) core temperature alongside a smaller change in thermal sensation (p = 0.04). Both groups improved the lactate threshold (LT, p = 0.021), lactate turnpoint (LTP, p = 0.005) and velocity at maximal oxygen consumption (vV̇O 2max ; p = 0.031) similarly. Statistical differences between training methods were observed in TT performance (STHA, -6.2(5.5)%; CON, -0.6(1.7)%, p = 0.029) and total running time during the GXT (STHA, +20.8(12.7)%; CON, +9.8(1.2)%, p = 0.006). There were large mean differences in change in maximal oxygen consumption between STHA +4.0(2.2) mL·kg -1 ·min -1 (7.3(4.0)%) and CON +1.9(3.7) mL·kg -1 ·min -1 (3.8(7.2)%). Running economy (RE) deteriorated following both training programmes (p = 0.008). Similarly, RE was impaired in the cool GXT, relative to the hot GXT (p = 0.004). STHA improved endurance running performance in comparison with work-matched normothermic training, despite equality of adaptation for typical determinants of performance (LT, LTP, vV̇O 2max ). Accordingly, these data highlight the ergogenic effect of STHA, potentially via greater improvements in maximal oxygen consumption and specific thermoregulatory and associated thermal perception adaptations absent in normothermic training.

  2. Improving Heat Pump Water Heater Effeciency by Avoiding Electric Resistance Heater Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, Philip R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Munk, Jeffrey D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jackson, Roderick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gehl, Anthony C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Parkison, April E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nutaro, James J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are a promising technology that can decrease the domestic hot water energy consumption over an electric resistance storage water heater by up to 50%. Heat pump water heaters are really two water heaters in one; they can heat water by using a heat pump or by using electric resistance elements. During large water draw events the HPWHs will use the resistance elements that decrease the overall efficiency of the units. ORNL proposed and tested an advanced control algorithm that anticipates the large water draw events and appropriately sets-up the temperature of the tank water using only the heat pump. With sufficient energy stored in the tank at the elevated temperature, the large water draw is provided for and electric resistance use is avoided. Simulations using a validated heat pump water heater model, and measured water draw data from 25 homes, show average yearly energy savings of 9% for the advanced control algorithm. If the advanced control algorithm perfectly predicts the large water draw events then the savings increase to 19%. This discrepancy could be due to a lack of predictability of water draw patterns in some homes, or the water draw forecasting algorithm could be improved.

  3. A review on improving thermal-hydraulic performance of fin-and-tube heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolas, N.; Moorthy, P.; Oumer, A. N.; Ishak, M.

    2017-10-01

    Fin-and-tube heat exchangers are one of the most common type of heat exchangers that are normally used in sectors that require small size and light weight but high heat transfer capabilities. Compact fin-and-tube heat exchangers experiences high convective thermal resistance at the air-side due to the thermo-physical properties of air. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of research works that are relevant to improving thermalhydraulic performance at the air-side of fin-and-tube heat exchangers. This paper covers a variety of parameters such as tube parameters like tube arrangement, tube shapes and tube inclination angles; extended surfaces such as different shapes of fins and different parameters of vortex generators like attack angles, shapes and locations. Overall, for most modifications there was increment in heat transfer but accompanied with a pressure drop penalty. However, this varies for different combinations of parameters thus this review is to help understand how every mentioned parameters influences the thermal-hydraulic performance.

  4. Improvement in the mechanical properties of PTFE bonded NdFeB magnets by heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattam, C.; Williams, A. J.; Hay, J. N.; Harris, I. R.; Tedstone, S. F.; Ashraf, M. M.

    1996-05-01

    Rotary forging has been used to produce high density bonded magnets using NdFeB based melt spun ribbons (MQP-D). The binder used was polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). A post-forging heat treatment at temperatures above the crystalline melting point of PTFE (˜ 340°C) has been seen to improve substantially the mechanical integrity of the compacts. Heat treatments that were undertaken in air resulted in oxidation of the magnets, but the extent of oxidation was reduced with increasing PTFE content, characterised by a greater retention of magnetic properties. This behaviour suggests that to some extent. PTFE is effective as a barrier to oxidation. By heat treating in a vacuum, an improvement of over 100% in the mechanical strength of the compacts could be obtained with little loss in the magnetic properties. The fracture surfaces of both as-forged and heat treated compacts have been examined using scanning electron microscopy and it appears that bonding between the melt spun ribbon (MQI) and PTFE occurs during heat treatment.

  5. Improving the Performance of a Semitransparent BIPV by Using High-Reflectivity Heat Insulation Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Mei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, standard semitransparent photovoltaic (PV modules can largely replace architectural glass installed in the windows, skylights, and facade of a building. Their main features are power generation and transparency, as well as possessing a heat insulating effect. Through heat insulation solar glass (HISG encapsulation technology, this study improved the structure of a typical semitransparent PV module and explored the use of three types of high-reflectivity heat insulation films to form the HISG building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV systems. Subsequently, the authors analyzed the influence of HISG structures on the optical, thermal, and power generation performance of the original semitransparent PV module and the degree to which enhanced performance is possible. The experimental results indicated that the heat insulation performance and power generation of HISGs were both improved. Selecting an appropriate heat insulation film so that a larger amount of reflective solar radiation is absorbed by the back side of the HISG can yield greater enhancement of power generation. The numerical results conducted in this study also indicated that HISG BIPV system not only provides the passive energy needed for power loading in a building, but also decreases the energy consumption of the HVAC system in subtropical and temperate regions.

  6. Diabatic heating rate estimates from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Vertically integrated diabatic heating rate estimates (H) calculated from 32 months of European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts daily analyses (May 1985-December 1987) are determined as residuals of the thermodynamic equation in pressure coordinates. Values for global, hemispheric, zonal, and grid point H are given as they vary over the time period examined. The distribution of H is compared with previous results and with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) measurements. The most significant negative correlations between H and OLR occur for (1) tropical and Northern-Hemisphere mid-latitude oceanic areas and (2) zonal and hemispheric mean values for periods less than 90 days. Largest positive correlations are seen in periods greater than 90 days for the Northern Hemispheric mean and continental areas of North Africa, North America, northern Asia, and Antarctica. The physical basis for these relationships is discussed. An interyear comparison between 1986 and 1987 reveals the ENSO signal.

  7. Improving Geothermal Heat Pump Air Conditioning Efficiency with Wintertime Cooling using Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES). Application Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    APPLICATION MANUAL Improving Geothermal Heat Pump Air Conditioning Efficiency with Wintertime Cooling using Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage...application projects to increase energy efficiency and occupant comfort. Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) technology, energy efficiency, geothermal heat...electrical energy use (kW-hr) for the geothermal heat pump system with and without a dry fluid cooler

  8. Prediction and measurement of heat transfer rates for the shock-induced unsteady laminar boundary layer on a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The unsteady laminar boundary layer induced by the flow-initiating shock wave passing over a flat plate mounted in a shock tube was theoretically and experimentally studied in terms of heat transfer rates to the plate for shock speeds ranging from 1.695 to 7.34 km/sec. The theory presented by Cook and Chapman for the shock-induced unsteady boundary layer on a plate is reviewed with emphasis on unsteady heat transfer. A method of measuring time-dependent heat-transfer rates using thin-film heat-flux gages and an associated data reduction technique are outlined in detail. Particular consideration is given to heat-flux measurement in short-duration ionized shocktube flows. Experimental unsteady plate heat transfer rates obtained in both air and nitrogen using thin-film heat-flux gages generally agree well with theoretical predictions. The experimental results indicate that the theory continues to predict the unsteady boundary layer behavior after the shock wave leaves the trailing edge of the plate even though the theory is strictly applicable only for the time interval in which the shock remains on the plate.

  9. A study of nuclear plant heat rate optimization using nonlinear artificial intelligence and linear statistical analysis models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Claude A.

    The emphasis of this dissertation is on developing methods by which a combination of multivariate analysis techniques (MAT) and artificial intelligence (AI) procedures can be adapted to on-line, real time monitoring systems for improving nuclear plant thermal efficiency. Present-day first principle models involve performing a heat balance of plant systems and the reactor coolant system. Typical variables involved in the plant data acquisition system usually number one-to-two thousand. The goal of the current work is twofold. First, simulate the heat rate with MAT and AI computer models. The second objective is to selectively reduce the number of predictors to only the most important variables, induce small perturbations around normal operating levels, and evaluate changes in the magnitude of plant efficiency. It is anticipated that making small changes will improve the thermal efficiency of the plant and lead to supplementary cost savings. Conclusions of this report are several. A sensitivity analysis showed the reduction of input variables by dimensionality reduction, i.e., principal component analysis or factor analysis, removes valuable information. Predictors can simply be eliminated from the input space, but dimensionality reduction of the input matrix is not an alternative option. However, perturbation modeling does require data to be standardized and collinear variables removed. Filtering of input data is not recommended except to remove outliers. It's ascertained that perturbation or sensitivity analysis differs from prediction modeling in that two additional requirements are necessary besides the criterion prediction. One is the magnitude of the criterion result given an input perturbation, and second, is the directionality of the model. Directionality is defined as the positive or negative movement of the heat rate (criterion) given a predetermined increase/decrease in predictor value, or input perturbation. While the criterion prediction is still

  10. Improving Student Understanding of Geological Rates via Chronotopographic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linneman, S. R.; Clark, D. H.; Buly, P.

    2010-12-01

    We are investigating the value of incorporating chronotopographic analysis into undergraduate geology courses using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to improve student understanding of the rates and styles of geomorphic processes. Repeat high-resolution TLS surveys can track the evolution of active landscapes, including sites of active faulting, glaciation, landslides, fluvial systems and coastal dynamics. We hypothesize that geology students who collect and analyze such positional data for local active landscapes will develop a better sense of the critical (and non-steady) geomorphic processes affecting landscape change and develop a greater interest in pursuing opportunities for geology field work. We have collected baseline TLS scans of actively evolving landscapes identified in cooperation with land-use agencies. The project team is developing inquiry activities for each site and assessing their impact. For example, our faculty partners at 2-year colleges are interested in rapid retreat of coastal bluffs near their campuses. In this situation, TLS will be part of a laboratory activity in which students compare historic air photos to predict areas of the most active long-term bluff retreat; join their instructor to collect TLS data at the site (replicating the baseline scan); sketch outcrops in the field and suggest areas of the site for higher resolution scanning; and in the following class compare their predictions to the deformation maps that are the output of the repeated TLS scans. A brief two question assessment instrument was developed to address both the content and attitudinal targets. It was given WWU Geomorphology classes in 3 sequential quarters of the 2009/2010 academic year, 2 which did not work with the TLS technology (pre treatment) and one that did participate in the redesigned activities (post treatment). Additionally focus group interviews were conducted with the post students so they could verbalize their experience with the TLS. The content

  11. Performance improvements in commercial heat pump water heaters using carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, C. D.; Elbel, S.; Petersen, M.; Hrnjak, P. S.

    2011-09-15

    Although heat pump water heaters are today widely accepted in Japan, where energy costs are high and government incentives for their use exist, acceptance of such a product in the U.S. has been slow. This trend is slowly changing with the introduction of heat pump water heaters into the residential market, but remains in the commercial sector. Barriers to heat pump water heater acceptance in the commercial market have historically been performance, reliability and first/operating costs. The use of carbon dioxide (R744) as the refrigerant in such a system can improve performance for relatively small increase in initial cost and make this technology more appealing. What makes R744 an excellent candidate for use in heat pump water heaters is not only the wide range of ambient temperatures within which it can operate, but also the excellent ability to match water to refrigerant temperatures on the high side, resulting in very high exit water temperatures of up to 82ºC (180ºF), as required by sanitary codes in the U.S.(Food Code, 2005), in a single pass, temperatures that are much more difficult to reach with other refrigerants. This can be especially attractive in applications where this water is used for the purpose of sanitation. While reliability has also been of concern historically, dramatic improvements have been made over the last several years through research done in the automotive industry and commercialization of R744 technology in residential water heating mainly in Japan. This paper presents the performance results from the development of an R744 commercial heat pump water heater of approximately 35kW and a comparison to a baseline R134a unit of the same capacity and footprint. In addition, recommendations are made for further improvements of the R744 system which could result in possible energy savings of up to 20%.

  12. Next generation commercial heat pumpwater heater using carbon dioxide using different improvement approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, Chad [Creative Thermal Solutions Inc., Urbana, IL (United States); Petersen, Michael [Creative Thermal Solutions Inc., Urbana, IL (United States); Elbel, Stefan [Creative Thermal Solutions Inc., Urbana, IL (United States); Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Hrnjak, Pega [Creative Thermal Solutions Inc., Urbana, IL (United States); Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Although heat pump water heaters are today widely accepted in Japan, where energy costs are high and government incentives for their use exist, acceptance of such a product in the U.S. has been slow. This trend is slowly changing with the introduction of heat pump water heaters into the residential market, but remains in the commercial sector. Barriers to heat pump water heater acceptance in the commercial market have historically been performance, reliability and first/operating costs. The use of carbon dioxide (R744) as the refrigerant in such a system can improve performance for relatively small increase in initial cost and make this technology more appealing. What makes R744 an excellent candidate for use in heat pump water heaters is not only the wide range of ambient temperatures within which it can operate, but also the excellent ability to match water to refrigerant temperatures on the high side, resulting in very high exit water temperatures of up to 82ºC, as required by sanitary codes in the U.S. (Food Code, 2005), in a single pass, temperatures that are much more difficult to reach with other refrigerants. This can be especially attractive in applications where this water is used for the purpose of sanitation. While reliability has also been of concern historically, dramatic improvements have been made over the last several years through research done in the automotive industry and commercialization of R744 technology in residential water heating mainly in Japan. This paper presents the performance results from the development of an R744 commercial heat pump water heater of approximately 35 kW and a comparison to a baseline R134a unit of the same capacity and footprint. In addition, recommendations are made for further improvements of the R744 system which could result in possible energy savings of up to 20 %.

  13. CFD Simulation and Experimental Analyses of a Copper Wire Woven Heat Exchanger Design to Improve Heat Transfer and Reduce the Size of Adsorption Beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John White

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The chief objective of this study is the proposal design and CFD simulation of a new compacted copper wire woven fin heat exchanger and silica gel adsorbent bed used as part of an adsorption refrigeration system. This type of heat exchanger design has a large surface area because of the wire woven fin design. It is estimated that this will help improve the coefficient of performance (COP of the adsorption phase and increase the heat transfer in this system arrangement. To study the heat transfer between the fins and porous adsorbent reactor bed, two experiments were carried out and matched to computational fluid dynamics (CFD results.

  14. Temperature and Heat Flow Rate Calibration of a Calvet Calorimeter from 0 {°}C to 190 {°}C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeho; Lee, Joohyun; Kwon, Suyong

    2017-12-01

    This study describes the temperature and heat flow rate calibrations of a Calvet calorimeter (SETARAM, BT2.15) in the temperature range of 0-190 {°}C. Temperature calibration is carried out using three reference materials, namely water, gallium, and indium, as specified in the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). The sample temperature of the Calvet calorimeter is corrected by the obtained mean value, -0.489 {°}C, of the measured extrapolated peak onset temperature (Te) when the heating rate (β) is zero (Δ T_corr (β = 0)). The heat flow rate is calibrated using a reference material with a known heat capacity, namely SRM 720 α -Al2O3 (synthetic sapphire), which is traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. From the heat flow rate measurements of the blank baseline and SRM 720, the proportional calibration factor, K_{Φ }, in the 0-190 {°}C temperature range was determined. The specific heat capacity of copper was measured with the obtained calibration values, and the measured data show consistency with the reference value.

  15. Tick resistance and heat tolerance characteristics in cattle. III. Sweating rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília José Veríssimo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cattle in a sustainable tropical livestock should be heat tolerant and resistant to ticks. The relationship between Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus infestation and sweating rate, an important heat tolerance characteristic, was studied in six Nellore and four Holstein steers of seven-month-old. They were artificial infested (a.i. with 10,000 (Holstein and 20,000 (Nellore larvae in 16/Apr/2011. In days 20, 23 and 24 after the infestation, the 10 bigger females ticks found in whole animal were weighed and put in a chamber (27 oC and 80% RH, weighing the egg mass of each female tick fourteen days after. The sweating rate (SRskin, measured by Scheleger and Turner, 1963, method, in a shaved area of shoulder skin was evaluated in 14/Apr (2 days before the a.i. and in 05/May (19 days after a.i.. In 14/Apr the Scheleger and Turner, 1963, method was done on the coat not shaved (SRcoat. The sweating rate was measured in the afternoon (from 2 P.M., after 30 minutes of direct sunlight, on April. On May, the animals remained 60 minutes in direct sunlight because this day was colder. The experimental design was a non-probability sample restricted to the 10 available animals. Data from the steers’ sweating rate were analyzed using the General linear models of the SPSS® statistical package (version 12.0 using SRskin as dependent variable and breed and sampling date as independent variables. For SRcoat breed was the independent variable. Nellore, a tropical cattle breed, had higher SRskin (1,000.82 ± 64.59 g m-2 h-1, P< 0.001 than Holstein (620.45 ± 79.10 g m-2 h-1. SRskin was higher on May (1,187.33 ± 71.49 g m-2 h-1, P< 0.001 than on April (433.93 ± 71.49 g m-2 h-1. The correlation between the two different measurements of SR was positive and significant (r= 0,545, P<0,01, Pearson correlation. But in SRcoat the breed effect disappeared because the Holstein SRcoat increased (Holstein: 884.95 ± 472.12 g m-2 h-1 and Nellore: 1,060.72 ± 318.21 g m-2 h-1

  16. [Calculation of thermal protein changes in food with heat conduction. Determination of reaction rate and activation heat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, J; Brennig, K; Nour, S

    1975-01-01

    The velocity constant k of protein changes is commonly determined by heating as abruptly as possible to a given temperature for various periods. Its dependence on temperature or activation heat is deduced from the k value determinations at different temperatures, using the ARRHENIUS diagram. In contrast to this, the authors determined the k and E values in a temperature field for a constant reaction time. This is done directly in the foodstuff which is introduced (in ball form) into a bath of constant temperature. In case of foodstuffs with mere heat conduction, there are in the interior innumerable spherical shells subjected to the same thermal stress which increases from within towards the exterior. Thermal protein changes (such as the thermal coagulation of egg white and muscle proteins and the formation of metmyochromogen) which can be visualized directly or, in case of enzymatic denaturation, indirectly by colour reactions, using the presence-absence method, may be observed if the ball is cut in half. This procedure (termed "change-over method" by the authors) permits to calculate the unknown k and E values from the radius of the visible inner circle. (This applied also to cylindrical forms.) Since this method allows to estimate approximately these reaction kinetic constants directly in the foodstuff under conditions encountered in practice, it is in many cases better suited for simulating, calculating, or optimizing desirable or undesirable protein changes occurring during thermal processing than the mere model experiment with abrupt heating which does not reproduce the changes in the reaction medium occuring during the slow increase or decrease in temperature.

  17. Assessment of external heat transfer coefficient during oocyte vitrification in liquid and slush nitrogen using numerical simulations to determine cooling rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-01-01

    In oocyte vitrification, plunging directly into liquid nitrogen favor film boiling and strong nitrogen vaporization. A survey of literature values of heat transfer coefficients (h) for film boiling of small metal objects with different geometries plunged in liquid nitrogen revealed values between 125 to 1000 W per per square m per K. These h values were used in a numerical simulation of cooling rates of two oocyte vitrification devices (open-pulled straw and Cryotop), plunged in liquid and slush nitrogen conditions. Heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was considered a linear mathematical problem and was solved using the finite element method applying the variational formulation. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate the cooling process of the systems. Predicted cooling rates for OPS and Cryotop when cooled at -196 degree C (liquid nitrogen) or -207 degree C (average for slush nitrogen) for heat transfer coefficients estimated to be representative of film boiling, indicated lowering the cooling temperature produces only a maximum 10 percent increase in cooling rates; confirming the main benefit of plunging in slush over liquid nitrogen does not arise from their temperature difference. Numerical simulations also demonstrated that a hypothetical four-fold increase in the cooling rate of vitrification devices when plunging in slush nitrogen would be explained by an increase in heat transfer coefficient. This improvement in heat transfer (i.e., high cooling rates) in slush nitrogen is attributed to less or null film boiling when a sample is placed in slush (mixture of liquid and solid nitrogen) because it first melts the solid nitrogen before causing the liquid to boil and form a film.

  18. Analytical expressions for optimum flow rates in evaporators and condensers of heat pumping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granryd, E. [Dept. of Energy Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-11-15

    The flow velocities on the air or liquid side of evaporators and condensers in refrigerating or heat pump systems affect the system performance considerably. Furthermore the velocity can often be chosen rather freely without obvious first cost implications. The purpose of the paper is to show analytical relations indicating possible optimum operating conditions. Considering a base case where the design data are known, simple analytical relations are deduced for optimum flow rates that will result in highest overall COP of the system when energy demand for the compressor as well as pumps or fans are included. This optimum is equivalent to the solution for minimum total energy demand of the system for a given cooling load. It is also shown that a different (and higher) flow rate will result in maximum net cooling capacity for a refrigerating system with fixed compressor speed. The expressions can be used for design purposes as well as for checking suitable flow velocities in existing plants. The relations may also be incorporated in algorithms for optimal operation of systems with variable speed compressors. (author)

  19. Coolant-side heat-transfer rates for a hydrogen-oxygen rocket and a new technique for data correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacht, R. L.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the coolant-side, heat transfer coefficients for a liquid cooled, hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chamber. Heat transfer rates were determined from measurements of local hot gas wall temperature, local coolant temperature, and local coolant pressure. A correlation incorporating an integration technique for the transport properties needed near the pseudocritical temperature of liquid hydrogen gives a satisfactory prediction of hot gas wall temperatures.

  20. Metabolic Effects of Acibenzolar-S-Methyl for Improving Heat or Drought Stress in Creeping Bentgrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jespersen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM is a synthetic functional analog of salicylic acid which can induce systemic acquired resistance in plants, but its effects on abiotic stress tolerance is not well known. The objectives of this study were to examine effects of acibenzolar-S-methyl on heat or drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera and to determine major ASM-responsive metabolites and proteins associated with enhanced abiotic stress tolerance. Creeping bentgrass plants (cv. ‘Penncross’ were foliarly sprayed with ASM and were exposed to non-stress (20/15°C day/night, heat stress (35/30°C, or drought conditions (by withholding irrigation in controlled-environment growth chambers. Exogenous ASM treatment resulted in improved heat or drought tolerance, as demonstrated by higher overall turf quality, relative water content, and chlorophyll content compared to the untreated control. Western blotting revealed that ASM application resulted in up-regulation of ATP synthase, HSP-20, PR-3, and Rubisco in plants exposed to heat stress, and greater accumulation of dehydrin in plants exposed to drought stress. Metabolite profiling identified a number of amino acids, organic acids, and sugars which were differentially accumulated between ASM treated and untreated plants under heat or drought stress, including aspartic acid, glycine, citric acid, malic acid, and the sugars glucose, and fructose. Our results suggested that ASM was effective in improving heat or drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass, mainly through enhancing protein synthesis and metabolite accumulation involved in osmotic adjustment, energy metabolism, and stress signaling.

  1. Uncertainties in the estimation of specific absorption rate during radiofrequency alternating magnetic field induced non-adiabatic heating of ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Ranoo, Surojit; Philip, John

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is becoming a viable cancer treatment methodology where the alternating magnetic field induced heating of magnetic fluid is utilized for ablating the cancerous cells or making them more susceptible to the conventional treatments. The heating efficiency in MFH is quantified in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR), which is defined as the heating power generated per unit mass. In majority of the experimental studies, SAR is evaluated from the temperature rise curves, obtained under non-adiabatic experimental conditions, which is prone to various thermodynamic uncertainties. A proper understanding of the experimental uncertainties and its remedies is a prerequisite for obtaining accurate and reproducible SAR. Here, we study the thermodynamic uncertainties associated with peripheral heating, delayed heating, heat loss from the sample and spatial variation in the temperature profile within the sample. Using first order approximations, an adiabatic reconstruction protocol for the measured temperature rise curves is developed for SAR estimation, which is found to be in good agreement with those obtained from the computationally intense slope corrected method. Our experimental findings clearly show that the peripheral and delayed heating are due to radiation heat transfer from the heating coils and slower response time of the sensor, respectively. Our results suggest that the peripheral heating is linearly proportional to the sample area to volume ratio and coil temperature. It is also observed that peripheral heating decreases in presence of a non-magnetic insulating shielding. The delayed heating is found to contribute up to ~25% uncertainties in SAR values. As the SAR values are very sensitive to the initial slope determination method, explicit mention of the range of linear regression analysis is appropriate to reproduce the results. The effect of sample volume to area ratio on linear heat loss rate is systematically studied and the

  2. Improved heat dissipation in gallium nitride light-emitting diodes with embedded graphene oxide pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Nam; Cuong, Tran Viet; Han, Min; Ryu, Beo Deul; Chandramohan, S; Park, Jong Bae; Kang, Ji Hye; Park, Young-Jae; Ko, Kang Bok; Kim, Hee Yun; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Jae Hyoung; Katharria, Y S; Choi, Chel-Jong; Hong, Chang-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The future of solid-state lighting relies on how the performance parameters will be improved further for developing high-brightness light-emitting diodes. Eventually, heat removal is becoming a crucial issue because the requirement of high brightness necessitates high-operating current densities that would trigger more joule heating. Here we demonstrate that the embedded graphene oxide in a gallium nitride light-emitting diode alleviates the self-heating issues by virtue of its heat-spreading ability and reducing the thermal boundary resistance. The fabrication process involves the generation of scalable graphene oxide microscale patterns on a sapphire substrate, followed by its thermal reduction and epitaxial lateral overgrowth of gallium nitride in a metal-organic chemical vapour deposition system under one-step process. The device with embedded graphene oxide outperforms its conventional counterpart by emitting bright light with relatively low-junction temperature and thermal resistance. This facile strategy may enable integration of large-scale graphene into practical devices for effective heat removal.

  3. Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. Final technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

    1995-05-01

    Plastic coals are important feedstocks in coke manufacture, coal liquefaction, gasification, and combustion. During these processes, the thermoplastic behavior of these coals is also important since it may contribute to desirable or undesirable characteristics. For example, during liquefaction, the plastic behavior is desired since it leads to liquid-liquid reactions which are faster than solid-liquid reactions. During gasification, the elastic behavior is undesired since it leads to caking and agglomeration of coal particles which result in bed bogging in fixed or fluidized bed gasifiers. The plastic behavior of different coals was studied using a fast-response plastometer. A modified plastometer was used to measure the torque required to turn at constant angular speed a cone-shaped disk embedded in a thin layer of coal. The coal particles were packed between two metal plates which are heated electrically. Heating rates, final temperatures, pressures, and durations of experiment ranged from 200--800 K/s, 700--1300 K, vacuum-50 atm helium, and 0--40 s, respectively. The apparent viscosity of the molten coal was calculated from the measured torque using the governing equation of the cone-and-plate viscometer. Using a concentrated suspension model, the molten coal`s apparent viscosity was related to the quantity of the liquid metaplast present during pyrolysis. Seven coals from Argonne National Laboratory Premium Coal Sample Bank were studied. Five bituminous coals, from high-volatile to low-volatile bituminous, were found to have very good plastic behavior. Coal type strongly affects the magnitude and duration of plasticity. Hvb coals were most plastic. Mvb and lvb coals, though the maximum plasticity and plastic period were less. Low rank coals such as subbituminous and lignite did not exhibit any plasticity in the present studies. Coal plasticity is moderately well correlated with simple indices of coal type such as the elemental C,O, and H contents.

  4. Parametric analysis of air–water heat recovery concept applied to HVAC systems: Effect of mass flow rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ramadan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last three decades, the world has experienced enormous increases in energy and fuel consumption as a consequence of the economic and population growth. This causes renewable energy and energy recovery to become a requirement in building designs rather than option. The present work concerns a coupling between energy recovery and Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning HVAC domains and aims to apply heat recovery concepts to HVAC applications working on refrigeration cycles. It particularly uses the waste energy of the condenser hot air to heat/preheat domestic water. The heat exchanger considered in the recovery system is concentric tube heat exchanger. A thermal modeling of the complete system as well as a corresponding iterative code are developed and presented. Calculations with the code are performed and give pertinent magnitude orders of energy saving and management in HVAC applications. A parametric analysis based on several water and air flow rates is carried out. It was shown that water can be heated from 25 to 70 °C depending on the mass flow rates and cooling loads of the HVAC system. The most efficient configurations are obtained by lowering the air flow rate of the condenser fan.

  5. Speech rate normalization used to improve speaker verification

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, CJ

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach to speech rate normalization is presented. Models are constructed to model the way in which speech rate variation of a specific speaker influences the duration of phonemes. The models are evaluated in two ways. Firstly, the mean...

  6. Mixing state of aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic Plain: Radiative forcing and heating rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R.; Ramachandran, S.

    2012-12-01

    ratio is calculated from the geometry of core-shell particles, which depends on the mass and density of the core and shell. The size distribution parameters and refractive indices of different aerosol species are taken from OPAC database [3]. Different fractions of black carbon, water soluble and mineral dust aerosols involved in core-shell mixing emerge as the most probable mixing states over the IGP. Aerosol forcing for external mixing shows higher deviations from those for probable mixing cases during winter and pre-monsoon. The heating rate over Kanpur and Gandhi College in the lower troposphere is similar during pre-monsoon (March-May) ( 0.75 K day^{-1}) and monsoon (June-September) ( 0.5 K day^{-1}), while differences occur in other seasons [4]. Aerosol heating rate profiles exhibit primary and secondary peaks over the IGP and exhibit seasonal variations. Details on the calculations of aerosol mixing states over IGP, the impact of aerosol mixing state on aerosol forcing and heating rate will be discussed. References: [1] Intergovernmental panel on climate change (2007), Solomon S. et al. (eds.), Cambridge Univ. Press, NewYork. [2] Holben B. N., et al. (2001), J. Geophys. Res., 106(D11), 12067-12097. [3] Hess M., P. Koepke, I. Schult (1998), Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc., 79, 831-844. [4] Srivastava R., S. Ramachandran (2012), Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc., 138, doi:10.1002/qj.1958.

  7. Heart rate variability and heat sensation during CT coronary angiography: Low-osmolar versus iso-osmolar contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Anders; Ripsweden, Jonaz; Aspelin, Peter; Cederlund, Kerstin; Brismar, B. Torkel (Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Inst., Div. of Medical Imaging and Technology and Dept. of Radiology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm (Sweden)), e-mail: anders.svensson@karolinska.se; Rueck, Andreas (Div. of Cardiology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    Background: During computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) unexpected changes in heart rate while scanning may affect image quality. Purpose: To evaluate whether an iso-osmolar contrast medium (IOCM, iodixanol) and a low-osmolar contrast medium (LOCM, iomeprol) affect heart rate and experienced heat sensation differently. Material and Methods: One hundred patients scheduled for CTCA were randomized to receive either iodixanol 320 mgI/ml or iomeprol 400 mgI/ml. Depending on their heart rate, the patients were assigned to one of five scanning protocols, each optimized for different heart rate ranges. During scanning the time between each heart beat (hb) was recorded, and the corresponding heart rate was calculated. For each contrast medium (CM) the average heart rate, the variation in heart rate from individual mean heart rate, and the mean deviation from the predefined scanning protocol were calculated. Experience of heat was obtained immediately after scanning by using a visual analog scale (VAS). Examination quality was rated by two radiologists on a three-point scale. Results: The mean variation in heart rate after IOCM was 1.4 hb/min and after LOCM it was 4.4 hb/min (NS). The mean deviations in heart rate from that in the predefined scanning protocol were 2.0 hb/min and 4.7 hb/min, respectively (NS). A greater number of arrhythmic hb were observed after LOCM compared with IOCM (P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in image quality. The LOCM group reported a stronger heat sensation after CM injection than the IOCM group (VAS =36 mm and 18 mm, P<0.05). Conclusion: At clinically used concentrations the IOCM, iodixanol 320 mgI/ml, does not increase the heart rate during CTCA and causes less heart arrhythmia and less heat sensation than the LOCM, iomeprol 400 mgI/ml

  8. The oxidation behavior of SiC sintered with Al-B-C and improved oxidation resistance via heat treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sixta, Mark [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1997-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of high strength and high toughness SiC, sintered with Al, B, and C (ABC-SiC), was examined. Kinetic data were acquired and the parabolic rate constant for oxidation was determined and compared with literature data on various SiC materials. The role of secondary phases on the oxide morphology was explored. ABC-SiC was compared to commercially available SiC, Hexoloy, and SiC sintered with 10% yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG). Two-step sintering (pre-coarsening) was employed with holds for 48 hours at 600-1,600°C, prior to the typical hot-pressing conditions of 1,900°C for 1 hour, to change the chemistry and reduce the number of bubbles in the silica scale. The effects on the oxide thickness and integrity was examined as a function of the precoarsening heat treatment temperature. Additionally, the hot-pressed ABC-SiC was subjected to heat treatments (anneals) at 1,800°C for 1 hour in nitrogen, Ar, and vacuum environments, and the effects on subsequent oxidation were evaluated. The Ar and vacuum heat treatments dramatically improved the oxidation resistance of ABC-SiC. Finally, reoxidation experiments were performed to try to alter the surface chemistry of the SiC to improve the oxidation resistance. The four-point bend strengths and two-parameter Weibull plots of the most successful heat treatments were compared with the standard ABC-SiC to ensure that significant degradation did not result from altering the processing of the material.

  9. Low effective activation energies for oxygen release from metal oxides: evidence for mass-transfer limits at high heating rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Guoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Piekiel, Nicholas W; Zachariah, Michael R

    2014-06-06

    Oxygen release from metal oxides at high temperatures is relevant to many thermally activated chemical processes, including chemical-looping combustion, solar thermochemical cycles and energetic thermite reactions. In this study, we evaluated the thermal decomposition of nanosized metal oxides under rapid heating (~10(5) K s(-1)) with time-resolved mass spectrometry. We found that the effective activation-energy values that were obtained using the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa isoconversional method are much lower than the values found at low heating rates, indicating that oxygen transport might be rate-determining at a high heating rate. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Adapting workload improves the measurement of heart rate recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, R P; Maskell, S; Borresen, J; Lambert, M I

    2011-09-01

    Heart rate after a standardized test varies with a change in training status, possibly compromising the accuracy of measuring changes in heart rate recovery (HRR). The aim of this study was to determine if a change in the exercise intensity would result in a change in heart rate recovery and/or the accuracy of the heart rate recovery measurement. 31 subjects performed 4 submaximal running tests (HIMS). Based on the heart rate after the first HIMS, subjects either completed 4 identical HIMS (SAME (n=9)), 2 standard and 2 faster HIMS (FASTER (n=10)) or 2 standard and 2 slower HIMS (SLOWER (n=12)). Although no changes in heart rate recovery were found when the HIMS protocol was adapted, lower coefficients of variation (CV) and typical errors of measurement (TEM) were found in the SLOWER (CV: 11 ± 7 to 5 ± 3% ( P=0.025)), TEM: 6 to 3 beats and FASTER group (CV: 11 ± 7 to 4 ± 3% ( P=0.048), TEM: 7 to 3 beats). To ensure the highest level of sensitivity in detecting meaningful changes in HRR over time, submaximal testing protocols should target exercise intensities ranging in-between 86-93% of heart rate maximum. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. A Study on Infrared Local Heat Treatment for AA5083 to Improve Formability and Automotive Part Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Ho; Yang, Dong-Yol; Ko, SeJin

    2017-09-01

    Automotive industries are increasingly employing aluminum alloys for auto parts to reduce vehicle weight. However, the low formability of aluminum alloys has been an obstacle to their application. To resolve the formability problem, some studies involving heat treatments under laboratory conditions have been reported. However, for industrial applications, the heat treatment sequence, heating energy efficiency, and a commercial part test should be studied. This work shows an infrared (IR) local heat treatment, heating only small areas where the heat treatment is required, for an aluminum alloy to improve the formability with a reduction of heating energy. The experiment shows that the formability drastically increases when the aluminum alloy is heat treated between two forming stages, referred to as intermediate heat treatment. The microstructures of the test pieces are evaluated to identify the cause of the increase in the formability. For an industrial application, an aluminum tailgate, which cannot be manufactured without heat treatment, was successfully manufactured by the IR local heat treatment with a reduction of energy. A simulation was also conducted with a stress-based forming limit diagram, which is not affected by the strain path and heat treatment histories. The simulation gives a good prediction of the formability improvement.

  12. Effect of heating rate and plant species on the size and uniformity of silver nanoparticles synthesized using aromatic plant extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pinero, Jorge Luis; Terrón-Rebolledo, Manuel; Foroughbakhch, Rahim; Moreno-Limón, Sergio; Melendrez, M. F.; Solís-Pomar, Francisco; Pérez-Tijerina, Eduardo

    2016-11-01

    Mixing aqueous silver solutions with aqueous leaf aromatic plant extracts from basil, mint, marjoram and peppermint resulted in the synthesis of quasi-spherical silver nanoparticles in a range of size between 2 and 80 nm in diameter as analyzed by analytical high-resolution electron microscopy. The average size could be controlled by applying heat to the initial reaction system at different rates of heating, and by the specific botanical species employed for the reaction. Increasing the rate of heating resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the size of the nanoparticles produced, regardless of the species employed. This fact was more evident in the case of marjoram, which decreased the average diameter from 27 nm at a slow rate of heating to 8 nm at a high rate of heating. With regard to the species, minimum sizes of mint yielded an average size between 10 and 25 nm. The results indicate that aromatic plant extracts can be used to achieve the controlled synthesis of metal nanoparticles.

  13. The improving of the heat networks operating process under the conditions of the energy efficiency providing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blinova Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the priorities it is important to highlight the modernization and improvement of energy efficiency of housing and communal services, as well as the transition to the principle of using the most efficient technologies used in reproduction (construction, creation of objects of municipal infrastructure and housing modernization. The main hypothesis of this study lies in the fact that in modern conditions the realization of the most important priorities of the state policy in the sphere of housing and communal services, is possible in the conditions of use of the most effective control technologies for the reproduction of thermal networks. It is possible to raise the level of information security Heat Distribution Company, and other market participants by improving business processes through the development of organizational and economic mechanism in the conditions of complex monitoring of heat network operation processes

  14. High Burn Rate Hybrid Fuel for Improved Grain Design Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel type of fuel providing high burning rate for hybrid rocket applications is proposed. This fuel maintains a hydrodynamically rough surface to...

  15. A heat vulnerability index to improve urban public health management in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Lázaro, Pablo; Muller-Karger, Frank E; Otis, Daniel; McCarthy, Matthew J; Rodríguez, Ernesto

    2017-02-17

    Increased frequency and length of high heat episodes are leading to more cardiovascular issues and asthmatic responses among the population of San Juan, the capital of the island of Puerto Rico, USA. An urban heat island effect, which leads to foci of higher temperatures in some urban areas, can raise heat-related mortality. The objective of this research is to map the risk of high temperature in particular locations by creating heat maps of the city of San Juan. The heat vulnerability index (HVI) maps were developed using images collected by satellite-based remote sensing combined with census data. Land surface temperature was assessed using images from the Thermal Infrared Sensor flown on Landsat 8. Social determinants (e.g., age, unemployment, education and social isolation, and health insurance coverage) were analyzed by census tract. The data were examined in the context of land cover maps generated using products from the Puerto Rico Terrestrial Gap Analysis Project (USDA Forest Service). All variables were set in order to transform the indicators expressed in different units into indices between 0 and 1, and the HVI was calculated as sum of score. The tract with highest index was considered to be the most vulnerable and the lowest to be the least vulnerable. Five vulnerability classes were mapped (very high, high, moderate, low, and very low). The hottest and the most vulnerable tracts corresponded to highly built areas, including the Luis Munoz International Airport, seaports, parking lots, and high-density residential areas. Several variables contributed to increased vulnerability, including higher rates of the population living alone, disabilities, advanced age, and lack of health insurance coverage. Coolest areas corresponded to vegetated landscapes and urban water bodies. The urban HVI map will be useful to health officers, emergency preparedness personnel, the National Weather Service, and San Juan residents, as it helps to prepare for and to mitigate

  16. A heat vulnerability index to improve urban public health management in San Juan, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Lázaro, Pablo; Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Otis, Daniel; McCarthy, Matthew J.; Rodríguez, Ernesto

    2017-02-01

    Increased frequency and length of high heat episodes are leading to more cardiovascular issues and asthmatic responses among the population of San Juan, the capital of the island of Puerto Rico, USA. An urban heat island effect, which leads to foci of higher temperatures in some urban areas, can raise heat-related mortality. The objective of this research is to map the risk of high temperature in particular locations by creating heat maps of the city of San Juan. The heat vulnerability index (HVI) maps were developed using images collected by satellite-based remote sensing combined with census data. Land surface temperature was assessed using images from the Thermal Infrared Sensor flown on Landsat 8. Social determinants (e.g., age, unemployment, education and social isolation, and health insurance coverage) were analyzed by census tract. The data were examined in the context of land cover maps generated using products from the Puerto Rico Terrestrial Gap Analysis Project (USDA Forest Service). All variables were set in order to transform the indicators expressed in different units into indices between 0 and 1, and the HVI was calculated as sum of score. The tract with highest index was considered to be the most vulnerable and the lowest to be the least vulnerable. Five vulnerability classes were mapped (very high, high, moderate, low, and very low). The hottest and the most vulnerable tracts corresponded to highly built areas, including the Luis Munoz International Airport, seaports, parking lots, and high-density residential areas. Several variables contributed to increased vulnerability, including higher rates of the population living alone, disabilities, advanced age, and lack of health insurance coverage. Coolest areas corresponded to vegetated landscapes and urban water bodies. The urban HVI map will be useful to health officers, emergency preparedness personnel, the National Weather Service, and San Juan residents, as it helps to prepare for and to mitigate

  17. Density of states, specific heat and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in PrOs4Sb12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Alrub, Tayseer; Curnoe, Stephanie

    2007-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the density of states, specific heat and nuclear spin-relaxation rate in the unconventional superconductor PrOs4Sb12. In this material, superconductivity is best described by a three component order parameter in the triplet channel. Instead of nodes, deep dips appear in the gap function producing power law temperature dependencies at higher temperatures and exponential suppression at low temperatures of the specific heat and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rate. Various experimental observations will be discussed in this context.

  18. Improvements in Mechanical Properties of 319 Al Alloy Engine Blocks Through Cost-Effective Solution Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, A.; Ravindran, C.; MacKay, R.

    2014-08-01

    The use of Al engine blocks has increased significantly to improve vehicle fuel efficiency. However, the gray cast iron cylinder liners cause the development of large tensile residual stress along the cylinder bores which necessitates the optimization of mechanical properties in this region to prevent premature engine failure. This study compared the microstructure of T4-treated Al billet castings of varying cooling rate to that of the cylinder region of T4-treated (current production schedule) Al engine blocks. The aim of this study was to develop a cost-effective small scale heat treatment optimization method for engine block production. Comparisons in microstructure between the engine block and the billet castings were carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The results suggest that the microstructure and hardness at the top, middle, and bottom of the cylinder were similar to those of each representative billet casting, indicating that heat treatment resulted in successful replication of the engine block locations. In addition, tensile testing revealed that the YS and UTS increased slightly following T4 treatment for all billet castings, which was also observed at the middle of the engine block cylinder bridge. As such, this method can be an effective forerunner for future heat treatment optimization in Al engine block production.

  19. Effects of heat stress on production, somatic cell score and conception rate in Holsteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiya, Koichi; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Shirai, Tatsuo; Osawa, Takefumi; Terawaki, Yoshinori; Nagamine, Yoshitaka; Masuda, Yutaka; Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effects of heat stress (HS) on production traits, somatic cell score (SCS) and conception rate at first insemination (CR) in Holsteins in Japan. We used a total of 228 242 records of milk, fat and protein yields, and SCS for the first three lactations, as well as of CR in heifers and in first- and second-lactation cows that had calved for the first time between 2000 and 2012. Records from 47 prefectural weather stations throughout Japan were used to calculate the temperature-humidity index (THI); areas were categorized into three regional groups: no HS (THI < 72), mild HS (72 ≤ THI < 79), and moderate HS (THI ≥ 79). Trait records from the three HS-region groups were treated as three different traits and trivariate animal models were used. The genetic correlations between milk yields from different HS groups were very high (0.91 to 0.99). Summer calving caused the greatest increase in SCS, and in the first and second lactations this increase became greater as THI increased. In cows, CR was affected by the interaction between HS group and insemination month: with summer and early autumn insemination, there was a reduction in CR, and it was much larger in the mild- and moderate-HS groups than in the no-HS group. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  20. How do rain drops affect atmospheric radiative fluxes and heating rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Peter; Chiu, Christine; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Allan, Richard; Hill, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    General circulation model (GCM) radiation schemes are becoming increasingly sophisticated; the treatment of clouds has become more refined while the number of gases and aerosol species that are represented continues to rise. However, all GCMs continue to ignore the radiative effect of precipitating liquid water (rain). The resulting biases are expected to be small, but they have yet to be quantified. This study aims to provide a first estimate of how rain affects the atmospheric radiation budget at a range of temporal and spatial scales. This is a necessary first step towards determining whether GCM radiation schemes should include rain. We define the rain radiative effect here as the difference between radiative fluxes calculated with and without rain. We perform calculations using the SOCRATES (Suite Of Community Radiative Transfer codes based on Edwards-Slingo) radiative tranfser scheme. Input atmospheric profiles are taken from two weeks (one week during boreal winter and the other during boreal summer) of a Goddard multiscale modelling framework (MMF) simulation. Based on these calculations, we shall quantify and explain how rain affects the transfer of radiation through the atmosphere and thus radiative heating rates and fluxes at both the surface and top of atmosphere.

  1. Hardening by cooling rate control and post-firing heat treatment in Pd-Ag-Sn alloy for bonding porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Young-Jun; Seol, Hyo-Joung; Cho, Mi-Hyang; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the hardening effect by controlling the cooling rate during the porcelain firing process and performing an additional post-firing heat treatment in a Pd-Ag-Sn alloy. The most effective cooling rate for alloy hardening was determined by cooling the specimens at various cooling rates after oxidation treatment. A subsequent porcelain firing simulation followed by cooling at the selected cooling rate was performed. A post-firing heat treatment was then done at 600°C in a porcelain furnace. The hardening mechanism was characterized by a hardness test, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Alloy softening occurred during the porcelain firing process followed by cooling at a controlled cooling rate. A post-firing heat treatment allowed apparent precipitation hardening. It is advisable to perform a postfiring heat treatment at 600°C in a porcelain furnace by annealing metal substructure after porcelain fusing.

  2. Improving the thermal efficiency of a jaggery production module using a fire-tube heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Madrid, Raul; Orbegoso, Elder Mendoza; Saavedra, Rafael; Marcelo, Daniel

    2017-12-15

    Jaggery is a product obtained after heating and evaporation processes have been applied to sugar cane juice via the addition of thermal energy, followed by the crystallisation process through mechanical agitation. At present, jaggery production uses furnaces and pans that are designed empirically based on trial and error procedures, which results in low ranges of thermal efficiency operation. To rectify these deficiencies, this study proposes the use of fire-tube pans to increase heat transfer from the flue gases to the sugar cane juice. With the aim of increasing the thermal efficiency of a jaggery installation, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD)-based model was used as a numerical tool to design a fire-tube pan that would replace the existing finned flat pan. For this purpose, the original configuration of the jaggery furnace was simulated via a pre-validated CFD model in order to calculate its current thermal performance. Then, the newly-designed fire-tube pan was virtually replaced in the jaggery furnace with the aim of numerically estimating the thermal performance at the same operating conditions. A comparison of both simulations highlighted the growth of the heat transfer rate at around 105% in the heating/evaporation processes when the fire-tube pan replaced the original finned flat pan. This enhancement impacted the jaggery production installation, whereby the thermal efficiency of the installation increased from 31.4% to 42.8%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of reusable surface insulation for space shuttle over a range of heat-transfer rate and surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Reusable surface insulation materials, which were developed as heat shields for the space shuttle, were tested over a range of conditions including heat-transfer rates between 160 and 620 kW/sq m. The lowest of these heating rates was in a range predicted for the space shuttle during reentry, and the highest was more than twice the predicted entry heating on shuttle areas where reusable surface insulation would be used. Individual specimens were tested repeatedly at increasingly severe conditions to determine the maximum heating rate and temperature capability. A silica-base material experienced only minimal degradation during repeated tests which included conditions twice as severe as predicted shuttle entry and withstood cumulative exposures three times longer than the best mullite material. Mullite-base materials cracked and experienced incipient melting at conditions within the range predicted for shuttle entry. Neither silica nor mullite materials consistently survived the test series with unbroken waterproof surfaces. Surface temperatures for a silica and a mullite material followed a trend expected for noncatalytic surfaces, whereas surface temperatures for a second mullite material appeared to follow a trend expected for a catalytic surface.

  4. Public participation GIS for improving wood burning emissions from residential heating and urban environmental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Aparicio, Susana; Vogt, Matthias; Schneider, Philipp; Kahila-Tani, Maarit; Broberg, Anna

    2017-04-15

    A crowdsourcing study supported by a public participation GIS tool was designed and carried out in two Norwegian regions. The aim was to improve the knowledge about emissions from wood burning for residential heating in urban areas based on the collection of citizens' localized insights. We focus on three main issues: 1) type of dwelling and residential heating source; 2) wood consumption and type of wood appliances; and 3) citizens' perception of the urban environment. Our study shows the importance of wood burning for residential heating, and of the resulted particle emissions, in Norwegian urban areas. Citizens' localized insights on environmental perception highlight the areas in the city that require particular attention as part of clean air strategies. Information about environmental perception is combined with existing environmental data showing certain correlation. The results support the urban environmental management based on co-benefit approaches, achieving several outcomes from a single policy measure. Measures to reduce urban air pollution will have a positive impact on the citizens' environmental perception, and therefore on their quality of life, in addition to reducing the negative consequences of air pollution on human health. The characterization of residential heating by fuelwood is still a challenging activity. Our study shows the potential of a crowdsourcing method as means for bottom-up approaches designed to increase our knowledge on human activities at urban scale that result on emissions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Improving the heat transfer efficiency of synthetic oil with silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, Elena V; Moravek, Michael R; Singh, Dileep

    2011-12-01

    The heat transfer properties of synthetic oil (Therminol 66) used for high temperature applications was improved by introducing 15 nm silicon dioxide nanoparticles. Stable suspensions of inorganic nanoparticles in the non-polar fluid were prepared using a cationic surfactant (benzalkonium chloride). The effects of nanoparticle and surfactant concentrations on thermo-physical properties (viscosity, thermal conductivity and total heat absorption) of these nanofluids were investigated in a wide temperature range. The surfactant-to-nanoparticle (SN) ratio was optimized for higher thermal conductivity and lower viscosity, which are both critical for the efficiency of heat transfer. The rheological behavior of SiO(2)/TH66 nanofluids was correlated to average agglomerate sizes, which were shown to vary with SN ratio and temperature. The conditions of ultrasonic treatment were studied and the temporary decrease of agglomerate size from an equilibrium size (characteristic to SN ratio) was demonstrated. The heat transfer efficiencies were estimated for the formulated nanofluids for both turbulent and laminar flow regimes and were compared to the performance of the base fluid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cross-Adaptation: Heat and Cold Adaptation to Improve Physiological and Cellular Responses to Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Oliver R; Taylor, Lee; Watt, Peter W; Maxwell, Neil S

    2017-09-01

    To prepare for extremes of heat, cold or low partial pressures of oxygen (O 2 ), humans can undertake a period of acclimation or acclimatization to induce environment-specific adaptations, e.g. heat acclimation (HA), cold acclimation (CA), or altitude training. While these strategies are effective, they are not always feasible due to logistical impracticalities. Cross-adaptation is a term used to describe the phenomenon whereby alternative environmental interventions, e.g. HA or CA, may be a beneficial alternative to altitude interventions, providing physiological stress and inducing adaptations observable at altitude. HA can attenuate physiological strain at rest and during moderate-intensity exercise at altitude via adaptations allied to improved O 2 delivery to metabolically active tissue, likely following increases in plasma volume and reductions in body temperature. CA appears to improve physiological responses to altitude by attenuating the autonomic response to altitude. While no cross-acclimation-derived exercise performance/capacity data have been measured following CA, post-HA improvements in performance underpinned by aerobic metabolism, and therefore dependent on O 2 delivery at altitude, are likely. At a cellular level, heat shock protein responses to altitude are attenuated by prior HA, suggesting that an attenuation of the cellular stress response and therefore a reduced disruption to homeostasis at altitude has occurred. This process is known as cross-tolerance. The effects of CA on markers of cross-tolerance is an area requiring further investigation. Because much of the evidence relating to cross-adaptation to altitude has examined the benefits at moderate to high altitudes, future research examining responses at lower altitudes should be conducted, given that these environments are more frequently visited by athletes and workers. Mechanistic work to identify the specific physiological and cellular pathways responsible for cross-adaptation between

  7. Improved Dissolution Rate of Piroxicam by Fusion Solid Dispersion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharmaceutical grade), a biodegradable polymer, to obtain a solution with drug: polymer ratio of 1:5. The release rate of the piroxicam solid dispersed drug was studied in simulated gastric fluid. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron ...

  8. ACDOS2: an improved neutron-induced dose rate code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagache, J.C.

    1981-06-01

    To calculate the expected dose rate from fusion reactors as a function of geometry, composition, and time after shutdown a computer code, ACDOS2, was written, which utilizes up-to-date libraries of cross-sections and radioisotope decay data. ACDOS2 is in ANSI FORTRAN IV, in order to make it readily adaptable elsewhere.

  9. Improved observations of turbulence dissipation rates from wind profiling radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. McCaffrey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Observations of turbulence dissipation rates in the planetary boundary layer are crucial for validation of parameterizations in numerical weather prediction models. However, because dissipation rates are difficult to obtain, they are infrequently measured through the depth of the boundary layer. For this reason, demonstrating the ability of commonly used wind profiling radars (WPRs to estimate this quantity would be greatly beneficial. During the XPIA field campaign at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, two WPRs operated in an optimized configuration, using high spectral resolution for increased accuracy of Doppler spectral width, specifically chosen to estimate turbulence from a vertically pointing beam. Multiple post-processing techniques, including different numbers of spectral averages and peak processing algorithms for calculating spectral moments, were evaluated to determine the most accurate procedures for estimating turbulence dissipation rates using the information contained in the Doppler spectral width, using sonic anemometers mounted on a 300 m tower for validation. The optimal settings were determined, producing a low bias, which was later corrected. Resulting estimations of turbulence dissipation rates correlated well (R2 = 0. 54 and 0. 41 with the sonic anemometers, and profiles up to 2 km from the 449 MHz WPR and 1 km from the 915 MHz WPR were observed.

  10. Aminophylline Improves Urine Flow Rates but Not Survival in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury (AKI) morbidity and mortality rates remain high. Variable AKI outcomes have been reported in association with aminophylline treatment. This study evaluated AKI outcome in a group of Nigerian children treated with aminophylline. Methods: This is a retrospective study of AKI in children ...

  11. Critical Analysis of Moving Heat Source Shape for ARC Welding Process of High Deposition Rate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ghosh, A.; Hloch, Sergej; Chattopadhyaya, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2014), s. 95-98 ISSN 1330-3651 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Gaussian heat distribution * oval heat source shape * Submerged Arc Welding Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 0.579, year: 2014 http://hrcak.srce.hr/index.php?show=clanak&id_clanak_jezik=172337

  12. Influence of heating rate on sorbitic transformation temperature of tempering C45 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kulawik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the analysis of speed heating influence on sorbitic transormation temperature of tempering C45 steel is presented. On thebasis of dilatometric research, functions associating heating time with initial and final temperature of sorbitic transformation have beendetermined as well as the size structural (γ and thermal (α expansion coefficients of quenching and tempering structures have beenestimated.

  13. Improving completion rates in adult education through social responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Mariager-Anderson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    teachers’ competences. This goal was pursued by engaging teachers in training programs aimed at improving their relational competences. The data showed that these focused training programs have an effect on the educational culture at the colleges and on the teachers’ attitudes toward the importance...

  14. Use of mobile phones to improve follow-up rates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite less than 30% accountability by mobile phone in. Hardy et al.'s study, effort should be made to encourage the use of modern applications to improve the overall quality of healthcare delivery in Africa. The only queries I have about this study are: what precisely was meant by “acutely unwell” children, and were ...

  15. Experimental study of the influence of varying ceiling height on the heat release rate of a pool fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiahao; Wang, Jian; Richard, Yuen

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the influence of ceiling height on the combustion process of a pool fire whose flame impinges the ceiling, a sequence of pool fires with varying ceiling heights was performed using a scaled-down cone calorimeter. N-heptane and jet-A were employed as fuels to conducted the tests. Experimental findings reveal that with the decreasing ceiling height, the maximum and average heat release rates will initially increase due to the enhanced heat feedback, and then decrease as a result of the restriction of air entrainment caused by the extremely small ceiling height. In addition, the dimensionless ceiling height is found to have a linear relationship with the logarithm value of the dimensionless averaged heat release rate for the two given fuels with the similar slope of -2/3.

  16. Hall Effects on Unsteady MHD Reactive Flow Through a Porous Channel with Convective Heating at the Arrhenius Reaction Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.; Patra, R. R.; Jana, R. N.; Makinde, O. D.

    2017-09-01

    This paper deals with the study of an unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow and heat transfer of a reactive, viscous, incompressible, electrically conducting fluid between two infinitely long parallel porous plates where one of the plates is set into impulsive/uniformly accelerated motion in the presence of a uniform transverse magnetic field at the Arrhenius reaction rate, with the Hall currents taken into account. The transient momentum equations are solved analytically with the use of the Laplace transform technique, and the velocity field and shear stresses are obtained in a unified closed form. The energy equation is tackled numerically using Matlab. The effects of the pertinent parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature, shear stresses, and the heat transfer rate at the plates are investigated. The results reveal that the combined effects of magnetic field, suction/injection, exothermic reaction, and variable thermal conductivity have a significant impact on the hydromagnetic flow and heat transfer.

  17. Improvement of dissolution rate of indomethacin by inkjet printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickström, Henrika; Palo, Mirja; Rijckaert, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare printable inks of the poorly water soluble drug indomethacin (IMC), fabricate printed systems with flexible doses and investigate the effect of ink excipients on the printability, dissolution rate and the solid state properties of the drug. A piezoelectric...... inkjet printer was used to print 1×1cm2 squares onto a paper substrate and an impermeable transparency film. l-arginine (ARG) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were used as additional formulation excipients. Accurately dosed samples were generated as a result of the ink and droplet formation optimization....... Increased dissolution rate was obtained for all formulations. The formulation with IMC and ARG printed on transparency film resulted in a co-amorphous system. The solid state characteristics of the printed drug on porous paper substrates were not possible to determine due to strong interference from...

  18. Take the HEAT: A pilot study on improving communication with angry families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacruz, Nicolas; Reed, Suzanne; Splinter, Ansley; Brown, Amy; Flowers, Stacy; Verbeck, Nicole; Turpening, Debbie; Mahan, John D

    2017-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the utility of an educational program consisting of a workshop based on the Take the HEAT communication strategy, designed specifically for addressing patients who are angry, using a novel tool to evaluate residents' skills in employing this method. 33 first-year pediatric and internal medicine-pediatrics residents participated in the study. The workshop presented the Take the HEAT (Hear, Empathize, Apologize, Take action) strategy of communication. Communication skills were assessed through standardized patient encounters at baseline and post-workshop. Encounters were scored using a novel assessment tool. After the workshop, residents' Take the HEAT communication improved from baseline total average score 23.15 to total average score 25.36 (Z=-3.428, pstrategy. Poor performance by residents in demonstrating empathy should be explored further. This study demonstrates the utility of a brief communications curriculum aimed at improving pediatric residents' ability to communicate with angry families. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Potential economic impacts from improving breastfeeding rates in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, S; Quigley, M A; Fox-Rushby, J; McCormick, F; Williams, A; Trueman, P; Dodds, R; Renfrew, M J

    2015-04-01

    Studies suggest that increased breastfeeding rates can provide substantial financial savings, but the scale of such savings in the UK is not known. To calculate potential cost savings attributable to increases in breastfeeding rates from the National Health Service perspective. Cost savings focussed on where evidence of health benefit is strongest: reductions in gastrointestinal and lower respiratory tract infections, acute otitis media in infants, necrotising enterocolitis in preterm babies and breast cancer (BC) in women. Savings were estimated using a seven-step framework in which an incidence-based disease model determined the number of cases that could have been avoided if breastfeeding rates were increased. Point estimates of cost savings were subject to a deterministic sensitivity analysis. Treating the four acute diseases in children costs the UK at least £89 million annually. The 2009-2010 value of lifetime costs of treating maternal BC is estimated at £959 million. Supporting mothers who are exclusively breast feeding at 1 week to continue breast feeding until 4 months can be expected to reduce the incidence of three childhood infectious diseases and save at least £11 million annually. Doubling the proportion of mothers currently breast feeding for 7-18 months in their lifetime is likely to reduce the incidence of maternal BC and save at least £31 million at 2009-2010 value. The economic impact of low breastfeeding rates is substantial. Investing in services that support women who want to breast feed for longer is potentially cost saving. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Impact of heating rate and solvent on Ni-based catalysts prepared by solution combustion method for syngas methanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Yan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ni-Al2O3 catalysts prepared by solution combustion method for syngas methanation were enhanced by employing various heating rate and different solvent. The catalytic properties were tested in syngas methanation. The result indicates that both of heating rate and solvent remarkably affect Ni particle size, which is a key factor to the catalytic activity of Ni-Al2O3 catalysts for syngas methanation. Moreover, the relationship between Ni particle size and the production rate of methane per unit mass was correlated. The optimal Ni-Al2O3 catalyst prepared in ethanol at 2°C/min, achieves a maximum production rate of methane at the mean size of 20.8 nm.

  1. Improving survival rates of newborn infants in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenfield David

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number, rates and causes of early neonatal deaths in South Africa were not known. Neither had modifiable factors associated with these deaths been previously documented. An audit of live born infants who died in the first week of life in the public service could help in planning strategies to reduce the early neonatal mortality rate. Methods The number of live born infants weighing 1000 g or more, the number of these infants who die in the first week of life, the primary and final causes of these deaths, and the modifiable factors associated with them were collected over four years from 102 sites in South Africa as part of the Perinatal Problem Identification Programme. Results The rate of death in the first week of life for infants weighing 1000 g or more was unacceptably high (8.7/1000, especially in rural areas (10.42/1000. Intrapartum hypoxia and preterm delivery are the main causes of death. Common modifiable factors included inadequate staffing and facilities, poor care in labour, poor neonatal resuscitation and basic care, and difficulties for patients in accessing health care. Conclusion Practical, affordable and effective steps can be taken to reduce the number of infants who die in the first week of life in South Africa. These could also be implemented in other under resourced countries.

  2. Improved method for measuring water imbibition rates on low-permeability porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, M.D.; Istok, J.D.; Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    Existing methods for measuring water imbibition rates are inadequate when imbibition rates are small (e.g., clay soils and many igneous rocks). We developed an improved laboratory method for performing imbibition measurements on soil or rock cores with a wide range of hydraulic properties. Core specimens are suspended from an electronic strain gauge (load cell) in a closed chamber while maintaining the lower end of the core in contact with a free water surface in a constant water level reservoir. The upper end of the core is open to the atmosphere. During imbibition, mass increase of the core is recorded continuously by a datalogger that converts the load cell voltage signal into mass units using a calibration curve. Computer automation allows imbibition rate measurement on as many as eight cores simultaneously and independently. Performance of each component of the imbibition apparatus was evaluated using a set of rock cores (2.5 cm in diameter and 2-5 cm in length) from a single lithostratigraphic unit composed of non-to-moderately welded ash-flow tuff (a glass-rich pyroclastic rock partially fused by heat and pressure) with porosities ranging from 0.094 to 0.533 m3 m-3. Reproducibility of sample handling and testing procedures was demonstrated using replicate measurements. Precision and accuracy of load cell measurements were assessed using mass balance calculations and indicated agreement within a few tenths of a percent of total mass. Computed values of sorptivity, S, ranged from 8.83 x 10-6 to 4.55 x 10-4 m s-0.5. The developed method should prove useful for measuring imbibition rates on a wide range of porous materials.

  3. Comparison of the Heat Release Rate from the Mass Loss Calorimeter to the Cone Calorimeter for Wood-based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura E. Hasburgh; Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing demand for material properties to be used as inputs in fi re behavior models designed to address building fire safety. This comparative study evaluates using the mass loss calorimeter as an alternative to the cone calorimeter for obtaining heat release rates of wood-based materials. For this study, a modified mass loss calorimeter utilized an...

  4. Effects of calcination temperature and heating rate on the photocatalytic properties of ZnO prepared by pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lingling; Tong, Zhifang; Wang, Zhonghua; Chen, Ming; Huang, Ni; Zhang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    A series of ZnO nanorods were prepared by pyrolysis of zinc acetate at different calcination temperatures and heating rates under ambient atmosphere. The as-prepared ZnO nanorods were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photocatalytic performances of the ZnO nanorods were evaluated by the photodegradation of methyl orange (MO) and 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). The morphology, optical property, surface composition, and photocatalytic performance of the ZnO samples were affected by both calcination temperature and heating rate. The photocatalytic activity of the ZnO sample was obviously decreased with increased heating rate, which might be ascribed to the simultaneous decrease of oxygen vacancies and surface adsorption oxygen species. The ZnO nanorods prepared at 300°C with a heating rate of 1°C/min exhibited good photocatalytic activity and photochemical stability, allowing good potential practical application in environmental remediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of fluidized bed heat exchangers in heat pump systems for improved performance. Technical status report, September 1, 1977--November 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J C; Sarubbi, R G

    1977-11-01

    A York (Split System) heat pump 60,000 BTUH has been selected, and one unit delivered, for use in comparing its coefficient of performance with an identical system using fluidized bed heat exchangers. Construction has begun on a plenum which will supply air over a wide range of operating temperatures and at flow rates and pressures which are comparable to normal operating conditions. Means for monitoring air flow rates have been decided upon and a tentative selection of instrumentation sensor points have been selected. The existing heat exchanger design is being examined so that a better knowledge of the complete range of operating pressures, temperatures, flow rates and refrigerant quality can be obtained.

  6. Improvement on life and NO{sub x} discharge of radiant heat transfer tube heating system by the elasto-plasticity creep analysis; Dansosei kuripukaiseki ni yoru hosha dennetsukan kanetsu shisutemu no jumyo to NO{sub x} haishutsuryo no kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Futahiko; Ikaruda, Kunihiro; Abe, Yoshio; Arai, Norio

    1999-06-05

    Combustion thermal process using the radiant heat transfer tube has widely been applied as a heating method which separates the combustion atmosphere from the heating-e atmosphere in various heating furnace such as iron and steel industry. In this thermal process, in order to burn the fuel in tight space in radiant heat transfer service area, radiant heat transfer tube and burner life were short under high temperature and high-load combustion, and there was a problem that that and, burning characteristic such as NO{sub x} generation rate are improved was difficult. In this study, large temperature distribution by the combustion in the radiant heat transfer tube clarified that the life of the radiant heat transfer tube was shortened by elasto-plasticity creep analysis of the radiant heat transfer tube. Then, two steps combustion burner of the exhaust gas self recycling type was developed as a method for reducing the NO{sub x} generation rate, while the temperature distribution of the radiant heat transfer tube was equalized. As the result, it was possible to reduce over 20% in comparison with conventional two steps combustion burner, while radiant heat transfer tube and life of the burner are extended over the conventional double, in respect of the NO{sub x} generation rate. (translated by NEDO)

  7. Geothermal electricity generation and desalination: an integrated process design to conserve latent heat with operational improvements

    KAUST Repository

    Missimer, Thomas M.

    2016-02-05

    A new process combination is proposed to link geothermal electricity generation with desalination. The concept involves maximizing the utilization of harvested latent heat by passing the turbine exhaust steam into a multiple effect distillation system and then into an adsorption desalination system. Processes are fully integrated to produce electricity, desalted water for consumer consumption, and make-up water for the geothermal extraction system. Further improvements in operational efficiency are achieved by adding a seawater reverse osmosis system to the site to utilize some of the generated electricity and using on-site aquifer storage and recovery to maximize water production with tailoring of seasonal capacity requirements and to meet facility maintenance requirements. The concept proposed conserves geothermally harvested latent heat and maximizes the economics of geothermal energy development. Development of a fully renewable energy electric generation-desalination-aquifer storage campus is introduced within the framework of geothermal energy development. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Taylor & Francis

  8. Developing Algorithms to Improve Defect Extraction and Suppressing Undesired Heat Patterns in Sonic IR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidat, Omar; Yu, Qiuye; Han, Xiaoyan

    2016-12-01

    Sonic IR imaging is an emerging NDE technology. This technology uses short pulses of ultrasonic excitation together with infrared imaging to detect defects in materials and structures. Sonic energy is coupled to the specimen under inspection by means of direct contact between the transducer tip and the specimen at some convenient point. This region which is normally in the field of view of the camera appears as intensity peak in the image which might be misinterpreted as defects or obscure the detection and/or extraction of the defect signals in the proximity of the contact region. Moreover, certain defects may have very small heat signature or being buried in noise. In this paper, we present algorithms to improve defect extraction and suppression of undesired heat patterns in sonic IR images. Two approaches are presented, each fits to a specific category of sonic IR images.

  9. Vaccination for tomorrow: the need to improve immunisation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassianos, George

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1998 health scare about measles mumps and rubella (MMR) immunisation, vaccination rates for measles have suffered. Although these recovered for a brief period in 2004-05, they have stalled again and latest figures suggest that only 85% of children are now immunised against this disease. The UK has become one of the five countries in the European Union with the highest measles rates. Meanwhile the wider picture indicates that other vaccination rates, including for seasonal influenza, are not meeting targets. This is a potential sign that the MMR scare and myths around immunisation are setting a worrying trend of some people losing confidence in the practice of vaccination. The UK has expanded its childhood immunisation programme to include the human papilloma virus vaccine (HPV) which protects against some types of cervical cancer. New life-saving vaccines for diseases, including meningococcal B meningitis (a strain of meningitis not yet covered by the existing vaccination programme), shingles and hepatitis C will soon become available. It is therefore important that information is available to the general public about the excellent safety record and benefits of vaccination to ensure that as many people as possible can take advantage of these new vaccines. This article explores the current uptake of, and attitudes towards, vaccination programmes and discusses some myths about immunisation. It suggests that community health care teams with access to adults, including parents of children and young people who need vaccination, are well placed to help challenge some of these myths and promote the benefits of immunisation. Practical suggestions are included on how this can be achieved.

  10. Two Improvements of an Operational Two-Layer Model for Terrestrial Surface Heat Flux Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to make the prediction of land surface heat fluxes more robust, two improvements were made to an operational two-layer model proposed previously by Zhang. These improvements are: 1 a surface energy balance method is used to determine the theoretical boundary lines (namely ‘true wet/cool edge’ and ‘true dry/warm edge’ in the trapezoid in the scatter plot for the surface temperature versus the fractional vegetation cover in mixed pixels; 2 a new assumption that the slope of the Tm – f curves is mainly controlled by soil water content is introduced. The variables required by the improved method include near surface vapor pressure, air temperature, surface resistance, aerodynamic resistance, fractional vegetation cover, surface temperature and net radiation. The model predictions from the improved model were assessed in this study by in situ measurements, which show that the total latent heat flux from the soil and vegetation are in close agreement with the in situ measurement with an RMSE (Root Mean Square Error ranging from 30 w/m2~50 w/m2,which is consistent with the site scale measurement of latent heat flux. Because soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration are not measured separately from the field site, in situ measured CO2 flux is used to examine the modeled λEveg. Similar trends of seasonal variations of vegetation were found for the canopy transpiration retrievals and in situ CO2 flux measurements. The above differences are mainly caused by 1 the scale disparity between the field measurement and the MODIS observation; 2 the non-closure problem of the surface energy balance from the surface fluxes observations themselves. The improved method was successfully used to predict the component surface heat fluxes from the soil and vegetation and it provides a promising approach to study the canopy transpiration and the soil evaporation quantitatively during the

  11. Optimized Heating Rate and Soot-catalyst Ratio for Soot Oxidation over MoO3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congwei Mei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available MoO3 is now utilized as a promising catalyst due to its high activity and favorable mobility at low temperature. Its spectral data and surface microstructures were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR and Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM. Thermo-analysis of the carbon black was performed over nano-MoO3 catalyst in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA at various heating rates and soot-catalyst ratios. Through the analysis of kinetic parameters, we found that the heat transfer effect and diffusion effect can be removed by setting lower heating rates and soot-catalyst ratios. Therefore, a strategy for selecting proper thermogravimetric parameters were established, which can contribute to the better understanding of thermo-analytical process. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 4th December 2016; Revised: 13rd June 2017; Accepted: 9th April 2017; Available online: 27th October 2017; Published regularly: December 2017 How to Cite: Mei, C., Mei, D., Yue, S, Chen, Z., Yuan, Y. (2017. Optimized Heating Rate and Soot-catalyst Ratio for Soot Oxidation over MoO3 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (3: 408-414 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.3.845.408-414

  12. Griseofulvin micronization and dissolution rate improvement by supercritical assisted atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverchon, E; Della Porta, G; Spada, A; Antonacci, A

    2004-11-01

    Supercritical assisted atomization (SAA) was used to micronize griseofulvin (GF), selected as a model compound, to verify the performance of this innovative process. SAA is based on the solubilization of supercritical carbon dioxide in a liquid solution containing the drug. The ternary mixture is then sprayed through a nozzle and microparticles are formed as a consequence of the enhanced atomization. Precipitation temperature and drug concentration in the liquid solution were studied to evaluate their influence on morphology and size of precipitated particles. A good particle size control was obtained and GF spherical particles with mean diameters ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 microm were produced with a narrow particle size distribution. Processed GF was characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography-UV/vis, headspace-gas chromatography-flame ionization detection, differential scanning calorimetry, BET and X-ray analyses. No drug degradation was observed and a solvent residue (acetone) less than 800 ppm was measured. GF microparticles showed good stability and surface areas ranging from about 4 to 6 m(2) g(-1); moreover, the micronized drug retained the crystalline habit. GF capsules were formulated with starch and used to compare the dissolution rate of SAA-processed and conventional jet-milled drug. A faster dissolution and a better reproducibility of the dissolution profile were observed for SAA-processed GF.

  13. SISGR - In situ characterization and modeling of formation reactions under extreme heating rates in nanostructured multilayer foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufnagel, Todd C.

    2014-06-09

    Materials subjected to extreme conditions, such as very rapid heating, behave differently than materials under more ordinary conditions. In this program we examined the effect of rapid heating on solid-state chemical reactions in metallic materials. One primary goal was to develop experimental techniques capable of observing these reactions, which can occur at heating rates in excess of one million degrees Celsius per second. One approach that we used is x-ray diffraction performed using microfocused x-ray beams and very fast x-ray detectors. A second approach is the use of a pulsed electron source for dynamic transmission electron microscopy. With these techniques we were able to observe how the heating rate affects the chemical reaction, from which we were able to discern general principles about how these reactions proceed. A second thrust of this program was to develop computational tools to help us understand and predict the reactions. From atomic-scale simulations were learned about the interdiffusion between different metals at high heating rates, and about how new crystalline phases form. A second class of computational models allow us to predict the shape of the reaction front that occurs in these materials, and to connect our understanding of interdiffusion from the atomistic simulations to measurements made in the laboratory. Both the experimental and computational techniques developed in this program are expected to be broadly applicable to a wider range of scientific problems than the intermetallic solid-state reactions studied here. For example, we have already begun using the x-ray techniques to study how materials respond to mechanical deformation at very high rates.

  14. Management of heat stress to improve fertility in dairy cows in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamenbaum, Israel; Galon, Nadav

    2010-01-01

    's performance. Based on the S:W ratio of each herd in 2007, we quantified the overall effect of intensive cooling in summer on the cow's whole year performance. Data from 24 farms with the highest S:W ratio were compared with data from 24 farms with the lowest S:W ratio. The comparison showed that well cooled cows in Israeli summer added approximately 700 kg of milk to cow's lactation, an increase of 6.5% in its annual production. Summer CR were significantly higher in the highest S:W ratio farms, compared with the lowest ones (27 vs. 19%), and compared to those obtained in same groups in winter (40 vs. 36%), respectively. High S: W ratio herds reached in summer conception rate of 70% of their winter CR, compared to only 50% in the lowest S:W ratio farms inseminated in same period. Trials conducted in the last 10 years show clearly that intensive cooling of high yielding cows (above 45 kg daily) in summer cannot completely eliminate summer decline in CR (as was achieved two decades ago when daily production was less than 30 kg). These high yielding cows despite being intensively cooled could not maintain normal body temperature all day long. This fact brought Israeli researchers to look for hormonal treatments to improve cow's summer fertility, among them elevating post insemination blood progesterone, GnRH treatment at time of insemination to optimise insemination time, improvement of egg quality by elimination of aged follicles produced during heat stress and the use of timed AI and embryo transfer. Part of these treatments improved summer CR when combined with intensive cooling. Cooling Intensification combined with hormonal therapy, management and nutritional practices are expected to minimize the gap between summer and winter CR obtained in Israel in the future.

  15. Hybrid Ground-Source Heat Pump Installations: Experiences, Improvements, and Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Hackel; Amanda Pertzborn

    2011-06-30

    One innovation to ground-source heat pump (GSHP, or GHP) systems is the hybrid GSHP (HyGSHP) system, which can dramatically decrease the first cost of GSHP systems by using conventional technology (such as a cooling tower or a boiler) to meet a portion of the peak heating or cooling load. This work uses three case studies (two cooling-dominated, one heating-dominated) to demonstrate the performance of the hybrid approach. Three buildings were studied for a year; the measured data was used to validate models of each system. The models were used to analyze further improvements to the hybrid approach, and establish that this approach has positive impacts, both economically and environmentally. Lessons learned by those who design and operate the systems are also documented, including discussions of equipment sizing, pump operation, and cooling tower control. Finally, the measured data sets and models that were created during this work are described; these materials have been made freely available for further study of hybrid systems.

  16. Improved Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated hairy root culture system of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal using sonication and heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilip, Chandrasekaran; Soundar Raju, Chellappan; Varutharaju, Kandhan; Aslam, Abubakker; Shajahan, Appakan

    2015-12-01

    An improved Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated genetic transformation of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal was developed using the bacterial strain R1000 with leaf segment explants of in vitro raised plantlets. Out of the three strains used (R1000, MTCC 2364 and MTCC 532), the strain R1000 proved to be more efficient than others. Among the different conditions tested, the highest (93.3 %) transformation rate was observed after 3 weeks when the explants were subjected to sonication (15 s) and heat treatment (41 °C for 5 min). Transgenic status of the hairy roots was confirmed by PCR using rol B-specific primers. HPLC analysis showed the ability of hairy roots to synthesize withaferin A and withanolide A, both steroidal lactones of medicinal value. This protocol offers new avenue in A. rhizogenes-mediated hairy root induction and is useful for large-scale production of these bioactive compounds from W. somnifera.

  17. Reiki improves heart rate homeostasis in laboratory rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ann Linda; Wagers, Christina; Schwartz, Gary E

    2008-05-01

    To determine whether application of Reiki to noise-stressed rats can reduce their heart rates (HRs) and blood pressures. In a previous study, we showed that exposure of rats to 90 dB white noise for 15 minutes caused their HRs and blood pressures to significantly increase. Reiki has been shown to significantly decrease HR and blood pressure in a small group of healthy human subjects. However, use of humans in such studies has the disadvantage that experimental interpretations are encumbered by the variable of belief or skepticism regarding Reiki. For that reason, noise-stressed rats were used as an animal model to test the efficacy of Reiki in reducing elevated HR and blood pressure. Three unrestrained, male Sprague-Dawley rats implanted with radiotelemetric transducers were exposed daily for 8 days to a 15-minute white noise regimen (90 dB). For the last 5 days, the rats received 15 minutes of Reiki immediately before the noise and during the noise period. The experiment was repeated on the same animals but using sham Reiki. The animals were housed in a quiet room in University of Arizona Animal Facility. Mean HRs and blood pressure were determined before Reiki/sham Reiki, during Reiki/sham Reiki, and during the noise in each case. Reiki, but not sham Reiki, significantly reduced HR compared to initial values. With Reiki, there was a high correlation between change in HR and initial HR, suggesting a homeostatic effect. Reiki, but not sham Reiki, significantly reduced the rise in HR produced by exposure of the rats to loud noise. Neither Reiki nor sham Reiki significantly affected blood pressure. Reiki is effective in modulating HR in stressed and unstressed rats, supporting its use as a stress-reducer in humans.

  18. Repeat rates in digital chest radiography and strategies for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fintelmann, Florian; Pulli, Benjamin; Abedi-Tari, Faezeh; Trombley, Maureen; Shore, Mary-Theresa; Shepard, Jo-Anne; Rosenthal, Daniel I

    2012-05-01

    To determine the repeat rate (RR) of chest radiographs acquired with portable computed radiography (CR) and installed direct radiography (DR) and to develop and assess strategies designed to decrease the RR. The RR and reasons for repeated digital chest radiographs were documented over the course of 16 months while a task force of thoracic radiologists, technologist supervisors, technologists, and information technology specialists continued to examine the workflow for underlying causes. Interventions decreasing the RR were designed and implemented. The initial RR of digital chest radiographs was 3.6% (138/3818) for portable CR and 13.3% (476/3575) for installed DR systems. By combining RR measurement with workflow analysis, targets for technical and teaching interventions were identified. The interventions decreased the RR to 1.8% (81/4476) for portable CR and to 8.2% (306/3748) for installed DR. We found the RR of direct digital chest radiography to be significantly higher than that of computed chest radiography. We believe this is due to the ease with which repeat images can be obtained and discarded, and it suggests the need for ongoing surveillance of RR. We were able to demonstrate that strategies to lower the RR, which had been developed in the era of film-based imaging, can be adapted to the digital environment. On the basis of our findings, we encourage radiologists to assess their own departmental RRs for direct digital chest radiography and to consider similar interventions if necessary to achieve acceptable RRs for this modality.

  19. Economic evaluation of replacement rates in dairy herds I. Reduction of replacement rates through improved health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, J.A.; Stelwagen, J.

    1979-01-01

    A model is presented with which two questions have been elaborated: 1. (a) what is the economic significance of improved health, permitting a longer herd life? 2. (b) which cows should be removed from the herd during the first lactation in view of their milk yield? This paper is confined to

  20. Application of multivariate adaptive regression spine-assisted objective function on optimization of heat transfer rate around a cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Prasenjit; Dad, Ajoy K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, National Institute of Technology, Agartala (India)

    2016-12-15

    The present study aims to predict the heat transfer characteristics around a square cylinder with different corner radii using multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS). Further, the MARS-generated objective function is optimized by particle swarm optimization. The data for the prediction are taken from the recently published article by the present authors [P. Dey, A. Sarkar, A.K. Das, Development of GEP and ANN model to predict the unsteady forced convection over a cylinder, Neural Comput. Appl. (2015). Further, the MARS model is compared with artificial neural network and gene expression programming. It has been found that the MARS model is very efficient in predicting the heat transfer characteristics. It has also been found that MARS is more efficient than artificial neural network and gene expression programming in predicting the forced convection data, and also particle swarm optimization can efficiently optimize the heat transfer rate.

  1. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  2. Improving heat generation of magnetic nanoparticles by pre-orientation of particles in a static three tesla magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Mathias M.; Lammel, Christian; Gleich, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Inductive heating of electrically insulating materials like fiberglass reinforced thermoplastics (FRTP) without susceptors is not possible. However, due to their low thermal conductivity a volumetric heat generation method is advisable to reach short heating times to melt this material for reshaping. This can be done with magnetic nanoparticles as susceptors within the thermoplastic of the FRTP using Néel relaxation. During the heating process the particle's magnetic moment rotates with the field while the particle itself is fixed within the thermoplastic. Therefore the heat dissipation of each particle depends on its orientation within the field. To achieve the maximum heat generation of the particles we pre-oriented the particles within a plastic at the best angle to the applied AC field for induction. To do this, five mass percent nanoparticles were dispersed in an epoxy resin, which was then hardened at room temperature in a static three Tesla magnetic field. After its solidification the heating behavior of the sample was compared to a reference sample, which was hardened without a field. The oriented particles showed an increased heating rate when oriented parallel to the applied AC field. The absorption rate was 3.3 times as high as the undirected reference sample. When the alternating electromagnetic field was perpendicular to the oriented particles, the specific absorption rate was similar to that of the reference sample. We compare this result with theory and with calculations from literature, and conduct a numerical simulation.

  3. Dietary glutamine supplementation improves growth performance, meat quality and colour stability of broilers under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S F; Wang, L K; Wen, A Y; Wang, L X; Jin, G M

    2009-05-01

    1. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary glutamine (Gln) supplementation on growth performance, carcase characteristics and meat quality in broilers exposed to high ambient temperature. 2. A total of 240 35-d-old male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups (three replicates of 20 birds per cage). The broilers were kept in a temperature-controlled room at either 23 degrees C (no-stress groups, NS) or 28 degrees C (heat stress groups, HS). The broilers were fed either on a basal diet (control, NS) or on the basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.5 or 1.0% Gln (HS). 3. Compared with the NS, the HS (0% Gln) group gained less weight and consumed less feed, had lower final body weight, gain-to-feed ratio, and abdominal fat yield. Breast meat in HS (0% Gln) had lower pH, water-holding capacity (WHC), a* value, ether extract (EE) content and crude protein (CP) content, and had higher shear force (SF) and L* value. 4. Linear increase were found in groups supplemented with Gln (0, 0.5% and 1.0%) for final body weight, weight gain, feed consumption, gain-to-feed ratio and abdominal fat yield. Supplementation with Gln improved breast meat pH, WHC, SF, L* value, a* value, EE content and CP content in broilers exposed to heat stress. No significant difference was observed in all the indices determined between the HS (1% Gln) and the NS. 5. Heat stress caused obvious breast meat discoloration in L*, a* and b* values. However, dietary supplementation with Gln gave a better colour stability. 6. The results indicated that dietary supplementation with Gln may alleviate heat stress-caused deterioration in growth performance, carcase characteristics, meat quality and meat colour stability of broilers.

  4. The effect of ultrasound irradiation on the convective heat transfer rate during immersion cooling of a stationary sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Hossein; Sun, Da-Wen; Zhang, Zhihang

    2012-11-01

    It has been proven that ultrasound irradiation can enhance the rate of heat transfer processes. The objective of this work was to study the heat transfer phenomenon, mainly the heat exchange at the surface, as affected by ultrasound irradiation around a stationary copper sphere (k=386W m(-1)K(-1), C(p)=384J kg(-1)K(-1), ρ=8660kg m(-3)) during cooling. The sphere (0.01m in diameter) was immersed in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (-10°C) in an ultrasonic cooling system that included a refrigerated circulator, a flow meter, an ultrasound generator and an ultrasonic bath. The temperature of the sphere was recorded using a data logger equipped with a T-type thermocouple in the center of the sphere. The temperature of the cooling medium was also monitored by four thermocouples situated at different places in the bath. The sphere was located at different positions (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06m) above the transducer surface of the bath calculated considering the center of the sphere as the center of the reference system and was exposed to different intensities of ultrasound (0, 120, 190, 450, 890, 1800, 2800, 3400 and 4100W m(-2)) during cooling. The frequency of the ultrasound was 25kHz. It was demonstrated that ultrasound irradiation can increase the rate of heat transfer significantly, resulting in considerably shorter cooling times. Higher intensities caused higher cooling rates, and Nu values were increased from about 23-27 to 25-108 depending on the intensity of ultrasound and the position of the sphere. However, high intensities of ultrasound led to the generation of heat at the surface of the sphere, thus limiting the lowest final temperature achieved. An analytical solution was developed considering the heat generation and was fitted to the experimental data with R(2) values in the range of 0.910-0.998. Visual observations revealed that both cavitation and acoustic streaming were important for heat transfer phenomenon. Cavitation clouds at the surface of the sphere

  5. Improving the Efficiency of the Heat Pump Control System of Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump with Several Evaporators and Gas Coolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sit M.L.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of coordination of the values of the refrigerant flow through the evaporators and gas coolers of the heat pump for the simultaneous production of heat and cold is studied. The compensation of the variations of the total flow through the evaporators is implemented using the variation of the capacity of the compressor and a corresponding change in flow through the auxiliary gas cooler of the heat pump. Control system of this gas cooler is constructed using the invariance principle of the output value (outlet temperature of the heated agent with respect to perturbations on the control channel (the refrigerant flow through the gas cooler. Principle of dual-channel compensation of the disturbance and advancing signal on input of control valve of the refrigerant through the gas cooler is ensured. Due to proposed solution, the intensity of the disturbances on the flow of refrigerant is reduced. Due to proposed technical solution power consumed by the heat pump compressor drive under transients is decreased.

  6. Thermal Disk Winds in X-Ray Binaries: Realistic Heating and Cooling Rates Give Rise to Slow, but Massive, Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbottom, N.; Proga, D.; Knigge, C.; Long, K. S.

    2017-02-01

    A number of X-ray binaries exhibit clear evidence for the presence of disk winds in the high/soft state. A promising driving mechanism for these outflows is mass loss driven by the thermal expansion of X-ray heated material in the outer disk atmosphere. Higginbottom & Proga recently demonstrated that the properties of thermally driven winds depend critically on the shape of the thermal equilibrium curve, since this determines the thermal stability of the irradiated material. For a given spectral energy distribution, the thermal equilibrium curve depends on an exact balance between the various heating and cooling mechanisms at work. Most previous work on thermally driven disk winds relied on an analytical approximation to these rates. Here, we use the photoionization code cloudy to generate realistic heating and cooling rates which we then use in a 2.5D hydrodynamic model computed in ZEUS to simulate thermal winds in a typical black hole X-ray binary. We find that these heating and cooling rates produce a significantly more complex thermal equilibrium curve, with dramatically different stability properties. The resulting flow, calculated in the optically thin limit, is qualitatively different from flows calculated using approximate analytical rates. Specifically, our thermal disk wind is much denser and slower, with a mass-loss rate that is a factor of two higher and characteristic velocities that are a factor of three lower. The low velocity of the flow—{v}\\max ≃ 200 km s-1—may be difficult to reconcile with observations. However, the high mass-loss rate—15 × the accretion rate—is promising, since it has the potential to destabilize the disk. Thermally driven disk winds may therefore provide a mechanism for state changes.

  7. Investigation of char strength and expansion properties of an intumescent coating exposed to rapid heating rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kristian Petersen; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Català, Pere

    2013-01-01

    , char properties, measured at room temperature, were dependent on the preceding storage conditions (in air or in a desiccator). The char was found to have the highest mechanical strength against compression in the outer crust facing the heat source. For thin (147μm) free coating films, a tendency...... with respect to the mechanical resistance against compression, degree of expansion, and residual mass fraction. Experimental results show that when using this type of shock heating, the mechanical resistance of the char against compression cannot meaningfully be correlated to the expansion factor. In addition...

  8. Telephone interviews and online questionnaires can be used to improve neurodevelopmental follow-up rates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Samantha; Seaton, Sarah E; Manktelow, Bradley N; Smith, Lucy K; Field, David; Draper, Elizabeth S; Marlow, Neil; Boyle, Elaine M

    2014-01-01

    .... We have investigated the use of telephone interviews and online questionnaires to improve response rates, reduce non-response bias, maintain data completeness and produce unbiased outcomes compared...

  9. Improvement of fire-tube boilers calculation methods by the numerical modeling of combustion processes and heat transfer in the combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, I. I.; Rostova, D. M.; Vegera, A. N.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the results of study on determination of degree and nature of influence of operating conditions of burner units and flare geometric parameters on the heat transfer in a combustion chamber of the fire-tube boilers. Change in values of the outlet gas temperature, the radiant and convective specific heat flow rate with appropriate modification of an expansion angle and a flare length was determined using Ansys CFX software package. Difference between values of total heat flow and bulk temperature of gases at the flue tube outlet calculated using the known methods for thermal calculation and defined during the mathematical simulation was determined. Shortcomings of used calculation methods based on the results of a study conducted were identified and areas for their improvement were outlined.

  10. Beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability of improved gross theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for unmeasured nuclei are adopted from the KTUY nuclear mass formula, which is based on the spherical-basis method. Considering the properties of the integrated Fermi function, we can roughly categorized energy region of excited-state of a daughter nucleus into three regions: a highly-excited energy region, which fully affect a delayed neutron probability, a middle energy region, which is estimated to contribute the decay heat, and a region neighboring the ground-state, which determines the beta-decay rate. Some results will be given in the presentation. A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for

  11. HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT OF CAMPUS AT UMAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF HORTICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Golovchuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In modern conditions of energy consumption growth and a rapid increase in energy prices the actual problem is the development and implementation of energy efficiency programs and resource-saving conversion in to a source to provide the needs of industry and municipal power. The paper aims to solve the urgent problem of energy saving and efficient use of fuel-energy ones and heat supply system optimization on the basis of Uman National University of Horticulture (UNUH. Methodology. The work investigated the process of heating and hot water supply in the course of 2007-2015 years. Implementation of current problems of energy saving is grounded on the scientific-practical and efficient assurance of fuel and energy usage. At the same time energy-saving technologies are viewed as a priority direction of the energy sector development, reduction of man-induced impact on the environment and as a way of improving the competitiveness of the national economy. Findings. Statistical data acquisition and analyzing of gas flow and outside air temperature for nine years was carried out. On the basis of this analysis, the problem was identified and specific targets for its solutions were set. Originality. Scientific novelty lies in solving the problem of energy saving and efficient use of fuel resources in Ukraine through the use of a systematic approach, the methodology development of efficient use of different fuels and optimization of local heating operation, applying contemporary automation and control systems. Firstly it was in detail analyzed and conducted the comprehensive assessment of various factors influence on energy conservation. It takes into account the human factor, professionalism and responsibility of the operators of boilers and their superiors, as well as the relevant control services. Practical value. For UNUH campus hybrid use of solid fuel and gas boilers was carried out. Decentralization of the university heating system has been

  12. Interaction of heat production, strain rate and stress power in a plastically deforming body under tensile test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglietti, A.

    1982-01-01

    At high strain rates the heat produced by plastic deformation can give rise to a rate dependent response even if the material has rate independent constitutive equations. This effect has to be evaluated when interpreting a material test, or else it could erroneously be ascribed to viscosity. A general thermodynamic theory of tensile testing of elastic-plastic materials is given in this paper; it is valid for large strain at finite strain rates. It enables discovery of the parameters governing the thermodynamic strain rate effect, provides a method for proper interpretation of the results of the tests of dynamic plasticity, and suggests a way of planning experiments in order to detect the real contribution of viscosity.

  13. Prediction of heating rate controlled viscous flow activation energy during spark plasma sintering of amorphous alloy powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Tanaji; Harimkar, Sandip P.

    2017-07-01

    The viscous flow behavior of Fe-based amorphous alloy powder during isochronal spark plasma sintering was analyzed under the integrated theoretical background of the Arrhenius and directional structural relaxation models. A relationship between viscous flow activation energy and heating rate was derived. An extension of the pertinent analysis to Ti-based amorphous alloys confirmed the broad applicability of such a relationship for predicting the activation energy for sintering below the glass transition temperature (T g) of the amorphous alloy powders.

  14. The effects of concentration and heating-cooling rate on rheological properties of Plantago lanceolata seed mucilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesarinejad, Mohammad Ali; Sami Jokandan, Maryam; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effect of concentration (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2%) and heating-cooling rate (1, 5 and 10 °C min−1) on the rheological properties of Plantago lanceolata seed mucilage (PLSM) solutions were investigated. It was observed that the gum dispersions exhibited viscoelastic properties under...... information. The results revealed that PLSM had high total sugar content (87.35%), and it is likely an arabinoxylomannan-type polysaccharide....

  15. Improving heat generation of magnetic nanoparticles by pre-orientation of particles in a static three tesla magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Mathias M., E-mail: Mathias.Beck@tum.de [Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lammel, Christian [Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Institute of Medical Engineering, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 11, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    Inductive heating of electrically insulating materials like fiberglass reinforced thermoplastics (FRTP) without susceptors is not possible. However, due to their low thermal conductivity a volumetric heat generation method is advisable to reach short heating times to melt this material for reshaping. This can be done with magnetic nanoparticles as susceptors within the thermoplastic of the FRTP using Néel relaxation. During the heating process the particle's magnetic moment rotates with the field while the particle itself is fixed within the thermoplastic. Therefore the heat dissipation of each particle depends on its orientation within the field. To achieve the maximum heat generation of the particles we pre-oriented the particles within a plastic at the best angle to the applied AC field for induction. To do this, five mass percent nanoparticles were dispersed in an epoxy resin, which was then hardened at room temperature in a static three Tesla magnetic field. After its solidification the heating behavior of the sample was compared to a reference sample, which was hardened without a field. The oriented particles showed an increased heating rate when oriented parallel to the applied AC field. The absorption rate was 3.3 times as high as the undirected reference sample. When the alternating electromagnetic field was perpendicular to the oriented particles, the specific absorption rate was similar to that of the reference sample. We compare this result with theory and with calculations from literature, and conduct a numerical simulation. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticles are aligned using a static three tesla magnetic field. • Inductive heating depends on the particles pre-orientation in a solid matrix. • Alignment increases the heat generation significantly.

  16. Influence of Heating Rate on Ferrite Recrystallization and Austenite Formation in Cold-Rolled Microalloyed Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippot, C.; Bellavoine, M.; Dumont, M.; Hoummada, K.; Drillet, J.; Hebert, V.; Maugis, P.

    2017-11-01

    Compared with other dual-phase (DP) steels, initial microstructures of cold-rolled martensite-ferrite have scarcely been investigated, even though they represent a promising industrial alternative to conventional ferrite-pearlite cold-rolled microstructures. In this study, the influence of the heating rate (over the range of 1 to 10 K/s) on the development of microstructures in a microalloyed DP steel is investigated; this includes the tempering of martensite, precipitation of microalloying elements, recrystallization, and austenite formation. This study points out the influence of the degree of ferrite recrystallization prior to the austenite formation, as well as the importance of the cementite distribution. A low heating rate giving a high degree of recrystallization, leads to the formation of coarse austenite grains that are homogenously distributed in the ferrite matrix. However, a high heating rate leading to a low recrystallization degree, results in a banded-like structure with small austenite grains surrounded by large ferrite grains. A combined approach, involving relevant multiscale microstructural characterization and modeling to rationalize the effect of the coupled processes, highlights the role of the cold-worked initial microstructure, here a martensite-ferrite mixture: recrystallization and austenite formation commence in the former martensite islands before extending in the rest of the material.

  17. Effect of heating rate and kinetic model selection on activation energy of nonisothermal crystallization of amorphous felodipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattoraj, Sayantan; Bhugra, Chandan; Li, Zheng Jane; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2014-12-01

    The nonisothermal crystallization kinetics of amorphous materials is routinely analyzed by statistically fitting the crystallization data to kinetic models. In this work, we systematically evaluate how the model-dependent crystallization kinetics is impacted by variations in the heating rate and the selection of the kinetic model, two key factors that can lead to significant differences in the crystallization activation energy (Ea ) of an amorphous material. Using amorphous felodipine, we show that the Ea decreases with increase in the heating rate, irrespective of the kinetic model evaluated in this work. The model that best describes the crystallization phenomenon cannot be identified readily through the statistical fitting approach because several kinetic models yield comparable R(2) . Here, we propose an alternate paired model-fitting model-free (PMFMF) approach for identifying the most suitable kinetic model, where Ea obtained from model-dependent kinetics is compared with those obtained from model-free kinetics. The most suitable kinetic model is identified as the one that yields Ea values comparable with the model-free kinetics. Through this PMFMF approach, nucleation and growth is identified as the main mechanism that controls the crystallization kinetics of felodipine. Using this PMFMF approach, we further demonstrate that crystallization mechanism from amorphous phase varies with heating rate. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  18. Acute acetaminophen (paracetamol) ingestion improves time to exhaustion during exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauger, Alexis R; Taylor, Lee; Harding, Christopher; Wright, Benjamin; Foster, Josh; Castle, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a commonly used over-the-counter analgesic and antipyretic and has previously been shown to improve exercise performance through a reduction in perceived pain. This study sought to establish whether its antipyretic action may also improve exercise capacity in the heat by moderating the increase in core temperature. On separate days, 11 recreationally active participants completed two experimental time-to-exhaustion trials on a cycle ergometer in hot conditions (30°C, 50% relative humidity) after ingesting a placebo control or an oral dose of acetaminophen in a randomized, double-blind design. Following acetaminophen ingestion, participants cycled for a significantly longer period of time (acetaminophen, 23 ± 15 min versus placebo, 19 ± 13 min; P = 0.005; 95% confidence interval = 90-379 s), and this was accompanied by significantly lower core (-0.15°C), skin (-0.47°C) and body temperatures (0.19°C; P 0.05). This is the first study to demonstrate that an acute dose of acetaminophen can improve cycling capacity in hot conditions, and that this may be due to the observed reduction in core, skin and body temperature and the subjective perception of thermal comfort. These findings suggest that acetaminophen may reduce the thermoregulatory strain elicited from exercise, thus improving time to exhaustion.

  19. Experimental and theoretical study of shuttle lee-side heat transfer rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mruk, G. K.; Bertin, J.; Lamb, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental program which was conducted in the Calspan 96-inch hypersonic shock tunnel to investigate what effect the windward surface temperature had on the heat transfer to the leeward surface of the space shuttle orbiter is discussed. Heat-transfer distributions, surface-pressure distributions, and schlieren photographs were obtained for an 0.01-scale model of the 139 configuration space shuttle orbiter at angles-of-attack of 30 and 40 deg. Similar data were obtained for an 0.01 scale wingless model of the 139 configuration at angles-of-attack of 30 and 90 deg. Data were obtained for Mach numbers from Reynolds numbers, and surface temperatures and compared with theoretical results.

  20. The effect of heat developed during high strain rate deformation on the constitutive modeling of amorphous polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Keivan H.; Zamani, Jamal; Guedes, Rui M.; Ferreira, Fernando J.

    2016-02-01

    An adiabatic constitutive model is proposed for large strain deformation of polycarbonate (PC) at high strain rates. When the strain rate is sufficiently high such that the heat generated does not have time to transfer to the surroundings, temperature of material rises. The high strain rate deformation behavior of polymers is significantly affected by temperature-dependent constants and thermal softening. Based on the isothermal model which first was introduced by Mulliken and Boyce et al. (Int. J. Solids Struct. 43:1331-1356, 2006), an adiabatic model is proposed to predict the yield and post-yield behavior of glassy polymers at high strain rates. When calculating the heat generated and the temperature changes during the step by step simulation of the deformation, temperature-dependent elastic constants are incorporated to the constitutive equations. Moreover, better prediction of softening phenomena is achieved by the new definition for softening parameters of the proposed model. The constitutive model has been implemented numerically into a commercial finite element code through a user material subroutine (VUMAT). The experimental results, obtained using a split Hopkinson pressure bar, are supported by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and Decompose/Shift/Reconstruct (DSR) method. Comparison of adiabatic model predictions with experimental data demonstrates the ability of the model to capture the characteristic features of stress-strain curve of the material at very high strain rates.

  1. Novel Method for Measuring the Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters Based on Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijian Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The determinations of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, the direct determination requires complex detection devices and a series of standard experiments, which also wastes too much time and manpower. To address this problem, we propose machine learning models including artificial neural networks (ANNs and support vector machines (SVM to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient without a direct determination. Parameters that can be easily obtained by “portable test instruments” were set as independent variables, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, final temperature and angle between tubes and ground, while the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient determined by the detection device were set as dependent variables respectively. Nine hundred fifteen samples from in-service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters were used for training and testing the models. Results show that the multilayer feed-forward neural network (MLFN with 3 nodes is the best model for the prediction of heat collection rate and the general regression neural network (GRNN is the best model for the prediction of heat loss coefficient due to their low root mean square (RMS errors, short training times, and high prediction accuracies (under the tolerances of 30%, 20%, and 10%, respectively.

  2. Correlation of Heating Rates, Crystal Structures, and Microwave Dielectric Properties of Li2ZnTi3O8 Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuepeng; Zheng, Yong; Huang, Qi; Xiong, Weihao

    2015-11-01

    The correlation of heating rates, crystal structures, and microwave dielectric properties of Li2ZnTi3O8 ceramics was thoroughly investigated. Ionic polarizability, atomic packing fractions, bond strengths, and octahedral distortion of Li2ZnTi3O8 ceramics were calculated on the basis of structure refinement data. The "black core" phenomenon resulting from reduction of Ti4+ ions was observed for Li2ZnTi3O8 ceramic sintered at 1°/min; reduction of Ti4+ ions could be limited by heating more rapidly. For heating rates from 1 to 7°/min, the dielectric constants ( ɛ r) of Li2ZnTi3O8 ceramics were mainly determined by ionic polarizability. The temperature coefficient of the resonant frequency ( τ f ) of Li2ZnTi3O8 ceramics was determined by bond strengths. Li2ZnTi3O8 ceramic sintered at 1°/min had the lowest quality factor ( Q × f); this was related to the high dielectric loss as a result of oxygen vacancies formed by reduction of Ti4+ ions. Q × f values of Li2ZnTi3O8 ceramics also decreased with increasing heating rate from 3 to 7°/min, owing to reduced packing fractions and average grain sizes. Li2ZnTi3O8 ceramic sintered at 3°/min had the optimum microwave dielectric properties of ɛ r = 26.6, Q × f = 83,563 GHz, and τ f = -12.4 ppm/°C.

  3. Industrial application of different heat treatments and cream fat contents for improving the spreadability of butter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tondhoosh, Arash; Nayebzadeh, Kooshan; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2016-01-01

    hardening of texture especially in winter. Methods: Firstly, Pasteurized cream with different fat contents (40 & 45% fat) was passed through heat treatments, and then it was injected to a continuous churn. Textural and melting behavior and fatty acid composition of butter were analyzed. Results: Increasing...... the fat content of cream (from 40 to 45 %) and holding time (from 3h to 5h) in mid-temperature (18 °C) and reducing the churning temperature (from 12 °C to 10 °C), resulted in soft butter texture and improved butter spreadability. Loss Tangent (tan δ) was increased from 0.11 to 0.74 (T=15 °C;f=1Hz......). The melting temperature of butter was decreased from 36°C to 32°C and total trans fatty acid content was decreased from 3.2 % to 1.87 %. Conclusion: It was concluded that such heating process (which has been studied and reported in patents) absorbs the low- SFC fats of the cream, integrates them...

  4. Dietary inclusion of chromium to improve growth performance and immune-competence of broilers under heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagwa M. Norain

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with chromium chloride, CrCl3.6H2O (2mg kg–1 basal diet on the performance and immune response of broiler chickens under heat stress condition (25-43°C. A total of 80 one-day-old broiler chicks (Ross-308 were assigned to two treatment groups according to a completely randomized design. Each treatment consisted of four equal replicates, each contained ten chicks. Chicks were fed on basal diets supplemented with different concentrations of chromium (0 and 2 mg kg–1 CrCl3 from 1 to 35 days of age. Chromium supplementation as feed additives resulted in a slightly lower rectal temperature, and significantly (P<0.05 lower respiration rate for the broiler chickens received diet supplemented with chromium compared to the control (0 mg kg–1 CrCl3. Dietary chromium supplementation increased final body weight (BW at the end of the production period (5 weeks. Average weight gain was significantly (P<0.05 higher in chickens fed on chromium supplemented diet. Feed intake was not influenced by dietary chromium supplementation, however, the efficiency of feed conversion was improved (P<0.05 in chromium supplemented chickens. Furthermore, dressing percentage was significantly (P<0.05 higher in Cr-treated chickens compared to control chickens. Chromium supplementation significantly (P<0.05 improved the immune response to Newcastle Disease Virus vaccine (NDV. The present results suggest that dietary chromium supplementation provides a good nutritional management approach to ameliorate heat stress induced depression in production performance and immune response of broiler chickens. 

  5. The Variations of Thermal Contact Resistance and Heat Transfer Rate of the AlN Film Compositing with PCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huann-Ming Chou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrical industries have been fast developing over the past decades. Moreover, the trend of microelements and packed division multiplex is obviously for the electrical industry. Hence, the high heat dissipative and the electrical insulating device have been popular and necessary. The thermal conduct coefficient of aluminum nitride (i.e., AlN is many times larger than the other materials. Moreover, the green technology of composite with phase change materials (i.e., PCMs is worked as a constant temperature cooler. Therefore, PCMs have been used frequently for saving energy and the green environment. Based on the above statements, it does show great potential in heat dissipative for the AlN film compositing with PCM. Therefore, this paper is focused on the research of thermal contact resistance and heat transfer between the AlN/PCM pairs. According to the experimental results, the heat transfer decreases and the thermal contact resistance increases under the melting process of PCM. However, the suitable parameters such as contact pressures can be used to improve the above defects.

  6. Impact of the High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU to LEU Fuel Conversion on Cold Source Nuclear Heat Generation Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, staff members at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducting studies to determine whether the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. As part of these ongoing studies, an assessment of the impact that the HEU to LEU fuel conversion has on the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source system and its moderator vessel was performed and is documented in this report. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions and few-group neutron fluxes in the cold source moderator were also estimated. Neutronics calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo N-Particle code to determine the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source and its vessel for the HEU core operating at a full reactor power (FP) of 85 MW(t) and the reference LEU core operating at an FP of 100 MW(t). Calculations were performed with beginning-of-cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) conditions to bound typical irradiation conditions. Average specific BOC heat generation rates of 12.76 and 12.92 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the hemispherical region of the cold source liquid hydrogen (LH2) for the HEU and LEU cores, and EOC heat generation rates of 13.25 and 12.86 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the HEU and LEU cores. Thus, the greatest heat generation rates were calculated for the EOC HEU core, and it is concluded that the conversion from HEU to LEU fuel and the resulting increase of FP from 85 MW to 100 MW will not impact the ability of the heat removal equipment to remove the heat deposited in the cold source system. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions are estimated to be about 12.0% greater at BOC and 2.7% greater at EOC for the LEU core in comparison to the HEU core. Silicon is aluminum s major transmutation product and

  7. Carbon nanostructured surfaces for enhanced heat transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high performance thermal systems has stimulated interest in methods to improve heat transfer rates. Considerable efforts have been made to increase heat transfer rates by implementing passive convective heat transfer enhancement methods that require no direct consumption of

  8. Improving the Material Response for Slow Heat of Energetic Materials (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A L

    2010-12-15

    The goal of modern high explosive slow heat cookoff modeling is to understand the level of mechanical violence. This requires understanding the coupled thermal-mechanical-chemical system that such an environment creates. Recent advances have improved our ability to predict the time to event, and we have been making progress on predicting the mechanical response. By adding surface tension to the product gas pores in the high explosive, we have been able to reduce the current model's tendency to over-pressurize confinement vessels. We describe the model and demonstrate how it affects a LX-10 STEX experiment. Issues associated with current product gas equations of state are described and examined.

  9. Improved Surgical Site Infection (SSI) rate through accurately assessed surgical wounds

    OpenAIRE

    John, Honeymol; Nimeri, Abdelrahman; Ellahham, Samer

    2015-01-01

    Sheikh Khalifa Medical City's (SKMC) Surgery Institute was identified as a high outlier in Surgical Site Infections (SSI) based on the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) - Semi-Annual Report (SAR) in January 2012. The aim of this project was to improve SSI rates through accurate wound classification. We identified SSI rate reduction as a performance improvement and safety priority at SKMC, a tertiary referral center. We used the American Col...

  10. Food crops face rising temperatures: An overview of responses, adaptive mechanisms, and approaches to improve heat tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeru Kaushal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rising temperatures are resulting in heat stress for various agricultural crops to limit their growth, metabolism, and leading to significant loss of yield potential worldwide. Heat stress adversely affects normal plant growth and development depending on the sensitivity of each crop species. Each crop species has its own range of temperature maxima and minima at different developmental stages beyond which all these processes get inhibited. The reproductive stage is on the whole more sensitive to heat stress, resulting in impaired fertilization to cause abortion of flowers. During seed filling, heat stress retards seed growth by affecting all the biochemical events to reduce seed size. Unfavorable temperature may significantly affect photosynthesis, respiration, water balance, and membrane stability of leaves. To combat heat stress, plants acquire various defense mechanisms for their survival such as maintaining membrane stability, and scavenging reactive oxygen species by generating antioxidants and stress proteins. Thermo-tolerance can be improved by the accumulation of various compounds of low molecular mass known as thermo-protectants as well as phyto-hormones. Exogenous application of these molecules has benefited plants growing under heat stress. Alternatively, transgenic plants over-expressing the enzymes catalyzing the synthesis of these molecules may be raised to increase their endogenous levels to improve heat tolerance. In recent times, various transgenics have been developed with improved thermo-tolerance having potential benefits for inducing heat tolerance in food crops. Updated information about of the effects of heat stress on various food crops and their responses as well as adaptive mechanisms is reviewed here.

  11. Transient Stability Improvement for Combined Heat and Power System Using Load Shedding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Cheng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to analyze and improve the transient stability of an industrial combined heat and power (CHP system in a high-tech science park in Taiwan. The CHP system installed two 161 kV/161 kV high-impendence transformers to connect with Taipower System (TPS for both decreasing the short-circuit fault current and increasing the fault critical clearing time. The transient stabilities of three types of operation modes in CHP units, 3G1S, 2G1S, and 1G1S, are analyzed. Under the 3G1S operation mode, the system frequency is immediately restored to 60 Hz after tie line tripping with the TPS. Under the 1G1S and 2G1S operation modes, the system frequencies will continuously decrease and eventually become unstable. A novel transient stability improvement approach using load shedding technique based on the change in frequency is proposed to improve the transient stability.

  12. Design and economic investigation of shell and tube heat exchangers using Improved Intelligent Tuned Harmony Search algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguz Emrah Turgut

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the thermal design of shell and tube heat exchangers by using Improved Intelligent Tuned Harmony Search (I-ITHS algorithm. Intelligent Tuned Harmony Search (ITHS is an upgraded version of harmony search algorithm which has an advantage of deciding intensification and diversification processes by applying proper pitch adjusting strategy. In this study, we aim to improve the search capacity of ITHS algorithm by utilizing chaotic sequences instead of uniformly distributed random numbers and applying alternative search strategies inspired by Artificial Bee Colony algorithm and Opposition Based Learning on promising areas (best solutions. Design variables including baffle spacing, shell diameter, tube outer diameter and number of tube passes are used to minimize total cost of heat exchanger that incorporates capital investment and the sum of discounted annual energy expenditures related to pumping and heat exchanger area. Results show that I-ITHS can be utilized in optimizing shell and tube heat exchangers.

  13. Examining Changes to Michigan's Early Childhood Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS). REL 2015-029

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Ann-Marie; Hawkinson, Laura E.; Greenberg, Ariela C.; Howard, Eboni C.; Brown, Leah

    2015-01-01

    Documenting and improving early childhood program quality is a national priority, leading to a rapid expansion of Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRISs). QRISs document and improve the quality of early childhood education programs and provide clear information to families about their child care choices. The current study described how…

  14. Development of a silicone ablator for high-heat-flux and high-shear-rate condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R. A.; Ramseyer, J. A.; Huntress, A.

    1972-01-01

    A silicone material was developed which gives suitable ablative protection in the high heat flux, high shear environments encountered in severe reentry applications, such as nose cones for ballistic vehicles and protection of leading edges or other critical areas of a vehicle. In addition, the ease of handling, low application cost, and room temperature cure make such a silicon material suitable nozzles for the large rockets necessary for vehicle launching. The development of this product is traced from the selection of suitable polymers through the choice of fillers and the finalization of filler loadings.

  15. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae Tanaka

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble, as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments.

  16. Physiological and performance adaptations to an in-season soccer camp in the heat: Associations with heart rate and heart rate variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchheit, M; Voss, S C; Nybo, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the associations between adaptive responses to an in-season soccer training camp in the heat and changes in submaximal exercising heart rate (HRex, 5-min run at 9 ¿km/h), postexercise HR recovery (HRR) and HR variability (HRV). Fifteen well-trained...... but non-heat-acclimatized male adult players performed a training week in Qatar (34.6¿±¿1.9°C wet bulb globe temperature). HRex, HRR, HRV (i.e. the standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability measured from Poincaré plots SD1, a vagal-related index), creatine kinase (CK......) activity, plasma volume (PV) changes, and post-5-min run rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were collected at six occasions in temperate environmental conditions (22°C). Players also performed the yo-yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) in the same environmental conditions (22°C), both...

  17. Heat dissipation does not suppress an immune response in laboratory mice divergently selected for basal metabolic rate (BMR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Książek, Aneta; Konarzewski, Marek

    2016-05-15

    The capacity for heat dissipation is considered to be one of the most important constraints on rates of energy expenditure in mammals. To date, the significance of this constraint has been tested exclusively under peak metabolic demands, such as during lactation. Here, we used a different set of metabolic stressors, which do not induce maximum energy expenditures and yet are likely to expose the potential constraining effect of heat dissipation. We compared the physiological responses of mice divergently selected for high (H-BMR) and low basal metabolic rate (L-BMR) to simultaneous exposure to the keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) antigen and high ambient temperature (Ta). At 34°C (and at 23°C, used as a control), KLH challenge resulted in a transient increase in core body temperature (Tb) in mice of both line types (by approximately 0.4°C). Warm exposure did not produce line-type-dependent differences in Tb (which was consistently higher by ca. 0.6°C in H-BMR mice across both Ta values), nor did it result in the suppression of antibody synthesis. These findings were also supported by the lack of between-line-type differences in the mass of the thymus, spleen or lymph nodes. Warm exposure induced the downsizing of heat-generating internal organs (small intestine, liver and kidneys) and an increase in intrascapular brown adipose tissue mass. However, these changes were similar in scope in both line types. Mounting a humoral immune response in selected mice was therefore not affected by ambient temperature. Thus, a combined metabolic challenge of high Ta and an immune response did not appreciably compromise the capacity to dissipate heat, even in the H-BMR mice. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. A pilot study of traditional indoor biomass cooking and heating in rural Bhutan: gas and particle concentrations and emission rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangchuk, T; He, C; Knibbs, L D; Mazaheri, M; Morawska, L

    2017-01-01

    Although many studies have reported the health effects of biomass fuels in developing countries, relatively few have quantitatively characterized emissions from biomass stoves during cooking and heating. The aim of this pilot study was to characterize the emission characteristics of different biomass stoves in four rural houses in Bhutan during heating (metal chimney stove), rice cooking (traditional mud stove), fodder preparation (stone tripod stove), and liquor distillation (traditional mud stove). Three stage measurements (before, during, and after the activity had ceased) were conducted for PM2.5 , particle number (PN), CO, and CO2 . When stoves were operated, the pollutant concentrations were significantly elevated above background levels, by an average of 40 and 18 times for PM2.5 and CO, respectively. Emission rates (mg/min) ranged from 1.07 × 102 (PM2.5 ) and 3.50 × 102 (CO) for the stone tripod stove during fodder preparation to 6.20 × 102 (PM2.5 ) and 2.22 × 103 (CO) for the traditional mud stove during liquor distillation. Usable PN data were only available for one house, during heating using a metal chimney stove, which presented an emission rate of 3.24 × 1013 particles/min. Interventions to control household air pollution in Bhutan, in order to reduce the health risks associated with cooking and heating, are recommended. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Development of an improved extruded dielectric cable rated 230 kV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blais, L D; Traut, R T; Bolden, G N

    1977-05-01

    Work performed on developing an improved 230 kV extruded solid dielectric cable, the techniques of jointing such cables and the testing of terminations suitable for operation at that voltage level are described. Difficulties were encountered during manufacture in applying the semi-conducting extruded conductor shield. A new higher melt point compound solved the problem. A joint capable of operating at the 230 kV level was developed but showed a deficiency under voltage impulse testing while the conductor was at elevated temperature. A reduction in contract scope terminated this effort. Two terminals rated for 230 kV were found to be commercially available from domestic manufacturers. The limited testing performed showed them to be compatible with the cable cross-linked polyethylene insulation and electrically sound under 60 Hertz testing. No direct voltage or impulse voltage testing was performed on the terminations. A sample circuit, consisting of cable and joint, was subjected to impulse voltages at both room temperature and normal conductor operating temperature of 90/sup 0/C. While the cable only was able to withstand voltage impulses in excess of the Basic Impulse Level (BIL) at room temperature, it failed at BIL while conductor was heated to 90/sup 0/C. In like manner, a cable and joint circuit was assembled. Similar voltages were impressed at room temperature without incident. The joint failed at 90/sup 0/C conductor temperature. Cable, joint and termination were assembled in a simulated circuit and subjected to conductor loading to elevate temperature while 60 Hz voltages in excess of normal operating levels were continuously applied.

  20. Clothing evaporative heat resistance - Proposal for improved representation in standards and models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenith, G.; Holmér, I.; Hartog, E.A. den; Parsons, K.C.

    1999-01-01

    Clothing heat and vapour resistances are important inputs for standards and models dealing with thermal comfort, heat- and cold-stress. A vast database of static clothing heat resistance values is available, and this was recently expanded with correction equations to account for effects of movement

  1. Drought priming at vegetative growth stages improves tolerance to drought and heat stresses occurring during grain filling in spring wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiao; Vignjevic, Marija; Liu, Fulai

    2015-01-01

    Plants of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Vinjett) were exposed to moderate water deficit at the vegetative growth stages six-leaf and/or stem elongation to investigate drought priming effects on tolerance to drought and heat stress events occurring during the grain filling stage....... Comparedwith the non-primed plants, drought priming could alleviate photo-inhibition in flag leaves caused by drought and heat stress episodes during grain filling. In the primed plants, drought stress inhibited photosynthesis mainly through decrease of maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate, while...... decrease of the carboxylation efficiency limited photosynthesis under heat stress. The higher saturated net photosynthetic rate of flag leaves coincidedwith the lowered nonphotochemical quenching rates in the twice-primed plants under drought stress and in the primed plants during stem elongation under...

  2. Polylactic acid with improved heat deflection temperatures and self-healing properties for durable goods applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, J T; Mauldin, T C; Boday, D J

    2014-11-12

    A method to recover fracture toughness after failure and increase thermal properties of polylactic acid (PLA) for use within durable goods applications is presented. Microcapsules were incorporated into PLA to form a composite material in which the microcapsules served the dual purpose of (1) releasing self-healing additives to fracture regions and (2) serving as nucleating agents to improve the PLA composite's thermal tolerance. Self-healing was achieved though embedment of dicyclopentadiene-filled microcapsules and Grubbs' first generation ruthenium metathesis catalyst, the former being autonomically released into damage volumes and undergoing polymerization in the presence of the catalyst. This approach led to up to 84% recovery of the polymer composite's initial fracture toughness. Additionally, PLA's degree of crystallinity and heat deflection temperature were improved by ∼ 11% and ∼ 21 °C, respectively, relative to nonfilled virgin PLA, owing to microcapsule-induced nucleation. The self-healing system developed here overcomes many property limitations of PLA that can potentially lead to its incorporation into various durable goods.

  3. QUALITY IMPROVEMENT OF SECONDARY SILUMINS BY USING REFINING-MODIFYING, HEAT AND LASER TREATMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Volchok

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. As a rule secondary silumins are characterized by lower quality than their primary analogues. During manufacture of alloys a large quantity of intermetallides, first of all on the basis of iron, in their structure is ignored. To achieve the optimum level of properties it is necessary to search for ways to adapt refining-modifying, heat and laser treatments to peculiarities of the structure of secondary Al-Si alloys. Methodology. The research was carried out by using standard methods of metallographic analysis, determination of foundry, mechanical and service properties of alloys according to rotatable plans of multifactor experiments. Findings. It was established, that refiningmodifying treatment is a required procedure during manufacture of secondary silumins as it permits to effectively influence the iron-containing phases' segregations by changing their morphology, size and distribution and to increase the effectiveness of further treatment in solid state. It was found that standard modes of heat treatment are not optimal for secondary silumins. Laser treatment has shown high effectiveness in increasing of strength, wear resistance, corrosion and cavitation resistance of secondary Al-Si alloys, and the increased iron content contributed to additional solid solution hardening. Originality. It was established, that after refining-modifying treatment the phase Al5SiFe, which crystallizes in the shape of long stretched plates transformed into phase Al15(FeMn3Si2 in skeletal or polyhedral shape. The relationship between iron content in secondary silumins and holding time during heat treatment that ensures optimum of mechanical properties was obtained. It was proved that the presence of ironcontaining intermetallides Al5SiFe results in the decrease of hardened layer's depth during laser treatment. It was established, that with increasing of iron concentration the corrosion rate of secondary silumins in 3 % NaCl + 0.1 % H2O2 and 10 % HCl

  4. Deformation behaviour in advanced heat resistant materials during slow strain rate testing at elevated temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Calmunger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, slow strain rate tensile testing at elevated temperature is used to evaluate the influence of temperature and strain rate on deformation behaviour in two different austenitic alloys. One austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L and one nickel-base alloy (Alloy 617 have been investigated. Scanning electron microscopy related techniques as electron channelling contrast imaging and electron backscattering diffraction have been used to study the damage and fracture micromechanisms. For both alloys the dominante damage micromechanisms are slip bands and planar slip interacting with grain bounderies or precipitates causing strain concentrations. The dominante fracture micromechanism when using a slow strain rate at elevated temperature, is microcracks at grain bounderies due to grain boundery embrittlement caused by precipitates. The decrease in strain rate seems to have a small influence on dynamic strain ageing at 650°C.

  5. Do Eco-rating Schemes Improve the Environmental Performance of Ships?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, René Taudal; Hermann, Roberto Rivas; Smink, Carla K.

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines if eco-rating schemes improve environmental outcomes in the context of the international shipping industry. Shipping faces global environmental challenges and has recently witnessed the introduction of several eco-rating schemes aiming to improve the environmental performance...... of ships. Extending the private environmental governance literature into a mature service industry with global operations, the paper shows that concerns about eco-rating schemes’ effectiveness also have relevance here. Shipping eco-rating schemes fall short of best practices for design and governance...

  6. Optimization of the RF cavity heat load and trip rates for CEBAF at 12 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Roblin, Yves R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Freyberger, Arne P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Krafft, Geoffrey A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Terzic, Balsa P. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at JLab has 200 RF cavities in the north linac and the south linac respectively after the 12 GeV upgrade. The purpose of this work is to simultaneously optimize the heat load and the trip rate for the cavities and to reconstruct the pareto-optimal front in a timely manner when some of the cavities are turned down. By choosing an efficient optimizer and strategically creating the initial gradients, the pareto-optimal front for no more than 15 cavities down can be re-established within 20 seconds.

  7. IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY OF THE HEATING SYSTEM FOR PUBLIC BUILDINGS INFRASTRUCTURE IN THE CONTEXT OF DNURT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Pshinko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper analyses the possibility and terms of increasing the efficiency of heating and ventilation systems of public buildings at the present stage of development and the specific climatic conditions of Ukraine. The main purpose is to develop specific measures for public buildings, which will lead to a significant reduction in energy costs for heating and air conditioning system. The example is similar system of DNURT compact campus, which is heated with its own autonomous boiler that uses natural gas. Methodology. The statistical heat loss analysis for the last 5 years allows defining the types and calculating the heat loss values for specific conditions. These losses are compared with those in the world practice and based on the comparison and analysis of the current system there are offered the ways to reduce the heat loss values through the use of various technical and organizational methods.The paper also proposes involvement for this purpose of secondary and alternative energy sources. The secondary energy resources include the heat that is emitted by people and that coming out with the air during ventilation of buildings. The renewable sources include solar and geothermal energy. To enhance the heat transfer medium temperature capacity it is proposed to use the heat pumps. Findings. The maximum possible use of the proposed measures and implementation of rational schematic and engineering solutions for heat and hot water supply systems cam reduce the energy loss for heating and hot water by 30-35%. Originality. The paper for the first time proposed the use of new integrated approaches to maintain the desired heat balance in the winter period, as well as the new schematic solutions for heating and ventilation systems, both in winter and in summer, based on the use of heat pumps and secondary energy resources. Practical value. The introduction of the proposed schematic solutions and approaches demand relatively small capital

  8. Theoretical prediction of the effect of heat transfer parameters on cooling rates of liquid-filled plastic straws used for cryopreservation of spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinen, M; Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Baez, R; Chirife, J

    2010-01-01

    Heat transfer plays a key role in cryopreservation of liquid semen in plastic straws. The effect of several parameters on the cooling rate of a liquid-filled polypropylene straw when plunged into liquid nitrogen was investigated using a theoretical model. The geometry of the straw containing the liquid was assimilated as two concentric finite cylinders of different materials: the fluid and the straw; the unsteady-state heat conduction equation for concentric cylinders was numerically solved. Parameters studied include external (convection) heat transfer coefficient (h), the thermal properties of straw manufacturing material and wall thickness. It was concluded that the single most important parameter affecting the cooling rate of a liquid column contained in a straw is the external heat transfer coefficient in LN2. Consequently, in order to attain maximum cooling rates, conditions have to be designed to obtain the highest possible heat transfer coefficient when the plastic straw is plunged in liquid nitrogen.

  9. Heat-Treated TiO2 Plasma Spray Deposition for Bioactivity Improvement in Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Renu; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, titanium di-oxide (TiO2) coating has been developed on Ti-6Al-4V substrate by plasma spray deposition. Followed by plasma spraying, heat treatment of the sprayed sample has been carried out by isothermally holding it at 823 K (550 °C) for 2 h. Microstructural analysis shows the presence of porosity and unmelted particles on the as-sprayed surface, the area fraction of which reduces after heat treatment. X-ray diffraction analysis shows the phase transformation from anatase (in precursor powder) to rutile (in as-sprayed coating and the same after heat treatment). There is an improvement in nano-hardness, "Young's modulus" and wear resistance in plasma-sprayed TiO2 coating (as-sprayed as well as post-heat-treated condition) as compared to as-received Ti-6Al-4V, though post-heat treatment offers a superior hardness, "young's modulus" and wear resistance as compared to as-sprayed coating. The corrosion behavior in "hank's solution" shows decrease in corrosion resistance after plasma spraying and post-heat treatment as compared to as-received substrate. A significant decrease in contact angle and improvement in bioactivity (in terms of apatite deposition) were observed in TiO2-coated surface as compared to as-received Ti-6Al-4V.

  10. Improved heat recovery and high-temperature clean-up for coal-gas fired combustion turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelemy, N.M.; Lynn, S.

    1991-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of an Improved Heat Recovery Method (IHRM) applied to a coal-gas fired power-generating system using a high-temperature clean-up. This heat recovery process has been described by Higdon and Lynn (1990). The IHRM is an integrated heat-recovery network that significantly increases the thermal efficiency of a gas turbine in the generation of electric power. Its main feature is to recover both low- and high-temperature heat reclaimed from various gas streams by means of evaporating heated water into combustion air in an air saturation unit. This unit is a packed column where compressed air flows countercurrently to the heated water prior to being sent to the combustor, where it is mixed with coal-gas and burned. The high water content of the air stream thus obtained reduces the amount of excess air required to control the firing temperature of the combustor, which in turn lowers the total work of compression and results in a high thermal efficiency. Three designs of the IHRM were developed to accommodate three different gasifying process. The performances of those designs were evaluated and compared using computer simulations. The efficiencies obtained with the IHRM are substantially higher those yielded by other heat-recovery technologies using the same gasifying processes. The study also revealed that the IHRM compares advantageously to most advanced power-generation technologies currently available or tested commercially. 13 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Registered nurses improving screening rates for non AIDS related comorbidities in people living with HIV

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Biggs, Karen; Power, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish whether a nurse-led screening and brief intervention project could improve screening rates for non-AIDS comorbidities in people living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Design...

  12. Enhanced Thermostability of Arabidopsis Rubisco Activase Improves Photosynthesis and Growth Rates under Moderate Heat Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Itzhak Kurek; Thom Kai Chang; Sean M. Bertain; Alfredo Madrigal; Lu Liu; Michael W. Lassner; Genhai Zhu

    2007-01-01

    Plant photosynthesis declines when the temperature exceeds its optimum range. Recent evidence indicates that the reduction in photosynthesis is linked to ribulose-1,5-bis-phosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco...

  13. Application for pinch design of heat exchanger networks by use of a computer code employing an improved problem algorithm table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozkan, Semra; Dincer, Salih [Department of Chemical Engineering, Chemical-Metallurgical Faculty, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpasa Kampusu, No 127, 34210 Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2001-12-01

    In this work, the methods used in pinch design were applied to a heat exchanger network with the aid of an improved problem algorithm table. This table enables one to compose composite and grand composite curves in a simplified way. A user friendly computer code entitled DarboTEK, compiled by using Visual Basic 3.0, was developed for the design of integrated heat exchanger networks and estimation of related capital costs. Based on the data obtained from the TUPRAS petroleum refinery at Izmit, a retrofit design of heat exchanger networks was accomplished using DarboTEK. An investment of 3,576,627 dollars is needed which will be paid back in 1.69 years simply by energy conservation due to heat integration. (Author)

  14. Heat Production and Storage Are Positively Correlated with Measures of Body Size/Composition and Heart Rate Drift during Vigorous Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buresh, Robert; Berg, Kris; Noble, John

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the relationships between: (a) measures of body size/composition and heat production/storage, and (b) heat production/storage and heart rate (HR) drift during running at 95 % of the velocity that elicited lactate threshold, which was determined for 20 healthy recreational male runners. Subsequently,…

  15. Improvement in fatigue strength of notched Ti-6Al-4V alloy by short-time heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Tatsuro, E-mail: morita@kit.ac.jp [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Department of Mechanical and System Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Ninomiya, Susumu [Japan Thermo-tech Co. Ltd., Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan)

    2016-07-04

    This study was conducted to improve the fatigue strength of notched Ti-6Al-4V alloy without a surface finish by short-time heat treatment. Specimens were heated at 1203 K and 1233 K for 60 s, and then quenched to create ST1203 material and ST1233 material, respectively. The microstructures of both heat-treated materials were composed of equiaxial α grains and the prior β phase. The fine acicular α′ phase was generated in the prior β phase by quenching. The results of electron diffraction suggested that the metastable β phase partially existed in the prior β phase. The volume fractions of the prior β phase and the α′ phase in this phase were higher in ST1233 material than in ST1203 material. The tensile strength was improved by the generation of the α′ phase; its improvement percentage was higher in ST1233 material than in ST1203 material. The fatigue strength was markedly improved by the heat treatment because crack propagation was strongly suppressed by the generation of the α′ phase and the strain-induced transformation of the metastable β phase. The improvement percentage of the fatigue strength was higher in ST1233 material (40%) than in ST1203 material (20%).

  16. Effects of heating and cooling rate on transformation behaviors in weld heat affected zone of low carbon steel; Teitanso koban no yosetsu netsu eikyobu no hentai kyodo ni oyobosu kanetsu reikyaku sokudo no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanetsuki, Y.; Katsumata, M. [Kobe Steel, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1998-01-25

    Discussions were given on effects of welding heat cycles on transformation behaviors in a weld heat affected zone (HAZ). Test pieces are low-carbon fine ferrite pearlite organization steel sheets, which have been treated with a thermomechanical control process (TMCP). The heat cycling was experimented at a maximum temperature of 1350 degC by using a high-frequency heating coil, heating rates from 0.15 to 200 degC/s, cooling rates from 10 to 80 degC/s at an elevated temperature region (higher than 900 degC), and transformation regions (lower than 900 degC) from 0.5 to 6 degC. A transformation curve in actual welding heat cycling was interpreted from these results. Shear-type inverse transformation (from ferrite to austenite) occurs in a rate region corresponding to the heating rate realized during welding. Austenite containing internal stress and a lower structure formed by this inverse transformation accelerates transformation into grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and acerous ferrite (AF). On the other hand, slow cooling in the elevated temperature region releases the internal stress, restores the lower structure, and suppresses the GBF and AF transformation. The GBF tends to precipitate pearlite in adjacent regions and deteriorates the HAZ tenacity. 17 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Flat rate accounting in district heat supply; Pauschalabrechnung in der Fernwaermeversorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heberle, V. [Veba Kraftwerke AG, Gelsenkirchen (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    In the form of laws and decrees of recent years, the energy political fundamentals in Germany have resulted in a substantial reduction in energy input as well as in environment relative emissions. For example, the `Thermal Protection Law` was revised and came into effect in 1995. Its objective is to cut the energy input for new buildings by at least 30% over the old regulation. A further 30% reduction for new buildings is planned for 1999 by a new energy conservation decree. In addition to the anticipated drop in consumption, the deregulation of the energy market will lead to pressure on costs and prices and consequently to a further depletion of the competitiveness of district heat. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die verstaerkten Anforderungen an den Gebaeudewaermeschutz sowie die anstehende Liberalisierung des Energiemarktes machen den Anschluss von Gebaeuden im kleineren Leistungsbereich wirtschaftlich immer schwieriger. Fernwaermeversorger, die Waerme aus Kraft-Waerme-Kopplung bereitstellen und daher mit hohen Festkosten belastet sind, muessen alle sich bietenden Moeglichkeiten zur Kostenreduzierung ausschoepfen, um wettbewerbsfaehig zu bleiben. Der Autor stellt die Wiedereinfuehrung der Pauschalabrechnung als eine preisgestalterische Variante zur Kostenreduzierung vor. Dabei geht er auf die rechtlichen Voraussetzungen und die Umsetzung bei neugebauten und bereits versorgten Einfamilienhaeuser ein. (orig.)

  18. Strategies to improve fertilisation rates with assisted conception: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeve, Yadava Bapurao; Potdar, Neelam; Blower, Jane A; Gelbaya, Tarek

    2017-05-26

    Successful fertilisation is one of the key steps determining success of assisted conception. Various factors including sperm or oocyte pathology and environmental factors have a significant impact on fertilisation rates. This systematic review is aimed to evaluate the existing evidence about factors affecting fertilisation and strategies to improve fertilisation rates. A literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE ® (Jan 1950-April 2016), EMBASE (Jan 1950-April 2016), Ovid OLDMEDLINE ®, Pre-MEDLINE (Jan 1950-April 2016) and the Cochrane Library. Relevant key words were used to combine sets of results and a total 243 papers were screened. Only qualitative analysis was performed, as there was major heterogeneity in study design and methodology for quantitative synthesis. Factors affecting fertilisation were divided into sperm- and oocyte-related factors. The methods to improve fertilisation rates were grouped together based on the approach used to improve fertilisation rates. Optimising laboratory condition and procedural effects in techniques is associated with improved fertilisation rates. Various techniques are described to improve fertilisation rates including assisted oocyte activation, physiological intracytoplasmic sperm injection (PICSI) and intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI). This review highlights the promising strategies under research to enhance fertilisation rates. Adequately powered multicentre randomised trials are required to evaluate these techniques before considering clinical application.

  19. Evaluation of heat stress response in crossbred dairy cows under tropical climate by analysis of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bun, Chan; Watanabe, Youki; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Inoue, Naoko; Ieda, Nahoko; Matsuda, Fuko; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Ohkura, Satoshi; Pheng, Vutha

    2017-12-11

    The present study aims to examine the effect of tropical temperatures on autonomic nervous activity in Cambodian dairy cattle by analyzing heart rate variability (HRV). Holter-type electrocardiograms were recorded in adult crossbred cows (Cambodian native × Holstein) either in a sheltered area or under direct sunlight. Rectal temperatures and heart rates increased in animals under direct sunlight as compared to those in the shelter. The power spectral analysis of HRV revealed that three out of the five cows studied underwent a decrease in parasympathetic nervous activity under direct sunlight with the remaining two cows showing no apparent change. The HRV analysis would prove to be a useful tool to reveal information about heat tolerance in dairy cows.

  20. Fluence rate as a determinant of synergistic interaction under simultaneous action of UV light and mild heat in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petin, V G; Zhurakovskaya, G P; Komarova, L N

    1997-04-01

    In experiments with wild-type diploid yeast cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the synergistic lethal action of a simultaneous application of ultraviolet (UV) light (wavelength, 254 nm) and mild heat (45-57.5 degrees C) was studied. It was shown that, at any fixed UV light intensity, the synergistic effect occurred within the given temperature interval. The optimal temperature to achieve the greatest synergistic effect may be shown for every fluence rate examined. The correlation between the optimal temperature that maximized the synergy and UV light intensity was estimated: this temperature shifted towards higher temperature values with an increasing fluence rate. A possible interpretation of this effect is based on the supposition that the mechanism of the synergistic effect is related to additional lethal damage produced by the interaction of sublesions induced by each agent. These sublesions are supposed to be non-lethal when each agent is applied separately.

  1. Cable Insulation Scheme to Improve Heat Transfer to Superfluid Helium in Nb-Ti Accelerator Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    La China, M; Tommasini, D

    2008-01-01

    In superconducting magnets operating at high heat loads as the ones for interaction region of particle colliders or for fast cycling synchrotrons, the limited heat transfer capability of state-of-the-art electrical insulation may constitute a heavy limitation to performance. In the LHC main magnets, Nb-Ti epoxy-free insulation, composed of polyimide tapes, has proved to be permeable to superfluid helium, however the heat flux is rather limited. After a review of the standard insulation scheme...

  2. Improving participation rates by providing choice of participation mode: two randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, N.; Lieshout, J. van; Wensing, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low participation rates reduce effective sample size, statistical power and can increase risk for selection bias. Previous research suggests that offering choice of participation mode can improve participation rates. However, few head-to-head trials compared choice of participation mode

  3. Comparability of the Social Skills Improvement System to the Social Skills Rating System: A Norwegian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamst-Klaussen, Thor; Rasmussen, Lene-Mari P.; Svartdal, Frode; Strømgren, Børge

    2016-01-01

    The Social Skills Improvement System-Rating Scales (SSIS-RS) is a multi-informant instrument assessing social skills and problem behavior in children and adolescents. It is a revised version of the Social Skills Rating System (SSRS). A Norwegian translation of the SSRS has been validated, but this has not yet been done for the Norwegian…

  4. Consistency between Sweat Rate and Wet Bulb Globe Temperature for the Assessment of Heat Stress of People Working Outdoor in Arid and Semi-arid Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Heidari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heat stress is common among workers in arid and semi-arid areas. In order to take every preventive measure to protect exposed workers against heat-related disorders, it is crucial to choose an appropriate index that accurately relates environmental parameters to physiological responses. Objective: To investigate the consistency between 2 heat stress and strain indices, ie, sweat rate and wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT, for the assessment of heat stress of people working outdoor in arid and semi-arid regions in Iran. Methods: During spring and summer, 136 randomly selected outdoor workers were enrolled in this study. Using a defined protocol, the sweat rate of these workers was measured 3 times a day. Simultaneously, the environmental parameters including WBGT index were recorded for each working station. Results: The level of agreement between sweat rate and WBGT was poor (κ<0.2. Based on sweat rate, no case exceeding the reference value was observed during the study. WBGT overestimated the heat stress in outdoor workers compared to sweat rate. Conclusion: It seems that the sweat rate standards may need some modifications related to real condition of work in arid and semi-arid regions in Iran. Moreover, it seems that judging workers solely based on monitoring their sweat rate in such regions, can probably result in underestimation of heat stress.

  5. Heating-Rate-Triggered Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Conducting Networks for a Highly Sensitive Noncontact Sensing Device

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2016-01-28

    Recently, flexible and transparent conductive films (TCFs) are drawing more attention for their central role in future applications of flexible electronics. Here, we report the controllable fabrication of TCFs for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks through drop casting lithography of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) ink. How ink formula and baking conditions influence the self-assembled microstructure of the TCFs is discussed. The sensor presents high-performance properties, including a reasonable sheet resistance (2.1 kohm/sq), a high visible-range transmittance (>69%, PET = 90%), and good stability when subjected to cyclic loading (>1000 cycles, better than indium tin oxide film) during processing, when formulation parameters are well optimized (weight ratio of SWCNT to PEDOT:PSS: 1:0.5, SWCNT concentration: 0.3 mg/ml, and heating rate: 36 °C/minute). Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of TCFs were verified through a fully transparent, highly sensitive, rapid response, noncontact moisture-sensing device (5 × 5 sensing pixels).

  6. Multiplatform analysis of the radiative effects and heating rates for an intense dust storm on 21 June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeger, Aaron R.; Christopher, Sundar A.; Johnson, Ben T.

    2013-08-01

    Dust radiative effects and atmospheric heating rates are investigated for a Saharan dust storm on 21 June 2007 using a combination of multiple satellite data sets and ground and aircraft observations as input into a delta-four stream radiative transfer model (RTM). This combines the strengths of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations and CloudSat satellites and in situ aircraft data to characterize the vertical structure of the dust layers (5 km in height with optical depths between 1.5 and 2.0) and underlying low-level water clouds. These observations were used, along with Aerosol Robotic Network retrievals of aerosol optical properties, as input to the RTM to assess the surface, atmosphere, and top of atmosphere (TOA) shortwave aerosol radiative effects (SWAREs). Our results show that the dust TOA SWARE per unit aerosol optical depth was -56 W m-2 in cloud-free conditions over ocean and +74 W m-2 where the dust overlay low-level clouds, and show heating rates greater than 10 K/d. Additional case studies also confirm the results of the 21 June case. This study shows the importance of identifying clouds beneath dust as they can have a significant impact on the radiative effects of dust, and hence assessments of the role of dust aerosol on the energy budget and climate.

  7. A stock-flow consistent input-output model with applications to energy price shocks, interest rates, and heat emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Matthew; Hartley, Brian; Richters, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    By synthesizing stock-flow consistent models, input-output models, and aspects of ecological macroeconomics, a method is developed to simultaneously model monetary flows through the financial system, flows of produced goods and services through the real economy, and flows of physical materials through the natural environment. This paper highlights the linkages between the physical environment and the economic system by emphasizing the role of the energy industry. A conceptual model is developed in general form with an arbitrary number of sectors, while emphasizing connections with the agent-based, econophysics, and complexity economics literature. First, we use the model to challenge claims that 0% interest rates are a necessary condition for a stationary economy and conduct a stability analysis within the parameter space of interest rates and consumption parameters of an economy in stock-flow equilibrium. Second, we analyze the role of energy price shocks in contributing to recessions, incorporating several propagation and amplification mechanisms. Third, implied heat emissions from energy conversion and the effect of anthropogenic heat flux on climate change are considered in light of a minimal single-layer atmosphere climate model, although the model is only implicitly, not explicitly, linked to the economic model.

  8. Comparison of heat transfer in liquid and slush nitrogen by numerical simulation of cooling rates for French straws used for sperm cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinena, M; Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-05-01

    Slush nitrogen (SN(2)) is a mixture of solid nitrogen and liquid nitrogen, with an average temperature of -207 °C. To investigate whether plunging a French plastic straw (commonly used for sperm cryopreservation) in SN(2) substantially increases cooling rates with respect to liquid nitrogen (LN(2)), a numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was used to predict cooling rates. Calculations performed using heat transfer coefficients in the range of film boiling confirmed the main benefit of plunging a straw in slush over LN(2) did not arise from their temperature difference (-207 vs. -196 °C), but rather from an increase in the external heat transfer coefficient. Numerical simulations using high heat transfer (h) coefficients (assumed to prevail in SN(2)) suggested that plunging in SN(2) would increase cooling rates of French straw. This increase of cooling rates was attributed to a less or null film boiling responsible for low heat transfer coefficients in liquid nitrogen when the straw is placed in the solid-liquid mixture or slush. In addition, predicted cooling rates of French straws in SN(2) tended to level-off for high h values, suggesting heat transfer was dictated by heat conduction within the liquid filled plastic straw. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 38 CFR 3.24 - Improved pension rates-Surviving children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Improved pension rates-Surviving children. 3.24 Section 3.24 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.24 Improved pension...

  10. Methods and techniques of improving experimental testing for microfluidic heat sinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D. Marshall

    2017-09-01

    Overall, especially in terms of achieving consistent, repeatable results, it was found that the arrangement of copper block heater, metal piping and the inclusion of manifolds was superior for this particular microchannel device. Hence, it is suggested that future testing of heat sinks and heat exchanger devices employ a similar arrangement of equipment for greater accuracy and comparability. In particular, the plastic tubing and hot plate configurations were found to have relatively poor consistency when testing the heat sink, and the film heater produced non-uniform heating, even over a small surface area.

  11. A New Wick Structure to Significantly Improve Heat Pipe Performance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Increasing thermal requirements for space-based thermal control systems are straining the capabilities of conventional heat pipes. Mainstream has experimentally...

  12. Modeling coupled convection and carbon dioxide injection for improved heat harvesting in geopressured geothermal reservoirs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Plaksina, Tatyana; White, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    .... In such geographic areas thick geopressured sandstones (up to several hundred meters thick) hold tremendous geothermal heat with conservative estimates of gross extractable energy approximately 0.2...

  13. Method for reducing excess heat supply experienced in typical Chinese district heating systems by achieving hydraulic balance and improving indoor air temperature control at the building level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lipeng; Gudmundsson, Oddgeir; Thorsen, Jan Eric

    2016-01-01

    A common problem with Chinese district heating systems is that they supply more heat than the actual heat demand. The reason for this excess heat supply is the general failure to use control devices to adjust the indoor temperature and flow in the building heating systems in accordance with the a.......03 kg NOx per heating square meter for a typical case in Harbin.......A common problem with Chinese district heating systems is that they supply more heat than the actual heat demand. The reason for this excess heat supply is the general failure to use control devices to adjust the indoor temperature and flow in the building heating systems in accordance...... with the actual heat demand. This results in 15-30% of the total supplied heat being lost. This paper proposes an integrated approach that aims to reduce the excess heat loss by introducing pre-set thermostatic radiator valves combined with automatic balancing valves. Those devices establish hydraulic balance...

  14. Beam Induced Ferrite Heating of the LHC Injection Kickers and Proposals for Improved Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Calatroni, S; Day, H; Ducimetière, L; Garlaschè, M; Gomes Namora, V; Mertens, V; Sobiech, Z; Taborelli, M; Uythoven, J; Weterings, W

    2013-01-01

    The two LHC injection kicker systems produce an integrated field strength of 1.3 T·m with a flattop duration variable up to 7860 ns, and rise and fall times of less than 900 ns and 3000 ns, respectively. A beam screen is placed in the aperture of each magnet, which consists of a ceramic tube with conductors in the inner wall. The conductors provide a path for the beam image current and screen the ferrite yoke against wakefields. Recent LHC operation, with high intensity beam stable for many hours, resulted in significant heating of both the ferrite yoke and beam impedance reduction ferrites. For one kicker magnet the ferrite yoke approached its Curie temperature. As a result of a long thermal time-constant the ferrite yoke can require several hours to cool sufficiently to allow re-injection of beam, thus limiting the running efficiency of the LHC. Thermal measurement data has been analysed, a thermal model developed and emissivity measurements carried out. Various measures to improve the ferrite cooling have...

  15. Enhanced specific absorption rate of bi-magnetic nanoparticles for heating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammad, Mohaned; Hempelmann, Rolf, E-mail: r.hempelmann@mx.uni-saarland.de

    2017-02-15

    Truncated octahedron bi-magnetic core/shell nanoparticles of Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}@Zn{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with different size distributions have been synthesized, and their structural and magnetic properties have been studied. The structure and morphology of the core/shell nanostructures were established by using X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Dark field-TEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results confirmed the formation of bi-magnetic core/shell nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at room temperature. The Curie temperature increases with the increase of particle size from 360 K to 394 K. The experimental results showed that core/shell nanoparticles have a higher specific absorption rate compared to the core ones. These nanoparticles are interfacial exchange coupled between hard and soft magnetic phases. We demonstrated that the specific absorption rate could be tuned by the concentration of precursor and the synthesis time. - Highlights: • Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}@Zn{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by seed-mediated growth method. • Exchange-coupling between magnetic hard and soft phase of the magnetic nanoparticles affects the specific absorption rate. • The specific absorption rate could be tuned by the concentration of precursor and the synthesis time. • An increase of the core/shell magnetic nanoparticles size resulted in the increase of Curie temperature.

  16. Pyrolysis behavior of tire-derived fuels at different temperatures and heating rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unapumnuk, Kessinee; Keener, Tim C; Lu, Mingming; Khang, Soon-Jai

    2006-05-01

    Pyrolytic product distribution rates and pyrolysis behavior of tire-derived fuels (TDF) were investigated using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) techniques. A TGA was designed and built to investigate the behavior and products of pyrolysis of typical TDF specimens. The fundamental knowledge of TGA analysis and principal fuel analysis are applied in this study. Thermogravimetry of the degradation temperature of the TDF confirms the overall decomposition rate of the volatile products during the depolymerization reaction. The principal fuel analysis (proximate and ultimate analysis) of the pyrolytic char products show the correlation of volatilization into the gas and liquid phases and the existence of fixed carbon and other compounds that remain as a solid char. The kinetic parameters were calculated using least square with minimizing sum of error square technique. The results show that the average kinetic parameters of TDF are the activation energy, E = 1322 +/- 244 kJ/mol, a pre-exponential constant of A = 2.06 +/- 3.47 x 10(10) min(-1), and a reaction order n = 1.62 +/- 0.31. The model-predicted rate equations agree with the experimental data. The overall TDF weight conversion represents the carbon weight conversion in the sample.

  17. Heat acclimatization does not improve VO2max or cycling performance in a cool climate in trained cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anders; Racinais, S; Jensen, M V

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if well-trained cyclists improve V ˙ O 2 m a x and performance in cool conditions following heat acclimatization through natural outdoor training in hot conditions. Eighteen trained male cyclists were tested for physiological adaptations, V ˙ O 2 m a x , peak aerobic power...

  18. Inverse problem and variation method to optimize cascade heat exchange network in central heating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Wei, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yinping; Wang, Xin

    2017-12-01

    Urban heating in northern China accounts for 40% of total building energy usage. In central heating systems, heat is often transferred from heat source to users by the heat network where several heat exchangers are installed at heat source, substations and terminals respectively. For given overall heating capacity and heat source temperature, increasing the terminal fluid temperature is an effective way to improve the thermal performance of such cascade heat exchange network for energy saving. In this paper, the mathematical optimization model of the cascade heat exchange network with three-stage heat exchangers in series is established. Aim at maximizing the cold fluid temperature for given hot fluid temperature and overall heating capacity, the optimal heat exchange area distribution and the medium fluids' flow rates are determined through inverse problem and variation method. The preliminary results show that the heat exchange areas should be distributed equally for each heat exchanger. It also indicates that in order to improve the thermal performance of the whole system, more heat exchange areas should be allocated to the heat exchanger where flow rate difference between two fluids is relatively small. This work is important for guiding the optimization design of practical cascade heating systems.

  19. Estimation of diurnal and seasonal variations of LTE radiative heating rates based on MGS/TES nadir temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, C.-V.

    Recently, even the description of the radiation transport in the martian atmosphere at lower altitudes below 50 km, where non-LTE effects are not so important, demands for a further development. The up to now existing LTE radiation transport models have two main foundations. On the one hand, there exists the semiempirical theory basing on laboratory experiments. This theory may be used very effectively, but in case of the mainly carbon-dioxide atmosphere of the mars, the results are rather uncertain. In general circulation models like the model MART-ACC, the corresponding radiative heating coefficients are thus multiplied by correction factors varying with the daytime, latitude, altitude and season by at least two orders. On the other hand, there exists the time-consuming method of solving the radiation transport problem using the more exact line-by-line algorithm for the multilevel and multi-molecular rotational-vibrational non-LTE problem (e.g. the ALIRET numerical programme by Kutepov and Feofilov, or the code developed by López-Valverde et al.). The accuracy of newly developed accelerated line-by-line codes increases with the altitude above the planetary surface. Remains again the problem of the calculation of the LTE-heating rates at lower altitudes. Thus, in the present work an analysis of the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) nadir temperature tables of the Mars Global Surveyor Data Archives distributed by the NASA planetary data system (http;//emma.la.asu.edu/data_archive) is performed for the four seasons. On the basis of the observed altitudinal and latitudinal temperature profiles, the heating rates of the martian atmosphere in an altitudinal range between 1.4 km and 42 km above the surface of the planet are calculated separately for daytime and nighttime using an LTE line-by-line code (equal to the description of the initial state of the ALIRET programme by Feofilov and Kutepov (2002)). The results for the heating coefficients are compared with

  20. Design and economic investigation of shell and tube heat exchangers using Improved Intelligent Tuned Harmony Search algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Turgut, Oguz Emrah; Turgut, Mert Sinan; Coban, Mustafa Turhan

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the thermal design of shell and tube heat exchangers by using Improved Intelligent Tuned Harmony Search (I-ITHS) algorithm. Intelligent Tuned Harmony Search (ITHS) is an upgraded version of harmony search algorithm which has an advantage of deciding intensification and diversification processes by applying proper pitch adjusting strategy. In this study, we aim to improve the search capacity of ITHS algorithm by utilizing chaotic sequences instead of uniformly distributed r...

  1. Improved corrosion resistance of aluminum brazing sheet by a post-brazing heat treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norouzi Afshar, F.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Glenn, A. M.; Taheri, P.; Sababi, M.; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    This work studies the influence of the microstructure on the corrosion mechanism and susceptibility of as-brazed aluminum sheet. Various microstructures are obtained using postbrazing heat treatments developed to enhance the corrosion resistance of an AA4xxx/AA3xxx brazing sheet. The heat

  2. Improving efficiency of heat pumps by use of zeotropic mixtures for different temperature glides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zühlsdorf, Benjamin; Jensen, Jonas Kjær; Cignitti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the optimization of a heat pump for an application with a large temperature glide on the sink and a smaller temperature glide on the source side. The study includes a simulation of a heat pump cycle for all possible binary mixtures from a list of 14 natural...

  3. Effects of Heating and Cooling Rates on Phase Transformations in 10 Wt Pct Ni Steel and Their Application to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Erin J.; Jain, Divya; DuPont, John N.; Seidman, David N.

    2017-10-01

    10 wt pct Ni steel is a high-strength steel that possesses good ballistic resistance from the deformation induced transformation of austenite to martensite, known as the transformation-induced-plasticity effect. The effects of rapid heating and cooling rates associated with welding thermal cycles on the phase transformations and microstructures, specifically in the heat-affected zone, were determined using dilatometry, microhardness, and microstructural characterization. Heating rate experiments demonstrate that the Ac3 temperature is dependent on heating rate, varying from 1094 K (821 °C) at a heating rate of 1 °C/s to 1324 K (1051 °C) at a heating rate of 1830 °C/s. A continuous cooling transformation diagram produced for 10 wt pct Ni steel reveals that martensite will form over a wide range of cooling rates, which reflects a very high hardenability of this alloy. These results were applied to a single pass, autogenous, gas tungsten arc weld. The diffusion of nickel from regions of austenite to martensite during the welding thermal cycle manifests itself in a muddled, rod-like lath martensitic microstructure. The results of these studies show that the nickel enrichment of the austenite in 10 wt pct Ni steel plays a critical role in phase transformations during welding.

  4. Effects of Heating and Cooling Rates on Phase Transformations in 10 Wt Pct Ni Steel and Their Application to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Erin J.; Jain, Divya; DuPont, John N.; Seidman, David N.

    2017-12-01

    10 wt pct Ni steel is a high-strength steel that possesses good ballistic resistance from the deformation induced transformation of austenite to martensite, known as the transformation-induced-plasticity effect. The effects of rapid heating and cooling rates associated with welding thermal cycles on the phase transformations and microstructures, specifically in the heat-affected zone, were determined using dilatometry, microhardness, and microstructural characterization. Heating rate experiments demonstrate that the Ac3 temperature is dependent on heating rate, varying from 1094 K (821 °C) at a heating rate of 1 °C/s to 1324 K (1051 °C) at a heating rate of 1830 °C/s. A continuous cooling transformation diagram produced for 10 wt pct Ni steel reveals that martensite will form over a wide range of cooling rates, which reflects a very high hardenability of this alloy. These results were applied to a single pass, autogenous, gas tungsten arc weld. The diffusion of nickel from regions of austenite to martensite during the welding thermal cycle manifests itself in a muddled, rod-like lath martensitic microstructure. The results of these studies show that the nickel enrichment of the austenite in 10 wt pct Ni steel plays a critical role in phase transformations during welding.

  5. Semi-metallic, strong conductive polymer microfiber, method and fast response rate actuators and heating textiles

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Jian

    2016-06-09

    A method comprising: providing at least one first composition comprising at least one conjugated polymer and at least one solvent, wet spinning the at least one first composition to form at least one first fiber material, hot-drawing the at least one fiber to form at least one second fiber material. In lead embodiments, high-performance poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy- thiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) conjugated polymer microfibers were fabricated via wet- spinning followed by hot-drawing. In these lead embodiments, due to the combined effects of the vertical hot-drawing process and doping/de-doping the microfibers with ethylene glycol (EG), a record electrical conductivity of 2804 S · cm-1 was achieved. This is believed to be a six-fold improvement over the best previously reported value for PEDOT/PSS fibers (467 S · cm-1) and a twofold improvement over the best values for conductive polymer films treated by EG de-doping (1418 S · cm-1). Moreover, these lead, highly conductive fibers experience a semiconductor-metal transition at 313 K. They also have superior mechanical properties with a Young\\'s modulus up to 8.3 GPa, a tensile strength reaching 409.8 MPa and a large elongation before failure (21%). The most conductive fiber also demonstrates an extraordinary electrical performance during stretching/unstretching: the conductivity increased by 25% before the fiber rupture point with a maximum strain up to 21%. Simple fabrication of the semi-metallic, strong and stretchable wet-spun PEDOT/PSS microfibers can make them available for conductive smart electronics. A dramatic improvement in electrical conductivity is needed to make conductive polymer fibers viable candidates in applications such as flexible electrodes, conductive textiles, and fast-response sensors and actuators.

  6. Improved life of die casting dies of H13 steel by attaining improved mechanical properties and distortion control during heat treatment. Year 1 report, October 1994--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.F.; Schwam, D. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Optimum heat treatment of dies (quenching) is critical in ensuring satisfactory service performance: rapid cooling rates increase the thermal fatigue/heat checking resistance of the steel, although very fast cooling rates can also lead to distortion and lower fracture toughness, increasing the danger of catastrophic fracture. Goal of this project is to increase die life by using fast enough quenching rates (> 30 F/min ave cooling rate from 1750 to 550 F, 1/2 in. below working surfaces) to obtain good toughness and fatigue resistance in Premium grade H-13 steel dies. An iterative approach of computer modeling validated by experiment was taken. Cooling curves during gas quenching of H-13 blocks and die shapes were measured under 2, 5, and 7.5 bar N2 and 4 bar Ar. Resulting dimensional changes and residual stresses were determined. To facilitate the computer modeling work, a database of H-13 mechanical and physical properties was compiled. Finite element analysis of the heat treated shapes was conducted. Good fit of modeled vs measured quenched rates was demonstrated for simple die shapes. The models predict well the phase transformation products from the quench. There is good fit between predicted and measured distortion contours; however magnitude of predicted distortion and residual stresses does not match well the measured values. Further fine tuning of the model is required.

  7. Developing a strategy for improving efficiency in the heating sector in central and eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A.S. [World Bank, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Heating is a vital energy service in Central and Eastern Europe, but the current delivery mechanisms are riddled with problems. District heating (DH) in its present technical form and with the present management structures is an inefficient system which produces expensive heat. Customers cannot control it and react to overheating by opening windows, even in winter. DH facilities together with other forms of individual heating are responsible for air pollution, causing severe impacts on the health of urban residents. The issues relating to DH are discussed, the first World Bank activities and experiences with projects in Poland are analyzed, and the cornerstones of a strategy to support future World Bank financing and the development of sound heating policies in CEE are presented.

  8. Intelligent Microbial Heat-Regulating Engine (IMHeRE) for Improved Thermo-Robustness and Efficiency of Bioconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Haiyang; Sun, Xiangying; Sun, Huan; Li, Chenyi; Wang, Yunqian; Feng, Xudong; Li, Chun

    2016-04-15

    The growth and production of microorganisms in bioconversion are often hampered by heat stress. In this study, an intelligent microbial heat-regulating engine (IMHeRE) was developed and customized to improve the thermo-robustness of Escherichia coli via the integration of a thermotolerant system and a quorum-regulating system. At the cell level, the thermotolerant system composed of different heat shock proteins and RNA thermometers hierarchically expands the optimum temperature by sensing heat changes. At the community level, the quorum-regulating system dynamically programs the altruistic sacrifice of individuals to reduce metabolic heat release by sensing the temperature and cell density. Using this hierarchical, dynamical, and multilevel regulation, the IMHeRE is able to significantly improve cell growth and production. In a real application, the production of lysine was increased 5-fold at 40 °C using the IMHeRE. Our work provides new potential for the development of bioconversion by conserving energy and increasing productivity.

  9. Research of Heat Rates Effect on the Process Of Fuel-Bed Gasification Of “Balakhtinskoe”, “Osinnikovskoe”, “Krasnogorskoe” and “Borodinskoe” Coal Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenkov Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research of fuel-bed gasification at different heating rates was conducted. Release of four gases (CO, NO, H2O, CO2 was determined. Optimal heating rate mode for this method of gasification was established.

  10. Improving aluminum can recycling rates: A six sigma study in Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subodh K.; Hughes, Margaret

    2006-08-01

    The aluminum can industry is facing a new challenge in declining recycling rates in the United States. The economic benefits of aluminum recycling are wide-spread and important not only to the U.S. aluminum industry, but to the economy in general. With an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation grant, Secat Inc. and the University of Kentucky, through the Center for a Sustainable Aluminum Industry, are conducting a project in Fayette County, Kentucky, to understand and improve recycling rates using Six Sigma methodology. This application of Six Sigma is the first methodological attempt at improving the recycling rate. To date, the preliminary process map has been identified and an initial estimate of the true recycling rate has been developed. The information gathered during this project and described in this article is expected to serve as a steppingstone to a national effort to increase U.S. recycling rates. The result, it is anticipated, will be increased economic development opportunities.

  11. The fluence rate determines the synergistic interaction of UV radiation and heat for mitotic recombination and cell inactivation in yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Komarova, Ludmila N; Zhurakovskaya, Galina P; Petin, Vladislav G

    2006-01-01

    The significance of the UV fluence rate for the synergistic interaction of UV light (254 nm) and heat was demonstrated for the frequency of mitotic recombination in a wild-type diploid yeast of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain T1) and for cell inactivation of two wild-type diploid yeast of S. cerevisiae (strains T1, XS800). It was shown for mitotic recombination that a decrease in the intensity of UV exposure results in the necessity of decreasing the temperature at which UV irradiation occurs to provide the same value of the synergistic enhancement ratio. For cell inactivation, there was a specific temperature maximizing the synergistic effect for any constant fluence rate and the temperature range, synergistically increasing the inactivation effect of UV radiation, should be shifted to lower temperatures with a decrease in the fluence rate. To interpret the results observed, a simple mathematical model of the synergistic interaction was applied. The model suggests that the synergistic interaction of UV light and hyperthermia is expected to result from some additional effective damages arising from the interaction of some sublesions induced by both agents. On the basis of data obtained, it was supposed that the synergistic interaction of these factors might take place at small intensities of UV light and temperatures existing in the biosphere. In other words, for a long duration of interaction, which is important for problems of UV light protection and health effects, one can expect a synergistic interaction of this factor with environmental heat or physiological temperatures and thereby an increase in their inactivating and genetic consequences.

  12. Improved decay rates for solutions for a multidimensional generalized Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the decay rates of solutions for the generalized Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation in multi-dimensional space. For initial data in some L1-weighted spaces, we prove faster decay rates of the solutions. More precisely, using the Fourier transform and the energy method, we show the global existence and the convergence rates of the solutions under the smallness assumption on the initial data and we give better decay rates of the solutions. This result improves early works in J. Differential Equations 158(2) (1999), 314-340 and Nonlinear Anal. 75(7) (2012), 3385-3392. © 2014-IOS Press.

  13. Exogenous Cytokinins Increase Grain Yield of Winter Wheat Cultivars by Improving Stay-Green Characteristics under Heat Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Yang

    Full Text Available Stay-green, a key trait of wheat, can not only increase the yield of wheat but also its resistance to heat stress during active photosynthesis. Cytokinins are the most potent general coordinator between the stay-green trait and senescence. The objectives of the present study were to identify and assess the effects of cytokinins on the photosynthetic organ and heat resistance in wheat. Two winter wheat cultivars, Wennong 6 (a stay-green cultivar and Jimai 20 (a control cultivar, were subjected to heat stress treatment from 1 to 5 days after anthesis (DAA. The two cultivars were sprayed daily with 10 mg L-1 of 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA between 1 and 3 DAA under ambient and elevated temperature conditions. We found that the heat stress significantly decreased the number of kernels per spike and the grain yield (P < 0.05. Heat stress also decreased the zeatin riboside (ZR content, but increased the gibberellin (GA3, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, and abscisic acid (ABA contents at 3 to 15 DAA. Application of 6-BA significantly (P < 0.05 increased the grain-filling rate, endosperm cell division rate, endosperm cell number, and 1,000-grain weight under heated condition. 6-BA application increased ZR and IAA contents at 3 to 28 DAA, but decreased GA3 and ABA contents. The contents of ZR, ABA, and IAA in kernels were positively and significantly correlated with the grain-filling rate (P < 0.05, whereas GA3 was counter-productive at 3 to 15 DAA. These results suggest that the decrease in grain yield under heat stress was due to a lower ZR content and a higher GA3 content compared to that at elevated temperature during the early development of the kernels, which resulted in less kernel number and lower grain-filling rate. The results also provide essential information for further utilization of the cytokinin substances in the cultivation of heat-resistant wheat.

  14. Heat stress effects on farrowing rate in sows: Genetic parameter estimation using within-line and crossbred models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemhof, S.; Kause, A.; Knol, E.F.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Misztal, I.

    2012-01-01

    The pork supply chain values steady and undisturbed piglet production. Fertilization and maintaining gestation in warm and hot climates is a challenge that can be potentially improved by selection. The objective of this study was to estimate 1) genetic variation for farrowing rate of sows in 2 dam

  15. An improved thermoregulatory model for cooling garment applications with transient metabolic rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, Johan K.

    Current state-of-the-art thermoregulatory models do not predict body temperatures with the accuracies that are required for the development of automatic cooling control in liquid cooling garment (LCG) systems. Automatic cooling control would be beneficial in a variety of space, aviation, military, and industrial environments for optimizing cooling efficiency, for making LCGs as portable and practical as possible, for alleviating the individual from manual cooling control, and for improving thermal comfort and cognitive performance. In this study, we adopt the Fiala thermoregulatory model, which has previously demonstrated state-of-the-art predictive abilities in air environments, for use in LCG environments. We validate the numerical formulation with analytical solutions to the bioheat equation, and find our model to be accurate and stable with a variety of different grid configurations. We then compare the thermoregulatory model's tissue temperature predictions with experimental data where individuals, equipped with an LCG, exercise according to a 700 W rectangular type activity schedule. The root mean square (RMS) deviation between the model response and the mean experimental group response is 0.16°C for the rectal temperature and 0.70°C for the mean skin temperature, which is within state-of-the-art variations. However, with a mean absolute body heat storage error 3¯ BHS of 9.7 W˙h, the model fails to satisfy the +/-6.5 W˙h accuracy that is required for the automatic LCG cooling control development. In order to improve model predictions, we modify the blood flow dynamics of the thermoregulatory model. Instead of using step responses to changing requirements, we introduce exponential responses to the muscle blood flow and the vasoconstriction command. We find that such modifications have an insignificant effect on temperature predictions. However, a new vasoconstriction dependency, i.e. the rate of change of hypothalamus temperature weighted by the

  16. Short-term heat acclimation prior to a multi-day desert ultra-marathon improves physiological and psychological responses without compromising immune status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Ashley G B; Hayes, Mark; Waldock, Kirsty A M; Relf, Rebecca L; Watkins, Emily R; James, Carl A; Gibson, Oliver R; Smeeton, Nicholas J; Richardson, Alan J; Watt, Peter W; Maxwell, Neil S

    2017-11-01

    Multistage, ultra-endurance events in hot, humid conditions necessitate thermal adaptation, often achieved through short term heat acclimation (STHA), to improve performance by reducing thermoregulatory strain and perceptions of heat stress. This study investigated the physiological, perceptual and immunological responses to STHA prior to the Marathon des Sables. Eight athletes (age 42 ± 4 years and body mass 81.9 ± 15.0 kg) completed 4 days of controlled hyperthermia STHA (60 min·day‒1, 45°C and 30% relative humidity). Pre, during and post sessions, physiological and perceptual measures were recorded. Immunological measures were recorded pre-post sessions 1 and 4. STHA improved thermal comfort (P = 0.02), sensation (P = 0.03) and perceived exertion (P = 0.04). A dissociated relationship between perceptual fatigue and Tre was evident after STHA, with reductions in perceived Physical (P = 0.04) and General (P = 0.04) fatigue. Exercising Tre and HR did not change (P > 0.05) however, sweat rate increased 14% (P = 0.02). No changes were found in white blood cell counts or content (P > 0.05). Four days of STHA facilitates effective perceptual adaptations, without compromising immune status prior to an ultra-endurance race in heat stress. A greater physiological strain is required to confer optimal physiological adaptations.

  17. Does low-protein diet improve broiler performance under heat stress conditions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RL Furlan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition for broilers under high temperatures is extremely important for brazilian broiler chicken industry because the amounts of consumed nutrients and environmental temperature have great effects on bird performance and carcass quality. Among diet nutrients, protein has the highest heat increment; thus, during many years, diets with low protein level were recommended in order to reduce heat production in broiler chickens under heat stress. However, reports have shown that low-protein diets have negative effects on broiler performance when environmental temperature is high, because during heat stress, low food intake associated to a low diet protein induce amino acid deficiencies. Other studies have shown that broilers fed low-protein diets increase their energy requirement for maintenance with higher heat production. Thus, with the growth of broiler industry in tropical areas more challenges need to be faced by the farmers. So, both the ambient and nutritional conditions ought to be well managed to avoid negative effects on poultry production once they can affect the metabolism (body heat production under low temperature and body heat dissipation under high temperature with consequence on poultry performance (meat and eggs.

  18. Heating rate effect on the evolution of texture in (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 Ag-sheathed tapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, J.C.; Raittila, J.; Xu, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Bi2223/Ag tapes have been produced by the powder-in-tube technique. The evolution of texture during the first heat treatment has been studied by means of in situ synchrotron radiation diffraction. Using various heating rates (1, 2 and 4 degrees C min(-1)), it wag found that the kinetics of prefer......Bi2223/Ag tapes have been produced by the powder-in-tube technique. The evolution of texture during the first heat treatment has been studied by means of in situ synchrotron radiation diffraction. Using various heating rates (1, 2 and 4 degrees C min(-1)), it wag found that the kinetics...... in a faster disappearance of the Bi2212 phase, which in turn is supposed to induce a faster rate of liquid phase formation at the beginning of the reaction process leading to the development of the Bi2223 phase. This feature is also believed to play a role in the texturing kinetics....

  19. IMPROVEMENT OF CALCULATION METHODS OF HEAT INPUT THROUGH TRANSLUCENT STRUCTURES AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THEIR REDUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Boroukhova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the ways of optimizing the existing calculation procedure for the heat input through infilling the area lights. While maintaining public buildings with large areas of translucent structures during the warm season, it is possible to encounter the premises overheat due to a large volume of incorrectly accounted in the heat balance heat input from the solar irradiation. The calculation procedure presently in use in the Republic of Belarus does not account for diversity of the existing forms of glazing employed in construction and needs revision. The authors adduce and analyze the heat-input calculation principles from solar irradiation through translucent structures applied in designing ventilation and air-conditioning systems in Belarus, FRG and USA, and make comparisons between them. Based on the analysis, they establish the ways of optimizing the existing heat-input calculation procedure. Firstly, on account of small geographical latitude difference it is possible to average the flows of direct and dispersed solar irradiation over the territory of Belarus. Secondly, in calculation it is proposed to discard use of heat fluxes of the solar irradiation that passed through the single glazing and to utilize the fluxes falling onto the surface. Therefore, the paper considers the notion of the solar factor of glazing and offers an expression for determining the radiative heat-input component from the solar irradiance appreciating the heat fluxes falling onto the surface. The authors consider the variants of decreasing amount of heat entering the premises through the area lights: glazing type optimal choice, engineering apertures with certain ratio of dimensions, and the use of out-of-door solar protection. 

  20. Energy savings based on solar heating and improved cooling of the district heating water; Energibesparelser baseret paa solvarme og bedre afkoeling af fjernvarmevandet. Projektrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fafner, K.; Kristjansson, H.; Hansen, Karl Erik

    2009-08-15

    The report analyses and compares the potential for savings in the heat supply, namely use of solar heating and better cooling of the circulating water in the district heating system. The analyses shows that better cooling in the users' heating systems, i.e. lower district heating temperature, should have higher priority than installation of a solar heating system. The report also demonstrates that solar heating continues to have a large un-utilized potential in the Danish heat supply in general, but for the individual building owner installation of a solar heating system will be far more expensive than buying a part of a large-scale solar heating system. However, lowering the return temperature in the district heating transmission pipes is economically more attractive for the building owners than solar heating.

  1. Fuel-disruption experiments under high-ramp-rate heating conditions. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, S.A.; Worledge, D.H.; Cano, G.L.; Mast, P.K.; Briscoe, F.

    1983-10-01

    This topical report presents the preliminary results and analysis of the High Ramp Rate fuel-disruption experiment series. These experiments were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the timing and mode of fuel disruption during the prompt-burst phase of a loss-of-flow accident. High-speed cinematography was used to observe the timing and mode of the fuel disruption in a stack of five fuel pellets. Of the four experiments discussed, one used fresh mixed-oxide fuel, and three used irradiated mixed-oxide fuel. Analysis of the experiments indicates that in all cases, the observed disruption occurred well before fuel-vapor pressure was high enough to cause the disruption. The disruption appeared as a rapid spray-like expansion and occurred near the onset of fuel melting in the irradiated-fuel experiments and near the time of complete fuel melting in the fresh-fuel experiment. This early occurrence of fuel disruption is significant because it can potentially lower the work-energy release resulting from a prompt-burst disassembly accident.

  2. High Sensitivity Carbon Nanotubes Flow-Rate Sensors and Their Performance Improvement by Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Yang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A new type of hot-wire flow-rate sensor (HWFS with a sensing element made of a macro-sized carbon nanotube (CNT strand is presented in this study. An effective way to improve repeatability of the CNT flow-rate sensor by coating a layer of Al2O3 on the CNT surface is proposed. Experimental results show that due to the large surface-to-volume ratio and thin coated Al2O3 layer, the CNT flow-rate sensor has higher sensitivity and faster response than a conventional platinum (Pt HWFS. It is also demonstrated that the covered CNT flow-rate sensor has better repeatability than its bare counterpart due to insulation from the surrounding environment. The proposed CNT flow-rate sensor shows application potential for high-sensitivity measurement of flow rate.

  3. High Sensitivity Carbon Nanotubes Flow-Rate Sensors and Their Performance Improvement by Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xing; Zhou, Zhaoying; Wang, Dingqu; Liu, Xiaoli

    2010-01-01

    A new type of hot-wire flow-rate sensor (HWFS) with a sensing element made of a macro-sized carbon nanotube (CNT) strand is presented in this study. An effective way to improve repeatability of the CNT flow-rate sensor by coating a layer of Al2O3 on the CNT surface is proposed. Experimental results show that due to the large surface-to-volume ratio and thin coated Al2O3 layer, the CNT flow-rate sensor has higher sensitivity and faster response than a conventional platinum (Pt) HWFS. It is also demonstrated that the covered CNT flow-rate sensor has better repeatability than its bare counterpart due to insulation from the surrounding environment. The proposed CNT flow-rate sensor shows application potential for high-sensitivity measurement of flow rate. PMID:22399913

  4. Evaluation of a practice-development initiative to improve breastfeeding rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Margaret; Cox, Julie; Doyle, Bronwyn; Reed, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The benefits of breastfeeding for infant, mother, family, and community are well recognized, and increasing breastfeeding rates is considered an important health-promotion strategy. Improving breastfeeding knowledge and practice among individuals caring for breastfeeding women is considered an important aspect of this strategy. The practice-development initiative described in this article aimed to improve hospital-based breastfeeding rates through the implementation of The Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. The initiative included the development and implementation of an education program aimed at changing and improving breastfeeding practices. The program was evaluated in three ways: changes in breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge; client preparation for breastfeeding and satisfaction during the postnatal period; and staff knowledge and skills.

  5. [Improvement on high frame rate ultrasonic imaging system based on linear frequency-modulated signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuemei; Peng, Hu; Cai, Bo

    2009-08-01

    The high frame rate (HFR) ultrasonic imaging system based on linear frequency-modulated (LFM) signal constructs images at a high frame rate; the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of this system can also be improved. Unfortunately, such pulse compression methods that increase the SNR usually cause range sidelobe artifacts. In an imaging situation, the effects of the sidelobes extending on either side of the compressed pulse will be self-noise along the axial direction and masking of weaker echoes. The improvement on high frame rate ultrasonic imaging system based on LFM signal is considered in this paper. In this proposed scheme, a predistorted LFM signal is used as excited signal and a mismatched filter is applied on receiving end. The results show that the proposed HFR ultrasonic imaging system can achieve higher SNR and the axial resolution is also improved.

  6. Turbulent Density Fluctuations and Proton Heating Rate in the Solar Wind from 9–20 R ⊙

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar Raja, K.; Subramanian, Prasad; Ramesh, R.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Ingale, Madhusudan

    2017-12-01

    We obtain scatter-broadened images of the Crab Nebula at 80 MHz as it transits through the inner solar wind in 2017 and 2016 June. These images are anisotropic, with the major axis oriented perpendicular to the radially outward coronal magnetic field. Using these data, we deduce that the density modulation index (δ {N}e/{N}e) caused by turbulent density fluctuations in the solar wind ranges from 1.9× {10}-3 to 7.7× {10}-3 between 9 and 20 R ⊙. We also find that the heating rate of solar wind protons at these distances ranges from 2.2× {10}-13 to 1.0× {10}-11 {erg} {{cm}}-3 {{{s}}}-1. On two occasions, the line of sight intercepted a coronal streamer. We find that the presence of the streamer approximately doubles the thickness of the scattering screen.

  7. Estimation of the dust production rate from the tungsten armour after repetitive ELM-like heat loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestchanyi, S.; Garkusha, I.; Makhlaj, V.; Landman, I.

    2011-12-01

    Experimental simulations for the erosion rate of tungsten targets under ITER edge-localized mode (ELM)-like surface heat loads of 0.75 MJ m-2 causing surface melting and of 0.45 MJ m-2 without melting have been performed in the QSPA-Kh50 plasma accelerator. Analytical considerations allow us to conclude that for both energy deposition values the erosion mechanism is solid dust ejection during surface cracking under the action of thermo-stress. Tungsten influx into the ITER containment of NW~5×1018 W per medium size ELM of 0.75 MJ m-2 and 0.25 ms time duration has been estimated. The radiation cooling power of Prad=150-300 MW due to such influx of tungsten is intolerable: it should cool the ITER core to 1 keV within a few seconds.

  8. Flow and heat transfer of nanofluids over a rotating disk with uniform stretching rate in the radial direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguang Yin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies flow and heat transfer of nanofluids over a rotating disk with uniform stretching rate. Three types of nanoparticles-Cu, Al2O3 and CuO-with water-based nanofluids are considered. The governing equations are reduced by Von Karman transformation and then solved by the homotopy analysis method (HAM, which is in close agreement with numerical results. Results indicate that with increasing in stretching strength parameter, the skin friction and the local Nusselt number, the velocity in radial and axial directions increase, whereas the velocity in tangential direction and the thermal boundary layer thickness decrease, respectively. Moreover, the effects of volume fraction and types of nanofluids on velocity and temperature fields are also analyzed.

  9. Improved Corrosion Resistance of a Heat Exchanger Using a Copper Tube Coated with Tin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    FUKUSHIMA, Makoto; YONESAKI, Takahiro; TAKIZAWA, Kikuo; SUSAI, Takashi

    2000-01-01

      The outer face of copper tubes used in a heat exchanger were coated with tin. The tubes were brazed with various types of solder in order to evaluate their corrosion resistance in a H2S gas environment...

  10. Application of heat treatment and hot extrusion processes to improve mechanical properties of the AZ91 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Reguła

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to evaluate the effects of hot working (extrusion and hest treatment on room temperature mechanical properties of magnesium-based AZ91 alloy. The results were compared with as-cast condition. The examined material had been obtained by gravity casting to permanent moulds and subsequently subjected to heat treatment and/or processed by extrusion at 648 K. Microstructural and mechanical properties of properly prepared specimens were studied. Rm, Rp02 and A5 were determined from tensile tests. Brinell hardness tests were also conducted. The research has shown that hot working of AZ91 alloy provides high mechanical properties unattainable by cast material subjected to heat-treatment. The investigated alloy subjected to hot working and subsequently heat-treated has doubled its strength and considerably improved the elongation - compared with the as-cast material.

  11. Higher ventilation rates improve learning; 'Hoehere Lueftungsraten steigern Lernverhalten'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, W.

    2007-07-01

    In this interview with professor Olli Seppann, president of the REHVA congress, the relationship between workplace-productivity and air quality is discussed. The REHVA is the Federation of European Heating and Air-Conditioning Associations. In this interview made at the congress at the ISH Fair in Frankfurt, Germany, the following areas of interest are addressed: Optimal internal climatic conditions for learning environments, the sick building syndrome, optimal temperatures, conflicts between political efforts to reduce energy consumption with hygiene and productivity, measurement methods for airborne toxic substances emanating from building materials, recommendations for the improvement of in-house climate, conflicts between energy-saving and healthy climatic conditions, measures to be taken, measurement and control systems for air-quality as well as possible further improvements in building automation systems. Finally, topics foreseen for a further conference in Helsinki are discussed. The question on why much research in the area of comfort systems is carried out in Scandinavia is also addressed.

  12. Geothermal flux and basal melt rate in the Dome C region inferred from radar reflectivity and heat modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Passalacqua

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Basal melt rate is the most important physical quantity to be evaluated when looking for an old-ice drilling site, and it depends to a great extent on the geothermal flux (GF, which is poorly known under the East Antarctic ice sheet. Given that wet bedrock has higher reflectivity than dry bedrock, the wetness of the ice–bed interface can be assessed using radar echoes from the bedrock. But, since basal conditions depend on heat transfer forced by climate but lagged by the thick ice, the basal ice may currently be frozen whereas in the past it was generally melting. For that reason, the risk of bias between present and past conditions has to be evaluated. The objective of this study is to assess which locations in the Dome C area could have been protected from basal melting at any time in the past, which requires evaluating GF. We used an inverse approach to retrieve GF from radar-inferred distribution of wet and dry beds. A 1-D heat model is run over the last 800 ka to constrain the value of GF by assessing a critical ice thickness, i.e. the minimum ice thickness that would allow the present local distribution of basal melting. A regional map of the GF was then inferred over a 80 km  ×  130 km area, with a N–S gradient and with values ranging from 48 to 60 mW m−2. The forward model was then emulated by a polynomial function to compute a time-averaged value of the spatially variable basal melt rate over the region. Three main subregions appear to be free of basal melting, two because of a thin overlying ice and one, north of Dome C, because of a low GF.

  13. Geothermal flux and basal melt rate in the Dome C region inferred from radar reflectivity and heat modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Olivier; Ritz, Catherine; Parrenin, Frédéric; Urbini, Stefano; Frezzotti, Massimo

    2017-09-01

    Basal melt rate is the most important physical quantity to be evaluated when looking for an old-ice drilling site, and it depends to a great extent on the geothermal flux (GF), which is poorly known under the East Antarctic ice sheet. Given that wet bedrock has higher reflectivity than dry bedrock, the wetness of the ice-bed interface can be assessed using radar echoes from the bedrock. But, since basal conditions depend on heat transfer forced by climate but lagged by the thick ice, the basal ice may currently be frozen whereas in the past it was generally melting. For that reason, the risk of bias between present and past conditions has to be evaluated. The objective of this study is to assess which locations in the Dome C area could have been protected from basal melting at any time in the past, which requires evaluating GF. We used an inverse approach to retrieve GF from radar-inferred distribution of wet and dry beds. A 1-D heat model is run over the last 800 ka to constrain the value of GF by assessing a critical ice thickness, i.e. the minimum ice thickness that would allow the present local distribution of basal melting. A regional map of the GF was then inferred over a 80 km × 130 km area, with a N-S gradient and with values ranging from 48 to 60 mW m-2. The forward model was then emulated by a polynomial function to compute a time-averaged value of the spatially variable basal melt rate over the region. Three main subregions appear to be free of basal melting, two because of a thin overlying ice and one, north of Dome C, because of a low GF.

  14. Strength training improves fatigue resistance and self-rated health in workers with chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Brandt, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    of a randomized controlled trial investigates the effect of strength training on muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health among workers with chronic pain. Sixty-six slaughterhouse workers with chronic upper limb pain and work disability were randomly allocated to 10 weeks of strength training or usual......-rated health and pain. Time to fatigue, muscle strength, hand/wrist pain, and self-rated health improved significantly more following strength training than usual care (all P strength training and this change was correlated to the reduction in fear avoidance...... (Spearman's rho = -0.40; P = 0.01). In conclusion, specific strength training improves muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health and reduces pain of the hand/wrist in manual workers with chronic upper limb pain. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01671267....

  15. Canada's pregnancy-related mortality rates: doing well but room for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Barbara S E; Mijovic-Kondejewski, Jane; Takeda, Jun; Tanaka, Satomi; Olson, David M

    2015-02-06

    Canada's perinatal, infant and maternal mortality rates were examined and compared with other Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. The type and the quality of the available data and best practices in several OECD countries were evaluated. A literature search was performed in PubMed and the Cochrane Library. Vital statistics data were obtained from the OECD Health Database and Statistics Canada and subjected to secondary analysis. Overall, Canadian pregnancy mortality rates have fallen dramatically since the early 1960's. Perinatal and infant mortality rates remain low and stable, but the maternal mortality rate has increased slightly and both mortality rates have declined in their relative OECD rankings over the last 20 years. Data quality and coverage across Canada and internationally, especially for Indigenous peoples, is inconsistent and registration practices differ greatly, making comparisons difficult. Available data do show that Indigenous people's perinatal and infant mortality rates are nearly twice those of the general population. Best practices in other OECD countries include Australia's National Maternity Services plan to improve Aboriginal perinatal health, the Netherlands' midwifery services and National Perinatal Registry and Japan's national pregnancy registration and Maternal Handbook. To diminish Canadian disparities in perinatal health rates and improve health outcomes we recommend a) uniform registration practices across Canada, b) better data quality and coverage especially among Indigenous communities, c) adoption of a national pregnancy registration and a maternal handbook along with d) improved midwifery and primary practice services to rural and remote communities. At a time when Canada is focusing upon improving pregnancy health in developing nations, it also needs to address its own challenges in improving pregnancy outcomes.

  16. Impact of heat stress on conception rate of dairy cows in the moderate climate considering different temperature-humidity index thresholds, periods relative to breeding, and heat load indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüller, L K; Burfeind, O; Heuwieser, W

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this retrospective study were to investigate the relationship between temperature-humidity index (THI) and conception rate (CR) of lactating dairy cows, to estimate a threshold for this relationship, and to identify periods of exposure to heat stress relative to breeding in an area of moderate climate. In addition, we compared three different heat load indices related to CR: mean THI, maximum THI, and number of hours above the mean THI threshold. The THI threshold for the influence of heat stress on CR was 73. It was statistically chosen based on the observed relationship between the mean THI at the day of breeding and the resulting CR. Negative effects of heat stress, however, were already apparent at lower levels of THI, and 1 hour of mean THI of 73 or more decreased the CR significantly. The CR of lactating dairy cows was negatively affected by heat stress both before and after the day of breeding. The greatest negative impact of heat stress on CR was observed 21 to 1 day before breeding. When the mean THI was 73 or more in this period, CR decreased from 31% to 12%. Compared with the average maximum THI and the total number of hours above a threshold of more than or 9 hours, the mean THI was the most sensitive heat load index relating to CR. These results indicate that the CR of dairy cows raised in the moderate climates is highly affected by heat stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sweating rate and sweat composition during exercise and recovery in ambient heat and humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, L J; Geor, R J; Hare, M J; Ecker, G L; Lindinger, M I

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the composition and extent of sweat losses during submaximal exercise under hot and humid conditions and to compare these findings with the same exercise protocol conducted under cool, dry and hot, dry conditions. Five Thoroughbred horses (age 3 to 6) completed exercise tests under each of 3 environmental conditions in random order: cool, dry (CD), room temperature (T) = 20 degrees C, relative humidity (RH) = 45-55%; hot, dry (HD), T = 32-34 degrees C, RH = 45-55%; and hot, humid (HH), T = 32-34 degrees C, RH = 80-85%. Horses exercised at 50% of their predetermined VO2max on a treadmill set at a 10% slope until attainment of a pulmonary artery blood temperature of 41.5 degrees C followed by a 60 min recovery. Sweat was collected from a sealed polyethylene pouch enclosing a 150 cm2 area on the lateral thorax. During exercise and the first 30 min of recovery, sweat fluid losses were 7.9 +/- 0.7 litres, 9.9 +/- 0.5 litres and 6.6 +/- 1.2 litres (mean +/- s.e.m.) for CD, HD and HH, respectively. Sweating rate (SR), calculated from sweat volume per unit area of enclosed skin, was lowest in CD and similar in HD and HH during exercise such that at end of exercise in HH (16.5 min) calculated sweat losses were approximately 5% and 32% higher than in HD and CD, respectively. In recovery, SR declined in all conditions but was significantly lower in CD (P Sweating was detectable until 30 min recovery in CD, 45 min recovery in HD and 60 min recovery in HH. Sweat composition and osmolality was different under the 3 environmental conditions and changed gradually during exercise and recovery in all conditions. Osmolality and [Na] was highest in HD and lowest in CD. During exercise, [Na] increased with increasing SR. Although exercise duration was significantly decreased in HH (16.5 +/- 1 min) when compared to HD (28 +/- 2 min) and CD (37 +/- 2 min), fluid and ion losses in HH were comparable to those in HD as a result of a high SR and

  18. Reliability improvement of a flexible FD-SOI MOSFET via heat management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Jae Hoon; Kim, Seung-Yoon; Jeong, Chan Bae; Chang, Ki Soo; Hwang, Wan Sik; Cho, Byung Jin

    2017-06-01

    Ultra-thin single-crystalline Si membrane transistors on a polymer substrate have drawn attention for flexible electronics applications. However, these devices accompany a reliability issue stemming from severe self-heating because of the inherent poor thermal conductivity of the polymer substrate. In the present study, under an operational condition of VG = 3 V and VD = 8 V, the temperature of the Si membrane transistor on the polymer substrate soared to about 64 °C immediately and remained consistently high. The excess heat generated from the active channel significantly degraded the device performance. However, the implementation of a silver heat spreading layer (HSL) between the active channel and the polymer substrate significantly alleviated the self-heating effect as the silver film rapidly spread the generated heat. The efficient heat spreading, monitored via a high resolution infrared thermal microscope, correlated well with the charge transfer characteristics of the device. These results may be helpful to realize high performance flexible devices using a silicon membrane.

  19. Evaluating research recruitment strategies to improve response rates amongst South African nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Khamisa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Nurse recruitment to and participation in empirical research is increasingly important in understanding and improving nursing practice. However, the low participation and recruitment rate amongst nurses is not well understood.Research purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate three research recruitment methods for their impact on recruitment and participation rates amongst South African nurses.Motivation for the study: A limited number of studies exist that formally evaluates different recruitment strategies to improve participation in research amongst nurses within developing contexts, especially South Africa.Research approach, design and method: Participants were recruited using three different methods. Of the 250 nurses randomly selected and invited to participate in a cross-sectional survey, 201 agreed and 162 (81% returned the questionnaires.Main findings: Nursing management participation in the recruitment and data collection process produces more favourable response rates. Reminders and the use of shorter questionnaires also aid higher response rates.Practical/managerial implications: Reminders as well as face-to-face recruitment strategies (especially by a familiar person successfully improved participation rates amongst South African nurses in this study.Contribution/value-add: This study identifies some strategies that could be used more widely to increase the recruitment and participation of South African nurses in research whilst potentially improving their work situation.

  20. Effect of higher heating rate during continuous annealing on microstructure and mechanical properties of cold-rolled 590 MPa dual-phase steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this presentation, the effect of higher heating rate in continuous annealing on microstructure and mechanical properties of a cold-rolled 590 MPa ferrite-martensite dual-phase steel were investigated by using microstructural observation and mechanical property measurement. The results show that compared with the conventional continuous annealed steels heated at a rate of 5 ∘C/s (CA, the average ferrite grain sizes heated at a higher rate (300 ∘C/s, HRA was obviously refined from 15.6 μm to 5.3 μm. The morphology of martensite is observed to shift from network along ferrite grain boundaries to uniformly dispersed in the final DP590 microstructure. Twinned substructure of martensite can be found when heated at a higher heating rate in continuous annealing. EBSD orientation maps show that the fraction of low angle grain boundary is increased in HRA sample compared to CA sample. The HRA sample has excellent mechanical properties when compared to the CA sample. The variations of strength, elongation, strain hardening behavior and fracture mechanism of the this DP590 steel with different heating routine were further discussed in relation to microstructural features.