WorldWideScience

Sample records for heat loss coefficient

  1. Heat Transmission Coefficient Measurements in Buildings Utilizing a Heat Loss Measuring Device

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    2013-01-01

    Global energy efficiency can be obtained in two ordinary ways. One way is to improve the energy production and supply side, and the other way is, in general, to reduce the consumption of energy in society. This paper has focus on the latter and especially the consumption of energy for heating...... and cooling our houses. There is a huge energy-saving potential in this area for reducing both the global climate problems as well as economy challenges. Heating of buildings in Denmark accounts for approximately 40% of the entire national energy consumption. For this reason, a reduction of heat losses from...... building envelopes are of great importance in order to reach the Bologna CO2 emission reduction targets. Upgrading of the energy performance of buildings is a topic of huge global interest these years. Not only heating in the temperate and arctic regions are important, but also air conditioning...

  2. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915measuredsamples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rateand heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08. PMID:26624613

  3. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters.

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915 measured samples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08.

  4. Extreme learning machine: a new alternative for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters.

    Liu, Zhijian; Li, Hao; Tang, Xindong; Zhang, Xinyu; Lin, Fan; Cheng, Kewei

    2016-01-01

    Heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial indicators for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, the direct determination requires complex detection devices and a series of standard experiments, wasting too much time and manpower. To address this problem, we previously used artificial neural networks and support vector machine to develop precise knowledge-based models for predicting the heat collection rates and heat loss coefficients of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters, setting the properties measured by "portable test instruments" as the independent variables. A robust software for determination was also developed. However, in previous results, the prediction accuracy of heat loss coefficients can still be improved compared to those of heat collection rates. Also, in practical applications, even a small reduction in root mean square errors (RMSEs) can sometimes significantly improve the evaluation and business processes. As a further study, in this short report, we show that using a novel and fast machine learning algorithm-extreme learning machine can generate better predicted results for heat loss coefficient, which reduces the average RMSEs to 0.67 in testing.

  5. Heat loss from Buildings

    Karlsson, Kenneth; Næraa, Rikke

    1997-01-01

    Determination of heat loss coefficients for buildings in Denmark. The coefficient are determined for 15 building groups and 3 year intervals. They are based on the BBR-registre and assumptions of U-values(W/K*m2)and computed in a simple spreed sheet model.The results are used in the REVEILLE...

  6. Experimental study of heat exchange coefficients, critical heat flux and charge losses, using water-steam mixtures in turbulent flow in a vertical tube

    Perroud, P.; De La Harpe, A.; Rebiere, J.

    1960-12-01

    Two stainless steel tubes were used (with diameters of 5 and 10 mm, lengths 400 and 600 mm respectively), heated electrically (50 Hz). The mixture flows from top to bottom. The work was carried out mainly on mixtures of high concentration (x > 0.1), at pressures between 50 and 60 kg/cm 2 , flowing as a liquid film on the walls of the tube with droplets suspended in the central current of steam. By analysis of the heat transfer laws the exchange mechanisms were established, and the conditions under which the critical heat flux may be exceeded without danger of actual burnout were determined. In this way high output concentrations (x s > 0.9) may be obtained. An attempt has been made to find out to what extent existing correlation formulae can be used to account for the phenomena observed. It is shown that those dealing with exchange coefficients can only be applied in a first approximation in cases where exchange by convection is preponderant, and only below the critical flux. The formulae proposed by WAPD and CISE do not give a satisfactory estimation of the critical heat flux, and the essential reasons for this inadequacy are explained. Lastly, the Martinelli and Nelson method may be used to an approximation of 30 per cent for the calculation of charge losses. (author) [fr

  7. Measuring of heat transfer coefficient

    Henningsen, Poul; Lindegren, Maria

    Subtask 3.4 Measuring of heat transfer coefficient Subtask 3.4.1 Design and setting up of tests to measure heat transfer coefficient Objective: Complementary testing methods together with the relevant experimental equipment are to be designed by the two partners involved in order to measure...... the heat transfer coefficient for a wide range of interface conditions in hot and warm forging processes. Subtask 3.4.2 Measurement of heat transfer coefficient The objective of subtask 3.4.2 is to determine heat transfer values for different interface conditions reflecting those typically operating in hot...

  8. Novel Method for Measuring the Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters Based on Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machine

    Zhijian Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The determinations of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, the direct determination requires complex detection devices and a series of standard experiments, which also wastes too much time and manpower. To address this problem, we propose machine learning models including artificial neural networks (ANNs and support vector machines (SVM to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient without a direct determination. Parameters that can be easily obtained by “portable test instruments” were set as independent variables, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, final temperature and angle between tubes and ground, while the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient determined by the detection device were set as dependent variables respectively. Nine hundred fifteen samples from in-service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters were used for training and testing the models. Results show that the multilayer feed-forward neural network (MLFN with 3 nodes is the best model for the prediction of heat collection rate and the general regression neural network (GRNN is the best model for the prediction of heat loss coefficient due to their low root mean square (RMS errors, short training times, and high prediction accuracies (under the tolerances of 30%, 20%, and 10%, respectively.

  9. Dependence of the coefficient of environmental thermal losses of radiation-absorbing thermal exchange panels of flat solar collectors for heating heat-transfer fluid from their average operating and ambient temperatures

    Avezova, N.R.; Avezov, R.R.

    2015-01-01

    The approximation formula is derived for calculating the normalized coefficient of thermal losses of flat solar collectors (FSCs) for heating heat-transfer fluid (HTF). These are used in hot water supply systems in the warmer part of the year, depending on the average working surface temperature of their radiation-absorbing thermal exchange panels (RATEPs) (t"-_w_s_r) and the ambient temperature (t_a_m_b) in their realistic variation range. (author)

  10. Heat transfer coefficient for boiling carbon dioxide

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen Høgaard; Jensen, Per Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop for boiling carbon dioxide (R744) flowing in a horizontal pipe has been measured. The calculated heat transfer coeeficient has been compared with the Chart correlation of Shah. The Chart Correlation predits too low heat transfer coefficient but the ratio...... between the measured and the calculated heat transfer coefficient is nearly constant and equal 1.9. With this factor the correlation predicts the measured data within 14% (RMS). The pressure drop is of the same order as the measuring uncertainty and the pressure drop has not been compared with correlation's....

  11. Heat transfer coefficient of cryotop during freezing.

    Li, W J; Zhou, X L; Wang, H S; Liu, B L; Dai, J J

    2013-01-01

    Cryotop is an efficient vitrification method for cryopreservation of oocytes. It has been widely used owing to its simple operation and high freezing rate. Recently, the heat transfer performance of cryotop was studied by numerical simulation in several studies. However, the range of heat transfer coefficient in the simulation is uncertain. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient for cryotop during freezing process was analyzed. The cooling rates of 40 percent ethylene glycol (EG) droplet in cryotop during freezing were measured by ultra-fast measurement system and calculated by numerical simulation at different value of heat transfer coefficient. Compared with the results obtained by two methods, the range of the heat transfer coefficient necessary for the numerical simulation of cryotop was determined, which is between 9000 W/(m(2)·K) and 10000 W/(m (2)·K).

  12. Ion heat conduction losses in Extrap

    Tennfors, E.

    1989-08-01

    The classical ion heat conduction losses in Extrap discharges are calculated using polynomial magnetic field profiles and compared to the power input. For polynomials matched to magnetic field profiles measured in present experiments, these losses are small. By varying the coefficients of the polynomials, a region is found, where the power input can balance the classical heat conduction losses. Each set of coefficients corresponds to values of the parameters F and Θ used in RFP physics. The region determines a region in an F-Θ diagram, including the usual RFP region but extending to higher values of Θ and βΘ

  13. Heat transfer coefficients during quenching of steels

    Hasan, H.S.; Jalil, J.M. [University of Technology, Department of Electromechanical Engineering, Baghdad (Iraq); Peet, M.J.; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [University of Cambridge, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    Heat transfer coefficients for quenching in water have been measured as a function of temperature using steel probes for a variety of iron alloys. The coefficients were derived from measured cooling curves combined with calculated heat-capacities. The resulting data were then used to calculate cooling curves using the finite volume method for a large steel sample and these curves have been demonstrated to be consistent with measured values for the large sample. Furthermore, by combining the estimated cooling curves with time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams it has been possible to predict the variation of hardness as a function of distance via the quench factor analysis. The work should prove useful in the heat treatment of the steels studied, some of which are in the development stage. (orig.)

  14. Winter-regime surface heat loss from heated streams

    Paily, P.P.; Macagno, E.O.; Kennedy, J.F.

    1974-01-01

    Evaluation of the rate of surface heat exchange between the water and air is a significant factor in any study of the thermal response of heated streams to heat inputs. Existing methods to determine the amount of heat transfer across the water surface are surveyed, and the different formulas developed for determining the heat exchange components are compiled. Heat-transfer models that have been proposed in the literature are reviewed, and a new linearized model for determining the rate of surface heat exchange is proposed. Generalized relations between the major climatological factors and the coefficients of the linearized heat-loss rate are established by multiple-regression analysis. The analysis is limited to cold-period conditions, in the sense that air temperatures below the freezing point of water only are considered in developing the regression equations. A computer program, using FORTRAN, is presented which enables the computation of the coefficients appearing in the linearized heat-loss rate for all combinations of the various climatological factors

  15. Measurement and modeling of interface heat transfer coefficients

    Rollett, A.D.; Lewis, H.D.; Dunn, P.S.

    1985-01-01

    The results of preliminary work on the modeling and measurement of the heat transfer coefficients of metal/mold interfaces is reported. The system investigated is the casting of uranium in graphite molds. The motivation for the work is primarily to improve the accuracy of process modeling of prototype mold designs at the Los Alamos Foundry. The evolution in design of a suitable mold for unidirectional solidification is described, illustrating the value of simulating mold designs prior to use. Experiment indicated a heat transfer coefficient of 2 kW/m 2 /K both with and without superheat. It was possible to distinguish between solidification due to the mold and that due to radiative heat loss. This permitted an experimental estimate of the emissivity, epsilon = 0.2, of the solidified metal

  16. Heat transfer direction dependence of heat transfer coefficients in annuli

    Prinsloo, Francois P. A.; Dirker, Jaco; Meyer, Josua P.

    2018-04-01

    In this experimental study the heat transfer phenomena in concentric annuli in tube-in-tube heat exchangers at different annular Reynolds numbers, annular diameter ratios, and inlet fluid temperatures using water were considered. Turbulent flow with Reynolds numbers ranging from 15,000 to 45,000, based on the average bulk fluid temperature was tested at annular diameter ratios of 0.327, 0.386, 0.409 and 0.483 with hydraulic diameters of 17.00, 22.98, 20.20 and 26.18 mm respectively. Both heated and cooled annuli were investigated by conducting tests at a range of inlet temperatures between 10 °C to 30 °C for heating cases, and 30 °C to 50 °C for cooling cases. Of special interest was the direct measurement of local wall temperatures on the heat transfer surface, which is often difficult to obtain and evasive in data-sets. Continuous verification and re-evaluation of temperatures measurements were performed via in-situ calibration. It is shown that inlet fluid temperature and the heat transfer direction play significant roles on the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient. A new adjusted Colburn j-factor definition is presented to describe the heating and cooling cases and is used to correlate the 894 test cases considered in this study.

  17. 24 CFR 3280.506 - Heat loss/heat gain.

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat loss/heat gain. 3280.506... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Thermal Protection § 3280.506 Heat loss/heat gain. The manufactured home heat loss/heat gain shall be determined by methods outlined in...

  18. Influence on Heat Transfer Coefficient of Heat Exchanger by Velocity and Heat Transfer Temperature Difference

    WANG Fang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aimed to insufficient heat transfer of heat exchanger, research the influence on the heat transfer coefficient impacted by velocity and heat transfer temperature difference of tube heat exchanger. According to the different heat transfer temperature difference and gas velocity,the experimental data were divided into group. Using the control variable method,the above two factors were analyzed separately. K一△T and k一:fitting curve were clone to obtain empirical function. The entire heat exchanger is as the study object,using numerical simulation methods,porous media,k一£model,second order upwind mode,and pressure一velocity coupling with SIMPLE algorithm,the entire heat exchanger temperature field and the heat transfer coefficient distribution were given. Finally the trend of the heat transfer coefficient effected by the above two factors was gotten.

  19. Experimental evaluation of heat transfer coefficients between radiant ceiling and room

    Causone, Francesco; Corgnati, Stefano P.; Filippi, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The heat transfer coefficients between radiant surfaces and room are influenced by several parameters: surfaces temperature distributions, internal gains, air movements. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the heat transfer coefficients between radiant ceiling and room in typical conditions...... of occupancy of an office or residential building. Internal gains were therefore simulated using heated cylinders and heat losses using cooled surfaces. Evaluations were developed by means of experimental tests in an environmental chamber. Heat transfer coefficient may be expressed separately for radiation...

  20. Transfer coefficients in elliptical tubes and plate fin heat exchangers

    Saboya, S.M.

    1979-09-01

    Mean transfer coefficients in elliptical tubes and plate fin heat exchangers were determined by application of heat and mass transfer analogy in conjunction with the naphthalene sublimation technique. The transfer coefficients are presented in a dimensionless form as functions of the Reynolds number. By using the least squares method analytical expressions for the transfer coefficients were determined with low scattering. (E.G.) [pt

  1. Experimental study of heat exchange coefficients, critical heat flux and charge losses, using water-steam mixtures in turbulent flow in a vertical tube; Etude experimentale des coefficients d'echanges thermiques, des flux de chaleur critiques et des pertes de charge avec des melanges eau-vapeur en ecoulement turbulent dans un tube vertical

    Perroud, P; De La Harpe, A; Rebiere, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-12-15

    Two stainless steel tubes were used (with diameters of 5 and 10 mm, lengths 400 and 600 mm respectively), heated electrically (50 Hz). The mixture flows from top to bottom. The work was carried out mainly on mixtures of high concentration (x > 0.1), at pressures between 50 and 60 kg/cm{sup 2}, flowing as a liquid film on the walls of the tube with droplets suspended in the central current of steam. By analysis of the heat transfer laws the exchange mechanisms were established, and the conditions under which the critical heat flux may be exceeded without danger of actual burnout were determined. In this way high output concentrations (x{sub s} > 0.9) may be obtained. An attempt has been made to find out to what extent existing correlation formulae can be used to account for the phenomena observed. It is shown that those dealing with exchange coefficients can only be applied in a first approximation in cases where exchange by convection is preponderant, and only below the critical flux. The formulae proposed by WAPD and CISE do not give a satisfactory estimation of the critical heat flux, and the essential reasons for this inadequacy are explained. Lastly, the Martinelli and Nelson method may be used to an approximation of 30 per cent for the calculation of charge losses. (author) [French] On a utilise deux tubes en acier inox (avec des diametres de 5 et 10 mm, et des longueurs respectives 400 et 600 mm) chauffes electriquement (50 Hz). Le melange s'ecoule de haut en bas. Les etudes ont porte plus specialement sur des melanges de titres eleves (x > 0,1) a des pressions comprises entre 60 et 90 kg/cm{sup 2} dont l'ecoulement se fait avec film liquide annulaire et gouttelettes en suspension dans le coeur de vapeur. Par l'analyse des lois de transfert de chaleur, on a precise les mecanismes d'echanges et l'on a d'autre part determine dans quelles conditions le flux de chaleur critique peut etre depasse sans danger de 'burnout' proprement dit. On peut ainsi obtenir des

  2. Heat losses through pipe connections in hot water stores

    Andersen, Elsa; Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2007-01-01

    The heat loss from pipe connections at the top of hot water storage tanks with and without a heat trap is investigated theoretically and compared to similar experimental investigations. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is used for the theoretical analysis. The investigations show that the heat...... loss from an ideally insulated pipe connected to the top of a hot water tank is mainly due to a natural convection flow in the pipe, that the heat loss coefficient of pipes connected to the top of a hot water tank is high, and that a heat trap can reduce the heat loss coefficient significantly. Further......, calculations show that the yearly thermal performance of solar domestic hot water systems is strongly reduced if the hot water tank has a thermal bridge located at the top of the tank....

  3. Non intrusive measurement of the convective heat transfer coefficient

    Rebay, M.; Mebarki, G.; Padet, J. [Reims Univ., Reims (France). Faculty of Science, GRESPI Thermomechanical Lab; Arfaoui, A. [Reims Univ., Reims (France). Faculty of Science, GRESPI Thermomechanical Lab; Tunis Univ., Tunis (Tunisia). Faculty of Science, EL MANAR, LETTM; Maad, B.R. [Tunis Univ., Tunis (Tunisia). Faculty of Science, EL MANAR, LETTM

    2010-07-01

    The efficiency of cooling methods in thermal systems such as radiators and heat exchangers must be improved in order to enhance performance. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients between a solid and a fluid is necessary for the control and the dimensioning of thermal systems. In this study, the pulsed photothermal method was used to measure the convective heat transfer coefficient on a solid-fluid interface, notably between an air flow and a heated slab mounted on a PVC flat plate. This configuration simulated the electronic air-cooling inside enclosures and racks. The influence of the deflector's inclination angle on the enhancement of heat transfer was investigated using 2 newly developed identification models. The first model was based on a constant heat transfer coefficient during the pulsed experiment, while the second, improved model was based on a variable heat transfer coefficient. The heat transfer coefficient was deduced from the evolution of the transient temperature induced by a sudden deposit of a luminous energy on the front face of the slab. Temperature evolutions were derived by infrared thermography, a camera for cartography and a detector for precise measurement in specific locations. The results show the improvement of measurement accuracies when using a model that considers the temporal evolution of the convective heat transfer coefficient. The deflection of air flow on the upper surface of the heated slab demonstrated better cooling of the slab by the deflection of air flow. 11 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  4. Analytical prediction of fuel assembly spacer grid loss coefficient

    Lim, J. S.; Nam, K. I.; Park, S. K.; Kwon, J. T.; Park, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    The analytical prediction model of the fuel assembly spacer grid pressure loss coefficient has been studied. The pressure loss of gap between the test section wall and spacer grid was separated from the current model and the different friction drag coefficient on spacer straps from high Reynolds number region were used to low Reynolds number region. The analytical model has been verified based on the hydraulic pressure drop test results for the spacer grids of three types for 5x5, 16x16(or 17x17) arrays. The analytical model predicts the pressure loss coefficients obtained from test results within the maximum errors of 12% and 7% for 5x5 test bundle and full size bundle, respectively, at Reynolds number 500,000 of the core operating condition. This result shows that the analytical model can be used for research and design change of the nuclear fuel assembly

  5. Measurement of heat transfer coefficient using termoanemometry methods

    Dančová, P.; Sitek, P.; Vít, T.

    2014-03-01

    This work deals with a measurement of heat transfer from a heated flat plate on which a synthetic jet impacts perpendicularly. Measurement of a heat transfer coefficient (HTC) is carried out using the hot wire anemometry method with glue film probe Dantec 55M47. The paper brings also results of velocity profiles measurements and turbulence intensity calculations.

  6. Measurement of heat transfer coefficient using termoanemometry methods

    Dančová P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with a measurement of heat transfer from a heated flat plate on which a synthetic jet impacts perpendicularly. Measurement of a heat transfer coefficient (HTC is carried out using the hot wire anemometry method with glue film probe Dantec 55M47. The paper brings also results of velocity profiles measurements and turbulence intensity calculations.

  7. Improving MODPRESS heat loss calculations for PWR pressurizers

    Ramos, Natalia V.; Lira, Carlos A. Brayner O.; Castrillho, Lazara S.

    2009-01-01

    The improvement of heat loss calculations in MODPRESS transient code for PWR pressurizer analysis is the main focus of this investigation. Initially, a heat loss model was built based on heat transfer coefficient (HTC) correlations obtained in handbooks of thermal engineering. A hand calculation for Neptunus experimental test number U47 yielded a thermal power loss of 11.2 kW against 17.3 kW given by MODPRESS at the same conditions, while the experimental estimate is given as 17 kW. This comparison is valid only for steady state or before starting the transient experiment, because MODPRESS does not update HTC's when the transient phase begins. Furthermore, it must be noted that MODPRESS heat transfer coefficients are adjusted to reproduce the experimental value of the specific type of pressurizer. After inserting the new routine for HTC's into MODPRESS, the heat loss was calculated as 11.4 kW, a value very close to the first estimate but far below 17 kW found in the U47 experiment. In this paper, the heat loss model and results will be described. Further research is being developed to find a more general HTC that allows the analysis of the effects of heat losses on transient behavior of Neptunus and IRIS pressurizers. (author)

  8. Modified loss coefficients in the determination of optimum generation scheduling

    Hazarika, D.; Bordoloi, P.K. (Assam Engineering Coll. (IN))

    1991-03-01

    A modified method has been evolved to form the loss coefficients of an electrical power system network by decoupling load and generation and thereby creating additional fictitious load buses. The system losses are then calculated and co-ordinated to arrive at an optimum scheduling of generation using the standard co-ordination equation. The method presented is superior to the ones currently available, in that it is applicable to a multimachine system with random variation of load and it accounts for limits in plant generations and line losses. The precise nature of results and the economy in the cost of energy production obtained by this method is quantified and presented. (author).

  9. Solution of heat equation with variable coefficient using derive

    Lebelo, RS

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the method of approximating solutions of partial differential equations with variable coefficients is studied. This is done by considering heat flow through a one-dimensional model with variable cross-sections. Two cases...

  10. Local heat transfer coefficient for turbulent flow in rod bundles

    Fernandez y Fernandez, E.; Carajilescov, P.

    1983-03-01

    The correlation of the local heat transfer coefficients in heated triangular array of rod bundles, in terms of the flow hydrodynamic parameters is presented. The analysis is made first for fluid with Prandtl numbers varying from moderated to high (Pr>0.2), and then extended to fluids with low Prandtl numbers (0.004 [pt

  11. Transmission Loss Calculation using A and B Loss Coefficients in Dynamic Economic Dispatch Problem

    Jethmalani, C. H. Ram; Dumpa, Poornima; Simon, Sishaj P.; Sundareswaran, K.

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes the performance of A-loss coefficients while evaluating transmission losses in a Dynamic Economic Dispatch (DED) Problem. The performance analysis is carried out by comparing the losses computed using nominal A loss coefficients and nominal B loss coefficients in reference with load flow solution obtained by standard Newton-Raphson (NR) method. Density based clustering method based on connected regions with sufficiently high density (DBSCAN) is employed in identifying the best regions of A and B loss coefficients. Based on the results obtained through cluster analysis, a novel approach in improving the accuracy of network loss calculation is proposed. Here, based on the change in per unit load values between the load intervals, loss coefficients are updated for calculating the transmission losses. The proposed algorithm is tested and validated on IEEE 6 bus system, IEEE 14 bus, system IEEE 30 bus system and IEEE 118 bus system. All simulations are carried out using SCILAB 5.4 (www.scilab.org) which is an open source software.

  12. Interpretation of Nonlinear Well Loss Coefficients for Rorabaugh (1953) Method.

    Kurtulus, B.; Yaylım, T. N.; Avşar

    2016-12-01

    Step drawdown test (SDT) are essential for hydrogeologist to determine aquifer loss and well loss parameters. In a SDT, different series of constant-discharges with incremental rates are conducted to obtain incremental drawdown into the pumping well. Pumping well efficiency (if the well is properly developed and designed), aquifer characteristics (transmissivity, storativity) and discharge-drawdown relationship can be derived from SDT. The well loss parameter directly associate with the well efficiency. The main problem is to determine the correct well loss parameter in order to estimate aquifer characteristics. Walton (1962) stated that the interpretation of the well efficiency is possible to determine the nonlinear head loss coefficient (C) with p equals to 2 and Walton (1962) presented a criteria that suggested the following terms: If C is less than 1800 m2/s5, the is properly developed and designed, If C is ranged from 1800 m2/s5 to 3600 m2/s5, the well has a mild deterioration, If C is greater than 3600 m2/s5, the well has a severe clogging. Until now, several well-known computer techniques such as Aqutesolv, AquiferWin32 , AquifertestPro can be found in the literature to evaluate well efficiency when exponential parameter (p) equals to 2. However, there exist a lack of information to evaluate well efficiency for different number of exponential parameter (p). Strategic Water Storage & Recovery (SWSR) Project in Liwa, Abu Dhabi is the leading and unique hydrogeology project in the world because of its both financial and scientific dimension. A total of 315 recovery wells have been drilled in pursuance of the scope of the SWSR project. A Universal Well Efficiency Criteria (UWEC) is developed using 315 Step Drawdown Test (SDT). UWEC is defined for different number of head loss equation coefficients. The results reveal that there is a strong correlation between non-linear well loss coefficient (C) and exponential parameter (p) up to a coefficient of determination

  13. Correlation of heat transfer coefficient in quenching process using ABAQUS

    Davare, Sandeep Kedarnath; Balachandran, G.; Singh, R. K. P.

    2018-04-01

    During the heat treatment by quenching in a liquid medium the convective heat transfer coefficient plays a crucial role in the extraction of heat. The heat extraction ultimately influences the cooling rate and hence the hardness and mechanical properties. A Finite Element analysis of quenching a simple flat copper sample with different orientation of sample and with different quenchant temperatures were carried out to check and verify the results obtained from the experiments. The heat transfer coefficient (HTC) was calculated from temperature history in a simple flat copper disc sample experimentally. This HTC data was further used as input to simulation software and the cooling curves were back calculated. The results obtained from software and using experimentation shows nearly consistent values.

  14. Heat loss from an open cavity

    McDonald, C.G. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (United States). Coll. of Engineering

    1995-12-01

    Cavity type receivers are used extensively in concentrating solar thermal energy collecting systems. The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP) in Shenandoah, Georgia is a large scale field test for the collection of solar thermal energy. The STEP experiment consists of a large field array of solar collectors used to supplement the process steam, cooling and other electrical power requirements of an adjacent knitwear manufacturing facility. The purpose of the tests, conducted for this study, was to isolate and quantify the radiative, conductive, and convective components of total heat loss, and to determine the effects of operating temperature, receiver angle, and aperture size on cavity heat loss. An analytical model for radiative heat loss was developed and compared with two other methods used to determine radiative heat loss. A proposed convective heat loss correlation, including effects of aperture size, receiver operating temperature, and receiver angle is presented. The resulting data is a source to evaluate the STEP measurements.

  15. Transfer coefficients for plate fin and elliptical tube heat exchangers

    Saboya, S.M.; Saboya, F.E.M.

    1981-01-01

    In order to determine transfer coefficients for plate fin and elliptical tube exchangers, mass transfer experiments have been performed using the naphthalene sublimation technique. By means of the heat-mass transfer analogy, the results can be converted to heat transfer results. The transfer coefficients were compared with those for circular tube exchangers and the comparison revealed no major differences. This is a positive outcome, since the use of elliptical tubes may reduce substantially the pressure drop, without affecting the transfer characteristics.(Author) [pt

  16. Heat transfer coefficient as parameter describing ability of insulating liquid to heat transfer

    Nadolny, Zbigniew; Gościński, Przemysław; Bródka, Bolesław

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the results of the measurements of heat transfer coefficient of insulating liquids used in transformers. The coefficient describes an ability of the liquid to heat transport. On the basis of the coefficient, effectiveness of cooling system of electric power devices can be estimated. Following liquids were used for the measurements: mineral oil, synthetic ester and natural ester. It was assumed that surface heat load is about 2500 W·m-2, which is equal the load of transformer windings. A height of heat element was 1.6 m, because it makes possible steady distribution of temperature on its surface. The measurements of heat transfer coefficient was made as a function of various position of heat element (vertical, horizontal). In frame of horizontal position of heat element, three suppositions were analysed: top, bottom, and side.

  17. Heat transfer coefficient as parameter describing ability of insulating liquid to heat transfer

    Nadolny Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the measurements of heat transfer coefficient of insulating liquids used in transformers. The coefficient describes an ability of the liquid to heat transport. On the basis of the coefficient, effectiveness of cooling system of electric power devices can be estimated. Following liquids were used for the measurements: mineral oil, synthetic ester and natural ester. It was assumed that surface heat load is about 2500 W·m-2, which is equal the load of transformer windings. A height of heat element was 1.6 m, because it makes possible steady distribution of temperature on its surface. The measurements of heat transfer coefficient was made as a function of various position of heat element (vertical, horizontal. In frame of horizontal position of heat element, three suppositions were analysed: top, bottom, and side.

  18. CFD Extraction of Heat Transfer Coefficient in Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Current reduced-order thermal model for cryogenic propellant tanks is based on correlations built for flat plates collected in the 1950's. The use of these correlations suffers from inaccurate geometry representation; inaccurate gravity orientation; ambiguous length scale; and lack of detailed validation. This study uses first-principles based CFD methodology to compute heat transfer from the tank wall to the cryogenic fluids and extracts and correlates the equivalent heat transfer coefficient to support reduced-order thermal model. The CFD tool was first validated against available experimental data and commonly used correlations for natural convection along a vertically heated wall. Good agreements between the present prediction and experimental data have been found for flows in laminar as well turbulent regimes. The convective heat transfer between the tank wall and cryogenic propellant, and that between the tank wall and ullage gas were then simulated. The results showed that the commonly used heat transfer correlations for either vertical or horizontal plate over-predict heat transfer rate for the cryogenic tank, in some cases by as much as one order of magnitude. A characteristic length scale has been defined that can correlate all heat transfer coefficients for different fill levels into a single curve. This curve can be used for the reduced-order heat transfer model analysis.

  19. Turbulent energy losses during orchard heating

    Bland, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    Two rapid-response drag anemometers and low time constant thermocouples, all at 4 m above a heated orchard floor, sampled wind component in the vertical direction and temperature at 30 Hz. The turbulent heat flux calculated revealed not more than 10% of the heat lost from the orchard was via turbulent transort. The observations failed to support previous estimates that at least a third of the energy applied was lost through turbulent transport. Underestimation of heat loss due to mean flow and a newly revealed flux due to spatial variations in the mean flow may explain the unaccounted for loss.

  20. Effect of rolling motion on the expansion and contraction loss coefficients

    Yan, B.H.; Gu, H.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The expansion and contraction loss coefficients in rolling motion are analyzed. ► Effects of rolling motion on the expansion and contraction loss coefficients are different. ► The spanwise and transverse additional forces contribute slightly to the local loss. ► The oscillations of loss coefficients increase as the strengthening of rolling motion. - Abstract: The sudden expansion and sudden contraction loss coefficients in rolling motion are investigated with CFD code FLUENT. The calculation results are validated with experimental and theoretical results in steady state. The effects of rolling motion on the expansion and contraction loss coefficients are different. The effects of spanwise and transverse additional forces on the expansion and contraction loss coefficients are weak. The effect of velocity oscillation on the contraction loss coefficient is more significant than that on the expansion loss coefficient. The oscillation of local loss coefficient also becomes more and more irregular as the strengthening of rolling motion

  1. Estimation of bulk transfer coefficient for latent heat flux (Ce)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    The bulk transfer coefficient for latent heat flux (Ce) has been estimated over the Arabian Sea from the moisture budget during the pre-monsoon season of 1988. The computations have been made over two regions (A: 0-8 degrees N: 60-68 degrees E: B: 0...

  2. Enhancement of pool boiling heat transfer coefficients using carbon nanotubes

    Park, Ki Jung; Jung, Dong Soo

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the effect of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on nucleate boiling heat transfer is investigated. Three refrigerants of R22, R123, R134a, and water were used as working fluids and 1.0 vol.% of CNTs was added to the working fluids to examine the effect of CNTs. Experimental apparatus was composed of a stainless steel vessel and a plain horizontal tube heated by a cartridge heater. All data were obtained at the pool temperature of 7 .deg. C for all refrigerants and 100 .deg. C for water in the heat flux range of 10∼80 kW/m 2 . Test results showed that CNTs increase nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficients for all fluids. Especially, large enhancement was observed at low heat fluxes of less than 30 kW/m 2 . With increasing heat flux, however, the enhancement was suppressed due to vigorous bubble generation. Fouling on the heat transfer surface was not observed during the course of this study. Optimum quantity and type of CNTs and their dispersion should be examined for their commercial application to enhance nucleate boiling heat transfer in many applications

  3. Effect of various refining processes for Kenaf Bast non-wood pulp fibers suspensions on heat transfer coefficient in circular pipe heat exchanger

    Ahmed, Syed Muzamil; Kazi, S. N.; Khan, Ghulamullah; Sadri, Rad; Dahari, Mahidzal; Zubir, M. N. M.; Sayuti, M.; Ahmad, Pervaiz; Ibrahim, Rushdan

    2018-03-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were obtained for a range of non-wood kenaf bast pulp fiber suspensions flowing through a circular pipe heat exchanger test loop. The data were produced over a selected temperature and range of flow rates from the flow loop. It was found that the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient of a fiber suspension is dependent on characteristics, concentration and pulping method of fiber. It was observed that at low concentration and high flow rates, the heat transfer coefficient values of suspensions were observed higher than that of the heat transfer coefficient values of water, on the other hand the heat transfer coefficient values of suspensions decreases at low flow rates and with the increase of their concentration. The heat transfer were affected by varying fiber characteristics, such as fiber length, fiber flexibility, fiber chemical and mechanical treatment as well as different pulping methods used to liberate the fibers. Heat transfer coefficient was decreased with the increase of fiber flexibility which was also observed by previous researchers. In the present work, the characteristics of fibers are correlated with the heat transfer coefficient of suspensions of the fibers. Deviations in fiber properties can be monitored from the flowing fiber suspensions by measuring heat transfer coefficient to adjust the degree of fiber refining treatment so that papers made from those fibers will be more uniform, consistent, within the product specification and retard the paper production loss.

  4. Targeting the maximum heat recovery for systems with heat losses and heat gains

    Wan Alwi, Sharifah Rafidah; Lee, Carmen Kar Mun; Lee, Kim Yau; Abd Manan, Zainuddin; Fraser, Duncan M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Illustration of heat gains and losses from process streams. - Highlights: • Maximising energy savings through heat losses or gains. • Identifying location where insulation can be avoided. • Heuristics to maximise heat losses or gains. • Targeting heat losses or gains using the extended STEP technique and HEAT diagram. - Abstract: Process Integration using the Pinch Analysis technique has been widely used as a tool for the optimal design of heat exchanger networks (HENs). The Composite Curves and the Stream Temperature versus Enthalpy Plot (STEP) are among the graphical tools used to target the maximum heat recovery for a HEN. However, these tools assume that heat losses and heat gains are negligible. This work presents an approach that considers heat losses and heat gains during the establishment of the minimum utility targets. The STEP method, which is plotted based on the individual, as opposed to the composite streams, has been extended to consider the effect of heat losses and heat gains during stream matching. Several rules to guide the proper location of pipe insulation, and the appropriate procedure for stream shifting have been introduced in order to minimise the heat losses and maximise the heat gains. Application of the method on two case studies shows that considering heat losses and heat gains yield more realistic utility targets and help reduce both the insulation capital cost and utility cost of a HEN

  5. Efficiencies and coefficients of performance of heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps with friction: a universal limiting behavior.

    Bizarro, João P S; Rodrigues, Paulo

    2012-11-01

    For work-producing heat engines, or work-consuming refrigerators and heat pumps, the percentage decrease caused by friction in their efficiencies, or coefficients of performance (COP's), is approximately given by the ratio W(fric)/W between the work spent against friction forces and the work performed by, or delivered to, the working fluid. This universal scaling, which applies in the limit of small friction (W(fric)/W heat-engine efficiencies), allows a simple and quick estimate of the impact that friction losses can have on the FOM's of thermal engines and plants, or of the level of those losses from the observed and predicted FOM's. In the case of refrigerators and heat pumps, if W(fric)/W heat engines), the COP percentage decrease due to friction approaches asymptotically (W(fric)/W)/(1+W(fric)/W) instead of W(fric)/W. Estimates for the level of frictional losses using the Carnot (or, for heat engines and power plants only, the Curzon-Ahlborn) predictions and observed FOM's of real power plants, heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps show that they usually operate in domains where these behaviors are valid.

  6. Local heat transfer coefficient in a fluidized bed

    Al-Busoul, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study for the local heat transfer coefficient. The experiments was conducted inside a reactor with inner diameter (I D = 142mm) at atmospheric conditions (temperature mean value = 29 deg.) The bed was heated by means of a parochial electric heater with a diameter of (d h = 29 mm) and a constant power of 5W. The following factors varied: particles type and diameter, fluid velocity, bed height and heater position inside the reactor. The results were presented and discussed. (author). 15 refs., 7 figs

  7. Heat transfer coefficient between UO2 and Zircaloy-2

    Ross, A.M.; Stoute, R.L.

    1962-06-01

    This paper provides some experimental values of the heat-transfer coefficient between UO 2 and Zircaloy-2 surfaces in contact under conditions of interfacial pressure, temperature, surface roughness and interface atmosphere, that are relevant to UO 2 /Zircaloy-2 fuel elements operating in pressurized-water power reactors. Coefficients were obtained from eight UO 2 / Zircaloy-2 pairs in atmospheres of helium, argon, krypton or xenon, at atmosphere pressure and in vacuum. Interfacial pressures were varied from 50 to 550 kgf/cm 2 while surface roughness heights were in the range 0.2 x 10 -4 to 3.5 x 10 -4 cm. The effect on the coefficients of cycling the interfacial pressure, of interface gas pressure and of temperature were examined. The experimental values of the coefficients were used to test the predictions of expressions for the heat-transfer between two solids in contact. For the particular UO 2 / Zircaloy-2 pairs examined, numerical values were assigned to several parameters that related the surface roughnesses to either the radius of solid/solid contact spots or to the mean thickness of the interface voids and that accounted for the imperfect accommodation of the void gas on the test surfaces. (author)

  8. Identification of the Heat Transfer Coefficient at the Charge Surface Heated on the Chamber Furnace

    Gołdasz A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The inverse method was applied to determine the heat flux reaching the charge surface. The inverse solution was based upon finding the minimum of the error norm between the measured and calculated temperatures. The charge temperature field was calculated with the finite element method by solving the heat transfer equation for a square charge made of 15HM steel heated on all its surfaces. On the basis of the mean value of heat flux, the value of the heat transfer coefficient at each surface was determined depending on the surface temperature of the material heated.

  9. A correlation to the heat transfer coefficient in nucleate boiling

    Ribatski, Gherhardt; Jabardo, Jose M. Saiz

    1999-01-01

    Nucleate boiling heat transfer is a complex phenomenon, making the development of a correlation for the heat transfer coefficient rather cumbersome due to the number of physical parameters involved in it. Some authors have followed a pragmatic approach to the problem by correlating the heat transfer coefficient in terms of reduced primitive properties. Two of the most knowledgeable authors who have followed this approach are Gorenflo and Cooper. Comparisons have been performed among results from the correlations proposed by these researchers and experimental results obtained elsewhere for refrigerants R-11, R-113 and R-114. These comparisons have shown that Cooper's correlation is best fitted for halocarbon refrigerants. The correlation proposed by Gorenflo ads the difficulty of including a numerical factor specific for each fluid. Leiner modified Gorenflo's correlation to determine the numerical factor as a function of known physical parameters of the fluid. In present study, the form of this function has been investigated for halocarbon refrigerants. The obtained correlation is written in terms of the following parameters: reduced pressure, eccentric and compressibility factors at the critical state, and a dimensionless specific heat of the vapor phase. The correlation compares well with experimental results. (author)

  10. Heat Transfer Coefficient Variations in Nuclear Fuel Rod Bundles

    Conner, Michael E.; Holloway, Mary V.

    2007-01-01

    The single-phase heat transfer performance of a PWR nuclear fuel rod bundle is enhanced by the use of mixing vanes attached to the downstream edges of the support grid straps. This improved single-phase performance will delay the onset of nucleate boiling, thereby reducing corrosion and delaying crud-related issues. This paper presents the variation in measured single-phase heat transfer coefficients (HTC) for several grid designs. Then, this variation is compared with observations of actual in-core crud patterns. While crud deposition is a function of a number of parameters including rod heat flux, the HTC is assumed to be a primary factor in explaining why crud deposition is a local phenomenon on nuclear fuel rods. The data from this study will be used to examine this assumption by providing a comparison between HTC variations and crud deposition patterns. (authors)

  11. Heat transfer coefficient in pool boiling for an electrically heated tube at various inclinations

    Fahmy, A.S.A.; Mariy, A.H.; Mahmoud, S.I.; Ibrahim, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out study the behaviour of heat transfer in pool boiling from a vertical and inclined heated tube at atmospheric pressure. An imperial correlation joining the different parameters affecting the heat transfer coefficient in pool boiling for an electrically heated tube at various inclinations is developed. Two test sections (zircaloy-4 and stainless steel) of 16 n n outer diameter and 120 nm length are investigated. Four levels of heat flux are used for heating the two lest sections (e.g. 381, 518, 721 and 929 k.watt/n 2). The maximum surface temperature achieved is 146.5 degree c for both materials, and the maximum bulk temperature is 95 degree C. It is found that the average heat transfer coefficient is inversely proportional with heated length l, where it reaches a constant value in the horizontal position. The heat transfer coefficient curves at various inclinations with respect to the heated tube length pass around one point which is defined as limit length

  12. Thermal properties and heat transfer coefficients in cryogenic cooling

    Biddulph, M. W.; Burford, R. P.

    This paper considers two aspects of the design of the cooling stage of the process known as cryogenic recycling. This process uses liquid nitrogen to embrittle certain materials before grinding and subsequent separation. It is being increasingly used in materials recycling. A simple method of establishing thermal diffusivity values of materials of interest by using cooling curves is described. These values are important for effective cooler design. In addition values of convective heat transfer coefficient have been determined in an operating inclined, rotating cylindrical cooler operating on scrap car tyres. These will also be useful for cooler design methods.

  13. Thermal stratification in a hot water tank established by heat loss from the tank

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents numerical investigations of thermal stratification in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank established by standby heat loss from the tank. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the tank during cooling caused by standby heat loss are calculated by means of validated...... computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The measured heat loss coefficient for the different parts of the tank is used as input to the CFD model. Parametric studies are carried out using the validated models to investigate the influence on thermal stratification of the tank by the downward flow...... the heat loss from the tank sides will be distributed at different levels of the tank at different thermal conditions. The results show that 20–55% of the side heat loss drops to layers below in the part of the tank without the presence of thermal stratification. A heat loss removal factor is introduced...

  14. Estimation of the heat transfer coefficient in melt spinning process

    Tkatch, V I; Maksimov, V V; Grishin, A M

    2009-01-01

    Effect of the quenching wheel velocity in the range 20.7-26.5 m/s on the cooling rate as well as on the structure and microtopology of the contact surfaces of the glass-forming FeNiPB melt-spun ribbons has been experimentally studied. Both the values of the cooling rate and heat transfer coefficient at the wheel-ribbon interface estimated from the temperature vs. time curves recorded during melt spinning runs are in the ranges (1.6-5.2)x10 6 K/s and (2.8-5.2)x10 5 Wm -2 K -1 , respectively, for ribbon thicknesses of 31.4-22.0 μm. It was found that the density of the air pockets at the underside surface of ribbons decreases while its average depth remains essentially unchanged with the wheel velocity. Using the surface quality parameters the values of the heat transfer coefficient in the areas of direct ribbon-wheel contact were evaluated to be ranging from 5.75 to 6.65x10 5 Wm -2 K -1 .

  15. Measurement of condensation heat transfer coefficients in a steam chamber using a variable conductance heat pipe

    Robinson, J.A.; Windebank, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer coefficients have been measured in a pressurised chamber containing a mixture of saturated steam and air. They were determined as a function of the air-steam ratio in nominally stagnant conditions. The effect of pressure is assessed and preliminary measurements with a forced convective component of velocity are presented. A novel measurement technique was adopted, namely to use a vertical heat pipe whose conductance could easily be varied. It transported heat from an evaporator located inside the chamber to a condenser section outside, at which the heat flow was measured. Heat flux at the evaporator could then be determined and a condensation heat transfer coefficient derived. The range of coefficients covered was from 150 W/m 2 0 K at high air-steam ratios to 20,000 W/m 2 0 K in pure steam. Results show that increasing either total pressure or velocity enhances condensation heat transfer over the range of air/steam ratios considered. (author)

  16. Experimentally Determined Heat Transfer Coefficients for Spacesuit Liquid Cooled Garments

    Bue, Grant; Watts, Carly; Rhodes, Richard; Anchondo, Ian; Westheimer, David; Campbell, Colin; Vonau, Walt; Vogel, Matt; Conger, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    A Human-In-The-Loop (HITL) Portable Life Support System 2.0 (PLSS 2.0) test has been conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center in the PLSS Development Laboratory from October 27, 2014 to December 19, 2014. These closed-loop tests of the PLSS 2.0 system integrated with human subjects in the Mark III Suit at 3.7 psi to 4.3 psi above ambient pressure performing treadmill exercise at various metabolic rates from standing rest to 3000 BTU/hr (880 W). The bulk of the PLSS 2.0 was at ambient pressure but effluent water vapor from the Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) and the Auxiliary Membrane Evaporator (Mini-ME), and effluent carbon dioxide from the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) were ported to vacuum to test performance of these components in flight-like conditions. One of the objectives of this test was to determine the heat transfer coefficient (UA) of the Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG). The UA, an important factor for modeling the heat rejection of an LCG, was determined in a variety of conditions by varying inlet water temperature, flowrate, and metabolic rate. Three LCG configurations were tested: the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) LCG, the Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) LCG, and the OSS auxiliary LCG. Other factors influencing accurate UA determination, such as overall heat balance, LCG fit, and the skin temperature measurement, will also be discussed.

  17. Comparação do Coeficiente Global de Perdas de Calor para casa de vegetação aquecida usando diferentes técnicas para eficiência energética Comparison of overall heat loss coefficient to warm greenhouse applying energy saving techiniques

    Celso E. L. de Oliveira

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available O Coeficiente Global de Perdas de Calor (U permite o equacionamento das necessidades térmicas de uma casa de vegetação climatizada. No presente trabalho, determinou-se esse coeficiente cujo referencial foi uma casa de vegetação localizada em Madri (Espanha, em que foram utilizadas medidas noturnas de temperatura do ar no interior, no exterior, bem como o consumo de energia para aquecimento. As comparações entre as técnicas de aquecimento utilizadas foram: solo radiante e aerotermos combinados com duas técnicas que visavam a promover melhor aproveitamento térmico, ou seja, a utilização de cobertura plástica formando dupla capa ou a utilização de túnel plástico. Os menores coeficientes foram conseguidos para a utilização de solo radiante com túnel e aerotermos com dupla capa com 7,19 W m-2 ºC-1 e 9,11 W m-2 ºC-1, respectivamente; o maior valor dentre os coeficientes nas condições estudadas foi 15,13 W m-2 ºC-1 ao considerar o uso de aerotermos sem utilização de plásticos. Conclui-se, portanto, que os resultados comprovam o melhor rendimento térmico para as técnicas ensaiadas.The Global Heat Loss Coefficient (U allows some answers about thermal requirements of climatic greenhouse. This trial determined this coefficient for a greenhouse in Madrid (Spain where night measurements of inside and outside air temperature as well as energy consumption to heat were used. Comparisons were accomplished among the used heating techniques as: radiant floor and heat fan combined with two techniques aiming to promote a better thermal which means the use of a plastic covering forming a double couple or the use of a plastic tunnel. The lowest coefficients for the use of radiant soil with tunnel and heat fan with double couple were respectively 7.19 W m-2 ºC-1 and 9.11 W m-2 ºC-1 and the largest value was 15.13 W m-2 ºC-1 for the heat fan use without plastics. Therefore, the results registered best thermal efficiency for the tested

  18. Evaluation of external heat loss from a small-scale expander used in organic Rankine cycle

    Li Jing; Pei Gang; Li Yunzhu; Ji Jie

    2011-01-01

    With the scaling down of the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), the engine shaft power is not only determined by the enthalpy drop in the expansion process but also the external heat loss from the expander. Theoretical and experimental support in evaluating small-scale expander heat loss is rare. This paper presents a quantitative study on the convection, radiation, and conduction heat transfer from a kW-scale expander. A mathematical model is built and validated. The results show that the external radiative or convective heat loss coefficient was about 3.2 or 7.0 W/K.m 2 when the ORC operated around 100 o C. Radiative and convective heat loss coefficients increased as the expander operation temperature increased. Conductive heat loss due to the connection between the expander and the support accounted for a large proportion of the total heat loss. The fitting relationships between heat loss and mean temperature difference were established. It is suggested that low conductivity material be embodied in the support of expander. Mattress insulation for compact expander could be eliminated when the operation temperature is around 100 o C. - Highlights: → A close examination of external heat loss from a small expander is presented. → Theoretical analysis and experimental test were conducted. → The established formulas can be applied to other small ORC expanders. → The results are useful in further research of small-scale ORC.

  19. Human local and total heat losses in different temperature.

    Wang, Lijuan; Yin, Hui; Di, Yuhui; Liu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of operative temperature on the local and total heat losses, and the relationship between the heat loss and thermal sensation. 10 local parts of head, neck, chest, abdomen, upper arm, forearm, hand, thigh, leg and foot are selected. In all these parts, convection, radiation, evaporation, respiration, conduction and diffusion heat losses are analyzed when operative temperature is 23, 28, 33 and 37 °C. The local heat losses show that the radiation and convection heat losses are mainly affected by the area of local body, and the heat loss of the thigh is the most in the ten parts. The evaporation heat loss is mainly affected by the distribution of sweat gland, and the heat loss of the chest is the most. The total heat loss of the local body shows that in low temperature, the thigh, leg and chest have much heat loss, while in high temperature, the chest, abdomen, thigh and head have great heat loss, which are useful for clothing design. The heat losses of the whole body show that as the operative temperature increases, the radiation and convection heat losses decrease, the heat losses of conduction, respiration, and diffusion are almost constant, and the evaporation heat loss increases. By comparison, the heat loss ratios of the radiation, convection and sweat evaporation, are in agreement with the previous researches. At last, the formula about the heat loss ratio of convection and radiation is derived. It's useful for thermal comfort evaluation and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of the internal heat losses in a thermoelectric generator

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn; Eriksen, Dan

    2014-01-01

    and radiative heat losses, including surface to surface radiation. For radiative heat losses it is shown that for the temperatures considered here, surface to ambient radiation is a good approximation of the heat loss. For conductive heat transfer the module efficiency is shown to be comparable to the case...... of radiative losses. Finally, heat losses due to internal natural convection in the module is shown to be negligible for the millimetre sized modules considered here. The combined case of radiative and conductive heat transfer resulted in the lowest efficiency. The optimized load resistance is found...... to decrease for increased heat loss. The leg dimensions are varied for all heat losses cases and it is shown that the ideal way to construct a TEG module with minimal heat losses and maximum efficiency is to either use a good insulating material between the legs or evacuate the module completely, and use...

  1. The Heat Transfer Coefficient of Recycled Concrete Bricks Combination with EPS Insulation Board Wall

    Jianhua Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Four tectonic forms samples were conducted to test their heat transfer coefficients. By analyzing and comparing the test values and theoretical values of the heat transfer coefficient, a corrected-value calculation method for determining the heat transfer coefficient was proposed; the proposed method was proved to be reasonably correct. The results indicated that the recycled concrete brick wall heat transfer coefficient is higher than that of the clay brick wall, the heat transfer coefficient of recycled concrete brick wall could be effectively reduced when combined with the EPS insulation board, and the sandwich insulation type was better than that of external thermal insulation type.

  2. Assessment of Real Heat Transfer Coefficients through Shell and Tube and Plate Heat Exchangers

    Dan CONSTANTINESCU

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a procedure used in the assessment of the real heat transfer characteristic of shell and tube and plate heat exchangers. The theoretical fundamentals of the procedure are introduced as well as the measured data collection and processing. The theoretical analysis is focused on the adoption of criterial equations which, subjected to certain verification criteria presented in the paper, provide the most credible value of the convection heat transfer coefficients inside the circular and flat tubes. In the end two case studies are presented, one concerning a shell and tube heat exchanger operational at INCERC Thermal Substation and the other concerning a plate heat exchanger tested on the Laboratory Stand of the Department of Building Services and Efficient Use of Energy in Buildings of INCERC Bucharest.

  3. Natural convection heat transfer coefficient for newborn baby - Thermal manikin assessed convective heat loses

    Ostrowski, Ziemowit; Rojczyk, Marek

    2017-11-01

    The energy balance and heat exchange for newborn baby in radiant warmer environment are considered. The present study was performed to assess the body dry heat loss from an infant in radiant warmer, using copper cast anthropomorphic thermal manikin and controlled climate chamber laboratory setup. The total body dry heat losses were measured for varying manikin surface temperatures (nine levels between 32.5 °C and 40.1 °C) and ambient air temperatures (five levels between 23.5 °C and 29.7 °C). Radiant heat losses were estimated based on measured climate chamber wall temperatures. After subtracting radiant part, resulting convective heat loses were compared with computed ones (based on Nu correlations for common geometries). Simplified geometry of newborn baby was represented as: (a) single cylinder and (b) weighted sum of 5 cylinders and sphere. The predicted values are significantly overestimated relative to measured ones by: 28.8% (SD 23.5%) for (a) and 40.9% (SD 25.2%) for (b). This showed that use of adopted general purpose correlations for approximation of convective heat losses of newborn baby can lead to substantial errors. Hence, new Nu number correlating equation is proposed. The mean error introduced by proposed correlation was reduced to 1.4% (SD 11.97%), i.e. no significant overestimation. The thermal manikin appears to provide a precise method for the noninvasive assessment of thermal conditions in neonatal care.

  4. Heat losses in power boilers caused by thermal bridges

    Kocot Monika

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the analysis of heat losses caused by thermal bridges that occur in the steam boiler OP-140 is presented. Identification of these bridges were conducted with use of thermographic camera. Heat losses were evaluated based on methodology of VDI 4610 standard, but instead of its simplified equations, criterial equations based on Nusselt number were used. Obtained values of annual heat losses and heat flux density corresponding to the fully insulated boiler surfaces were compared to heat losses generated by thermal bridges located in the same areas. The emphasis is put on the role of industrial insulation in heat losses reduction.

  5. Heat loss by helicity injection in spheromaks

    Fowler, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented for spheromak buildup and decay including thermal diffusivity associated with magnetic turbulence during helicity injection. It is shown that heat loss by magnetic turbulence scales more favorably than gyroBohm transport. Thus gyroBohm scaling for the proposed ignition experiment would be the conservative choice, though present experiments may be dominated by magnetic turbulence. Because of a change in boundary conditions when the gun is turned off, the model may account for the observed increase in electron temperature in CTX after turnoff

  6. Condensing heat transfer following a loss-of-coolant accident

    Krotiuk, W.J.; Rubin, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    A new method for calculating the steam mass condensation energy removal rates on cold surfaces in contact with an air-steam mixture has been developed. This method is based on the principles of mass diffusion of steam from an area of high concentration to the condensing surface, which is an area of low steam concentration. This new method of calculating mass condensation has been programmed into the CONTEMPT-LT Mod 26 computer code, which calculates the pressure and temperature transients inside a light water reactor containment following a loss-of-coolant accident. The condensing heat transfer coefficient predicted by the mass diffusion method is compared to existing semi-empirical correlations and to the experimental results of the Carolinas Virginia Tube Reactor Containment natural decay test. Closer agreement with test results is shown in the calculation of containment pressure, temperature, and heat sink surface temperature using the mass diffusion condensation method than when using any existing semi-empirical correlation

  7. Semi-empirical model for heat transfer coefficient in liquid metal turbulent flow

    Fernandez y Fernandez, E.; Carajilescov, P.

    1982-01-01

    The heat transfer by forced convection in a metal liquid turbulent flow for circular ducts is analyzed. An analogy between the momentum and heat in the wall surface, is determined, aiming to determine an expression for heat transfer coefficient in function of the friction coefficient. (E.G.) [pt

  8. Buoyancy driven flow in a hot water tank due to standby heat loss

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Results of experimental and numerical investigations of thermal behavior in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank due to standby heat loss of the tank are presented. The effect of standby heat loss on temperature distribution in the tank is investigated experimentally on a slim 150l tank...... show that the CFD model predicts satisfactorily water temperatures at different levels of the tank during cooling by standby heat loss. It is elucidated how the downward buoyancy driven flow along the tank wall is established by the heat loss from the tank sides and how the natural convection flow...... with a height to diameter ratio of 5. A tank with uniform temperatures and with thermal stratification is studied. A detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the tank is developed to calculate the natural convection flow in the tank. The distribution of the heat loss coefficient for the different...

  9. Effect of design and operation parameters on heat transfer coefficient in condensers

    Eskin, N.; Arslan, G.; Balci, T.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate and optimum usage of energy sources is gaining importance all over the world due to the increase of energy need and limited energy sources. Increasing condenser efficiency, reduce both the dimensions and the material usage and also the investment cost of the devices. This can be maintained by increasing the heat transfer coefficient in condensers. Generally, tubes having plain inner surfaces are mounted horizontally in serpentine type condenser applications and due to the performance loss results from the congestion in serpentine connections, vertical tube mounting is not preferred. Due to the complexity of the two-phase flow, a single set of correlation for heat transfer cannot be used. Average and local heat transfer coefficient for condensers are determined. Moreover, for each experiments flow pattern is determined and the validity of the correlations are compared according to that flow pattern. In Table 2, some of the experiments for R134a are listed. Local heat transfer coefficient is also important for condenser design. As a result, to design effective condensers the accuracy of the correlations is very important. When all the experiments are taken into account, it is seen that deviation of the correlations differs according to the refrigerant type, tube dimensions, mass flux, saturation temperature and flow pattern. For high mass flux (>400 kg/m 2 s) Traviss (1973) correlation failed. For small diameters (<3.14 mm) Tandon (1985) correlation estimate the heat transfer coefficient with a high deviation. Most accurate results are obtained for Akers et al. (1959), M.M. Shah (1978), Cavallini and Zecchlin (1974), J.R. Thome - J. El Hajal - A. Cavallini (2003) correlations. For high mass flux and annular flow, M.M. Shah (1978) correlation estimates the heat transfer coefficient with high precision. However, as the tube diameter decrease, this deviation increases. For small tube diameter such as 0.691 mm Cavallini and Zecchlin (1974) gives the most

  10. Preliminary Experimental Study on Pressure Loss Coefficients of Exhaust Manifold Junction

    Xiao-lu Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow characteristic of exhaust system has an important impact on inlet boundary of the turbine. In this paper, high speed flow in a diesel exhaust manifold junction was tested and simulated. The pressure loss coefficient of the junction flow was analyzed. The steady experimental results indicated that both of static pressure loss coefficients L13 and L23 first increased and then decreased with the increase of mass flow ratio of lateral branch and public manifold. The total pressure loss coefficient K13 always increased with the increase of mass flow ratio of junctions 1 and 3. The total pressure loss coefficient K23 first increased and then decreased with the increase of mass flow ratio of junctions 2 and 3. These pressure loss coefficients of the exhaust pipe junctions can be used in exhaust flow and turbine inlet boundary conditions analysis. In addition, simulating calculation was conducted to analyze the effect of branch angle on total pressure loss coefficient. According to the calculation results, total pressure loss coefficient was almost the same at low mass flow rate of branch manifold 1 but increased with lateral branch angle at high mass flow rate of branch manifold 1.

  11. Heat and mass transfer coefficients and modeling of infrared drying of banana slices

    Fernanda Machado Baptestini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Banana is one of the most consumed fruits in the world, having a large part of its production performed in tropical countries. This product possesses a wide range of vitamins and minerals, being an important component of the alimentation worldwide. However, the shelf life of bananas is short, thus requiring procedures to prevent the quality loss and increase the shelf life. One of these procedures widely used is drying. This work aimed to study the infrared drying process of banana slices (cv. Prata and determine the heat and mass transfer coefficients of this process. In addition, effective diffusion coefficient and relationship between ripening stages of banana and drying were obtained. Banana slices at four different ripening stages were dried using a dryer with infrared heating source with four different temperatures (65, 75, 85, and 95 ºC. Midilli model was the one that best represented infrared drying of banana slices. Heat and mass transfer coefficients varied, respectively, between 46.84 and 70.54 W m-2 K-1 and 0.040 to 0.0632 m s-1 for temperature range, at the different ripening stages. Effective diffusion coefficient ranged from 1.96 to 3.59 × 10-15 m² s-1. Activation energy encountered were 16.392, 29.531, 23.194, and 25.206 kJ mol-1 for 2nd, 3rd, 5th, and 7th ripening stages, respectively. Ripening stages did not affect the infrared drying of bananas.

  12. Development of Falling Film Heat Transfer Coefficient for Industrial Chemical Processes Evaporator Design

    Shahzad, Muhammad Wakil; Burhan, Muhammad; Ng, Kim Choon

    2018-01-01

    In falling film evaporators, the overall heat transfer coefficient is controlled by film thickness, velocity, liquid properties and the temperature differential across the film layer. This chapter presents the heat transfer behaviour for evaporative

  13. Development of a model to calculate the overall heat transfer coefficient of greenhouse covers

    Rasheed, A.; Lee, J. W.; Lee, H.L.

    2017-07-01

    A Building Energy Simulation (BES) model based on TRNSYS, was developed to investigate the overall heat transfer coefficient (U-value) of greenhouse covers including polyethylene (PE), polycarbonate (PC), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and horticultural glass (HG). This was used to determine the influences of inside-to-outside temperature difference, wind speed, and night sky radiation on the U-values of these materials. The model was calibrated using published values of the inside and outside convective heat transfer coefficients. Validation of the model was demonstrated by the agreement between the computed and experimental results for a single-layer PE film. The results from the BES model showed significant changes in U-value in response to variations in weather parameters and the use of single or double layer greenhouse covers. It was found that the U-value of PC, PVC, and HG was 9%, 4%, and 15% lower, respectively, than that for PE. In addition, by using double glazing a 34% reduction in heat loss was noted. For the given temperature U-value increases as wind speed increases. The slopes at the temperature differences of 20, 30, 40, and 50 °C, were approximately 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9, respectively. The results agree with those put forward by other researchers. Hence, the presented model is reliable and can play a valuable role in future work on greenhouse energy modelling.

  14. Effects of the blockage ratio of a valve disk on loss coefficient in a butterfly valve

    Rho, Hyung Joon; Lee, Jee Keun; Choi, Hee Joo

    2008-01-01

    The loss coefficient of the butterfly valve which allows partial opening of the valve at closed position and is applicable to the small-sized pipe system with the diameter of 1 inch was measured for the variation of the valve disk blockage ratio. Two different types of the valve disk configuration to adjust the blockage ratio were considered. One was the solid type valve disk of which the diameter was changed into the smaller size rather than the pipe diameter, and the other was the perforate type valve disk on which some holes were perforated. The results from two types of valve disk were compared to identify their characteristics in the loss coefficient distributions. The loss coefficient and the controllable angle of the valve disk were decreased exponentially with the decrease of the blockage ratio. In addition, the perforate valve disk had the effect on the higher loss coefficient rather than the solid type valve disk

  15. Using a thermalhydraulics system code to estimate heat transfer coefficients for a critical heat flux experiment

    Statham, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    RELAP5/SCDAPSIM MOD 3.4 is used to predict wall temperature before and after critical heat flux (CHF) is reached in a vertical, uniformly heated tube using light water as the working fluid. The heated test section is modeled as a 1 m long Inconel 600 tube having an OD of 6.35 mm and ID of 4.57 mm with a 0.5 m long unheated development length at the inlet. Simulations are performed at pressures of 0.5 to 2.0 MPa with mass fluxes from 500 to 2000 kg m -2 s -1 and inlet qualities ranging from -0.2 to 0. Loss of flow simulations are performed with flow reduction rates of 10, 20, 50, and 100 kg m -2 s -2 . Inlet mass flux at CHF was nominally independent of rate in the model; this may or may not be realistic. (author)

  16. Determining convective heat transfer coefficient using phoenics software package

    Kostikov, A; Matsevity, Y [Institute of Mechanical Engineering Problems of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    1998-12-31

    The two methods of determination of such important quantity of heat exchange on a body surface using PHOENICS are suggested in the presentation. The first method consists in a post-processing of results of conjugate heat transfer problem solved by PHOENICS. The second one is solving an inverse heat conduction problem for solid body using PHOENICS. Comparative characteristic of these two methods is represented. (author) 4 refs.

  17. Determining convective heat transfer coefficient using phoenics software package

    Kostikov, A.; Matsevity, Y. [Institute of Mechanical Engineering Problems of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The two methods of determination of such important quantity of heat exchange on a body surface using PHOENICS are suggested in the presentation. The first method consists in a post-processing of results of conjugate heat transfer problem solved by PHOENICS. The second one is solving an inverse heat conduction problem for solid body using PHOENICS. Comparative characteristic of these two methods is represented. (author) 4 refs.

  18. Heat conduction coefficient and coefficient of linear thermal expansion of electric insulation materials for superconducting magnetic system

    Deev, V.I.; Sobolev, V.P.; Kruglov, A.B.; Pridantsev, A.I.

    1984-01-01

    Results of experimental investigation of heat conduction coefficient and coefficient of linear thermal expansion and thermal shrinkages of the STEF-1 textolite-glass widely used in superconducting magnetic systems as electric insulating and structural material are presented. Samples of two types have been died: sample axisa is perpendicular to a plae of fiberglass layers ad sample axis is parallel to a plane of fiberglass layers. Heat conduction coefficient was decreased almost a five times with temperature decrease from 300 up to 5K and was slightly dependent on a sample type. Temperature variation of linear dimensions in a sample of the first type occurs in twice as fast as compared to the sample of the second type

  19. Condensation heat transfer coefficient with noncondensible gases for heat transfer in thermal hydraulic codes

    Banerjee, S.; Hassan, Y.A.

    1995-01-01

    Condensation in the presence of noncondensible gases plays an important role in the nuclear industry. The RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code was used to study the ability of the code to predict this phenomenon. Two separate effects experiments were simulated using this code. These were the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Pressurizer Experiment, the MIT Single Tube Experiment. A new iterative approach to calculate the interface temperature and the degraded heat transfer coefficient was developed and implemented in the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. This model employs the heat transfer simultaneously. This model was found to perform much better than the reduction factor approach. The calculations using the new model were found to be in much better agreement with the experimental values

  20. Condensation heat transfer coefficient with noncondensible gases for heat transfer in thermal hydraulic codes

    Banerjee, S.; Hassan, Y.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Condensation in the presence of noncondensible gases plays an important role in the nuclear industry. The RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code was used to study the ability of the code to predict this phenomenon. Two separate effects experiments were simulated using this code. These were the Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s (MIT) Pressurizer Experiment, the MIT Single Tube Experiment. A new iterative approach to calculate the interface temperature and the degraded heat transfer coefficient was developed and implemented in the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. This model employs the heat transfer simultaneously. This model was found to perform much better than the reduction factor approach. The calculations using the new model were found to be in much better agreement with the experimental values.

  1. Impact of Next Generation District Heating Systems on Distribution Network Heat Losses: A Case Study Approach

    Li, Yu; Rezgui, Yacine

    2018-01-01

    District heating (DH) is a promising energy pathway to alleviate environmental negative impacts induced by fossil fuels. Improving the performance of DH systems is one of the major challenges facing its wide adoption. This paper discusses the heat losses of the next generation DH based on the constructed Simulink model. Results show that lower distribution temperature and advanced insulation technology greatly reduce network heat losses. Also, the network heat loss can be further minimized by a reduction of heat demand in buildings.

  2. Local total and radiative heat-transfer coefficients during the heat treatment of a workpiece in a fluidised bed

    Gao, W.M.; Kong, L.X.; Hodgson, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    The heat-transfer coefficients around a workpiece immersed in an electrically heated heat treatment fluidised bed were studied. A suspension probe designed to simulate a workpiece of complex geometry was developed to measure local total and radiative heat-transfer coefficients at a high bed temperature. The probe consisted of an energy-storage region separated by insulation from the fluidised bed, except for the measuring surface, and a multi-thermocouple measurement system. Experiments in the fluidised bed were performed for a fluidising medium of 120-mesh alumina, a wide temperature range of 110-1050 deg. C and a fluidising number range of 1.18-4.24. It was found that the workpiece surface temperature has a more significant effect on heat transfer than the bed temperature. The total heat-transfer coefficient at the upper surface of the workpiece sharply decreased at the start of heating, and then steadily increased as heating progressed, while a sharp decrease became a rapid increase and then a slow increase for the radiative heat-transfer coefficient. A great difference in the heat-transfer coefficients around the workpiece was observed

  3. Estimating the workpiece-backingplate heat transfer coefficient in friction stirwelding

    Larsen, Anders; Stolpe, Mathias; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to determine the magnitude and spatial distribution of the heat transfer coefficient between the workpiece and the backingplate in a friction stir welding process using inverse modelling. Design/methodology/approach - The magnitude and distribution of the heat...... in an inverse modeling approach to determine the heat transfer coefficient in friction stir welding. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited....

  4. Generalized heat kernel coefficients for a new asymptotic expansion

    Osipov, Alexander A.; Hiller, Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    The method which allows for asymptotic expansion of the one-loop effective action W = lndetA is formulated. The positively defined elliptic operator A = U + M2 depends on the external classical fields taking values in the Lie algebra of the internal symmetry group G. Unlike the standard method of Schwinger - DeWitt, the more general case with the nongenerate mass matrix M = diag(m1, m2, ...) is considered. The first coefficients of the new asymptotic series are calculated and their relationship with the Seeley - DeWitt coefficients is clarified

  5. Quantum elasticity of graphene: Thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat

    Burmistrov, I.S.; Gornyi, I.V.; Kachorovskii, V.Y.; Katsnelson, M.I.; Mirlin, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore thermodynamics of a quantum membrane, with a particular application to suspended graphene membrane and with a particular focus on the thermal expansion coefficient. We show that an interplay between quantum and classical anharmonicity-controlled fluctuations leads to unusual elastic

  6. Measurement of subcooled boiling pressure drop and local heat transfer coefficient in horizontal tube under LPLF conditions

    Baburajan, P.K.; Bisht, G.S.; Gupta, S.K.; Prabhu, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Measured subcooled boiling pressure drop and local heat transfer coefficient in horizontal tubes. ► Infra-red thermal imaging is used for wall temperature measurement. ► Developed correlations for pressure drop and local heat transfer coefficient. -- Abstract: Horizontal flow is commonly encountered in boiler tubes, refrigerating equipments and nuclear reactor fuel channels of pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR). Study of horizontal flow under low pressure and low flow (LPLF) conditions is important in understanding the nuclear core behavior during situations like LOCA (loss of coolant accidents). In the present work, local heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop are measured in a horizontal tube under LPLF conditions of subcooled boiling. Geometrical parameters covered in this study are diameter (5.5 mm, 7.5 mm and 9.5 mm) and length (550 mm, 750 mm and 1000 mm). The operating parameters varied are mass flux (450–935 kg/m 2 s) and inlet subcooling (29 °C, 50 °C and 70 °C). Infra-red thermography is used for the measurement of local wall temperature to estimate the heat transfer coefficient in single phase and two phase flows with water as the working medium at atmospheric pressure. Correlation for single phase diabatic pressure drop ratio (diabatic to adiabatic) as a function of viscosity ratio (wall temperature to fluid temperature) is presented. Correlation for pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions as a function of Boiling number (Bo) and Jakob number (Ja) is obtained. Correlation for single phase heat transfer coefficient in the thermal developing region is presented as a function of Reynolds number (Re), Prandtl number (Pr) and z/d (ratio of axial length of the test section to diameter). Correlation for two phase heat transfer coefficient under subcooled boiling condition is developed as a function of boiling number (Bo), Jakob number (Ja) and Prandtl number (Pr)

  7. Boiling Heat Transfer Coefficients of Nanofluids Containing Carbon Nanotubes up to Critical Heat Fluxes

    Park, Ki Jung; Lee, Yohan; Jung, Dong Soo; Shim, Sang Eun

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) and critical heat flux (CHF) for a smooth and square flat heater in a pool of pure water with and without carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dispersed at 60 .deg. C were measured. Tested aqueous nanofluids were prepared using CNTs with volume concentrations of 0.0001%, 0.001%, and 0.01%. The CNTs were dispersed by chemically treating them with an acid in the absence of any polymers. The results showed that the pool boiling HTCs of the nanofluids are higher than those of pure water in the entire nucleate boiling regime. The acid-treated CNTs led to the deposition of a small amount of CNTs on the surface, and the CNTs themselves acted as heat-transfer-enhancing particles, owing to their very high thermal conductivity. There was a significant increase in the CHF- up to 150%-when compared to that of pure water containing CNTs with a volume concentration of 0.001%. This is attributed to the change in surface characteristics due to the deposition of a very thin layer of CNTs on the surface. This layer delays nucleate boiling and causes a reduction in the size of the large vapor canopy around the CHF. This results in a significant increase in the CHF

  8. Heat transfer coefficient correlation for convective boiling inside plain and micro fin tubes using genetic algorithms

    Picanco, Marco Antonio Silva; Bandarra Filho, Enio Pedone; Passos, Julio Cesar

    2006-01-01

    Two-phase flow heat transfer has been exhaustively studied over recent years. However, in this field several questions remain unanswered. Heat transfer coefficient prediction related to nucleate and convective boiling have been studied using different approaches, numerical, analytical and experimental. In this work, an experimental analysis, data representation and heat transfer coefficient prediction on two-phase heat transfer on nucleate and convective boiling are presented. An empirical correlation is obtained based on genetic algorithms search engine over a dimensional analysis of the two-phase flow heat transfer problem. (author)

  9. New external convective heat transfer coefficient correlations for isolated low-rise buildings

    Emmel, M. G.; Mendes, N. [Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, PUCPR/CCET, Thermal Systems Laboratory, LST, Curitiba (Brazil); Abadie, M. O. [Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, PUCPR/CCET, Thermal Systems Laboratory, LST, Curitiba (Brazil); Laboratoire d' Etude des Phenomenes de Transfert Appliques au batiment (LEPTAB), University of La Rochelle, La Rochelle (France)

    2007-07-01

    Building energy analyses are very sensitive to external convective heat transfer coefficients so that some researchers have conducted sensitivity calculations and proved that depending on the choice of those coefficients, energy demands estimation values can vary from 20% to 40%. In this context, computational fluid dynamics calculations have been performed to predict convective heat transfer coefficients at the external surfaces of a simple shape low-rise building. Effects of wind velocity and orientation have been analyzed considering four surface-to-air temperature differences. Results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient value strongly depends on the wind velocity, that the wind direction has a notable effect for vertical walls and for roofs and that the surface-to-air temperature difference has a negligible effect for wind velocity higher than 2 m/s. External convective heat transfer coefficient correlations are provided as a function of the wind free stream velocity and wind-to-surface angle. (author)

  10. Combined heat transfer and kinetic models to predict cooking loss during heat treatment of beef meat.

    Kondjoyan, Alain; Oillic, Samuel; Portanguen, Stéphane; Gros, Jean-Bernard

    2013-10-01

    A heat transfer model was used to simulate the temperature in 3 dimensions inside the meat. This model was combined with a first-order kinetic models to predict cooking losses. Identification of the parameters of the kinetic models and first validations were performed in a water bath. Afterwards, the performance of the combined model was determined in a fan-assisted oven under different air/steam conditions. Accurate knowledge of the heat transfer coefficient values and consideration of the retraction of the meat pieces are needed for the prediction of meat temperature. This is important since the temperature at the center of the product is often used to determine the cooking time. The combined model was also able to predict cooking losses from meat pieces of different sizes and subjected to different air/steam conditions. It was found that under the studied conditions, most of the water loss comes from the juice expelled by protein denaturation and contraction and not from evaporation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Self-heating, gamma heating and heat loss effects on resistance temperature detector (RTD) accuracy

    Qian, T.; Hinds, H.W.; Tonner, P.

    1997-01-01

    Resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) are extensively used in CANDU nuclear power stations for measuring various process and equipment temperatures. Accuracy of measurement is an important performance parameter of RTDs and has great impact on the thermal power efficiency and safety of the plant. There are a number of factors that contribute to some extent to RTD measurement error. Self-heating, gamma heating and the heat-loss throughout conduction of the thermowell are three of these factors. The degree to which these three affect accuracy of RTDs used for the measurement of reactor inlet header temperature (RIHT) has been analyzed and is presented in this paper. (author)

  12. Measurement of the Convective Heat-Transfer Coefficient

    Conti, Rosaria; Gallitto, Aurelio Agliolo; Fiordilino, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    We propose an experiment for investigating how objects cool down toward the thermal equilibrium with their surroundings. We describe the time dependence of the temperature difference of the cooling objects and the environment with an exponential decay function. By measuring the thermal constant t, we determine the convective heat-transfer…

  13. CFD simulation of simultaneous monotonic cooling and surface heat transfer coefficient

    Mihálka, Peter; Matiašovský, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The monotonic heating regime method for determination of thermal diffusivity is based on the analysis of an unsteady-state (stabilised) thermal process characterised by an independence of the space-time temperature distribution on initial conditions. At the first kind of the monotonic regime a sample of simple geometry is heated / cooled at constant ambient temperature. The determination of thermal diffusivity requires the determination rate of a temperature change and simultaneous determination of the first eigenvalue. According to a characteristic equation the first eigenvalue is a function of the Biot number defined by a surface heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivity of an analysed material. Knowing the surface heat transfer coefficient and the first eigenvalue the thermal conductivity can be determined. The surface heat transport coefficient during the monotonic regime can be determined by the continuous measurement of long-wave radiation heat flow and the photoelectric measurement of the air refractive index gradient in a boundary layer. CFD simulation of the cooling process was carried out to analyse local convective and radiative heat transfer coefficients more in detail. Influence of ambient air flow was analysed. The obtained eigenvalues and corresponding surface heat transfer coefficient values enable to determine thermal conductivity of the analysed specimen together with its thermal diffusivity during a monotonic heating regime.

  14. Measurement and CFD calculation of spacer loss coefficient for a tight-lattice fuel bundle

    In, Wang Kee; Shin, Chang Hwan; Kwack, Young Kyun; Lee, Chi Young

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Experiment and CFD analysis evaluated the pressure drop in a spacer grid. • The measurement and CFD errors for the spacer loss coefficient were estimated. • The spacer loss coefficient for the dual-cooled annular fuel bundle was determined. • The CFD prediction agrees with the measured spacer loss coefficient within 8%. - Abstract: An experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis were performed to evaluate the pressure drop in a spacer grid for a dual-cooled annular fuel (DCAF) bundle. The DCAF bundle for the Korean optimum power reactor (OPR1000) is a 12 × 12 tight-lattice rod array with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.08 owing to a larger outer diameter of the annular fuel rod. An experiment was conducted to measure the pressure drop in spacer grid for the DCAF bundle. The test bundle is a full-size 12 × 12 rod bundle with 11 spacer grid. The test condition covers a Reynolds number range of 2 × 10 4 –2 × 10 5 by changing the temperature and flow rate of water. A CFD analysis was also performed to predict the pressure drop through a spacer grid using the full-size and partial bundle models. The pressure drop and loss coefficient of a spacer grid were predicted and compared with the experimental results. The CFD predictions of spacer pressure drop and loss coefficient agree with the measured values within 8%. The spacer loss coefficient for the DCAF bundle is estimated to be approximately 1.50 at a nominal operating condition of OPR1000, i.e., Re = 4 × 10 5

  15. Experimental determination of the local heat transfer coefficient in a closely packed pin arrangement

    Moeller, S.V.

    1982-09-01

    The determination of the heat transfer coefficient of the pins of the Spallation Neutron Source is a very important problem for the development of this facility, as data for thermal and structural studies. For this purpose, a test apparatus was built, in scale 1:1, for the simulation of the thermal and hydraulical conditions of the Neutron Source. This apparatus is a pin bank, with one of the pins electrically heated. Performance of measurements gave the values for the heat transfer coefficient, here presented in the Nusselt Number form, and its local distribution. Results show the linear dependence of Nusselt Number on Reynolds Number, for a constant heat production. (orig.) [de

  16. Simultaneous determination of reference free-stream temperature and convective heat transfer coefficients

    Jeong, Gi Ho; Song, Ki Bum; Kim, Kui Soon

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of a new method that can obtain heat transfer coefficient and reference free stream temperature simultaneously. The method is based on transient heat transfer experiments using two narrow-band TLCs. The method is validated through error analysis in terms of the random uncertainties in the measured temperatures. It is shown how the uncertainties in heat transfer coefficient and free stream temperature can be reduced. The general method described in this paper is applicable to many heat transfer models with unknown free stream temperature

  17. Thermal stratification in a hot water tank established by heat loss from the tank

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Results of experimental and numerical investigations of thermal stratification and natural convection in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank during standby periods are presented. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the tank during cooling caused by heat loss are investigated...... on the natural buoyancy resulting in downward flow along the tank side walls due to heat loss of the tank and the influence on thermal stratification of the tank by the downward flow and the corresponding upward flow in the central parts of the tank. Water temperatures at different levels of the tank...... by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and by thermal measurements. A tank with uniform temperatures and thermal stratification is studied. The distribution of the heat loss coefficient for the different parts of the tank is measured by tests and used as input to the CFD model. The investigations focus...

  18. Heat loss investigation from spherical cavity receiver of solar concentrator

    Shewale, V. C. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, NDMVPS KBT College of Engineering, Nashik (India); Dongarwar, P. R. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, College of Military Engineering, Pune (India); Gawande, R. P. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, B.D.C.O.E. Wardha, Nagpur University, NagpurI (India)

    2016-11-15

    The heat losses are mainly affects on the performance of cavity receiver of solar concentrator. In this paper, the experimental and numerical study is carried out for different heat losses from spherical cavity receiver of 0.385 m cavity diameter and 0.154 m opening diameter. The total and convection losses are studied experimentally to no wind and wind conditions for the temperature range of 150 °C to 300 °C at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° inclination angle of cavity receiver. The experimental set up mainly consists of copper tube material cavity receiver wrapped with nichrome heating coil to heat the cavity and insulated with glasswool insulation. The numerical analysis was carried out with Fluent Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, to study connective heat losses for no wind condition only. The numerical results are compared with experimental results and found good agreement with maximum deviation of 12 %. The effect of inclination angle of cavity receiver on total losses and convection losses shows that as the inclination angle increases from 0o to 90o, both losses decreased due to decreased in convective zone into the cavity receiver. The effect of operating temperature of cavity shows that as the temperature of cavity receiver increases, the total and convective losses goes on increasing. The effect of external wind at 2 m/s and 4 m/s in two directions (side-on wind and head-on wind) is also studied experimentally for total and convective heat losses. The result shows that the heat losses are higher for head-on wind condition compared to side-on wind and no wind condition at all inclination angle of cavity receiver. The present results are also compared to the convective losses obtained from the correlations of Stine and Mcdonald and M. Prakash. The convective loss from these correlations shows nearest prediction to both experimental and numerical results.

  19. Heat loss investigation from spherical cavity receiver of solar concentrator

    Shewale, V. C.; Dongarwar, P. R.; Gawande, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    The heat losses are mainly affects on the performance of cavity receiver of solar concentrator. In this paper, the experimental and numerical study is carried out for different heat losses from spherical cavity receiver of 0.385 m cavity diameter and 0.154 m opening diameter. The total and convection losses are studied experimentally to no wind and wind conditions for the temperature range of 150 °C to 300 °C at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° inclination angle of cavity receiver. The experimental set up mainly consists of copper tube material cavity receiver wrapped with nichrome heating coil to heat the cavity and insulated with glasswool insulation. The numerical analysis was carried out with Fluent Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, to study connective heat losses for no wind condition only. The numerical results are compared with experimental results and found good agreement with maximum deviation of 12 %. The effect of inclination angle of cavity receiver on total losses and convection losses shows that as the inclination angle increases from 0o to 90o, both losses decreased due to decreased in convective zone into the cavity receiver. The effect of operating temperature of cavity shows that as the temperature of cavity receiver increases, the total and convective losses goes on increasing. The effect of external wind at 2 m/s and 4 m/s in two directions (side-on wind and head-on wind) is also studied experimentally for total and convective heat losses. The result shows that the heat losses are higher for head-on wind condition compared to side-on wind and no wind condition at all inclination angle of cavity receiver. The present results are also compared to the convective losses obtained from the correlations of Stine and Mcdonald and M. Prakash. The convective loss from these correlations shows nearest prediction to both experimental and numerical results

  20. The Impact of One Heat Treated Contact Element on the Coefficient of Static Friction

    P. Todorović, , , , , ,

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the paper includes theoretical considerations, the conducting of experimental tests, and the analysis of exposed test results related to determination of the coefficient of static friction of previously heat-treated contact pairs. One contact element is previously, before the procedure of determining the coefficient of static friction, heated at temperatures in the range of ambient temperature to 280°C and then cooled down to ambient temperature. The results of experimental tests of five different materials show that depending on the heat treatment of one contact element, there is a significant decrease in the coefficient of static friction. The authors of the paper consider that the reasons for the decreasing coefficient of static friction are related to oxide formation and changes in the surface layer of the contact element which is previously heat-treated.

  1. Heat Loss Evaluation of the SMART-ITL Primary System

    Ryu, Sung Uk; Bae, Hwang; Kim, Dong Eok; Park, Keun Tae; Park, Hyun Sik; Yi, Sung Jae

    2013-01-01

    It is considered that the heat loss rate is one of the critical factors affecting the transient behavior of an integral effect test facility. This paper presents the experimental results of the heat loss rate for the primary system of a SMART-ITL (System-Integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor-Integral Test Loop) facility including the pressurizer (PZR). To evaluate the heat loss rate of the primary system, two different approaches were pursued, i. e., integral and differential approaches. The integral approach is a constant temperature method which controls the core and PZR powers at a desired temperature condition and the differential approach is a natural cooling-down measurement method that lasts for a long period of time. In the present work, the heat losses derived from integral and differential approaches were acquired for the primary system of the SMART-ITL. The results obtained by the two approaches were very similar. In addition, an empirical correlation with respect to the difference between the wall temperature and the ambient temperature was proposed to represent the heat loss characteristics of the SMART-ITL facility. The estimated heat losses could be used to estimate the heat loss during the tests and code simulations

  2. Regularization algorithm within two-parameters for identification heat-coefficient in the parabolic equation

    Hinestroza Gutierrez, D.

    2006-08-01

    In this work a new and promising algorithm based on the minimization of especial functional that depends on two regularization parameters is considered for the identification of the heat conduction coefficient in the parabolic equation. This algorithm uses the adjoint and sensibility equations. One of the regularization parameters is associated with the heat-coefficient (as in conventional Tikhonov algorithms) but the other is associated with the calculated solution. (author)

  3. Regularization algorithm within two-parameters for identification heat-coefficient in the parabolic equation

    Hinestroza Gutierrez, D.

    2006-12-01

    In this work a new and promising algorithm based in the minimization of especial functional that depends on two regularization parameters is considered for identification of the heat conduction coefficient in the parabolic equation. This algorithm uses the adjoint and sensibility equations. One of the regularization parameters is associated with the heat-coefficient (as in conventional Tikhonov algorithms) but the other is associated with the calculated solution. (author)

  4. Heat Loss Measurements in Buildings Utilizing a U-value Meter

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    Heating of buildings in Denmark accounts for approximately 40% of the entire national energy consumption. For this reason, a reduction of heat losses from building envelopes are of great importance in order to reach the Bologna CO2 emission reduction targets. Upgrading of the energy performance...... of buildings is a topic of huge global interest these years. Not only heating in the temperate and arctic regions are important, but also air conditioning and mechanical ventilation in the tropical countries contribute to an enormous energy consumption and corresponding CO2 emission. In order to establish...... the best basis for upgrading the energy performance, it is important to measure the heat losses at different locations on a building facade, in order to optimize the energy performance. The author has invented a U-value meter, enabling measurements of heat transfer coefficients. The meter has been used...

  5. Experimental result of BWR post-CHF tests. Critical heat flux and post-CHF heat transfer coefficient. Contract research

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Anoda, Yoshinari

    2002-02-01

    Authors performed post-CHF experiments under wider pressure ranges of 2 MPa - 18 MPa, wider mass flux ranges of 33 kg/m 2 s - 1651 kg/m 2 s and wider superheat of heaters up to 500 K in comparison to experimental ranges at previous post-CHF experiments. Data on boiling transition, critical heat flux and post-CHF heat transfer coefficient were obtained. Used test section was 4x4-rod bundle with heaters, which diameter and length were the same as those of BWR nuclear fuels. As the result of the experiments, it was found that the boiling transition occurred just below several grid spacers, and that the fronts of the boiling transition region proceeded lower with increase of heated power. Heat transfer was due to nucleate boiling above grid spacers, while it was due to film boiling below grid spacers. Consequently, critical heat flux is affected on the distance from the grid spacers. Critical heat flux above the grid spacers was about 15% higher than that below the grid spacers, by comparing them under the same local condition. Heat transfer by steam turbulent flow was dominant to post-CHF heat transfer, when superheat of heaters was sufficiently high. Then, post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was predicted with heat transfer correlations for single-phase flow. On the other hand, when superhead of heaters was not sufficiently high, post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was higher than the prediction with heat transfer correlations for single-phase flow. Mass flux effect on post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was described by standardization of post-CHF heat transfer coefficient with the prediction for single-phase flow. However, pressure effect, superheat effect and effect of position were not described. Authors clarified that those effects could be described with functions of heater temperature and position. Post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was lowest just blow the grid spacers, and it increased with the lower positions. It increased by about 30% in one span of the grid

  6. Experimental result of BWR post-CHF tests. Critical heat flux and post-CHF heat transfer coefficient. Contract research

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Anoda, Yoshinari [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Iwaki, Chikako [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    Authors performed post-CHF experiments under wider pressure ranges of 2 MPa - 18 MPa, wider mass flux ranges of 33 kg/m{sup 2}s - 1651 kg/m{sup 2}s and wider superheat of heaters up to 500 K in comparison to experimental ranges at previous post-CHF experiments. Data on boiling transition, critical heat flux and post-CHF heat transfer coefficient were obtained. Used test section was 4x4-rod bundle with heaters, which diameter and length were the same as those of BWR nuclear fuels. As the result of the experiments, it was found that the boiling transition occurred just below several grid spacers, and that the fronts of the boiling transition region proceeded lower with increase of heated power. Heat transfer was due to nucleate boiling above grid spacers, while it was due to film boiling below grid spacers. Consequently, critical heat flux is affected on the distance from the grid spacers. Critical heat flux above the grid spacers was about 15% higher than that below the grid spacers, by comparing them under the same local condition. Heat transfer by steam turbulent flow was dominant to post-CHF heat transfer, when superheat of heaters was sufficiently high. Then, post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was predicted with heat transfer correlations for single-phase flow. On the other hand, when superhead of heaters was not sufficiently high, post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was higher than the prediction with heat transfer correlations for single-phase flow. Mass flux effect on post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was described by standardization of post-CHF heat transfer coefficient with the prediction for single-phase flow. However, pressure effect, superheat effect and effect of position were not described. Authors clarified that those effects could be described with functions of heater temperature and position. Post-CHF heat transfer coefficient was lowest just blow the grid spacers, and it increased with the lower positions. It increased by about 30% in one span of

  7. Indoor temperatures for calculating room heat loss and heating capacity of radiant heating systems combined with mechanical ventilation systems

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Fang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    change rates on the indoor temperatures were performed using the proposed model. When heated surface temperatures and air change rates were from 21.0 to 29.0 degrees C and from 0.5 to 4.0 h-1, the indoor temperatures for calculating the transmission heat loss and ventilation heat loss were between 20...

  8. Assessment of the crossflow loss coefficient in Very High Temperature Reactor core - 15338

    Lee, S.N.; Tak, N.I.; Kim, M.H.; Noh, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is a helium gas cooled and graphite moderated reactor. It was chosen as one of the Gen-4 reactors owing to its inherent safety. Various researches for prismatic gas-cooled reactors have been conducted for efficient and safe use. The prismatic VHTR consists of vertically stacked fuel blocks. Between the vertical fuel blocks, there is cross gap because of manufacturing tolerance or graphite change during the operation. This cross gap changes the coolant flow path, called a crossflow, which may affect the fuel temperature. Various tests and numerical studies have been conducted to predict the crossflow and loss coefficient. In the present study, the CFD calculation is conducted to draw the loss coefficient, and compared with Groehn, Kaburaki and General Atomics (GA) correlations. The results of the Groehn and Kaburaki correlations tend to decrease as the gap size increases, whereas the data of GA show the opposite. The loss coefficient given by the CFD calculation tends to maintain the regular value without regard to the gap size for the standard fuel block, like the Groehn correlation. However, the loss coefficient of the control fuel block increases as the gap size widens, like the GA results

  9. Wall heat transfer coefficient in a molten salt bubble column: testing the experimental setup

    Skosana, PJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available reactors that are highly exothermic or endothermic. This paper presents the design and operation of experimental setup used for measurement of the heat transfer coefficient in molten salt media. The experimental setup was operated with tap water, heat...

  10. Heat transfer coefficient testing in nuclear fuel rod bundles with mixing vane grids

    Conner, Michael E.; Smith, L. David III; Holloway, Mary V.; Beasley, Donald E.

    2005-01-01

    An air heat transfer test facility was developed to test the heat transfer downstream of support grids in simulated PWR nuclear fuel rod bundles. The goal of this testing is to study the single-phase heat transfer coefficients downstream of grids with mixing vanes in a square-pitch rod bundle. The technique developed utilizes fully-heated grid spans and a specially designed thermocouple holder that can be moved axially down the rod bundle and aximuthally within a test rod. From this testing, the axial and aximuthally varying heat transfer coefficient can be determined. Different grid designs are tested and compared to determine the heat transfer enhancement associated with key grid features such as mixing vanes. (author)

  11. Orbit losses of strongly ICRF-heated ions

    Anderson, A.; Dillner, Oe.; Lisak, M.

    1992-01-01

    An approximate analytical investigation is made to assess the importance of orbit losses of strongly ICRF-heated minority ions. Explicit expressions for the fraction of lost minority ions are derived and shown to be in good agreement with numerical simulation results. The results indicate that present day ICRF heating power density levels cannot be raised significantly without causing important particle and energy losses due to unconfined particle orbits. 6 refs., 5 figs

  12. Study on heat transfer coefficients during cooling of PET bottles for food beverages

    Liga, Antonio; Montesanto, Salvatore; Mannella, Gianluca A.; La Carrubba, Vincenzo; Brucato, Valerio; Cammalleri, Marco

    2016-08-01

    The heat transfer properties of different cooling systems dealing with Poly-Ethylene-Terephthalate (PET) bottles were investigated. The heat transfer coefficient (Ug) was measured in various fluid dynamic conditions. Cooling media were either air or water. It was shown that heat transfer coefficients are strongly affected by fluid dynamics conditions, and range from 10 W/m2 K to nearly 400 W/m2 K. PET bottle thickness effect on Ug was shown to become relevant under faster fluid dynamics regimes.

  13. Heat transfer coefficients for particles in liquid in axially rotating cans

    Hassan, B. H.

    A theoretical analysis was carried out to determine the nondimensional parameters and corresponding correlations for the overall heat transfer coefficient (between the external steam and internal rotating liquid) and the liquid-particle film heat transfer coefficient for spherical particles in liquid in axially rotating 303 x 406 cans undergoing steam heating. The correlations were obtained from dimensional analysis of the equations of continuity, motion and energy, together with the thermal energy balances and the particle-fluid dynamics of the system. The theoretical solutions for the temperature distribution in spherical particles with a time varying boundary condition were presented.

  14. Influence of the convective surface transfer coefficients on the Heat, Air, and Moisture (HAM) building performance

    Steskens, Paul Wilhelmus Maria Hermanus; Janssen, Hans; Rode, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Current models to predict heat, air and moisture (HAM) conditions in buildings assume constant boundary conditions for the temperature and relative humidity of the neighbouring air and for the surface heat and moisture transfer coefficients. These assumptions may introduce errors in the predicted...... influence on the predicted hygrothermal conditions at the surface of a building component and on the heat and vapour exchange with the indoor environment....

  15. Aging Impairs Whole-Body Heat Loss in Women under Both Dry and Humid Heat Stress.

    Notley, Sean R; Poirier, Martin P; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Flouris, Andreas D; Boulay, Pierre; Sigal, Ronald J; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-11-01

    This study was designed to determine whether age-related impairments in whole-body heat loss, which are known to exist in dry heat, also occur in humid heat in women. To evaluate this possibility, 10 young (25 ± 4 yr) and 10 older (51 ± 7 yr) women matched for body surface area (young, 1.69 ± 0.11; older, 1.76 ± 0.14 m, P = 0.21) and peak oxygen consumption (V˙O2peak) (young, 38.6 ± 4.6; older, 34.8 ± 6.6 mL·kg·min, P = 0.15) performed four 15-min bouts of cycling at a fixed metabolic heat production rate (300 W; equivalent to ~45% V˙O2peak), each separated by a 15-min recovery, in dry (35°C, 20% relative humidity) and humid heat (35°C, 60% relative humidity). Total heat loss (evaporative ± dry heat exchange) and metabolic heat production were measured using direct and indirect calorimetry, respectively. Body heat storage was measured as the temporal summation of heat production and loss. Total heat loss was lower in humid conditions compared with dry conditions during all exercise bouts in both groups (all P body heat storage in young and older women, respectively (both P body heat storage was 29% and 16% greater in older women compared with young women in dry and humid conditions, respectively (both P < 0.05). Increasing ambient humidity reduces heat loss capacity in young and older women. However, older women display impaired heat loss relative to young women in both dry and humid heat, and may therefore be at greater risk of heat-related injury during light-to-moderate activity.

  16. Effect of heat loss in a geothermal reservoir

    Ganguly, Sayantan; Tan, Lippong; Date, Abhijit; Mohan Kumar, Mandalagiri Subbarayappa

    This paper reports a three-dimensional (3D) numerical study to determine the effect of heat loss on the transient heat transport and temperature distribution in a geothermal reservoir. The operation of a geothermal power plant, which is essentially an injection-production process, involves

  17. Influence of Variable Fluid Properties and Radiative Heat loss on ...

    Consequently, comparative analysis is also performed on the wall shear stress and local heat transfer of the present study with the available results.The results show that the inclusion variable viscosity and thermal conductivity, and radiative heat loss mechanism cause significant effects on the fluid flow velocity, temperature ...

  18. Plasma Heating and Losses in Toroidal Multipole Fields

    Armentrout, C. J.; Barter, J. D.; Breun, R. A.; Cavallo, A. J.; Drake, J. R.; Etzweiler,; Greenwood, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The heating and loss of plasmas have been studied in three pulsed, toroidal multipole devices: a large levitated octupole, a small supported octupole and a very small supported quadrupole. Plasmas are produced by gun injection and heated by electron and ion cyclotron resonance heating and ohmic heating. Electron cyclotron heating rates have been measured over a wide range of parameters, and the results are in quantitative agreement with stochastic heating theory. Electron cyclotron resonance heating produces ions with energies larger than predicted by theory. With the addition of a toroidal field, ohmic heating gives densities as high as 10 13 cm -3 in the toroidal quadrupole and 10 12 cm -3 in the small octupole. Plasma losses for n=5 x 10 9 cm -3 plasmas are inferred from Langmuir probe and Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements, and measured with special striped collectors on the wall and rings. The loss to a levitated ring is measured using a modulated light beam telemeter. The confinement is better than Bohm but considerably worse than classical. Low frequency convective cells which are fixed in space are observed. These cells around the ring are diminished when a weak toroidal field is added, and loss collectors show a vastly reduced flux to the rings. Analysis of the spatial density profile shows features of B-independent diffusion. The confinement is sensitive to some kinds of dc field errors, but surprisingly insensitive to perturbations of the ac confining field

  19. A numerical model for boiling heat transfer coefficient of zeotropic mixtures

    Barraza Vicencio, Rodrigo; Caviedes Aedo, Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    Zeotropic mixtures never have the same liquid and vapor composition in the liquid-vapor equilibrium. Also, the bubble and the dew point are separated; this gap is called glide temperature (Tglide). Those characteristics have made these mixtures suitable for cryogenics Joule-Thomson (JT) refrigeration cycles. Zeotropic mixtures as working fluid in JT cycles improve their performance in an order of magnitude. Optimization of JT cycles have earned substantial importance for cryogenics applications (e.g, gas liquefaction, cryosurgery probes, cooling of infrared sensors, cryopreservation, and biomedical samples). Heat exchangers design on those cycles is a critical point; consequently, heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of two-phase zeotropic mixtures are relevant. In this work, it will be applied a methodology in order to calculate the local convective heat transfer coefficients based on the law of the wall approach for turbulent flows. The flow and heat transfer characteristics of zeotropic mixtures in a heated horizontal tube are investigated numerically. The temperature profile and heat transfer coefficient for zeotropic mixtures of different bulk compositions are analysed. The numerical model has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, constant temperature wall, and two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model taking into account continuity, momentum, and energy equations. Local heat transfer coefficient results are compared with available experimental data published by Barraza et al. (2016), and they have shown good agreement.

  20. Enhancement of heat transfer coefficient multi-metallic nanofluid with ANFIS modeling for thermophysical properties

    Balla Hyder H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu and Zn-water nanofluid is a suspension of the Cu and Zn nanoparticles with the size 50 nm in the water base fluid for different volume fractions to enhance its Thermophysical properties. The determination and measuring the enhancement of Thermophysical properties depends on many limitations. Nanoparticles were suspended in a base fluid to prepare a nanofluid. A coated transient hot wire apparatus was calibrated after the building of the all systems. The vibro-viscometer was used to measure the dynamic viscosity. The measured dynamic viscosity and thermal conductivity with all parameters affected on the measurements such as base fluids thermal conductivity, volume factions, and the temperatures of the base fluid were used as input to the Artificial Neural Fuzzy inference system to modeling both dynamic viscosity and thermal conductivity of the nanofluids. Then, the ANFIS modeling equations were used to calculate the enhancement in heat transfer coefficient using CFD software. The heat transfer coefficient was determined for flowing flow in a circular pipe at constant heat flux. It was found that the thermal conductivity of the nanofluid was highly affected by the volume fraction of nanoparticles. A comparison of the thermal conductivity ratio for different volume fractions was undertaken. The heat transfer coefficient of nanofluid was found to be higher than its base fluid. Comparisons of convective heat transfer coefficients for Cu and Zn nanofluids with the other correlation for the nanofluids heat transfer enhancement are presented. Moreover, the flow demonstrates anomalous enhancement in heat transfer nanofluids.

  1. Effects of entrance configuration on pressure loss and heat transfer of transitional gas flow in a circular tube

    Ogawa, Masuro; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    Pressure loss and heat transfer of a transitional gas flow are affected significantly by the entrance configuration. The friction factor and the heat transfer coefficient were measured using a circular tube with four different kinds of entrance configurations. The Reynolds number at the transition from laminar to intermittent flow was varied from about 1,940 to 9,120. The intermittency factor was measured for heated and unheated flows ; and the relation between the intermittency and the friction factor or heat transfer coefficient was examined. Several existing correlations were tested and found to correlate with the experimental results fairly well. (author)

  2. An Analytical Solution for Transient Heat Conduction in a Composite Slab with Time-Dependent Heat Transfer Coefficient

    Ryoichi Chiba

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical solution is derived for one-dimensional transient heat conduction in a composite slab consisting of n layers, whose heat transfer coefficient on an external boundary is an arbitrary function of time. The composite slab, which has thermal contact resistance at n-1 interfaces, as well as an arbitrary initial temperature distribution and internal heat generation, convectively exchanges heat at the external boundaries with two different time-varying surroundings. To obtain the analytical solution, the shifting function method is first used, which yields new partial differential equations under conventional types of external boundary conditions. The solution for the derived differential equations is then obtained by means of an orthogonal expansion technique. Numerical calculations are performed for two composite slabs, whose heat transfer coefficient on the heated surface is either an exponential or a trigonometric function of time. The numerical results demonstrate the effects of temporal variations in the heat transfer coefficient on the transient temperature field of composite slabs.

  3. Ripple losses during ICRF heating in Tore Supra

    Basiuk, V.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Bergeaud, V.; Chantant, M.; Martin, G.; Nguyen, F.; Reichle, R.; Vallet, J.C.; Delpeche, L.; Surle, F.

    2004-01-01

    The toroidal field coils in Tore Supra are supra-conducting, and their number is restricted to 18. As a result, the ripple is fairly large, about 7% at the plasma boundary. Tore Supra has consequently been equipped with dedicated ripple loss diagnostics, which has allowed ripple loss studies. This paper reports on the measurements made with these diagnostics and provides an analysis of the experimental results, comparing them with theoretical expectations whenever possible. Furthermore, the main heating source accelerating ions in Tore Supra is ion cyclotron resonance range of frequency (ICRF) heating, and the paper provides new information on the ripple losses of ICRF accelerated ions. (author)

  4. Regenerator heat exchanger – calculation of heat recovery efficiency and pressure loss

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    Performance of heat exchangers is determined based on two main parameters: efficiency to exchange / recover heat and pressure loss due to friction between fluid and exchanger surfaces. These two parameters are contradicting each other which mean that the higher is efficiency the higher becomes...... pressure loss. The aim of the optimized design of heat exchanger is to reach the highest or the required heat efficiency and at the same time to keep pressure losses as low as possible keeping total exchanger size within acceptable size. In this report is presented analytical calculation method...... to calculate efficiency and pressure loss in the regenerator heat exchanger with a fixed matrix that will be used in the decentralized ventilation unit combined in the roof window. Moreover, this study presents sensitivity study of regenerator heat exchanger performance, taking into account, such parameters as...

  5. Measuring and heat losses for district heating systems in detached house areas; Maet- och vaermefoerluster foer fjaerrvaermesystem i smaahusomraaden

    Cederborg, Frederick; Nordgren, Ola [FVB Sverige ab, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    volume measurements. By study the actual deviation in water volume for both low and high load seasons it can though be seen that unregistered volumes are occurring all year round. This fact in combination with surveying of the holding flow lead to the conclusion that the holding circuits generate a significantly greater portion of the losses than unregistered use in the single house meters. The experiences from the accomplished measurements and data collection shows the great importance of a structured work with components, compatibility, routines for data collection, storage and back up of historical data. A considerable portion of the time in a measuring project should be spent on studying whether the system is compatible and well functioning at start, supervision and function control as well as spent on establishing routines for the measures to be taken during disturbances. The factors that influence the net coefficient and the relative heat loss are the structure of the area, temperature levels and degree of building connections, which is the reason to, that the area 'Munksundet' is accounting a lower net coefficient than the area 'Rotskaer'. The area 'Munksundet' is a denser area with a low temperature system and maximum rate of building connections.

  6. Heat loss prediction of a confined premixed jet flame using a conjugate heat transfer approach

    Gövert, S.; Mira, D.; Zavala-Ake, M.; Kok, J.B.W.; Vázquez, M.; Houzeaux, G.

    2017-01-01

    The presented work addresses the investigation of the heat loss of a confined turbulent jet flame in a lab-scale combustor using a conjugate-heat transfer approach and large-eddy simulation. The analysis includes the assessment of the principal mechanisms of heat transfer in this combustion chamber:

  7. Quantitative thermography and methods for in-situ determination of heat losses from district heating networks

    Boehm, B. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    The course and seminar summarizing application of infrared thermography in district heating systems control gathered Danish specialists with 5 contributions on the subject. Maintenance of the heat distribution pipelines and thermographic inspection of the systems are essential in order to avoid heat losses. (EG)

  8. Modeling heat loss from the udder of a dairy cow.

    Gebremedhin, Kifle G; Wu, Binxin

    2016-07-01

    A mechanistic model that predicts sensible and latent heat fluxes from the udder of a dairy cow was developed. The prediction of the model was spot validated against measured data from the literature, and the result agreed within 7% of the measured value for the same ambient temperature. A dairy cow can lose a significant amount of heat (388W/m(2)) from the udder. This suggests that the udder could be considered as a heat sink. The temperature profile through the udder tissue (core to skin) approached the core temperature for an air temperature ≥37°C whereas the profile decreased linearly from the core to skin surface for an air temperature less than 37°C. Sensible heat loss was dominant when ambient air temperature was less than 37.5°C but latent heat loss was greater than sensible heat loss when air temperature was ≥37.5°C. The udder could lose a total (sensible + latent) heat flux of 338W/m(2) at an ambient temperature of 35°C and blood-flow rate of 3.2×10(-3)m(3)/(sm(3) tissue). The results of this study suggests that, in time of heat stress, a dairy cow could be cooled by cooling the udder only (e.g., using an evaporative cooling jacket). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Convective Heat Transfer Coefficients of the Human Body under Forced Convection from Ceiling

    Kurazumi, Yoshihito; Rezgals, Lauris; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2014-01-01

    The average convective heat transfer coefficient for a seated human body exposed to downward flow from above was determined. Thermal manikin with complex body shape and size of an average Scandinavian female was used. The surface temperature distribution of the manikin’s body was as the skin...... of the convective heat transfer coefficient of the whole body (hc [W/(m2•K)]) was proposed: hc=4.088+6.592V1.715 for a seated naked body at 20ºC and hc=2.874+7.427V1.345 for a seated naked body at 26ºC. Differences in the convective heat transfer coefficient of the whole body in low air velocity range, V

  10. Basic data generation and pressure loss coefficient evaluation for HANARO core thermal-hydraulic analyses

    Chae, Hee Taek; Lee, Kye Hong

    1999-06-01

    MATRA-h, a HANARO subchannel analysis computer code, is used to evaluate thermal margin of the HANARO fuel. It's capability includes the assessments of CHF, ONB margin, and fuel temperature. In this report, basic input data and core design parameters required to perform the subchannel analysis with MATRA-h code are collected. These data include the subchannel geometric data, thermal-hydraulic correlations, empirical constants and material properties. The friction and form loss coefficients of the fuel assemblies were determined based on the results of the pressure drop test. At the same time, different form loss coefficients at the end plates and spacers are evaluated for various subchannels. The adequate correlations are applied to the evaluation of the form loss coefficients for various subchannels, which are corrected by measured values in order to have a same pressure drop at each flow channel. These basic input data and design parameters described in this report will be applied usefully to evaluate the thermal margin of the HANARO fuel. (author). 11 refs., 13 tabs., 11 figs

  11. Calculation of heat-kernel coefficients and usage of computer algebra

    Bel'kov, A.A.; Lanev, A.V.; Schaale, A.

    1995-01-01

    The calculation of heat-kernel coefficients with the classical De Witt algorithm has been discussed. We present the explicit form of the coefficients up to h 5 in the general case and up to h 7 min for the minimal parts. The results are compared with the expressions in other papers. A method to optimize the usage of memory for working with large expressions on universal computer algebra systems has been proposed. 20 refs

  12. Lithium bromide high-temperature absorption heat pump: coefficient of performance and exergetic efficiency

    Izquierdo, M [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (ES). Inst. de Optica; Aroca, S [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Valladolid (ES). Catedratico de Ingenieria Termica

    1990-04-01

    A theoretical study of a lithium bromide absorption heat pump, used as a machine type I and aimed to produce heat at 120{sup 0}C via waste heat sources at 60{sup 0}C, is given. Real performance conditions are stated for each component of the machine. By means of thermodynamic diagrams (p, t, x) and (h, x), the required data are obtained for calculation of the heat recovered in the evaporator Q{sub e}, the heat delivered to the absorber Q{sub a} and to the condenser Q{sub c}, and the heat supplied to the generator Q{sub g}. The heat delivered by the hot solution to the cold solution in the heat recovered Q{sub r}, and the work W{sub p} done by the solution pump are calculated. The probable COP is calculated as close to 1.4 and the working temperature in the generator ranges from 178 to 200{sup 0}C. The heat produced by the heat pump is 22% cheaper than that obtained from a cogeneration system comprising a natural gas internal combustion engine and high temperature heat pump with mechanical compression. Compared with a high temperature heat pump with mechanical compression, the heat produced by the absorption heat pump is 31% cheaper. From (h, x) and (s, x) diagrams, exergy losses for each component can be determined leading to an exergetic efficiency of 75% which provides the quality index of the absorption cycle. (author).

  13. Determination of the heat transfer coefficient from IRT measurement data using the Trefftz method

    Maciejewska Beata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the method of heat transfer coefficient determination for boiling research during FC-72 flow in the minichannels, each 1.7 mm deep, 24 mm wide and 360 mm long. The heating element was the thin foil, enhanced on the side which comes into contact with fluid in the minichannels. Local values of the heat transfer coefficient were calculated from the Robin boundary condition. The foil temperature distribution and the derivative of the foil temperature were obtained by solving the two-dimensional inverse heat conduction problem, due to measurements obtained by IRT. Calculations was carried out by the method based on the approximation of the solution of the problem using a linear combination of Trefftz functions. The basic property of this functions is they satisfy the governing equation. Unknown coefficients of linear combination of Trefftz functions are calculated from the minimization of the functional that expresses the mean square error of the approximate solution on the boundary. The results presented as IR thermographs, two-phase flow structure images and the heat transfer coefficient as a function of the distance from the channel inlet, were analyzed.

  14. Measurement of the thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient of a binary bed of beryllium pebbles

    Donne, M.D.; Piazza, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik; Goraieb, A.; Sordon, G.

    1998-01-01

    The four ITER partners propose to use binary beryllium pebble bed as neutron multiplier. Recently this solution has been adopted for the ITER blanket as well. In order to study the heat transfer in the blanket the effective thermal conductivity and the wall heat transfer coefficient of the bed have to be known. Therefore at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe heat transfer experiments have been performed with a binary bed of beryllium pebbles and the results have been correlated expressing thermal conductivity and wall heat transfer coefficients as a function of temperature in the bed and of the difference between the thermal expansion of the bed and of that of the confinement walls. The comparison of the obtained correlations with the data available from the literature show a quite good agreement. (author)

  15. Heat loss mechanisms in a measurement of specific heat capacity of graphite

    Shipley, D.R.; Duane, S.

    1996-01-01

    Absorbed dose to graphite in electron beams with nominal energies in the range 3-20 MeV is determined by measuring the temperature rise in the core of a primary standard graphite calorimeter. This temperature rise is related to absorbed dose by a separate measurement of the specific heat capacity of the graphite core. There is, however, a small but significant amount of heat loss from the sample in the determination of specific heat capacity and corrections for these losses are required. This report discusses the sources of heat loss in the measurements and, where possible, provides estimates for the magnitude of these losses. For those mechanisms which are significant, a more realistic model of the measurement system is analysed and corrections for the losses are provided. (UK)

  16. Heat transfer coefficient: Medivance Arctic Sun Temperature Management System vs. water immersion.

    English, M J; Hemmerling, T M

    2008-07-01

    To improve heat transfer, the Medivance Arctic Sun Temperature Management System (Medivance, Inc., Louisville, CO, USA) features an adhesive, water-conditioned, highly conductive hydrogel pad for intimate skin contact. This study measured and compared the heat transfer coefficient (h), i.e. heat transfer efficiency, of this pad (hPAD), in a heated model and in nine volunteers' thighs; and of 10 degrees C water (hWATER) in 33 head-out immersions by 11 volunteers. Volunteer studies had ethical approval and written informed consent. Calibrated heat flux transducers measured heat flux (W m-2). Temperature gradient (DeltaT) was measured between skin and pad or water temperatures. Temperature gradient was changed through the pad's water temperature controller or by skin cooling on immersion. The heat transfer coefficient is the slope of W m-2/DeltaT: its unit is W m-2 degrees C-1. Average with (95% CI) was: model, hPAD = 110.4 (107.8-113.1), R2 = 0.99, n = 45; volunteers, hPAD = 109.8 (95.5-124.1), R2 = 0.83, n = 51; and water immersion, hWATER = 107.1 (98.1-116), R2 = 0.86, n = 94. The heat transfer coefficient for the pad was the same in the model and volunteers, and equivalent to hWATER. Therefore, for the same DeltaT and heat transfer area, the Arctic Sun's heat transfer rate would equal water immersion. This has important implications for body cooling/rewarming rates.

  17. A study on improvement of analytical prediction model for spacer grid pressure loss coefficients

    Lim, Jonh Seon

    2002-02-01

    Nuclear fuel assemblies used in the nuclear power plants consist of the nuclear fuel rods, the control rod guide tubes, an instrument guide tube, spacer grids,a bottom nozzle, a top nozzle. The spacer grid is the most important component of the fuel assembly components for thermal hydraulic and mechanical design and analyses. The spacer grids fixed with the guide tubes support the fuel rods and have the very important role to activate thermal energy transfer by the coolant mixing caused to the turbulent flow and crossflow in the subchannels. In this paper, the analytical spacer grid pressure loss prediction model has been studied and improved by considering the test section wall to spacer grid gap pressure loss independently and applying the appropriate friction drag coefficient to predict pressure loss more accurately at the low Reynolds number region. The improved analytical model has been verified based on the hydraulic pressure drop test results for the spacer grids of three types with 5x5, 16x16, 17x17 arrays, respectively. The pressure loss coefficients predicted by the improved analytical model are coincident with those test results within ±12%. This result shows that the improved analytical model can be used for research and design change of the nuclear fuel assembly

  18. Tomography based determination of permeability, Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient, and interfacial heat transfer coefficient in reticulate porous ceramics

    Petrasch, Joerg; Meier, Fabian; Friess, Hansmartin; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    A computer tomography based methodology is applied to determine the transport properties of fluid flow across porous media. A 3D digital representation of a 10-ppi reticulate porous ceramic (RPC) sample was generated by X-ray tomographic scans. Structural properties such as the porosity, specific interfacial surface area, pore-size distribution, mean survival time, two-point correlation function s 2 , and local geometry distribution of the RPC sample are directly extracted from the tomographic data. Reference solutions of the fluid flow governing equations are obtained for Re = 0.2-200 by applying finite volume direct pore-level numerical simulation (DPLS) using unstructured, body-fitted, tetrahedral mesh discretization. The permeability and the Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient are determined from the reference solutions by DPLS, and compared to the values predicted by selected porous media flow models, namely: conduit-flow, hydraulic radius theory, drag models, mean survival time bound, s 2 -bound, fibrous bed correlations, and local porosity theory-based models. DPLS is further employed to determine the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and to derive a corresponding Nu-correlation, which is compared to empirical correlations

  19. MEASUREMENT OF QUENCHING INTENSITY, CALCULATION OF HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT AND GLOBAL DATABASE OF LIQUID QUENCHANTS

    Božidar Liščić

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the need for a database of cooling intensities for liquid quenchants, in order to predict the quench hardness, microstructure, stresses and distortion, when real engineering components of complex geometry are quenched. The existing laboratory procedures for cooling intensity evaluation, using small test specimens, and Lumped-Heat-Capacity Method for calculation of heat transfer coefficient, are presented. Temperature Gradient Method for heat transfer calculation in workshop conditions, when using the Liscic/Petrofer probe, has been elaborated. Critical heat flux densities and their relation to the initial heat flux density, is explained. Specific facilities for testing quenching intensity in workshop conditions, are shown. The two phase project of the International Federation for Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering (IFHTSE, as recently approved, is mentioned.

  20. Analysis of decay heat removal following loss of RHR

    Naff, S.A.; Ward, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    Recent plant experience has included many events occurring during outages at pressurized water reactors. A recent example is the loss of residual heat removal system event that occurred March 20, 1990 at the Vogtle-1 plant following refueling. Plant conditions during outages differ markedly from those prevailing at normal full-power operation on which most past research has concentrated. Specifically, during outages the core power is low, the coolant system may be in a drained state with air or nitrogen present, and various reactor coolant system closures may be unsecured. With the residual heat removal system operating, the core decay heat is readily removed. However, if the residual heat removal system capability is lost and alternative heat removal means cannot be established, heat up of the coolant could lead to core coolant boil-off, fuel rod heat up, and core damage. A study was undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to identify what information was needed to understand pressurized water reactor response to an extended loss of residual heat removal event during refueling and maintenance outages. By identifying the possible plant conditions and cooling methods that might be used, the controlling thermal-hydraulic processes and phenomena were identified. Controlling processes and phenomena include: gravity drain into the reactor coolant system, core water boil-off, and reflux condensation cooling processes

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Extraction of Heat Transfer Coefficient in Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Current reduced-order thermal model for cryogenic propellant tanks is based on correlations built for flat plates collected in the 1950's. The use of these correlations suffers from: inaccurate geometry representation; inaccurate gravity orientation; ambiguous length scale; and lack of detailed validation. The work presented under this task uses the first-principles based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique to compute heat transfer from tank wall to the cryogenic fluids, and extracts and correlates the equivalent heat transfer coefficient to support reduced-order thermal model. The CFD tool was first validated against available experimental data and commonly used correlations for natural convection along a vertically heated wall. Good agreements between the present prediction and experimental data have been found for flows in laminar as well turbulent regimes. The convective heat transfer between tank wall and cryogenic propellant, and that between tank wall and ullage gas were then simulated. The results showed that commonly used heat transfer correlations for either vertical or horizontal plate over predict heat transfer rate for the cryogenic tank, in some cases by as much as one order of magnitude. A characteristic length scale has been defined that can correlate all heat transfer coefficients for different fill levels into a single curve. This curve can be used for the reduced-order heat transfer model analysis.

  2. Heat transfer coefficient for lead matrixing in disposal containers for used reactor fuel

    Mathew, P.M.; Taylor, M.; Krueger, P.A.

    1985-02-01

    In the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, metal matrices with low melting points are being evaluated for their potential to provide support for the shell of disposal containers for used fuel, and to act as an additional barrier to the release of radionuclides. The metal matrix would be incorporated into the container by casting. To study the heat transfer processes during solidification, a steady-state technique was used, involving lead as the cast metal, to determine the overall heat transfer coefficient between the lead and some of the candidate container materials. The existence of an air gap between the cast lead and the container material appeared to control the overall heat transfer coefficient. The experimental observations indicated that the surface topography of the container material influences the heat transfer and that a smoother surface results in a greater heat transfer than a rough surface. The experimental results also showed an increasing heat transfer coefficient with increasing temperature difference across the container base plates; a model developed to base-plate bending can explain the observed results

  3. Experimental investigation of thermal conductivity coefficient and heat exchange between fluidized bed and inclined exchange surface

    B. Stojanovic

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental research of thermal conductivity coefficients of the siliceous sand bed fluidized by air and an experimental investigation of the particle size influence on the heat transfer coefficient between fluidized bed and inclined exchange surfaces. The measurements were performed for the specific fluidization velocity and sand particle diameters d p=0.3, 0.5, 0.9 mm. The industrial use of fluidized beds has been increasing rapidly in the past 20 years owing to their useful characteristics. One of the outstanding characteristics of a fluidized bed is that it tends to maintain a uniform temperature even with nonuniform heat release. On the basis of experimental research, the influence of the process's operational parameters on the obtained values of the bed's thermal conductivity has been analyzed. The results show direct dependence of thermal conductivity on the intensity of mixing, the degree of fluidization, and the size of particles. In the axial direction, the coefficients that have been treated have values a whole order higher than in the radial direction. Comparison of experimental research results with experimental results of other authors shows good agreement and the same tendency of thermal conductivity change. It is well known in the literature that the value of the heat transfer coefficient is the highest in the horizontal and the smallest in the vertical position of the heat exchange surface. Variation of heat transfer, depending on inclination angle is not examined in detail. The difference between the values of the relative heat transfer coefficient between vertical and horizontal heater position for all particle sizes reduces by approximately 15% with the increase of fluidization rate.

  4. Controlling the Internal Heat Transfer Coefficient by the Characteristics of External Flows

    Zhuromskii, V. M.

    2018-01-01

    The engineering-physical fundamentals of substance synthesis in a boiling apparatus are presented. We have modeled a system of automatic stabilization of the maximum internal heat transfer coefficient in such an apparatus by the characteristics of external flows on the basis of adaptive seeking algorithms. The results of operation of the system in the shop are presented.

  5. Modelling water evaporation during frying with an evaporation dependent heat transfer coefficient

    Koerten, van K.N.; Somsen, D.; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2017-01-01

    In this study a cylindrical crust-core frying model was developed including an evaporation rate dependent heat transfer coefficient. For this, we applied a Nusselt relation for cylindrical bodies and view the release of vapour bubbles during the frying process as a reversed fluidised bed. The

  6. Evaluation of convective heat transfer coefficient of various crops in cyclone type dryer

    Akpinar, E. Kavak

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt was made to evaluate the convective heat transfer coefficient during drying of various crops and to investigate the influences of drying air velocity and temperature on the convective heat transfer coefficient. Drying was conducted in a convective cyclone type dryer at drying air temperatures of 60, 70 and 80 deg. C and velocities of 1 and 1.5 m/s using rectangle shaped potato and apple slices (12.5 x 12.5 x 25 mm) and cylindrical shaped pumpkin slices (35 x 5 mm). The temperature changes of the dried crops and the temperature of the drying air were measured during the drying process. It was found that the values of convective heat transfer coefficient varied from crop to crop with a range 30.21406 and 20.65470 W/m 2 C for the crops studied, and it was observed that the convective heat transfer coefficient increased in large amounts with the increase of the drying air velocity but increased in small amounts with the rise of the drying air temperature

  7. Numerical calculation of wall-to-bed heat transfer coefficients in gas-fluidized beds

    Kuipers, J.A.M.; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, W.P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A computer model for a hot gas-fluidized bed has been developed. The theoretical description is based on a two-fluid model (TFM) approach in which both phases are considered to be continuous and fully interpenetrating. Local wall-to-bed heat-transfer coefficients have been calculated by the

  8. Thermographic determination of the sheath heat transmission coefficient in a high density plasma

    Berg, van den M.A.; Bystrov, K.E.; Pasquet, R.; Zielinski, J.J.; De Temmerman, G.C.

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were performed in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma device, to determine the sheath heat transmission coefficients in a high recycling regime under various conditions of density (1–20 × 1020 m-3) and plasma composition (H2, Ar, N2) relevant for the ITER divertor plasma. The 2D surface

  9. Transmission coefficient and heat conduction of a harmonic chain with random masses

    Verheggen, T.

    1979-01-01

    We find upper and lower bounds for the transmission coefficient of a chain of random masses. Using these bounds we show that the heat conduction in such a chain does not obey Fourier's law: For different temperatures at the ends of a chain containing N particles the energy flux falls off like Nsup(-1/2) rather than N -1 . (orig.)

  10. Small thermistors for the measurement of heat transfer coefficients; Kleine Thermistoren zur Messung von Waermeuebergangskoeffizienten

    Uffrecht, Wieland; Guenther, Andre [TU Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Stroemungsmechanik; Caspary, Volker [MAN Diesel und Turbo SE, Oberhausen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The measurement of heat transfer coefficients at rotating machine parts is a difficult measurement task and is particularily challenging for fast rotating parts with good thermal conductivity in combination with gaseous flow. This contribution reports about the test of a setup with small thermistors employed to achieve compatibility with the demands of telemetry. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of convective heat transfer coefficient of various crops in cyclone type dryer

    Akpinar, E. Kavak [Mechanical Engineering Department, Firat University, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)]. E-mail: eakpinar@firat.edu.tr

    2005-09-15

    In this paper, an attempt was made to evaluate the convective heat transfer coefficient during drying of various crops and to investigate the influences of drying air velocity and temperature on the convective heat transfer coefficient. Drying was conducted in a convective cyclone type dryer at drying air temperatures of 60, 70 and 80 deg. C and velocities of 1 and 1.5 m/s using rectangle shaped potato and apple slices (12.5 x 12.5 x 25 mm) and cylindrical shaped pumpkin slices (35 x 5 mm). The temperature changes of the dried crops and the temperature of the drying air were measured during the drying process. It was found that the values of convective heat transfer coefficient varied from crop to crop with a range 30.21406 and 20.65470 W/m{sup 2} C for the crops studied, and it was observed that the convective heat transfer coefficient increased in large amounts with the increase of the drying air velocity but increased in small amounts with the rise of the drying air temperature.

  12. Determination of heat transfer coefficient with vapor condensation inside the tubes diesel’s radiator sections

    Y.K.Sklifus

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the calculation of heat transfer coefficient during condensation of steam, the mathematical model of temperature distribution in the gas and liquid phases of the coolant and the model of the formation of the condensate film on the walls of the tubes.

  13. Measurements of heat transfer coefficients at low contact pressures for actively cooled bolted armour concepts in Tore Supra

    Lipa, M.; Chappuis, Ph.; Dufayet, A.

    2000-01-01

    For the future upgrade of inner vessel components (CIEL project) a guard limiter for plasma ramp-up and disruption protection will be installed on the high field side of the vacuum vessel. Among transient heat loads, this structure has to sustain a moderate heat flux in the range of ≤0.5 MW/m 2 during quasi steady state operation (1000 s). A bolted carbon-carbon (C-C) tile is preferred compared with a brazed tile solution due to the expected moderate heat fluxes, costs and the possibility of rapid replacement of individual tiles. Large flat tile assemblies require a sufficient soft and conductive compliant layer enclosed between tile and heat sink in order to avoid thermal contact loss of the assembly during heat loads and therefore minimising the tile surface temperature. The global heat transfer coefficient (H gl ) under vacuum at low contact pressures (0.5-1.5 MPa) between C-C and CuCrZr heat sink substrata has been measured in the experimental device, installation of contact heat transfer measurements (ITTAC), using different compliant materials. It appears that the best compliant layer is a graphite sheet (PAPYEX), compared with copper-felt/foam material. As an example, a H gl number of ∼10 4 W/m 2 K at an average contact pressure of 0.5 MPa has been measured near room temperature between C-C (SEP N11) and CuCrZr substrata using a 0.5-mm thick PAPYEX layer. Thermohydraulic calculations (2D) of the guard limiter design show an expected tile surface temperature of about 550 deg. C in steady state regime for an incident heat flux of 0.5 MW/m 2

  14. The prediction of heat transfer coefficient in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    Hamdan, M.A.; Al-qaq, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the present work, a theoretical study is performed to modify an existing model that is used to predict the heat transfer coefficient in circulating fluidized bed combustors. In the model, certain parameters were used as being of constant values, which leads to an error in the obtained value of the heat transfer coefficient. In this study and as a first step, the model is thoroughly studied and then the variation of the coefficient with these parameters is presented. Having done that, correlation for these parameters are obtained and then used in the model. Finally the modified model was tested against previously experimental and theoretical data that is available in literature. It was found that the accuracy of the model has been improved after it has been modified

  15. The prediction of heat transfer coefficient in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    Hamdan, M.A.; Al-qaq, A.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Jordan Amman, Qween Rania Street, Amman, AL Jbeeha 11942 (Jordan)

    2008-11-15

    In the present work, a theoretical study is performed to modify an existing model that is used to predict the heat transfer coefficient in circulating fluidized bed combustors. In the model, certain parameters were used as being of constant values, which leads to an error in the obtained value of the heat transfer coefficient. In this study and as a first step, the model is thoroughly studied and then the variation of the coefficient with these parameters is presented. Having done that, correlation for these parameters are obtained and then used in the model. Finally the modified model was tested against previously experimental and theoretical data that is available in literature. It was found that the accuracy of the model has been improved after it has been modified. (author)

  16. Low-grade heat and its definitions of Coefficient-of-Performance (COP)

    Wang, Lin-Shu; Ma, Peizheng

    2015-01-01

    Use of fire for low grade heat, still widely practiced today, is wasteful because it is based on the principle of heat production – which should have become an outmoded idea post-Carnot for low grade heat application as an exergy analysis will readily conclude. Instead of application of exergy analysis, a new thermodynamic analysis resulting from the unification of Kelvin's energy principle and the entropy principle, formulated recently (called the entropic theory of heat), is applied here to reexamine the problem of building heating. Other than improving envelope heat resistance, conventional building efficiency gain is predominantly obtained by improving HVAC efficiency (i.e., boiler efficiency); our finding shows that there is in fact large room in improving the building heating operation surpassing 100% boiler efficiency, as demonstrated by the large value of the Kelvin limit (the theoretical upper bound of Thermal COP). This theoretical possibility of generous amount of heat from fire suggests additional possibilities of heat from primary energy other than fire, and the disclosure of these possibilities by applying the triad framework in the entropic theory of heat in terms of alternative definitions of Coefficient of Performance (COP). Consideration of such alternative COPs suggests real possibility of efficiently and cost effectively obtaining low grade heat from primary energy. - Highlights: • Importance of thinking heat extraction for high energy efficiency in buildings. • The concept of Thermal COP and the determination of its (maximum) Kelvin limit. • Key to find the sweet spot of using heat pump is thinking general heat extraction. • triadCOP &eThermalCOP are measure of energy transformation in the triad framework

  17. Analytical Modeling Of The Steinmetz Coefficient For Single-Phase Transformer Eddy Current Loss Prediction

    T. Aly Saandy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article presents to an analytical calculation methodology of the Steinmetz coefficient applied to the prediction of Eddy current loss in a single-phase transformer. Based on the electrical circuit theory the active power consumed by the core is expressed analytically in function of the electrical parameters as resistivity and the geometrical dimensions of the core. The proposed modeling approach is established with the duality parallel series. The required coefficient is identified from the empirical Steinmetz data based on the experimented active power expression. To verify the relevance of the model validations both by simulations with two in two different frequencies and measurements were carried out. The obtained results are in good agreement with the theoretical approach and the practical results.

  18. Evaluation of heat transfer coefficient of tungsten filaments at low pressures and high temperatures

    Chondrakis, N.G.; Topalis, F.V.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental method for the evaluation of the heat transfer coefficient of tungsten filaments at low pressures and high temperatures. For this purpose an electrode of a T5 fluorescent lamp was tested under low pressures with simultaneous heating in order to simulate the starting conditions in the lamp. It was placed in a sealed vessel in which the pressure was varied from 1 kM (kilo micron) to 760 kM. The voltage applied to the electrode was in the order of the filament's voltage of the lamp at the normal operation with the ballast during the preheating process. The operating frequency ranged from DC to 50 kHz. The experiment targeted on estimating the temperature of the electrode at the end of the first and the ninth second after initiating the heating process. Next, the heat transfer coefficient was calculated at the specific experimental conditions. A mathematical model based on the results was developed that estimates the heat transfer coefficient. The experiments under different pressures confirm that the filament's temperature strongly depends on the pressure.

  19. Coefficient of Performance Optimization of Single-Effect Lithium-Bromide Absorption Cycle Heat Pumps

    Vinther, Kasper; Just Nielsen, Rene; Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the coefficient of performance (COP) of a LiBr absorption cycle heat pump under different operating conditions. The investigation is carried out using a dynamical model fitted against data recorded from an actual heat pump used for district heating in S......⊘nderborg, Denmark. Since the model is too complex to study analytically, we vary different input variables within the permissible operating range of the heat pump and evaluate COP at the resulting steady-state operating points. It is found that the best set-point for each individual input is located at an extreme......-state operation of the heat pump, while avoiding crystallization issues....

  20. Sound absorption coefficient in situ: an alternative for estimating soil loss factors.

    Freire, Rosane; Meletti de Abreu, Marco Henrique; Okada, Rafael Yuri; Soares, Paulo Fernando; GranhenTavares, Célia Regina

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the sound absorption coefficient and factors of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was determined in a section of the Maringá Stream basin, Paraná State, by using erosion plots. In the field, four erosion plots were built on a reduced scale, with dimensions of 2.0×12.5m. With respect to plot coverage, one was kept with bare soil and the others contained forage grass (Brachiaria), corn and wheat crops, respectively. Planting was performed without any type of conservation practice in an area with a 9% slope. A sedimentation tank was placed at the end of each plot to collect the material transported. For the acoustic system, pink noise was used in the measurement of the proposed monitoring, for collecting information on incident and reflected sound pressure levels. In general, obtained values of soil loss confirmed that 94.3% of material exported to the basin water came from the bare soil plot, 2.8% from the corn plot, 1.8% from the wheat plot, and 1.1% from the forage grass plot. With respect to the acoustic monitoring, results indicated that at 16kHz erosion plot coverage type had a significant influence on the sound absorption coefficient. High correlation coefficients were found in estimations of the A and C factors of the USLE, confirming that the acoustic technique is feasible for the determination of soil loss directly in the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Coeficientes de transferencia de calor experimental para el enfriamiento de licor en intercambiadores de placas//Experimental heat transfer coefficients for the liquor cooling in plate heat exchanger

    Enrique Torres‐Tamayo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La pérdida de eficiencia del proceso de enfriamiento del licor amoniacal, mediante el uso de intercambiadores de calor de placas, está asociada a imprecisiones en la estimación de los coeficientes de transferencia de calor y la acumulación de incrustaciones en la superficie de intercambio. El objetivo de la investigación es determinar los coeficientes de transferencia de calor y la influencia de lasincrustaciones en la pérdida de eficiencia de la instalación. Mediante un procedimiento iterativo se estableció la ecuación del número de Nusselt y su relación con el número de Reynolds y Prandtl. Se utilizó un diseño experimental multifactorial. Los resultados predicen el conocimiento de los coeficientespara el cálculo del número de Nusselt en ambos fluidos. Los valores de los coeficientes del licor amoniacal son inferiores, ello se debe a la presencia de componentes gaseosos. La ecuación obtenida muestra correspondencia con el modelo de Buonapane, el error comparativo es del 3,55 %.Palabras claves: intercambiador de calor de placas, coeficientes de transferencia de calor, eficiencia térmica.______________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe loss of efficiency of the ammonia liquor cooling process, by means of the plate heat exchanger, is associated to the incorrect estimate of the heat transfer coefficients and the accumulation of inlays in the exchange surface. The objective of the investigation is to determine the transfer coefficients and the influence of the inlays in the efficiency loss of the installation. By means of an iterative procedure was obtained the Nusselt number equation and the relationship with the Reynolds and Prandtl number, for it was used it a design experimental multifactorial. The results predict the knowledge of the coefficients forthe calculation of the Nusselt number for both fluids. The ammonia liquor coefficients values are inferior, due to the presence of gassy

  2. Analysis study of the condensation heat transfer coefficient in the presence of noncondensable on PCCS vertical condenser tube using MARS-KS

    Choi, Dong jae; Jang, Yeong jun; Lee, Yeon-Gun [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sin [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) to be introduced in advanced LWRs removes released energy to an external heat sink by a naturally driven flow. Containment through the condensation heat transfer phenomenon in the event of the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or main steam line break (MSLB). As the released steam pressurizes the containment, the PCCS will activate to transport the decay heat In this study, a numerical analysis of the condensation heat transfer coefficients on the PCCS condenser tube is conducted using the MARS-KS code. The condensation heat transfer coefficients are obtained from JNU condensation tests performed on a 1000 long and 40 mm O.D. tube. The analysis condition covers 2 and 4 bar for the air mass fraction ranging from 0.1 to 0.8. The JNU single vertical condensation experimental results, Uchida's and Dehbi's correlation compared with the MARS-KS code's results at 2 and 4 bar. Experimental results and MARS-KS predicted heat transfer coefficient is different from the thermal resistances and Wall subcooling. An average relative error is 18.8% and 15% at 2 and 4 bar, respectively. Uchida's correlation is considered the noncondensable gas mass fraction only. Therefore, that is lower than MARS-KS results at 4 bar. Dehbi's correlation affected by ratio of the height-to-diameter, so its results are higher condensation heat transfer coefficient than MARS-KS predicted results.

  3. Steady-state heat losses in pipes for low-energy district heating

    Dalla Rosa, Alessandro; Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    2010-01-01

    The synergy between highly energy efficient buildings and low-energy district heating (DH) systems is a promising concept for the optimal integration of energy saving policies and energy supply systems based on renewable energy (RE). Distribution heat losses represent a key factor in the design o...

  4. Heat stress causes substantial labour productivity loss in Australia

    Zander, Kerstin K.; Botzen, Wouter J. W.; Oppermann, Elspeth; Kjellstrom, Tord; Garnett, Stephen T.

    2015-07-01

    Heat stress at the workplace is an occupational health hazard that reduces labour productivity. Assessment of productivity loss resulting from climate change has so far been based on physiological models of heat exposure. These models suggest productivity may decrease by 11-27% by 2080 in hot regions such as Asia and the Caribbean, and globally by up to 20% in hot months by 2050. Using an approach derived from health economics, we describe self-reported estimates of work absenteeism and reductions in work performance caused by heat in Australia during 2013/2014. We found that the annual costs were US$655 per person across a representative sample of 1,726 employed Australians. This represents an annual economic burden of around US$6.2 billion (95% CI: 5.2-7.3 billion) for the Australian workforce. This amounts to 0.33 to 0.47% of Australia’s GDP. Although this was a period when many Australians experienced what is at present considered exceptional heat, our results suggest that adaptation measures to reduce heat effects should be adopted widely if severe economic impacts from labour productivity loss are to be avoided if heat waves become as frequent as predicted.

  5. Efficiency analysis of straight fin with variable heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivity

    Sadri, Somayyeh; Raveshi, Mohammad Reza; Amiri, Shayan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, one type of applicable analytical method, differential transformation method (DTM), is used to evaluate the efficiency and behavior of a straight fin with variable thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient. Fins are widely used to enhance heat transfer between primary surface and the environment in many industrial applications. The performance of such a surface is significantly affected by variable thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient, particularly for large temperature differences. General heat transfer equation related to the fin is derived and dimensionalized. The concept of differential transformation is briefly introduced, and then this method is employed to derive solutions of nonlinear equations. Results are evaluated for several cases such as: laminar film boiling or condensation, forced convection, laminar natural convection, turbulent natural convection, nucleate boiling, and radiation. The obtained results from DTM are compared with the numerical solution to verify the accuracy of the proposed method. The effects of design parameters on temperature and efficiency are evaluated by some figures. The major aim of the present study, which is exclusive for this article, is to find the effect of the modes of heat transfer on fin efficiency. It has been shown that for radiation heat transfer, thermal efficiency reaches its maximum value

  6. Determination of drying kinetics and convective heat transfer coefficients of ginger slices

    Akpinar, Ebru Kavak; Toraman, Seda

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, the effects of some parametric values on convective heat transfer coefficients and the thin layer drying process of ginger slices were investigated. Drying was done in the laboratory by using cyclone type convective dryer. The drying air temperature was varied as 40, 50, 60 and 70 °C and the air velocity is 0.8, 1.5 and 3 m/s. All drying experiments had only falling rate period. The drying data were fitted to the twelve mathematical models and performance of these models was investigated by comparing the determination of coefficient ( R 2), reduced Chi-square ( χ 2) and root mean square error between the observed and predicted moisture ratios. The effective moisture diffusivity and activation energy were calculated using an infinite series solution of Fick's diffusion equation. The average effective moisture diffusivity values and activation energy values varied from 2.807 × 10-10 to 6.977 × 10-10 m2/s and 19.313-22.722 kJ/mol over the drying air temperature and velocity range, respectively. Experimental data was used to evaluate the values of constants in Nusselt number expression by using linear regression analysis and consequently, convective heat transfer coefficients were determined in forced convection mode. Convective heat transfer coefficient of ginger slices showed changes in ranges 0.33-2.11 W/m2 °C.

  7. Effect of pressure on heat transfer coefficient at the metal/mold interface of A356 aluminum alloy

    Fardi Ilkhchy, A.; Jabbari, Masoud; Davami, P.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to correlate interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) to applied external pressure, in which IHTC at the interface between A356 aluminum alloy and metallic mold during the solidification of casting under different pressures were obtained using the inverse heat...... conduction problem (IHCP) method. The method covers the expedient of comparing theoretical and experimental thermal histories. Temperature profiles obtained from thermocouples were used in a finite difference heat flow program to estimate the transient heat transfer coefficients. The new simple formula...... was presented for correlation between external pressure and heat transfer coefficient. Acceptable agreement with data in literature shows the accuracy of the proposed formula....

  8. Chlorophyll loss associated with heat-induced senescence in bentgrass.

    Jespersen, David; Zhang, Jing; Huang, Bingru

    2016-08-01

    Heat stress-induced leaf senescence is characterized by the loss of chlorophyll from leaf tissues. The objectives of this study were to examine genetic variations in the level of heat-induced leaf senescence in hybrids of colonial (Agrostis capillaris)×creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) contrasting in heat tolerance, and determine whether loss of leaf chlorophyll during heat-induced leaf senescence was due to suppressed chlorophyll synthesis and/or accelerated chlorophyll degradation in the cool-season perennial grass species. Plants of two hybrid backcross genotypes ('ColxCB169' and 'ColxCB190') were exposed to heat stress (38/33°C, day/night) for 28 d in growth chambers. The analysis of turf quality, membrane stability, photochemical efficiency, and chlorophyll content demonstrated significant variations in the level of leaf senescence induced by heat stress between the two genotypes, with ColXCB169 exhibiting a lesser degree of decline in chlorophyll content, photochemical efficiency and membrane stability than ColXCB190. The assays of enzymatic activity or gene expression of several major chlorophyll-synthesizing (porphobilinogen deaminase, Mg-chelatase, protochlorophyllide-reductase) and chlorophyll-degrading enzymes (chlorophyllase, pheophytinase, and chlorophyll-degrading peroxidase) indicated heat-induced decline in leaf chlorophyll content was mainly due to accelerated chlorophyll degradation, as manifested by increased gene expression levels of chlorophyllase and pheophytinase, and the activity of pheophytinase (PPH), while chlorophyll-synthesizing genes and enzymatic activities were not differentially altered by heat stress in the two genotypes. The analysis of heat-induced leaf senescence of pph mutants of Arabidopsis further confirmed that PPH could be one enzymes that plays key roles in regulating heat-accelerated chlorophyll degradation. Further research on enzymes responsible in part for the loss of chlorophyll during heat

  9. Effect of the Contact Pressure on the Friction Loss Coefficient in a Micro Gap

    Nam, Ho Yun; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Yong Bum

    2010-01-01

    As one way to improve the reliability of a steam generator for a sodium-cooled fast reactor, a double-wall tube steam generator is being developed. The current development of the DWTSG focuses on the improvement of heat transfer capability for a double-wall tube and the development of a proper leak detection method for the double-wall tube during the operation of a reactor. In the conventional double wall tubes(DWT), the inner tube and the outer tube are made of the same material. When the temperature difference between the inner tube and the outer tube increases, the heat transfer efficiency decreases. To improve the heat transfer capability of a double wall tube, the inner tube is made of a material with a thermal expansion coefficient which is about 10 to 15% greater than that of the outer tube . For the on-line and real-time detection of whether the heat transfer tube is damaged or not, a detection method was developed by combining the heat transfer tube gaps and the detection holes meeting with a one-to-one correspondence in the lower tubesheet. In the pre-stressed DWT, there is a very small space due to the surface roughness of the inner wall and outer wall. Thus, if the outer wall is broken, the helium gas (2MPa) in the very narrow space is ejected into the sodium (0.1MPa), and if the inner wall is broken, the superheated gas (16.5MPa) is ejected into the space filled with helium gas. If the four grooves with 0.2-04mm depths are dug in the inner surface of the outer wall in order for the helium gas to flow easily, we can detect the leakage by checking the change of gas volume in the online groove

  10. Estimation of instantaneous heat transfer coefficients for a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine

    Lee, C. M.; Addy, H. E.; Bond, T. H.; Chun, K. S.; Lu, C. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The main objective of this report was to derive equations to estimate heat transfer coefficients in both the combustion chamber and coolant pasage of a rotary engine. This was accomplished by making detailed temperature and pressure measurements in a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine under a range of conditions. For each sppecific measurement point, the local physical properties of the fluids were calculated. Then an empirical correlation of the coefficients was derived by using a multiple regression program. This correlation expresses the Nusselt number as a function of the Prandtl number and Reynolds number.

  11. Influence of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition

    Guo Zerong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition, considering the heat transfer coefficient as the power function of temperature, mathematical thermal explosion steady state and unsteady-state model of finite cylindrical fireworks and crackers with complex shell structures are established based on two-dimensional steady state thermal explosion theory. The influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition are analyzed. When heat transfer coefficient is changing with temperature and in the condition of natural convection heat transfer, critical ambient temperature lessen, thermal explosion time to ignition shorten. If ambient temperature is close to critical ambient temperature, the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on time to ignition become large. For firework with inner barrel in example analysis, the critical ambient temperature of propellant is 463.88 K and the time to ignition is 4054.9s at 466 K, 0.26 K and 450.8s less than without considering the change of heat transfer coefficient respectively. The calculation results show that the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion time to ignition is greater in this example. Therefore, the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient should be considered into thermal safety evaluation of fireworks to reduce potential safety hazard.

  12. Effect of Wind Flow on Convective Heat Losses from Scheffler Solar Concentrator Receivers

    Nene, Anita Arvind; Ramachandran, S.; Suyambazhahan, S.

    2018-05-01

    Receiver is an important element of solar concentrator system. In a Scheffler concentrator, solar rays get concentrated at focus of parabolic dish. While radiation losses are more predictable and calculable since strongly related to receiver temperature, convective looses are difficult to estimate in view of additional factors such as wind flow direction, speed, receiver geometry, prior to current work. Experimental investigation was carried out on two geometries of receiver namely cylindrical and conical with 2.7 m2 Scheffler to find optimum condition of tilt to provide best efficiency. Experimental results showed that as compared to cylindrical receiver, conical receiver gave maximum efficiency at 45° tilt angle. However effect of additional factors like wind speed, wind direction on especially convective losses could not be separately seen. The current work was undertaken to investigate further the same two geometries using computation fluid dynamics using FLUENT to compute convective losses considering all variables such at tilt angle of receiver, wind velocity and wind direction. For cylindrical receiver, directional heat transfer coefficient (HTC) is remarkably high to tilt condition meaning this geometry is critical to tilt leading to higher convective heat losses. For conical receiver, directional average HTC is remarkably less to tilt condition leading to lower convective heat loss.

  13. MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF OPERATION HEAT NETWORKS IN VIEW OF HEAT LOSS

    ZBARAZ L. I.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Goal. In recent years, due to a significant rise in price of energy, the reduction of direct costs for heating becomes a priority. In the utilities especially important to optimization of energy heating system equipment. During transport of thermal energy in the distribution networks thermal losses occur along the length of the hydraulic pipes and the coolant pumping losses. These loss-dependence of the particular distribution network. Changing temperature and the hydraulic regime at the source necessary to achieve the minimum cost of transport for today acting tariffs for energy. Scientific novelty. The studies received law changes head to the source at the qualitative and quantitative methods of regulation. Results. A mathematical model of an extensive network of decentralized heat source heating, which are analyzed using different methods of regulating and found the best.

  14. Comparison of boiling heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop correlations for evaporators

    Eskin, N.; Arslan, G.

    2009-01-01

    Evaporator design is an important aspect for the HVAC industry. As the demand for more efficient and compact heat exchangers increase, researches on estimation of two-phase flow heat transfer and pressure drop gain importance. Due to complexity of the hydrodynamic and heat transfer of the two-phase flow, there are many experimental studies available for refrigerants int he literature. In this study, a model for boiling heat transfer in a horizontal tube has been developed and the simulation results are compared with experimental ones published in the literature. In these comparisons, heat transfer coefficient is calculated by using Kattan-Thome-Favrat (1998), Shah (1982), Kandilikar (1990), Chaddock and Brunemann (1967) correlations under different operational conditions such as saturation pressure, mass flux, the type of refrigerant and two phase flow pattern. Besides that flow pattern has also been considered in the simulation by using Thome and El Hajal (2002) model. For pressure drop Lockhart-Martinelli (1949), Mueller-Steinhagen-Hack (1986) and Groennerund (1979) correlations are used in simulations. Local vapor quality change at each experimental condition through the model is determined. Roughness is an important parameter for frictional pressure drop. Friction coefficient is determined by using Churchill (1977) model. (author)

  15. Calculating the Effect of External Shading on the Solar Heat Gain Coefficient of Windows

    Kohler, Christian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shukla, Yash [CEPT Univ., Ahmedabad (India); Rawal, Rajan [CEPT Univ., Ahmedabad (India)

    2017-08-09

    Current prescriptive building codes have limited ways to account for the effect of solar shading, such as overhangs and awnings, on window solar heat gains. We propose two new indicators, the adjusted Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (aSHGC) which accounts for external shading while calculating the SHGC of a window, and a weighted SHGC (SHGCw) which provides a seasonal SHGC weighted by solar intensity. We demonstrate a method to calculate these indices using existing tools combined with additional calculations. The method is demonstrated by calculating the effect of an awning on a clear double glazing in New Delhi.

  16. Effect of Mixed Working Fluid Composition on Binary Cycle Condenser Heat Transfer Coefficients

    Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

    2011-10-01

    Effect of Mixed Working Fluid Composition on Binary Cycle Condenser Heat Transfer Coefficients Dan Wendt, Greg Mines Idaho National Laboratory The use of mixed working fluids in binary power plants can provide significant increases in plant performance, provided the heat exchangers are designed to take advantage of these fluids non-isothermal phase changes. In the 1980's testing was conducted at DOE's Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) where mixtures of different compositions were vaporized at supercritical pressures and then condensed. This testing had focused on using the data collected to verify that Heat Transfer Research Incorporated (HTRI) codes were suitable for the design of heat exchangers that could be used with mixtures. The HCRF data includes mixture compositions varying from 0% to 40% isopentane and condenser tube orientations of 15{sup o}, 60{sup o}, and 90{sup o} from horizontal. Testing was performed over a range of working fluid and cooling fluid conditions. Though the condenser used in this testing was water cooled, the working fluid condensation occurred on the tube-side of the heat exchanger. This tube-side condensation is analogous to that in an air-cooled condenser. Tube-side condensing heat transfer coefficient information gleaned from the HCRF testing is used in this study to assess the suitability of air-cooled condenser designs for use with mixtures. Results of an air-cooled binary plant process model performed with Aspen Plus indicate that that the optimal mixture composition (producing the maximum net power for the scenario considered) is within the range of compositions for which data exist. The HCRF data is used to assess the impact of composition, tube orientation, and process parameters on the condensing heat transfer coefficients. The sensitivity of the condensing coefficients to these factors is evaluated and the suitability of air-cooled condenser designs with mixtures is assessed. This paper summarizes the evaluation

  17. Thermal performance of the nuclear fuel rods submitted to angular variation of the heat exchanger coefficients

    Carvalho, A.M.M. de.

    1984-01-01

    Generally, LMFBR fuel rods consist of fuel pellets encapsulated in cladding tubes. These tubes are wrapped by a helical wire, working as a spacer. Distortions in the rod temperature distribution and in the external heat flux can be generated by angular variations in the local heat transfer coefficients due to the wire, by excentricity between pellet and clad or by ovalization of the cladding tube. Also, the temperature distributions can be affected by fuel densification, reestructuring and swelling. The present work consists of the development of a computer code in order to analyse the fuel rod performance as function of geometrical and operational effects, in steady state regime. (Author) [pt

  18. Development of the loss coefficient correlation for cross flow between graphite fuel blocks in the core of prismatic very high temperature reactor-PMR200

    Lee, Jeong-Hun; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu; Park, Goon-Cherl

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cross flow experimental data are produced with wedge-shaped and parallel gaps. • The results of a CFD analysis and experimental data are in good agreement. • Pressure loss coefficient for the cross gap between fuel blocks in PMR200 is found. • A new correlation of the cross flow loss coefficient for PMR200 is proposed. - Abstract: The core of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) PMR200 (a prismatic modular reactor rated at 200 MW of thermal power) consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of graphite. If the core bypass flow ratio increases, the coolant channel flow is decreased and can then lower the heat removal efficiency, resulting in a locally increased fuel block temperature. The coolant channels in the fuel blocks are connected to bypass gaps by the cross gap, complicating flow distribution in the VHTR core. Therefore, reliable estimation of the bypass flow is highly important for the design and safety analysis of the VHTR core. Because of the complexity of the core geometry and gap configuration, it is challenging to predict the flow distribution in the VHTR core. To analyze this flow distribution accurately, it is necessary to determine the cross flow phenomena, and the loss coefficient across the cross gap has to be evaluated to determine the flow distribution in the VHTR core when a lumped parameter code or a flow network analysis code that uses the correlation of the loss coefficient is employed. The purpose of this paper is to develop a loss coefficient correlation applicable to the cross gap in the PMR200 core. The cross flow was evaluated experimentally using the difference between the measured inlet and outlet mass flow rates. Next, the applicability of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX 15, was confirmed by comparing the experimental data and CFD analysis results. To understand the cross flow phenomena, the loss coefficient was evaluated; in the high Reynolds number region

  19. Development of the loss coefficient correlation for cross flow between graphite fuel blocks in the core of prismatic very high temperature reactor-PMR200

    Lee, Jeong-Hun, E-mail: huny12@snu.ac.kr; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr; Park, Goon-Cherl, E-mail: parkgc@snu.ac.kr

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Cross flow experimental data are produced with wedge-shaped and parallel gaps. • The results of a CFD analysis and experimental data are in good agreement. • Pressure loss coefficient for the cross gap between fuel blocks in PMR200 is found. • A new correlation of the cross flow loss coefficient for PMR200 is proposed. - Abstract: The core of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) PMR200 (a prismatic modular reactor rated at 200 MW of thermal power) consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of graphite. If the core bypass flow ratio increases, the coolant channel flow is decreased and can then lower the heat removal efficiency, resulting in a locally increased fuel block temperature. The coolant channels in the fuel blocks are connected to bypass gaps by the cross gap, complicating flow distribution in the VHTR core. Therefore, reliable estimation of the bypass flow is highly important for the design and safety analysis of the VHTR core. Because of the complexity of the core geometry and gap configuration, it is challenging to predict the flow distribution in the VHTR core. To analyze this flow distribution accurately, it is necessary to determine the cross flow phenomena, and the loss coefficient across the cross gap has to be evaluated to determine the flow distribution in the VHTR core when a lumped parameter code or a flow network analysis code that uses the correlation of the loss coefficient is employed. The purpose of this paper is to develop a loss coefficient correlation applicable to the cross gap in the PMR200 core. The cross flow was evaluated experimentally using the difference between the measured inlet and outlet mass flow rates. Next, the applicability of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX 15, was confirmed by comparing the experimental data and CFD analysis results. To understand the cross flow phenomena, the loss coefficient was evaluated; in the high Reynolds number region

  20. Contribution to the study of heat transfer coefficients during the decompression of a water cooled heating tube

    Bonneton, Michel.

    1980-02-01

    The main correlations likely to be suitable for describing heat transfers between the fluid and wall during decompression are analyzed. The most important experimental work on the boiling crisis in the transient regime is presented. Experimental studies are then treated. The test installation (OMEGA experiment), the instumentation used and the experiments realized are described. The purpose of these experiments was to establish heat exchange laws for decompression conditions. Local and instantaneous exchange coefficients were determined in a heated test section together with the thermohydraulic parameters of the flow. The methods used to investigate the measurements made and to analyze their validity are described. Finally, the test results are presented and discussed. It is shown that under certain conditions, the boiling crisis can be determined with a permanent regime correlation. An attempt is made to establish a correlation for the transition boiling zone from these results. A test reconstitution calculation based on a two-fluid model is presented [fr

  1. Estimation of interfacial heat transfer coefficient in inverse heat conduction problems based on artificial fish swarm algorithm

    Wang, Xiaowei; Li, Huiping; Li, Zhichao

    2018-04-01

    The interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) is one of the most important thermal physical parameters which have significant effects on the calculation accuracy of physical fields in the numerical simulation. In this study, the artificial fish swarm algorithm (AFSA) was used to evaluate the IHTC between the heated sample and the quenchant in a one-dimensional heat conduction problem. AFSA is a global optimization method. In order to speed up the convergence speed, a hybrid method which is the combination of AFSA and normal distribution method (ZAFSA) was presented. The IHTC evaluated by ZAFSA were compared with those attained by AFSA and the advanced-retreat method and golden section method. The results show that the reasonable IHTC is obtained by using ZAFSA, the convergence of hybrid method is well. The algorithm based on ZAFSA can not only accelerate the convergence speed, but also reduce the numerical oscillation in the evaluation of IHTC.

  2. Application of EoEP principle with variable heat transfer coefficient in minimizing entropy production in heat exchangers

    Balkan, F.

    2005-01-01

    A more realistic application of the entropy minimization principle EoEP is presented. This principle dictates uniform local entropy generations along the heat exchanger in order to minimize the total entropy generation rate due only to heat transfer. For a certain heat duty and area of an existing exchanger, this is done by changing the temperatures of one fluid while the temperatures of the other fluid are held constant. Since the heat duty is fixed, the change in the temperatures of the fluid after the change, however, may sometimes cause a drastic change in its flow rate. This may cause considerable changes in the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) and, consequently, in the entropy generation rate. Depending on the choice of the fluid for changing, the new entropy generation rates may be higher or lower than those based on constant U as is the case in papers recently published. So, the classical application of the EoEP principle needs to be modified to achieve more realistic entropy generation rates. In this study, the principle of EoEP with variable U is applied to some cases of heat exchange, and a simple method is presented as a criterion for the proper choice of the fluid to be changed

  3. Calculating the heat transfer coefficient of frame profiles with internal cavities

    Noyé, Peter Anders; Laustsen, Jacob Birck; Svendsen, Svend

    2004-01-01

    . The heat transfer coefficient is determined by two-dimensional numerical calculations and by measurements. Calculations are performed in Therm (LBNL (2001)), which is developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA. The calculations are performed in accordance with the future European standards...... correspondence between measured and calculated values. Hence, when determining the heat transfer coefficient of frame profiles with internal cavities by calculations, it is necessary to apply a more detailed radiation exchange model than described in the prEN ISO 10077-2 standard. The ISO-standard offers......Determining the energy performance of windows requires detailed knowledge of the thermal properties of their different elements. A series of standards and guidelines exist in this area. The thermal properties of the frame can be determined either by detailed two-dimensional numerical methods...

  4. Determination of heat transfer coefficient for an interaction of sub-cooled gas and metal

    Sidek, Mohd Zaidi; Kamarudin, Muhammad Syahidan

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for a hot metal surface and their surrounding is one of the need be defined parameter in hot forming process. This study has been conducted to determine the HTC for an interaction between sub-cooled gas sprayed on a hot metal surface. Both experiments and finite element have been adopted in this work. Initially, the designated experiment was conducted to obtain temperature history of spray cooling process. Then, an inverse method was adopted to calculate the HTC value before we validate in a finite element simulation model. The result shows that the heat transfer coefficient for interaction of subcooled gas and hot metal surface is 1000 W/m 2 K. (paper)

  5. Effect of pipe insulation losses on a loss-of-heat sink accident for an LMR

    Horak, W.C.; Guppy, J.G.; Wood, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The efficacy of pipe radiation losses as a heat sink during LOHS in a loop-type LMR plant is investigated. The Super System Code (SSC), which was modified to include pipe radiation losses, was used to simulate such an LOHS in an LMR plant. In order to enhance these losses, the pipes were assumed to be insulated by rock wool, a material whose thermal conductivity increases with increasing temperature. A transient was simulated for a total of eight days, during which the coolant temperatures peaked well below saturation conditions and then declined steadily. The coolant flow rate in the loop remained positive throughout the transient

  6. Pressure loss characteristics of LSTF steam generator heat-transfer tubes. Pressure loss increase due to tube internal instruments

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro

    1994-11-01

    The steam generator of the Large-Scale Test Facility (LSTF) includes 141 heat-transfer U-tubes with different lengths. Six U-tubes among them are furnished with 15 or 17 probe-type instruments (conduction probe with a thermocouple; CPT) protuberant into the primary side of the U-tubes. Other 135 U-tubes are not instrumented. This results in different hydraulic conditions between the instrumented and non-instrumented U-tubes with the same length. A series of pressure loss characteristics tests was conducted at a test apparatus simulating both types of U-tube. The following pressure loss coefficient (K CPT ) was reduced as a function of Reynolds number (Re) from these tests under single-phase water flow conditions. K CPT =0.16 5600≤Re≤52820, K CPT =60.66xRe -0.688 2420≤Re≤5600, K CPT =2.664x10 6 Re -2.06 1371≤Re≤2420. The maximum uncertainty is 22%. By using these results, the total pressure loss coefficients of full length U-tubes were estimated. It is clarified that the total pressure loss of the shortest instrumented U-tube is equivalent to that of the middle-length non-instrumented U-tube and also that a middle-length instrumented U-tube is equivalent to the longest non-instrumented U-tube. Concludingly. it is important to take account of the CPT pressure loss mentioned above in estimation of fluid behavior at the non-instrumented U-tubes either by using the LSTF experiment data from the CPT-installed U-tubes or by using any analytical codes. (author)

  7. Fuel-clad heat transfer coefficient of a defected fuel rod

    Bruet, M.; Stora, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    A special rod has been built with a stack of UO 2 pellets inside a thick zircaloy clad. The atmosphere inside the fuel rod can be changed and particularly the introduction of water is possible. The capsule was inserted in the Siloe pool reactor in a special device equipped with a neutron flux monitor. The fuel centerline temperature and the temperature at a certain radius of the clad were recorded by two thermocouples. The temperature profiles in the fuel and in the cladding have been calculated and then the heat transfer coefficient. In order to check the proper functioning of the device, two runs were successively achieved with a helium atmosphere. Then the helium atmosphere inside the fuel rod was removed and replaced by water. The heat transfer coefficients derived from the measurements at low power level are in agreement with the values given by the model based on thermal conductivity. However, for higher power levels, the heat transfer coefficients become higher than those based on the calculated gap

  8. Fuel-to-cladding heat transfer coefficient into reactor fuel element

    Lassmann, K.

    1979-01-01

    Models describing the fuel-to-cladding heat transfer coefficient in a reactor fuel element are reviewed critically. A new model is developed with contributions from solid, fluid and radiation heat transfer components. It provides a consistent description of the transition from an open gap to the contact case. Model parameters are easily available and highly independent of different combinations of material surfaces. There are no restrictions for fast transients. The model parameters are fitted to 388 data points under reactor conditions. For model verification another 274 data points of steel-steel and aluminium-aluminium interfaces, respectively, were used. The fluid component takes into account peak-to-peak surface roughnesses and, approximatively, also the wavelengths of surface roughnesses. For minor surface roughnesses normally prevailing in reactor fuel elements the model asymptotically yields Ross' and Stoute's model for the open gap, which is thus confirmed. Experimental contact data can be interpreted in very different ways. The new model differs greatly from Ross' and Stoute's contact term and results in better correlation coefficients. The numerical algorithm provides an adequate representation for calculating the fuel-to-cladding heat transfer coefficient in large fuel element structural analysis computer systems. (orig.) [de

  9. On the determination of the overall heat transmission coefficient and soil heat flux for a fog cooled, naturally ventilated greenhouse: Analysis of radiation and convection heat transfer

    Abdel-Ghany, Ahmed M.; Kozai, Toyoki

    2006-01-01

    A physical model for analyzing the radiative and convective heat transfer in a fog cooled, naturally ventilated greenhouse was developed for estimating the overall heat transmission coefficient based on the conduction, convection and thermal radiation heat transfer coefficients and for predicting the soil heat flux. The contribution of the water vapor of the inside air to the emission and absorption of thermal radiation was determined. Measurements of the outside and inside greenhouse environments to be used in the analysis were conducted around solar noon (12:19-13:00) on a hot sunny day to provide the maximum solar radiation transmission into the greenhouse. The net solar radiation flux measured at the greenhouse floor showed a reasonable agreement with the predicted value. The net fluxes were estimated around noon. The average net radiation (solar and thermal) at the soil surface was 220.0 W m -2 , the average soil heat flux was 155.0 W m -2 and the average contribution of the water vapor of the inside air to the thermal radiation was 22.0 W m -2 . The average overall heat transmission coefficient was 4.0 W m -2 C -1 and was in the range between 3.0 W m -2 C -1 and 6.0 W m -2 C -1 under the different hot summer conditions between the inside and outside of the naturally ventilated, fog cooled greenhouse

  10. Prediction of local loss coefficient for turbulent flow in axisymmetric sudden expansions with a chamfer: Effect of Reynolds number

    Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Young In

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Turbulent flow in axisymmetric sudden expansion with a chamfer is studied numerically. • Reynolds number dependency of the local loss coefficient is investigated. • Extended correlation is proposed for estimation of the local loss coefficient. - Abstract: This paper reports the pressure losses in turbulent flows through axisymmetric sudden expansions having a slight chamfer on the edge. A parametric study is performed for dimensionless chamfer lengths of 0–0.5, expansion ratios of 2–6, and chamfer angles of 0–45° in a Reynolds number range of 1 × 10 5 –8 × 10 5 . The chamfer effect on the expansion losses and its dependence on the Reynolds number are analyzed in detail along with a discussion of the relevant flow features. On the basis of numerical results, an existing correlation of the local loss coefficient is also extended to take into account the effect of the Reynolds number additionally

  11. Numerical determination of lateral loss coefficients for subchannel analysis in nuclear fuel bundles

    Sin Kim; Goon-Cherl Park [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-01

    An accurate prediction of cross-flow based on detailed knowledge of the velocity field in subchannels of a nuclear fuel assembly is of importance in nuclear fuel performance analysis. In this study, the low-Reynolds number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model has been adopted in two adjacent subchannels with cross-flow. The secondary flow is estimated accurately by the anisotropic algebraic Reynolds stress model. This model was numerically calculated by the finite element method and has been verified successfully through comparison with existing experimental data. Finally, with the numerical analysis of the velocity field in such subchannel domain, an analytical correlation of the lateral loss coefficient is obtained to predict the cross-flow rate in subchannel analysis codes. The correlation is expressed as a function of the ratio of the lateral flow velocity to the donor subchannel axial velocity, recipient channel Reynolds number and pitch-to-diameter.

  12. Condition monitoring of steam generator by estimating the overall heat transfer coefficient

    Furusawa, Hiroaki; Gofuku, Akio

    2013-01-01

    This study develops a technique for monitoring in on-line the state of the steam generator of the fast-breeder reactor (FBR) “Monju”. Because the FBR uses liquid sodium as coolant, it is necessary to handle liquid sodium with caution due to its chemical characteristics. The steam generator generates steam by the heat of secondary sodium coolant. The sodium-water reaction may happen if a pinhole or crack occurs at the thin metal tube wall that separates the secondary sodium coolant and water/steam. Therefore, it is very important to detect an anomaly of the wall of heat transfer tubes at an early stage. This study aims at developing an on-line condition monitoring technique of the steam generator by estimating overall heat transfer coefficient from process signals. This paper describes simplified mathematical models of superheater and evaporator to estimate the overall heat transfer coefficient and a technique to diagnose the state of the steam generator. The applicability of the technique is confirmed by several estimations using simulated process signals with artificial noises. The results of the estimations show that the developed technique can detect the occurrence of an anomaly. (author)

  13. Flow boiling heat transfer coefficients at cryogenic temperatures for multi-component refrigerant mixtures of nitrogen-hydrocarbons

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The recuperative heat exchanger governs the overall performance of the mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler. In these heat exchangers, the non-azeotropic refrigerant mixture of nitrogen-hydrocarbons undergoes boiling and condensation simultaneously at cryogenic temperature. Hence, the design of such heat exchanger is crucial. However, due to lack of empirical correlations to predict two-phase heat transfer coefficients of multi-component mixtures at low temperature, the design of such heat exchanger is difficult.

  14. Determination of interfacial heat transfer coefficient for TC11 titanium alloy hot forging

    Lu, Baoshan; Wang, Leigang; Geng, Zhe; Huang, Yao

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, based on self-developed experimental apparatus, the upsetting test of TC11 titanium alloy on the hot flat die was conducted and Beck's nonlinear inverse estimation method was adopted to calculate the interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) and the change rules of IHTC following billet deformation rate, average interfacial temperature and holding time were investigated respectively. Experimental results indicate that IHTC increases with the increase of deformation rate as a whole, and the billet deformation heat and interfacial friction heat during forming that remarkably contribute to IHTC and the contributions by heat conduction to IHTC is differ from that by friction; the glass lubricant coated on the billet surface that weakens the heat transfer situation in the early stage of forging, however, this blocking effect of lubricant on IHTC soon vanishes with increasing deformation rate and it enhances the interface heat transfer later; the average interfacial temperature impacts on IHTC in many aspects and a high average interfacial temperature IHTC corresponds to a high IHTC when the deformation rate is certain, but this changing trend is not monotonous; the IHTC decreases with the increase of holding time due to oxidation. After certain holding time, the IHTC is only related to temperature and pressure in the absence of deformation rate, and the influence of pressure on IHTC is larger than that of temperature on it.

  15. Experimental study of overall heat transfer coefficient in the application of dilute nanofluids in the car radiator

    Peyghambarzadeh, S.M.; Hashemabadi, S.H.; Naraki, M.; Vermahmoudi, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Heat transfer of coolant flow through the automobile radiators is of great importance for the optimization of fuel consumption. In this study, the heat transfer performance of the automobile radiator is evaluated experimentally by calculating the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) according to the conventional ε-NTU technique. Copper oxide (CuO) and Iron oxide (Fe 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles are added to the water at three concentrations 0.15, 0.4, and 0.65 vol.% with considering the best pH for longer stability. In these experiments, the liquid side Reynolds number is varied in the range of 50–1000 and the inlet liquid to the radiator has a constant temperature which is changed at 50, 65 and 80 °C. The ambient air for cooling of the hot liquid is used at constant temperature and the air Reynolds number is varied between 500 and 700. However, the effects of these variables on the overall heat transfer coefficient are deeply investigated. Results demonstrate that both nanofluids show greater overall heat transfer coefficient in comparison with water up to 9%. Furthermore, increasing the nanoparticle concentration, air velocity, and nanofluid velocity enhances the overall heat transfer coefficient. In contrast, increasing the nanofluid inlet temperature, lower overall heat transfer coefficient was recorded. -- Highlights: ► Overall heat transfer coefficient in the car radiator measured experimentally. ► Nanofluids showed greater heat transfer performance comparing with water. ► Increasing liquid and air Re increases the overall heat transfer coefficient. ► Increasing the inlet liquid temperature decreases the overall heat transfer coefficient

  16. Experimental measurement of variation of heat transfer coefficient and temperature gradients in 16'' deep fluidised beds

    Blacker, P.T.; McLain, D.R.

    1962-04-01

    The object of the experiments was to choose suitable particulate materials for a fluidised bed cooler, to test a deep fluidised bed for uniformity of heat transfer coefficient, and to explore the temperature distribution in a centrally heated annular fluidised bed. This memorandum records the techniques used and some of the practical aspects involved, together with the performance results obtained, for the assistance of other experimenters who may wish to use fluidised beds as a laboratory technique. Mathematical correlation of the results has not been attempted since some of the properties of the bed material were not known and to determine them was beyond the scope of the work programme. Rather, we have compared our results with those of other experimenters. Graphite tubes, for use in steady state thermal stress experiments, are to be heated by a graphite radiant heater situated in the bore and cooled on the outer surface. The tubes are 2 cm. bore, 8 cm. outside diameter and 48 cm. long. The outside temperature of the tubes is to be between 500 deg. C. and 1500 deg. C. It is estimated that the heat transfer rate required for fracture at the outer surface is 30 watts/cm 2 . This could readily be achieved by cooling with liquid metals, water or high velocity gas. However, serious problems of either materials compatibility or mechanical complexity make these undesirable. A water-cooled fluidised bed of compatible solids fluidised with nitrogen gas can overcome most of these problems and give heat transfer coefficients close to that required, vis. about 0.1 w/cm C . A coolant bed about 20'' long would be required and an annulus of about 2'' radial width round the specimen was considered to be practicable

  17. Experimental measurement of variation of heat transfer coefficient and temperature gradients in 16'' deep fluidised beds

    Blacker, P T; McLain, D R [Reactor Development Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1962-04-15

    The object of the experiments was to choose suitable particulate materials for a fluidised bed cooler, to test a deep fluidised bed for uniformity of heat transfer coefficient, and to explore the temperature distribution in a centrally heated annular fluidised bed. This memorandum records the techniques used and some of the practical aspects involved, together with the performance results obtained, for the assistance of other experimenters who may wish to use fluidised beds as a laboratory technique. Mathematical correlation of the results has not been attempted since some of the properties of the bed material were not known and to determine them was beyond the scope of the work programme. Rather, we have compared our results with those of other experimenters. Graphite tubes, for use in steady state thermal stress experiments, are to be heated by a graphite radiant heater situated in the bore and cooled on the outer surface. The tubes are 2 cm. bore, 8 cm. outside diameter and 48 cm. long. The outside temperature of the tubes is to be between 500 deg. C. and 1500 deg. C. It is estimated that the heat transfer rate required for fracture at the outer surface is 30 watts/cm{sup 2}. This could readily be achieved by cooling with liquid metals, water or high velocity gas. However, serious problems of either materials compatibility or mechanical complexity make these undesirable. A water-cooled fluidised bed of compatible solids fluidised with nitrogen gas can overcome most of these problems and give heat transfer coefficients close to that required, vis. about 0.1 w/cm C . A coolant bed about 20'' long would be required and an annulus of about 2'' radial width round the specimen was considered to be practicable.

  18. Experiments and numerical simulations of flow field and heat transfer coefficients inside an autoclave model

    Ghamlouch, T.; Roux, S.; Bailleul, J.-L.; Lefèvre, N.; Sobotka, V.

    2017-10-01

    Today's aerospace industrial first priority is the quality improvement of the composite material parts with the reduction of the manufacturing time in order to increase their quality/cost ratio. A fabrication method that could meet these specifications especially for large parts is the autoclave curing process. In fact the autoclave molding ensures the thermal control of the composite parts during the whole curing cycle. However the geometry of the tools as well as their positioning in the autoclave induce non uniform and complex flows around composite parts. This heterogeneity implies non-uniform heat transfers which can directly impact on part quality. One of the main challenges is therefore to describe the flow field inside an autoclave as well as the convective heat transfer from the heated pressurized gas to the composite part and the mold. For this purpose, and given the technical issues associated with instrumentation and measurements in actual autoclaves, an autoclave model was designed and then manufactured based on similarity laws. This tool allows the measurement of the flow field around representative real industrial molds using the PIV technique and the characterization of the heat transfer thanks to thermal instrumentation. The experimental results are then compared with those derived from numerical simulations using a commercial RANS CFD code. This study aims at developing a semi-empirical approach for the prediction of the heat transfer coefficient around the parts and therefore predicts its thermal history during the process with a view of optimization.

  19. Replacement of unsteady heat transfer coefficient by equivalent steady-state one when calculating temperature oscillations in a thermal layer

    Supel'nyak, M. I.

    2017-11-01

    Features of calculation of temperature oscillations which are damped in a surface layer of a solid and which are having a small range in comparison with range of temperature of the fluid medium surrounding the solid at heat transfer coefficient changing in time under the periodic law are considered. For the specified case the equations for approximate definition of constant and oscillating components of temperature field of a solid are received. The possibility of use of appropriately chosen steady-state coefficient when calculating the temperature oscillations instead of unsteady heat-transfer coefficient is investigated. Dependence for definition of such equivalent constant heat-transfer coefficient is determined. With its help the research of temperature oscillations of solids with canonical form for some specific conditions of heat transfer is undertaken. Comparison of the obtained data with results of exact solutions of a problem of heat conductivity by which the limits to applicability of the offered approach are defined is carried out.

  20. Device and method for measuring the coefficient of performance of a heat pump

    Brantley, V.R.; Miller, D.R.

    1982-05-18

    A method and instrument is provided which allows quick and accurate measurement of the coefficient of performance of an installed electrically powered heat pump including auxiliary resistane heaters. Temperature-sensitive resistors are placed in the return and supply air ducts to measure the temperature increase of the air across the refrigerant and resistive-heating elements of the system. The voltages across the resistors which are directly proportional to the respective duct tempertures are applied to the inputs of a differential amplifier so that its output voltage is proportional to the temperature difference across the unit. A voltage-to-frequency converter connected to the output of the differential amplifier converts the voltage signal to a proportional-frequency signal. A digital watt meter is used to measure the power to the unit and produces a signal having a frequency proportional to the input power. A digital logic circuit ratios the temperature difference signal and the electric power input signal in a unique manner to produce a single number which is the coefficient of performance of the unit over the test interval. The digital logic and an in-situ calibration procedure enables the instrument to make these measurements in such a way that the ratio of heat flow/power input is obtained without computations. No specialized knowledge of thermodynamics or electrons is required to operate the instrument.

  1. Heat Transfer Coefficient at Cast-Mold Interface During Centrifugal Casting: Calculation of Air Gap

    Bohacek, Jan; Kharicha, Abdellah; Ludwig, Andreas; Wu, Menghuai; Karimi-Sibaki, Ebrahim

    2018-06-01

    During centrifugal casting, the thermal resistance at the cast-mold interface represents a main blockage mechanism for heat transfer. In addition to the refractory coating, an air gap begins to form due to the shrinkage of the casting and the mold expansion, under the continuous influence of strong centrifugal forces. Here, the heat transfer coefficient at the cast-mold interface h has been determined from calculations of the air gap thickness d a based on a plane stress model taking into account thermoelastic stresses, centrifugal forces, plastic deformations, and a temperature-dependent Young's modulus. The numerical approach proposed here is rather novel and tries to offer an alternative to the empirical formulas usually used in numerical simulations for a description of a time-dependent heat transfer coefficient h. Several numerical tests were performed for different coating thicknesses d C, rotation rates Ω, and temperatures of solidus T sol. Results demonstrated that the scenario at the interface is unique for each set of parameters, hindering the possibility of employing empirical formulas without a preceding experiment being performed. Initial values of h are simply equivalent to the ratio of the coating thermal conductivity and its thickness ( 1000 Wm-2 K-1). Later, when the air gap is formed, h drops exponentially to values at least one order of magnitude smaller ( 100 Wm-2 K-1).

  2. Effect of heat and mass transfer coefficients on the performance of automotive catalytic converters

    Shamim, T. [Michigan Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Dearborn, MI (United States)

    2003-06-01

    This paper numerically investigates the role of heat and mass transfer coefficients on the performance of automotive catalytic converters, which are employed to reduce engine exhaust emissions. The pollutant conversion performance of a converter is influenced by a number of physical and chemical processes that take place in gaseous and solid phases as the exhaust gases flow through the catalyst. A quantitative predictive understanding of these complex catalyst processes involving flow dynamics, heterogeneous surface reactions and heat and mass transport mechanisms is important in improving the converter design. The role of convective transport phenomena becomes important at high temperature when the mass transfer becomes rate-limiting to an increasing extent. The objective of the present study is to elucidate the influence of convective heat and mass transfer coefficients (mechanisms). The mathematical model considers the conservation of mass, momentum and energy in both gaseous and solid phases. In addition to the heterogeneous surface reactions, the model also takes into account the adsorption/desorption of oxygen in the catalyst during non-stoichiometric composition of air/fuel mixtures. The governing equations are solved by an implicit scheme using a successive line under a relaxation method. The converter performance under the transient conditions as simulated by the US Federal Test Procedure (US-FTP) is analysed. (Author)

  3. Evaluation of Contact Heat Transfer Coefficient and Phase Transformation during Hot Stamping of a Hat-Type Part

    Kim, Heung-Kyu; Lee, Seong Hyeon; Choi, Hyunjoo

    2015-01-01

    Using an inverse analysis technique, the heat transfer coefficient on the die-workpiece contact surface of a hot stamping process was evaluated as a power law function of contact pressure. This evaluation was to determine whether the heat transfer coefficient on the contact surface could be used for finite element analysis of the entire hot stamping process. By comparing results of the finite element analysis and experimental measurements of the phase transformation, an evaluation was performed to determine whether the obtained heat transfer coefficient function could provide reasonable finite element prediction for workpiece properties affected by the hot stamping process. PMID:28788046

  4. Combined Influence of Strain and Heat Loss on Turbulent Premixed Flame Stabilization

    Tay-Wo-Chong, Luis; Zellhuber, Mathieu; Komarek, Thomas; Im, Hong G.; Polifke, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    relation in terms of Markstein number, Karlovitz Number and a non-dimensional heat loss parameter was proposed for the combined influence of strain and heat losses on the consumption speed. Combining this empirical relation with a presumed probability

  5. Finite time thermodynamic analysis and optimization of solar-dish Stirling heat engine with regenerative losses

    Sharma Arjun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the performance of the solar-driven Stirling engine system to maximize the power output and thermal efficiency using the non-linearized heat loss model of the solar dish collector and the irreversible cycle model of the Stirling engine. Finite time thermodynamic analysis has been done for combined system to calculate the finite-rate heat transfer, internal heat losses in the regenerator, conductive thermal bridging losses and finite regeneration process time. The results indicate that exergy efficiency of dish system increases as the effectiveness of regenerator increases but decreases with increase in regenerative time coefficient. It is also found that optimal range of collector temperature and corresponding concentrating ratio are 1000 K~1400 K and 1100~1400, respectively in order to get maximum value of exergy efficiency. It is reported that the exergy efficiency of this dish system can reach the maximum value when operating temperature and concentrating ratio are 1150 K and 1300, respectively.

  6. Chaos of radiative heat-loss-induced flame front instability.

    Kinugawa, Hikaru; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    We are intensively studying the chaos via the period-doubling bifurcation cascade in radiative heat-loss-induced flame front instability by analytical methods based on dynamical systems theory and complex networks. Significant changes in flame front dynamics in the chaotic region, which cannot be seen in the bifurcation diagrams, were successfully extracted from recurrence quantification analysis and nonlinear forecasting and from the network entropy. The temporal dynamics of the fuel concentration in the well-developed chaotic region is much more complicated than that of the flame front temperature. It exhibits self-affinity as a result of the scale-free structure in the constructed visibility graph.

  7. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2014-01-01

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ω e τ e effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ω e τ e as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics

  8. Comparison of the methods for calculating the interfacial heat transfer coefficient in hot stamping

    Zhao, Kunmin; Wang, Bin; Chang, Ying; Tang, Xinghui; Yan, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a hot stamping experimentation and three methods for calculating the Interfacial Heat Transfer Coefficient (IHTC) of 22MnB5 boron steel. Comparison of the calculation results shows an average error of 7.5% for the heat balance method, 3.7% for the Beck's nonlinear inverse estimation method (the Beck's method), and 10.3% for the finite-element-analysis-based optimization method (the FEA method). The Beck's method is a robust and accurate method for identifying the IHTC in hot stamping applications. The numerical simulation using the IHTC identified by the Beck's method can predict the temperature field with a high accuracy. - Highlights: • A theoretical formula was derived for direct calculation of IHTC. • The Beck's method is a robust and accurate method for identifying IHTC. • Finite element method can be used to identify an overall equivalent IHTC

  9. Irrecoverable pressure loss coefficients for two out-of-plane piping elbows at high Reynolds number

    Coffield, R.D.; Hammond, R.B.; McKeown, P.T.

    1999-02-08

    Pressure drops of multiple piping elbows were experimentally determined for high Reynolds number flows. The testing described has been performed in order to reduce uncertainties in the currently used methods for predicting irrecoverable pressure losses and also to provide a qualification database for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer codes. The earlier high Reynolds number correlations had been based on extrapolations over several orders of magnitude in Reynolds number from where the original database existed. Recent single elbow test data shows about a factor of two lower elbow pressure loss coefficient (at 40x 106 Reynolds number) than those from current correlations. This single piping elbow data has been extended in this study to a multiple elbow configuration of two elbows that are 90o out-of-plane relative to each other. The effects of separation distance and Reynolds number have been correlated and presented in a form that can be used for design application. Contrary to earlier extrapolations from low Reynolds numbers (Re c 1.0x 106), a strong Reynolds number dependence was found to exist. The combination of the high Reynolds number single elbow data with the multiple elbow interaction effects measured in this study shows that earlier design correlations are conservative by significant margins at high Reynolds numbers. Qualification of CFD predictions with this new high Reynolds number database will help guide the need for additional high Reynolds number testing of other piping configurations. The study also included velocity measurements at several positions downstream of the first and second test elbows using an ultrasonic flowmeter. Reasonable agreement after the first test elbow was found relative to flow fields that are known to exist from low Reynolds number visual tests and also from CFD predictions. This data should help to qualify CFD predictions of the three-dimensional flow stream downstream of the second test elbow.

  10. Experimental determination of the heat transfer coefficient in shell-and-tube condensers using the Wilson plot method

    Havlik Jan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the experimental determination of heat transfer coefficients. The calculation of heat transfer coefficients constitutes a crucial issue in design and sizing of heat exchangers. The Wilson plot method and its modifications based on measured experimental data utilization provide an appropriate tool for the analysis of convection heat transfer processes and the determination of convection coefficients in complex cases. A modification of the Wilson plot method for shell-and-tube condensers is proposed. The original Wilson plot method considers a constant value of thermal resistance on the condensation side. The heat transfer coefficient on the cooling side is determined based on the change in thermal resistance for different conditions (fluid velocity and temperature. The modification is based on the validation of the Nusselt theory for calculating the heat transfer coefficient on the condensation side. A change of thermal resistance on the condensation side is expected and the value is part of the calculation. It is possible to improve the determination accuracy of the criterion equation for calculation of the heat transfer coefficient using the proposed modification. The criterion equation proposed by this modification for the tested shell-and-tube condenser achieves good agreement with the experimental results and also with commonly used theoretical methods.

  11. The effect of surface roughness on the heat exchange and pressure-drop coefficients

    Malherbe, J.M.

    1963-02-01

    The effect of various types of roughness on the wall of an axial tube in an annular space of 15-25 mm cooled by an air-flow has been studied in the case of steady turbulence. Roughness of the type 'disrupter of the boundary layer' was set up using triangular threads of 0.2 to 0.4 mm thickness machined in the tube itself, or brass or glass wire wound on a smooth tube. Tests were also carried out using the roughness provided by regularly spaced pyramids 0.4 mm high. The results obtained showed that the heat exchange increased because of the presence of this roughness. A maximum in the heat exchange and pressure-drop coefficients was observed when the pitch equals about eight times the height of the thread. An analytical method has been developed and experiments have been carried out in which the two walls of the annular space were heated in such a way as to transmit unequal heat flows. The region considered is limited to Reynolds's numbers of between 5 X 10 3 and 5 x 10 4 and wall temperatures of under 250 deg C. (author) [fr

  12. Calculation and validation of heat transfer coefficient for warm forming operations

    Omer, Kaab; Butcher, Clifford; Worswick, Michael

    2017-10-01

    In an effort to reduce the weight of their products, the automotive industry is exploring various hot forming and warm forming technologies. One critical aspect in these technologies is understanding and quantifying the heat transfer between the blank and the tooling. The purpose of the current study is twofold. First, an experimental procedure to obtain the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) as a function of pressure for the purposes of a metal forming simulation is devised. The experimental approach was used in conjunction with finite element models to obtain HTC values as a function of die pressure. The materials that were characterized were AA5182-O and AA7075-T6. Both the heating operation and warm forming deep draw were modelled using the LS-DYNA commercial finite element code. Temperature-time measurements were obtained from both applications. The results of the finite element model showed that the experimentally derived HTC values were able to predict the temperature-time history to within a 2% of the measured response. It is intended that the HTC values presented herein can be used in warm forming models in order to accurately capture the heat transfer characteristics of the operation.

  13. Development of Falling Film Heat Transfer Coefficient for Industrial Chemical Processes Evaporator Design

    Shahzad, Muhammad Wakil

    2018-03-07

    In falling film evaporators, the overall heat transfer coefficient is controlled by film thickness, velocity, liquid properties and the temperature differential across the film layer. This chapter presents the heat transfer behaviour for evaporative film boiling on horizontal tubes, but working at low pressures of 0.93–3.60 kPa as well as seawater salinity of 15,000–90,000 mg/l or ppm. Owing to a dearth of literature on film-boiling at these conditions, the chapter is motivated by the importance of evaporative film-boiling in the process industries. It is observed that in addition to the above-mentioned parameters, evaporative heat transfer of seawater is affected by the emergence of micro-bubbles within the thin film layer, particularly when the liquid saturation temperatures drop below 25°C (3.1 kPa). Such micro-bubbles are generated near to the tube wall surfaces, and they enhanced the heat transfer by two or more folds when compared with the predictions of conventional evaporative film-boiling. The appearance of micro-bubbles is attributed to the rapid increase in the specific volume of vapour, i.e. dv/dT, at low saturation temperature conditions. A new correlation is thus proposed in this chapter and it shows good agreement to the measured data with an experimental uncertainty less than ±8%.

  14. Impact of External Pressure on the Heat Transfer Coefficient during Solidification of Al-A356 Alloy

    Jabbari, Masoud; Ilkhchy, A.Fardi; Moumani, E.

    In this paper the interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) is correlated to applied external pressure, in which IHTC at the interface between A356 aluminum alloy and metallic mold during the solidification of the casting under different pressures were obtained using the Inverse Heat Conduction...... Problem (IHCP) method. The method covers the expedient of comparing theoretical and experimental thermal histories. Temperature profiles obtained from thermocouples were used in a finite difference heat flow program to estimate the transient heat transfer coefficients. The new simple formula was presented...

  15. Large scale steam flow test: Pressure drop data and calculated pressure loss coefficients

    Meadows, J.B.; Spears, J.R.; Feder, A.R.; Moore, B.P.; Young, C.E.

    1993-12-01

    This report presents the result of large scale steam flow testing, 3 million to 7 million lbs/hr., conducted at approximate steam qualities of 25, 45, 70 and 100 percent (dry, saturated). It is concluded from the test data that reasonable estimates of piping component pressure loss coefficients for single phase flow in complex piping geometries can be calculated using available engineering literature. This includes the effects of nearby upstream and downstream components, compressibility, and internal obstructions, such as splitters, and ladder rungs on individual piping components. Despite expected uncertainties in the data resulting from the complexity of the piping geometry and two-phase flow, the test data support the conclusion that the predicted dry steam K-factors are accurate and provide useful insight into the effect of entrained liquid on the flow resistance. The K-factors calculated from the wet steam test data were compared to two-phase K-factors based on the Martinelli-Nelson pressure drop correlations. This comparison supports the concept of a two-phase multiplier for estimating the resistance of piping with liquid entrained into the flow. The test data in general appears to be reasonably consistent with the shape of a curve based on the Martinelli-Nelson correlation over the tested range of steam quality

  16. Measurement of the heat transfer coefficient in the dimpled channel: effects of dimple arrangement and channel height

    Shin, So Min; Lee, Ki Seon; Park, Seoung Duck; Kwak, Jae Su

    2009-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured in a channel with one side dimpled surface. The sphere type dimples were fabricated, and the diameter (D) and the depth of dimple was 16 mm and 4 mm, respectively. Two channel heights of about 0.6D and 1.2D, two dimple configurations were tested. The Reynolds number based on the channel hydraulic diameter was varied from 30000 to 50000. The improved hue detection based transient liquid crystal technique was used in the heat transfer measurement. Heat transfer measurement results showed that high heat transfer was induced downstream of the dimples due to flow reattachment. Due to the flow recirculation on the upstream side in the dimple, the heat transfer coefficient was very low. As the Reynolds increased, the overall heat transfer coefficients also increased. With the same dimple arrangement, the heat transfer coefficients and the thermal performance factors were higher for the lower channel height. As the distance between the dimples became smaller, the overall heat transfer coefficient and the thermal performance factors increased

  17. Experimental determination of surface heat transfer coefficient in a dry ice-ethanol cooling bath using a numerical approach.

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    BACKGROUND: Dry ice-ethanol bath (-78 degree C) have been widely used in low temperature biological research to attain rapid cooling of samples below freezing temperature. The prediction of cooling rates of biological samples immersed in dry ice-ethanol bath is of practical interest in cryopreservation. The cooling rate can be obtained using mathematical models representing the heat conduction equation in transient state. Additionally, at the solid cryogenic-fluid interface, the knowledge of the surface heat transfer coefficient (h) is necessary for the convective boundary condition in order to correctly establish the mathematical problem. The study was to apply numerical modeling to obtain the surface heat transfer coefficient of a dry ice-ethanol bath. A numerical finite element solution of heat conduction equation was used to obtain surface heat transfer coefficients from measured temperatures at the center of polytetrafluoroethylene and polymethylmetacrylate cylinders immersed in a dry ice-ethanol cooling bath. The numerical model considered the temperature dependence of thermophysical properties of plastic materials used. A negative linear relationship is observed between cylinder diameter and heat transfer coefficient in the liquid bath, the calculated h values were 308, 135 and 62.5 W/(m 2 K) for PMMA 1.3, PTFE 2.59 and 3.14 cm in diameter, respectively. The calculated heat transfer coefficients were consistent among several replicates; h in dry ice-ethanol showed an inverse relationship with cylinder diameter.

  18. Determination of heat and mass transfer coefficients in a rotary shaker used in fermentation processes

    Mario Arias Zabala

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the volumetric oxygen transfer (kLa and overall heat transfer (Ua coefficients were determined in flasks which were subjected to rotary shaker action, also provided with a temperature control chamber. Likewise, it was determined the effect over such coefficients of some parameters like surrounding temperature, shaking speed, closure type, liquid volume, capacity and baffles presence or absence in each flask, to determine the optimal work conditions in the rotary shaker. The used liquid in these experiments was distilled water. The kLa and Ua coefficients were also determined in the alcoholic fermentation of glucose by Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast, in order to establish comparison standards. The maximum and minimum values of referred coefficients to distilled water and the operation conditions were:   kLa of 6.2 x 10-3 s-1, working at 25 ºC, 100 rpm, 50 ml of liquid volume, erlenmeyer of 500 ml with baffles and plastic closure. kLa of 4.107 x 10-3 s-1, working at 45 ºC, 60 rpm, 150 ml of liquid volume, erlenmeyer of 250 ml without baffles and cotton closure. Ua of 31.9963 J/min °C, working at 45 ºC, 150 rpm, 150 ml of liquid volume, erlenmeyer of 500 ml with baffles and cotton closure. Ua of 6.0179 J/min °C, working at 35 ºC, 60 rpm, 50 ml of liquid volume, erlenmeyer of 250 ml without baffles and plastic closure. The kLa and Ua values in the alcoholic fermentation and the operation conditions were: kLa of 2.6 x 10-4 s-1 and Ua of 12.8907 J/min °C, working at 35 °C, 150 rpm, 150 ml of liquid volume, Erlenmeyer of 250 ml, with baffles and cotton closure.

  19. Experimentally Determined Overall Heat Transfer Coefficients for Spacesuit Liquid Cooled Garments

    Bue, Grant; Rhodes, Richard; Anchondo, Ian; Westheimer, David; Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matt; Vonaue, Walt; Conger, Bruce; Stein, James

    2015-01-01

    A Human-In-The-Loop (HITL) Portable Life Support System 2.0 (PLSS 2.0) test has been conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center in the PLSS Development Laboratory from October 27, 2014 to December 19, 2014. These closed-loop tests of the PLSS 2.0 system integrated with human subjects in the Mark III Suit at 3.7 psi to 4.3 psi above ambient pressure performing treadmill exercise at various metabolic rates from standing rest to 3000 BTU/hr (880 W). The bulk of the PLSS 2.0 was at ambient pressure but effluent water vapor from the Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) and the Auxiliary Membrane Evaporator (Mini-ME), and effluent carbon dioxide from the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) were ported to vacuum to test performance of these components in flight-like conditions. One of the objectives of this test was to determine the overall heat transfer coefficient (UA) of the Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG). The UA, an important factor for modeling the heat rejection of an LCG, was determined in a variety of conditions by varying inlet water temperature, flow rate, and metabolic rate. Three LCG configurations were tested: the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) LCG, the Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) LCG, and the OSS auxiliary LCG. Other factors influencing accurate UA determination, such as overall heat balance, LCG fit, and the skin temperature measurement, will also be discussed.

  20. Prediction of flow boiling heat transfer coefficient for carbon dioxide in minichannels and conventional channels

    Mikielewicz Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper presented are the results of calculations using authors own model to predict heat transfer coefficient during flow boiling of carbon dioxide. The experimental data from various researches were collected. Calculations were conducted for a full range of quality variation and a wide range of mass velocity. The aim of the study was to test the sensitivity of the in-house model. The results show the importance of taking into account the surface tension as the parameter exhibiting its importance in case of the flow in minichannels as well as the influence of reduced pressure. The calculations were accomplished to test the sensitivity of the heat transfer model with respect to selection of the appropriate two-phase flow multiplier, which is one of the elements of the heat transfer model. For that purpose correlations due to Müller-Steinhagen and Heck as well as the one due to Friedel were considered. Obtained results show a good consistency with experimental results, however the selection of two-phase flow multiplier does not significantly influence the consistency of calculations.

  1. Heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling in an annular mini gap

    Hożejowska Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to present the concept of mathematical models of heat transfer in flow boiling in an annular mini gap between the metal pipe with enhanced exterior surface and the external glass pipe. The one- and two-dimensional mathematical models were proposed to describe stationary heat transfer in the gap. A set of experimental data governed both the form of energy equations in cylindrical coordinates and the boundary conditions. The models were formulated to minimize the number of experimentally determined constants. Known temperature distributions in the enhanced surface and in the fluid helped to determine, from the Robin condition, the local heat transfer coefficients at the enhanced surface – fluid contact. The Trefftz method was used to find two-dimensional temperature distributions for the thermal conductive filler layer, enhanced surface and flowing fluid. The method of temperature calculation depended on whether the area of single-phase convection ended with boiling incipience in the gap or the two-phase flow region prevailed, with either fully developed bubbly flow or bubbly-slug flow. In the two–phase flow, the fluid temperature was calculated by Trefftz method. Trefftz functions for the Laplace equation and for the energy equation were used in the calculations.

  2. Model for definition of heat transfer coefficient in an annular two-phase flow

    Khun, J.

    1976-01-01

    Near-wall heat exchange in a vertical tube at high vapor velocity in a two-phase vapor and liquid flow is investigated. The flow divides inside the tube into a near-wall liquid film and a vapor nucleus containing liquid droplets, with the boundaries being uniform. The liquid film thickness determines the main resistance during heat transfer between the wall and vapor nucleus. The theoretical model presented is verified in water vaporization experiments, the R12 cooling agent and certain hydrocarbons. The loss of friction pressure is determined by the Lockart-Martinelli method. The approximately universal Carman velocity profile is used to evaluate the velocity in film, and basing on this, film thickness is determined. The parameter ranges were: Resub(vap)=10 4 -3x10 6 , Resub(liq.)=0.9-10. The theoretical model ensures good correlation with the experiment

  3. Thermal stability and temperature coefficients of four rare-earth-cobalt matrix magnets heated in dry air

    Strnat, R. M. W.; Liu, S.; Strnat, K. J.

    1982-03-01

    Flux-loss characteristics during long-term air aging of four rare-earth-cobalt matrix magnet types were measured. Irreversible losses and reversible temperature coefficients on heating above room temperature are reported. Purely magnetic and permanent microstructure-related changes during aging were differentiated by measuring hysteresis curves before and after long-term exposure. Three commercial polymer-bonded magnets using different rare-earth-cobalt-transition metal alloys and a solder-matrix magnet with Sm(Co, Cu, Fe, Zr)7.4 were studied. They were cycled between 25 °C and maximum temperatures to 150 °C (25 ° intervals) as applicable. Aging data at 50 and 125 °C for an exposure time of 3300 h are reported. The 2-17 samples have a stability far superior to bonded 1-5. The soft metal binder imparts significantly better aging behavior on precipitation-hardened 2-17 magnet alloys above 100 °C than an epoxy resin matrix.

  4. Estimation of spatially varying heat transfer coefficient from a flat plate with flush mounted heat sources using Bayesian inference

    Jakkareddy, Pradeep S.; Balaji, C.

    2016-09-01

    This paper employs the Bayesian based Metropolis Hasting - Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to solve inverse heat transfer problem of determining the spatially varying heat transfer coefficient from a flat plate with flush mounted discrete heat sources with measured temperatures at the bottom of the plate. The Nusselt number is assumed to be of the form Nu = aReb(x/l)c . To input reasonable values of ’a’ and ‘b’ into the inverse problem, first limited two dimensional conjugate convection simulations were done with Comsol. Based on the guidance from this different values of ‘a’ and ‘b’ are input to a computationally less complex problem of conjugate conduction in the flat plate (15mm thickness) and temperature distributions at the bottom of the plate which is a more convenient location for measuring the temperatures without disturbing the flow were obtained. Since the goal of this work is to demonstrate the eficiacy of the Bayesian approach to accurately retrieve ‘a’ and ‘b’, numerically generated temperatures with known values of ‘a’ and ‘b’ are treated as ‘surrogate’ experimental data. The inverse problem is then solved by repeatedly using the forward solutions together with the MH-MCMC aprroach. To speed up the estimation, the forward model is replaced by an artificial neural network. The mean, maximum-a-posteriori and standard deviation of the estimated parameters ‘a’ and ‘b’ are reported. The robustness of the proposed method is examined, by synthetically adding noise to the temperatures.

  5. Study of high energy ion loss during hydrogen minority heating in TFTR

    Park, J.; Zweben, S.J.

    1994-03-01

    High energy ion loss during hydrogen minority ICRF heating is measured and compared with the loss of the D-D fusion products. During H minority heating a relatively large loss of high energy ions is observed at 45 degrees below the outer midplane, with or without simultaneous NBI heating. This increase is most likely due to a loss of the minority tail protons, a possible model for this process is described

  6. Influence of a variable Rayleigh scattering-loss coefficient on the light backscattering in multimode optical fibers.

    Bisyarin, M A; Kotov, O I; Hartog, A H; Liokumovich, L B; Ushakov, N A

    2017-06-01

    The recently developed diffraction technique of analytical investigation of the Rayleigh backscattering produced by an incident fundamental mode in a multimode optical fiber with an arbitrary refractive index profile is supplemented by taking into account the Rayleigh scattering-loss coefficient, which could be variable within the fiber cross section. The relative changes in various radial and azimuthal modes' excitation levels, due to some typical radial dependences of this coefficient, are computed for the quadratic- and step-index fibers. It is stated that the excitation efficiency could either rise or decay for different modes. The effect of the variable Rayleigh scattering-loss coefficient is shown to be more noticeable in the fibers with a quadratic refractive index profile, whereas it is negligible in actual multimode step-index fibers.

  7. Modeling and data analysis of the NASA-WSTF frictional heating apparatus - Effects of test parameters on friction coefficient

    Zhu, Sheng-Hu; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Benz, Frank J.; Yuen, Walter W.

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical model is being developed jointly by the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) to analyze data generated from the WSTF frictional heating test facility. Analyses of the data generated in the first seconds of the frictional heating test are shown to be effective in determining the friction coefficient between the rubbing interfaces. Different friction coefficients for carobn steel and Monel K-500 are observed. The initial condition of the surface is shown to affect only the initial value of the friction coefficient but to have no significant influence on the average steady-state friction coefficient. Rotational speed and the formation of oxide film on the rotating surfaces are shown to have a significant effect on the friction coefficient.

  8. Determination of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient in the hot stamping of AA7075

    Liu Xiaochuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC is a key parameter in hot stamping processes, in which a hot blank is formed and quenched by cold dies simultaneously. The IHTC should therefore be identified and used in FE models to improve the accuracy of simulation results of hot stamping processes. In this work, a hot stamping simulator was designed and assembled in a Gleeble 3800 thermo-mechanical testing system and a FE model was built in PAM-STAMP to determine the IHTC value between a hot aluminium alloy 7075 blank and cold dies. The IHTC was determined at different contact pressures under both dry and lubricated (Omega-35 conditions. In addition, a model to calculate the IHTC value at different contact pressures and area densities of lubricant was developed for the hot stamping process.

  9. Determination of the Interfacial Heat Transfer Coefficient in the Hot Stamping of AA7075

    Ji Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC is a key parameter in hot stamping processes, in which a hot blank is formed and quenched by cold dies simultaneously. The IHTC should therefore be identified and used in FE simulations to improve the accuracy of simulation results of hot stamping processes. In this work, a hot stamping simulator was designed and assembled in a Gleeble 3800 thermo-mechanical testing system and a FE model was built in PAM-STAMP to determine the IHTC values between a hot aluminium alloy 7075 blank and cold dies. The IHTC values were determined at different contact pressures under both dry and lubricated (Omega-35 conditions. In addition, a model to calculate the IHTC value at different contact pressures and area densities of lubricant was developed for the hot stamping process, which was proved to be working well with verification tests.

  10. Condensation heat transfer coefficient in horizontal stratified cocurrent flow of steam and cold water

    Kim, Kap; Kim, Hho Jung

    1986-01-01

    Some studies on direct-contact condensation in cocurrent stratified flow of steam and subcooled water were reviewed. Several approaches have been performed to develop the condensation heat transfer coefficient relationship. The local Nusselt number is correlated in terms of the local water Reynolds and Prandtl numbers as well as the steam Froude number. In addition, a turbulence-centered model, developed principally for gas absorption in several geometries, is modified by using calculated interfacial parameters for the turbulent velocity and length scales. These approaches result in a fairly good agreement with the data, whereas, the turbulence-centered model is here recommended since it is based on the turbulent properties which may be closely related to the condensation phenomena. (Author)

  11. Characterization of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient for hot stamping processes

    Luan, Xi; Liu, Xiaochuan; Fang, Haomiao; Ji, Kang; El Fakir, Omer; Wang, LiLiang

    2016-08-01

    In hot stamping processes, the interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) between the forming tools and hot blank is an essential parameter which determines the quenching rate of the process and hence the resulting material microstructure. The present work focuses on the characterization of the IHTC between an aluminium alloy 7075-T6 blank and two different die materials, cast iron (G3500) and H13 die steel, at various contact pressures. It was found that the IHTC between AA7075 and cast iron had values 78.6% higher than that obtained between AA7075 and H13 die steel. Die materials and contact pressures had pronounced effects on the IHTC, suggesting that the IHTC can be used to guide the selection of stamping tool materials and the precise control of processing parameters.

  12. Identification of the Heat Transfer Coefficient in the Inverse Stefan Problem by Using the ABC Algorithm

    E. Hetmaniok

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A procedure based on the Artificial Bee Colony algorithm for solving the two-phase axisymmetric one-dimensional inverse Stefanproblem with the third kind boundary condition is presented in this paper. Solving of the considered problem consists in reconstruction of the function describing the heat transfer coefficient appearing in boundary condition of the third kind in such a way that the reconstructed values of temperature would be as closed as possible to the measurements of temperature given in selected points of the solid. A crucial part of the solution method consists in minimizing some functional which will be executed with the aid of one of the swarm intelligence algorithms - the ABC algorithm.

  13. Characterization of the frictional losses and heat transfer of oscillatory viscous flow through wire-mesh regenerators

    A.A. Boroujerdi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, new relations for calculating heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of oscillatory flow through wire-mesh screen regenerator such as Darcy permeability, Forchheimer’s inertial coefficient, and heat transfer area per unit volume, as a function of the wire diameter are presented. According to the derived relations, thinner wires have higher pressure drop and higher heat transfer rate. The relations are applicable for all regenerative cryocoolers. Embedding the new relations into a numerical model, three Stirling-type orifice pulse tube cryocoolers with three regenerators different in length and diameter but same volume in a variety of wire diameters, have been modeled. The results achieved by the model reveal that the local heat transfer coefficient decreases with increase of the wire diameter and the length-to-diameter ratio. In addition, it was shown that the mean absolute gas–solid wire temperature difference is a linear function of wire diameter in the range investigated. The results show that for larger length-to-diameter ratios, Forchheimer’s effect will dominate frictional losses, and the variations of the frictional losses are proportional to the inverse of the wire diameter. Wire diameter has been optimized to maximize the coefficient of performance of the cryocooler. Shorter regenerators have thinner optimum wires.

  14. Condensation heat transfer coefficients of flammable refrigerants on various enhanced tubes

    Park, Ki Jung; Jung, Dong Soo

    2005-01-01

    In this study, external condensation Heat Transfer Coefficients (HTCs) of six flammable refrigerants of propylene (R1270), propane (R290), isobutane (R600a), butane (R600), dimethylether (RE170), and HFC32 were measured at the vapor temperature of 39 .deg. C on a 1023 fpm low fin and turbo-C tubes. All data were taken under the heat flux of 32∼116 and 42∼142 kW/m 2 for the low fin and turbo-C tubes respectively. Flammable refrigerants' data obtained on enhanced tubes showed a typical trend that external condensation HTCs decrease with increasing wall subcooling. HFC32 and DME showed up to 30% higher HTCs than those of HCFC22 due to their excellent thermophysical properties. Propylene, propane, isobutane, and butane showed similar or lower HTCs than those of HCFC22. Beatty and Katz' correlation predicted the HTCs of the flammable refrigerants obtained on a low fin tube within a mean deviation of 7.3%. Turbo-C tube showed the best performance due to its 3 dimensional surface geometry for fast removal of condensate

  15. Geospatial Analysis of the Building Heat Demand and Distribution Losses in a District Heating Network

    Tobias Törnros

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The district heating (DH demand of various systems has been simulated in several studies. Most studies focus on the temporal aspects rather than the spatial component. In this study, the DH demand for a medium-sized DH network in a city in southern Germany is simulated and analyzed in a spatially explicit approach. Initially, buildings are geo-located and attributes obtained from various sources including building type, ground area, and number of stories are merged. Thereafter, the annual primary energy demand for heating and domestic hot water is calculated for individual buildings. Subsequently, the energy demand is aggregated on the segment level of an existing DH network and the water flow is routed through the system. The simulation results show that the distribution losses are overall the highest at the end segments (given in percentage terms. However, centrally located pipes with a low throughflow are also simulated to have high losses. The spatial analyses are not only useful when addressing the current demand. Based on a scenario taking into account the refurbishment of buildings and a decentralization of energy production, the future demand was also addressed. Due to lower demand, the distribution losses given in percentage increase under such conditions.

  16. Effect of human skin grafts on whole-body heat loss during exercise heat stress: a case report.

    Ganio, Matthew S; Gagnon, Daniel; Stapleton, Jill; Crandall, Craig G; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-01-01

    When exposed to heat stress, increases in cutaneous blood flow and sweating in well-healed grafted skin are severely attenuated, which could impair whole-body heat loss if skin grafts cover a large portion of total body surface area (TBSA). It is unknown to what extent whole-body heat loss is impaired when skin grafts cover a significant (eg, >50%) proportion of TBSA. The authors examined whole-body heat exchange during and after 60 min of cycling exercise in the heat (35°C; 25% relative humidity), at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (~400 W) in a woman (age, 36 years; mass, 78.2 kg) with well-healed (17+ years) skin grafts covering 75% of TBSA. Her responses were compared with two noninjured control subjects. Whole-body evaporative and dry heat exchange were measured by direct calorimetry. While exercising in the same ambient conditions and at the same rate of heat production, relative evaporative heat loss of nongrafted skin in the grafted subject (ie, evaporative heat loss per m) was nearly twice that of the control subjects. However, total rate of evaporative heat loss reached only 59% of the amount required for heat balance in the skin-grafted subject compared with 92 ± 3% in controls. Thus, the increase in core temperature was 2-fold greater for the grafted (1.22°C) vs control (0.61 ± 0.19°C) individuals. This case study demonstrates that a large area of grafted skin greatly diminishes maximum evaporative heat loss during exercise in the heat, making a compensable environment for control subjects uncompensable for skin-grafted individuals.

  17. Can intradermal administration of angiotensin II influence human heat loss responses during whole body heat stress?

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D; Paull, Gabrielle; McGinn, Ryan; Foudil-bey, Imane; Akbari, Pegah; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-05-01

    It is unclear if angiotensin II, which can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress), modulates heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow and sweating. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II-induced increases in oxidative stress impair cutaneous perfusion and sweating during rest and exercise in the heat. Eleven young (24 ± 4 yr) healthy adults performed two 30-min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). The first and second exercises were followed by a 20- and 40-min recovery. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for continuous administration of either: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 μM angiotensin II, 3) 10 mM ascorbate (an antioxidant), or 4) a combination of 10 μM angiotensin II + 10 mM ascorbate. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweating (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at each skin site. Compared with control, angiotensin II reduced both CVC and sweating at baseline resting and during each recovery in the heat (all P 0.05). When ascorbate was coinfused with angiotensin II, the effect of angiotensin II on sweating was abolished (all P > 0.05); however, its effect on CVC at baseline resting and during each recovery remained intact (all P stress, while it impairs sweating through increasing oxidative stress during exposure to an ambient heat stress before and following exercise. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Condensation heat transfer coefficient of air-cooled condensing heat exchanger of emergency cooldown tank in long-term passive cooling system

    Huh, Seon Jeong; Lee, Hee Joon; Moon, Joo Hyung; Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Young In

    2017-01-01

    For the design purpose of air-cooled condensing heat exchanger of emergency cooldown tank, average condensation heat transfer coefficient inside a circular tube was reduced by a thermal sizing program using the experimental data of Kim et al. It was compared to the existing condensation heat transfer correlations. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis of both inside condensation and outside air natural convection correlations was performed. Although condensation heat transfer did not play a great role to design over 10 3 W/m 2 /K, the improved Shah's correlation gives the best prediction for the design. Consequently, air natural convection coefficient significantly affects the design of air-cooled condensing heat exchanger. (author)

  19. The impact of fuel temperature reactivity coefficient on loss of reactivity control accident

    Park, J. H.; Ryu, E. H.; Song, Y. M.; Jung, J. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear reactors experience small power fluctuations or anticipated operational transients during even normal power operation. During normal operation, the reactivity is mainly controlled by liquid zone controllers, adjuster rods, mechanical control absorbers, and moderator poison. Even when the reactor power is increased abruptly and largely from an accident and when reactor control systems cannot be actuated quickly due to a fast transient, the reactor should be controlled and stabilized by its inherent safety parameter, such as a negative PCR (Power Coefficient of Reactivity) feedback. A PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor), it is well designed for the reactor to have a negative PCR so that the reactor can be safely shut down or stabilized whenever an abrupt reactivity insertion into the reactor core occurs or the reactor power is abruptly increased. However, it is known that a CANDU reactor has a small amount of PCR, as either negative or positive, because of the different design basis and safety concepts from a PWR. CNSC's regulatory and safety regime has stated that; The PCR of CANDU reactors does not pose a significant risk. Consistent with Canadian nuclear safety requirements, nuclear power plants must have an appropriate combination of inherent and engineered safety features incorporated into the design of the reactor safety and control systems. A reactor design that has a PCR is quite acceptable provided that the reactor is stable against power fluctuations, and that the probability and consequences of any potential accidents that would be aggravated by a positive reactivity feedback are maintained within CNSCprescribed limits. Recently, it was issued licensing the refurbished Wolsong unit 1 in Korea to be operated continuously after its design lifetime in which the calculated PCR was shown to have a small positive value by applying the recent physics code systems, which are composed of WIMS IST, DRAGON IST, and RFSP IST. These code systems were transferred

  20. Influence of high range of mass transfer coefficient and convection heat transfer on direct contact membrane distillation performance

    Lee, Jung Gil

    2017-11-03

    In order to improve water production of membrane distillation (MD), the development of high performance membrane having better mass transfer and enhancement of convection heat transfer in MD module have been continuously investigated. This paper presents the relationship between the heat and mass transfer resistance across the membrane and the performance improvement. Various ranges of mass transfer coefficient (MTC) from normal (0.3×10−6 to 2.1×10−6kg/m2sPa: currently available membranes) to high (>2.1×10−6kg/m2sPa: membranes under development) were simulated using an experimentally validated model at different ranges of convection heat transfer by varying the inlet flow rates and spacer enhancement factor. The effect of mass transfer and convection heat transfer on the MD performance parameters including temperature polarization coefficient (TPC), mean permeate flux, and specific energy consumption were investigated in a direct contact MD (DCMD) configuration. Results showed that improving the MTC at the low ranges is more important than that at the high ranges where the heat transfer resistance becomes dominant and hence the convection heat transfer coefficient must be increased. Therefore, an effort on designing MD modules using feed and permeate spacers and controlling the membrane surface roughness to increase the convection heat transfer and TPC in the channel aiming to enhance the flux is required because the currently developed mass transfer has almost reached the critical point.

  1. Experimental and numerical analysis of convective heat losses from spherical cavity receiver of solar concentrator

    Shewale Vinod C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spherical cavity receiver of solar concentrator is made up of Cu tubing material having cavity diameter 385 mm to analyze the different heat losses such as conduction, convection and radiation. As the convection loss plays major role in heat loss analysis of cavity receiver, the experimental analysis is carried out to study convective heat loss for the temperature range of 55-75°C at 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° inclination angle of downward facing cavity receiver. The numerical analysis is carried out to study convective heat loss for the low temperature range (55-75°C as well as high temperature range (150-300 °C for no wind condition only. The experimental set-up mainly consists of spherical cavity receiver which is insulated with glass wool insulation to reduce the heat losses from outside surface. The numerical analysis is carried out by using CFD software and the results are compared with the experimental results and found good agreement. The result shows that the convective loss increases with decrease in cavity inclination angle and decreases with decrease in mean cavity receiver temperature. The maximum losses are obtained at 0° inclination angle and the minimum losses are obtained at 90° inclination angle of cavity due to increase in stagnation zone in to the cavity from 0° to 90° inclination. The Nusselt number correlation is developed for the low temperature range 55-75°C based on the experimental data. The analysis is also carried out to study the effect of wind speed and wind direction on convective heat losses. The convective heat losses are studied for two wind speeds (3 m/s and 5 m/s and four wind directions [α is 0° (Side-on wind, 30°, 60°, and 90° (head-on wind]. It is found that the convective heat losses for both wind speed are higher than the losses obtained by no wind test. The highest heat losses are found for wind direction α is 60° with respect to receiver stand and lowest heat losses are found

  2. Determination of heat transfer coefficients in plastic French straws plunged in liquid nitrogen.

    Santos, M Victoria; Sansinena, M; Chirife, J; Zaritzky, N

    2014-12-01

    The knowledge of the thermodynamic process during the cooling of reproductive biological systems is important to assess and optimize the cryopreservation procedures. The time-temperature curve of a sample immersed in liquid nitrogen enables the calculation of cooling rates and helps to determine whether it is vitrified or undergoes phase change transition. When dealing with cryogenic liquids, the temperature difference between the solid and the sample is high enough to cause boiling of the liquid, and the sample can undergo different regimes such as film and/or nucleate pool boiling. In the present work, the surface heat transfer coefficients (h) for plastic French straws plunged in liquid nitrogen were determined using the measurement of time-temperature curves. When straws filled with ice were used the cooling curve showed an abrupt slope change which was attributed to the transition of film into nucleate pool boiling regime. The h value that fitted each stage of the cooling process was calculated using a numerical finite element program that solves the heat transfer partial differential equation under transient conditions. In the cooling process corresponding to film boiling regime, the h that best fitted experimental results was h=148.12±5.4 W/m(2) K and for nucleate-boiling h=1355±51 W/m(2) K. These values were further validated by predicting the time-temperature curve for French straws filled with a biological fluid system (bovine semen-extender) which undergoes freezing. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental and predicted temperature profiles, further confirming the accuracy of the h values previously determined for the ice-filled straw. These coefficients were corroborated using literature correlations. The determination of the boiling regimes that govern the cooling process when plunging straws in liquid nitrogen constitutes an important issue when trying to optimize cryopreservation procedures. Furthermore, this information can lead to

  3. Assessment of heat loss for RSG-GAS primary cooling system

    Dibyo, S.

    1998-01-01

    Heat Loss is part term of energy balance equation of system, therefore heat loss very important thing in the thermal dynamic analysis. Heat energy loosed from the surface pipe to the air in the room was calculated. Heat energy pass through by conduction, convection and radiation. The convection process are caused by moving of air density, i.e up flow of the hot air return to be down flow. The heat transfer phenomenon could be determined by empirical correlation of Heilman. The primary cooling system is consisted to the 3 zone : 1). Zone of (safety valves-heat exchanger), 2). Zone of heat exchanger surfaces, 3). Zone of heat exchanger-reactor pool. By using input data of air temperature are about 25 o C, temperature of primary coolant about 45 o C, The heat Loss along the pipes to the air are 23.9 k watt or 0.1%

  4. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT AND FRICTION FACTOR OF Al2O3 NANOFLUID IN A PACKED BED COLUMN

    G. Srinivasa Rao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The forced convection heat transfer coefficient and friction factor are determined for the flow of water and nanofluid in a vertical packed bed column. The analysis is undertaken in the laminar and transition Reynolds number range. The column is filled with spherical glass beads as the bed material. The heat transfer coefficients with Al2O3 nanofluid increased by 12% to 15% with the increase of volume concentration from 0.02% to 0.5% compared with water. The experimental values of axial temperature are in good agreement with the NTU-ε method proposed by Schumann’s model.

  5. Investigation of Pear Drying Performance by Different Methods and Regression of Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient with Support Vector Machine

    Mehmet Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an air heated solar collector (AHSC dryer was designed to determine the drying characteristics of the pear. Flat pear slices of 10 mm thickness were used in the experiments. The pears were dried both in the AHSC dryer and under the sun. Panel glass temperature, panel floor temperature, panel inlet temperature, panel outlet temperature, drying cabinet inlet temperature, drying cabinet outlet temperature, drying cabinet temperature, drying cabinet moisture, solar radiation, pear internal temperature, air velocity and mass loss of pear were measured at 30 min intervals. Experiments were carried out during the periods of June 2017 in Elazig, Turkey. The experiments started at 8:00 a.m. and continued till 18:00. The experiments were continued until the weight changes in the pear slices stopped. Wet basis moisture content (MCw, dry basis moisture content (MCd, adjustable moisture ratio (MR, drying rate (DR, and convective heat transfer coefficient (hc were calculated with both in the AHSC dryer and the open sun drying experiment data. It was found that the values of hc in both drying systems with a range 12.4 and 20.8 W/m2 °C. Three different kernel models were used in the support vector machine (SVM regression to construct the predictive model of the calculated hc values for both systems. The mean absolute error (MAE, root mean squared error (RMSE, relative absolute error (RAE and root relative absolute error (RRAE analysis were performed to indicate the predictive model’s accuracy. As a result, the rate of drying of the pear was examined for both systems and it was observed that the pear had dried earlier in the AHSC drying system. A predictive model was obtained using the SVM regression for the calculated hc values for the pear in the AHSC drying system. The normalized polynomial kernel was determined as the best kernel model in SVM for estimating the hc values.

  6. Experimental determination of convective heat transfer coefficients in the separated flow region of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Majumdar, Alok K.; Jenkins, Susan L.; Bacchus, David L.

    1990-01-01

    A series of cold flow heat transfer tests was conducted with a 7.5-percent scale model of the Space Shuttle Rocket Motor (SRM) to measure the heat transfer coefficients in the separated flow region around the nose of the submerged nozzle. Modifications were made to an existing 7.5 percent scale model of the internal geometry of the aft end of the SRM, including the gimballed nozzle in order to accomplish the measurements. The model nozzle nose was fitted with a stainless steel shell with numerous thermocouples welded to the backside of the thin wall. A transient 'thin skin' experimental technique was used to measure the local heat transfer coefficients. The effects of Reynolds number, nozzle gimbal angle, and model location were correlated with a Stanton number versus Reynolds number correlation which may be used to determine the convective heating rates for the full scale Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor nozzle.

  7. Comparison of Heat Transfer Coefficients of Silver Coated and Chromium Coated Copper Tubes of Condenser in Dropwise Condensation

    Er. Shivesh Kumar; Dr. Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Since centuries steam is being used in power generating system. The steam leaving the power unit is reconverted into water in a condenser designed to transfer heat from the steam to the cooling water as rapidly and as efficiently as possible. The efficiency of condenser depends on rate of condensation and mode of condensation of steam in the condenser. The increase in efficiency of the condenser enhances the heat transfer co-efficient which in turn results in economic design of condenser and ...

  8. The fuel to clad heat transfer coefficient in advanced MX-type fuel pins

    Caligara, F.; Campana, M.; Mandler, R.; Blank, H.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced fuels (mixed carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides) are characterised by a high thermal conductivity compared to that of oxide fuels (5 times greater) and their behaviour under irradiation (amount of swelling, fracture behaviour, restructuring) is far more sensitive to the design parameters and to the operating temperature than that of oxide fuels. The use of advanced fuels is therefore conditioned by the possibility of mastering the above phenomena, and the full exploitation of their favorable neutron characteristics depends upon a good understanding of the mutual relationships of the various parameters, which eventually affect the mechanical stability of the pin. By far the most important parameter is the radial temperature profile which controls the swelling of the fuel and the build-up of stress fields within the pin. Since the rate of fission gas swelling of these fuels is relatively large, a sufficient amount of free space has to be provided within the pin. This space originally appears as fabrication porosity and as fuel-to-clad clearance. Due to the large initial gap width and to the high fuel thermal conductivity, the range of the fuel operating temperatures is mainly determined by the fuel-to-clad heat transfer coefficient h, whose correct determination becomes one of the central points in modelling. During the many years of modelling activity in the field of oxide fuels, several theoretical models have been developed to calculate h, and a large amount of experimental data has been produced for the empirical adjustment of the parameters involved, so that the situation may be regarded as rather satisfactory. The analysis lead to the following conclusions. A quantitative comparison of experimental h-values with existing models for h requires rather sophisticated instrumented irradiation capsules, which permit the measurement of mechanical data (concerning fuel and clad) together with heat rating and temperatures. More and better well

  9. Thermal Stress and Heat Transfer Coefficient for Ceramics Stalk Having Protuberance Dipping into Molten Metal

    Noda, Nao-Aki; Hendra; Li, Wenbin; Takase, Yasushi; Ogura, Hiroki; Higashi, Yusuke

    Low pressure die casting is defined as a net shape casting technology in which the molten metal is injected at high speeds and pressure into a metallic die. The low pressure die casting process plays an increasingly important role in the foundry industry as a low-cost and high-efficiency precision forming technique. In the low pressure die casting process is that the permanent die and filling systems are placed over the furnace containing the molten alloy. The filling of the cavity is obtained by forcing the molten metal, by means of a pressurized gas, to rise into a ceramic tube having protuberance, which connects the die to the furnace. The ceramics tube, called stalk, has high temperature resistance and high corrosion resistance. However, attention should be paid to the thermal stress when the stalk having protuberance is dipped into the molten aluminum. It is important to reduce the risk of fracture that may happen due to the thermal stresses. In this paper, thermo-fluid analysis is performed to calculate surface heat transfer coefficient. The finite element method is applied to calculate the thermal stresses when the stalk having protuberance is dipped into the crucible with varying dipping speeds. It is found that the stalk with or without protuberance should be dipped into the crucible slowly to reduce the thermal stress.

  10. Estimation of internal heat transfer coefficients and detection of rib positions in gas turbine blades from transient surface temperature measurements

    Heidrich, P; Wolfersdorf, J v; Schmidt, S; Schnieder, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive, non-destructive, transient inverse measurement technique that allows one to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and rib positions of real gas turbine blades from outer surface temperature measurements after a sudden flow heating. The determination of internal heat transfer coefficients is important during the design process to adjust local heat transfer to spatial thermal load. The detection of rib positions is important during production to fulfill design and quality requirements. For the analysis the one-dimensional transient heat transfer problem inside of the turbine blade's wall was solved. This solution was combined with the Levenberg-Marquardt method to estimate the unknown boundary condition by an inverse technique. The method was tested with artificial data to determine uncertainties with positive results. Then experimental testing with a reference model was carried out. Based on the results, it is concluded that the presented inverse technique could be used to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and to detect rib positions of real turbine blades.

  11. A fluid-solid coupling simulation method for convection heat transfer coefficient considering the under-vehicle condition

    Tian, C.; Weng, J.; Liu, Y.

    2017-11-01

    The convection heat transfer coefficient is one of the evaluation indexes of the brake disc performance. The method used in this paper to calculate the convection heat transfer coefficient is a fluid-solid coupling simulation method, because the calculation results through the empirical formula method have great differences. The model, including a brake disc, a car body, a bogie and flow field, was built, meshed and simulated in the software FLUENT. The calculation models were K-epsilon Standard model and Energy model. The working condition of the brake disc was considered. The coefficient of various parts can be obtained through the method in this paper. The simulation result shows that, under 160 km/h speed, the radiating ribs have the maximum convection heat transfer coefficient and the value is 129.6W/(m2·K), the average coefficient of the whole disc is 100.4W/(m2·K), the windward of ribs is positive-pressure area and the leeward of ribs is negative-pressure area, the maximum pressure is 2663.53Pa.

  12. Experiment of flow regime map and local condensing heat transfer coefficients inside three dimensional inner microfin tubes

    Du, Yang; Xin, Ming Dao

    1999-03-01

    This paper developed a new type of three dimensional inner microfin tube. The experimental results of the flow patterns for the horizontal condensation inside these tubes are reported in the paper. The flow patterns for the horizontal condensation inside the new made tubes are divided into annular flow, stratified flow and intermittent flow within the test conditions. The experiments of the local heat transfer coefficients for the different flow patterns have been systematically carried out. The experiments of the local heat transfer coefficients changing with the vapor dryness fraction have also been carried out. As compared with the heat transfer coefficients of the two dimensional inner microfin tubes, those of the three dimensional inner microfin tubes increase 47-127% for the annular flow region, 38-183% for the stratified flow and 15-75% for the intermittent flow, respectively. The enhancement factor of the local heat transfer coefficients is from 1.8-6.9 for the vapor dryness fraction from 0.05 to 1.

  13. Effects of heat transfer coefficient treatments on thermal shock fracture prediction for LWR fuel claddings in water quenching

    Lee, Youho; Lee, Jeong Ik; Cheon, Hee

    2015-01-01

    Accurate modeling of thermal shock induced stresses has become ever most important to emerging accident-tolerant ceramic cladding concepts, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and SiC coated zircaloy. Since fractures of ceramic (entirely ceramic or coated) occur by excessive tensile stresses with linear elasticity, modeling transient stress distribution in the material provides a direct indication of the structural integrity. Indeed, even for the current zircaloy cladding material, the oxide layer formed on the surface - where cracks starts to develop upon water quenching - essentially behaves as a brittle ceramic. Hence, enhanced understanding of thermal shock fracture of a brittle material would fundamentally contribute to safety of nuclear reactors for both the current fuel design and that of the coming future. Understanding thermal shock fracture of a brittle material requires heat transfer rate between the solid and the fluid for transient temperature fields of the solid, and structural response of the solid under the obtained transient temperature fields. In water quenching, a solid experiences dynamic time-varying heat transfer rates with phase changes of the fluid over a short quenching period. Yet, such a dynamic change of heat transfer rates during the water quenching transience has been overlooked in assessments of mechanisms, predictability, and uncertainties for thermal shock fracture. Rather, a time-constant heat transfer coefficient, named 'effective heat transfer coefficient' has become a conventional input to thermal shock fracture analysis. No single constant heat transfer could suffice to depict the actual stress evolution subject to dynamic heat transfer coefficient changes with fluid phase changes. Use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient will remarkably increase predictability of thermal shock fracture of brittle materials and complete the picture of stress evolution in the quenched solid. The presented result

  14. Effects of heat transfer coefficient treatments on thermal shock fracture prediction for LWR fuel claddings in water quenching

    Lee, Youho; Lee, Jeong Ik; Cheon, Hee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Accurate modeling of thermal shock induced stresses has become ever most important to emerging accident-tolerant ceramic cladding concepts, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and SiC coated zircaloy. Since fractures of ceramic (entirely ceramic or coated) occur by excessive tensile stresses with linear elasticity, modeling transient stress distribution in the material provides a direct indication of the structural integrity. Indeed, even for the current zircaloy cladding material, the oxide layer formed on the surface - where cracks starts to develop upon water quenching - essentially behaves as a brittle ceramic. Hence, enhanced understanding of thermal shock fracture of a brittle material would fundamentally contribute to safety of nuclear reactors for both the current fuel design and that of the coming future. Understanding thermal shock fracture of a brittle material requires heat transfer rate between the solid and the fluid for transient temperature fields of the solid, and structural response of the solid under the obtained transient temperature fields. In water quenching, a solid experiences dynamic time-varying heat transfer rates with phase changes of the fluid over a short quenching period. Yet, such a dynamic change of heat transfer rates during the water quenching transience has been overlooked in assessments of mechanisms, predictability, and uncertainties for thermal shock fracture. Rather, a time-constant heat transfer coefficient, named 'effective heat transfer coefficient' has become a conventional input to thermal shock fracture analysis. No single constant heat transfer could suffice to depict the actual stress evolution subject to dynamic heat transfer coefficient changes with fluid phase changes. Use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient will remarkably increase predictability of thermal shock fracture of brittle materials and complete the picture of stress evolution in the quenched solid. The presented result

  15. Combined Influence of Strain and Heat Loss on Turbulent Premixed Flame Stabilization

    Tay-Wo-Chong, Luis

    2015-11-16

    The present paper argues that the prediction of turbulent premixed flames under non-adiabatic conditions can be improved by considering the combined effects of strain and heat loss on reaction rates. The effect of strain in the presence of heat loss on the consumption speed of laminar premixed flames was quantified by calculations of asymmetric counterflow configurations (“fresh-to-burnt”) with detailed chemistry. Heat losses were introduced by setting the temperature of the incoming stream of products on the “burnt” side to values below those corresponding to adiabatic conditions. The consumption speed decreased in a roughly exponential manner with increasing strain rate, and this tendency became more pronounced in the presence of heat losses. An empirical relation in terms of Markstein number, Karlovitz Number and a non-dimensional heat loss parameter was proposed for the combined influence of strain and heat losses on the consumption speed. Combining this empirical relation with a presumed probability density function for strain in turbulent flows, an attenuation factor that accounts for the effect of strain and heat loss on the reaction rate in turbulent flows was deduced and implemented into a turbulent combustion model. URANS simulations of a premixed swirl burner were carried out and validated against flow field and OH chemiluminescence measurements. Introducing the effects of strain and heat loss into the combustion model, the flame topology observed experimentally was correctly reproduced, with good agreement between experiment and simulation for flow field and flame length.

  16. Radiant heat loss, an unexploited path for heat stress reduction in shaded cattle.

    Berman, A; Horovitz, T

    2012-06-01

    Reducing thermal radiation on shaded animals reduces heat stress independently of other means of stress relief. Radiant heat exchange was estimated as a function of climate, shade structure, and animal density. Body surface portion exposed to radiant sources in shaded environments was determined by geometrical relations to determine angles of view of radiation sources (roof underside, sky, sun-exposed ground, shaded ground) on the animal's surface. The relative representation of environment radiation sources on the body surface was determined. Animal thermal radiation balance was derived from radiant heat gained from radiation sources (including surrounding animals) and that lost from the animal surface. The animal environment was assumed to have different shade dimensions and temperatures. These were summed to the radiant heat balance of the cow. The data formed served to estimate the effect of changes in intensity of radiation sources, roof and shaded surface dimensions, and animal density on radiant heat balance (Rbal) of cattle. Roof height effect was expressed by effect of roof temperature on Rbal. Roof underside temperature (35 to 75°C) effect on Rbal was reduced by roof height. If roof height were 4m, an increase in its underside temperature from 35 to 75°C would increase mean Rbal from -63 to -2 W·m⁻², whereas if roof height were 10 m, Rbal would only increase from -99 to -88 W·m⁻². A hot ground temperature increase from 35 to 65°C reduced mean Rbal heat loss from -45 to 3 W·m⁻². Increasing the surface of the shaded area had only a minor effect on Rbal and on the effect of hot ground on Rbal. Increasing shade roof height reduced the effect of roof temperature on Rbal to minor levels when height was > 8m. Increasing the roof height from 4 to 10 m decreased Rbal from -32 to -94 W·m⁻². Increasing indirect radiation from 100 to 500 W·m⁻² was associated with an increase in Rbal from -135 to +23 W·m⁻². Their combined effects were lower

  17. DETERMINATION OF HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENTS FOR FRENCH PLASTIC SEMEN STRAW SUSPENDED IN STATIC NITROGEN VAPOR OVER LIQUID NITROGEN.

    Santo, M V; Sansinena, M; Chirife, J; Zaritzky, N

    2015-01-01

    The use of mathematical models describing heat transfer during the freezing process is useful for the improvement of cryopreservation protocols. A widespread practice for cryopreservation of spermatozoa of domestic animal species consists of suspending plastic straws in nitrogen vapor before plunging into liquid nitrogen. Knowledge of surface heat transfer coefficient (h) is mandatory for computational modelling; however, h values for nitrogen vapor are not available. In the present study, surface heat transfer coefficients for plastic French straws immersed in nitrogen vapor over liquid nitrogen was determined; vertical and horizontal positions were considered. Heat transfer coefficients were determined from the measurement of time-temperature curves and from numerical solution of heat transfer partial differential equation under transient conditions using finite elements. The h values experimentally obtained for horizontal and vertically placed straws were compared to those calculated using correlations based on the Nusselt number for natural convection. For horizontal straws the average obtained value was h=12.5 ± 1.2 W m(2) K and in the case of vertical straws h=16 ± 2.48 W m(2) K. The numerical simulation validated against experimental measurements, combined with accurate h values provides a reliable tool for the prediction of freezing curves of semen-filled straws immersed in nitrogen vapor. The present study contributes to the understanding of the cryopreservation techniques for sperm freezing based on engineering concepts, improving the cooling protocols and the manipulation of the straws.

  18. Test bench HEATREC for heat loss measurement on solar receiver tubes

    Márquez, José M.; López-Martín, Rafael; Valenzuela, Loreto; Zarza, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    In Solar Thermal Electricity (STE) plants the thermal energy of solar radiation is absorbed by solar receiver tubes (HCEs) and it is transferred to a heat transfer fluid. Therefore, heat losses of receiver tubes have a direct influence on STE plants efficiency. A new test bench called HEATREC has been developed by Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) in order to determinate the heat losses of receiver tubes under laboratory conditions. The innovation of this test bench consists in the possibility to determine heat losses under controlled vacuum.

  19. Comparison of the Friction-Loss Coefficient for the Gap of Two Contact Surfaces and a Crack

    Nam, Ho Yun; Choi, Byoung Hae; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Young Bum

    2011-01-01

    A leak-detection method has been developed by measuring the pressure variation between the inner and outer heat transfer tubes of a double-wall tube steam generator. An experiment was carried out to measure the leak rate in the gap between two surfaces pressed with a hydraulic press in order to simulate the phenomena, and a correlation was determined for the leak rate in a micro gap. However, in the correlation, the gap width and friction coefficient were coupled with the surface roughness, which affects the two parameters. The two parameters were separated using a surface-contact model to develop a correlation for the friction coefficient. The correlation was compared with the existing correlations used for crack analysis. Although the applied ranges of Reynolds numbers were different, the developed correlation for Reynolds numbers of 0.1.0.35 showed similar tendencies to existing correlations used for higher Reynolds numbers

  20. A new method to calculate pressure drop and shell-side heat transfer coefficient in a shell-and-tube heat exchanger

    Baptista Filho, B.D.; Konuk, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    A new method to calculate pressure drop (Δp) and shell-side heat transfer coefficient (h sub(c)) in a shell-and-tube heat exchanger with segmental baffles is presented. The method is based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass and momentum between two baffles. The calculated distributions of pressure and velocities given respectively, Δp and h sub(c). The values of Δp and h sub(c) are correlated for a given geometry whit the shell side fluid properties and flow rate. The calculated and experimental results agree very well for a U-Tube heat exchanger. (Author) [pt

  1. Method for optimal design of pipes for low-energy district heating, with focus on heat losses

    Dalla Rosa, Alessandro; Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    2011-01-01

    The synergy between highly energy-efficient buildings and low-energy district heating (DH) systems is a promising concept for the optimal integration of energy-saving policies and energy supply systems based on renewable energy (RE). Network transmission and distribution heat loss is one of the k...

  2. Experimental measurement of the interfacial heat transfer coefficients of subcooled flow boiling using micro-thermocouple and double directional images

    Seong-Jin Kim; Goon-Cherl Park

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Models or correlations for phase interface are needed to analyze the multi-phase flow. Interfacial heat transfer coefficients are important to constitute energy equation of multi-phase flow, specially. In subcooled boiling flow, bubble condensation at the bubble-liquid interface is a major mechanism of heat transfer within bulk subcooled liquid. Bubble collapse rates and temperatures of each phase are needed to determine the interfacial heat transfer coefficient for bubble condensation. Bubble collapse rates were calculated through image processing in single direction, generally. And in case of liquid bulk temperature, which has been obtained by general temperature sensor such as thermocouple, was used. However, multi-directional images are needed to analyze images due to limitations of single directional image processing. Also, temperature sensor, which has a fast response time, must be used to obtain more accurate interfacial heat transfer coefficient. Low pressure subcooled water flow experiments using micro-thermocouple and double directional image processing with mirrors were conducted to investigate bubble condensation phenomena and to modify interfacial heat transfer correlation. Experiments were performed in a vertical subcooled boiling flow of a rectangular channel. Bubble condensing traces with respect to time were recorded by high speed camera in double direction and bubble collapse rates were calculated by processing recorded digital images. Temperatures were measured by micro-thermocouple, which is a K-type with a 12.7 μm diameter. The liquid temperature was estimated by the developed algorithm to discriminate phases and find each phase temperature in the measured temperature including both liquid and bubble temperature. The interfacial heat transfer coefficient for bubble condensation was calculated from the bubble collapse rates and the estimated liquid temperature, and its correlation was modified. The modified

  3. Reduction of heat losses from greenhouses by means of internal blinds with low thermal emissivity

    Meijer, J.

    1980-01-01

    Heat losses in greenhouses may be substantially reduced by the use of heat reflecting blinds. Quantitative results are obtained solving a mathematical heat flow model by numerical methods. Special attention has been given to the emissivity and transmittance of the screen and the ventilation through

  4. RCS pressure under reduced inventory conditions following a loss of residual heat removal

    Palmrose, D.E.; Hughes, E.D.; Johnsen, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic response of a closed-reactor coolant system to loss of residual heat removal (RHR) cooling is investigated. The processes examined include: core coolant boiling and steam generator reflux condensation, pressure increase on the primary side, heat transfer mechanisms on the steam generator primary and secondary sides, and effects of noncondensible gas on heat transfer processes

  5. Seasonal coefficient of performance for ground source heat pump and groundwater one in Białystok

    Gajewski, Andrzej

    2017-11-01

    European Economic Area (EEA) states declare to contain greenhouse gases emissions at 20% by 2020, whereas European Union (EU) does 40% before 2030, which result in encouragement to apply low-carbon technologies. Coefficient of Performance (COP) and Seasonal Coefficient of Performance (SCOPnet) are obtained using temperature measurement done by The Institute of Meteorology and Water Management - National Research Institute (IMGW-PIB) at the weather station in Bialystok for ten-year period. The first variant is ground source heat pump (GSHP) and the second one is groundwater source heat pump (WSHP) which can be equipped with separating heat exchanger (SHE) optionally. In both cases heat is generated for heating system only. Ground temperature is determined from Baggs (1983) formula using Oleśkowicz-Popiel et. al. (2002) adaptation to Polish climate and substituting the local constants achieved by Biernacka (2010). Water temperature in a groundwater basin is obtained from Kowalski (2007) equation. Estimation is done in each hour of heating season. All COP values are higher than 3.5 required by EU (2013). SCOPnet are as follows: 6.12, 5.86, 5.03 for WSHP, WSHP+SHE, GSHP respectively. Insomuch as WSHP needs only two boreholes it is recommended to the areas beneath ones a groundwater basin is located.

  6. Seasonal coefficient of performance for ground source heat pump and groundwater one in Białystok

    Gajewski Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available European Economic Area (EEA states declare to contain greenhouse gases emissions at 20% by 2020, whereas European Union (EU does 40% before 2030, which result in encouragement to apply low-carbon technologies. Coefficient of Performance (COP and Seasonal Coefficient of Performance (SCOPnet are obtained using temperature measurement done by The Institute of Meteorology and Water Management – National Research Institute (IMGW-PIB at the weather station in Bialystok for ten-year period. The first variant is ground source heat pump (GSHP and the second one is groundwater source heat pump (WSHP which can be equipped with separating heat exchanger (SHE optionally. In both cases heat is generated for heating system only. Ground temperature is determined from Baggs (1983 formula using Oleśkowicz-Popiel et. al. (2002 adaptation to Polish climate and substituting the local constants achieved by Biernacka (2010. Water temperature in a groundwater basin is obtained from Kowalski (2007 equation. Estimation is done in each hour of heating season. All COP values are higher than 3.5 required by EU (2013. SCOPnet are as follows: 6.12, 5.86, 5.03 for WSHP, WSHP+SHE, GSHP respectively. Insomuch as WSHP needs only two boreholes it is recommended to the areas beneath ones a groundwater basin is located.

  7. Pressure loss coefficient evaluation based on CFD analysis for simple geometries and PWR reactor vessel without geometry simplification

    Ko II, B.; Park, J. P.; Jeong, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear vendors and utilities perform lots of simulations and analyses in order to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). In general, the simulations are carried out using vendor-specific design codes and best-estimate system analysis codes and most of them were developed based on 1-dimensional lumped parameter models. These thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes require user input for pressure loss coefficient, k-factor; since they numerically solve Euler-equation. In spite of its high impact on the safety analysis results, there has not been good validation method for the selection of loss coefficient. During the past decade, however; computers, parallel computation methods, and 3-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes have been dramatically enhanced. It is believed to be beneficial to take advantage of advanced commercial CFD codes in safety analysis and design of NPP5. The present work aims to validate pressure loss coefficient evaluation for simple geometries and k-factor calculation for PWR based on CFD. The performances of standard k-ε model, RNG k-ε model, Reynolds stress model (RSM) on the simulation of pressure drop for simple geometry such as, or sudden-expansion, and sudden-contraction are evaluated. The calculated value was compared with pressure loss coefficient in handbook of hydraulic resistance. Then the present work carried out analysis for flow distribution in downcomer and lower plenum of Korean standard nuclear power plants (KSNPs) using STAR-CD. The lower plenum geometry of a PWR is very complicated since there are so many reactor internals, which hinders in CFD analysis for real reactor geometry up to now. The present work takes advantage of 3D CAD model so that real geometry of lower plenum is used. The results give a clear figure about flow fields in the reactor vessel, which is one of major safety concerns. The calculated pressure drop across downcomer and lower plenum appears to be in good agreement

  8. Predicting TDN losses from heat damaged hays and haylages with NIR

    During the storage of hay or haylage, heating damage may occur and lead to losses of available protein and digestible nutrients. Recent research indicates that losses of TDN may be more significant economically than losses of available protein. Our objectives for this study were to establish a near-...

  9. Impedance spectroscopy of PZT ceramics--measuring diffusion coefficients, mixed conduction, and Pb loss.

    Donnelly, Niall J; Randall, Clive A

    2012-09-01

    Sintering of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) at high temperatures results in loss of Pb unless an ambient Pb activity is maintained. The tell-tale sign of Pb loss is an increased conductivity, usually manifested in unacceptably high values of tanδ. The conductivity is caused by oxygen vacancies and/or electron holes which are a byproduct of Pb evaporation. In the first part of this paper, it is shown how impedance spectroscopy can be used to separate ionic and electronic conductivity in a properly designed sample by selection of appropriate boundary conditions. Subsequently, impedance is used to probe defect concentrations in PZT during prolonged annealing at 700°C. It is found that oxygen vacancies are generated during annealing in air but the rate of generation actually decreases upon lowering the ambient pO(2). These results are explained by a model of Pb evaporation which, in this case, leads predominantly to oxygen vacancy generation. In principle, this effect could be used to generate a specific vacancy concentration in similar Pb-based oxides.

  10. Radiation loss driven instabilities in laser heated plasmas

    Evans, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Any plasma in which a significant part of the power balance is due to optically thin radiative losses may be subject to a radiation cooling instability. A simple analytical model gives the dispersion relation for the instability and inclusion of a realistic radiation loss term in a two dimensional hydrodynamic simulation shows that ''jet'' like features form in moderate to high Z plasmas

  11. Behavior of specific heat and self diffusion coefficient of sodium near transition temperature: a molecular dynamics study

    Ahmed, N.; Khan, G.

    1990-09-01

    In this report the author used of a very useful technique of simulation and applied it to successfully for determining the various properties of sodium, both in liquid and solid phase near transition point. As a first step the determination of specific heat and diffusion coefficient have been carried out. In liquid state the molecular dynamics (MD) values calculated matched the experimental data. But in solid state the diffusion coefficient obtained were not consistent with the one expected for a solid, rather the values obtained suggested that sodium remained in liquid state even below the melting point. (A.B.)

  12. Single-jet gas cooling of in-beam foils or specimens: Prediction of the convective heat-transfer coefficient

    Steyn, Gideon; Vermeulen, Christiaan

    2018-05-01

    An experiment was designed to study the effect of the jet direction on convective heat-transfer coefficients in single-jet gas cooling of a small heated surface, such as typically induced by an accelerated ion beam on a thin foil or specimen. The hot spot was provided using a small electrically heated plate. Heat-transfer calculations were performed using simple empirical methods based on dimensional analysis as well as by means of an advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The results provide an explanation for the observed turbulent cooling of a double-foil, Havar beam window with fast-flowing helium, located on a target station for radionuclide production with a 66 MeV proton beam at a cyclotron facility.

  13. Estimation of sediment friction coefficient from heating upon APC penetration during the IODP NanTroSEIZE

    Kinoshita, M.; Kawamura, K.; Lin, W.

    2015-12-01

    During the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiments (NanTroSEIZE) of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), the advanced piston corer temperature (APC-T) tool was used to determine in situ formation temperatures while piston coring down to ~200 m below sea floor. When the corer is fired into the formation, temperature around the shoe abruptly increases due to the frictional heating. The temperature rise due to the frictional heat at the time of penetration is 10 K or larger. We found that the frictional temperature rise (=maximum temperature) increases with increasing depth, and that its intersection at the seafloor seems non-zero. Frictional heat energy is proportional to the maximum temperature rise, which is confirmed by a FEM numerical simulation of 2D cylindrical system. Here we use the result of numerical simulation to convert the observed temperature rise into the frictional heat energy. The frictional heat energy is represented as the product of the shooting length D and the shear stress (τ) between the pipe and the sediment. Assuming a coulomb slip regime, the shear stress is shows as: τ= τ0 + μ*(Sv-Pp), where τ0 is the cohesive stress, μ the dynamic frictional coefficient between the pipe and the sediment, Sv the normal stress at the pipe, and Pp the pore pressure. This can explain the non-zero intersection as well as depth-dependent increase for the frictional heating observed in the APC-T data. Assuming a hydrostatic state and by using the downhole bulk density data, we estimated the friction coefficient for each APC-T measurement. For comparison, we used the vane-shear strength measured on core samples to estimate the friction coefficients. The frictional coefficients μ were estimated as ranging 0.01 - 0.06, anomalously lower than expected for shallow marine sediments. They were lower than those estimated from vane-shear data, which range 0.05 to 0.2. Still, both estimates exhibit a significant increase in the friction coefficient at

  14. Recouping the thermal-to-electric conversion loss by the use of waste heat

    Bradley, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    This paper looks at ways to recoup the thermal-to-electric conversion loss of our thermal power generating stations. These stations now produce twice as much low-grade waste heat as they do electricity. We can improve the situation in two ways: by improving the station efficiency, and by utilizing the low-grade heat beneficially. The following options are examined: N 2 O 4 turbines condensing at 10 deg C; power from moderator waste heat; 50 MW heat pump for district heating; industrial parks with integrated waste heat upgrading station. (author)

  15. Plate heat exchanger - inertia flywheel performance in loss of flow transient

    Abou-El-Maaty, Talal; Abd-El-Hady, Amr

    2009-01-01

    One of the most versatile types of heat exchangers used is the plate heat exchanger. It has principal advantages over other heat exchangers in that plates can be added and/or removed easily in order to change the area available for heat transfer and therefore its overall performance. The cooling systems of Egypt's second research reactor (ETRR 2) use this type of heat exchanger for cooling purposes in its primary core cooling and pool cooling systems. In addition to the change in the number of heat exchanger cooling channels, the effect of changing the amount of mass flow rate on the heat exchanger performance is an important issues in this study. The inertia flywheel mounted on the primary core cooling system pump with the plate heat exchanger plays an important role in the case of loss of flow transients. The PARET code is used to simulate the effect of loss of flow transients on the reactor core. Hence, the core outlet temperature with the pump-flywheel flow coast down is fed into the plate heat exchanger model developed to estimate the total energy transferred to the cooling tower, the primary side heat exchanger temperature variation, the transmitted heat exchanger power, and the heat exchanger effectiveness. In addition, the pressure drop in both, the primary side and secondary side of the plate heat exchanger is calculated in all simulated transients because their values have limits beyond which the heat exchanger is useless. (orig.)

  16. Measurement of the fuel temperature and the fuel-to-coolant heat transfer coefficient of Super Phenix 1 fuel elements

    Edelmann, M.

    1995-12-01

    A new measurement method for measuring the mean fuel temperature as well as the fuel-to-coolant heat transfer coefficient of fast breeder reactor subassemblies (SA) is reported. The method is based on the individual heat balance of fuel SA's after fast reactor shut-downs and uses only the plants normal SA outlet temperature and neutron power signals. The method was used successfully at the french breeder prototype Super Phenix 1. The mean SA fuel temperature as well as the heat transfer coefficient of all SPX SA's have been determined at power levels between 15 and 90% of nominal power and increasing fuel burn-up from 3 to 83 EFPD (Equivalent of Full Power-Days). The measurements also provided fuel and whole SA time constants. The estimated accuracy of measured fuel parameters is in the order of 10%. Fuel temperatures and SA outlet temperature transients were also calculated with the SPX1 systems code DYN2 for exactly the same fuel and reactor operating parameters as in the experiments. Measured fuel temperatures were higher than calculated ones in all cases. The difference between measured and calculated core mean values increases from 50 K at low power to 180 K at 90% n.p. This is about the double of the experimental error margins. Measured SA heat transfer coefficients are by nearly 20% lower than corresponding heat transfer parameters used in the calculations. Discrepancies found between measured and calculated results also indicate that either the transient heat transfer in the gap between fuel and cladding (gap conductance) might not be exactly reproduced in the computer code or that the gap in the fresh fuel was larger than assumed in the calculations. (orig.) [de

  17. Heat loss may explain bill size differences between birds occupying different habitats.

    Russell Greenberg

    Full Text Available Research on variation in bill morphology has focused on the role of diet. Bills have other functions, however, including a role in heat and water balance. The role of the bill in heat loss may be particularly important in birds where water is limiting. Song sparrows localized in coastal dunes and salt marsh edge (Melospiza melodia atlantica are similar in size to, but have bills with a 17% greater surface area than, those that live in mesic habitats (M. m. melodia, a pattern shared with other coastal sparrows. We tested the hypotheses that sparrows can use their bills to dissipate "dry" heat, and that heat loss from the bill is higher in M. m. atlantica than M. m. melodia, which would indicate a role of heat loss and water conservation in selection for bill size.Bill, tarsus, and body surface temperatures were measured using thermal imaging of sparrows exposed to temperatures from 15-37°C and combined with surface area and physical modeling to estimate the contribution of each body part to total heat loss. Song sparrow bills averaged 5-10°C hotter than ambient. The bill of M. m atlantica dissipated up to 33% more heat and 38% greater proportion of total heat than that of M. m. melodia. This could potentially reduce water loss requirements by approximately 7.7%.This >30% higher heat loss in the bill of M. m. atlantica is independent of evaporative water loss and thus could play an important role in the water balance of sparrows occupying the hot and exposed dune/salt marsh environments during the summer. Heat loss capacity and water conservation could play an important role in the selection for bill size differences between bird populations and should be considered along with trophic adaptations when studying variation in bill size.

  18. Measurement of local heat transfer coefficient during gas–liquid Taylor bubble train flow by infra-red thermography

    Mehta, Balkrishna; Khandekar, Sameer

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Infra-red thermographic study of Taylor bubble train flow in square mini-channel. • Design of experiments for measurement of local streamwise Nusselt number. • Minimizing conjugate heat transfer effects and resulting errors in data reduction. • Benchmarking against single-phase flow and three-dimensional computations. • Local heat transfer enhancement up to two times due to Taylor bubble train flow. -- Abstract: In mini/micro confined internal flow systems, Taylor bubble train flow takes place within specific range of respective volume flow ratios, wherein the liquid slugs get separated by elongated Taylor bubbles, resulting in an intermittent flow situation. This unique flow characteristic requires understanding of transport phenomena on global, as well as on local spatio-temporal scales. In this context, an experimental design methodology and its validation are presented in this work, with an aim of measuring the local heat transfer coefficient by employing high-resolution InfraRed Thermography. The effect of conjugate heat transfer on the true estimate of local transport coefficients, and subsequent data reduction technique, is discerned. Local heat transfer coefficient for (i) hydrodynamically fully developed and thermally developing single-phase flow in three-side heated channel and, (ii) non-boiling, air–water Taylor bubble train flow is measured and compared in a mini-channel of square cross-section (5 mm × 5 mm; D h = 5 mm, Bo ≈ 3.4) machined on a stainless steel substrate (300 mm × 25 mm × 11 mm). The design of the setup ensures near uniform heat flux condition at the solid–fluid interface; the conjugate effects arising from the axial back conduction in the substrate are thus minimized. For benchmarking, the data from single-phase flow is also compared with three-dimensional computational simulations. Depending on the employed volume flow ratio, it is concluded that enhancement of nearly 1.2–2.0 times in time

  19. Studying fluid-to-particle heat transfer coefficients in vessel cooking processes using potatoes as measuring devices

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Christensen, Martin Gram; Pedersen, Søren Juhl

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents and demonstrates a novel idea of using spherical potatoes as a dispensable, cheap device for determining the fluid-to-particle heat transfer coefficient, hfp in vessel cooking processes. The transmission of heat through the potato can be traced by measuring the distance from...... that the method is rather precise at relevant values of hfp in vessel cooking (100–300 [W/m2K]), allowing a prediction of the centre temperature within ±0.6°C....

  20. HEAT LOSS FROM HOT WATER SUPPLY LINE IN A RESIDENTIAL BUILDING

    近藤, 修平; 鉾井, 修一

    2011-01-01

    In order to the evaluate heat loss from hot water supply lines in a residential building, hot water demand in a house in Chiba prefecture was measured and analyzed. The following results were obtained. 1. The heat loss of the hot water supply line was about 132kJ for the shower and 110kJ for the bathtub in winter. Since the temperature difference between the inlet and outlet of the hot water supply line is small, the measured heat loss from the hot water supply line sometimes becomes negative...

  1. CFD simulation of direct contact condensation with ANSYS CFX using surface renewal theory based heat transfer coefficients

    Wanninger, Andreas; Ceuca, Sabin Cristian; Macian-Juan, Rafael [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Different approaches for the calculation of Direct Contact Condensation (DCC) using Heat Transfer Coefficients (HTC) based on the Surface Renewal Theory (SRT) are tested using the CFD simulation tool ANSYS CFX. The present work constitutes a preliminary study of the flow patterns and conditions observed using different HTC models. A complex 3D flow pattern will be observed in the CFD simulations as well as a strong coupling between the condensation rate and the two-phase flow dynamics. (orig.)

  2. A new correlation for convective heat transfer coefficient of water–alumina nanofluid in a square array subchannel under PWR condition

    Shamim, Jubair A.; Bhowmik, Palash K.; Xiangyi, Chen; Suh, Kune Y.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermo-hydrodynamic properties of water–Al_2O_3 nanofluid at PWR condition is analyzed. • Details of CFD simulation and validation procedure is outlined. • Augmented heat transfer capacity of nanofluid is governed by larger pumping power. • A new correlation for nanofluid Nusselt number in subchannel geometry is proposed. - Abstract: The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation is performed to determine on the thermo- and hydrodynamic performance of the water–alumina (Al_2O_3) nanofluid in a square array subchannel featuring pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.25 and 1.35. Two fundamental aspects of thermal hydraulics, viz. heat transfer and pressure drop, are assessed under typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions at various flow rates (3 × 10"5 ⩽ Re ⩽ 6 × 10"5) using pure water and differing concentrations of water–alumina nanofluid (0.5–3.0 vol.%) as coolant. Numerical results are compared against predictions made by conventional single-phase convective heat transfer and pressure loss correlations for fully developed turbulent flow. It is observed that addition of tiny nanoparticles in PWR coolant can give rise to the convective heat transfer coefficient at the expense of larger pressure drop. Nevertheless, a modified correlation as a function of nanoparticle volume fraction is proposed to estimate nanofluid Nusselt number more precisely in square array subchannel.

  3. A new correlation for convective heat transfer coefficient of water–alumina nanofluid in a square array subchannel under PWR condition

    Shamim, Jubair A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Bhowmik, Palash K. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 1201 N. State St., Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Xiangyi, Chen [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kune Y., E-mail: kysuh@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Thermo-hydrodynamic properties of water–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofluid at PWR condition is analyzed. • Details of CFD simulation and validation procedure is outlined. • Augmented heat transfer capacity of nanofluid is governed by larger pumping power. • A new correlation for nanofluid Nusselt number in subchannel geometry is proposed. - Abstract: The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation is performed to determine on the thermo- and hydrodynamic performance of the water–alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanofluid in a square array subchannel featuring pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.25 and 1.35. Two fundamental aspects of thermal hydraulics, viz. heat transfer and pressure drop, are assessed under typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions at various flow rates (3 × 10{sup 5} ⩽ Re ⩽ 6 × 10{sup 5}) using pure water and differing concentrations of water–alumina nanofluid (0.5–3.0 vol.%) as coolant. Numerical results are compared against predictions made by conventional single-phase convective heat transfer and pressure loss correlations for fully developed turbulent flow. It is observed that addition of tiny nanoparticles in PWR coolant can give rise to the convective heat transfer coefficient at the expense of larger pressure drop. Nevertheless, a modified correlation as a function of nanoparticle volume fraction is proposed to estimate nanofluid Nusselt number more precisely in square array subchannel.

  4. Measurements of Heat-Transfer and Friction Coefficients for Helium Flowing in a Tube at Surface Temperatures up to 5900 Deg R

    Taylor, Maynard F.; Kirchgessner, Thomas A.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of average heat transfer and friction coefficients and local heat transfer coefficients were made with helium flowing through electrically heated smooth tubes with length-diameter ratios of 60 and 92 for the following range of conditions: Average surface temperature from 1457 to 4533 R, Reynolds numbe r from 3230 to 60,000, heat flux up to 583,200 Btu per hr per ft2 of heat transfer area, and exit Mach numbe r up to 1.0. The results indicate that, in the turbulent range of Reynolds number, good correlation of the local heat transfer coefficients is obtained when the physical properties and density of helium are evaluated at the surface temperature. The average heat transfer coefficients are best correlated on the basis that the coefficient varies with [1 + (L/D))(sup -0,7)] and that the physical properties and density are evaluated at the surface temperature. The average friction coefficients for the tests with no heat addition are in complete agreement with the Karman-Nikuradse line. The average friction coefficients for heat addition are in poor agreement with the accepted line.

  5. Oceans and continents: Similarities and differences in the mechanisms of heat loss

    Sclater, J.G.; Parsons, B.; Jaupart, C.

    1981-01-01

    The principal objective of this paper is to present a simple and self-consistent review of the basic physical processes controlling heat loss from the earth. To accomplish this objective, we give a short summary of the oceanic and continental data and compare and contrast the respective mechanisms of heat loss . In the oceans we concentrate on the effect of hydrothermal circulation, and on the continents we consider in some detail a model relating surface heat flow to varying depth scales for the distribution of potassium, thorium, and uranium. From this comparison we conclude that the range in possible geotherms at depths below 100 to 150 km under continents and oceans overlaps and the thermal structure beneath an old stable continent is indistinguishable from that beneath an ocean were it at equilibrium. Oceans and continents are part of the same thermal system. Both have an upper rigid mechanical layer where heat loss is by conduction and a lower thermal boundary layer where convection is dominant. The simple conductive definition of the plate thickness is an oversimplification. The observed distribution of area versus age in the ocean allows us to investigate the dominant mechanism of heat loss which is plate creation. This distribution and an understanding of the heat flow through oceans and continents can be used to calculate the heat loss of the earth. This heat loss is 10 13 cal/s (4.2 x 10 13 W) of which more than 60% results from the creation of oceanic plate. The relation between area and age of the oceans is coupled to the ridge and subducting slab forces that contribute to the driving mechanism for plate motions. These forces are self-regulating and maintain the rate of plate generation required to achieve a balance between heat loss and heat generation

  6. On development of analytical closure relationships for local wall friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients for sub-channel codes

    Kornienko, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose has been to describe an approach suggested for constructing generalized closure relationships for local and subchannel wall friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients, with not only axial and transversal parameters taken into account, but azimuthal substance transfer effects as well. These constitutive relations that are primary for description of one- and two-phase one-dimensional flow models can be derived from the initial 3-D drift flux formulation. The approach is based on the Reynolds flux, boundary layer and generalized coefficient of substance transfer. One more task has been to illustrate the validity of the 'conformity principle' for the limiting cases. The method proposed is based on the similarity theory, boundary layer model, and a phenomenological description of the regularities of the substance transfer (momentum, heat, and mass), as well as on an adequate simulation of the forms of flow structure by a generalized approach to build (an integrated in form and semi-empirical in maintenance structure) analytical relationships for wall friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients. (author)

  7. The Analytical Objective Hysteresis Model (AnOHM v1.0: methodology to determine bulk storage heat flux coefficients

    T. Sun

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The net storage heat flux (ΔQS is important in the urban surface energy balance (SEB but its determination remains a significant challenge. The hysteresis pattern of the diurnal relation between the ΔQS and net all-wave radiation (Q∗ has been captured in the Objective Hysteresis Model (OHM parameterization of ΔQS. Although successfully used in urban areas, the limited availability of coefficients for OHM hampers its application. To facilitate use, and enhance physical interpretations of the OHM coefficients, an analytical solution of the one-dimensional advection–diffusion equation of coupled heat and liquid water transport in conjunction with the SEB is conducted, allowing development of AnOHM (Analytical Objective Hysteresis Model. A sensitivity test of AnOHM to surface properties and hydrometeorological forcing is presented using a stochastic approach (subset simulation. The sensitivity test suggests that the albedo, Bowen ratio and bulk transfer coefficient, solar radiation and wind speed are most critical. AnOHM, driven by local meteorological conditions at five sites with different land use, is shown to simulate the ΔQS flux well (RMSE values of ∼ 30 W m−2. The intra-annual dynamics of OHM coefficients are explored. AnOHM offers significant potential to enhance modelling of the surface energy balance over a wider range of conditions and land covers.

  8. Heat loss and fluid leakage tests of the ROSA-III facility

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Tasaka, Kanji; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1981-12-01

    The report presents characteristic test results about the steady state heat loss, one of the inherent characteristics of the ROSA-III test facility. The steady state heat loss tests were conducted at five different temperature conditions between 111 0 C and 290 0 C . Net heat loss rates were obtained by estimating the electric power supplied to the core, heat input from the recirculation pumps and steam leakage rate. The heat loss characteristics have important contribution to analyses of the ROSA-III small break tests. A following simple relation was obtained between the net heat loss rate Q*sub(HL) (kJ/s) (*: radical) of the ROSA-III facility and the temperature difference ΔT ( 0 C) between the fluid temperature of the system and the room temperature, Q*sub(HL) = 0.56 x ΔT. (*: radical) And the steam leak flow at normal operating condition of the ROSA-III test, (P = 7.2 MPa) was obtained as 8.9 x 10 -3 kg/s and corresponding steam leakage energy as 10.5 kJ/s. The heat input from the recirculation pumps was indirectly estimated under a constant speed by assuming the heat input was equal to the brake horce power of the pumps. (author)

  9. MeV ion loss during 3He minority heating in TFTR

    Zweben, S.J.; Hammett, G.; Boivin, R.; Phillips, C.; Wilson, R.

    1992-01-01

    The loss of MeV ions during 3 He ICRH minority heating experiments has been measured using scintillator detectors near the wall of TFTR. The observed MeV ion losses to the bottom (90 degrees poloidal) detector are generally consistent with the expected first-orbit loss of D- 3 He alpha particle fusion products, with an inferred global reaction rate up to ∼10 16 reactions/sec. A qualitatively similar but unexpectedly large loss occurs 45 degrees poloidally below the outer midplane. This additional loss might be due to ICRH tail ions or to ICRH wave-induced loss of previously confined fusion products

  10. Heat loss during carbon dioxide insufflation: comparison of a nebulization based humidification device with a humidification and heating system.

    Noll, Eric; Schaeffer, Roland; Joshi, Girish; Diemunsch, Sophie; Koessler, Stefanie; Diemunsch, Pierre

    2012-12-01

    This study compared the heat loss observed with the use of MR860 AEA Humidifier™ system (Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, New Zealand), which humidifies and heats the insufflated CO(2), and the use of the AeronebPro™ device (Aerogen, Ireland), which humidifies but does not heat the insufflated CO(2). With institutional approval, 16 experiments were conducted in 4 pigs. Each animal, acting as its own control, was studied at 8-day intervals in randomized sequence with the following four conditions: (1) control (C) no pneumoperitoneum; (2) standard (S) insufflation with nonhumidified, nonheated CO(2); (3) Aeroneb™ (A): insufflation with humidified, nonheated CO(2); and (4) MR860 AEA humidifier™ (MR): insufflation with humidified and heated CO(2). The measured heat loss after 720L CO(2) insufflation during the 4 h was 1.03 ± 0.75 °C (mean ± SEM) in group C; 3.63 ± 0.31 °C in group S; 3.03 ± 0.39 °C in group A; and 1.98 ± 0.09 °C in group MR. The ANOVA showed a significant difference with time (p = 0.0001) and with the insufflation technique (p = 0.024). Heat loss in group C was less than in group S after 60 min (p = 0.03), less than in group A after 70 min (p = 0.03), and less than in group MR after 150 min (p = 0.03). The heat loss in group MR was less than in group S after 50 min (p = 0.04) and less than in group A after 70 min (p = 0.02). After 160 min, the heat loss in group S was greater than in group A (p = 0.03). As far as heat loss is concerned, for laparoscopic procedures of less than 60 min, there is no benefit of using any humidification with or without heating. However, for procedures greater than 60 min, use of heating along with humidification, is superior.

  11. Wind effects on convective heat loss from a cavity receiver for a parabolic concentrating solar collector

    Ma, R.Y. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomoma, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-09-01

    Tests were performed to determine the convective heat loss characteristics of a cavity receiver for a parabolid dish concentrating solar collector for various tilt angles and wind speeds of 0-24 mph. Natural (no wind) convective heat loss from the receiver is the highest for a horizontal receiver orientation and negligible with the reveler facing straight down. Convection from the receiver is substantially increased by the presence of side-on wind for all receiver tilt angles. For head-on wind, convective heat loss with the receiver facing straight down is approximately the same as that for side-on wind. Overall it was found that for wind speeds of 20--24 mph, convective heat loss from the receiver can be as much as three times that occurring without wind.

  12. The condensation of steam on the external surfaces of the shells of HIFAR heavy water heat exchangers during a loss-of-coolant accident

    Chapman, A.G.

    1987-03-01

    A study of steam condensation rates on the HIFAR heavy water heat exchangers was undertaken to predict thermohydraulic conditions in the HIFAR containment during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The process of surface condensation from a mixture of air and steam, and methods for calculating the rate of condensation, are briefly reviewed. Suitable experimental data are used to estimate coefficients of condensation heat transfer to cool surfaces in a reactor containment during a LOCA. The relevance of the available data to a LOCA in the HIFAR materials testing reactor is examined, and two sets of data are compared. The differences between air/H 2 O and air/D 2 O mixtures are discussed. Formulae are derived for the estimation of the coefficient of heat transfer from the heat exchanger shells to the cooling water, and a method of calculating the rate of condensation per unit area of surface is developed

  13. DETERMINATION OF CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT AT THE OUTER SURFACE OF A CRYOVIAL BEING PLUNGED INTO LIQUID NITROGEN.

    Wang, T; Zhao, G; Tang, H Y; Jiang, Z D

    2015-01-01

    Cell survival upon cryopreservation is affected by the cooling rate. However, it is difficult to model the heat transfer process or to predict the cooling curve of a cryoprotective agent (CPA) solution due to the uncertainty of its convective heat transfer coefficient (h). To measure the h and to better understand the heat transfer process of cryovials filled with CPA solution being plunged in liquid nitrogen. The temperatures at three locations of the CPA solution in a cryovial were measured. Different h values were selected after the cooling process was modeled as natural convection heat transfer, the film boiling and the nucleate boiling, respectively. And the temperatures of the selected points are simulated based on the selected h values. h was determined when the simulated temperature best fitted the experimental temperature. When the experimental results were best fitted, according to natural convection heat transfer model, h(1) = 120 W/(m(2)·K) while due to film boiling and nucleate boiling regimes h(f) = 5 W/(m(2)·K) followed by h(n) = 245 W/(m(2)·K). These values were verified by the differential cooling rates at the three locations of a cryovial. The heat transfer process during cooling in liquid nitrogen is better modeled as film boiling followed by nucleate boiling.

  14. Tritium permeation losses in HYLIFE-II heat exchanger tubes

    Longhurst, G.R.; Dolan, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    Tritium permeation through the intermediate heat exchanger of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion design concept is evaluated for routine operating conditions. The permeation process is modelled using the Lewis analogy combined with surface recombination. It is demonstrated that at very low driving potentials, permeation becomes proportional to the first power of the driving potential. The model predicts that under anticipated conditions the primary cooling loop will pass about 6% of the tritium entering it to the intermediate coolant. Possible approached to reducing tritium permeation are explored. Permeation is limited by turbulent diffusion transport through the molten salt. Hence, surface barriers with impendance factors typical of present technology can do very little to reduce permeation. Low Flibe viscosity is desirable. An efficient tritium removal system operating on the Flibe before it gets to the intermediate heat exchanger is required. Needs for further research are highlighted. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  15. Treatment of the loss of ultimate heat sink initiating events in the IRSN level 1 PSA

    Dupuy, Patricia; Georgescu, Gabriel; Corenwinder, Francois

    2014-01-01

    The total loss of the ultimate heat sink is an initiating event which, even it is mainly of external origin, has been considered in the frame of internal events Level 1 PSA by IRSN. The on-going actions on the development of external hazards PSA and the recent incident of loss of the heat sink induced by the ingress of vegetable matter that occurred in France in 2009 have pointed out the need to improve the modeling of the loss of the heat sink initiating event and sequences to better take into account the fact that this loss may be induced by external hazards and thus affect all the site units. The paper presents the historical steps of the modeling of the total loss of the heat sink, the safety stakes of this modeling, the main assumptions used by IRSN in the associated PSA for the 900 MWe reactors and the results obtained. The total loss of the heat sink was not initially addressed in the safety demonstration of French NPPs. On the basis of the insights of the first probabilistic assessments performed in the 80's, the risks associated to this 'multiple failure situation' turned out to be very significant and design and organisational improvements were implemented on the plants. Reviews of the characterization of external hazards and of their consequences on the installations and French operating feedback have revealed that extreme hazards may induce a total loss of the heat sink. Moreover, the accident that occurred at Fukushima in 2011 has pointed out the risk of such a loss of long duration at all site units in case of extreme hazards. In this context, it seems relevant to further improve the modelling of the total loss of the heat sink by considering the external hazards that may cause this loss. In a first step, IRSN has improved the assumptions and data used in the loss of the heat sink PSA model, in particular by considering that such a loss may affect all the site units. The next challenge will be the deeper analysis of the impact of external hazards on

  16. Heat loss of heat pipelines in insulation moisture conditions with the evaporation

    Polovnikov Vyacheslav Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in a wet fibroporous material in conditions of evaporation and steam diffusion were obtained. Values of heat and mass fluxes were established. The contribution of evaporation effect to total heat flux and need to consider volume fractions of water and steam into the structure of fibroporous material in calculation of effective thermal conductivity were shown. Nonstationarity of heat and mass transfer in conditions of considered problem can be ignored.

  17. The TX-model - a quantitative heat loss analysis of district heating pipes by means of IR surface temperature measurements

    Zinki, Heimo [ZW Energiteknik, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1996-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of analysing the temperature profile at the ground surface above buried district heating pipes in such a way that would enable the quantitative determination of heat loss from the pair of pipes. In practical applications, it is supposed that this temperature profile is generated by means of advanced IR-thermography. For this purpose, the principle of the TX - model has been developed, based on the fact that the heat losses from pipes buried in the ground have a temperature signature on the ground surface. Qualitative analysis of this temperature signature is very well known and in practical use for detecting leaks from pipes. These techniques primarily make use of relative changes of the temperature pattern along the pipe. In the quantitative heat loss analysis, however, it is presumed that the temperature profile across the pipes is related to the pipe heat loss per unit length. The basic idea is that the integral of the temperature profile perpendicular to the pipe, called TX, is a function of the heat loss, but is also affected by other parameters such as burial depth, heat diffusivity, wind, precipitation and so on. In order to analyse the parameters influencing the TX- factor, a simulation model for the energy balance at the ground surface has been developed. This model includes the heat flow from the pipe to the surface and the heat exchange at the surface with the environment due to convection, latent heat change, solar and long wave radiation. The simulation gives the surprising result that the TX factor is by and large unaffected during the course of a day even when the sun is shining, as long as other climate conditions are relatively stable (low wind, no rain, no shadows). The results from the simulations were verified at different sites in Denmark, Finland, Sweden and USA through a co-operative research program organised and partially financed by the IEA District Heating Programme, Task III, and

  18. Study of overall heat transfer coefficient from upper crust to overlaying water during MCCI

    Kondo, Masaya; Nishida, Ayumu; Sugimoto, Jun

    2015-01-01

    A model of the overall heat transfer between the molten core and the overlying coolant above crust during MCCI in severe accident is proposed and confirmed experimentally and analytically. The model assumes that the heat transferred from molten core to the overlaying water is proportional to the amount of water that reaches the molten core surface. The water flow to the molten core surface is assumes to be prevented by the CCFL in the porous crust. Thus, the steam flow and the non-condensable gas flow interact with the water flow. The present model describes the relationship between the overall heat transfer and the water flow, and furthermore, the CCFL effect on the water flow. The non-condensable gas effect on the overall heat transfer predicted by the present model agrees well with experiments. The effects of porosity and hole diameter on the amount of water, which reaches the molten core surface, has also been confirmed using RELAP5 code. (author)

  19. A model for allometric scaling of mammalian metabolism with ambient heat loss

    Kwak, Ho Sang; Im, Hong G.; Shim, Eun Bo

    2016-01-01

    The finding that additional radiative heat loss and the consideration of an outer insulation fur layer attenuate these deviation effects and render the scaling law closer to 2/3 provides in silico evidence for a functional impact of heat transfer mode on the allometric scaling law in mammalian metabolism.

  20. Transverse heat transfer coefficient in the dual channel ITER TF CICCs Part II. Analysis of transient temperature responses observed during a heat slug propagation experiment

    Lewandowska, Monika; Herzog, Robert; Malinowski, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    A heat slug propagation experiment in the final design dual channel ITER TF CICC was performed in the SULTAN test facility at EPFL-CRPP in Villigen PSI. We analyzed the data resulting from this experiment to determine the equivalent transverse heat transfer coefficient hBC between the bundle and the central channel of this cable. In the data analysis we used methods based on the analytical solutions of a problem of transient heat transfer in a dual-channel cable, similar to Renard et al. (2006) and Bottura et al. (2006). The observed experimental and other limits related to these methods are identified and possible modifications proposed. One result from our analysis is that the hBC values obtained with different methods differ by up to a factor of 2. We have also observed that the uncertainties of hBC in both methods considered are much larger than those reported earlier.

  1. Use of infrared thermography for the evaluation of heat losses during coal storage

    Fierro, V.; Miranda, J.L.; Romero, C.; Andrés, J.M.; Pierrot, A.; Gómez-Landesa, E.; Arriaga, A.; Schmal, D.

    1999-01-01

    The exothermic processes during coal storage reduce the calorific value of the coal which in turn results in financial losses. An accurate and easy calculation of the losses may be an efficient tool to evaluate the effectiveness of the measures taken to reduce the spontaneous heating of coal and to

  2. A model for particle and heat losses by type I edge localized modes

    Tokar, M Z; Gupta, A; Kalupin, D; Singh, R

    2007-01-01

    A model to estimate the particle and energy losses caused in tokamaks by type I edge localized modes (ELMs) is proposed. This model is based on the assumption that the increase in transport by ELM is due to flows along magnetic field lines perturbed by ballooning-peeling MHD modes. The model reproduces well the experimentally found variation of losses with the plasma collisionality ν*, namely, the weak dependence of the particle loss and significant reduction of the energy loss with increasing ν*. It is argued that the electron parallel heat conductivity is dominating in the energy loss at not very large ν*

  3. SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Heat Transfer and Flow Losses in Lower Head Porous Debris

    Coryell, E.W.; Siefken, L.J.; Paik, S.

    1998-01-01

    Designs are described for implementing models for calculating the heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris in the lower head of a reactor vessel. The COUPLE model in SCDAP/RELAP5 represents both the porous and non-porous debris that results from core material slumping into the lower head. Currently, the COUPLE model has the capability to model convective and radiative heat transfer from the surfaces of non-porous debris in a detailed manner and to model only in a simplistic manner the heat transfer from porous debris. In order to advance beyond the simplistic modeling for porous debris, designs are developed for detailed calculations of heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris. Correlations are identified for convective heat transfer in porous debris for the following modes of heat transfer; (1) forced convection to liquid, (2) forced convection to gas, (3) nucleate boiling, (4) transition boiling, and (5) film boiling. Interphase heat transfer is modeled in an approximate manner. A design is also described for implementing a model of heat transfer by radiation from debris to the interstitial fluid. A design is described for implementation of models for flow losses and interphase drag in porous debris. Since the models for heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris in the lower head are designed for general application, a design is also described for implementation of these models to the analysis of porous debris in the core region. A test matrix is proposed for assessing the capability of the implemented models to calculate the heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris. The implementation of the models described in this report is expected to improve the COUPLE code calculation of the temperature distribution in porous debris and in the lower head that supports the debris. The implementation of these models is also expected to improve the calculation of the temperature and flow distribution in porous debris in the core region

  4. The photo-assisted heat current and its Peltier coefficient in a metal/dot/metal junction

    Crépieux, A

    2012-01-01

    The photo-assisted heat current through a metal/dot/metal junction and its associated Peltier coefficient are computed in the framework of the time-dependent out-of-equilibrium Keldysh formalism in the presence of a dot energy modulation. When the frequency of the modulation is much larger than the amplitude of the modulation, the heat current follows the sinusoidal time evolution of the dot energy. This is no longer the case when the modulation frequency becomes of the order of or smaller than the amplitude of the modulation. To characterize this non-sinusoidal behavior, we have calculated the harmonics of the photo-assisted heat current. The zero-order harmonic can be expressed as an infinite sum of dc heat currents associated with a dot with shifted energies. It exhibits a devil's staircase profile with non-horizontal steps, whereas it is established that the steps are horizontal for the zero-order harmonic of the photo-assisted electric current. This particularity is related to the fact that the dot heat is not a conserved quantity due to energy dissipation within the tunnel barriers.

  5. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42 %. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  6. Heat losses and thermal imaging of ferroic components

    Ilyashenko, S E; Ivanova, A I; Gasanov, O V; Grechishkin, R M; Tretiakov, S A; Yushkov, K B; Linde, B B J

    2015-01-01

    A study is made of spatial and temporal temperature variations in working devices based on ferroic functional materials. The measurement of the sample's temperature is complemented with direct observation of its distribution over the sample surface. For the latter purpose a thermovision infrared videocamera technique was employed. Specific features of the temperature distribution and its evolution during heating and cooling of a number of piezoelectric, acoustooptic and shape memory components are revealed. Examples of hot spot observations indicative of structural defects in the samples under study are given thus suggesting the use of thermal vision for nondestructive testing. A proposal is made to combine the thermovision method with that of thermomagnetic analysis for the study of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

  7. Heat losses and thermal performance of commercial combined solar and pellet heating systems

    Fiedler, Frank; Persson, Tomas; Bales, Chris; Nordlander, Svante

    2004-01-01

    Various pellet heating systems are marketed in Sweden, some of them in combination with a solar heating system. Several types of pellet heating units are available and can be used for a combined system. This article compares four typical combined solar and pellet heating systems: System 1 and 2 two with a pellet stove, system 3 with a store integrated pellet burner and system 4 with a pellet boiler. The lower efficiency of pellet heaters compared to oil or gas heaters increases the primary en...

  8. Experimental investigations on heat content of supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate by a simple heat loss method

    Kong, Weiqiang; Dannemand, Mark; Johansen, Jakob Berg

    2016-01-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate is a phase change material that can be used for long term heat storage in solar heating systems because of its relatively high heat of fusion, a melting temperature of 58 °C and its ability to supercool stable. In practical applications sodium acetate trihydrate tend to ......, 0.3–0.5 % (wt.%) Xanthan Gum or 1–2% (wt.%) of some solid or liquid polymers as additives had significantly higher heat contents compared to samples of sodium acetate trihydrate suffering from phase separation....

  9. Sauropod necks: are they really for heat loss?

    Donald M Henderson

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional digital models of 16 different sauropods were used to examine the scaling relationship between metabolism and surface areas of the whole body, the neck, and the tail in an attempt to see if the necks could have functioned as radiators for the elimination of excess body heat. The sauropod taxa sample ranged in body mass from a 639 kg juvenile Camarasaurus to a 25 t adult Brachiosaurus. Metabolism was assumed to be directly proportional to body mass raised to the ¾ power, and estimates of body mass accounted for the presence of lungs and systems of air sacs in the trunk and neck. Surface areas were determined by decomposing the model surfaces into triangles and their areas being computed by vector methods. It was found that total body surface area was almost isometric with body mass, and that it showed negative allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. In contrast, neck area showed positive allometry when plotted against metabolic rate. Tail area show negative allometry with respect to metabolic rate. The many uncertainties about the biology of sauropods, and the variety of environmental conditions that different species experienced during the groups 150 million years of existence, make it difficult to be absolutely certain about the function of the neck as a radiator. However, the functional combination of the allometric increase of neck area, the systems of air sacs in the neck and trunk, the active control of blood flow between the core and surface of the body, changing skin color, and strategic orientation of the neck with respect to wind, make it plausible that the neck could have functioned as a radiator to avoid over-heating.

  10. Adsorption Behavior of Heat Modified Soybean Oil via Boundary Lubrication Coefficient of Friction Measurements

    The frictional behaviors of soybean oil and heat modified soybean oils with different Gardner scale viscosities as additives in hexadecane have been examined in a boundary lubrication test regime (steel contacts) using Langmuir adsorption model. The free energy of adsorption (delta-Gads) of various...

  11. Estimation of eddy diffusivity coefficient of heat in the upper layers of equatorial Arabian Sea

    Zavialov, P.O.; Murty, V.S.N.

    in the Central Equatorial Arabian Sea (CEAS). A comparison of the model computed K sub(h) values with those estimated from the heat balance of the upper layer (50 m) of the sea shows good agreement in the region of weak winds (CEAS) or low turbulent mixing regime...

  12. Enhanced O2 Loss at Mars Due to an Ambipolar Electric Field from Electron Heating

    Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L. A.; Fowler, C. M.; Woodson, A. K.; Weber, T. D.; Delory, G. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; Mcenulty, T.; Morooka, M. W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures (T sub e) in Mars dayside ionosphere above approx. 180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to approx. 500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher T(sub e) (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher T(sub e) may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced T(sub e) in Mars ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field with a potential (e) of several k(sub b)T(sub e), which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars over time.

  13. SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Heat Transfer and Flow Losses in Lower Head Porous Debris

    Siefken, Larry James; Coryell, Eric Wesley; Paik, Seungho; Kuo, Han Hsiung

    1999-01-01

    Designs are described for implementing models for calculating the heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris in the lower head of a reactor vessel. The COUPLE model in SCDAP/RELAP5 represents both the porous and nonporous debris that results from core material slumping into the lower head. Currently, the COUPLE model has the capability to model convective and radiative heat transfer from the surfaces of nonporous debris in a detailed manner and to model only in a simplistic manner the heat transfer from porous debris. In order to advance beyond the simplistic modeling for porous debris, designs are developed for detailed calculations of heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris. Correlations are identified for convective heat transfer in porous debris for the following modes of heat transfer; (1) forced convection to liquid, (2) forced convection to gas, (3) nucleate boiling, (4) transition boiling, and (5) film boiling. Interphase heat transfer is modeled in an approximate manner. Designs are described for models to calculate the flow losses and interphase drag of fluid flowing through the interstices of the porous debris, and to apply these variables in the momentum equations in the RELAP5 part of the code. Since the models for heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris in the lower head are designed for general application, a design is also described for implementation of these models to the analysis of porous debris in the core region. A test matrix is proposed for assessing the capability of the implemented models to calculate the heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris. The implementation of the models described in this report is expected to improve the COUPLE code calculation of the temperature distribution in porous debris and in the lower head that supports the debris. The implementation of these models is also expected to improve the calculation of the temperature and flow distribution in porous debris in the core region

  14. Effect of energetic ion loss on ICRF heating efficiency and energy confinement time in heliotrons

    Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.; Nuehrenberg, J.

    1999-06-01

    ICRF heating efficiency and the global energy confinement time during ICRF heating are investigated including the effect of energetic ion loss in heliotrons. The approximate formula of ICRF heating efficiency is derived using the results based on Monte Carlo simulations. The global energy confinement time including energetic ion effect can be expressed in terms of ICRF heating power, plasma density, and magnetic field strength in heliotrons. Our results in the CHS plasma show the systematic decrement of the global energy confinement time due to the energetic ion loss from the assumed energy confinement scaling law, which is consistent with the experimental observations. Also we apply our model to the ICRF minority heating in the LHD plasma in two cases of typical magnetic configurations. The clear increment of the global energy confinement time due to the stored energy of energetic tail ions is obtained in the 'orbit improved' configuration, while the decrement is observed in the 'standard' configuration. (author)

  15. Determination of emissivity coefficient of heat-resistant super alloys and cemented carbide

    Kieruj Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of emissivity engineering materials according to temperature. Experiment is concerned on difficult to machine materials, which may be turned with laser assisting. Cylindrical samples made of nickel-based alloys Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Waspaloy and tungsten-carbides based on cobalt matrix were analyzed. The samples’ temperature in contact method was compared to the temperature measured by non-contact pyrometers. Based on this relative, the value of the emissivity coefficient was adjusted to the right indication of pyrometers.

  16. Determination of friction factors and heat transfer coefficients for flow past artificially roughened surfaces

    Hodge, S.A.

    1979-12-01

    Because convective heat transfer is enhanced in flow past rough surfaces, much experimental and analytical effort over the past several decades has been devoted to the evaluation of artificial roughening for potential application to the heat transfer surfaces of gas-cooled reactors. Unfortunately, much of the analytical development in this field has been inadequately explained in the literature; this has led to misinterpretation of some of the subsequent experimental findings, compounding the uncertainty. This work provides a critical review of the underlying assumptions, theoretical foundations, and supporting experimental evidence for the analytical procedures in current use for the evaluation of roughness effects. It is a concise presentation of the available formulations with recommendations concerning their applicability to rough rod bundles

  17. A model for allometric scaling of mammalian metabolism with ambient heat loss

    Kwak, Ho Sang

    2016-02-02

    Background Allometric scaling, which represents the dependence of biological trait or process relates on body size, is a long-standing subject in biological science. However, there has been no study to consider heat loss to the ambient and an insulation layer representing mammalian skin and fur for the derivation of the scaling law of metabolism. Methods A simple heat transfer model is proposed to analyze the allometry of mammalian metabolism. The present model extends existing studies by incorporating various external heat transfer parameters and additional insulation layers. The model equations were solved numerically and by an analytic heat balance approach. Results A general observation is that the present heat transfer model predicted the 2/3 surface scaling law, which is primarily attributed to the dependence of the surface area on the body mass. External heat transfer effects introduced deviations in the scaling law, mainly due to natural convection heat transfer which becomes more prominent at smaller mass. These deviations resulted in a slight modification of the scaling exponent to a value smaller than 2/3. Conclusion The finding that additional radiative heat loss and the consideration of an outer insulation fur layer attenuate these deviation effects and render the scaling law closer to 2/3 provides in silico evidence for a functional impact of heat transfer mode on the allometric scaling law in mammalian metabolism.

  18. Morphological dependency of cutaneous blood flow and sweating during compensable heat stress when heat-loss requirements are matched across participants.

    Notley, Sean R; Park, Joonhee; Tagami, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Norikazu; Taylor, Nigel A S

    2016-07-01

    Human heat loss is thought, in part, to be morphologically related. It was therefore hypothesized that when heat-loss requirements and body temperatures were matched, that the mass-specific surface area alone could significantly explain both cutaneous vascular and sudomotor responses during compensable exercise. These thermoeffector responses were examined in 36 men with widely varying mass-specific surface areas (range, 232.3-292.7 cm(2)/kg), but of similar age, aerobic fitness, and adiposity. Subjects completed two trials under compensable conditions (28.1°C, 36.8% relative humidity), each involving rest (20 min) and steady-state cycling (45 min) at two matched metabolic heat-production rates (light, ∼135 W/m(2); moderate, ∼200 W/m(2)). Following equivalent mean body temperature changes, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance (r = 0.63 and r = 0.65) shared significant, positive associations with the mass-specific surface area during light work (P < 0.05), explaining ∼45% of the vasomotor variation. Conversely, during light and moderate work, whole body sweat rate, as well as local sweat rate and sudomotor sensitivity at three of four measured sites, revealed moderate, negative relationships with the mass-specific surface area (correlation coefficient range -0.37 to -0.73, P < 0.05). Moreover, those relationships could uniquely account for between 10 and 53% of those sweating responses (P < 0.05). Therefore, both thermoeffector responses displayed a significant morphological dependency in the presence of equivalent thermoafferent drive. Indeed, up to half of the interindividual variation in these effector responses could now be explained through morphological differences and the first principles governing heat transfer. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Enhanced loss of fusion products during mode conversion heating in TFTR

    Darrow, D.S.; Majeski, R.; Fisch, N.J.; Heeter, R.F.; Herrmann, H.W.; Herrmann, M.C.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.

    1995-07-01

    Ion Bernstein waves (IBWS) have been generated by mode conversion of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) fast waves in TFTR. The loss rate of fusion products in these discharges can be large, up to 10 times the first orbit loss rate. The losses are observed at the passing/trapped boundary, indicating that passing particles are being moved onto loss orbits either by increase of their v perpendicular due to the wave, by outward transport in minor radius, or both. The lost particles appear to be DD fusion produced tritons heated to ∼1.5 times their birth energy

  20. A unified view of energetic efficiency in active drag reduction, thrust generation and self-propulsion through a loss coefficient with some applications

    Arakeri, Jaywant H.; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2013-08-01

    An analysis of the energy budget for the general case of a body translating in a stationary fluid under the action of an external force is used to define a power loss coefficient. This universal definition of power loss coefficient gives a measure of the energy lost in the wake of the translating body and, in general, is applicable to a variety of flow configurations including active drag reduction, self-propulsion and thrust generation. The utility of the power loss coefficient is demonstrated on a model bluff body flow problem concerning a two-dimensional elliptical cylinder in a uniform cross-flow. The upper and lower boundaries of the elliptic cylinder undergo continuous motion due to a prescribed reflectionally symmetric constant tangential surface velocity. It is shown that a decrease in drag resulting from an increase in the strength of tangential surface velocity leads to an initial reduction and eventual rise in the power loss coefficient. A maximum in energetic efficiency is attained for a drag reducing tangential surface velocity which minimizes the power loss coefficient. The effect of the tangential surface velocity on drag reduction and self-propulsion of both bluff and streamlined bodies is explored through a variation in the thickness ratio (ratio of the minor and major axes) of the elliptical cylinders.

  1. Analytical Solution of Heat Conduction for Hollow Cylinders with Time-Dependent Boundary Condition and Time-Dependent Heat Transfer Coefficient

    Te-Wen Tu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical solution for the heat transfer in hollow cylinders with time-dependent boundary condition and time-dependent heat transfer coefficient at different surfaces is developed for the first time. The methodology is an extension of the shifting function method. By dividing the Biot function into a constant plus a function and introducing two specially chosen shifting functions, the system is transformed into a partial differential equation with homogenous boundary conditions only. The transformed system is thus solved by series expansion theorem. Limiting cases of the solution are studied and numerical results are compared with those in the literature. The convergence rate of the present solution is fast and the analytical solution is simple and accurate. Also, the influence of physical parameters on the temperature distribution of a hollow cylinder along the radial direction is investigated.

  2. Extra Heat Loss Through Light Weight Roofs Due to Latent Heat

    Rode, Carsten

    1996-01-01

    that changes phase at the terminals of its passage.Note however, that convection of air most often will have an important effect on the overall heat flow - but that is a different topic.Macroscopic latent heat transferConsider the following scenario: Initially, moisture is present in its condensed or frozen......This report is one in a series of papers in Task 5 of IEA Annex 24 on how moisture and air movements affect the energy performance of building constructions. The effect of latent heat flow will be demonstrated by means of an example: a light weight flat roof.Latent heat flow is one of three...... processes by which moisture affects energy performance:Higher thermal conductivityMoist materials have higher thermal con-ductivity than when they are dry. This is because thermally conducting moisture replaces the better insulating air in the pores of the materials. Moisture also enhan-ces the thermal...

  3. Determination of blade-to-coolant heat-transfer coefficients on a forced-convection, water-cooled, single-stage turbine

    Freche, John C; Schum, Eugene F

    1951-01-01

    Blade-to-coolant convective heat-transfer coefficients were obtained on a forced-convection water-cooled single-stage turbine over a large laminar flow range and over a portion of the transition range between laminar and turbulent flow. The convective coefficients were correlated by the general relation for forced-convection heat transfer with laminar flow. Natural-convection heat transfer was negligible for this turbine over the Grashof number range investigated. Comparison of turbine data with stationary tube data for the laminar flow of heated liquids showed good agreement. Calculated average midspan blade temperatures using theoretical gas-to-blade coefficients and blade-to-coolant coefficients from stationary-tube data resulted in close agreement with experimental data.

  4. Core debris cooling with flooded vessel or core-catcher. Heat exchange coefficients under natural convection

    Rouge, S.; Seiler, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    External cooling by natural water circulation is necessary for molten core retention in LWR lower head or in a core-catcher. Considering the expected heat flux levels (between 0.2 to 1.5 MW/m 2 ) film boiling should be avoided. This rises the question of the knowledge of the level of the critical heat flux for the considered geometries and flow paths. The document proposes a state of the art of the research in this field. Mainly small scale experiments have been performed in a very recent past. These experiments are not sufficient to extrapolate to large scale reactor structures. Limited large scale experimental results exist. These results together with some theoretical investigations show that external cooling by natural water circulation may be considered as a reasonable objective of severe accident R and D. Recently (in fact since the beginning of 1994) new results are available from large scale experiments (CYBL, ULPU 2000, SULTAN). These results indicate that CHF larger than 1 MW/m 2 can be obtained under natural water circulation conditions. In this report, emphasis is given to the pursuit of finding predictive models for the critical heat flux in large, naturally convective channels with thick walls. This theoretical understanding is important for the capability to extrapolate to different situations (various geometries, flow paths....). The outcome of this research should be the ability to calculate Boundary Layer Boiling situations (2D), channelling boiling situations (1D) and related CHF conditions. However, a more straightforward approach can be used for the analysis of specific designs. Today there are already some CHF data available for hemispherical geometry and these data can be used before a mechanistic understanding is achieved

  5. Calculation of thermal-diffusion coefficients from plane-wave fluctuations in the heat energy density

    Palmer, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    A method to calculate the thermal diffusivity D T from spontaneous fluctuations in the local heat energy density is presented. Calculations of the thermal diffusivity are performed for the Lennard-Jones fluid, carbon dioxide, and water. The results for the Lennard-Jones fluid are in agreement with calculations of the thermal conductivity using Green-Kubo relations and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics techniques. The results for carbon dioxide and water give thermal diffusivities within a factor of 2 of the experimental values

  6. Convective Heat Transfer Coefficients of Automatic Transmission Fluid Jets with Implications for Electric Machine Thermal Management: Preprint

    Bennion, Kevin; Moreno, Gilberto

    2015-09-29

    Thermal management for electric machines (motors/ generators) is important as the automotive industry continues to transition to more electrically dominant vehicle propulsion systems. Cooling of the electric machine(s) in some electric vehicle traction drive applications is accomplished by impinging automatic transmission fluid (ATF) jets onto the machine's copper windings. In this study, we provide the results of experiments characterizing the thermal performance of ATF jets on surfaces representative of windings, using Ford's Mercon LV ATF. Experiments were carried out at various ATF temperatures and jet velocities to quantify the influence of these parameters on heat transfer coefficients. Fluid temperatures were varied from 50 degrees C to 90 degrees C to encompass potential operating temperatures within an automotive transaxle environment. The jet nozzle velocities were varied from 0.5 to 10 m/s. The experimental ATF heat transfer coefficient results provided in this report are a useful resource for understanding factors that influence the performance of ATF-based cooling systems for electric machines.

  7. A kinetic model of droplet heating and evaporation: Effects of inelastic collisions and a non-unity evaporation coefficient

    Sazhin, Sergei S.

    2013-01-01

    The previously developed kinetic model for droplet heating and evaporation into a high pressure air is generalised to take into account the combined effects of inelastic collisions between molecules in the kinetic region, a non-unity evaporation coefficient and temperature gradient inside droplets. It is pointed out that for the parameters typical for Diesel engine-like conditions, the heat flux in the kinetic region is a linear function of the vapour temperature at the outer boundary of this region, but practically does not depend on vapour density at this boundary for all models, including and not including the effects of inelastic collisions, and including and not including the effects of a non-unity evaporation coefficient. For any given temperature at the outer boundary of the kinetic region the values of the heat flux are shown to decrease with increasing numbers of internal degrees of freedom of the molecules. The rate of this decrease is strong for small numbers of these degrees of freedom but negligible when the number of these degrees exceeds 20. This allows us to restrict the analysis to the first 20 arbitrarily chosen degrees of freedom of n-dodecane molecules when considering the effects of inelastic collisions. The mass flux at this boundary decreases almost linearly with increasing vapour density at the same location for all above-mentioned models. For any given vapour density at the outer boundary of the kinetic region the values of the mass flux are smaller for the model, taking into account the contribution of internal degrees of freedom, than for the model ignoring these degrees of freedom. It is shown that the effects of inelastic collisions lead to stronger increase in the predicted droplet evaporation time in Diesel engine-like conditions relative to the hydrodynamic model, compared with the similar increase predicted by the kinetic model considering only elastic collisions. The effects of a non-unity evaporation coefficient are shown to be

  8. A comparison of different methods for in-situ determination of heat losses form district heating pipes

    Boehm, Benny [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Energy Engineering (Denmark)

    1996-11-01

    A comparison of different methods for in-situ determination of heat losses has been carried out on a 273 mm transmission line in Copenhagen. Instrumentation includes temperature sensors, heat flux meters and an infrared camera. The methods differ with regard to time consumption and costs of applying the specific method, demand on accuracy of temperature measurements, sensitivity to computational parameters, e.g. the thermal conductivity of the soil, response to transients in water temperature and the ground, and steady state assumptions in the model used in the interpretation of the measurements. Several of the applied methods work well. (au)

  9. The Heat Resistance of Microbial Cells Represented by D Values Can be Estimated by the Transition Temperature and the Coefficient of Linear Expansion.

    Nakanishi, Koichi; Kogure, Akinori; Deuchi, Keiji; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Ito, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed a method for evaluating the heat resistance of microorganisms by measuring the transition temperature at which the coefficient of linear expansion of a cell changes. Here, we performed heat resistance measurements using a scanning probe microscope with a nano thermal analysis system. The microorganisms studied included six strains of the genus Bacillus or related genera, one strain each of the thermophilic obligate anaerobic bacterial genera Thermoanaerobacter and Moorella, two strains of heat-resistant mold, two strains of non-sporulating bacteria, and one strain of yeast. Both vegetative cells and spores were evaluated. The transition temperature at which the coefficient of linear expansion due to heating changed from a positive value to a negative value correlated strongly with the heat resistance of the microorganism as estimated from the D value. The microorganisms with greater heat resistance exhibited higher transition temperatures. There was also a strong negative correlation between the coefficient of linear expansion and heat resistance in bacteria and yeast, such that microorganisms with greater heat resistance showed lower coefficients of linear expansion. These findings suggest that our method could be useful for evaluating the heat resistance of microorganisms.

  10. Determination of Heat Tolerance Coefficient in Crossbred and Baladi Pregnant Cows under Egyptian Environmental Conditions

    EL-Masry, K.A.; Nessim, M.Z.; Gad, A.E.

    2010-01-01

    The experiment was carried out during August (hot climate) on twelve pregnant cows, six crossbred (50% native Baladi and 50% Brown Swiss) and six native Baladi pregnant cows in the same age and second parity during their mid-pregnancy as detected by rectal palpation. The experiment was repeated during December (mild climate) on similar twelve pregnant cows. Blood sample was obtained from each cow at the end of August (first group) and at the end of December (second group) to determine blood plasma levels of two thermogenic hormones (total T3 and cortisol) and biochemical parameters, total protein, creatinine, urea-N, triglycerides, ALT and AST. Comparison was made between hot group and mild group to estimate heat induced changes in both breeds and to identify which breed is more tolerant to heat stress. The results showed that heat- induced a significant decrease (p<0.01) in plasma level of total T3 in crossbred and Baladi by (-53.6 and -51.8%), respectively and triglycerides in crossbred and Baladi by (-35.6 and-32.2%), respectively. But hot weather caused a significant increase (p<0.01) in cortisol hormone level in crossbred and Baladi by (78.3 and 77.6%), respectively. Significant (p<0.01) difference between crossbred and Baladi cows in cortisol hormone level was remarked. Moreover, a significant increase (p<0.01) in total protein level in crossbred and Baladi by (11.4 and 13.4%), respectively was observed. An increase (p<0.05) was noticed in creatinine level by 25.0% and 20.1% in crossbred and Baladi, respectively, urea-N level in crossbred and Baladi by 16.6% and 21.7%, respectively and ALT in crossbred and Baladi by 42.4% and 45.7%, respectively. Also, a difference was recognized amounted in AST level in crossbred and Baladi by 22.3 %, (p<0.02) and 31.0 % (p<0.01), respectively.

  11. Thermal performance of a porus radial fin with natural convection and radiative heat losses

    Darvishi M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytic (series solution is developed to describe the thermal performance of a porous radial fin with natural convection in the fluid saturating the fin and radiation heat loss from the top and bottom surfaces of the fin. The HAM results for the temperature distribution and base heat flux are compared with the direct numerical results and found to be very accurate.

  12. Mathematical model for heat loss calculation through a window; Modelo para el calculo de la perdida de calor por una ventana

    Fissore Sch, Adelqui; Cuevas B, Cristian [Universidad de Concepcion (Chile). Facultad de Ingenieria. Dept. de Ingenieria Mecanica]. E-mail: afissore@udec.cl; ccuevas@udec.cl

    2000-07-01

    In the present work a semi-empirical model for heat loss by convection at an indoor window surface with curtain or blind is given. With this model, the convection heat transfer coefficient and temperature of the air at confined space between the curtain and the glass can be calculated. The curtain was modeled with a paper due to the low thermal inertia that it has. The model is based on experimental data obtained for four separations between the paper and the window. Data from numerical simulation program are also used. (author)

  13. Reducing heat loss from the energy absorber of a solar collector

    Chao, Bei Tse; Rabl, Ari

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing convective heat loss in a cylindrical radiant energy collector. It includes a curved reflective wall in the shape of the arc of a circle positioned on the opposite side of the exit aperture from the reflective side walls of the collector. Radiant energy exiting the exit aperture is directed by the curved wall onto an energy absorber such that the portion of the absorber upon which the energy is directed faces downward to reduce convective heat loss from the absorber.

  14. Uncertainty in unprotected loss-of-heat-sink, loss-of-flow, and transient-overpower accidents.

    Morris, E. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-08

    The sensitivities of various output parameters to selected input parameters in unprotected combined loss of heat-sink and loss-of-flow (ULOHS), loss-of-flow (ULOF), and transient-overpower (UTOP) accidents are explored in this report. This line of investigation was suggested by R. A. Wigeland. For an initial examination of potential sensitivities, the MATWS computer program has been compiled as part of a dynamic link library (DLL) so that uncertain input parameters can be sampled from their probability distributions using the GoldSim simulation software. The MATWS program combines the point-kinetics module from the SAS4A/SASSYS computer code with a simplified representation of the reactor heat removal system. Coupling with the GoldSim software by means of a DLL not only provides a convenient mechanism for sampling the stochastic input parameters but also allows the use of various tools that are available in GoldSim for analyzing the dependence of various MATWS outputs on these parameters. Should a decision be made to continue this investigation, the techniques used to couple MATWS and GoldSim could also be applied to couple the SAS4A/SASSYS computer code with GoldSim. The work described here illustrates the type of results that can be obtained from the stochastic analysis.

  15. Uncertainty in unprotected loss-of-heat-sink, loss-of-flow, and transient-overpower accidents

    Morris, E.E.

    2007-01-01

    The sensitivities of various output parameters to selected input parameters in unprotected combined loss of heat-sink and loss-of-flow (ULOHS), loss-of-flow (ULOF), and transient-overpower (UTOP) accidents are explored in this report. This line of investigation was suggested by R. A. Wigeland. For an initial examination of potential sensitivities, the MATWS computer program has been compiled as part of a dynamic link library (DLL) so that uncertain input parameters can be sampled from their probability distributions using the GoldSim simulation software. The MATWS program combines the point-kinetics module from the SAS4A/SASSYS computer code with a simplified representation of the reactor heat removal system. Coupling with the GoldSim software by means of a DLL not only provides a convenient mechanism for sampling the stochastic input parameters but also allows the use of various tools that are available in GoldSim for analyzing the dependence of various MATWS outputs on these parameters. Should a decision be made to continue this investigation, the techniques used to couple MATWS and GoldSim could also be applied to couple the SAS4A/SASSYS computer code with GoldSim. The work described here illustrates the type of results that can be obtained from the stochastic analysis

  16. A Study on the Efficiency Improvement of Multi-Geothermal Heat Pump Systems in Korea Using Coefficient of Performance

    Young-Ju Jung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Korean government is fostering a renewable energy industry as a means of handling the energy crisis. Among the renewable energy systems available, geothermal energy has been highlighted as highly efficient, safely operable and relatively unaffected by outdoors air conditions. Despite the increasing use of renewable energy, the devices using renewables may not be operating appropriately. This study examined current problems in the operation of a geothermal heat pump (GHP system. The efficiency of a geothermal heat pump system to studied to maximize the operation plan. Our study modelled the target building and analyzed the energy using TRNSYS, which is a dynamic energy simulation tool, to apply the coefficient of performance (COP and evaluate the operation method. As a result, the GHP total energy consumption from the COP control method was reduced by 46% compared to the current operation. The proposed control method was evaluated after applying the system to a building. The results showed that efficient operation of a geothermal heat pump system is possible.

  17. Experiments and correlations of pressure loss coefficients for hexagonal arranged rod bundles (P/D > 1.02) with helical wire spacers in laminar and turbulent flows

    Marten, K.; Yonekawa, S.; Hoffmann, H.

    1987-05-01

    Advanced pressurized water reactors as well as sodium cooled fast reactors, in their breeding and absorber elements, use tightly packed rod bundles with hexagonally arranged rods. Helical wires or helical fins serve as spacers. The pressure loss coefficients of twelve bundles with helical wires were determined systematically in water experiments. High measuring accuracy was achieved by very precise fabrication of the bundles and the shroud as well as by investigations of the proper measuring techniques. The results show a dependency of the loss coefficients on the Reynolds number and on the P/D and H/D ratios of the bundles. These results together with available systematic experimental results of investigations at P/D > 1.1 were used to develop a correlation to determine the pressure loss coefficients of tightly and widely packed hexagonally arranged rod bundles with helical wire spacers. These correlations were used to recalculate and compare results of pressure loss investigations found in the literature; good agreement was demonstrated. Hence, calculation methods exist for a broad range of applications to determine the pressure loss coefficients of hexagonally arranged rod bundles with helical wires for spacers. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Studies in boiling heat transfer in two phase flow through tube arrays: nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient and maximum heat flux as a function of velocity and quality of Freon-113

    Rahmani, R.

    1983-01-01

    The nucleate boiling heat-transfer coefficient and the maximum heat flux were studied experimentally as functions of velocity, quality and heater diameter for single-phase flow, and two-phase flow of Freon-113 (trichlorotrifluorethane). Results show: (1) peak heat flux: over 300 measured peak heat flux data from two 0.875-in. and four 0.625-in.-diameter heaters indicated that: (a) for pool boiling, single-phase and two-phase forced convection boiling the only parameter (among hysteresis, rate of power increase, aging, presence and proximity of unheated rods) that has a statistically significant effect on the peak heat flux is the velocity. (b) In the velocity range (0 0 position or the point of impact of the incident fluid) and the top (180 0 position) of the test element, respectively

  19. Systematic losses of outdoor production from heat stress and climate change

    Buzan, J. R.; Huber, M.

    2017-12-01

    Heat stress impacts humans today with heat waves, worker reductions, and health issues. Here we show novel results in labor productivity for outdoor work due to global warming. We use the HumanIndexMod to calculate 4x daily values of Simplified Wet Bulb Globe Temperature index (sWBGT) from the CMIP5 archive normalized by global mean surface temperature changes. Previous work shows that scaling of sWBGT is robust across the CMIP5 archive. We calculate total annual outdoor labor capacity from our scaled sWBGT results. Our results show modern day losses due to heat stress impacting outdoor work for low latitudes (and parts of Eastern China and the Southern United States). At 2°C of climate change, up to 20% losses to total capacity impact Midwestern United States, while the Southern United States suffers >20% losses. Western Coastal Africa suffers annual losses at >80%, along with the Amazon Basin and the greater South East Asia region. India suffers losses >50% annually. At +5°C, the estimated mean global change by 2100, the Equatorial region (Northern Australia and Northern Bolivia to Western Coastal Africa and Southern India) has complete cessation of annual outdoor work. The Midwest United States suffers losses up to 30%, and the Gulf of Mexico suffers losses >50%. Our results imply that small changes in global mean surface temperature (2°C) will lead to crippling losses to outdoor work annually, and ≥5°C losses will lead to cessation of labor for more than half the world's population.

  20. Influence of inhomogeneous surface heat capacity on the estimation of radiative response coefficients in a two-zone energy balance model

    Park, Jungmin; Choi, Yong-Sang

    2018-04-01

    Observationally constrained values of the global radiative response coefficient are pivotal to assess the reliability of modeled climate feedbacks. A widely used approach is to measure transient global radiative imbalance related to surface temperature changes. However, in this approach, a potential error in the estimate of radiative response coefficients may arise from surface inhomogeneity in the climate system. We examined this issue theoretically using a simple two-zone energy balance model. Here, we dealt with the potential error by subtracting the prescribed radiative response coefficient from those calculated within the two-zone framework. Each zone was characterized by the different magnitude of the radiative response coefficient and the surface heat capacity, and the dynamical heat transport in the atmosphere between the zones was parameterized as a linear function of the temperature difference between the zones. Then, the model system was forced by randomly generated monthly varying forcing mimicking time-varying forcing like an observation. The repeated simulations showed that inhomogeneous surface heat capacity causes considerable miscalculation (down to -1.4 W m-2 K-1 equivalent to 31.3% of the prescribed value) in the global radiative response coefficient. Also, the dynamical heat transport reduced this miscalculation driven by inhomogeneity of surface heat capacity. Therefore, the estimation of radiative response coefficients using the surface temperature-radiation relation is appropriate for homogeneous surface areas least affected by the exterior.

  1. New set of convective heat transfer coefficients established for pools and validated against CLARA experiments for application to corium pools

    Michel, B., E-mail: benedicte.michel@irsn.fr

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A new set of 2D convective heat transfer correlations is proposed. • It takes into account different horizontal and lateral superficial velocities. • It is based on previously established correlations. • It is validated against recent CLARA experiments. • It has to be implemented in a 0D MCCI (molten core concrete interaction) code. - Abstract: During an hypothetical Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) or Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) severe accident with core meltdown and vessel failure, corium would fall directly on the concrete reactor pit basemat if no water is present. The high temperature of the corium pool maintained by the residual power would lead to the erosion of the concrete walls and basemat of this reactor pit. The thermal decomposition of concrete will lead to the release of a significant amount of gases that will modify the corium pool thermal hydraulics. In particular, it will affect heat transfers between the corium pool and the concrete which determine the reactor pit ablation kinetics. A new set of convective heat transfer coefficients in a pool with different lateral and horizontal superficial gas velocities is modeled and validated against the recent CLARA experimental program. 155 tests of this program, in two size configurations and a high range of investigated viscosity, have been used to validate the model. Then, a method to define different lateral and horizontal superficial gas velocities in a 0D code is proposed together with a discussion about the possible viscosity in the reactor case when the pool is semi-solid. This model is going to be implemented in the 0D ASTEC/MEDICIS code in order to determine the impact of the convective heat transfer in the concrete ablation by corium.

  2. Enhanced loss of fast ions during mode conversion ion Bernstein wave heating in TFTR

    Darrow, D.S.; Majeski, R.; Fisch, N.J.; Heeter, R.F.; Herrmann, H.W.; Herrmann, M.C.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.

    1995-12-01

    A strong interaction of fast ions with ion Bernstein waves has been observed in TFTR. It results in a large increase in the fast ion loss rate, and heats the lost particles to several MeV. The lost ions are observed at the passing/trapped boundary and appear to be either DD fusion produced tritons or accelerated D neutral beam ions. Under some conditions, enhanced loss of DT alpha particles is also seen. The losses provide experimental support for some of the elements required for alpha energy channeling

  3. Minimum success criteria at SGTR combined with loss of secondary heat sink

    Parzer, I.; Petelin, S.

    1993-01-01

    A parametric analysis has been performed investigating minimum success criteria for the hypothetical Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) accident in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Nuclear Power Plant, combined with the total loss of secondary heat sink. The analyses have been performed by RELAP5/MOD2 and MOD3 computer codes using Krsko NPP input deck. The Krsko NPP is a 2-loop Westinghouse PWR, 640 MWe, located in Slovenia and operating from 1981. Two break sizes have been chosen for the SGTR event: 2 and 5 double-ended broken tubes have been assumed. Total loss of secondary heat sink has been assumed from the beginning of the calculation. The ways of cooling down the plant after the postulated accident have been investigated, including Bleed ampersand Feed through the primary system. The NPP Krsko Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) have been verified for this case. Some suggestions have been made, how to improve FR-H.1 procedure (Loss of Secondary Heat Sink), to include some steps, which take into account also SGTR when it is combined with loss of secondary heat sink. Possible misinterpretations of E-0 procedure (Reactor Trip or Safety Injection) have been studied

  4. Turbomachinery Heat Transfer and Loss Modeling for 3D Navier-Stokes Codes

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Ameri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    This report's contents focus on making use of NASA Glenn on-site computational facilities,to develop, validate, and apply models for use in advanced 3D Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes to enhance the capability to compute heat transfer and losses in turbomachiney.

  5. The influence of soil moisture transfer on building heat loss via the ground

    Janssen, H.M.; Carmeliet, J.; Hens, H.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of soil moisture transfer on building heat loss via the ground is investigated by comparing fully coupled simulations with linear thermal simulations. The observed influences of coupling are (1) the larger amplitude of surface temperature, (2) the variation of thermal

  6. Effect of variable heat transfer coefficient on tissue temperature next to a large vessel during radiofrequency tumor ablation

    Pinheiro Cleber

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the current shortcomings of radiofrequency (RF tumor ablation is its limited performance in regions close to large blood vessels, resulting in high recurrence rates at these locations. Computer models have been used to determine tissue temperatures during tumor ablation procedures. To simulate large vessels, either constant wall temperature or constant convective heat transfer coefficient (h have been assumed at the vessel surface to simulate convection. However, the actual distribution of the temperature on the vessel wall is non-uniform and time-varying, and this feature makes the convective coefficient variable. Methods This paper presents a realistic time-varying model in which h is a function of the temperature distribution at the vessel wall. The finite-element method (FEM was employed in order to model RF hepatic ablation. Two geometrical configurations were investigated. The RF electrode was placed at distances of 1 and 5 mm from a large vessel (10 mm diameter. Results When the ablation procedure takes longer than 1–2 min, the attained coagulation zone obtained with both time-varying h and constant h does not differ significantly. However, for short duration ablation (5–10 s and when the electrode is 1 mm away from the vessel, the use of constant h can lead to errors as high as 20% in the estimation of the coagulation zone. Conclusion For tumor ablation procedures typically lasting at least 5 min, this study shows that modeling the heat sink effect of large vessels by applying constant h as a boundary condition will yield precise results while reducing computational complexity. However, for other thermal therapies with shorter treatment using a time-varying h may be necessary.

  7. The effect of wind on the rate of heat loss from avian cup-shaped nests.

    Heenan, Caragh B; Seymour, Roger S

    2012-01-01

    Forced convection can significantly influence the heat loss from birds and their offspring but effects may be reduced by using sheltered micro-sites such as cavities or constructing nests. The structural and thermal properties of the nests of two species, the spiny-cheeked honeyeater (Acanthagenys rufogularis) and yellow-throated miner (Manorina flavigula), were measured in relation to three wind speeds. Nest dimensions differ between the two species, despite the similar body mass of the incubating adults, however nest conductance is comparable. As wind speed increases, so does the rate of heat loss from the nests of both species, and further still during incubation recesses. The significance of forced convection through the nest is a near-doubling in heat production required by the parent, even when incubating at relatively low wind speeds. This provides confirmation that selecting a sheltered nest site is important for avian reproductive success.

  8. The effect of wind on the rate of heat loss from avian cup-shaped nests.

    Caragh B Heenan

    Full Text Available Forced convection can significantly influence the heat loss from birds and their offspring but effects may be reduced by using sheltered micro-sites such as cavities or constructing nests. The structural and thermal properties of the nests of two species, the spiny-cheeked honeyeater (Acanthagenys rufogularis and yellow-throated miner (Manorina flavigula, were measured in relation to three wind speeds. Nest dimensions differ between the two species, despite the similar body mass of the incubating adults, however nest conductance is comparable. As wind speed increases, so does the rate of heat loss from the nests of both species, and further still during incubation recesses. The significance of forced convection through the nest is a near-doubling in heat production required by the parent, even when incubating at relatively low wind speeds. This provides confirmation that selecting a sheltered nest site is important for avian reproductive success.

  9. Experimentally-determined external heat loss of automotive gas turbine engine

    Meng, P. R.; Wulf, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    An external heat balance was conducted on a 150 HP two-shaft automotive gas turbine engine. The engine was enclosed in a calorimeter box and the temperature change of cooling air passing through the box was measured. Cooling airflow ranges of 1.6 to 2.1 lb-per-second and 0.8 to 1.1 lb-per-second were used. The engine housing heat loss increased as the cooling airflow through the calorimeter box was increased, as would be the case in a moving automobile. The heat balance between the total energy input and the sum of shaft power output and various losses compared within 30 percent at engine idle speeds and within 7 percent at full power.

  10. Analysis and optimization of the heat transfer coefficient of a finned heat exchanger submitted to natural convection; Analise e otimizacao do coeficiente de transferencia de calor de um trocador aletado submetido a conveccao natural

    Rocha, Alan Carlos Bueno da

    1997-07-01

    A heat transfer (condenser) of a domestic freezer was tested in a vertical channel in order to study the influence of the chimney effect in the optimization of the heat transfer coefficient. The variation of the opening of the channel, position and the heating power of the heat exchanger in the heat transfer coefficient was considered. The influence of the surface emissivity on the heat transfer by thermal radiation was studied with the heat exchanger testes without paint and with black paint. The air velocity entering the channel was measured with a hot wire anemometer. In order to evaluate the chimney effect, the heat exchanger was testes in a open ambient. This situation simulates its operational conditions when installed on the freezer system. The variables collected in the experimental procedures was gathered in the form of dimensionless parameters as Nusselt, Rayleigh, Grashof and Prandtl numbers, and dimensional parameters of the convection. The results showed that the highest heat transfer value occurred when both a specific position and a specific channel opening were used. The experiments pointed out that the radiation contribution must be considered in heat transfer calculations. The conclusions showed that different channel openings can improve the heat transfer coefficient in this heat transfer exchanger. (author)

  11. Experimental determination of heat transfer coefficients in roll bite and air cooling for computer simulations of 1100 MPa carbon steel rolling

    Leinonen, Olli; Ilmola, Joonas; Seppälä, Oskari; Pohjonen, Aarne; Paavola, Jussi; Koskenniska, Sami; Larkiola, Jari

    2018-05-01

    In modeling of hot rolling pass schedules the heat transfer phenomena have to be known. Radiation to ambient, between rolls and a steel slab as well as heat transfer in contacts must be considered to achieve accurate temperature distribution and thereby accurate material behavior in simulations. Additional heat is generated by friction between the slab and the work roll and by plastic deformation. These phenomena must be taken into account when the effective heat transfer coefficient is determined from experimental data. In this paper we determine the effective heat transfer coefficient at the contact interface and emissivity factor of slab surface for 1100MPa strength carbon steel for hot rolling simulations. Experimental pilot rolling test were carried out and slab temperatures gathered right below the interface and at the mid thickness of the slab. Emissivity factor tests were carried out in the same manner but without rolling. Experimental data is utilized to derive contact heat transfer coefficient at the interface and emissivity factor of slab surface. Pilot rolling test is reproduced in FE-analysis to further refine the heat transfer coefficient and emissivity factor. Material mechanical properties at rolling temperatures were determined by Gleeble™ thermo-mechanical simulator and IDS thermodynamic-kinetic-empirical software.

  12. Evaluation of Heat Losses Behind the Front of the Detonation Moving Along the Metallic Porous Surface

    S. V. Golovastov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a computational technique of the heat flow from the hot products of detonation combustion into the porous coating and estimates the efficiency of the coating layer that results in slowing the flame front down with disregard the transverse displacement of the combustion products weight of a hydrogen-air mixture.Initial thermodynamic parameters of combustion products on the porous coating surface have been estimated. A drag (stagnation temperature of flow was determined.The statement of task was to calculate the heat flow into the long cylindrical metal fiber with radius of 15 μm. The reference values of heat capacity and heat diffusivity were used to estimate a thermal diffusivity in a wide range of temperatures. An approximation of the parameters is given for a wide range of temperatures.The calculation algorithm using an explicit four-point scheme is presented. The convergence and accuracy of the results were confirmed. The theoretical estimation using cylindrical Bessel functions was made to prove the accuracy of the results.Total heat loss was estimated using the photos of moving detonation front and hot combustion gases.Comparison of the total heat loss and the amount of energy absorbed by a single fiber allowed us to find that the porous coating thickness, resulting in attenuation of detonation wave, is efficient.

  13. Modeling and simulation of loss of the ultimate heat sink in a typical material testing reactor

    El-Khatib, Hisham; El-Morshedy, Salah El-Din; Higazy, Maher G.; El-Shazly, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A thermal–hydraulic model has been developed to simulate loss of the ultimate heat sink in MTR. ► The model involves three coupled sub-models for core, heat exchanger and cooling tower. ► The model is validated against PARET for steady-state and verified by operation data for transients. ► The model is used to simulate the behavior of the reactor under a loss of the ultimate heat sink. ► The model results are analyzed and discussed. -- Abstract: A thermal–hydraulic model has been developed to simulate loss of the ultimate heat sink in a typical material testing reactor (MTR). The model involves three interactively coupled sub-models for reactor core, heat exchanger and cooling tower. The model is validated against PARET code for steady-state operation and verified by the reactor operation records for transients. Then, the model is used to simulate the thermal–hydraulic behavior of the reactor under a loss of the ultimate heat sink event. The simulation is performed for two operation regimes: regime I representing 11 MW power and three cooling tower cells operated, and regime II representing 22 MW power and six cooling tower cells operated. In regime I, the simulation is performed for 1, 2 and 3 cooling tower cells failed while in regime II, it is performed for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 cooling tower cells failed. The simulation is performed under protected conditions where the safety action called power reduction is triggered by reactor protection system to decrease the reactor power by 20% when the coolant inlet temperature to the core reaches 43 °C and scram is triggered if the core inlet temperature reaches 44 °C. The model results are analyzed and discussed.

  14. Theoretical and experimental study of the rule for heat transfer coefficient in hot stamping of high strength steels

    Han, Xianhong; Hao, Xin; Yang, Kun; Zhong, Yaoyao

    2013-01-01

    Heat transfer is a crucial aspect for hot stamping process, the fully austenitized boron steel blank with temperature about 900°C is transferred to the tool, then formed rapidly and quenched in the cooled tool. The desired fully martensitic transformation will happen only if the cooling rate exceeds a critical value approximately 27 K/s. During such process, the heat transfer coefficient (abbreviated as HTC) between the tool and blank plays a decisive role for the variation of the blank temperature. In this work, a theoretical formula based on the joint-roughness model is presented to describe the law of HTC, which relies on the roughness, hardness, and other material parameters of the tool and blank. Moreover, a non-contact temperature measuring system based on the infrared thermal camera is built to catch the temperature change course, and then the HTC value is derived through the inverse analysis. Based on the theoretical and experimental results, the change rule of HTC especially its dependence on the process pressure will be discussed in detail

  15. Impact of Subgrid Scale Models and Heat Loss on Large Eddy Simulations of a Premixed Jet Burner Using Flamelet-Generated Manifolds

    Hernandez Perez, Francisco E.; Im, Hong G.; Lee, Bok Jik; Fancello, Alessio; Donini, Andrea; van Oijen, Jeroen A.; de Goey, L. Philip H.

    2017-11-01

    Large eddy simulations (LES) of a turbulent premixed jet flame in a confined chamber are performed employing the flamelet-generated manifold (FGM) method for tabulation of chemical kinetics and thermochemical properties, as well as the OpenFOAM framework for computational fluid dynamics. The burner has been experimentally studied by Lammel et al. (2011) and features an off-center nozzle, feeding a preheated lean methane-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.71 and mean velocity of 90 m/s, at 573 K and atmospheric pressure. Conductive heat loss is accounted for in the FGM tabulation via burner-stabilized flamelets and the subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence-chemistry interaction is modeled via presumed filtered density functions. The impact of heat loss inclusion as well as SGS modeling for both the SGS stresses and SGS variance of progress variable on the numerical results is investigated. Comparisons of the LES results against measurements show a significant improvement in the prediction of temperature when heat losses are incorporated into FGM. While further enhancements in the LES results are accomplished by using SGS models based on transported quantities and/or dynamically computed coefficients as compared to the Smagorinsky model, heat loss inclusion is more relevant. This research was sponsored by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and made use of computational resources at KAUST Supercomputing Laboratory.

  16. Energy reduction in buildings in temperate and tropic regions utilizing a heat loss measuring device

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    2012-01-01

    There exist two ordinary ways to obtain global energy efficiency. One way is to make improvements on the energy production and supply side, and the other way is, in general, to reduce the consume of energy in the society. This paper has focus on the latter and especially the consume of energy...... for heating up, and cooling down our houses. There is a huge energy saving potential on this area reducing both the World climate problems and economy challenges as well. Heating of buildings in Denmark counts for approximately 40% of the entire national energy consume. Of this reason a reduction of heat...... losses from building envelopes are of great impor­tance in order to reach the Bologna CO2-emission reduction goals. Energy renovation of buildings is a topic of huge focus around the world these years. Not only expenses for heating in the tempered and arctic regions are of importance, but also expenses...

  17. Experimental determination of new statistical correlations for the calculation of the heat transfer coefficient by convection for flat plates, cylinders and tube banks

    Ismael Fernando Meza Castro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This project carried out an experimental research with the design, assembly, and commissioning of a convection heat transfer test bench. Objective: To determine new statistical correlations that allow knowing the heat transfer coefficients by air convection with greater accuracy in applications with different heating geometry configurations. Methodology: Three geometric configurations, such as flat plate, cylinders and tube banks were studied according to their physical properties through Reynolds and Prandtl numbers, using a data transmission interface using Arduino® controllers Measured the air temperature through the duct to obtain real-time data and to relate the heat transferred from the heating element to the fluid and to perform mathematical modeling in specialized statistical software. The study was made for the three geometries mentioned, one power per heating element and two air velocities with 10 repetitions. Results: Three mathematical correlations were obtained with regression coefficients greater than 0.972, one for each heating element, obtaining prediction errors in the heat transfer convective coefficients of 7.50% for the flat plate, 2.85% for the plate Cylindrical and 1.57% for the tube bank. Conclusions: It was observed that in geometries constituted by several individual elements, a much more accurate statistical adjustment was obtained to predict the behavior of the convection heat coefficients, since each unit reaches a stability in the surface temperature profile with Greater speed, giving the geometry in general, a more precise measurement of the parameters that govern the transfer of heat, as it is in the case of the geometry of the tube bank.

  18. Heat loss in air of an Antarctic marine mammal, the Weddell seal.

    Mellish, Jo-Ann; Hindle, Allyson; Skinner, John; Horning, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The conflicting needs of homeostasis in air versus water complicate our understanding of thermoregulation in marine mammals. Large-scale modeling efforts directed at predicting the energetic impact of changing sea ice conditions on polar ecosystems require a better understanding of thermoregulation in air of free-ranging animals. We utilized infrared imaging as an indirect approach to determine surface temperatures of dry, hauled-out Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii, n = 35) of varying age and body condition during the Antarctic summer. The study groups provided a fivefold range in body mass and a threefold range in blubber depth. Surface temperature (T s) did not vary by body region (head, shoulder, axilla, torso, hip, flippers). Average seal T s (mean 13.9 ± 11.2 °C) was best described through a combination of the physical traits of body mass and environmental variables of ambient temperature T air, and wind speed. Additional factors of ice temperature (T ice), relative humidity and cloud cover did not improve the model. Heat transfer model estimates suggested that radiation contributed 56.6 ± 7.7 % of total heat loss. Convection and conduction accounted for the remaining 15.7 ± 12.3 and 27.7 ± 9.3 %, respectively. Heat loss by radiation was primarily influenced by body mass and wind speed, whereas convective heat loss was influenced primarily by blubber depth and wind speed. Conductive heat loss was modeled largely as a function of physical traits of mass and blubber depth rather than any environmental covariates, and therefore was substantially higher in animals in leaner condition.

  19. Effect of energetic ion loss on ICRF heating efficiency and energy confinement time in heliotrons

    Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.; Nuehrenberg, J.

    1999-01-01

    The ICRF heating efficiency and the global energy confinement time during ICRF heating are investigated, including the effect of energetic ion loss in heliotrons. The approximate formula of ICRF heating efficiency is derived using results based on Monte Carlo simulations (Murakami, S., et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 26 (1995) 209). The global energy confinement time including the energetic ion effect can be expressed in heliotrons in terms of ICRF heating power, plasma density and magnetic field strength. Results in plasmas at CHS show a systematic decrease of the global energy confinement time due to energetic ion loss from the assumed energy confinement scaling law, which is consistent with the experimental observations. The model is also applied to ICRF minority heating in LHD plasmas in two cases of typical magnetic configurations. A clear increase of the global energy confinement time due to the stored energy of energetic tail ions is obtained in the 'orbit improved' configuration, while a decrease is observed in the 'standard' configuration. (author)

  20. ANALYSIS OF THERMAL PROPERTIES AND HEAT LOSS IN CONSTRUCTION AND ISOTHERMAL MATERIALS OF MULTILAYER BUILDING WALLS

    Arkadiusz Urzędowski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the impact of vertical partition, technology on thermal insulation of the building, and the resulting savings and residents thermal comfort. The study is carried out as an analysis of three selected design solutions including such materials as: aerated concrete elements, polystyrene, ceramic elements, concrete, mineral plaster. Simulation results of heat transfer in a multi-layered wall, are subjected to detailed analysis by means of thermal visual methods. The study of existing structures, helped to identify the local point of heat loss by means of infrared technology leading to determination of U-value reduction by 36% in maximum for the described 3 types of structure.

  1. Probabilistic analysis of the loss of the decay heat removal function for Creys-Malville reactor

    Lanore, J.M.; Villeroux-Lombard, C.; Bouscatie, F.; Pavret de la Rochefordiere, A.

    1982-01-01

    The classical fault tree/event tree methods do not take into account the dependence in time of the systems behaviour during the sequences, and that is quite unrealistic for the decay heat removal function. It was then necessary to use a new methodology based on functional states of the whole system and on transition laws between these states. Thus, the probabilistic analysis of the decay heat removal function for Creys-Malville plant is performed in a global way. The main accident sequences leading to the loss of the function are then determined a posteriori. The weak points are pointed out, in particular the importance of common mode failures

  2. Combined numerical and experimental determination of the convective heat transfer coefficient between an AlCrN-coated Vanadis 4 tool and Rhenus oil

    Üstünyagiz, Esmeray; Nielsen, Chris V.; Tiedje, Niels S.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Regardless of the field of application, the reliability of numerical simulations depends on correct description of boundary conditions. In thermal simulation, determination of heat transfer coefficients is important because it varies with material properties and process conditions....... This paper shows a combined experimental and numerical analysis applied for determination of the heat transfer coefficient between an AlCrN-coated Vanadis 4 tool and Rhenus LA722086 oil in an unloaded condition, i.e. without the tool being in contact with a workpiece. It is found that the heat transfer...... coefficient in unloaded conditions at 80°C oil temperature is 0.1 kW/(m2∙K) between the selected stamping tool and mineral oil. A sensitivity analysis of the numerical model was performed to verify the effects of mesh discretization, temperature measurement location and tool geometry. Among these parameters...

  3. A new consideration for the heat transfer coefficient and an analysis of the thermal stress of the high-interim pressure turbine casing model

    Um, Dall Sun

    2004-01-01

    In real design of the high and interim pressure turbine casing, it is one of the important things to figure out its thermal strain exactly. In this paper, with the establishment of the new concept for the heat transfer coefficient of steam that is one of the factors in analysis of the thermal stress for turbine casing, an analysis was done for one of the high and interim pressure turbine casings in operating domestically. The sensitivity analysis of the heat transfer coefficient of steam to the thermal strain of the turbine casing was done with a 2-D simple model. The analysis was also done with switching of the material properties of the turbine casing and resulted in that the thermal strain of the turbine casing was not so sensitive to the heat transfer coefficient of steam. On the basis of this, 3-D analysis of the thermal strain for the high and interim pressure turbine casing was done

  4. Mode and climatic factors effect on energy losses in transient heat modes of transmission lines

    Bigun, A. Ya; Sidorov, O. A.; Osipov, D. S.; Girshin, S. S.; Goryunov, V. N.; Petrova, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    Electrical energy losses increase in modern grids. The losses are connected with an increase in consumption. Existing models of electric power losses estimation considering climatic factors do not allow estimating the cable temperature in real time. Considering weather and mode factors in real time allows to meet effectively and safely the consumer’s needs to minimize energy losses during transmission, to use electric power equipment effectively. These factors increase an interest in the evaluation of the dynamic thermal mode of overhead transmission lines conductors. The article discusses an approximate analytic solution of the heat balance equation in the transient operation mode of overhead lines based on the least squares method. The accuracy of the results obtained is comparable with the results of solving the heat balance equation of transient thermal mode with the Runge-Kutt method. The analysis of mode and climatic factors effect on the cable temperature in a dynamic thermal mode is presented. The calculation of the maximum permissible current for variation of weather conditions is made. The average electric energy losses during the transient process are calculated with the change of wind, air temperature and solar radiation. The parameters having the greatest effect on the transmission capacity are identified.

  5. Theoretical study to determine the heat transfer by forced convection coefficient in an empirical correlation in single phase, for annular channels

    Herrera A, E.

    1994-01-01

    In the heat transfer studies by forced convection, we have few data about behavior of the fluids in an annular channel heated by a concentric pipe, such date is necessary to know the heat transfer coefficient that establish the interchange of energy and the thermic properties of the fluid with the geometry of the flow. In this work the objective, was to compare some empirical correlations that we needed for determinate the heat transfer coefficient for annular channels, where we obtained similar at the theoretical results of an experiment made by Miller and Benforado. It is important to know such coefficients because we can determinate the heat quantity transmitted to a probe zone, in which we simulate a nuclear fuel element that developed huge heat quantity that must be dispersed in short time. We give theoretical data of the heat forced transfer convection and we analyzed the phenomena in annular channels given some empirical correlations employed by some investigators and we analyzed each one. (Author)

  6. Oscillating-flow loss test results in rectangular heat exchanger passages

    Wood, J. Gary

    1991-01-01

    Test results of oscillating flow losses in rectangular heat exchanger passages of various aspect ratios are given. This work was performed in support of the design of a free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) for a dynamic space power conversion system. Oscillating flow loss testing was performed using an oscillating flow rig, which was based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. Tests were run over a range of oscillating flow parameters encompassing the flow regimes of the proposed engine design. Test results are presented in both tabular and graphical form and are compared against analytical predictions.

  7. Heat Loss Testing of Schott's 2008 PTR70 Parabolic Trough Receiver

    Burkholder, Frank [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kutscher, Chuck [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Two Schott 2008 model year PTR70 HCEs were tested on NREL's heat loss test stand from 100 - 500 deg C in 50 deg C increments. Absorber emittance was determined from the laboratory testing so that the performance of the HCEs could be modeled in a parabolic trough collector. Collector/HCE simulation results for many different field operation conditions were used to create heat loss correlationcoefficients for Excelergy and SAM. SAM estimates that the decreased emittance of the 2008 PTR70 will decrease the LCOE for parabolic trough power plants by 0.5 cents/kWh and increase the electricity generated by 5% relative to previous PTR70s. These conclusions assume that the 2008 PTR70 is supplied at the same cost and with the same optical performance as earlier PTR70 models.

  8. Monitoring the risk of loss of heat sink during plant shutdowns at Bruce Generating Station 'A'

    Krishnan, K.S.; Mancuso, F.; Vecchiarelli, D.

    1996-01-01

    A relatively simple loss of shutdown heat sink fault tree model has been developed and used during unit outages at Bruce Nuclear Generation Station 'A' to assess, from a risk and reliability perspective, alternative heat sink strategies and to aid in decisions on allowable outage configurations. The model is adjusted to reflect the various unit configurations planned during a specific outage, and identifies events and event combinations leading to loss of fuel cooling. The calculated failure frequencies are compared to the limits consistent with corporate and international public safety goals. The importance measures generated by the interrogation of the fault tree model for each outage configuration are also used to reschedule configurations with high fuel damage frequency later into the outage and to control the configurations with relatively high probability of fuel damage to short intervals at the most appropriate time into the outage. (author)

  9. The influence of soil moisture in the unsaturated zone on the heat loss from buildings via the ground

    Janssen, H.; Carmeliet, J.; Hens, H.

    2002-01-01

    In calculations of building heat loss via the ground, the coupling with soil moisture transfer is generally ignored, an important hypothesis which will be falsified in this paper. Results from coupled simulations - coupled soil heat and moisture transfer equations and complete surface heat and

  10. Heat deposition on the first wall due to ICRF-induced loss of fast ions in JT-60U

    Kusama, Y.; Tobita, K.; Kimura, H.; Hamamatsu, K.; Fujii, T.; Nemoto, M.; Saigusa, M.; Moriyama, S.; Tani, K.; Koide, Y.; Sakasai, A.; Nishitani, T.; Ushigusa, K.

    1995-01-01

    In JT-60U, the heat deposition on the first wall due to the ICRF-induced loss of fast ions was investigated by changing the position of the resonance layer in the ripple-trapping region. A heat spot appears on the first wall of the same major radius as the resonance layer of the ICRF waves. The broadening of the heat spot in the major radius direction is consistent with that of the resonance layer due to the Doppler broadening. The heat spot is considered to be formed by the ICRF-induced ripple-trapped loss of fast ions. Although the total ICRF-induced loss power to the heat spot is as low as 2% of the total ICRF power, the additional heat flux will become a new issue because of the localized heat deposition on the first wall. ((orig.))

  11. Simple method for calculation of heat loss through floor/beam-wall intersections according to ISO 9164

    Dilmac, Sukran; Guner, Abdurrahman; Senkal, Filiz; Kartal, Semiha

    2007-01-01

    The international standards for calculation of energy consumption for heating are ISO 9164 and EN 832. Although they are based on similar principles, there are significant differences in the calculation procedure of transmission heat loss coefficient, H T , especially in the evaluation of thermal bridges. The calculation of H T and the way thermal bridges are to be taken into consideration are explained in detail in EN 832 and in a series of other linked standards. In ISO 9164, the parameters used in the relevant equations are cited, but there is a lack of explanation about how they will be determined or calculated. Although in ISO 6946-2, the earlier version of the same standard, the calculation methods of these quantities were explained for column-wall intersections; in the revised ISO 6946, these explanations have been removed. On the other hand, these parameters had never been defined for floor/beam-wall intersections. In this paper, a new method is proposed for calculation of the parameters cited in ISO 9164 for floor/beam-wall intersections. The results obtained by the proposed method for typical floor with beam sections are compared with the results obtained by the methods stated in EN 832/EN 13789/EN ISO 14683 and the results obtained from 2D analysis. Different methods are evaluated as to their simplicity and agreement

  12. Determination of the Optimum Heat Transfer Coefficient and Temperature Rise Analysis for a Lithium-Ion Battery under the Conditions of Harbin City Bus Driving Cycles

    Xiaogang Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the heat problems that occur during the operation of power batteries, especially thermal runaway, which usually take place in high temperature environments. The study was conducted on a ternary polymer lithium-ion battery. In addition, a lumped parameter thermal model was established to analyze the thermal behavior of the electric bus battery system under the operation conditions of the driving cycles of the Harbin city electric buses. Moreover, the quantitative relationship between the optimum heat transfer coefficient of the battery and the ambient temperature was investigated. The relationship between the temperature rise (Tr, the number of cycles (c, and the heat transfer coefficient (h under three Harbin bus cycles have been investigated at 30 °C, because it can provide a basis for the design of the battery thermal management system. The results indicated that the heat transfer coefficient that meets the requirements of the battery thermal management system is the cubic power function of the ambient temperature. Therefore, if the ambient temperature is 30 °C, the heat transfer coefficient should be at least 12 W/m2K in the regular bus lines, 22 W/m2K in the bus rapid transit lines, and 32 W/m2K in the suburban lines.

  13. Method for reducing heat loss during injection of hot water into an oil stratum

    Evgenev, A E; Kalashnikov, V N; Raiskii, Yu D

    1968-07-01

    A method is described for reduction of heat loss during the injection of hot water into an oil stratum. During the transportation of the hot water to the face of the bore holes, it has high-molecular polymers added to it. The high-molecular polymer may be guanidine or polyoxyethylene in the quantity of 0.01 to 0.03% by wt.

  14. Introducing a novel method to estimate the total heat transfer coefficient inside irregular-shape cavities utilizing thermoelectric modules; Special application in solar engineering

    Asadi, Amin; Rahbar, Nader; Rezaniakolaei, Alireza

    The main objective of the present study is to introduce a novel method to measure the total heat transfer coefficient inside irregular-shape cavities, used in solar applications, utilizing thermoelectric modules. Applying mathematical and thermodynamics modeling, the governing equations related...... to the total heat transfer coefficient between thermoelectric and glass cover as a function of ambient temperature, glass temperature, and output voltage has been derived. Investigating the accuracy of the proposed equation, an experimental case study has been performed. The experimental setup consists...... of three parts; a heat sink, a thermoelectric module, and a glass cover. All the experiments have been performed on the typical winter day and under the real climatic conditions of Semnan (35° 33′ N, 53° 23′ E), Iran. The results showed that the proposed method has the ability to measure the total heat...

  15. Radiation losses and global energy balance for Ohmically heated discharges in ASDEX

    Mueller, E.R.; Behringer, K.; Niedermeyer, H.

    1982-01-01

    Global energy balance, radiation profiles and dominant impurity radiation sources are compared for Ohmically heated limiter and divertor discharges in the ASDEX tokamak. In discharges with a poloidal stainless-steel limiter, total radiation from the plasma is the dominant energy loss channel. The axisymmetric divertor reduces this volume-integrated radiation to 30-35% of the heating power and additional Ti-gettering halves it again to 10-15%. Local radiation losses in the plasma centre, which are mainly due to the presence of iron impurity ions, are reduced by about one order of magnitude. In high-current (Isub(p) = 400 kA) and high-density (nsub(e)-bar = 6 x 10 13 cm -3 ) ungettered divertor discharges, up to 55% of the heating power is dumped into a cold-gas target inside the divertor chambers. The bolometrically detected volume power losses in the chambers can mainly be attributed to neutral hydrogen atoms with kinetic energies of a few eV. In this parameter range, the divertor plasma is dominated by inelastic molecular and atomic processes, the main process being Franck-Condon dissociation of H 2 molecules. (author)

  16. Superconductor design and loss analysis for a 20 MJ induction heating coil

    Walker, M.S.; Declercq, J.G.; Zeitlin, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a 50 k Ampere conductor for use in a 20 MJ Induction Heating Coil is described. The conductor is a wide flat cable of 36 subcables, each of which contains six NbTi strands around a stainless steel core strand. The 2.04 mm (0.080'') diameter monolithic strands allow bubble clearing for cryostable operation at a pool boiling heat transfer from the unoccluded strand surface of 0.26 Watts/cm 2 . A thin, tough polyester amide-imide (Westinghouse Omega) insulation provides a rugged coating that will resist flaking and chipping during the cabling and compaction operations and provide (1) a reliable adherent surface for enhanced heat transfer, and (2) a low voltage standoff preventing interstrand coupling losses. The strands are uniquely configured using CuNi elements to provide low ac losses with NbTi filaments in an all-copper matrix. AC losses are expected to be approximately 0.3% of 20 MJ for a -7.5 T to 7.5 T one-second 1/2-cosinusoidal bipolar operation in a 20 MJ coil. They will be approximately 0.1% of 100 MJ for 1.8 second -8 T and +8 T ramped operation in a 100 MJ coil. The design is firmly based on the results of tests performed on prototype strands and subcables

  17. Using Solar Hot Water to Address Piping Heat Losses in Multifamily Buildings

    Springer, David [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States); Seitzler, Matt [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States); Backman, Christine [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States); Weitzel, Elizabeth [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Solar thermal water heating is most cost effective when applied to multifamily buildings and some states offer incentives or other inducements to install them. However, typical solar water heating designs do not allow the solar generated heat to be applied to recirculation losses, only to reduce the amount of gas or electric energy needed for hot water that is delivered to the fixtures. For good reasons, hot water that is recirculated through the building is returned to the water heater, not to the solar storage tank. The project described in this report investigated the effectiveness of using automatic valves to divert water that is normally returned through the recirculation piping to the gas or electric water heater instead to the solar storage tank. The valves can be controlled so that the flow is only diverted when the returning water is cooler than the water in the solar storage tank.

  18. Evaluation of fission-product gases in program GAPCON series and FREG-3 to estimate the gap heat transfer coefficient

    Ohki, Naohisa; Harayama, Yasuo; Takeda, Tsuneo; Izumi, Fumio.

    1977-12-01

    In safety evaluation of a fuel rod, estimation of the stored energy in the fuel rod is indispensable. For this estimation, the temperature distribution in the fuel rod is calculated. Most important in determination of the temperature distribution is the gap heat transfer coefficient (gap conductance) between pellet surface and cladding inner surface. Under fuel rod operating condition, the mixed gas in the gap is composed of He, Xe and Kr. He is initial seald gas. Xe and Kr are fission-product gases, of which the quantities depend on the fuel burn-up. In program GAPCON series (GAPCON and GAPCON-THERMAL-1 and -2) and FREG-3, these quantities are given as a function of the irradiation time, power rating and neutron flux in estimation of the thermal conductivity of the mixed gas. The methods of calculating the quantities of Xe and Kr in the programs have been examined. Input of the neutron flux which influences F.P. gas production rates is better than the determination from the fuel-rod power rating. (auth.)

  19. Investigation on heat transfer enhancement and pressure loss of double swirl chambers cooling

    Gang Lin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available By merging two standard swirl chambers, an alternative cooling configuration named double swirl chambers (DSC has been developed. In the DSC cooling configuration, the main physical phenomena of the swirl flow in swirl chamber and the advantages of swirl flow in heat transfer augmentation are maintained. Additionally, three new physical phenomena can be found in DSC cooling configuration, which result in a further improvement of the heat transfer: (1 impingement effect has been observed, (2 internal heat exchange has been enhanced between fluids in two swirls, and (3 “∞” shape swirl has been generated because of cross effect between two chambers, which improves the mixing of the fluids. Because of all these improvements, the DSC cooling configuration leads to a higher globally-averaged thermal performance parameter (Nu¯¯/Nu∞/(f/f01/3 than standard swirl chamber. In particular, at the inlet region, the augmentation of the heat transfer is nearly 7.5 times larger than the fully developed non-swirl turbulent flow and the circumferentially averaged Nusselt number coefficient is 41% larger than the standard swirl chamber. Within the present work, a further investigation on the DSC cooling configuration has been focused on the influence of geometry parameters e.g. merging ratio of chambers and aspect ratio of inlet duct on the cooling performance. The results show a very large influence of these geometry parameters in heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop ratio. Compared with the basic configuration of DSC cooling, the improved configuration with 20% to 23% merging ratio shows the highest globally-averaged thermal performance parameter. With the same cross section area in tangential inlet ducts, the DSC cooling channel with larger aspect ratio shows larger heat transfer enhancement and at the same time reduced pressure drop ratio, which results in a better globally-averaged thermal performance parameter.

  20. Modeling Loss-of-Flow Accidents and Their Impact on Radiation Heat Transfer

    Jivan Khatry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term high payload missions necessitate the need for nuclear space propulsion. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA investigated several reactor designs from 1959 to 1973 in order to develop the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA. Study of planned/unplanned transients on nuclear thermal rockets is important due to the need for long-term missions. In this work, a system model based on RELAP5 is developed to simulate loss-of-flow accidents on the Pewee I test reactor. This paper investigates the radiation heat transfer between the fuel elements and the structures around it. In addition, the impact on the core fuel element temperature and average core pressure was also investigated. The following expected results were achieved: (i greater than normal fuel element temperatures, (ii fuel element temperatures exceeding the uranium carbide melting point, and (iii average core pressure less than normal. Results show that the radiation heat transfer rate between fuel elements and cold surfaces increases with decreasing flow rate through the reactor system. However, radiation heat transfer decreases when there is a complete LOFA. When there is a complete LOFA, the peripheral coolant channels of the fuel elements handle most of the radiation heat transfer. A safety system needs to be designed to counteract the decay heat resulting from a post-LOFA reactor scram.

  1. Optimizing the District Heating Primary Network from the Perspective of Economic-Specific Pressure Loss

    Haichao Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A district heating (DH system is one of the most important components of infrastructures in cold areas. Proper DH network design should balance the initial investment and the heat distribution cost of the DH network. Currently, this design is often based on a recommended value for specific pressure loss (R = ∆P/L in the main lines. This will result in a feasible network design, but probably not be optimal in most cases. The paper develops a novel optimization model to facilitate the design by considering the initial investment in the pipes and the heat distribution costs. The model will generate all possible network scenarios consisting of different series of diameters for each pipe in the flow direction of the network. Then, the annuity on the initial investment, the heat distribution cost, and the total annual cost will be calculated for each network scenario, taking into account the uncertainties of the material prices and the yearly operating time levels. The model is applied to a sample DH network and the results indicate that the model works quite well, clearly identifying the optimal network design and demonstrating that the heat distribution cost is more important than the initial investment in DH network design.

  2. STEAM GENERATOR TUBE INTEGRITY ANALYSIS OF A TOTAL LOSS OF ALL HEAT SINKS ACCIDENT FOR WOLSONG NPP UNIT 1

    HEOK-SOON LIM

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A total loss of all heat sinks is considered a severe accident with a low probability of occurrence. Following a total loss of all heat sinks, the degasser/condenser relief valves (DCRV become the sole means available for the depressurization of the primary heat transport system. If a nuclear power plant has a total loss of heat sinks accident, high-temperature steam and differential pressure between the primary heat transport system (PHTS and the steam generator (SG secondary side can cause a SG tube creep rupture. To protect the PHTS during a total loss of all heat sinks accident, a sufficient depressurization capability of the degasser/condenser relief valve and the SG tube integrity is very important. Therefore, an accurate estimation of the discharge through these valves is necessary to assess the impact of the PHTS overprotection and the SG tube integrity of the primary circuit. This paper describes the analysis of DCRV discharge capacity and the SG tube integrity under a total loss of all heat sink using the CATHENA code. It was found that the DCRV's discharge capacity is enough to protect the overpressure in the PHTS, and the SG tube integrity is maintained in a total loss of all heat accident.

  3. Steam Generator Tube Integrity Analysis of A Total Loss of all Heat Sinks Accident for Wolsong NPP Unit 1

    Lim, Heoksoon; Song, Taeyoung; Chi, Moongoo [Korea Htydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seoungrae [Nuclear Engineering Service and Solution, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    A total loss of all heat sinks is considered a severe accident with a low probability of occurrence. Following a total loss of all heat sinks, the degasser/condenser relief valves (DCRV) become the sole means available for the depressurization of the primary heat transport system. If a nuclear power plant has a total loss of heat sinks accident, high-temperature steam and differential pressure between the primary heat transport system (PHTS) and the steam generator (SG) secondary side can cause a SG tube creep rupture. To protect the PHTS during a total loss of all heat sinks accident, a sufficient depressurization capability of the degasser/condenser relief valve and the SG tube integrity is very important. Therefore, an accurate estimation of the discharge through these valves is necessary to assess the impact of the PHTS overprotection and the SG tube integrity of the primary circuit. This paper describes the analysis of DCRV discharge capacity and the SG tube integrity under a total loss of all heat sink using the CATHENA code. It was found that the DCRV's discharge capacity is enough to protect the overpressure in the PHTS, and the SG tube integrity is maintained in a total loss of all heat accident.

  4. Steam Generator Tube Integrity Analysis of A Total Loss of all Heat Sinks Accident for Wolsong NPP Unit 1

    Lim, Heoksoon; Song, Taeyoung; Chi, Moongoo; Kim, Seoungrae

    2014-01-01

    A total loss of all heat sinks is considered a severe accident with a low probability of occurrence. Following a total loss of all heat sinks, the degasser/condenser relief valves (DCRV) become the sole means available for the depressurization of the primary heat transport system. If a nuclear power plant has a total loss of heat sinks accident, high-temperature steam and differential pressure between the primary heat transport system (PHTS) and the steam generator (SG) secondary side can cause a SG tube creep rupture. To protect the PHTS during a total loss of all heat sinks accident, a sufficient depressurization capability of the degasser/condenser relief valve and the SG tube integrity is very important. Therefore, an accurate estimation of the discharge through these valves is necessary to assess the impact of the PHTS overprotection and the SG tube integrity of the primary circuit. This paper describes the analysis of DCRV discharge capacity and the SG tube integrity under a total loss of all heat sink using the CATHENA code. It was found that the DCRV's discharge capacity is enough to protect the overpressure in the PHTS, and the SG tube integrity is maintained in a total loss of all heat accident

  5. Performance evaluation of a biomass boiler on the basis of heat loss method and total heat values of steam

    Munir, A.; Alvi, J.Z.; Ashfaq, S.; Ghafoor, A.

    2014-01-01

    Pakistan being an agricultural country has large resources of biomass in the form of crop residues like wood, wheat straw, rice husk, cotton sticks and bagasse. Power generation using biomass offers an excellent opportunity to overcome current scenario of energy crises. Of the all biomass resources, bagasse is one of the potential energy sources which can be successfully utilized for power generation. During the last decade, bagasse fired boilers attained major importance due to increasing prices of primary energy (e.g. fossil fuels). Performance of a bagasse fired boiler was evaluated at Shakarganj Sugar Mill, Bhone-Jhang having steam generation capacity of 80 tons h/sup -1/at 25 bar working pressure. The unit was forced circulation and bi-drum type water tube boiler which was equipped with all accessories like air heater, economizer and super-heater. Flue gas analyzer and thermocouples were used to record percent composition and temperature of flue gases respectively. Physical analysis of bagasse showed gross calorific value of bagasse as 2326 kCal kg/sup -1/. Ultimate analysis of bagasse was performed and the actual air supplied to the boiler was calculated to be 4.05 kg per kg of bagasse under the available resources of the plant. Performance evaluation of the boiler was carried out and a complete heat balance sheet was prepared to investigate the different sources of heat losses. The efficiency of the boiler was evaluated on the basis of heat losses through boiler and was found to be 56.08%. It was also determined that 2 kg of steam produced from 1 kg of bagasse under existing condition of the boiler. The performance evaluation of the boiler was also done on the basis of total heat values of steam and found to be 55.98%. The results obtained from both the methods were found almost similar. Effects of excess air, stack and ambient temperature on the efficiency of boiler have also been evaluated and presented in the manuscript. (author)

  6. Coefficient of solid-gas heat transfer in particle fixed bed; Coeficiente de transferencia de calor gas-solido em leito fixo de particulas

    Fernandes Filho, Francisco

    1991-03-01

    The work presents a study on heat transfer between gas and solid phases for fixed beds in the absence of mass transfer and chemical reactions. Mathematical models presented in the literature were analyzed concerning to the assumptions made on axial dispersion in the fluid phase and interparticle thermal conductivity. Heat transfer coefficients and their dependency on flow conditions, particles and packed bed characteristics were experimentally determined through the solution of the previous mathematical models. Pressure drop behaviour for the packed beds used for the heat transfer study was also included. (author) 32 refs., 12 figs.

  7. Influence of the heat losses and accumulated heat upon the evolution of the thermohydraulic processes in the transients as applied to the ISB-WWER integral test facility

    Gashenko, I.V.; Melikhov, O.I.; Shmal, I.I.; Kouznetsov, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    The results of the calculational study using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 thermalhydraulic code performed on the influence of the heat losses to the ambient and the heat accumulated in the pipelines walls upon the evolution of the thermalhydraulic processes in the primary circuit of the integral test facility ISB-WWER when simulating the transients caused by the loss of the coolant are presented in the paper. (authors)

  8. Impact of thermodynamic properties and heat loss on ignition of transportation fuels in rapid compression machines

    Ahmed, Ahfaz

    2018-01-30

    Rapid compression machines (RCM) are extensively used to study autoignition of a wide variety of fuels at engine relevant conditions. Fuels ranging from pure species to full boiling range gasoline and diesel can be studied in an RCM to develop a better understanding of autoignition kinetics in low to intermediate temperature ranges. In an RCM, autoignition is achieved by compressing a fuel/oxidizer mixture to higher pressure and temperature, thereby initiating chemical reactions promoting ignition. During these experiments, the pressure is continuously monitored and is used to deduce significant events such as the end of compression and the onset of ignition. The pressure profile is also used to assess the temperature evolution of the gas mixture with time using the adiabatic core hypothesis and the heat capacity ratio of the gas mixture. In such RCM studies, real transportation fuels containing many components are often represented by simpler surrogate fuels. While simpler surrogates such as primary reference fuels (PRFs) and ternary primary reference fuel (TPRFs) can match research and motor octane number of transportation fuels, they may not accurately replicate thermodynamic properties (including heat capacity ratio). This non-conformity could exhibit significant discrepancies in the end of compression temperature, thereby affecting ignition delay (τign) measurements. Another aspect of RCMs that can affect τign measurement is post compression heat loss, which depends on various RCM parameters including geometry, extent of insulation, pre-heating temperature etc. To, better understand the effects of these non-chemical kinetic parameters on τign, thermodynamic properties of a number of FACE G gasoline surrogates were calculated and simulated in a multi-zone RCM model. The problem was further investigated using a variance based analysis and individual sensitivities were calculated. This study highlights the effects on τign due to thermodynamic properties of

  9. Impact of thermodynamic properties and heat loss on ignition of transportation fuels in rapid compression machines

    Ahmed, Ahfaz; Hantouche, Mireille; Khurshid, Muneeb; Mohamed, Samah; Nasir, Ehson Fawad; Farooq, Aamir; Roberts, William L.; Knio, Omar; Sarathy, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Rapid compression machines (RCM) are extensively used to study autoignition of a wide variety of fuels at engine relevant conditions. Fuels ranging from pure species to full boiling range gasoline and diesel can be studied in an RCM to develop a better understanding of autoignition kinetics in low to intermediate temperature ranges. In an RCM, autoignition is achieved by compressing a fuel/oxidizer mixture to higher pressure and temperature, thereby initiating chemical reactions promoting ignition. During these experiments, the pressure is continuously monitored and is used to deduce significant events such as the end of compression and the onset of ignition. The pressure profile is also used to assess the temperature evolution of the gas mixture with time using the adiabatic core hypothesis and the heat capacity ratio of the gas mixture. In such RCM studies, real transportation fuels containing many components are often represented by simpler surrogate fuels. While simpler surrogates such as primary reference fuels (PRFs) and ternary primary reference fuel (TPRFs) can match research and motor octane number of transportation fuels, they may not accurately replicate thermodynamic properties (including heat capacity ratio). This non-conformity could exhibit significant discrepancies in the end of compression temperature, thereby affecting ignition delay (τign) measurements. Another aspect of RCMs that can affect τign measurement is post compression heat loss, which depends on various RCM parameters including geometry, extent of insulation, pre-heating temperature etc. To, better understand the effects of these non-chemical kinetic parameters on τign, thermodynamic properties of a number of FACE G gasoline surrogates were calculated and simulated in a multi-zone RCM model. The problem was further investigated using a variance based analysis and individual sensitivities were calculated. This study highlights the effects on τign due to thermodynamic properties of

  10. Fitness-related differences in the rate of whole-body total heat loss in exercising young healthy women are heat-load dependent.

    Lamarche, Dallon T; Notley, Sean R; Poirier, Martin P; Kenny, Glen P

    2018-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? Aerobic fitness modulates heat loss, albeit the heat load at which fitness-related differences occur in young healthy women remains unclear. What is the main finding and its importance? We demonstrate using direct calorimetry that fitness modulates heat loss in a heat-load dependent manner, with differences occurring between young women of low and high fitness and matched physical characteristics when the metabolic heat load is at least 400 W in hot, dry conditions. Although fitness has been known for some time to modulate heat loss, our findings define the metabolic heat load at which fitness-related differences occur. Aerobic fitness has recently been shown to alter heat loss capacity in a heat-load dependent manner in young men. However, given that sex-related differences in heat loss capacity exist, it is unclear whether this response is consistent in women. We therefore assessed whole-body total heat loss in young (21 ± 3 years old) healthy women matched for physical characteristics, but with low (low-fit; 35.8 ± 4.5 ml O 2  kg -1  min -1 ) or high aerobic fitness (high-fit; 53.1 ± 5.1 ml O 2  kg -1  min -1 ; both n = 8; indexed by peak oxygen consumption), during three 30 min bouts of cycling performed at increasing rates of metabolic heat production of 250 (Ex1), 325 (Ex2) and 400 W (Ex3), each separated by a 15 min recovery, in hot, dry conditions (40°C, 11% relative humidity). Whole-body total heat loss (evaporative ± dry heat exchange) and metabolic heat production were measured using direct and indirect calorimetry, respectively. Body heat content was measured as the temporal summation of heat production and loss. Total heat loss did not differ during Ex1 (low-fit, 215 ± 16 W; high-fit, 231 ± 20 W; P > 0.05) and Ex2 (low-fit, 278 ± 15 W; high-fit, 301 ± 20 W; P > 0.05), but was lower in the low-fit (316 ± 21 W) compared with the high-fit women (359 ± 32

  11. Numerical Studies on Natural Convection Heat Losses from Open Cubical Cavities

    M. Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural convection heat losses occurring from cubical open cavities are analysed in this paper. Open cubical cavities of sides 0.1 m, 0.2 m, 0.25 m, 0.5 m, and 1 m with constant temperature back wall boundary conditions and opening ratio of 1 are studied. The Fluent CFD software is used to analyse the three-dimensional (3D cavity models. The studies are carried out for cavities with back wall temperatures between 35°C and 100°C. The effect of cavity inclination on the convective loss is analysed for angles of 0° (cavity facing sideways, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° (cavity facing vertically downwards. The Rayleigh numbers involved in this study range between 4.5 × 105 and 1.5 × 109. The natural convection loss is found to increase with an increase in back wall temperature. The natural convection loss is observed to decrease with an increase in cavity inclination; the highest convective loss being at 0° and the lowest at 90° inclination. This is observed for all cavities analysed here. Nusselt number correlations involving the effect of Rayleigh number and the cavity inclination angle have been developed from the current studies. These correlations can be used for engineering applications such as electronic cooling, low- and medium-temperature solar thermal systems, passive architecture, and also refrigeration systems.

  12. Rapid, non-destructive and non-contact inspection of solid foods by means of photothermal radiometry; thermal effusivity and initial heating coefficient

    Gijsbertsen, A.; Bicanic, D.; Gielen, J. L. W.; Chirtoc, M.

    2004-03-01

    CO 2-laser photothermal radiometry (PTR) was demonstrated to be suitable for the non-destructive and non-contact characterization (both optical and thermal) of solid phase agricultural commodities (fresh vegetables, fruits) and confectionery products (candy). Proper interpretation of PTR signals enable one to calculate two parameters, i.e. the well known thermal effusivity e ( e= λρc p, where λ and ρcp are the thermal conductivity and the volume specific heat, respectively) and a newly introduced physical quantity termed 'initial heating coefficient' chi ( χ= β/( ρcp), β is the absorption coefficient). Obtained values for e are in a good agreement with data reported in the literature. PTR enables one to rapidly determine e via a single measurement. As opposed to this, the knowledge of two out of three thermophysical parameters (thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and volume specific heat) is a condition sine qua non for determining effusivity in the conventional manner.

  13. Study on interfacial heat transfer coefficient at metal/die interface during high pressure die casting process of AZ91D alloy

    GUO Zhi-peng

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The high pressure die casting (HPDC process is one of the fastest growing and most efficient methods for the production of complex shape castings of magnesium and aluminum alloys in today’s manufacturing industry.In this study, a high pressure die casting experiment using AZ91D magnesium alloy was conducted, and the temperature profiles inside the die were Measured. By using a computer program based on solving the inverse heat problem, the metal/die interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC was calculated and studied. The results show that the IHTC between the metal and die increases right after the liquid metal is brought into the cavity by the plunger,and decreases as the solidification process of the liquid metal proceeds until the liquid metal is completely solidified,when the IHTC tends to be stable. The interfacial heat transfer coefficient shows different characteristics under different casting wall thicknesses and varies with the change of solidification behavior.

  14. Heat loss analysis-based design of a 12 MW wind power generator module having an HTS flux pump exciter

    Sung, Hae-Jin; Go, Byeong-Soo; Jiang, Zhenan; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A large-scale HTS generator module has been suggested to avoid issues such as a huge vacuum vessel and higher reliability. • The challenging heat loss analysis of a large-scale HTS generator has successfully been performed, enabling the design of an optimal support structure having a total heat loss of 43 W/400 kW. • The results prove the potential of a large-scale superconducting wind-power generator to operate efficiently, and support further development of the concept. - Abstract: The development of an effective high-temperature superconducting (HTS) generator is currently a research focus; however, the reduction of heat loss of a large-scale HTS generator is a challenge. This study deals with a heat loss analysis-based design of a 12 MW wind power generator module having an HTS flux pump exciter. The generator module consists of an HTS rotor of the generator and an HTS flux pump exciter. The specifications of the module were described, and the detailed configuration of the module was illustrated. For the heat loss analysis of the module, the excitation loss of the flux pump exciter, eddy current loss of all of the structures in the module, radiation loss, and conduction loss of an HTS coil supporter were assessed using a 3D finite elements method program. In the case of the conduction loss, different types of the supporters were compared to find out the supporter of the lowest conduction loss in the module. The heat loss analysis results of the module were reflected in the design of the generator module and discussed in detail. The results will be applied to the design of large-scale superconducting generators for wind turbines including a cooling system.

  15. Heat loss analysis-based design of a 12 MW wind power generator module having an HTS flux pump exciter

    Sung, Hae-Jin, E-mail: haejin0216@gmail.com [Changwon National University, 20 Changwondaehak-ro, Changwon, 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Go, Byeong-Soo [Changwon National University, 20 Changwondaehak-ro, Changwon, 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Jiang, Zhenan [Robinson Research Institute, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 33436 (New Zealand); Park, Minwon [Changwon National University, 20 Changwondaehak-ro, Changwon, 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, In-Keun, E-mail: yuik@changwon.ac.kr [Changwon National University, 20 Changwondaehak-ro, Changwon, 641-773 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A large-scale HTS generator module has been suggested to avoid issues such as a huge vacuum vessel and higher reliability. • The challenging heat loss analysis of a large-scale HTS generator has successfully been performed, enabling the design of an optimal support structure having a total heat loss of 43 W/400 kW. • The results prove the potential of a large-scale superconducting wind-power generator to operate efficiently, and support further development of the concept. - Abstract: The development of an effective high-temperature superconducting (HTS) generator is currently a research focus; however, the reduction of heat loss of a large-scale HTS generator is a challenge. This study deals with a heat loss analysis-based design of a 12 MW wind power generator module having an HTS flux pump exciter. The generator module consists of an HTS rotor of the generator and an HTS flux pump exciter. The specifications of the module were described, and the detailed configuration of the module was illustrated. For the heat loss analysis of the module, the excitation loss of the flux pump exciter, eddy current loss of all of the structures in the module, radiation loss, and conduction loss of an HTS coil supporter were assessed using a 3D finite elements method program. In the case of the conduction loss, different types of the supporters were compared to find out the supporter of the lowest conduction loss in the module. The heat loss analysis results of the module were reflected in the design of the generator module and discussed in detail. The results will be applied to the design of large-scale superconducting generators for wind turbines including a cooling system.

  16. An experimental investigation of the effects of spiral angle on the evaporation heat transfer coefficients in microfin tubes with visualization technique

    Oh, Se-Yoon

    A smooth tube and five microfin tubes were tested, and evaporation heat transfer coefficients were measured and compared for mass fluxes, 50, 100 and 200 kg/m2 s, and heat fluxes, 5, 10 and 20 kW/m 2, with Refrigerant 134a as a working fluid. The evaporation heat transfer coefficients at quality 0.5 were compared among the smooth and five microfin tubes with spiral angles 6, 12, 18, 25 and 44 degrees. The effect of the spiral angle on the heat transfer coefficients was examined. It was found that the optimal spiral angle where the maximum heat transfer coefficient occurs, mainly depends on mass flux. The optimal spiral angle was 18 degrees for G=50 kg/m2 s, and 6 degrees for G=100 and 200 kg/m 2 s. A borescope was used to visualize the flow on the inside wall of test tubes. The purpose was to find out the effect of the grooves on the liquid flow in microfin tubes and to explain the mechanism of heat transfer enhancement. Temperatures on the tube wall were measured at the same axial location as the imaging sensor of the borescope, and were related to the behavior of the liquid flow on the inside wall of the tubes. The liquid flow in the grooves on the wall was found to be the most important factor in enhancing heat transfer coefficients. The liquid flowed upward along the grooves and covered the upper inside wall of the microfin tubes at G=50 kg/m2 s. When heat flux increases, the liquid flow was found at a higher position. Both liquid viscosity and surface tension decrease, when temperature increases. Thus, the lower viscosity at higher heat flux facilitated the upward motion of the liquid flow in the grooves, so that the momentum force as well as the capillary effect was found to push the liquid along the grooves.* *A CD is included with dissertation containing video clips in avi format which can be viewed with media player.

  17. Influence of resonant magnetic perturbations on transient heat load deposition and fast ion losses

    Rack, Michael Thomas

    2014-01-01

    losses in the presence of resonant magnetic perturbation fields, is presented. It is used to investigate the impact of various types of perturbation field, static and rotating, on the losses. The investigations of the heat load deposition profiles show important features of the resonant magnetic perturbation fields. Firstly, the heat can be favourably redistributed to reduce the local heat fluxes; secondly, a physical process is observed that appears to be linked to the heat redistribution and causes a slow propagation of a heat flux pattern long before the major energy is ejected. This opens a new view on the physics of resonant magnetic perturbation fields as it shows that processes on different time-scales are involved during the control of the plasma edge instabilities. The control of these instabilities can benefit from the new method of applying resonant magnetic perturbation fields using lower hybrid waves. This method provides high flexibility as needed to optimize the heat load redistribution. It is proven to create perturbation fields that are always resonant in the plasma edge region. In addition, it was found that no clear drawbacks appear over a wide range of perturbation fields; moreover, strong indications for an improvement of the fast ion confinement are seen. The overall results provide a positive outlook for the application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields to control edge instabilities: (a) an advantageous redistribution of transient heat loads is achievable, (b) lower hybrid waves can be used for the production of highly flexible resonant magnetic perturbation fields, and (c) resonant magnetic perturbation fields do not necessarily reduce the fast ion confinement. These results show that an optimization of the applied magnetic perturbation fields is able to solve the problem of transient heat loads without any drawbacks for the crucial fast ion confinement.

  18. Influence of resonant magnetic perturbations on transient heat load deposition and fast ion losses

    Rack, Michael Thomas

    2014-07-11

    losses in the presence of resonant magnetic perturbation fields, is presented. It is used to investigate the impact of various types of perturbation field, static and rotating, on the losses. The investigations of the heat load deposition profiles show important features of the resonant magnetic perturbation fields. Firstly, the heat can be favourably redistributed to reduce the local heat fluxes; secondly, a physical process is observed that appears to be linked to the heat redistribution and causes a slow propagation of a heat flux pattern long before the major energy is ejected. This opens a new view on the physics of resonant magnetic perturbation fields as it shows that processes on different time-scales are involved during the control of the plasma edge instabilities. The control of these instabilities can benefit from the new method of applying resonant magnetic perturbation fields using lower hybrid waves. This method provides high flexibility as needed to optimize the heat load redistribution. It is proven to create perturbation fields that are always resonant in the plasma edge region. In addition, it was found that no clear drawbacks appear over a wide range of perturbation fields; moreover, strong indications for an improvement of the fast ion confinement are seen. The overall results provide a positive outlook for the application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields to control edge instabilities: (a) an advantageous redistribution of transient heat loads is achievable, (b) lower hybrid waves can be used for the production of highly flexible resonant magnetic perturbation fields, and (c) resonant magnetic perturbation fields do not necessarily reduce the fast ion confinement. These results show that an optimization of the applied magnetic perturbation fields is able to solve the problem of transient heat loads without any drawbacks for the crucial fast ion confinement.

  19. Distance determination of NPP and oil reservoir on enhanced oil recovery based on heat loss and safety in view point

    Erlan Dewita; Dedy Priambodo; Sudi Ariyanto

    2013-01-01

    EOR is a method used to increasing oil recovery by injecting material or other to the reservoir. There are 3 EOR technique have been used in the world, namely thermal injection, chemical injection dan Miscible. Thermal injection method is the method most widely used in the world, however, one drawback is the loss of heat during steam distribution to the injection wells. In Indonesia, EOR application has been successfully done in the field of Duri, Chevron uses steam injection method, but still use petroleum as a fuel for steam production. In order to save oil reserves, it was done the introduction of co-generation nuclear power plants to supply some of the heat of nuclear power plants for EOR processes. In cogeneration nuclear power plant, the safety aspect is main priority. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the distance NPP with oil wells by considering heat loss and safety aspects. The method of study and calculations done using Tempo Cycle program. The study results showed that in the distance of 400 meter as exclusion zone of PBMR reactor, with pipe insulation thickness 1 in, the amount of heat loss of 277, 883 kw, while in pipe isolation thickness 2 in, amount of heat loss became 162,634 kw and with isolation thickness 3 in, amount of heat loss 120,767 kw., heat loss can be overcome and provide insulation pipes and improve the quality of saturated steam into superheated. (author)

  20. The dry-heat loss effect of melt-spun phase change material fibres.

    Tjønnås, Maria Suong; Færevik, Hilde; Sandsund, Mariann; Reinertsen, Randi E

    2015-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) have the ability to store latent heat when they change phases, a property that gives clothing that incorporates PCM its cooling effect. This study investigated the effect of dry-heat loss (cooling) of a novel melt-spun PCM fibre on the basis of the area covered, mass, the latent heat of fusion and melting temperature, compared to a known PCM clothing product. PCM fibres with melting temperatures of 28.4 and 32.0°C and PCM packs with melting temperatures of 28.0 and 32.0°C were studied. The results showed that the PCM fibres had a larger initial peak cooling effect than that of the PCM packs. The duration of the cooling effect of PCM fibres was primarily dependent on the PCM mass and the latent heat of fusion capacity, and secondly on the covered area and melting temperature of the PCM. This study investigates the cooling effect of PCM fibres on a thermal manikin. The PCM fibres had a high but short-lasting cooling effect. This study contributes to the knowledge of how the body's temperature regulation may be affected by the cooling properties of clothing that incorporates PCM.

  1. Large Eddy Simulations of a Premixed Jet Combustor Using Flamelet-Generated Manifolds: Effects of Heat Loss and Subgrid-Scale Models

    Hernandez Perez, Francisco E.; Lee, Bok Jik; Im, Hong G.; Fancello, Alessio; Donini, Andrea; van Oijen, Jeroen A.; de Goey, Philip H.

    2017-01-01

    Large eddy simulations of a turbulent premixed jet flame in a confined chamber were conducted using the flamelet-generated manifold technique for chemistry tabulation. The configuration is characterized by an off-center nozzle having an inner diameter of 10 mm, supplying a lean methane-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.71 and a mean velocity of 90 m/s, at 573 K and atmospheric pressure. Conductive heat loss is accounted for in the manifold via burner-stabilized flamelets and the subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulencechemistry interaction is modeled via presumed probability density functions. Comparisons between numerical results and measured data show that a considerable improvement in the prediction of temperature is achieved when heat losses are included in the manifold, as compared to the adiabatic one. Additional improvement in the temperature predictions is obtained by incorporating radiative heat losses. Moreover, further enhancements in the LES predictions are achieved by employing SGS models based on transport equations, such as the SGS turbulence kinetic energy equation with dynamic coefficients. While the numerical results display good agreement up to a distance of 4 nozzle diameters downstream of the nozzle exit, the results become less satisfactory along the downstream, suggesting that further improvements in the modeling are required, among which a more accurate model for the SGS variance of progress variable can be relevant.

  2. Large Eddy Simulations of a Premixed Jet Combustor Using Flamelet-Generated Manifolds: Effects of Heat Loss and Subgrid-Scale Models

    Hernandez Perez, Francisco E.

    2017-01-05

    Large eddy simulations of a turbulent premixed jet flame in a confined chamber were conducted using the flamelet-generated manifold technique for chemistry tabulation. The configuration is characterized by an off-center nozzle having an inner diameter of 10 mm, supplying a lean methane-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.71 and a mean velocity of 90 m/s, at 573 K and atmospheric pressure. Conductive heat loss is accounted for in the manifold via burner-stabilized flamelets and the subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulencechemistry interaction is modeled via presumed probability density functions. Comparisons between numerical results and measured data show that a considerable improvement in the prediction of temperature is achieved when heat losses are included in the manifold, as compared to the adiabatic one. Additional improvement in the temperature predictions is obtained by incorporating radiative heat losses. Moreover, further enhancements in the LES predictions are achieved by employing SGS models based on transport equations, such as the SGS turbulence kinetic energy equation with dynamic coefficients. While the numerical results display good agreement up to a distance of 4 nozzle diameters downstream of the nozzle exit, the results become less satisfactory along the downstream, suggesting that further improvements in the modeling are required, among which a more accurate model for the SGS variance of progress variable can be relevant.

  3. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Environmental Monitoring with Special Reference to Heat Loss

    Anweiler, Stanisław; Piwowarski, Dawid; Ulbrich, Roman

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of device for remote and automatic monitoring of temperature field of large objects. The project aimed to create a quadcopter flying platform equipped with a thermal imaging camera. The object of the research was district heating installations above ground and underground. The results of the work on the implementation of low-cost (below 750 EUR) and efficient heat loss monitoring system. The system consists of a small (<2kg) multirotor platform. To perform thermal images micro camera FlirOne with microcomputer Raspberry Pi3 was used. Exploitation of UAVs in temperature field monitoring reveals only a fraction of their capabilities. The fast-growing multirotor platform market continues to deliver new solutions and improvements. Their use in monitoring the environment is limited only by the imagination of the user.

  4. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Environmental Monitoring with Special Reference to Heat Loss

    Anweiler Stanisław

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of device for remote and automatic monitoring of temperature field of large objects. The project aimed to create a quadcopter flying platform equipped with a thermal imaging camera. The object of the research was district heating installations above ground and underground. The results of the work on the implementation of low-cost (below 750 EUR and efficient heat loss monitoring system. The system consists of a small (<2kg multirotor platform. To perform thermal images micro camera FlirOne with microcomputer Raspberry Pi3 was used. Exploitation of UAVs in temperature field monitoring reveals only a fraction of their capabilities. The fast-growing multirotor platform market continues to deliver new solutions and improvements. Their use in monitoring the environment is limited only by the imagination of the user.

  5. ATHENA simulations of divertor pump trip and loss of heat sink transients for the GSSR

    Sjoeberg, A

    2001-04-01

    The ITER-FEAT Generic Site Safety Report includes evaluations of the consequences of various types of conceivable transients that may occur during operation. The transients that have to be considered in this respect are specified in the Accident Analysis Specifications document of the safety report. For the divertor primary heat transport system the ranges of transients include amongst others a trip of the main circulation pump in the divertor cooling loop as well as a loss of heat sink, both initiated at full fusion power operation. The thermal-hydraulic consequences related to the coolability of the divertor primary heat transport system components for these two transients have been evaluated and summarized in the safety report and in the current report an overview of those efforts and associated outcome is provided. The analyses have been made with the ATHENA thermal-hydraulic code using a separately developed ATHENA model of the ITER-FEAT divertor cooling system. The results from the analyses indicate that for the pump trip transient the margin against overheating of critical highly loaded parts of the divertor cassette is small but seems sufficient. In case of the loss of heat sink transient the conservative analysis reveals that the pressurizer safety valve will be opened for an extended period of time and the long term transient development indicates a risk of completely filling up the pressurizer vessel. Thus the margins against jeopardizing the integrity of the divertor cooling system with the current design are for this case small but can for a long term operation at associate conditions pose a problem.

  6. A method to determine stratification efficiency of thermal energy storage processes independently from storage heat losses

    Haller, M.Y.; Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Andersen, Elsa

    2010-01-01

    process is in agreement with the first law of thermodynamics. A comparison of the stratification efficiencies obtained from experimental results of charging, standby, and discharging processes gives meaningful insights into the different mixing behaviors of a storage tank that is charged and discharged......A new method for the calculation of a stratification efficiency of thermal energy storages based on the second law of thermodynamics is presented. The biasing influence of heat losses is studied theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, it does not make a difference if the stratification...

  7. A Numerical Study on Effect of Gas-Phase Radiative Heat Loss on Extinction of Hydrogen Diffusion Flames

    Sohn, Chae Hoon

    2007-01-01

    Extinction characteristics of hydrogen-air diffusion flames are investigated numerically by adopting counterflow flame configuration. At various pressures, effect of radiative heat loss on flame extinction is examined. Only gas-phase radiation is considered here. Radiative heat loss depends on flame thickness, temperature, H 2 O concentration, and pressure. From flame structures at various pressures, flame thickness decreases with pressure, but its gradient decreases at high pressure. Flame temperature and mole fraction of H 2 O increase slightly with pressure. Accordingly, as pressure increases, radiative heat loss becomes dominant. When radiative heat loss is considered, radiation-induced extinction is observed at low strain rate in addition to transport-induced extinction. As pressure increases, flammable region shifts to the high-temperature region and then, shrunk to the point on the coordinate plane of flame temperature and strain rate

  8. Consideration of the loss of activity in the soil for large transfer coefficients in the food chain

    Brenk, H.D.; Vogt, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    The studies have shown that in the case of large transfer coefficients there will result a considerable overestimation of the ingestion dose if nonradioactive depletion effects are neglected. This overestimation may, depending on nuclide, vegetation and transfer coefficient, amount to two orders of magnitude. There will result e.g. for the bone exposure of a grown-up person, caused by 90 Sr taken up by the consumption of root vegetables, a dose overestimation up to a factor of 50. For the dose to the kidneys of adults by 137 Cs through consumption of beef there will result an overestimation by a factor of up to 60. And for 129 I there will be obtained an infant thyroid dose from the pasture-cow-milk pathway being too large by a factor of up to 100. In order to be able to cover these cases by a sufficiently generalized formalism, too, it appears necessary therefore to modify or extend the 'Allgemeine Berechnungsgrundlagen' (German reg. guide for evaluating the exposure from environmental contamination) in the manner proposed in the paper. (orig./HP) 891 HP/orig.- 892 MB [de

  9. Fitness-related differences in the rate of whole-body evaporative heat loss in exercising men are heat-load dependent.

    Lamarche, Dallon T; Notley, Sean R; Louie, Jeffrey C; Poirier, Martin P; Kenny, Glen P

    2018-01-01

    What is the central question of this study? Aerobic fitness modulates heat loss, but the heat-load threshold at which fitness-related differences in heat loss occur in young healthy men remains unclear. What is the main finding and its importance? We demonstrate using direct calorimetry that aerobic fitness modulates heat loss in a heat-load-dependent manner, with fitness-related differences occurring between young men who have low and high fitness when the heat load is ∼≥500 W. Although aerobic fitness has been known for some time to modulate heat loss, our findings define the precise heat-load threshold at which fitness-related differences occur. The effect of aerobic fitness (defined as rate of peak oxygen consumption) on heat loss during exercise is thought to be related to the level of heat stress. However, it remains unclear at what combined exercise and environmental (net) heat-load threshold these fitness-related differences occur. To identify this, we assessed whole-body heat exchange (dry and evaporative) by direct calorimetry in young (22 ± 3 years) men matched for physical characteristics with low (Low-fit; 39.8 ± 2.5 ml O 2  kg -1  min -1 ), moderate (Mod-fit; 50.9 ± 1.2 ml O 2  kg -1  min -1 ) and high aerobic fitness (High-fit; 62.0 ± 4.4 ml O 2  kg -1  min -1 ; each n = 8), during three 30 min bouts of cycling in dry heat (40°C, 12% relative humidity) at increasing rates of metabolic heat production of 300 (Ex1), 400 (Ex2) and 500 W (Ex3), each followed by a 15 min recovery period. Each group was exposed to a similar net heat load (metabolic plus ∼100 W dry heat gain; P = 0.83) during each exercise bout [∼400 (Ex1), ∼500 (Ex2) and ∼600 W (Ex3); P fit (Ex2, 466 ± 21 W; Ex3, 557 ± 26 W) compared with the Low-fit group (Ex2, 439 ± 22 W; Ex3, 511 ± 20 W) during Ex2 and Ex3 (P ≤ 0.03). Conversely, evaporative heat loss for the Mod-fit group did not differ from either the High-fit or Low

  10. Minimizing scatter-losses during pre-heat for magneto-inertial fusion targets

    Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, Adam J.; Awe, Thomas J.; Bliss, David E.; Glinsky, Michael E.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Harding, Eric; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher; Kimmel, Mark W.; Knapp, Patrick; Lewis, Sean M.; Peterson, Kyle; Schollmeier, Marius; Schwarz, Jens; Shores, Jonathon E.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Smith, Ian C.; Speas, C. Shane; Vesey, Roger A.; Weis, Matthew R.; Porter, John L.

    2018-02-01

    The size, temporal and spatial shape, and energy content of a laser pulse for the pre-heat phase of magneto-inertial fusion affect the ability to penetrate the window of the laser-entrance-hole and to heat the fuel behind it. High laser intensities and dense targets are subject to laser-plasma-instabilities (LPI), which can lead to an effective loss of pre-heat energy or to pronounced heating of areas that should stay unexposed. While this problem has been the subject of many studies over the last decades, the investigated parameters were typically geared towards traditional laser driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) with densities either at 10% and above or at 1% and below the laser's critical density, electron temperatures of 3-5 keV, and laser powers near (or in excess of) 1 × 1015 W/cm2. In contrast, Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010) and Slutz and Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] currently operates at 5% of the laser's critical density using much thicker windows (1.5-3.5 μm) than the sub-micron thick windows of traditional ICF hohlraum targets. This article describes the Pecos target area at Sandia National Laboratories using the Z-Beamlet Laser Facility [Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44(12), 2421 (2005)] as a platform to study laser induced pre-heat for magneto-inertial fusion targets, and the related progress for Sandia's MagLIF program. Forward and backward scattered light were measured and minimized at larger spatial scales with lower densities, temperatures, and powers compared to LPI studies available in literature.

  11. Charts Adapted from Van Driest's Turbulent Flat-plate Theory for Determining Values of Turbulent Aerodynamic Friction and Heat-transfer Coefficients

    Lee, Dorothy B; Faget, Maxime A

    1956-01-01

    A modified method of Van Driest's flat-plate theory for turbulent boundary layer has been found to simplify the calculation of local skin-friction coefficients which, in turn, have made it possible to obtain through Reynolds analogy theoretical turbulent heat-transfer coefficients in the form of Stanton number. A general formula is given and charts are presented from which the modified method can be solved for Mach numbers 1.0 to 12.0, temperature ratios 0.2 to 6.0, and Reynolds numbers 0.2 times 10 to the 6th power to 200 times 10 to the 6th power.

  12. Impact of air-sea drag coefficient for latent heat flux on large scale climate in coupled and atmosphere stand-alone simulations

    Torres, Olivier; Braconnot, Pascale; Marti, Olivier; Gential, Luc

    2018-05-01

    The turbulent fluxes across the ocean/atmosphere interface represent one of the principal driving forces of the global atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Despite decades of effort and improvements, representation of these fluxes still presents a challenge due to the small-scale acting turbulent processes compared to the resolved scales of the models. Beyond this subgrid parameterization issue, a comprehensive understanding of the impact of air-sea interactions on the climate system is still lacking. In this paper we investigates the large-scale impacts of the transfer coefficient used to compute turbulent heat fluxes with the IPSL-CM4 climate model in which the surface bulk formula is modified. Analyzing both atmosphere and coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (AGCM, OAGCM) simulations allows us to study the direct effect and the mechanisms of adjustment to this modification. We focus on the representation of latent heat flux in the tropics. We show that the heat transfer coefficients are highly similar for a given parameterization between AGCM and OAGCM simulations. Although the same areas are impacted in both kind of simulations, the differences in surface heat fluxes are substantial. A regional modification of heat transfer coefficient has more impact than uniform modification in AGCM simulations while in OAGCM simulations, the opposite is observed. By studying the global energetics and the atmospheric circulation response to the modification, we highlight the role of the ocean in dampening a large part of the disturbance. Modification of the heat exchange coefficient modifies the way the coupled system works due to the link between atmospheric circulation and SST, and the different feedbacks between ocean and atmosphere. The adjustment that takes place implies a balance of net incoming solar radiation that is the same in all simulations. As there is no change in model physics other than drag coefficient, we obtain similar latent heat flux

  13. Comparison of the Heat Release Rate from the Mass Loss Calorimeter to the Cone Calorimeter for Wood-based Materials

    Laura E. Hasburgh; Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing demand for material properties to be used as inputs in fi re behavior models designed to address building fire safety. This comparative study evaluates using the mass loss calorimeter as an alternative to the cone calorimeter for obtaining heat release rates of wood-based materials. For this study, a modified mass loss calorimeter utilized an...

  14. Flow map and measurement of void fraction and heat transfer coefficient using an image analysis technique for flow boiling of water in a silicon microchannel

    Singh, S G; Duttagupta, S P; Jain, A; Sridharan, A; Agrawal, Amit

    2009-01-01

    The present work focuses on the generation of the flow regime map for two-phase water flow in microchannels of a hydraulic diameter of 140 µm. An image analysis algorithm has been developed and utilized to obtain the local void fraction. The image processing technique is also employed to identify and estimate the percentage of different flow regimes and heat transfer coefficient, as a function of position, heat flux and mass flow rate. Both void fraction and heat transfer coefficient are found to increase monotonically along the length of the microchannel. At low heat flux and low flow rates, bubbly, slug and annular flow regimes are apparent. However, the flow is predominately annular at high heat flux and high flow rate. A breakup of the flow frequency suggests that the flow is bistable in the annular regime, in that at a fixed location, the flow periodically switches from single-phase liquid to annular and vice versa. Otherwise, the occurrence of three regimes—single-phase liquid, bubbly and slug are observed. These results provide several useful insights about two-phase flow in microchannels besides being of fundamental interest

  15. ATHENA simulations of divertor loss of heat sink transient for the GSSR - Final report with updates

    Sponton, L.L

    2001-05-01

    The ITER-FEAT Generic Site Safety Report includes evaluations of the consequences of various types of conceivable transients that can occur during operation. The transients that have to be considered in this respect are specified in the Accident Analysis Specifications document of the safety report. For the divertor primary heat transport system the ranges of transients include amongst others a loss of heat sink at full fusion power operation. The thermal-hydraulic consequences related to the coolability of the divertor primary heat transport system components for this transient have been evaluated and summarised in the safety report and in the current report an overview of those efforts and associated outcome is provided. The analyses have been made with the ATHENA thermal-hydraulic code using a separately developed ATHENA model of the ITER-FEAT divertor cooling system. In the current report results from calculations with an updated pressurizer model and pressurizer control system are outlined. The results show that the pressurizer safety valve does not open, that the pressurizer level increase is moderate and that no temperature increases jeopardize the structure integrity.

  16. ATHENA simulations of divertor loss of heat sink transient for the GSSR - Final report with updates

    Sponton, L.L.

    2001-05-01

    The ITER-FEAT Generic Site Safety Report includes evaluations of the consequences of various types of conceivable transients that can occur during operation. The transients that have to be considered in this respect are specified in the Accident Analysis Specifications document of the safety report. For the divertor primary heat transport system the ranges of transients include amongst others a loss of heat sink at full fusion power operation. The thermal-hydraulic consequences related to the coolability of the divertor primary heat transport system components for this transient have been evaluated and summarised in the safety report and in the current report an overview of those efforts and associated outcome is provided. The analyses have been made with the ATHENA thermal-hydraulic code using a separately developed ATHENA model of the ITER-FEAT divertor cooling system. In the current report results from calculations with an updated pressurizer model and pressurizer control system are outlined. The results show that the pressurizer safety valve does not open, that the pressurizer level increase is moderate and that no temperature increases jeopardize the structure integrity

  17. A Numerical Procedure for Flow Distribution and Pressure Drops for U and Z Type Configurations Plate Heat Exchangers with Variable Coefficients

    López, R; Lecuona, A; Ventas, R; Vereda, C

    2012-01-01

    In Plate Heat Exchangers it is important to determine the flow distribution and pressure drops, because they affect directly the performance of a heat exchanger. This work proposes an incompressible, one-dimensional, steady state, discrete model allowing for variable overall momentum coefficients to determine these magnitudes. The model consists on a modified version of the Bajura and Jones model for dividing and combining flow manifolds. The numerical procedure is based on the finite differences approximation approach proposed by Datta and Majumdar. A linear overall momentum coefficient distribution is used in the dividing manifold, but the model is not limited to linear distributions. Comparisons are made with experimental, numerical and analytical data, yielding good results.

  18. Analysis of unscrammed loss of flow and heat sink for PRISM with GEM

    Slovik, G.C.; Van Tuyle, G.J.; Kennett, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is sponsoring an advanced liquid-metal reactor design by General Electric Company (GE) called PRISM. The intent is to design a reactor with passively safe responses to many operational and severe accidents. PRISM is under review at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for licensability with Brookhaven National Laboratory providing technical assistance. Recently, the PRISM design has been modified to include three gas expansion modules (GEMs) on its core periphery. The GEMs were added to quickly reduce the power (by inserting negative reactivity) during loss-of-flow events to curtail peak fuel and clad temperatures predicted in the previous design. The GEM prototypes have been tested at the Fast Flux Test Facility. The significance of the GEMs in PRISM is discussed in this paper through the evaluation of the unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) and loss of heat sink using the SSC code. It has been demonstrated in the past that SSC predicts results similar to GE and other liquid-metal reactor codes

  19. Study of Power Loss Reduction in SEPR Converters for Induction Heating through Implementation of SiC Based Semiconductor Switches

    Angel Marinov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a power loss analysis for a Single Ended Parallel Resonance (SEPR Converter used for induction heating. The analysis includes a comparison of the losses in the electronic switch when the circuit is realized using a conventional Silicon (Si based IGBT or when using Silicon Carbide (SiC based MOSFET. The analysis includes modelling and simulation as well as experimental verification through power loss and heat dissipation measurement. The presented results can be used as a base of comparison between the switches and can be a starting point for efficiency based design of those types of converters.

  20. Experimental determination of the heat transfer coefficient for the optimal design of the cooling system of a PEM fuel cell placed inside the fuselage of an UAV

    Barroso, Jorge; Renau, Jordi; Lozano, Antonio; Miralles, José; Martín, Jesús; Sánchez, Fernando; Barreras, Félix

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to calculate the heat transfer coefficients needed for the further design of the optimal cooling system of a high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) stack that will be incorporated to the powerplant of a light unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) capable of reaching an altitude of 10,000 m. Experiments are performed in two rectangular tunnels, for three different form factors, in experimental conditions as close as possible to the actual ones in the HT-PEMFC stack. For the calculations, all the relevant thermal processes are considered (i.e., convection and radiation). Different parameters are measured, such as air mass flow rate, inlet and outlet air temperatures, and wall temperatures for bipolar plates and endplates. Different numerical models are fitted revealing the influence of the diverse relevant non-dimensional groups on the Nusselt number. Heat transfer coefficients calculated for the air cooling flow vary from 8 to 44 W m"−"2 K"−"1. Results obtained at sea level are extrapolated for a flight ceiling of 10 km. The flow section is optimized as a function of the power required to cool the stack down to the temperature recommended by the membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) manufacturer using a numerical code specifically developed for this purpose. - Highlights: • Heat transfer coefficients to refrigerate a HT-PEMFC stack are calculated. • Experiments are performed in 2 wind tunnels, for 3 form factors and real conditions. • The calculated heat transfer coefficient varies from 8 to 44 W m"−"2 K"−"1. • Results at sea level are suitably extrapolated for a target altitude of 10 km. • Flow area is optimized as a function of the power required to cool the stack down.

  1. Effect of prolonged heat treatments at low temperature on shear force and cooking loss in cows and young bulls

    Christensen, L.; Andersen, L.; Løje, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    and cooking loss in semitendinosus from cows (4-6 years) and young bulls (12-14 months), representing 2 categories of beef with varying thermal strength of connective tissue. Vacuum packed muscle samples were heat treated at 53°C, 55°C, 58°C and 63°C in water baths for 2½, 7½ and 19½ h. Cooking loss...... 53°C to 55°C, or when increasing heating time from 2½ to 7½ h at 53°C. In semitendinosus from cows shear force decreased significantly with increasing temperature, and with increasing heating time from 2½ to 19½ h at 55°C and 63°C. Cooking loss increased with increasing heating temperature in both...

  2. Assessment of external heat transfer coefficient during oocyte vitrification in liquid and slush nitrogen using numerical simulations to determine cooling rates.

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-01-01

    In oocyte vitrification, plunging directly into liquid nitrogen favor film boiling and strong nitrogen vaporization. A survey of literature values of heat transfer coefficients (h) for film boiling of small metal objects with different geometries plunged in liquid nitrogen revealed values between 125 to 1000 W per per square m per K. These h values were used in a numerical simulation of cooling rates of two oocyte vitrification devices (open-pulled straw and Cryotop), plunged in liquid and slush nitrogen conditions. Heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was considered a linear mathematical problem and was solved using the finite element method applying the variational formulation. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate the cooling process of the systems. Predicted cooling rates for OPS and Cryotop when cooled at -196 degree C (liquid nitrogen) or -207 degree C (average for slush nitrogen) for heat transfer coefficients estimated to be representative of film boiling, indicated lowering the cooling temperature produces only a maximum 10 percent increase in cooling rates; confirming the main benefit of plunging in slush over liquid nitrogen does not arise from their temperature difference. Numerical simulations also demonstrated that a hypothetical four-fold increase in the cooling rate of vitrification devices when plunging in slush nitrogen would be explained by an increase in heat transfer coefficient. This improvement in heat transfer (i.e., high cooling rates) in slush nitrogen is attributed to less or null film boiling when a sample is placed in slush (mixture of liquid and solid nitrogen) because it first melts the solid nitrogen before causing the liquid to boil and form a film.

  3. SCDAP/RELAP5 modeling of heat transfer and flow losses in lower head porous debris. Rev. 1

    Siefken, L.J.; Coryell, E.W.; Paik, S.; Kuo, H.

    1999-01-01

    Designs are described for implementing models for calculating the heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris in the lower head of a reactor vessel. The COUPLE model in SCDAP/RELAP5 represents both the porous and nonporous debris that results from core material slumping into the lower head. Currently, the COUPLE model has the capability to model convective and radiative heat transfer from the surfaces of nonporous debris in a detailed manner and to model only in a simplistic manner the heat transfer from porous debris. In order to advance beyond the simplistic modeling for porous debris, designs are developed for detailed calculations of heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris. Correlations are identified for convective heat transfer in porous debris for the following modes of heat transfer; (1) forced convection to liquid, (2) forced convection to gas, (3) nucleate boiling, (4) transition boiling, and (5) film boiling. Interphase heat transfer is modeled in an approximate ma nner. Designs are described for models to calculate the flow losses and interphase drag of fluid flowing through the interstices of the porous debris, and to apply these variables in the momentum equations in the RELAP5 part of the code. Since the models for heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris in the lower head are designed for general application, a design is also described for implementation of these models to the analysis of porous debris in the core region. A test matrix is proposed for assessing the capability of the implemented models to calculate the heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris. The implementation of the models described in this report is expected to improve the COUPLE code calculation of the temperature distribution in porous debris and in the lower head that supports the debris. The implementation of these models is also expected to improve the calculation of the temperature and flow distribution in porous debris in the core region

  4. Life cycle biological efficiency of mice divergently selected for heat loss.

    Bhatnagar, A S; Nielsen, M K

    2014-08-01

    Divergent selection in mice for heat loss was conducted in 3 independent replicates creating a high maintenance, high heat loss (MH) and low maintenance, low heat loss (ML) line and unselected control (MC). Improvement in feed efficiency was observed in ML mice due to a reduced maintenance energy requirement but there was also a slight decline in reproductive performance, survivability, and lean content, particularly when compared to MC animals. The objective of this study was to model a life cycle scenario similar to a livestock production system and calculate total inputs and outputs to estimate overall biological efficiency of these lines and determine if reduced feed intake resulted in improved life cycle efficiency. Feed intake, reproductive performance, growth, and body composition were recorded on 21 mating pairs from each line × replicate combination, cohabitated at 7 wk of age and maintained for up to 1 yr unless culled. Proportion of animals at each parity was calculated from survival rates estimated from previous research when enforcing a maximum of 4, 8, or 12 allowed parities. This parity distribution was then combined with values from previous studies to calculate inputs and outputs of mating pairs and offspring produced in a single cycle at equilibrium. Offspring output was defined as kilograms of lean output of offspring at 49 d. Offspring input was defined as megacalories of energy intake for growing offspring from 21 to 49 d. Parent output was defined as kilograms of lean output of culled parents. Parent input was defined as megacalories of energy intake for mating pairs from weaning of one parity to weaning of the next. Offspring output was greatest in MC mice due to superior BW and numbers weaned, while output was lowest in ML mice due to smaller litter sizes and lean content. Parent output did not differ substantially between lines but was greatest in MH mice due to poorer survival rates resulting in more culled animals. Input was greatest in

  5. Application of modified export coefficient method on the load estimation of non-point source nitrogen and phosphorus pollution of soil and water loss in semiarid regions.

    Wu, Lei; Gao, Jian-en; Ma, Xiao-yi; Li, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Chinese Loess Plateau is considered as one of the most serious soil loss regions in the world, its annual sediment output accounts for 90 % of the total sediment loads of the Yellow River, and most of the Loess Plateau has a very typical characteristic of "soil and water flow together", and water flow in this area performs with a high sand content. Serious soil loss results in nitrogen and phosphorus loss of soil. Special processes of water and soil in the Loess Plateau lead to the loss mechanisms of water, sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus are different from each other, which are greatly different from other areas of China. In this study, the modified export coefficient method considering the rainfall erosivity factor was proposed to simulate and evaluate non-point source (NPS) nitrogen and phosphorus loss load caused by soil and water loss in the Yanhe River basin of the hilly and gully area, Loess Plateau. The results indicate that (1) compared with the traditional export coefficient method, annual differences of NPS total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) load after considering the rainfall erosivity factor are obvious; it is more in line with the general law of NPS pollution formation in a watershed, and it can reflect the annual variability of NPS pollution more accurately. (2) Under the traditional and modified conditions, annual changes of NPS TN and TP load in four counties (districts) took on the similar trends from 1999 to 2008; the load emission intensity not only is closely related to rainfall intensity but also to the regional distribution of land use and other pollution sources. (3) The output structure, source composition, and contribution rate of NPS pollution load under the modified method are basically the same with the traditional method. The average output structure of TN from land use and rural life is about 66.5 and 17.1 %, the TP is about 53.8 and 32.7 %; the maximum source composition of TN (59 %) is farmland; the maximum source

  6. Effects of heat loss as percentage of fuel's energy, friction and variable specific heats of working fluid on performance of air standard Otto cycle

    Lin, J.-C.; Hou, S.-S.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of heat loss characterized by a percentage of the fuel's energy, friction and variable specific heats of working fluid on the performance of an air standard Otto cycle with a restriction of maximum cycle temperature. A more realistic and precise relationship between the fuel's chemical energy and the heat leakage that is based on a pair of inequalities is derived through the resulting temperature. The variations in power output and thermal efficiency with compression ratio, and the relations between the power output and the thermal efficiency of the cycle are presented. The results show that the power output as well as the efficiency where maximum power output occurs will increase with increase of the maximum cycle temperature. The temperature dependent specific heats of the working fluid have a significant influence on the performance. The power output and the working range of the cycle increase with the increase of specific heats of the working fluid, while the efficiency decreases with the increase of specific heats of the working fluid. The friction loss has a negative effect on the performance. Therefore, the power output and efficiency of the cycle decrease with increasing friction loss. It is noteworthy that the effects of heat loss characterized by a percentage of the fuel's energy, friction and variable specific heats of the working fluid on the performance of an Otto cycle engine are significant and should be considered in practical cycle analysis. The results obtained in the present study are of importance to provide good guidance for performance evaluation and improvement of practical Otto engines

  7. Attempts of Thermal Imaging Camera Usage in Estimations of the Convective Heat Loss From a Vertical Plate

    Denda Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new method for determining heat transfer coefficients using a gradient method has been developed. To verify accuracy of the proposed method vertical isothermal heating plate with natural convection mechanism has been examined. This configuration was deliberately chosen, because of the fact that such case is historically the earliest and most thoroughly studied and its rich scientific documentation – the most reliable. New method is based on temperature field visualization made in perpendicular plane to the heating surface of the plate using infrared camera. Because the camera does not record temperature of air itself but the surface only, therefore plastic mesh with low thermal conductivity has been used as a detector. Temperature of each mesh cell, placed perpendicular to the vertical heating surface and rinsed with convection stream of heated air could be already recorded by infrared camera. In the same time using IR camera surface of heating plate has been measured. By numerical processing of the results matrix temperature gradient on the surface ∂T/∂x │ x=0, local heat transfer coefficients αy, and local values of Nusselt number Nuy, can be calculated. After integration the average Nusselt number for entire plate can be calculated. Obtained relation characteristic numbers Nu = 0.647 Ra 0.236 (R2 = 0.943, has a good correlation with literature reports and proves usefulness of the method.

  8. A assessment of loss-of-heat-sink accident with scram in the LMFBR

    Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Pratt, W.T.; Sun, Y.H.

    1978-01-01

    A description of a slow core meltdown in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor is presented for conditions of loss-of-heat-sink following neutronic shutdown. Simple models are developed for the prediction of phase changes and/or relocation of the core materials including fuel, clad, ducts, control rod absorber material (B 4 C), and plenum gases. The sequence of events is accounted for and the accident progression is described up to the point of recriticality. The neutronic behavior of the disrupted core is analyzed in R-Z geometry with a static transport theory code. For most scenarios assessed, the reactor is expected to become recritical although large ramp rates are not anticipated. (author)

  9. Assessment of the loss-of-heat-sink accident with scram in the LMFBR

    Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Pratt, W.T.; Sun, Y.H.

    1978-01-01

    A description of a slow core meltdown in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor is presented for the conditions of loss-of-heat-sink following neutronic shutdown. Simple models are developed for the prediction of phase changes and/or relocation of the core materials including fuel, clad, ducts, control rod absorber material (B 4 C), and plenum gases. The sequence of events is accounted for and the accident progression is described up to the point of recriticality. The neutronic behavior of the disrupted core is analyzed in R-Z geometry with a static transport theory code. For most scenarios assessed, the reactor is expected to become recritical although large ramp rates are not anticipated

  10. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    Sartori, E., E-mail: emanuele.sartori@igi.cnr.it; Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Sonato, P. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Padova University, Via Gradenigo 6/a, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  11. Thermal-hydraulic processes involved in loss of residual heat removal during reduced inventory operation

    Fletcher, C.D.; McHugh, P.R.; Naff, S.A.; Johnsen, G.W.

    1991-02-01

    This paper identifies the topics needed to understand pressurized water reactor response to an extended loss of residual heat removal event during refueling and maintenance outages. By identifying the possible plant conditions and cooling methods that would be used for each cooling mode, the controlling thermal-hydraulic processes and phenomena were identified. Controlling processes and phenomena include: gravity drain, core water boil-off, and reflux cooling processes. Important subcategories of the reflux cooling processes include: the initiation of reflux cooling from various plant conditions, the effects of air on reflux cooling, core level depression effects, issues regarding the steam generator secondaries, and the special case of boiler-condenser cooling with once-through steam generators. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  12. Total heat loss coefficient of flat roof constructions with external insulation in tapered layers including the effects of thermal bridges

    Rose, Jørgen; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    In order to achieve durability of flat roofs with external insulation, it is necessary to secure proper drainage of the roof, i.e. to avoid water leaking into the insulation. The design of the tapered insulation of the roof is quite difficult as requirements with respect to both drainage...

  13. A kinetic model of droplet heating and evaporation: Effects of inelastic collisions and a non-unity evaporation coefficient

    Sazhin, Sergei S.; Xie, Jianfei; Shishkova, Irina N.; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Heikal, Morgan Raymond

    2013-01-01

    The previously developed kinetic model for droplet heating and evaporation into a high pressure air is generalised to take into account the combined effects of inelastic collisions between molecules in the kinetic region, a non-unity evaporation

  14. Momentum, sensible heat and CO2 correlation coefficient variability: what can we learn from 20 years of continuous eddy covariance measurements?

    Hurdebise, Quentin; Heinesch, Bernard; De Ligne, Anne; Vincke, Caroline; Aubinet, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Long-term data series of carbon dioxide and other gas exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere become more and more numerous. Long-term analyses of such exchanges require a good understanding of measurement conditions during the investigated period. Independently of climate drivers, measurements may indeed be influenced by measurement conditions themselves subjected to long-term variability due to vegetation growth or set-up changes. The present research refers to the Vielsalm Terrestrial Observatory (VTO) an ICOS candidate site located in a mixed forest (beech, silver fir, Douglas fir, Norway spruce) in the Belgian Ardenne. Fluxes of momentum, carbon dioxide and sensible heat have been continuously measured there by eddy covariance for more than 20 years. During this period, changes in canopy height and measurement height occurred. The correlation coefficients (for momemtum, sensible heat and CO2) and the normalized standard deviations measured for the past 20 years at the Vielsalm Terrestrial Observatory (VTO) were analysed in order to define how the fluxes, independently of climate conditions, were affected by the surrounding environment evolution, including tree growth, forest thinning and tower height change. A relationship between canopy aerodynamic distance and the momentum correlation coefficient was found which is characteristic of the roughness sublayer, and suggests that momentum transport processes were affected by z-d. In contrast, no relationship was found for sensible heat and CO2 correlation coefficients, suggesting that the z-d variability observed did not affect their turbulent transport. There were strong differences in these coefficients, however, between two wind sectors, characterized by contrasted stands (height differences, homogeneity) and different hypotheses were raised to explain it. This study highlighted the importance of taking the surrounding environment variability into account in order to ensure the spatio

  15. Mitigation Measures Following a Loss-of-Residual-Heat-Removal Event During Shutdown

    Seul, Kwang Won; Bang, Young Seok; Kim, Hho Jung

    2000-01-01

    The transient following a loss-of-residual-heat-removal event during shutdown was analyzed to determine the containment closure time (CCT) to prevent uncontrolled release of fission products and the gravity-injection path and rate (GIPR) for effective core cooling using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code. The plant conditions of Yonggwang Units 3 and 4, a pressurized water reactor (PWR) of 2815-MW(thermal) power in Korea, were reviewed, and possible event sequences were identified. From the CCT analysis for the five cases of typical plant configurations, it was estimated for the earliest CCT to be 40 min after the event in a case with a large cold-leg opening and emptied steam generators (SGs). However, the case with water-filled SGs significantly delayed the CCT through the heat removal to the secondary side. From the GIPR analysis for the six possible gravity-injection paths from the refueling water storage tank (RWST), the case with the injection point and opening on the other leg side was estimated to be the most suitable path to avoid core boiling. In addition, from the sensitivity study, it was evaluated for the plant to be capable of providing the core cooling for the long-term transient if nominal RWST water is available. As a result, these analysis methods and results will provide useful information in understanding the plant behavior and preparing the mitigation measures after the event, especially for Combustion Engineering-type PWR plants. However, to directly apply the analysis results to the emergency procedure for such an event, additional case studies are needed for a wide range of operating conditions such as reactor coolant inventory, RWST water temperature, and core decay heat rate

  16. Free convective heat loss from cavity-type solar furnace; Solar receiver kara no shizen tairyu ni yoru netsusonshitsu

    Fujii, I; Ito, N [Meiji University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Free convective heat loss from solar heat receivers was studied, using three laboratory model receivers (different in depth L and aperture diameter d) heated by electric heaters. Most of the heat produced by heaters was transmitted to the air inside. The cylindrical vessel walls were fully insulated against heat. Heat loss being supposed to result mainly from transfer by free convection, the experiment results were edited by use of Nusselt number Nu and Rayley number Ra. Relations between Nu(D/d){sup m1} and Ra(L/D){sup m2} were plotted in a chart. Here, D is the receiver inner diameter, and m1 and m2 are constants that can be determined by computation. Tests points were provided approximately lineally, irrespective of D, L, or receiver inclination. Air currents were found to produce one or more swirls inside, thanks to the current visualization technique, when the receiver inclination was not sharper than 120{degree} (except 0{degree}). The number of swirls increased as the inner wall temperature rose. This kind of behavior of air currents directly affects the degree of heat loss. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Physiological Responses and Lactation to Cutaneous Evaporative Heat Loss in , , and Their Crossbreds

    Wang Jian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous evaporative heat loss in Bos indicus and Bos taurus has been well documented. Nonetheless, how crossbreds with different fractional genetic proportions respond to such circumstances is of interest. A study to examine the physiological responses to cutaneous evaporative heat loss, also lactation period and milk yield, were conducted in Sahiwal (Bos indicus, n = 10, 444±64.8 kg, 9±2.9 years, Holstein Friesian (Bos taurus, HF100% (n = 10, 488±97.9 kg, 6±2.8 years and the following crossbreds: HF50% (n = 10, 355±40.7 kg, 2±0 years and HF87.5% (n = 10, 489±76.8 kg, 7±1.8 years. They were allocated so as to determine the physiological responses of sweating rate (SR, respiration rate (RR, rectal temperature (RT, and skin temperature (ST with and without hair from 06:00 h am to 15:00 h pm. And milk yield during 180 days were collected at days from 30 to 180. The ambient temperature-humidity-index (THI increased from less than 80 in the early morning to more than 90 in the late afternoon. The interaction of THI and breed were highly affected on SR, RR, RT, and ST (p0.05 but did change over time. The ST with and without hair were similar, and was higher in HF100% (37.4°C; 38.0°C and their crossbred HF50% (35.5°C; 35.5°C and HF87.5% (37.1°C; 37.9°C than Sahiwal (34.8°C; 34.8°C (p<0.01. Moreover, the early lactation were higher at HF100% (25 kg and 87.5% (25 kg than HF50% (23 kg which were higher than Sahiwal (18 kg while the peak period of lactation was higher at HF100% (35 kg than crossbreds both HF87.5% and HF50% (32 kg which was higher than Sahiwal (26 kg (p<0.05. In conclusion, sweating and respiration were the main vehicle for dissipating excess body heat for Sahiwal, HF and crossbreds, respectively. The THI at 76 to 80 were the critical points where the physiological responses to elevated temperature displayed change.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Average Heat-Transfer and Friction Coefficients for Air Flowing in Circular Tubes Having Square-Thread-Type Roughness

    Sams, E. W.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of forced-convection heat transfer and associated pressure drops was conducted with air flowing through electrically heated Inconel tubes having various degrees of square-thread-type roughness, an inside diameter of 1/2 inch, and a length of 24 inches. were obtained for tubes having conventional roughness ratios (height of thread/radius of tube) of 0 (smooth tube), 0.016, 0.025, and 0.037 over ranges of bulk Reynolds numbers up to 350,000, average inside-tube-wall temperatures up to 1950deg R, and heat-flux densities up to 115,000 Btu per hour per square foot. Data The experimental data showed that both heat transfer and friction increased with increase in surface roughness, becoming more pronounced with increase in Reynolds number; for a given roughness, both heat transfer and friction were also influenced by the tube wall-to-bulk temperature ratio. Good correlation of the heat-transfer data for all the tubes investigated was obtained by use of a modification of the conventional Nusselt correlation parameters wherein the mass velocity in the Reynolds number was replaced by the product of air density evaluated at the average film temperature and the so-called friction velocity; in addition, the physical properties of air were evaluated at the average film temperature. The isothermal friction data for the rough tubes, when plotted in the conventional manner, resulted in curves similar to those obtained by other investigators; that is, the curve for a given roughness breaks away from the Blasius line (representing turbulent flow in smooth tubes) at some value of Reynolds number, which decreases with increase in surface roughness, and then becomes a horizontal line (friction coefficient independent of Reynolds number). A comparison of the friction data for the rough tubes used herein indicated that the conventional roughness ratio is not an adequate measure of relative roughness for tubes having a square-thread-type element. The present data, as well

  19. Influence of the heat flux and of the gas on heat transfer and friction coefficients in a smooth cylindrical tube; Influence du flux de chaleur et de la nature du gaz sur les coefficients d'echange et le frottement dans un tube cylindrique lisse

    Delpont, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-12-15

    The stainless steel tube used for the experiments is heated by means of d.c current; its inside diameter is 40 mm; its length is about 5.80 meters. Special core has been taken (heated rocket) to avoid heat loss and to provide very accurate measurements. The cooling gases tested are air and carbon dioxide at a pressure of 2.6 to 19 psi; the Reynolds number ranges from 70,000 to 10{sup 6}, the wall temperature and the heat flux reach respectively 430 deg C and 16 watts/cm{sup 2}. The Reynolds number Re{sub m}, Stanton number M{sub m} and friction coefficient f are computed by evaluating the physical properties of the gases at the mean temperature T{sub m}. For a given Reynolds number, a decrease of M{sub m} and of f is observed hen the heat flux increases, this decrease reaches 10 per cent in the experiments described. A formulation is proposed to express this effect in terms of a heat flow parameter (T{sub m} - T{sub m}) / T{sub p} used as a corrective factor (T{sub p} = wall temperature). The correlation formulae are: M{sub m} = 0.0168 Re{sub m}{sup -0.18} P{sub m}{sup -0.6} (1 - 0.4 [(T{sub p} - T{sub m}) / T{sub p}]) for air f = f{sub 0} (1 0.25 [(T{sub p} - T{sub m}) / T{sub p}]) for air M{sub m} = 0.0171 Re{sub m}{sup -0.18} P{sub m}{sup -0.6} (1 - 0.2 [(T{sub p} - T{sub m}) / T{sub p}]) for carbon dioxide f = f{sub 0} (1 - 0.20 [(T{sub p} - T{sub m}) / T{sub p}]) for carbon dioxide where f{sub 0} = the friction coefficient for isotherm flow. (author) [French] Le tube utilite a un diametre interieur de 40 mm; sa longueur est de 5,80 m environ; il est en acier inoxydable et chauffe par un courant continu. Des precautions particulieres (enceinte chauffante exterieure) ont ete prises pour eviter tout echange de chaleur avec le milieu exterieur et permettre des mesures extremement precises. Les gaz de refroidissement experimentes sont l'air et le gaz corbonique sous une pression de 1,8 a 13 hpz; les nombres de Reynolds vont de 70 000 a 10{sup 6}, la temperature de

  20. In-vessel natural circulation during a hypothetical loss-of-heat-sink accident in the Fast Flux Test Facility

    Perkins, K.R.; Bari, R.A.; Pratt, W.T.

    1979-05-01

    The capability to remove decay heat from the FFTF core via in-vessel natural circulation has been analyzed for the preboiling phase using a lumped parameter model. The results indicate that boiling will occur in the average fuel assembly for a wide spectrum of initial conditions which appear to be representative of the hypothetical loss-of-heat-sink accident. Two-phase pressure drop calculations indicate that, once the saturation temperature is reached, coolability can only be assured for decay heat levels which are less than 0.5% of the operating power. A review of the limited sodium boiling data indicates that boiling-induced natural circulation may support up to 4% of the operating power, but geometric atypicalities and a large degree of inlet subcooling for the existing data limit the applicability to the loss-of-heat-sink accident in FFTF

  1. Assessment of Coping Capability of KORI Unit 1 under Extended Loss AC Power and Loss of Ultimate Heat Sink Initiated by Beyond Design Natural Disaster

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Ha, Sang Jun [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kee Soo [Nuclear Engineering Service and Solution (NESS) Co. Ltd., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chan Eok [KEPCO Engineering and Constructd., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In Korea, the government and industry performed comprehensive safety inspection on all domestic nuclear power plants against beyond design basis external events and fifty action items have been issued. In addition to post- Fukushima action items, the stress tests for all domestic nuclear power plants are on the way to enhance the safety of domestic nuclear power plants through finding the vulnerabilities in intentional stress conditions initiated by beyond design natural disaster. This paper presents assessment results of coping capability of KORI Unit 1 under the simultaneous Extended Loss of AC Power (ELAP) and Loss of Ultimate Heat Sink (LUHS) which is a representative plant condition initiated by beyond design natural disaster. The assessment of the coping capability of KORI Unit 1 has been performed under simultaneous the extended loss of AC power and loss of ultimate heat sink initiated by beyond design natural disaster. It is concluded that KORI Unit 1 has the capability, in the event of loss of safety functions by beyond design natural disaster, to sufficiently cool down the reactor core without fuel damage, to keep pressure boundaries of the reactor coolant system in transient condition and to control containment and temperature to maintain the integrity of the containment buildings.

  2. Assessment of Coping Capability of KORI Unit 1 under Extended Loss AC Power and Loss of Ultimate Heat Sink Initiated by Beyond Design Natural Disaster

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Ha, Sang Jun; Han, Kee Soo; Park, Chan Eok

    2016-01-01

    In Korea, the government and industry performed comprehensive safety inspection on all domestic nuclear power plants against beyond design basis external events and fifty action items have been issued. In addition to post- Fukushima action items, the stress tests for all domestic nuclear power plants are on the way to enhance the safety of domestic nuclear power plants through finding the vulnerabilities in intentional stress conditions initiated by beyond design natural disaster. This paper presents assessment results of coping capability of KORI Unit 1 under the simultaneous Extended Loss of AC Power (ELAP) and Loss of Ultimate Heat Sink (LUHS) which is a representative plant condition initiated by beyond design natural disaster. The assessment of the coping capability of KORI Unit 1 has been performed under simultaneous the extended loss of AC power and loss of ultimate heat sink initiated by beyond design natural disaster. It is concluded that KORI Unit 1 has the capability, in the event of loss of safety functions by beyond design natural disaster, to sufficiently cool down the reactor core without fuel damage, to keep pressure boundaries of the reactor coolant system in transient condition and to control containment and temperature to maintain the integrity of the containment buildings

  3. The effect of surface roughness on the heat exchange and pressure-drop coefficients; Influence des rugosites de paroi sur les coefficients d'echange thermique et de perte de charge

    Malherbe, J M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-02-15

    The effect of various types of roughness on the wall of an axial tube in an annular space of 15-25 mm cooled by an air-flow has been studied in the case of steady turbulence. Roughness of the type 'disrupter of the boundary layer' was set up using triangular threads of 0.2 to 0.4 mm thickness machined in the tube itself, or brass or glass wire wound on a smooth tube. Tests were also carried out using the roughness provided by regularly spaced pyramids 0.4 mm high. The results obtained showed that the heat exchange increased because of the presence of this roughness. A maximum in the heat exchange and pressure-drop coefficients was observed when the pitch equals about eight times the height of the thread. An analytical method has been developed and experiments have been carried out in which the two walls of the annular space were heated in such a way as to transmit unequal heat flows. The region considered is limited to Reynolds's numbers of between 5 X 10{sup 3} and 5 x 10{sup 4} and wall temperatures of under 250 deg C. (author) [French] L'effet de diverses rugosites sur la paroi du tube central d'un espace annulaire de diametre 15-25 mm refroidi par un ecoulement d'air a ete etudie en regime turbulent etabli. Des rugosites du type 'interrupteur de couche limite' etaient realisees au moyen de filets triangulaires, de 0,2 a 0,4 mm de hauteur usines dans l'epaisseur du tube ou de fils de laiton, ou de verre, enroules sur un tube lisse. Les essais ont porte egalement sur des rugosites constituees par des pyramides de 0,4 mm de hauteur et regulierement espacees. Les resultats obtenus ont mis en evidence une augmentation de transfert de chaleur due a la presence des elements rugueux. L'existence d'un maximum pour les coefficients d'echange thermique et de perte de charge a ete constate lorsque le pas atteint huit fois la hauteur des rugosites. Une methode analytique a ete etablie et des experiences ont ete realisees au cours desquelles les deux parois de l

  4. Flow patterns and heat transfer coefficients in flow-boiling and convective condensation of R22 inside a micro fin of new design

    Muzzio, A.; Niro, A.; Garaviglia, M.

    1998-01-01

    Saturated flow boiling and convective condensation experiments for oil-free refrigerant R22 been carried out with a micro fin tube of new design and with a smooth tube. Both tube have the same outer diameter of 9.52 mm and are horizontally operated. Two-phase flow pattern data have been obtained in addition of heat transfer coefficient and pressure drops; more-over, adiabatic tests have been also performed in order for flow pattern map to cover even adiabatic flows. Data are for mass fluxes ranging from about 90 to 400 Kg/s m 2 . In boiling tests, the nominal saturation temperature is 5 degree C, with inlet quality varying from 0.2 to 0.6 and the quality change ranging from 0.1 to 0.5. In condensation, results are for saturation temperature equal to 35 degree C, with inlet quality between 0.8 and 0.4, and quality change within 0.6 and 0.2. The comparison shows a large heat transfer augmentation with a moderate increment of pressure drops, especially in evaporation were the enhancement factor comes up to 4 while the penalty factor is about 1.4 at the most. Heat transfer coefficients both in evaporation and condensation are compared to the predictions of some recent correlations specifically proposed or modified for micro fin tube

  5. Friction pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient of two-phase flow in helically coiled tube once-through steam generator for integrated type marine water reactor

    Nariai, Hideki; Kobayashi, Michiyuki; Matsuoka, Takeshi.

    1982-01-01

    Two-phase friction pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients in a once-through steam generator with helically coiled tubes were investigated with the model test rig of an integrated type marine water reactor. As the dimensions of the heat transfer tubes and the thermal-fluid conditions are almost the same as those of real reactors, the data applicable directly to the real reactor design were obtained. As to the friction pressure drop, modified Kozeki's prediction which is based on the experimental data by Kozeki for coiled tubes, agreed the best with the experimental data. Modified Martinelli-Nelson's prediction which is based on Martinelli-Nelson's multiplier using Ito's equation for single-phase flow in coiled tube, agreed within 30%. The effect of coiled tube on the average heat transfer coefficients at boiling region were small, and the predictions for straight tube could also be applied to coiled tube. Schrock-Grossman's correlation agreed well with the experimental data at the pressures of lower than 3.5 MPa. It was suggested that dryout should be occurred at the quality of greater than 90% within the conditions of this report. (author)

  6. Solutions of Heat-Like and Wave-Like Equations with Variable Coefficients by Means of the Homotopy Analysis Method

    Alomari, A. K.; Noorani, M. S. M.; Nazar, R.

    2008-01-01

    We employ the homotopy analysis method (HAM) to obtain approximate analytical solutions to the heat-like and wave-like equations. The HAM contains the auxiliary parameter ħ, which provides a convenient way of controlling the convergence region of series solutions. The analysis is accompanied by several linear and nonlinear heat-like and wave-like equations with initial boundary value problems. The results obtained prove that HAM is very effective and simple with less error than the Adomian decomposition method and the variational iteration method

  7. Latent heat loss and sweat gland histology of male goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment

    de Melo Costa, Cíntia Carol; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Neto, José Domingues Fontenele; Oliveira, Steffan Edward Octávio; de Queiroz, João Paulo Araújo Fernandes

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this work was to quantify the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of goats in an equatorial semi-arid environment. The latent heat loss from the body surfaces of these ten undefined breed goats was measured using a ventilated capsule in sun and shade and in the three body regions (neck, flank and hindquarters). Skin samples from these three regions were histologically analyzed to relate the quantity of sweat glands, the area of sweat glands and the epithelium thickness of each of these regions to the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation of the examined goats. The epithelium thickness that was measured varied significantly for body regions with different quantities and areas of sweat glands ( P < 0.01). Among the body regions that were examined, the samples from the neck demonstrated the highest epithelium thickness (16.23 ± 0.13 μm). However, the samples of sweat glands from the flank had the biggest area (43330.51 ± 778.71 μm2) and quantity per square centimeter (390 ± 9 cm-2). After the animals were exposed to sun, the flanks lost the greatest amount of heat by cutaneous evaporation (73.03 ± 1.75 W m-2) and possessed the highest surface temperatures (39.47 ± 0.18 °C). The histological characteristics may have influenced the heat loss by cutaneous evaporation that was observed in the flank region after the animals were exposed to sun.

  8. Pressure loss coefficient and flow rate of side hole in a lower end plug for dual-cooled annular nuclear fuel

    Shin, Chang-Hwan, E-mail: shinch@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Ju-Yong, E-mail: juyong@kaeri.re.kr; In, Wang-Kee, E-mail: wkin@kaeri.re.kr

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • A lower end plug with side flow holes is suggested to provide alternative flow paths of the inner channel. • The inlet loss coefficient of the lower end plug is estimated from the experiment. • The flow rate through the side holes is estimated in a complete entrance blockage of inner channel. • The consequence in the reactor core condition is evaluated with a subchannel analysis code. - Abstract: Dual-cooled annular nuclear fuel for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) has been introduced for a significant increase in reactor power. KAERI has been developing a dual-cooled annular fuel for a power uprate of 20% in an optimized PWR in Korea, the OPR1000. This annular fuel can help decrease the fuel temperature substantially relative to conventional cylindrical fuel at a power uprate. Annular fuel has dual flow channels around itself; however, the inner flow channel has a weakness in that it is isolated unlike the outer flow channel, which is open to other neighbouring outer channels for a coolant exchange in the reactor core. If the entrance of the inner channel is, as a hypothetical event, completely blocked by debris, the inner channel will then experience a rapid increase in coolant temperature such that a departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) may occur. Therefore, a remedy to avoid such a postulated accident is indispensable for the safety of annular fuel. A lower end plug with side flow holes was suggested to provide alternative flow paths in addition to the central entrance of the inner channel. In this paper, the inlet loss coefficient of the lower end plug and the flow rate through the side holes were estimated from the experimental results even in a complete entrance blockage of the inner channel. An optimization for the side hole was also performed, and the results are applied to a subchannel analysis to evaluate the consequence in the reactor core condition.

  9. First and Second-Law Efficiency Analysis and ANN Prediction of a Diesel Cycle with Internal Irreversibility, Variable Specific Heats, Heat Loss, and Friction Considerations

    M. M. Rashidi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The variability of specific heats, internal irreversibility, heat and frictional losses are neglected in air-standard analysis for different internal combustion engine cycles. In this paper, the performance of an air-standard Diesel cycle with considerations of internal irreversibility described by using the compression and expansion efficiencies, variable specific heats, and losses due to heat transfer and friction is investigated by using finite-time thermodynamics. Artificial neural network (ANN is proposed for predicting the thermal efficiency and power output values versus the minimum and the maximum temperatures of the cycle and also the compression ratio. Results show that the first-law efficiency and the output power reach their maximum at a critical compression ratio for specific fixed parameters. The first-law efficiency increases as the heat leakage decreases; however the heat leakage has no direct effect on the output power. The results also show that irreversibilities have depressing effects on the performance of the cycle. Finally, a comparison between the results of the thermodynamic analysis and the ANN prediction shows a maximum difference of 0.181% and 0.194% in estimating the thermal efficiency and the output power. The obtained results in this paper can be useful for evaluating and improving the performance of practical Diesel engines.

  10. A new predictive dynamic model describing the effect of the ambient temperature and the convective heat transfer coefficient on bacterial growth.

    Ben Yaghlene, H; Leguerinel, I; Hamdi, M; Mafart, P

    2009-07-31

    In this study, predictive microbiology and food engineering were combined in order to develop a new analytical model predicting the bacterial growth under dynamic temperature conditions. The proposed model associates a simplified primary bacterial growth model without lag, the secondary Ratkowsky "square root" model and a simplified two-parameter heat transfer model regarding an infinite slab. The model takes into consideration the product thickness, its thermal properties, the ambient air temperature, the convective heat transfer coefficient and the growth parameters of the micro organism of concern. For the validation of the overall model, five different combinations of ambient air temperature (ranging from 8 degrees C to 12 degrees C), product thickness (ranging from 1 cm to 6 cm) and convective heat transfer coefficient (ranging from 8 W/(m(2) K) to 60 W/(m(2) K)) were tested during a cooling procedure. Moreover, three different ambient air temperature scenarios assuming alternated cooling and heating stages, drawn from real refrigerated food processes, were tested. General agreement between predicted and observed bacterial growth was obtained and less than 5% of the experimental data fell outside the 95% confidence bands estimated by the bootstrap percentile method, at all the tested conditions. Accordingly, the overall model was successfully validated for isothermal and dynamic refrigeration cycles allowing for temperature dynamic changes at the centre and at the surface of the product. The major impact of the convective heat transfer coefficient and the product thickness on bacterial growth during the product cooling was demonstrated. For instance, the time needed for the same level of bacterial growth to be reached at the product's half thickness was estimated to be 5 and 16.5 h at low and high convection level, respectively. Moreover, simulation results demonstrated that the predicted bacterial growth at the air ambient temperature cannot be assumed to be

  11. Influence of high range of mass transfer coefficient and convection heat transfer on direct contact membrane distillation performance

    Lee, Jung Gil; Jeong, Sanghyun; Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem; Ghaffour, NorEddine

    2017-01-01

    (>2.1×10−6kg/m2sPa: membranes under development) were simulated using an experimentally validated model at different ranges of convection heat transfer by varying the inlet flow rates and spacer enhancement factor. The effect of mass transfer

  12. Stefan-Maxwell Relations and Heat Flux with Anisotropic Transport Coefficients for Ionized Gases in a Magnetic Field with Application to the Problem of Ambipolar Diffusion

    Kolesnichenko, A. V.; Marov, M. Ya.

    2018-01-01

    The defining relations for the thermodynamic diffusion and heat fluxes in a multicomponent, partially ionized gas mixture in an external electromagnetic field have been obtained by the methods of the kinetic theory. Generalized Stefan-Maxwell relations and algebraic equations for anisotropic transport coefficients (the multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, electric and thermoelectric conductivity coefficients as well as the thermal diffusion ratios) associated with diffusion-thermal processes have been derived. The defining second-order equations are derived by the Chapman-Enskog procedure using Sonine polynomial expansions. The modified Stefan-Maxwell relations are used for the description of ambipolar diffusion in the Earth's ionospheric plasma (in the F region) composed of electrons, ions of many species, and neutral particles in a strong electromagnetic field.

  13. Numerical analysis of the effects of radiation heat transfer and ionization energy loss on the cavitation Bubble's dynamics

    Mahdi, M.; Ebrahimi, R.; Shams, M.

    2011-01-01

    A numerical scheme for simulating the acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation was developed. Bubble instantaneous radius was obtained using Gilmore equation which considered the compressibility of the liquid. A uniform temperature was assumed for the inside gas during the collapse. Radiation heat transfer inside the bubble and the heat conduction to the bubble was considered. The numerical code was validated with the experimental data and a good correspondence was observed. The dynamics of hydrofoil cavitation bubble were also investigated. It was concluded that the thermal radiation heat transfer rate strongly depended on the cavitation number, initial bubble radius and hydrofoil angle of attack. -- Highlights: → Heat transfer and ionization energy losses were analyzed in the cavitation bubble. → Radiation of hydrodynamic bubble was approximately equal to the black body. → Radiation heat transfer did not affect the bubble dynamic. → Conduction decreased the bubble pressure and increased the bubble temperature. → Ionization decreased the temperature and increased the pressure in the bubble.

  14. Pressure-modulated differential scanning calorimetry. An approach to the continuous, simultaneous determination of heat capacities and expansion coefficients.

    Boehm, K; Rösgen, J; Hinz, H-J

    2006-02-15

    A new method is described that permits the continuous and synchronous determination of heat capacity and expansibility data. We refer to it as pressure-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (PMDSC), as it involves a standard DSC temperature scan and superimposes on it a pressure modulation of preselected format. The power of the method is demonstrated using salt solutions for which the most accurate heat capacity and expansibility data exist in the literature. As the PMDSC measurements could reproduce the parameters with high accuracy and precision, we applied the method also to an aqueous suspension of multilamellar DSPC vesicles for which no expansibility data had been reported previously for the transition region. Excellent agreement was obtained between data from PMDSC and values from independent direct differential scanning densimetry measurements. The basic theoretical background of the method when using sawtooth-like pressure ramps is given under Supporting Information, and a complete statistical thermodynamic derivation of the general equations is presented in the accompanying paper.

  15. Transferencia de calor incrementada en espacios anulares con elementos helicoidales insertados//Review of augmentation techniques for heat transfer coefficient in annular spaces using helical elements

    Josué Imbert‐González

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available La transferencia de calor incrementada por métodos pasivos se emplea en diversosintercambiadores de calor de alta efectividad. El objetivo del trabajo presentado fue la evaluación del estado de las investigaciones en el campo de la transferencia de calor mejorada en espacios anulares, a partir del empleo de elementos turbulizadores helicoidales como técnicas pasivas. La revisión se centró en el empleo de láminas helicoidales y espirales, la obtención de ecuaciones de correlación del coeficiente de transferencia de calor incrementado, el coeficiente de fricción y la evaluación que se realiza de este proceso por parte de diferentes autores. El análisis crítico permitió realizar valoraciones integradas y recomendar sobre los aspectos que podrían ser analizados en el futuro en esta temática.Palabras claves: transferencia de calor incrementada, láminas helicoidales, espirales, espacios anulares, métodos pasivos._______________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe transfer enhancement by passive methods is used in several heat exchanger of high effectiveness. The objective of the presented work was the evaluation of the state of the investigations in heat transfer enhancement in annular spaces, from the employment of elements helical. The revision was centered in the employment of twisted tape and wire coil in spiral, the equations of correlation obtained of the coefficient of transfer of increased heat, the coefficient of friction and the evaluation that was carried out of this process on the part of different authors. From the critical analysis of the published results, the authors recommend on the topics that can be analyzed in the future in this area.Key words: heat transfer enhancement, twisted tape, helical springs, annular spaces, passive methods.

  16. Modelling and Pareto optimization of heat transfer and flow coefficients in microchannels using GMDH type neural networks and genetic algorithms

    Amanifard, N.; Nariman-Zadeh, N.; Borji, M.; Khalkhali, A.; Habibdoust, A.

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of water flow in a set of rectangular microchannels are numerically investigated using Fluent and compared with those of experimental results. Two metamodels based on the evolved group method of data handling (GMDH) type neural networks are then obtained for modelling of both pressure drop (ΔP) and Nusselt number (Nu) with respect to design variables such as geometrical parameters of microchannels, the amount of heat flux and the Reynolds number. Using such obtained polynomial neural networks, multi-objective genetic algorithms (GAs) (non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm, NSGA-II) with a new diversity preserving mechanism is then used for Pareto based optimization of microchannels considering two conflicting objectives such as (ΔP) and (Nu). It is shown that some interesting and important relationships as useful optimal design principles involved in the performance of microchannels can be discovered by Pareto based multi-objective optimization of the obtained polynomial metamodels representing their heat transfer and flow characteristics. Such important optimal principles would not have been obtained without the use of both GMDH type neural network modelling and the Pareto optimization approach

  17. Heat transfer and loss by whole-body hyperthermia during severe lower-body heating are impaired in healthy older men.

    Brazaitis, Marius; Paulauskas, Henrikas; Eimantas, Nerijus; Obelieniene, Diana; Baranauskiene, Neringa; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2017-10-01

    Most studies demonstrate that aging is associated with a weakened thermoregulation. However, it remains unclear whether heat transfer (for heat loss) from the lower (uncompensable) to the upper (compensable) body during passively-induced severe lower-body heating is delayed or attenuated with aging. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to investigate heat transfer from uncompensable to compensable body areas in young men and healthy older men during passively-induced whole-body hyperthermia with a demonstrated post-heating change in core body (rectal; T re ) temperature. Nine healthy older men and eleven healthy young men (69±6 vs. 21±1 years old, mean±SD, Pheating in water at approximately 43°C. Despite a similar increment in T re (approximately 2.5°C) in both groups, the heating rate was significantly lower in older men than in young men (1.69±0.12 vs. 2.47±0.29°C/h, respectively; Pheat in the skin and deep muscles than young men, and this was associated with a greater heat-transfer delay and subsequent inertia in the increased core body (T re ) temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tidal heating and mass loss in neutron star binaries - Implications for gamma-ray burst models

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    A neutron star in a close binary orbit around another neutron star (or stellar-mass black hole) spirals inward owing to gravitational radiation. We discuss the effects of tidal dissipation during this process. Tidal energy dissipated in the neutron star's core escapes mainly as neutrinos, but heating of the crust, and outward diffusion of photons, blows off the outer layers of the star. This photon-driven mass loss precedes the final coalescence. The presence of this eject material impedes the escape of gamma-rays created via neutrino interactions. If an e(+) - e(-) fireball, created in the late stages of coalescence, were loaded with (or surrounded by) material with the mean column density of the ejecta, it could not be an efficient source of gamma-rays. Models for cosmologically distant gamma-rays burst that involve neutron stars must therefore be anisotropic, so that the fireball expands preferentially in directions where the column density of previously blown-off material is far below the spherically averaged value which we have calculated. Some possible 'scenarios' along these lines are briefly discussed.

  19. Loss of residual heat removal system: Diablo Canyon, Unit 2, April 10, 1987

    1987-06-01

    This report presents the findings of an NRC Augmented Inspection Team (AIT) investigation into the circumstances associated with the loss of residual heat removal (RHR) system capability for a period of approximately one and one-half hours at the Diablo Canyon, Unit 2 reactor facility on April 10, 1987. This event occurred while the Diablo Canyon, Unit 2, a pressurized water reactor, was shutdown with the reactor coolant system (RCS) water level drained to approximately mid-level of the hot leg piping. The reactor containment building equipment hatch was removed at the time of the event, and plant personnel were in the process of removing the primary side manways to gain access into the steam generator channel head areas. Thus, two fission product barriers were breached throughout the event. The RCS temperature increased from approximately 87 0 F to bulk boiling conditions without RCS temperature indication available to the plant operators. The RCS was subsequently pressurized to approximately 7 to 10 psig. The NRC AIT members concluded that the Diablo Canyon, Unit 2 plant was, at the time of the event, in a condition not previously analyzed by the NRC staff. The AIT findings from this event appear significant and generic to other pressurized water reactor facilities licensed by the NRC

  20. Evaluation of the dependence of heat transfer coefficient on the particle diameter of a metal porous medium in a heat removal system using liquid nitrogen

    Sasaki, Shunsuke; Ito, Satoshi; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic cooling system using a bronze-particle-sintered porous medium has been studied for a re mountable high-temperature superconducting magnet. This study evaluates boiling curve of subcooled liquid nitrogen as flowing in a bronze porous medium as a function of the particle diameter of the medium. We obtained Departure from Nuclear Boiling (Dnb) point from the boiling curve and discussed growth of nitrogen vapor bubble inferred from measured pressure drop. The pressure drop decreased significantly at wall superheat before reaching the DNB point whereas that slightly decreased after reaching the DNB point compared to the smallest wall superheat. This result could consider DNB rises with an increase in the particle diameter because larger particle makes vapor to move easily from the heated pore region. The influence of the particle diameter on the heat transfer performance is larger than that of coolant's degree of subcooling. (author)

  1. Prediction of heat transfer coefficients for forced convective boiling of N2-hydrocarbon mixtures at cryogenic conditions using artificial neural networks

    Barroso-Maldonado, J. M.; Belman-Flores, J. M.; Ledesma, S.; Aceves, S. M.

    2018-06-01

    A key problem faced in the design of heat exchangers, especially for cryogenic applications, is the determination of convective heat transfer coefficients in two-phase flow such as condensation and boiling of non-azeotropic refrigerant mixtures. This paper proposes and evaluates three models for estimating the convective coefficient during boiling. These models are developed using computational intelligence techniques. The performance of the proposed models is evaluated using the mean relative error (mre), and compared to two existing models: the modified Granryd's correlation and the Silver-Bell-Ghaly method. The three proposed models are distinguished by their architecture. The first is based on directly measured parameters (DMP-ANN), the second is based on equivalent Reynolds and Prandtl numbers (eq-ANN), and the third on effective Reynolds and Prandtl numbers (eff-ANN). The results demonstrate that the proposed artificial neural network (ANN)-based approaches greatly outperform available methodologies. While Granryd's correlation predicts experimental data within a mean relative error mre = 44% and the S-B-G method produces mre = 42%, DMP-ANN has mre = 7.4% and eff-ANN has mre = 3.9%. Considering that eff-ANN has the lowest mean relative error (one tenth of previously available methodologies) and the broadest range of applicability, it is recommended for future calculations. Implementation is straightforward within a variety of platforms and the matrices with the ANN weights are given in the appendix for efficient programming.

  2. Force Field Benchmark of the TraPPE_UA for Polar Liquids: Density, Heat of Vaporization, Dielectric Constant, Surface Tension, Volumetric Expansion Coefficient, and Isothermal Compressibility.

    Núñez-Rojas, Edgar; Aguilar-Pineda, Jorge Alberto; Pérez de la Luz, Alexander; de Jesús González, Edith Nadir; Alejandre, José

    2018-02-08

    The transferable potential for a phase equilibria force field in its united-atom version, TraPPE_UA, is evaluated for 41 polar liquids that include alcohols, thiols, ethers, sulfides, aldehydes, ketones, and esters to determine its ability to reproduce experimental properties that were not included in the parametrization procedure. The intermolecular force field parameters for pure components were fit to reproduce experimental boiling temperature, vapor-liquid coexisting densities, and critical point (temperature, density, and pressure) using Monte Carlo simulations in different ensembles. The properties calculated in this work are liquid density, heat of vaporization, dielectric constant, surface tension, volumetric expansion coefficient, and isothermal compressibility. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed in the gas and liquid phases, and also at the liquid-vapor interface. We found that relative error between calculated and experimental data is 1.2% for density, 6% for heat of vaporization, and 6.2% for surface tension, in good agreement with the experimental data. The dielectric constant is systematically underestimated, and the relative error is 37%. Evaluating the performance of the force field to reproduce the volumetric expansion coefficient and isothermal compressibility requires more experimental data.

  3. On Inverse Coefficient Heat-Conduction Problems on Reconstruction of Nonlinear Components of the Thermal-Conductivity Tensor of Anisotropic Bodies

    Formalev, V. F.; Kolesnik, S. A.

    2017-11-01

    The authors are the first to present a closed procedure for numerical solution of inverse coefficient problems of heat conduction in anisotropic materials used as heat-shielding ones in rocket and space equipment. The reconstructed components of the thermal-conductivity tensor depend on temperature (are nonlinear). The procedure includes the formation of experimental data, the implicit gradient-descent method, the economical absolutely stable method of numerical solution of parabolic problems containing mixed derivatives, the parametric identification, construction, and numerical solution of the problem for elements of sensitivity matrices, the development of a quadratic residual functional and regularizing functionals, and also the development of algorithms and software systems. The implicit gradient-descent method permits expanding the quadratic functional in a Taylor series with retention of the linear terms for the increments of the sought functions. This substantially improves the exactness and stability of solution of the inverse problems. Software systems are developed with account taken of the errors in experimental data and disregarding them. On the basis of a priori assumptions of the qualitative behavior of the functional dependences of the components of the thermal-conductivity tensor on temperature, regularizing functionals are constructed by means of which one can reconstruct the components of the thermal-conductivity tensor with an error no higher than the error of the experimental data. Results of the numerical solution of the inverse coefficient problems on reconstruction of nonlinear components of the thermal-conductivity tensor have been obtained and are discussed.

  4. An Approximate Solution for Predicting the Heat Extraction and Preventing Heat Loss from a Closed-Loop Geothermal Reservoir

    Bisheng Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximate solutions are found for a mathematical model developed to predict the heat extraction from a closed-loop geothermal system which consists of two vertical wells (one for injection and the other for production and one horizontal well which connects the two vertical wells. Based on the feature of slow heat conduction in rock formation, the fluid flow in the well is divided into three stages, that is, in the injection, horizontal, and production wells. The output temperature of each stage is regarded as the input of the next stage. The results from the present model are compared with those obtained from numerical simulator TOUGH2 and show first-order agreement with a temperature difference less than 4°C for the case where the fluid circulated for 2.74 years. In the end, a parametric study shows that (1 the injection rate plays dominant role in affecting the output performance, (2 higher injection temperature produces larger output temperature but decreases the total heat extracted given a specific time, (3 the output performance of geothermal reservoir is insensitive to fluid viscosity, and (4 there exists a critical point that indicates if the fluid releases heat into or absorbs heat from the surrounding formation.

  5. SCDAP/RELAP5 modeling of fluid heat transfer and flow losses through porous debris in a light water reactor

    Harvego, E. A.; Siefken, L. J.

    2000-01-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 code is being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory under the primary sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide best-estimate transient simulations of light water reactor coolant systems during severe accidents. This paper describes the modeling approach used in the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to calculate fluid heat transfer and flow losses through porous debris that has accumulated in the vessel lower head and core regions during the latter stages of a severe accident. The implementation of heat transfer and flow loss correlations into the code is discussed, and calculations performed to assess the validity of the modeling approach are described. The different modes of heat transfer in porous debris include: (1) forced convection to liquid, (2) forced convection to gas, (3) nucleate boiling, (4) transition boiling, (5) film boiling, and (6) transition from film boiling to convection to vapor. The correlations for flow losses in porous debris include frictional and form losses. The correlations for flow losses were integrated into the momentum equations in the RELAP5 part of the code. Since RELAP5 is a very general non-homogeneous non-equilibrium thermal-hydraulics code, the resulting modeling methodology is applicable to a wide range of debris thermal-hydraulic conditions. Assessment of the SCDAP/RELAP5 debris bed thermal-hydraulic models included comparisons with experimental measurements and other models available in the open literature. The assessment calculations, described in the paper, showed that SCDAP/RELAP5 is capable of calculating the heat transfer and flow losses occurring in porous debris regions that may develop in a light water reactor during a severe accident

  6. 3D discrete angiogenesis dynamic model and stochastic simulation for the assessment of blood perfusion coefficient and impact on heat transfer between nanoparticles and malignant tumors.

    Yifat, Jonathan; Gannot, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of malignant tumors plays a crucial role in the survivability chances of the patient. Therefore, new and innovative tumor detection methods are constantly searched for. Tumor-specific magnetic-core nano-particles can be used with an alternating magnetic field to detect and treat tumors by hyperthermia. For the analysis of the method effectiveness, the bio-heat transfer between the nanoparticles and the tissue must be carefully studied. Heat diffusion in biological tissue is usually analyzed using the Pennes Bio-Heat Equation, where blood perfusion plays an important role. Malignant tumors are known to initiate an angiogenesis process, where endothelial cell migration from neighboring vasculature eventually leads to the formation of a thick blood capillary network around them. This process allows the tumor to receive its extensive nutrition demands and evolve into a more progressive and potentially fatal tumor. In order to assess the effect of angiogenesis on the bio-heat transfer problem, we have developed a discrete stochastic 3D model & simulation of tumor-induced angiogenesis. The model elaborates other angiogenesis models by providing high resolution 3D stochastic simulation, capturing of fine angiogenesis morphological features, effects of dynamic sprout thickness functions, and stochastic parent vessel generator. We show that the angiogenesis realizations produced are well suited for numerical bio-heat transfer analysis. Statistical study on the angiogenesis characteristics was derived using Monte Carlo simulations. According to the statistical analysis, we provide analytical expression for the blood perfusion coefficient in the Pennes equation, as a function of several parameters. This updated form of the Pennes equation could be used for numerical and analytical analyses of the proposed detection and treatment method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of a heat transfer coefficient for describing the radiative exchange between water vapour and the bounding walls

    Eifler, W.; Shepherd, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    During the ''severe-fuel-damage'' experiments of the SUPER SARA test program radiation heat transfer will play an important part. For the analysis of these experiments it should be modelled therefore in a particularly appropriate manner. Based on the same engineering type principles which are used in the radiation model of the TRAC code version for boiling water reactors a new model has been developed. This model is less computer time consuming than the TRAC model and particularly appropriate for the use in the subchannel - type bundle computer code which is planned to be developed for the analysis of the ''severe-fuel-damage'' experiments. Sample calculations for the ''severe-fuel-damage'' test array show that the difference between the results obtained with the new model and those obtained with the TRAC model is in general not significant

  8. Evaluation of soft x-ray average recombination coefficient and average charge for metallic impurities in beam-heated plasmas

    Sesnic, S.S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Hiroe, S.; Hulse, R.; Shimada, M.; Stratton, B.; von Goeler, S.

    1986-05-01

    The soft x-ray continuum radiation in TFTR low density neutral beam discharges can be much lower than its theoretical value obtained by assuming a corona equilibrium. This reduced continuum radiation is caused by an ionization equilibrium shift toward lower states, which strongly changes the value of the average recombination coefficient of metallic impurities anti γ, even for only slight changes in the average charge, anti Z. The primary agent for this shift is the charge exchange between the highly ionized impurity ions and the neutral hydrogen, rather than impurity transport, because the central density of the neutral hydrogen is strongly enhanced at lower plasma densities with intense beam injection. In the extreme case of low density, high neutral beam power TFTR operation (energetic ion mode) the reduction in anti γ can be as much as one-half to two-thirds. We calculate the parametric dependence of anti γ and anti Z for Ti, Cr, Fe, and Ni impurities on neutral density (equivalent to beam power), electron temperature, and electron density. These values are obtained by using either a one-dimensional impurity transport code (MIST) or a zero-dimensional code with a finite particle confinement time. As an example, we show the variation of anti γ and anti Z in different TFTR discharges

  9. Heat Transfer Modes and their Coefficients for a Passive Containment Cooling System of PWR using a Multi-Pod Heat Pipe

    Nam, Gyeongho; Park, Junseok; Kim, Sangnyung [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    If a reactor core is damaged due to a disaster such as happened at TEPCO's Fukushima nuclear power plant, the inevitable rise of super-heated steam that could potentially convert to hydrogen resulting from unimpeded temperature and pressure rises will threaten the integrity of the containment structure. To prevent this, safety and regulatory standards typically specify that the gas vent and external cooling systems be designed to maintain containment up to the level C limit for 24 hours and integrity for 48 hours after any damage to the core. Furthermore, it is recommended that the installation of the exhaust penetration unit have a minimum diameter of 3ft. However, installation of such cooling measures or penetration units is burdensome in terms of operational and maintenance costs not to mention the need to ensure a fleet of fire trucks to be on standby as well as the need to ensure a plentiful supply of water for cooling and a filtration system to clean the water. Therefore, the development of a reliable passive cooling system will be economically advantageous because the extra cost burdens of the external system can be omitted. The Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) using a multi-pod heat pipe proposed in this study satisfies these conditions.

  10. Analysis on the Role of RSG-GAS Pool Cooling System during Partial Loss of Heat Sink Accident

    Susyadi; Endiah, P. H.; Sukmanto, D.; Andi, S. E.; Syaiful, B.; Hendro, T.; Geni, R. S.

    2018-02-01

    RSG-GAS is a 30 MW reactor that is mostly used for radioisotope production and experimental activities. Recently, it is regularly operated at half of its capacity for efficiency reason. During an accident, especially loss of heat sink, the role of its pool cooling system is very important to dump decay heat. An analysis using single failure approach and partial modeling of RELAP5 performed by S. Dibyo, 2010 shows that there is no significant increase in the coolant temperature if this system is properly functioned. However lessons learned from the Fukushima accident revealed that an accident can happen due to multiple failures. Considering ageing of the reactor, in this research the role of pool cooling system is to be investigated for a partial loss of heat sink accident which is at the same time the protection system fails to scram the reactor when being operated at 15 MW. The purpose is to clarify the transient characteristics and the final state of the coolant temperature. The method used is by simulating the system in RELAP5 code. Calculation results shows the pool cooling systems reduce coolant temperature for about 1 K as compared without activating them. The result alsoreveals that when the reactor is being operated at half of its rated power, it is still in safe condition for a partial loss of heat sink accident without scram.

  11. Prediction of evaporation heat transfer coefficient based on gas-liquid two-phase annular flow regime in horizontal microfin tubes

    Wang Yueshe; Wang Yanling; Wang, G.-X.; Honda, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    A physical model of gas-liquid two-phase annular flow regime is presented for predicting the enhanced evaporation heat transfer characteristics in horizontal microfin tubes. The model is based on the equivalence of a periodical distortion of the disturbance wave in the substrate layer. Corresponding to the stratified flow model proposed previously by authors, the dimensionless quantity Fr 0 = G/[gd e ρ v (ρ l - ρ v )] 0.5 may be used as a measure for determining the applicability of the present theoretical model, which was used to restrict the transition boundary between the stratified-wavy flow and the annular/intermittent flows. Comparison of the prediction of the circumferential average heat transfer coefficient with available experimental data for four tubes and three refrigerants reveals that a good agreement is obtained or the trend is better than that of the previously developed stratified flow model for Fr 0 > 4.0 as long as the partial dry out of tube does not occur. Obviously, the developed annular model is applicable and reliable for evaporation in horizontal microfin tubes under the case of high heat flux and high mass flux.

  12. Flow condensation heat transfer coefficients of R22, R134a, R407C, and R410A inside plain and microfin tubes

    Jung, Dongsoo; Cho, Youngmok; Park, Kiho [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-01-01

    Flow condensation heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) of R22, R134a, R407C, and R410A inside horizontal plain and microfin tubes of 9.52 mm outside diameter and 1 m length were measured at the condensation temperature of 40{sup o}C with mass fluxes of 100, 200, and 300 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and a heat flux of 7.7-7.9 kW m{sup -2}. For a plain tube, HTCs of R134a and R410A were similar to those of R22 while HTCs of R407C are 11-15% lower than those of R22. For a microfin tube, HTCs of R134a were similar to those of R22 while HTCs of R407C and R410A were 23-53% and 10-21% lower than those of R22. For a plain tube, our correlation agreed well with the present data for all refrigerants exhibiting a mean deviation of 11.6%. Finally, HTCs of a microfin tube were 2-3 times higher than those of a plain tube and the heat transfer enhancement factor decreased as the mass flux increased for all refrigerants tested. (Author)

  13. Prediction of evaporation heat transfer coefficient based on gas-liquid two-phase annular flow regime in horizontal microfin tubes

    Wang Yueshe, E-mail: wangys@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Yanling, Wang [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, G -X [Mechanical Engineering Department, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3903 (United States); Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, 337 Kasuya-machi, Kasuya-gun, Kukuoka 811-2307 (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    A physical model of gas-liquid two-phase annular flow regime is presented for predicting the enhanced evaporation heat transfer characteristics in horizontal microfin tubes. The model is based on the equivalence of a periodical distortion of the disturbance wave in the substrate layer. Corresponding to the stratified flow model proposed previously by authors, the dimensionless quantity Fr{sub 0} = G/[gd{sub e}{rho}{sub v}({rho}{sub l} - {rho}{sub v})]{sup 0.5} may be used as a measure for determining the applicability of the present theoretical model, which was used to restrict the transition boundary between the stratified-wavy flow and the annular/intermittent flows. Comparison of the prediction of the circumferential average heat transfer coefficient with available experimental data for four tubes and three refrigerants reveals that a good agreement is obtained or the trend is better than that of the previously developed stratified flow model for Fr{sub 0} > 4.0 as long as the partial dry out of tube does not occur. Obviously, the developed annular model is applicable and reliable for evaporation in horizontal microfin tubes under the case of high heat flux and high mass flux.

  14. Psychophysical and cerebral responses to heat stimulation in patients with central pain, painless central sensory loss, and in healthy persons.

    Casey, Kenneth L; Geisser, Michael; Lorenz, Jürgen; Morrow, Thomas J; Paulson, Pamela; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2012-02-01

    Patients with central pain (CP) typically have chronic pain within an area of reduced pain and temperature sensation, suggesting an impairment of endogenous pain modulation mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that some brain structures normally activated by cutaneous heat stimulation would be hyperresponsive among patients with CP but not among patients with a central nervous system lesion causing a loss of heat or nociceptive sensation with no pain (NP). We used H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography to measure, in 15 healthy control participants, 10 NP patients, and 10 CP patients, increases in regional cerebral blood flow among volumes of interest (VOI) from the resting (no stimulus) condition during bilateral contact heat stimulation at heat detection, heat pain threshold, and heat pain tolerance levels. Both patient groups had a reduced perception of heat intensity and unpleasantness on the clinically affected side and a bilateral impairment of heat detection. Compared with the HC group, both NP and CP patients had more hyperactive and hypoactive VOI in the resting state and more hyperresponsive and hyporesponsive VOI during heat stimulation. Compared with NP patients, CP patients had more hyperresponsive VOI in the intralaminar thalamus and sensory-motor cortex during heat stimulation. Our results show that focal CNS lesions produce bilateral sensory deficits and widespread changes in the nociceptive excitability of the brain. The increased nociceptive excitability within the intralaminar thalamus and sensory-motor cortex of our sample of CP patients suggests an underlying pathophysiology for the pain in some central pain syndromes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. All fiber cladding mode stripper with uniform heat distribution and high cladding light loss manufactured by CO2 laser ablation

    Jebali, M. A.; Basso, E. T.

    2018-02-01

    Cladding mode strippers are primarily used at the end of a fiber laser cavity to remove high-power excess cladding light without inducing core loss and beam quality degradation. Conventional manufacturing methods of cladding mode strippers include acid etching, abrasive blasting or laser ablation. Manufacturing of cladding mode strippers using laser ablation consist of removing parts of the cladding by fused silica ablation with a controlled penetration and shape. We present and characterize an optimized cladding mode stripper design that increases the cladding light loss with a minimal device length and manufacturing time. This design reduces the localized heat generation by improving the heat distribution along the device. We demonstrate a cladding mode stripper written on a 400um fiber with cladding light loss of 20dB, with less than 0.02dB loss in the core and minimal heating of the fiber and coating. The manufacturing process of the designed component is fully automated and takes less than 3 minutes with a very high throughput yield.

  16. A Strain-Based Method to Detect Tires’ Loss of Grip and Estimate Lateral Friction Coefficient from Experimental Data by Fuzzy Logic for Intelligent Tire Development

    Jorge Yunta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tires are a key sub-system of vehicles that have a big responsibility for comfort, fuel consumption and traffic safety. However, current tires are just passive rubber elements which do not contribute actively to improve the driving experience or vehicle safety. The lack of information from the tire during driving gives cause for developing an intelligent tire. Therefore, the aim of the intelligent tire is to monitor tire working conditions in real-time, providing useful information to other systems and becoming an active system. In this paper, tire tread deformation is measured to provide a strong experimental base with different experiments and test results by means of a tire fitted with sensors. Tests under different working conditions such as vertical load or slip angle have been carried out with an indoor tire test rig. The experimental data analysis shows the strong relation that exists between lateral force and the maximum tensile and compressive strain peaks when the tire is not working at the limit of grip. In the last section, an estimation system from experimental data has been developed and implemented in Simulink to show the potential of strain sensors for developing intelligent tire systems, obtaining as major results a signal to detect tire’s loss of grip and estimations of the lateral friction coefficient.

  17. A Strain-Based Method to Detect Tires' Loss of Grip and Estimate Lateral Friction Coefficient from Experimental Data by Fuzzy Logic for Intelligent Tire Development.

    Yunta, Jorge; Garcia-Pozuelo, Daniel; Diaz, Vicente; Olatunbosun, Oluremi

    2018-02-06

    Tires are a key sub-system of vehicles that have a big responsibility for comfort, fuel consumption and traffic safety. However, current tires are just passive rubber elements which do not contribute actively to improve the driving experience or vehicle safety. The lack of information from the tire during driving gives cause for developing an intelligent tire. Therefore, the aim of the intelligent tire is to monitor tire working conditions in real-time, providing useful information to other systems and becoming an active system. In this paper, tire tread deformation is measured to provide a strong experimental base with different experiments and test results by means of a tire fitted with sensors. Tests under different working conditions such as vertical load or slip angle have been carried out with an indoor tire test rig. The experimental data analysis shows the strong relation that exists between lateral force and the maximum tensile and compressive strain peaks when the tire is not working at the limit of grip. In the last section, an estimation system from experimental data has been developed and implemented in Simulink to show the potential of strain sensors for developing intelligent tire systems, obtaining as major results a signal to detect tire's loss of grip and estimations of the lateral friction coefficient.

  18. Effects of synthetic oil in a compression refrigeration system using R410A. Part II: quality of heat transfer and pressure losses within the heat exchangers

    Lottin, O.; Guillemet, P. [Ecole Polytechnique de l' Universite de Nantes (France). Laboratoire de Thermocinetique; Lebreton, J-M. [Electricite de France, Moret sur Loing (France)

    2003-11-01

    The consequences of the oil rejected by the compressor of a vapour-compression refrigeration system on the operation of the evaporator and condenser are analysed. The modelled prototype uses the mixture of HFC R410A and a synthetic polyolester (POE) oil. The rise of the amount of lubricant circulating in the system leads to a progressive change in the behaviour of the mixture of refrigerant and oil that, for the higher oil mass fraction, evolves like a zeotropic mixture. One also observes that the presence of lubricant is generally associated with a fall of the performances of the heat exchangers, except however in the evaporator where an optimum is observed when the quantity of oil is equal to 0.1% of the total mass of the mixture. Some conclusions are drawn about the choice of correlations for the calculation of the refrigerant side heat transfer coefficient in a plate evaporator. (author)

  19. A study on emergency response guideline during the loss of steam generator secondary heat sink in pressurizer water reactor

    Yoon, D. J.; Lee, J. Y.; Song, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    A loss of secondary heat sink can occur as a result of several different initiating events, which are a loss of main feedwater during power operation, a loss of off-site power, or any other scenario for which main feedwater is isolated or lost. At this point the opening and closing of the PORV or safety valves will result in a loss of RCS inventory similar in nature to a small break loss of coolant accident. If operator action is not taken, the pressurizer PORV or safety valves will continue to cycle open and closed at the valve setpoint pressure removing RCS inventory and a limited amount of core decay heat until eventually enough inventory will be lost to result in core uncovery. We conclude that a requirement to successfully initiate bleed and feed on steam generator dryout, without any significant core uncovery expected to occur, is that the PORV flow to power ratio must exceed 140 (lbm/hr)/Mwt. For all plants whose PORV capacity is less than 140 (lbm/hr)/Mwt, since symptoms of SG dryout cannot be used to initiate bleed and feed, increasing RCS pressure and temperature or pressure greater than 2335 psig cannot be used. The only alternative symptom available is SG narrow range level. Since Kori 1,2,3 and 4' PORV capacity is more than the criteria, the bleed and feed operation can be initiated at steam generator dryout

  20. Local heat transfer coefficients during boiling of R22 and R407C in horizontal smooth and microfin tubes; Coefficients d'echange locaux au cours de l'ebullition du R22 et du R407C dans des tubes horizontaux, lisse ou micro-ailete

    Lallemand, M; Branescu, C; Haberschill, P [Centre de Thermique, INSA-CNRS, UMR 5008, Villeurbanne (France)

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to experimentally investigate forced convective boiling. The heat transfer coefficients of pure refrigerant R22 and non azeotropic refrigerant mixture R407C were measured in both a smooth tube and a microfin tube. The tests have been carried out with a uniform heat flux all along the tube length. The refrigerant mass flux was varied from 100 to 300 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and heat fluxes from 10 to 30 kW m{sup -2}. Local heat transfer coefficient depend strongly on heat flux at a low quality and on mass fluxes at a high quality. When compared to smooth tube, the microfin tubes exhibit a significant heat transfer enhancement, up to 180%. In comparison to R22, the R407C heat transfer coefficients of smooth and microfin tubes are 15 to 35% lower, respectively. The best heat transfer enhancement is obtained at low heat flux and mass flow rate. (Author)

  1. Time-accurate CFD conjugate analysis of transient measurements of the heat-transfer coefficient in a channel with pin fins

    Tom I-P. Shih

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat-transfer coefficients (HTC on surfaces exposed to convection environments are often measured by transient techniques such as thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC or infrared thermography. In these techniques, the surface temperature is measured as a function of time, and that measurement is used with the exact solution for unsteady, zero-dimensional (0-D or one-dimensional (1-D heat conduction into a solid to calculate the local HTC. When using the 0-D or 1-D exact solutions, the transient techniques assume the HTC and the free-stream or bulk temperature characterizing the convection environment to be constants in addition to assuming the conduction into the solid to be 0-D or 1-D. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD conjugate analyses were performed to examine the errors that might be invoked by these assumptions for a problem, where the free-stream/bulk temperature and the heat-transfer coefficient vary appreciably along the surface and where conduction into the solid may not be 0-D or 1-D. The problem selected to assess these errors is flow and heat transfer in a channel lined with a staggered array of pin fins. This conjugate study uses three-dimensional (3-D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS closed by the shear-stress transport (SST turbulence model for the gas phase (wall functions not used and the Fourier law for the solid phase. The errors in the transient techniques are assessed by comparing the HTC predicted by the time-accurate conjugate CFD with those predicted by the 0-D and 1-D exact solutions, where the surface temperatures needed by the exact solutions are taken from the time-accurate conjugate CFD solution. Results obtained show that the use of the 1-D exact solution for the semi-infinite wall to give reasonably accurate “transient” HTC (less than 5% relative error. Transient techniques that use the 0-D exact solution for the pin fins were found to produce large errors (up to 160% relative error

  2. XML Survey of the productivity loss due to heat stress in different tasks of farmers in Darreh Shahr city

    M. R. Monazzam Esmaielpou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heat is one of the hazardous physical agents in the workplace. Exposure to heat and consequent thermal stress influence workers productivity in addition to adverse health effects. The aim of this study was to determine the heat stress induced productivity loss related to different tasks of farmers in Darreh Shahr city, during summer. Material and Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in summer, 2014, among farmers in Darreh Shahr city. After determining the sample size, farmers’ activities were determined using hierarchical task analysis (HTA, and WBGT measurements were done according to the ISO7243. Metabolism was estimated by the ISO8996. Following, the type of activities were identified according their required metabolism. Knowing WBGT and workload and using the work capacity model, the productivity loss in different tasks and ultimately total productivity loss were calculated. Result: The mean WBGT activities for plowing, terracing, planting seeds, watering, fertilizing, weeding, spraying, and harvesting were 29.98 °C, 31.28 °C,30.66 °C,31.39 °C,31.99 °C,31.75 °C,31.08 °C, and 30.3 °C, respectively. WBGT values were higher than the permissible level provided by ISO7243 in all farming activities. Maximum value of WBGT was belonged to fertilizing activity (31.99 °C and the lowest value was for plowing (29.98 °C. ANOVA test results did not show a significant difference in WBGT at head, waist, and ankle height. The highest and lowest amount of productivity loss was estimated respectively for weeding and plowing activities. The total productivity loss for farming was calculated 69.3 percent in an hour which is due to high physical activity, working outdoor, with exposure to direct solar radiation, and consequent heat stress imposed to workers. Conclusion: Productivity is a factor which is affected by the workplace heat stress. According to results of the present research, the amount of productivity is reduced

  3. Survey of the productivity loss due to heat stress in different tasks of farmers in Darreh Shahr city

    M. R. Monazzam Esmaielpour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heat is one of the hazardous physical agents in the workplace. Exposure to heat and consequent thermal stress influence workers productivity in addition to adverse health effects. The aim of this study was to determine the heat stress induced productivity loss related to different tasks of farmers in Darreh Shahr city, during summer. . Material and Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in summer, 2014, among farmers in Darreh Shahr city. After determining the sample size, farmers’ activities were determined using hierarchical task analysis (HTA, and WBGT measurements were done according to the ISO7243. Metabolism was estimated by the ISO8996. Following, the type of activities were identified according their required metabolism. Knowing WBGT and workload and using the work capacity model, the productivity loss in different tasks and ultimately total productivity loss were calculated. .Result: The mean WBGT activities for plowing, terracing, planting seeds, watering, fertilizing, weeding, spraying, and harvesting were 29.98 °C, 31.28 °C,30.66 °C,31.39 °C,31.99 °C,31.75 °C,31.08 °C, and 30.3 °C, respectively. WBGT values were higher than the permissible level provided by ISO7243 in all farming activities. Maximum value of WBGT was belonged to fertilizing activity (31.99 °C and the lowest value was for plowing (29.98 °C. ANOVA test results did not show a significant difference in WBGT at head, waist, and ankle height. The highest and lowest amount of productivity loss was estimated respectively for weeding and plowing activities. The total productivity loss for farming was calculated 69.3 percent in an hour which is due to high physical activity, working outdoor, with exposure to direct solar radiation, and consequent heat stress imposed to workers. .Conclusion: Productivity is a factor which is affected by the workplace heat stress. According to results of the present research, the amount of productivity is

  4. Method to allow the estimation of heat transfer coefficients in solar stills; Metodo para determinar coeficientes locales de transferencia de calor en destiladores solares

    Rubio Cerda, Eduardo; Porta Gandara, Miguel A [CIBNOR, Mexico D.F (Mexico); Fernandez Zayas, Jose Luis [UNAM Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    This work reports an experimental method that allows to estimate the heat transfer coefficients in the neighborhood of walls or flat plates subject to convective transport phenomena. This method can be applied to a great variety of thermal systems since it is based on the knowledge of the border condition for the temperature at the surface of the plate, and the temperature profile that characterize the dimensionless coefficient of heat transfer in the fluid, according to its definition given by the Nusselt number. The approach of this work are the foundations of the method and the system that has been developed to apply it, that incorporates automatic acquisition equipment for continuos monitoring of the information and elements to control the parameters of interest. In addition, the experimental cavities on which the method will be evaluated are discussed, considering two different scales, as well as experiments in cavities filled with air, and with a mixture of air and steam water, as is the case for solar distillation. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presenta un metodo que permite determinar de manera experimental coeficientes de transferencia de calor por conveccion. Este metodo puede ser aplicado a una gran variedad de sistemas termicos ya que se fundamenta en el conocimiento de la condicion de frontera para la temperatura en la superficie de la placa, y del perfil de temperaturas que caracteriza el coeficiente adimensional de transferencia de calor en el fluido, de acuerdo a la definicion de este, dada por el numero de Nusselt. El trabajo que aqui se reporta esta enfocado a la fundamentacion del metodo y al equipamiento que se ha desarrollado para instrumentarlo, que incorpora equipos automaticos de adquisicion continua de informacion y elementos de control para los parametros de interes. Se presentan ademas, las cavidades experimentales sobre las que sera evaluado el metodo, que considera dos escalas diferentes, asi como experimentos en cavidades llenas de aire

  5. An effect of heat insulation parameters on thermal losses of water-cooled roofs for secondary steelmaking electric arc furnaces

    E. Mihailov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is research in the insulation parameters effect on the thermal losses of watercooled roofs for secondary steelmaking electric arc furnaces. An analytical method has been used for the investigation in heat transfer conditions in the working area. The results of the research can be used to choose optimal cooling parameters and select a suitable kind of insulation for water-cooled surfaces.

  6. Infrared thermography applied to the evaluation of metabolic heat loss of chicks fed with different energy densities

    VMOS Ferreira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Brazil must comply with international quality standards and animal welfare requirements in order to maintain its position as world's largest exporter of poultry meat. With the scenario of global climate change there is the forecast of occurrence of extreme events with characteristics of both excess cold and heat for several regions of the country. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using images of infrared thermography to evaluate the loss of sensible heat in young broilers fed different dietary energy levels. Twenty birds were reared in a house with appropriate brooding using infrared lamps. Birds were distributed in a completely randomized experimental into two treatments: T1 (control diet with 2950 kcal ME/kg-1, and T2 (high-energy diet with 3950 kcal ME/kg-1. Infrared thermographic images of the birds were recorded for four consecutive days. One bird was randomly chosen per treatment, and had special images taken and analyzed. Average surface temperature of the body area was calculated using the surface temperature recorded at 100 spots (50 at the front and 50 at the lateral side of the bird's body. Mean surface temperature of the flock was calculated recording 100 spots on the group of birds. Total radiant heat loss was calculated based on the average data of surface temperature. The results indicated that the young broilers fed the high-energy diet presented a metabolic energy loss equivalent to 0.64 kcal h-1, while the birds fed with the control diet lost 2.18 kcal h-1. This finding confirms that oil supplementation to the diet reduces bird heat loss. The infrared camera was able to record young broilers' surface temperature variation when birds were fed diets with different energy contents.

  7. Disorder effect on heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient, and choosing best potential model for melting temperature, in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster with 55 atoms

    Taherkhani, Farid; Akbarzadeh, Hamed; Feyzi, Mostafa; Rafiee, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been implemented for doping effect on melting temperature, heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient of gold–copper bimetallic nanostructure with 55 total gold and copper atom numbers and its bulk alloy. Trend of melting temperature for gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster is not same as melting temperature copper–gold bulk alloy. Molecular dynamics simulation of our result regarding bulk melting temperature is consistence with available experimental data. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that melting temperature of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster increases with copper atom fraction. Semi-empirical potential model and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models do not change melting temperature trend with copper doping of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Self-diffusion coefficient of copper atom is greater than gold atom in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Semi-empirical potential within the tight-binding second moment approximation as new application potential model for melting temperature of gold–copper bulk structure shows better result in comparison with EAM, Sutton–Chen potential, and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models

  8. Disorder effect on heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient, and choosing best potential model for melting temperature, in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster with 55 atoms

    Taherkhani, Farid, E-mail: faridtaherkhani@gmail.com, E-mail: f.taherkhani@razi.ac.ir [Razi University, Department of Physical Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbarzadeh, Hamed [Hakim Sabzevari University, Department of Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Feyzi, Mostafa; Rafiee, Hamid Reza [Razi University, Department of Physical Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been implemented for doping effect on melting temperature, heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient of gold–copper bimetallic nanostructure with 55 total gold and copper atom numbers and its bulk alloy. Trend of melting temperature for gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster is not same as melting temperature copper–gold bulk alloy. Molecular dynamics simulation of our result regarding bulk melting temperature is consistence with available experimental data. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that melting temperature of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster increases with copper atom fraction. Semi-empirical potential model and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models do not change melting temperature trend with copper doping of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Self-diffusion coefficient of copper atom is greater than gold atom in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Semi-empirical potential within the tight-binding second moment approximation as new application potential model for melting temperature of gold–copper bulk structure shows better result in comparison with EAM, Sutton–Chen potential, and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models.

  9. Ongoing hydrothermal heat loss from the 1912 ash-flow sheet, Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska

    Hogeweg, N.; Keith, T.E.C.; Colvard, E.M.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    The June 1912 eruption of Novarupta filled nearby glacial valleys on the Alaska Peninsula with ash-flow tuff (ignimbrite), and post-eruption observations of thousands of steaming fumaroles led to the name 'Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes' (VTTS). By the late 1980s most fumarolic activity had ceased, but the discovery of thermal springs in mid-valley in 1987 suggested continued cooling of the ash-flow sheet. Data collected at the mid-valley springs between 1987 and 2001 show a statistically significant correlation between maximum observed chloride (Cl) concentration and temperature. These data also show a statistically significant decline in the maximum Cl concentration. The observed variation in stream chemistry across the sheet strongly implies that most solutes, including Cl, originate within the area of the VTTS occupied by the 1912 deposits. Numerous measurements of Cl flux in the Ukak River just below the ash-flow sheet suggest an ongoing heat loss of ???250 MW. This represents one of the largest hydrothermal heat discharges in North America. Other hydrothermal discharges of comparable magnitude are related to heat obtained from silicic magma bodies at depth, and are quasi-steady on a multidecadal time scale. However, the VTTS hydrothermal flux is not obviously related to a magma body and is clearly declining. Available data provide reasonable boundary and initial conditions for simple transient modeling. Both an analytical, conduction-only model and a numerical model predict large rates of heat loss from the sheet 90 years after deposition.

  10. NLP modeling for the optimization of LiBr-H2O absorption refrigeration systems with exergy loss rate, heat transfer area, and cost as single objective functions

    Mussati, Sergio F.; Gernaey, Krist; Morosuk, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    exergy loss rate, the total heat transfer area, and the total annual cost of the system. It was found that the optimal solution obtained by minimization of the total exergy loss rate provides “theoretical” upper bounds not only for the total heat transfer area of the system but also for each process unit...... and all stream temperatures, while the optimal solution obtained by minimization of the total heat transfer area provides the lower bounds for these model variables, to solve a cost optimization problem. The minimization of the total exergy loss rate by varying parametrically the available total heat...... transfer area between these bounds was also performed, allowing to see how the optimal distribution of the available total heat transfer area among the system components, as well as the operating conditions (stream temperature, pressure, composition, and mass flow rate) and heat loads, vary qualitatively...

  11. Measurement of cooling coil film heat transfer coefficient with polymer reaction proceeding in a stirred batch reactor; Jugo sonai ni okeru hanno shinko ni tomonau reikyaku coil no kyomaku netsudentatsu keisu no keiji henka

    Yamamoto, K [Soken Chemical and Engineering Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan); Nishi, K; Kaminoyama, M; Kamiwano, M [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-09-10

    In radical additional solution polymerization, the viscosity increases with reaction progress. It is important to evaluate beforehand the cooling capacity of the reactor, which worsens with the process. In this study, a stirred batch reactor with both a paddle and a helical screw impeller were studied, and measurements were made for the dynamic changes of the film heat transfer coefficient of the cooling coil with progress of the polymer reaction. We found the change could be evaluated by the calculating heat balance of the generated heat, the viscous dissipation energy and the sensible heat change under conditions of monomer conversion and changing viscosity. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Heat waves imposed during early pod development in soybean (Glycine max) cause significant yield loss despite a rapid recovery from oxidative stress.

    Siebers, Matthew H; Yendrek, Craig R; Drag, David; Locke, Anna M; Rios Acosta, Lorena; Leakey, Andrew D B; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2015-08-01

    Heat waves already have a large impact on crops and are predicted to become more intense and more frequent in the future. In this study, heat waves were imposed on soybean using infrared heating technology in a fully open-air field experiment. Five separate heat waves were applied to field-grown soybean (Glycine max) in central Illinois, three in 2010 and two in 2011. Thirty years of historical weather data from Illinois were analyzed to determine the length and intensity of a regionally realistic heat wave resulting in experimental heat wave treatments during which day and night canopy temperatures were elevated 6 °C above ambient for 3 days. Heat waves were applied during early or late reproductive stages to determine whether and when heat waves had an impact on carbon metabolism and seed yield. By the third day of each heat wave, net photosynthesis (A), specific leaf weight (SLW), and leaf total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration (TNC) were decreased, while leaf oxidative stress was increased. However, A, SLW, TNC, and measures of oxidative stress were no different than the control ca. 12 h after the heat waves ended, indicating rapid physiological recovery from the high-temperature stress. That end of season seed yield was reduced (~10%) only when heat waves were applied during early pod developmental stages indicates the yield loss had more to do with direct impacts of the heat waves on reproductive process than on photosynthesis. Soybean was unable to mitigate yield loss after heat waves given during late reproductive stages. This study shows that short high-temperature stress events that reduce photosynthesis and increase oxidative stress resulted in significant losses to soybean production in the Midwest, U.S. The study also suggests that to mitigate heat wave-induced yield loss, soybean needs improved reproductive and photosynthetic tolerance to high but increasingly common temperatures. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is

  13. Heat production, respiratory quotient, and methane loss subsequent to LPS challenge in beef heifers

    Respiration calorimetry was used to measure energy utilization during an acute phase response (APR) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Eight Angus heifers (208 +/- 29.2 kg) were randomly assigned to one of two calorimeters in four 2-day periods for measurement of heat production (HP), methane (CH4), and r...

  14. Effect of Stabilization Heat Treatment on Time-Dependent Polarization Losses in Sintered Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets

    Tuominen S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some companies in the motor and generator industry utilizing sintered NdFeB magnets have adopted pre-ageing heat treatment in order to improve the stability of the magnets. The parameters of this stabilization heat treatment are based mainly on assumptions rather than on any published research results. In this work, the effects of pre-ageing treatment on the time-dependent polarization losses of two different types of commercial sintered NdFeB magnets were studied. The material showing the squarer J(H curve did not benefit from the pre-ageing treatment, since it seems to be stable under a certain critical temperature. In contrast, a stabilizing effect was observed in the material showing rounder J(H curve. After the stabilization heat treatment, the polarization of the magnets was found to be at lower level, but unchanged over a certain period of time. The length of this period depends on the temperature and the duration of the pre-ageing treatment. In addition, our analysis reveals that the stabilization heat treatment performed in an open circuit condition does not stabilize the magnet uniformly.

  15. Fast pyrobolometers for measurements of plasma heat fluxes and radiation losses in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    Fiksel, G.; Frank, J.; Holly, D.

    1993-01-01

    Two types of fast bolometers are described for the plasma energy transport study in the Madison Symmetric Torus plasma confinement device. Both types use pyrocrystals of LiTaO 3 or LiNbO 3 as the sensors. One type is used for measurements of the radiated heat losses and is situated at the vacuum shell inner surface. Another type is insertable in the plasma and measures the plasma particle heat flux. The frequency response of the bolometers is measured to be in the 150--200 kHz range. The range of the measured power fluxes is 0.1 W/cm 2 10 kW/cm 2 and can be adjusted by changing the size of the entrance aperture. The lower limit is determined by the amplifier noise and the frequency bandwidth, the higher limit by destruction of the bolometer sensor

  16. NO formation in the burnout region of a partially premixed methane-air flame with upstream heat loss

    Mokhov, A.V.; Levinsky, H.B.

    1999-09-01

    Measurements of temperature and NO concentration in laminar, partially premixed methane-air flames stabilized on a ceramic burner in coflow are reported. The NO concentration and temperature were determined by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), respectively. Upstream heat loss to the burner was varied by changing the exit velocity of the fuel-air mixture at a constant equivalence ratio of 1,3; this alters the structure of the flame from an axisymmetric Bunsen-type to a strongly stabilized flat flame. To facilitate analysis of the results, a method is derived for separating the effects of dilution from those of chemical reaction based on the relation between the measured temperature and the local mixture fraction, including the effects of upstream heat loss. Using this method, the amount of NO formed during burnout of the hot, fuel-rich combustion products can be ascertained. In the Bunsen-type flame, it is seen that {approximately}40 ppm of NO are produced in this burnout region, at temperatures between {approximately}2,100 K and {approximately}1,900 K, probably via the Zeldovich mechanism. Reducing the exit velocity of 12 cm/s reduces the flame temperature substantially, and effectively eliminates this contribution. At velocities of 12 and 8 cm/s, {approximately}10 ppm of NO are formed in the burnout region, even though the gas temperatures are too low for Zeldovich NO to be significant. Although the mechanism responsible for these observations is as yet unclear, the results are consistent with the idea that the low temperatures in the fuel-rich gases caused by upstream heat loss retard the conversion of HCN (formed via the Fenimore mechanism) to NO, with this residual HCN then being converted to NO during burnout.

  17. THERMAL POWER LOSS COMPENSATION IN THE PRODUCTION OF COOKED AND DRIED GRAINS WITH HEAT PUMPS USING

    S. A. Shevtsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using scientificand practical experience and analysis of recent innovative activity on modernization of food concentrates production, a new variant of the energy-efficient processing of cereal crops using superheated steam and direct involvement in the cooking and drying process waste energy using the vapor compression heat pump was suggested. A method for production of cereal concentrates, which is realized using microprocessor control of technological parameters. According to the information on the processes of cereals washing, cooking, drying and cooling microprocessor provides regime parameters control under the restrictions due to both yield of cooked and dried cereal of high quality and economic feasibility. At the same time the amount of moisture is continuously determined in the recirculation loop formed by the evaporation from the cereals in the drying process. To implement the proposed method of cooked and dried cereals production it is offered to use refrigerationand compressor unit operating in a heat pump mode. The refrigerant to be used is khladon 12V1 CF2ClBr with a boiling point in the evaporator of 4°C and the condensing temperature of 153.7 °C. The use of the heat pump in the heat supply system of cooked and dried cereals production instead of electric heaters will reduce power costs by 1.72 times. The proposed method for the production and control of technological parameters in the field of the product acceptable technological properties will provide high quality cooked and dried cereals; an increase in thermal efficiency by making full use of the waste heat of superheated steam; the reduction of specific energy consumption by 25-30 %; the creation of waste-free and environmentally friendly technologies for cereal production.

  18. Estimation of radiation losses from sheathed thermocouples

    Roberts, I.L.; Coney, J.E.R.; Gibbs, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermocouples are often used for temperature measurements in heat exchangers. However if the radiation losses from a thermocouple in a high temperature gas flow to colder surroundings are ignored significant errors can occur. Even at moderate temperature differences, these can be significant. Prediction of radiation losses from theory can be problematic, especially in situations where there are large variations in the measured temperatures as the emissivity and radiative heat transfer coefficient of the thermocouple are not constant. The following approach combines experimental results with established empirical relationships to estimate losses due to radiation in an annular heat exchanger at temperatures up to 950 o C. - Highlights: → Sheathed thermocouples are often used to measure temperatures in heat exchangers. → Errors are introduced if radiation losses are ignored. → Radiation losses are environment specific and may be significant. → Experimental and theoretical methods are used to estimate losses. → Hot side maximum temperature 950 o C.

  19. Radiation loss and global energy balance of ohmically heated divertor discharge in JT-60 tokamak

    Koide, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Kimio; Yoshida, Hidetoshi; Nakamura, Hiroo; Niikura, Setsuo; Tsuji, Shunji

    1986-03-01

    Divertor experiment in JT-60 with a small divertor chamber has been successfully performed up to 1.6 MA discharge. Several divertor effects were experimentally confirmed as follows. Radiation loss in main plasma saturates with the increase of plasma current and its ratio to the input power is about 20 % at 1.5 MA. The rest of input power is exhausted into the divertor chamber and a half of it is dissipated as the radiation loss. Impurity accumulation is not observed during a few sec without internal MHD activity and gross impurity confinement time is several hundred msec. (author)

  20. Evaluation of a loss of residual heat removal event during mid-loop operation

    Seul, Kwang Won; Bang, Young Seok; Lee, Sukho; Kim, Hho Jung

    1996-01-01

    The potential for the RELAP5/MOD3.2 was assessed for the loss-of -RHR event during the mid-loop operation and the predictability of major thermal-hydraulic phenomena was also evaluated for the long term transient. The analysis results of the typical two cases(cold leg opening case and pressurizer opening case) were compared with experimental data which was conducted at ROSA-IV/LSTF in Japan. As a result, it was shown that the code was capable of simulating the thermal-hydraulic transport process with appropriate time step during the reduced inventory operation with the loss-of-RHR system