WorldWideScience

Sample records for heat island phenomenon

  1. The Urban Heat Island Phenomenon: How Its Effects Can Influence Environmental Decision Making in Your Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale; Stasiak, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Reinvestment in urban centers is breathing new life into neighborhoods that have been languishing as a result of explosive suburban development over the past several decades. In cities all over the country, adaptive reuse, brownfields redevelopment, transforming urban landscapes, economies, and quality of life. However, the way in which this development occurs has the potential to exacerbate the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon, an existing problem in many areas and one which poses a threat to the long-term sustainability and environmental quality of cities. The UHI phenomenon is rooted in the science of how the land covers respond to solar heating and can adversely effect the environment. This phenomenon is responsible for urban centers having higher air temperatures and poorer air quality than suburban areas. In addition, the UHI phenomenon causes metrological occurrences, degrades water quality, increases energy demands, poses threats to public health and contributes to global warming. While the name of the phenomenon implies that is solely an urban issue, research has shown that the effects of the UHI are becoming prevalent in suburbs, as well. The UHI phenomenon can plague regions - urban centers and their suburbs. Furthermore, heat islands have been found to exist in both city centers and suburban communities. As suburban areas increasingly develop using land covers and building materials common to urban areas, they are inheriting urban problems - such as heat islands. In this way, it may be necessary for non-urban communities to engage in heat island mitigation. The good news is that through education and planning, the effects of the UHI phenomenon can be prevented and mitigated. Heat islands are more a product of urban design rather than the density of development. Therefore, cities can continue to grow and develop without exacerbating the UHI by employing sustainable development strategies.

  2. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  3. Spatial Analysis of Post-Hurricane Katrina Thermal Pattern and Intensity in Greater New Orleans: Implications for Urban Heat Island Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lief, Aram Parrish

    In 2005, Hurricane Katrina's diverse impacts on the Greater New Orleans area included damaged and destroyed trees, and other despoiled vegetation, which also increased the exposure of artificial and bare surfaces, known factors that contribute to the climatic phenomenon known as the urban heat island (UHI). This is an investigation of UHI in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, which entails the analysis of pre and post-hurricane Katrina thermal imagery of the study area, including changes to surface heat patterns and vegetative cover. Imagery from Landsat TM was used to show changes to the pattern and intensity of the UHI effect, caused by an extreme weather event. Using remote sensing visualization methods, in situ data, and local knowledge, the author found there was a measurable change in the pattern and intensity of the New Orleans UHI effect, as well as concomitant changes to vegetative land cover. This finding may be relevant for urban planners and citizens, especially in the context of recovery from a large-scale disaster of a coastal city, regarding future weather events, and other natural and human impacts.

  4. URBAN HEAT ISLAND AEROSPACE STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Grishchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  Modern cities are characterized by special urban landscape and special urban climate. Urban heat island is a phenomenon closely associated with urban territories. There are many methods developed for studying urban heat island, they can be combined into two groups: imagery-based methods and physicomathematical methods. Using spatial imagery can provide revealing thermal anomalies evolution in time and space, spatial distribution of various thermal anomalies, differences in quantitative measures of various thermal anomalies. Despite the fact that imagery-based methods are seemed to be very widespread among scientists all over the world, still there are some problems with using spatial imagery. The best spatial resolution of accessible thermal imagery is 60 m (ETM+ sensor, and sometimes it is not enough for urban studies (many urban objects have smaller dimensions. The problem of urban heat island is rather serious in modern world, and it needs data of very good quality.

  5. Heat Island Compendium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat islands can be mitigated through measures like planting trees and vegetation, installing green roofs and cool roofs, and using cool pavements. The compendium describes all of these strategies and shows how communities around the country are being used

  6. Urban heat island 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühler, Oliver; Jensen, Marina Bergen; Petersen, Karen Sejr

    2010-01-01

    Urban Heat Island beskriver det forhold, at temperaturen i byområder er højere end temperaturen i tilgrænsede landområder. Årsagen hertil ligger i den urbane arealanvendelse, hvor en mindre andel af arealerne er dækket af vegetation, og en større andel består af forseglede arealer....

  7. Study on Boiling Heat Transfer Phenomenon in Micro-channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Namgyun [Inha Technical College, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Recently, efficient heat dissipation has become necessary because of the miniaturization of devices, and research on boiling on micro-channels has attracted attention. However, in the case of micro-channels, the friction coefficient and heat transfer characteristics are different from those in macro-channels. This leads to large errors in the micro scale results, when compared to correlations derived from the macro scale. In addition, due to the complexity of the mechanism, the boiling phenomenon in micro-channels cannot be approached only by experimental and theoretical methods. Therefore, numerical methods should be utilized as well, to supplement these methods. However, most numerical studies have been conducted on macro-channels. In this study, we applied the lattice Boltzmann method, proposed as an alternative numerical tool to simulate the boiling phenomenon in the micro-channel, and predicted the bubble growth process in the channel.

  8. Urban Heat Island Effect Actions - Neighborhood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisville Metro Government — The urban heat island effect — defined as the difference in temperature between the core of Louisville and its suburbs — contributes to heat-related illnesses and...

  9. Network optimization for enhanced resilience of urban heat island measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Honjo, Tsuyoshi; Yamato, Hiroaki; Mikami, Takehiko; Grimmond, C.S.B.

    2015-01-01

    The urban heat island is a well-known phenomenon that impacts a wide variety of city operations. With greater availability of cheap meteorological sensors, it is possible to measure the spatial patterns of urban atmospheric characteristics with greater resolution. To develop robust and resilient networks, recognizing sensors may malfunction, it is important to know when measurement points are providing additional information and also the minimum number of sensors needed to provide spatial inf...

  10. Post heat shock tolerance: a neuroimmunological anti-inflammatory phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazani Nima

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We previously showed that the progression of burn-induced injury was inhibited by exposing the peripheral area of injured skin to sublethal hyperthermia following the burn. We called this phenomenon post-heat shock tolerance. Here we suggest a mechanism for this phenomenon. Exposure of the peripheral primary hyperalgesic/allodynic area of burned skin to local hyperthermia (45°C, 30 seconds, which is a non-painful stimulus for normal skin, results in a painful sensation transmitted by nociceptors. This hyperthermia is too mild to induce any tissue injury, but it does result in pain due to burn-induced hyperalgesia/allodynia. This mild painful stimulus can result in the induction of descending anti-nociceptive mechanisms, especially in the adjacent burned area. Some of these inhibitory mechanisms, such as alterations of sympathetic outflow and the production of endogenous opioids, can modify peripheral tissue inflammation. This decrease in burn-induced inflammation can diminish the progression of burn injury.

  11. Hotterdam: mapping the Rotterdam urban heat island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank van der Hoeven

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island is considered to be one of the contemporary health aspects that cities urgently need to respond to. The Hotterdam research project addresses the Rotterdam urban heat island, in order to explain the links between the health of the city’s population and the features of its built environment that make it more or rather less warm. The work resulted in two heat maps that make the city of Rotterdam and its inhabitants more aware of and less susceptible to the health effects of heat waves. The insights into the urban heat island that were gained in this project are relevant for other cities in Holland (Amsterdam, The Hague and abroad.

  12. The urban heat island in a small city in coastal Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, O S; Orgaz, M D

    2000-11-01

    This project arose from the need to study the phenomenon of the urban heat island, since only by recognising this phenomenon can we moderate it to improve the human and urban environments. Not only big cities develop urban heat islands. This study detected the presence and recorded the characteristics of an urban heat island in the small coastal city of Aveiro, Portugal. The study was developed through the scheduled measurements of air temperature and the analysis of the geographical, meteorological and urban conditions. The form and intensity of Aveiro's heat island are a response to the interaction of three principal factors: the urban morphology (the hottest zones in the city are those with the tallest and the highest density of buildings, without green spaces and with intense generation of heat from traffic, commerce and services); the meteorological conditions (the intensity of the island is at its maximum when the sky is totally clear and there is no wind, and at its minimum in those situations when there is atmospheric instability, such as wind, cloud and precipitation); and the proximity of the coastal lagoon (which borders the city to the west and northwest and moderates seasonal temperatures. The urban heat island influences the comfort and health of its inhabitants, thus urban planning is very important in the moderation and prevention of this phenomenon.

  13. The Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeff; Morris, Lynn; Stewart, Fran; Thretheway, Ray; Gartland, Lisa; Russell, Camille; Reddish, Merrill; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Urban heat islands increase the demand for cooling energy and accelerate the formation of smog. They are created when natural vegetation is replaced by heat-absorbing surfaces such as building roofs and walls, parking lots, and streets. Through the implementation of measures designed to mitigate the urban heat island, communities can decrease their demand for energy and effectively "cool" the metropolitan landscape. Measures to reverse the urban heat island include afforestation and the widespread use of highly reflective surfaces. To demonstrate the potential benefits of implementing these measures, EPA has teamed up with NASA and LBNL to initiate a pilot project with three U.S. cities. As part of the pilot, NASA is using remotely-sensed data to quantify surface temperature, albedo, the thermal response number and NDVI vegetation of each city. To pursue these efforts, more information is needed about specific characteristics of several different cities. NASA used the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) to obtain high spatial resolution (10 m pixel resolution) over each of the three pilot cities (Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City). The goal of the UHIPP is to use the results from the NASA/LBNL analysis, combined with knowledge gained through working with various organizations within each pilot city to identify the most effective means of implementing strategies designed to mitigate the urban heat island, These "lessons learned" will be made available and used by cities across the U.S. to assist policy makers and others within various communities to analyze their own urban heat islands and determine which, if any, measures can be taken to help save energy and money, and to prevent pollution. The object of this session is for representatives from each of the pilot cities to present their results of the study and share the experience of working with these data in managing their urban landscape.

  14. Cooling urban heat islands with sustainable landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson

    1994-01-01

    This paper is directed to the policy-makers who are responsible for urban design and its climatological consequences. It summarizes our current knowledge on the structure, energetics, and mitigation of the urban heat island. Special attention is given to physical features of the environment that can be easily manipulated, particularly vegetation. Prototypical designs...

  15. Urban environment and vegetation: comfort and urban heat island mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Magliocco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the outcomes of an experimental simulation on the microclimatic effects and on thermal comfort of vegetation in urban environment, conducted by means of a three-dimensional microclimate model, ENVI- met 3.1. The simulation considers a wide range of hypothetical cases of typical city areas with different characteristics related to: building density, building height, vegetation type and density. The results of the study show how different combinations of amount and type of vegetation, density and height of buildings affect the urban heat island phenomenon in Mediterranean climate.

  16. Green Roof Technology- Mitigate Urban Heat Island (UHI Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odli Z.S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations on the land surfaces, which are attributed by human activities, especially in cities, cause many implications to the ecosystem. The increase of buildings in cities is reflecting the growth of human activities resulted in a significant temperature increase and warmer pattern in the urban area than the surrounding countryside. The phenomenon defined as urban heat island. This study investigates the application and efficiency of the green roof as an approach to mitigate urban heat island and reducing indoor temperature in a building. Two types of roof models, which consist of vegetative roof and non-vegetative roof, were built to investigate the efficiency of vegetated roof in reducing indoor temperature compared to the non-vegetated roof. The outdoor and indoor temperature and humidity of each roof model were monitored by using RH520 Thermo Hygrometer. The data was collected for three times in a week for 9 weeks at 9:00am to 5:00pm. It was found that the indoor average temperature data for vegetative roof could be reduced 2.4°C from the outdoor average temperature and 0.8°C for non-vegetative roof. The difference of temperature reduction for vegetative roof was greater than the nonvegetative roof, thus indicate that green roof was highly efficient in reducing indoor temperature and mitigate urban heat island impact.

  17. Linking Surface Urban Heat Islands with Groundwater Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Susanne A; Bayer, Peter; Goettsche, Frank M; Olesen, Folke S; Blum, Philipp

    2016-01-05

    Urban temperatures are typically, but not necessarily, elevated compared to their rural surroundings. This phenomenon of urban heat islands (UHI) exists both above and below the ground. These zones are coupled through conductive heat transport. However, the precise process is not sufficiently understood. Using satellite-derived land surface temperature and interpolated groundwater temperature measurements, we compare the spatial properties of both kinds of heat islands in four German cities and find correlations of up to 80%. The best correlation is found in older, mature cities such as Cologne and Berlin. However, in 95% of the analyzed areas, groundwater temperatures are higher than land surface temperatures due to additional subsurface heat sources such as buildings and their basements. Local groundwater hot spots under city centers and under industrial areas are not revealed by satellite-derived land surface temperatures. Hence, we propose an estimation method that relates groundwater temperatures to mean annual land-surface temperatures, building density, and elevated basement temperatures. Using this method, we are able to accurately estimate regional groundwater temperatures with a mean absolute error of 0.9 K.

  18. The use of NOAA AVHRR data for assessment of the urban heat island effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, K. P.; Mcnab, A. L.; Karl, T. R.; Brown, J. F.; Hood, J. J.; Tarpley, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the use of a satellite-derived vegetation index and surface temperature estimates for the assessment of the difference in urban and rural air temperature due to the urban heat island effect. The difference in the ND (normalized difference) index between urban and rural regions appears to be an indicator of the difference in surface properties (evaporation and heat storage capacity) between the two environments that are responsible for the urban heat island effect. The use of the approach proposed here may provide a globally consistent method for assessing this phenomenon.

  19. The urban physical environment: temperature and urban heat islands. Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon M. Heisler; Anthony J. Brazel

    2010-01-01

    The term urban heat island (UHI) describes the phenomenon in which cities are generally warmer than adjacent rural areas. The UHI effect is strongest with skies free of clouds and with low wind speeds. In moist temperate climates, the UHI effect causes cities to be slightly warmer in midday than rural areas, whereas in dry climates, irrigation of vegetation in cites...

  20. Exploring the Urban Heat Island (UHI) Effect in Port Louis, Mauritius

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012r

    2014-10-13

    Oct 13, 2014 ... Exploring the Urban Heat Island (UHI) Effect in Port Louis, Mauritius. 140. An UHI is a phenomenon of local temperature change, and its shape, location, and intensity vary depending on the time and season. Therefore, to save energy by UHI mitigation, it is crucial to select appropriate measures that are ...

  1. Investigating the Urban Heat Island Effect with a Collaborative Inquiry Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Linda A.; Becker, William G.

    2003-01-01

    Explains a collaborative research project in which students study a phenomenon known as the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect which is a measure of the near-surface air temperature contrast between urbanized and adjoining rural areas. Includes background content and literature review, preliminary studies, development of research questions,…

  2. Parks and the urban heat island: A longitudinal study in Westfield, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert S. Bristow; Robert Blackie; Nicole. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Urban landscapes often have warmer temperatures than the surrounding countryside, a phenomenon known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect. This study compares and contrasts temperatures across Westfield, Massachusetts, a moderate size New England city, and considers the influence that the city’s parks and protected areas have on the local microclimate. The data show a...

  3. Paving materials for heat island mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerantz, M.; Akbari, H.; Chen, A.; Taha, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Rosenfeld, A.H. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report summarizes paving materials suitable for urban streets, driveways, parking lots and walkways. The authors evaluate materials for their abilities to reflect sunlight, which will reduce their temperatures. This in turn reduces the excess air temperature of cities (the heat island effect). The report presents the compositions of the materials, their suitability for particular applications, and their approximate costs (in 1996). Both new and resurfacing are described. They conclude that, although light-colored materials may be more expensive than conventional black materials, a thin layer of light-colored pavement may produce energy savings and smog reductions whose long-term worth is greater than the extra cost.

  4. Sorption and agglutination phenomenon of nanofluids on a plain heating surface during pool boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhen-hua; Liao, Liang [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 200030 Shanghai (China)

    2008-05-15

    The pool nucleate boiling heat transfer experiments of water (H{sub 2}O) based and alcohol (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) based nanofluids and nanoparticles-suspensions on the plain heated copper surface were carried out. The study was focused on the sorption and agglutination phenomenon of nanofluids on a heated surface. The nanofluids consisted of the base liquid, the nanoparticles and the surfactant. The nanoparticles-suspensions consisted of the base liquid and nanoparticles. The both liquids of water and alcohol and both nanoparticles of CuO and SiO{sub 2} were used. The surfactant was sodium dodecyl benzene sulphate (SDBS). The experimental results show that for nanofluids, the agglutination phenomenon occurred on the heated surface when the wall temperature was over 112{sup o}C and steady nucleated boiling experiment could not be carried out. The reason was that an unsteady porous agglutination layer was formed on the heated surface. However, for nanoparticles-suspensions, no agglutination phenomenon occurred on the heating surface and the steady boiling could be carried out in the whole nucleate boiling region. For the both of alcohol based nanofluids and nano-suspensions, no agglutination phenomenon occurred on the heating surface and steady nucleate boiling experiment could be carried out in the whole nucleate boiling region whose wall temperature did not exceed 112{sup o}C. The boiling heat transfer characteristics of the nanofluids and nanoparticles-suspensions are somewhat poor compared with that of the base fluids, since the decrease of the active nucleate cavities on the heating surface with a very thin nanoparticles sorption layer. The very thin nanoparticles sorption layer also caused a decrease in the solid-liquid contact angle on the heating surface which leaded to an increase of the critical heat flux (CHF). (author)

  5. Urban Heat Island and Overheating Characteristics in Sydney, Australia. An Analysis of Multiyear Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat Santamouris

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It has become increasingly important to study the urban heat island phenomenon due to the adverse effects on summertime cooling energy demand, air and water quality and most importantly, heat-related illness and mortality. The present article analyses the magnitude and the characteristics of the urban heat island in Sydney, Australia. Climatic data from six meteorological stations distributed around the greater Sydney region and covering a period of 10 years are used. It is found that both strong urban heat island (UHI and oasis phenomena are developed. The average maximum magnitude of the phenomena may exceed 6 K. The intensity and the characteristics of the phenomena are strongly influenced by the synoptic weather conditions and in particular the development of the sea breeze and the westerly winds from the desert area. The magnitude of the urban heat island varies between 0 and 11°C, as a function of the prevailing weather conditions. The urban heat island mainly develops during the warm summer season while the oasis phenomenon is stronger during the winter and intermediate seasons. Using data from an extended network of stations the distribution of Cooling Degree Days in the greater Sydney area is calculated. It is found that because of the intense development of the UHI, Cooling Degree Days in Western Sydney are about three times higher than in the Eastern coastal zone. The present study will help us to better design and implement urban mitigation strategies to counterbalance the impact of the urban heat island in the city.

  6. Urban Heat Island Characteristics Of Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgen, S. I.; Unal, Y. S.; Yürük, C.; Göktepe, N.; Diren, D. H.; Topçu, S.; Güney, C.; Doğru, A. O.

    2015-12-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) is defined as the temperature difference between the urbanized areas and their surroundings due to local surface energy balance since urban materials and build up structures modify the heating and cooling rates of the ambient air. Istanbul is the largest city of Turkey with the population over 14 million inhabitants and the urbanization is drastically expanded since 1965 due to the population increase from 2 million to 14 million. In this study we investigate impacts of urban expansion on meteorological variables in relation to the UHI effect in Istanbul. To estimate the strength of UHI, temperature differences between urban and suburban stations are calculated by using temperature observations from 6 stations for 1960-2012 years, and 34 stations for 2007-2012. The results show that, the UHI intensity is stronger during summer season and Kartal experiences intensified UHI effect more than the others. The daytime(nighttime) UHI intensity defined with respect to Şile (suburban) varies between 0.41 and 3.01oC (1.02 and 2.18oC). The atmospheric UHI usually reaches its highest intensity on summer nights, and under calm air and a cloudless sky. Therefore, the total of 127 dry days which have cloudiness less than 2/8 and wind speed less than 2 m/s are selected to estimate the strength of UHI in Istanbul. The hourly temperature differences between a selected urban station (Pendik) and a rural station (Terkos), are calculated as 5oC for daytime and 8oC for the nighttime. The relationship between urbanization and long-term modification of the urban climate of Istanbul is investigated by modeling the present-day spatial distribution of the urban heat load. Geographical data of the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality and CORINE Land Cover Raster Data are used to generate the land use distribution. Furthermore, the new urban land use types are defined by considering the spatial coverage and the average height of the buildings. Effects of change in land

  7. Urban heat islands in China enhanced by haze pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang; Lee, Xuhui; Liu, Shoudong; Schultz, Natalie; Xiao, Wei; Zhang, Mi; Zhao, Lei

    2016-08-23

    The urban heat island (UHI), the phenomenon of higher temperatures in urban land than the surrounding rural land, is commonly attributed to changes in biophysical properties of the land surface associated with urbanization. Here we provide evidence for a long-held hypothesis that the biogeochemical effect of urban aerosol or haze pollution is also a contributor to the UHI. Our results are based on satellite observations and urban climate model calculations. We find that a significant factor controlling the nighttime surface UHI across China is the urban-rural difference in the haze pollution level. The average haze contribution to the nighttime surface UHI is 0.7±0.3 K (mean±1 s.e.) for semi-arid cities, which is stronger than that in the humid climate due to a stronger longwave radiative forcing of coarser aerosols. Mitigation of haze pollution therefore provides a co-benefit of reducing heat stress on urban residents.

  8. Heat sink phenomenon of bipolar and monopolar radiofrequency ablation observed using polypropylene tubes for vessel simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alem, Ihssan; Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javed; Chua, Terence C; Morris, David L

    2014-06-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is widely used for treating liver tumors; recurrence is common owing to proximity to blood vessels possibly due to the heat sink effect. We seek to investigate this phenomenon using unipolar and bipolar RFA on an egg white tumor tissue model and an animal liver model. Temperature profiles during ablation (with and without vessel simulation) were studied, using both bipolar and unipolar RFA probes by 4 strategically placed temperature leads to monitor temperature profile during ablation. The volume of ablated tissue was also measured. The volume ablated during vessel simulation confirmed the impact of the heat sink phenomenon. The heat sink effect of unipolar RFA was greater compared with bipolar RFA (ratio of volume affected 2:1) in both tissue and liver models. The volume ablated using unipolar RFA was less than the bipolar RFA (ratio of volume ablated = 1:4). Unipolar RFA achieved higher ablation temperatures (122°C vs 98°C). Unipolar RFA resulted in tissue damage beyond the vessel, which was not observed using bipolar RFA. Bipolar RFA ablates a larger tumor volume compared with unipolar RFA, with a single ablation. The impact of heat sink phenomenon in tumor ablation is less so with bipolar than unipolar RFA with sparing of adjacent vessel damage. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Analysis of Heat Transfer Phenomenon in Magnetohydrodynamic Casson Fluid Flow Through Cattaneo-Christov Heat Diffusion Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, G. K.; Gireesha, B. J.; Shehzad, S. A.; Abbasi, F. M.

    2017-07-01

    Heat transport phenomenon of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic Casson fluid flow by employing Cattaneo-Christov heat diffusion theory is described in this work. The term of heat absorption/generation is incorporated in the mathematical modeling of present flow problem. The governing mathematical expressions are solved for velocity and temperature profiles using RKF 45 method along with shooting technique. The importance of arising nonlinear quantities namely velocity, temperature, skin-friction and temperature gradient are elaborated via plots. It is explored that the Casson parameter retarded the liquid velocity while it enhances the fluid temperature. Further, we noted that temperature and thickness of temperature boundary layer are weaker in case of Cattaneo-Christov heat diffusion model when matched with the profiles obtained for Fourier’s theory of heat flux.

  10. Heat Island Mitigation Measures in Response to Climate Change Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale a.; Estes, Maurice, Jr.; Crosson, William; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation examines the effect of cities, the accompanying heat island effect, and other impacts that urbanization has had on the environment. Various satellite views of several urban areas are shown.

  11. Global Urban Heat Island (UHI) Data Set, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect represents the relatively higher temperatures found in urban areas compared to surrounding rural areas owing to higher proportions...

  12. Strong contributions of local background climate to urban heat islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Lee, Xuhui; Smith, Ronald B; Oleson, Keith

    2014-07-10

    The urban heat island (UHI), a common phenomenon in which surface temperatures are higher in urban areas than in surrounding rural areas, represents one of the most significant human-induced changes to Earth's surface climate. Even though they are localized hotspots in the landscape, UHIs have a profound impact on the lives of urban residents, who comprise more than half of the world's population. A barrier to UHI mitigation is the lack of quantitative attribution of the various contributions to UHI intensity (expressed as the temperature difference between urban and rural areas, ΔT). A common perception is that reduction in evaporative cooling in urban land is the dominant driver of ΔT (ref. 5). Here we use a climate model to show that, for cities across North America, geographic variations in daytime ΔT are largely explained by variations in the efficiency with which urban and rural areas convect heat to the lower atmosphere. If urban areas are aerodynamically smoother than surrounding rural areas, urban heat dissipation is relatively less efficient and urban warming occurs (and vice versa). This convection effect depends on the local background climate, increasing daytime ΔT by 3.0 ± 0.3 kelvin (mean and standard error) in humid climates but decreasing ΔT by 1.5 ± 0.2 kelvin in dry climates. In the humid eastern United States, there is evidence of higher ΔT in drier years. These relationships imply that UHIs will exacerbate heatwave stress on human health in wet climates where high temperature effects are already compounded by high air humidity and in drier years when positive temperature anomalies may be reinforced by a precipitation-temperature feedback. Our results support albedo management as a viable means of reducing ΔT on large scales.

  13. Strong contributions of local background climate to urban heat islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Lee, Xuhui; Smith, Ronald B.; Oleson, Keith

    2014-07-01

    The urban heat island (UHI), a common phenomenon in which surface temperatures are higher in urban areas than in surrounding rural areas, represents one of the most significant human-induced changes to Earth's surface climate. Even though they are localized hotspots in the landscape, UHIs have a profound impact on the lives of urban residents, who comprise more than half of the world's population. A barrier to UHI mitigation is the lack of quantitative attribution of the various contributions to UHI intensity (expressed as the temperature difference between urban and rural areas, ΔT). A common perception is that reduction in evaporative cooling in urban land is the dominant driver of ΔT (ref. 5). Here we use a climate model to show that, for cities across North America, geographic variations in daytime ΔT are largely explained by variations in the efficiency with which urban and rural areas convect heat to the lower atmosphere. If urban areas are aerodynamically smoother than surrounding rural areas, urban heat dissipation is relatively less efficient and urban warming occurs (and vice versa). This convection effect depends on the local background climate, increasing daytime ΔT by 3.0 +/- 0.3 kelvin (mean and standard error) in humid climates but decreasing ΔT by 1.5 +/- 0.2 kelvin in dry climates. In the humid eastern United States, there is evidence of higher ΔT in drier years. These relationships imply that UHIs will exacerbate heatwave stress on human health in wet climates where high temperature effects are already compounded by high air humidity and in drier years when positive temperature anomalies may be reinforced by a precipitation-temperature feedback. Our results support albedo management as a viable means of reducing ΔT on large scales.

  14. VERIFICATION OF THE INFLUENCE OF URBAN GEOMETRY ON THE NOCTURNAL HEAT ISLAND INTENSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila M. Nakata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal heat island formation is a prom inent phenomenon in urban planning research and thermal comfort. It is characterized by an increased air temperature from the periphery to the center of the cities and is partly caused by the urban geometry. The phenomenon is a result of the influence of the characteristics of urbanization, which alter the energy balance of the cities. Among surveys in this context, the model proposed by Oke (1981 shows its relevan ce in the area. Using simulations with reduced models, Oke found that the fraction of visible sky negatively correlated with the heat buildup on the surfaces and increased the air temperature. The relationship between the height of the buildings and the width of the path (H/W ratio, height/width was used to measure the urban geometry in this previous study. Based on that study, this research verified the role of geometry in the formation of an urban heat island in a Brazilian city, aiming to adapt this model to real urban conditions. The methodological procedures rely on the following steps: a study of a theoretical-numerical base model (Oke model, 1981 and adjustment (validati on. Thus, the methodology to be employed included urban data collection, which include d urban geometry and air temperature, the application of the Oke model and its adjustme nt. The results found in this investigation corroborate the study of Oke (1981 and dem onstrate that urban geometry effectively contributes to the formation of nocturnal heat islands.

  15. Link between Surface and Subsurface Urban Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Susanne; Bayer, Peter; Olesen, Folke; Goettsche, Frank; Blum, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Urban heat islands exist in all diverse layers of modern cities, such as surface and subsurface. While both layers are typically investigated separately, the coupling of surface and subsurface urban heat islands is insufficiently understood. Hence, this study focuses on the interrelation of both zones and the influence of additional underground heat sources, such as heated basements, on this interaction. Using satellite derived land surface temperatures and interpolated groundwater temperature measurements the spatial properties of both heat islands are compared. Significant correlations of 0.5 up to more than 0.8 are found between surface and subsurface urban heat islands. If groundwater flow is considered this correlation increases by approximately 10%. Next we analyzed the dissimilarities between both heat islands in order to understand the interaction between the urban surface and subsurface. We find that local groundwater hotspots under the city center and industrial areas are not revealed in satellite derived land surface temperatures. Overall groundwater temperatures are higher than land surface temperatures in 95% of the analyzed area due to the influence of below ground anthropogenic heat sources such as sewage systems, district heating systems, and especially elevated basement temperatures. Thus, an estimation method is proposed that relates groundwater temperatures to mean annual land surface temperatures, building density, and elevated basement temperatures. Using this method regional groundwater temperatures can be accurately estimated with a mean absolute error of 0.9 K. Since land surface temperatures and building densities are available from remote sensing, this method has the potential for a large scale estimations of urban groundwater temperatures. Thus, it is feasible to detect subsurface urban heat islands on a global level and to investigate sustainable geothermal potentials using satellite derived data.

  16. Heat waves and urban heat islands in Europe: A review of relevant drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kathrin; Lauf, Steffen; Kleinschmit, Birgit; Endlicher, Wilfried

    2016-11-01

    The climate change and the proceeding urbanization create future health challenges. Consequently, more people around the globe will be impaired by extreme weather events, such as heat waves. This study investigates the causes for the emergence of surface urban heat islands and its change during heat waves in 70 European cities. A newly created climate class indicator, a set of meaningful landscape metrics, and two population-related parameters were applied to describe the Surface Urban Heat Island Magnitude (SUHIM) - the mean temperature increase within the urban heat island compared to its surrounding, as well as the Heat Magnitude (HM) - the extra heat load added to the average summer SUHIM during heat waves. We evaluated the relevance of varying urban parameters within linear models. The exemplary European-wide heat wave in July 2006 was chosen and compared to the average summer conditions using MODIS land surface temperature with an improved spatial resolution of 250m. The results revealed that the initial size of the urban heat island had significant influence on SUHIM. For the explanation of HM the size of the heat island, the regional climate and the share of central urban green spaces showed to be critical. Interestingly, cities of cooler climates and cities with higher shares of urban green spaces were more affected by additional heat during heat waves. Accordingly, cooler northern European cities seem to be more vulnerable to heat waves, whereas southern European cities appear to be better adapted. Within the ascertained population and climate clusters more detailed explanations were found. Our findings improve the understanding of the urban heat island effect across European cities and its behavior under heat waves. Also, they provide some indications for urban planners on case-specific adaptation strategies to adverse urban heat caused by heat waves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Satellite Based Analysis of Surface Urban Heat Island Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gémes Orsolya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The most obvious characteristics of urban climate are higher air and surface temperatures compared to rural areas and large spatial variation of meteorological parameters within the city. This research examines the long term and seasonal development of urban surface temperature using satellite data during a period of 30 years and within a year. The medium resolution Landsat data were (preprocessed using open source tools. Besides the analysis of the long term and seasonal changes in land surface temperature within a city, also its relationship with changes in the vegetation cover was investigated. Different urban districts and local climate zones showed varying strength of correlation. The temperature difference between urban surfaces and surroundings is defined as surface urban heat island (SUHI. Its development shows remarkable seasonal and spatial anomalies. The satellite images can be applied to visualize and analyze the SUHI, although they were not collected at midday and early afternoon, when the phenomenon is normally at its maximum. The applied methodology is based on free data and software and requires minimal user interaction. Using the results new urban developments (new built up and green areas can be planned, that help mitigate the negative effects of urban climate.

  18. Using Remote Sensing Data and Research Results for Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Maury; Luvall, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides information on the characteristics of the urban heat island, research designed to provide the data needed to develop effective urban heat island reduction strategies, and the development of local working groups to develop implementation plans. As background, an overview of research results on the urban heat island phenomenon and the resultant effect on energy usage and air quality will be explored. The use of more reflective roofing materials, paving materials, tree planting, and other initiatives will be explored as a basis for strategies to mitigate urban heat islands and improve the urban environment. Current efforts to use aircraft remote sensing data in Atlanta, Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City and our work with non-profit organizations designated to lead public education and strategic development efforts will be presented. Efforts to organize working groups comprised of key stakeholders, the process followed in communicating research results, and methodology for soliciting feedback and incorporating ideas into local plans, policies and decision-making will be discussed. Challenges in developing and transferring data products and research results to stakeholders will be presented. It is our ultimate goal that such efforts be integrated into plans and/or decision models that encourage sustainable development.

  19. The NSF-RCN Urban Heat Island Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twine, T. E.; Snyder, P. K.; Hamilton, P.; Shepherd, M.; Stone, B., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    In much of the world cities are warming at twice the rate of outlying rural areas. The frequency of urban heat waves is projected to increase with climate change through the 21stcentury. Addressing the economic, environmental, and human costs of urban heat islands requires a better understanding of their behavior from many disciplinary perspectives. The goal of this four-year Urban Heat Island Network is to (1) bring together scientists studying the causes and impacts of urban warming, (2) advance multidisciplinary understanding of urban heat islands, (3) examine how they can be ameliorated through engineering and design practices, and (4) share these new insights with a wide array of stakeholders responsible for managing urban warming to reduce their health, economic, and environmental impacts. The Urban Heat Island Network involves atmospheric scientists, engineers, architects, landscape designers, urban planners, public health experts, and education and outreach experts, who will share knowledge, evaluate research directions, and communicate knowledge and research recommendations to the larger research community as well as stakeholders engaged in developing strategies to adapt to and mitigate urban warming. The first Urban Climate Institute was held in Saint Paul, Minnesota in July 2013 and focused on the characteristics of urban heat islands. Scientists engaged with local practitioners to improve communication pathways surrounding issues of understanding, adapting to, and mitigating urban warming. The second Urban Climate Institute was held in Atlanta, Georgia in July 2014 and focused on urban warming and public health. Scientists discussed the state of the science on urban modeling, heat adaptation, air pollution, and infectious disease. Practitioners informed participants on emergency response methods and protocols related to heat and other extreme weather events. Evaluation experts at the Science Museum of Minnesota have extensively evaluated both Institutes

  20. Urban and regional heat island adaptation measures in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyre Echevarria Icaza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The urban planner´s role should be adapted to the current globalised and overspecialised economic and environmental context, envisioning a balance at the regional scale, apprehending not only new technologies, but also new mapping principles, that allow obtaining multidisciplinary integral overviews since the preliminary stages of the design process. The urban heat Island (UHI is one of the main phenomena affecting the urban climate. In the Netherlands, during the heat wave of 2006, more than 1,000 extra deaths were registered. UHI-related parameters are an example of new elements that should be taken into consideration since the early phases of the design process. Problem statement Thus, the development of urban design guidelines to reduce the heat islands in Dutch cities and regions requires first an overall reflection on the heat island phenomenom (relevance of the large scale assessment, existing tools, instruments and proposal of integrative and catalysing mapping strategies and then a specific assessment of the phenomenom at the selected locations in The Netherlands (testing those principles. Main research question Could the use of satellite imagery help analyse the UHI in the Netherlands and contribute to suggest catalysing mitigation acions actions implementable in the existing urban context of the cities, regions and provinces assessed? Method The development of urban design principles that aim at reaching a physical balance at the regional scale is critical to ensure a reduction of the UHI effect. Landsat and Modis satellite imagery can be analysed and processed using ATCOR 2/3, ENVI 4.7 and GIS, allowing not only a neighbourhood, city and regional scale assessment, but also generating holistic catalysing mapping typologies: game-board, rhizome, layering and drift, which are critical to ensure the integration of all parameters. The scientific inputs need to be combined not only with other disciplines but often also with existing urban

  1. Urban Heat Island of Valparaíso, Chile - A Comparison between 2007 and 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Claudio; Palme, Massimo; Galvez, Miguel Angel; Inostroza, Luis; Padilla, Uriel; Fonseca, Andrés

    2017-10-01

    The urban heat island phenomenon shows that the city changes the climate of the planet and affects it negatively by favouring the global warming. Urban morphology and city metabolism defines this behaviour. The city of Valparaíso, Chile, located in coastal Mediterranean climate in southern hemisphere is a city with around 295,000 inhabitants. In this research, the differences between UHI phenomenon in winters of 2007 and 2016 are evaluated. The city presented a temperature difference of 4.6 °C between the outskirts and the urban centre as a manifestation of this phenomenon, in 2007. By 2016 the city in population not increases and has had small morphological variations; the city presents an average temperature difference of 5.2 ° C between the outskirts and the urban centre as manifestation of urban heat island. This higher temperature occurs in the higher density built area, mainly of offices buildings. Here is the highest density of metabolic activity of the city, same as 2007.

  2. Comparison of different methods for the assessment of the urban heat island in Stuttgart, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterer, Christine; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    This study of the urban heat island (UHI) aims to support planning authorities by going beyond the traditional way of urban heat island studies. Therefore, air temperature as well as the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) were applied to take into account the effect of the thermal atmosphere on city dwellers. The analysis of the urban heat island phenomenon of Stuttgart, Germany, includes a long-term frequency analysis using data of four urban and one rural meteorological stations. A (high resolution map) of the UHI intensity and PET was created using stepwise multiple linear regression based on data of car traverses as well as spatial data. The mapped conditions were classified according to the long-term frequency analysis. Regarding climate change, the need for adaptation measures as urban greening is obvious. Therefore, a spatial analysis of quantification of two scenarios of a chosen study area was done by the application of a micro-scale model. The nocturnal UHI of Stuttgart is during 15 % stronger than 4 K in the city center during summer when daytime heat stress occurs during 40 %. A typical summer condition is mapped using statistical approach to point out the most strained areas in Stuttgart center and west. According to the model results, the increase in number of trees in a chosen area (Olga hospital) can decrease PET by 0.5 K at 22:00 CET but by maximum 27 K at 14:00 CET.

  3. Comparison of different methods for the assessment of the urban heat island in Stuttgart, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterer, Christine; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    This study of the urban heat island (UHI) aims to support planning authorities by going beyond the traditional way of urban heat island studies. Therefore, air temperature as well as the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) were applied to take into account the effect of the thermal atmosphere on city dwellers. The analysis of the urban heat island phenomenon of Stuttgart, Germany, includes a long-term frequency analysis using data of four urban and one rural meteorological stations. A (high resolution map) of the UHI intensity and PET was created using stepwise multiple linear regression based on data of car traverses as well as spatial data. The mapped conditions were classified according to the long-term frequency analysis. Regarding climate change, the need for adaptation measures as urban greening is obvious. Therefore, a spatial analysis of quantification of two scenarios of a chosen study area was done by the application of a micro-scale model. The nocturnal UHI of Stuttgart is during 15 % stronger than 4 K in the city center during summer when daytime heat stress occurs during 40 %. A typical summer condition is mapped using statistical approach to point out the most strained areas in Stuttgart center and west. According to the model results, the increase in number of trees in a chosen area (Olga hospital) can decrease PET by 0.5 K at 22:00 CET but by maximum 27 K at 14:00 CET.

  4. Sensitivities Affecting Heat and Urban Heat Island Effect on Local Scale Projected to Neighborhood Scale in Baltimore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, C.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Scott, A.

    2015-12-01

    Urban regions are often impacted more by heat than adjacent rural areas, which is a phenomenon known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban areas are also highly heterogeneous and notoriously difficult to monitor using standard meteorological protocols—the hottest microclimates within a city often occur in locations that lack open, representative installation sites that are an adequate distance from buildings and direct heat sources. To investigate the challenges of monitoring urban heat, this study examines the sensitivity of temperature and humidity sensors currently used in a Baltimore UHI monitoring network to differences in sun exposure, material on which the data collecting instrument is attached, and land cover class of the vicinity. Sensitivity to sun exposure and attachment site can be interpreted as sources of uncertainty for urban heat monitoring, while sensitivity to land cover may reflect a true source of local temperature and humidity variability. In this study, we present results from a test deployment designed to assess the sensitivity of heat measurements to each of these three factors. We then apply these results to interpret measurements taken across the entire Baltimore UHI monitoring network. These results can then be used to improve heat measurements and more accurately represent and quantify the UHI effect on a broader scale, such as in neighborhoods or urban centers.

  5. Heat islands over Mumbai as revealed by autorecorded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 1. Heat islands over Mumbai as revealed by autorecorded thermograph data. A K Srivastava James Voogt ... One data point (Coloba, Mumbai) is in centre of the city and the other one (Santacruz, Mumbai) is at the airport. The study finds that there were ...

  6. An assessment of urban heat island of Lokoja Town and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urbanization impacts on air and water quality, local climate and biodiversity. This study assesses the Urban Heat Island (UHI) of Lokoja town and surroundings from LandSat ETM satellite imagery of 2001 using remote sensing techniques. Band 3, 4 and 6 of the imagery were use in the estimation of NDVI, land surface ...

  7. Observed urban heat island characteristics in Akure, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A climatological analysis of the differences in air temperature between rural and urban areas (Tu-r) corroborates the existence of an urban heat island (UHI) in Akure (7º 25' N, 5º 20' E), a tropical city in the south western part of Nigeria. The investigations which have been conducted out of a year-long experiment from fixed ...

  8. The urban heat island of Basel – seen from different perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parlow, Eberhard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For decades thermal infrared satellite imagery has been used for climate studies of a variety of geosystems, including urban areas. Additionally, airborne thermal remotely sensed data can provide high resolution information about urban land surface temperatures (LST. Numerous studies make use of these data for the investigation of urban-rural LST differences, commonly known as the urban heat island (UHI phenomenon. Most of these studies try to analyse the urban heat island by means of the LST distribution. It seems that the UHI is easy to measure, easy to explain, easy to find, and easy to illustrate. Due to this apparent simplicity some people seem to jump into UHI studies without fully understanding the nature of the phenomenon as far as time and spatial scales, physical processes and the numerous methodological pitfalls inherent to UHI studies are concerned. In this study the use of thermal infrared satellite data with respect to the assessment of the surface UHI is investigated. The need to clearly distinguish between different types of UHI is emphasised by recalling the (surface temperature and the UHI terminology. The pretended simplicity of UHI effects is in reality a result of complex interactions between local radiation conditions, earth surface heat budget, the urban structure and the boundary layer atmosphere. Different methods may provide completely different results. This paper aims to bring more clearness into the subject by assessing the urban heat island of the city of Basel, Switzerland, by the use of thermal data provided by satellites (Landsat TM/ETM+, helicopter-borne infrared camera (InfraTec VarioCAM ® and ground-based measurements of air temperature profiles. It is shown that UHIs vary essentially with the choice of the respective temperature (LST, air temperature and height (surface level, street/canopy level, roof level.

  9. Trends of urban surface temperature and heat island characteristics in the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benas, Nikolaos; Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Cartalis, Constantinos

    2017-11-01

    Urban air temperature studies usually focus on the urban canopy heat island phenomenon, whereby the city center experiences higher near surface air temperatures compared to its surrounding non-urban areas. The Land Surface Temperature (LST) is used instead of urban air temperature to identify the Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI). In this study, the nighttime LST and SUHI characteristics and trends in the seventeen largest Mediterranean cities were investigated, by analyzing satellite observations for the period 2001-2012. SUHI averages and trends were based on an innovative approach of comparing urban pixels to randomly selected non-urban pixels, which carries the potential to better standardize satellite-derived SUHI estimations. A positive trend for both LST and SUHI for the majority of the examined cities was documented. Furthermore, a 0.1 °C decade-1 increase in urban LST corresponded to an increase in SUHI by about 0.04 °C decade-1. A longitudinal differentiation was found in the urban LST trends, with higher positive values appearing in the eastern Mediterranean. Examination of urban infrastructure and development factors during the same period revealed correlations with SUHI trends, which can be used to explain differences among cities. However, the majority of the cities examined show considerably increased trends in terms of the enhancement of SUHI. These findings are considered important so as to promote sustainable urbanization, as well as to support the development of heat island adaptation and mitigation plans in the Mediterranean.

  10. On the influence of the urban heat island on the cooling load of a school building in Athens, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagiorgas, H. S.; Mihalakakou, G.

    2016-02-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon, measured in the Greater Athens Area (GAA), on the energy consumption of a typical modern school building. The energy performance of the selected building has been calculated using an accurate, extensively validated, transient simulation model for 17 different sites of the GAA, for the summer period. Calculations showed that the urban heat island phenomenon affects remarkably the thermal behavior of the school building, as suburban areas presented much lower cooling loads. The cooling load values fluctuated between 3304.3 kWh for the rural stations and 14,585.1 kWh for the central stations (for the year 2011) or between 3206.5 kWh and 14,208.3 kWh (for the year 2012), respectively. Moreover, the mean monthly cooling load values varied between 0.4-2 kWh/m2 for the rural stations and 4-6.9 kWh/m2 for the central stations, for the selected time period. Furthermore, a neural network model was designed and developed in order to quantify the contribution of various meteorological parameters (such as the mean daily air temperature values, the mean daily solar radiation values, the average wind speed and the urban heat island intensity) to the energy consumption of the building and it was found that the urban heat island intensity is the predominant parameter, influencing remarkably the energy consumption of the typical school building.

  11. Best estimate approach for the evaluation of critical heat flux phenomenon in the boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaliatka, Tadas; Kaliatka, Algirdas; Uspuras, Eudenijus; Vaisnoras, Mindaugas [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania); Mochizuki, Hiroyasu; Rooijen, W.F.G. van [Fukui Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-05-15

    Because of the uncertainties associated with the definition of Critical Heat Flux (CHF), the best estimate approach should be used. In this paper the application of best-estimate approach for the analysis of CHF phenomenon in the boiling water reactors is presented. At first, the nodalization of RBMK-1500, BWR-5 and ABWR fuel assemblies were developed using RELAP5 code. Using developed models the CHF and Critical Heat Flux Ratio (CHFR) for different types of reactors were evaluated. The calculation results of CHF were compared with the well-known experimental data for light water reactors. The uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of ABWR 8 x 8 fuel assembly CHFR calculation result was performed using the GRS (Germany) methodology with the SUSA tool. Finally, the values of Minimum Critical Power Ratio (MCPR) were calculated for RBMK-1500, BWR-5 and ABWR fuel assemblies. The paper demonstrate how, using the results of sensitivity analysis, to receive the MCPR values, which covers all uncertainties and remains best estimated.

  12. Urban heat island impacted by fine particles in Nanjing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Tijian; Riemer, Nicole; Chen, Pulong; Li, Mengmeng; Li, Shu

    2017-09-12

    Atmospheric aerosol particles (especially particles with aerodynamic diameters equal to or less than 2.5 μm, called PM2.5) can affect the surface energy balance and atmospheric heating rates and thus may impact the intensity of urban heat islands. In this paper, the effect of fine particles on the urban heat island intensity in Nanjing was investigated via the analysis of observational data and numerical modelling. The observations showed that higher PM2.5 concentrations over the urban area corresponded to lower urban heat island (UHI) intensities, especially during the day. Under heavily polluted conditions, the UHI intensity was reduced by up to 1 K. The numerical simulation results confirmed the weakening of the UHI intensity due to PM2.5 via the higher PM2.5 concentrations present in the urban region than those in the suburban areas. The effects of the fine particles on the UHI reduction were limited to the lowest 500-1000 m. The daily range of the surface air temperature was also reduced by up to 1.1 K due to the particles' radiative effects. In summary, PM2.5 noticeably impacts UHI intensity, which should be considered in future studies on air pollution and urban climates.

  13. The footprint of urban heat island effect in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decheng Zhou; Shuqing Zhao; Liangxia Zhang; Ge Sun; Yongqiang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) is one major anthropogenic modification to the Earth system that transcends its physical boundary. Using MODIS data from 2003 to 2012, we showed that the UHI effect decayed exponentially toward rural areas for majority of the 32 Chinese cities. We found an obvious urban/ rural temperature “cliff”, and estimated that the footprint of UHI effect (...

  14. The NSF-RCN Urban Heat Island Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, P. K.; Twine, T. E.; Hamilton, P.; Shepherd, M.; Stone, B., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    In much of the world cities are warming at twice the rate of outlying rural areas. The frequency of urban heat waves is projected to increase with climate change through the 21st century. Addressing the economic, environmental, and human costs of urban heat islands requires a better understanding of their behavior from many disciplinary perspectives. The goal of this four-year Urban Heat Island Network is to (1) bring together scientists studying the causes and impacts of urban warming, (2) advance multidisciplinary understanding of urban heat islands, (3) examine how they can be ameliorated through engineering and design practices, and (4) share these new insights with a wide array of stakeholders responsible for managing urban warming to reduce their health, economic, and environmental impacts. The NSF-RCN Urban Heat Island Network involves atmospheric scientists, engineers, architects, landscape designers, urban planners, public health experts, and education and outreach experts, who will share knowledge, evaluate research directions, and communicate knowledge and research recommendations to the larger research community as well as stakeholders engaged in developing strategies to adapt to and mitigate urban warming. The first Urban Climate Institute was held in Saint Paul, MN in July 2013 and focused on the characteristics of urban heat islands. Scientists engaged with local practitioners to improve communication pathways surrounding issues of understanding, adapting to, and mitigating urban warming. The second Urban Climate Institute was held in Atlanta, Georgia in July 2014 and focused on urban warming and public health. The third Urban Climate Institute was held in Athens, GA in July 2015 and focused on urban warming and the role of the built environment. Scientists and practitioners discussed strategies for mitigation and adaptation. The fourth Institute was held in Saint Paul, MN in July 2016 and focused on putting research to practice. Evaluation experts

  15. Long term evolution of the urban heat island beneath the city of Karlsruhe, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menberg, Kathrin; Blum, Philipp; Schaffitel, Axel; Bayer, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Increased air and surface temperature in urban areas are a widely spread phenomenon commonly referred to as urban heat islands (UHI). However, changes in the urban environment also lead to increased subsurface temperatures and cause extensive thermal anomalies in shallow urban aquifers. The reasons for this heating are manifold as several possible heat sources exist in the urban subsurface. Previous studies have primarily discussed basements and increased surface temperature as possible cause for heterogeneous groundwater temperature distribution. But also, sewers and district heating networks are likely to influence the temperature of the surrounding subsurface. In this study, the spatial distribution of groundwater temperature in the city Karlsruhe, Germany, is analyzed using a data set from 1977 and recent measurements from 2011. Furthermore, the anthropogenic heat input in the urban groundwater is quantified by a spatially resolved heat flux model. In the latter, several heat transport processes are considered, such as heat flux from basements and sewers, heat loss from district heating networks and heat input due to increased ground surface temperatures (GST) and reinjections of thermal waste water. Uncertainties are accounted for in a Monte Carlo simulation. In order to investigate the long-term evolution of the subsurface thermal regime, we compared the heat fluxes for the years 1977 and 2011. In both years, the spatial distribution of groundwater temperatures exhibits the highest temperatures under the city center and a large industrial site. Compared to 1977 background temperatures in 2011 have increased by approximately 1 K, while the maximum temperature is nearly equal. However, the area of the thermal anomaly has spread notably in the last 30 years. In both years the largest mean heat fluxes occurred from increased GST and basements. The development of the heat flux from increased GST reflects the evolution of surface air temperature (SAT), while the

  16. Spatial and temporal distribution of urban heat islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Alexandre Rosa; de Oliveira, Felício Santos; da Silva, Aderbal Gomes; Gleriani, José Marinaldo; Gonçalves, Wantuelfer; Moreira, Giselle Lemos; Silva, Felipe Gimenes; Branco, Elvis Ricardo Figueira; Moura, Marks Melo; da Silva, Rosane Gomes; Juvanhol, Ronie Silva; de Souza, Kaíse Barbosa; Ribeiro, Carlos Antonio Alvares Soares; de Queiroz, Vagner Tebaldi; Costa, Adilson Vidal; Lorenzon, Alexandre Simões; Domingues, Getulio Fonseca; Marcatti, Gustavo Eduardo; de Castro, Nero Lemos Martins; Resende, Rafael Tassinari; Gonzales, Duberli Elera; de Almeida Telles, Lucas Arthur; Teixeira, Thaisa Ribeiro; Dos Santos, Gleissy Mary Amaral Dino Alves; Mota, Pedro Henrique Santos

    2017-12-15

    The formation of an urban heat island (UHI) is one of the most common impacts of the urbanization process. To mitigate the effects of UHI, the planning of urban forests (e.g., creation of parks, forests and afforestation streets) has been the major tool applied in this context. Thus, the aim of this study is to evaluate the spatial and temporal distribution of heat islands in Vila Velha, ES, Brazil using the mono-window algorithm. The study followed these methodological steps: 1) mapping of urban green areas through a photointerpretation screen; 2) application of the mono-window algorithm to obtain the spatial and temporal patterns of land surface temperature (LST); 3) correlation between LST and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and normalized difference build-up index (NDBI); 4) application of ecological evaluation index. The results showed that the mean values of LST in urban areas were at least 2.34 to 7.19°C higher than undeveloped areas. Moreover, the positive correlation between LST and NDBI showed an amplifying effect of the developed areas for UHI, while areas with a predominance of vegetation attenuated the effect of UHI. Urban centers, clustered in some parts of the city, received the worst ecological assessment index. Finally, the adoption of measures to guide the urban forest planning within urban centers is necessary to mitigate the effect of heat islands and provide thermal comfort in urban areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Surface urban heat island across 419 global big cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shushi; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ottle, Catherine; Bréon, François-Marie; Nan, Huijuan; Zhou, Liming; Myneni, Ranga B

    2012-01-17

    Urban heat island is among the most evident aspects of human impacts on the earth system. Here we assess the diurnal and seasonal variation of surface urban heat island intensity (SUHII) defined as the surface temperature difference between urban area and suburban area measured from the MODIS. Differences in SUHII are analyzed across 419 global big cities, and we assess several potential biophysical and socio-economic driving factors. Across the big cities, we show that the average annual daytime SUHII (1.5 ± 1.2 °C) is higher than the annual nighttime SUHII (1.1 ± 0.5 °C) (P albedo and nighttime light between urban area and suburban area, while the distribution of daytime SUHII correlates negatively across cities with the difference of vegetation cover and activity between urban and suburban areas. Our results emphasize the key role of vegetation feedbacks in attenuating SUHII of big cities during the day, in particular during the growing season, further highlighting that increasing urban vegetation cover could be one effective way to mitigate the urban heat island effect.

  18. The urban heat island and its impact on heat waves and human health in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jianguo; Zheng, Youfei; Tang, Xu; Guo, Changyi; Li, Liping; Song, Guixiang; Zhen, Xinrong; Yuan, Dong; Kalkstein, Adam J; Li, Furong

    2010-01-01

    With global warming forecast to continue into the foreseeable future, heat waves are very likely to increase in both frequency and intensity. In urban regions, these future heat waves will be exacerbated by the urban heat island effect, and will have the potential to negatively influence the health and welfare of urban residents. In order to investigate the health effects of the urban heat island (UHI) in Shanghai, China, 30 years of meteorological records (1975-2004) were examined for 11 first- and second-order weather stations in and around Shanghai. Additionally, automatic weather observation data recorded in recent years as well as daily all-cause summer mortality counts in 11 urban, suburban, and exurban regions (1998-2004) in Shanghai have been used. The results show that different sites (city center or surroundings) have experienced different degrees of warming as a result of increasing urbanization. In turn, this has resulted in a more extensive urban heat island effect, causing additional hot days and heat waves in urban regions compared to rural locales. An examination of summer mortality rates in and around Shanghai yields heightened heat-related mortality in urban regions, and we conclude that the UHI is directly responsible, acting to worsen the adverse health effects from exposure to extreme thermal conditions.

  19. The Urban Heat Island: Implications for Health in a Changing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaviside, Clare; Macintyre, Helen; Vardoulakis, Sotiris

    2017-09-01

    The Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a well-studied phenomenon, whereby urban areas are generally warmer than surrounding suburban and rural areas. The most direct effect on health from the UHI is due to heat risk, which is exacerbated in urban areas, particularly during heat waves. However, there may be health benefits from warming during colder months. This review highlights recent attempts to quantitatively estimate the health impacts of the UHI and estimations of the health benefits of UHI mitigation measures. Climate change, increasing urbanisation and an ageing population in much of the world, is likely to increase the risks to health from the UHI, particularly from heat exposure. Studies have shown increased health risks in urban populations compared with rural or suburban populations in hot weather and a disproportionate impact on more vulnerable social groups. Estimations of the impacts of various mitigation techniques suggest that a range of measures could reduce health impacts from heat and bring other benefits to health and wellbeing. The impact of the UHI on heat-related health is significant, although often overlooked, particularly when considering future impacts associated with climate change. Multiple factors should be considered when designing mitigation measures in urban environments in order to maximise health benefits and avoid unintended negative effects.

  20. Study on Urban Heat Island Intensity Level Identification Based on an Improved Restricted Boltzmann Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal infrared remote sensing has become one of the main technology methods used for urban heat island research. When applying urban land surface temperature inversion of the thermal infrared band, problems with intensity level division arise because the method is subjective. However, this method is one of the few that performs heat island intensity level identification. This paper will build an intensity level identifier for an urban heat island, by using weak supervision and thought-based learning in an improved, restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM model. The identifier automatically initializes the annotation and optimizes the model parameters sequentially until the target identifier is completed. The algorithm needs very little information about the weak labeling of the target training sample and generates an urban heat island intensity spatial distribution map. This study can provide reliable decision-making support for urban ecological planning and effective protection of urban ecological security. The experimental results showed the following: (1 The heat island effect in Wuhan is existent and intense. Heat island areas are widely distributed. The largest heat island area is in Wuhan, followed by the sub-green island. The total area encompassed by heat island and strong island levels accounts for 54.16% of the land in Wuhan. (2 Partially based on improved RBM identification, this method meets the research demands of determining the spatial distribution characteristics of the internal heat island effect; its identification accuracy is superior to that of comparable methods.

  1. Study on Surface Heat Budget of Various Pavements for Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Takebayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface heat budgets of various pavement surfaces are studied with the aim of mitigating the urban heat island effect. In this study, the thermal characteristics of pavements are examined using data from observations. The net radiation, surface temperature, temperature under the surface, conduction heat flux, and core weight for each experimental surface are recorded, together with the weather conditions at the time of observation. The latent heat flux is estimated from the observed weight of the cores. The surface heat budget under the same weather conditions is examined, and the sensible heat flux from each target surface is calculated. The parameters that influence the surface heat budget, for example, solar reflectance (albedo, evaporative efficiency, heat conductivity, and heat capacity, are examined. On a typical summer day, the maximum reduction in the sensible heat flux from that on a normal asphalt surface is about 150 W/m2 for an asphalt surface with water-retaining material and about 100 W/m2 for a cement concrete surface with water-retaining material, depending on the albedo of each surface.

  2. Application of satellite images analysis to assess the variability of the surface thermal heat island distribution in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudała, Janina; Nádudvari, Ádám; Bronder, Joachim; Fudała, Marta

    2018-01-01

    One of the elements of the urban plans for adapting to climate change is to identify the range the urban heat island (UHI). To a relatively rare ground station network air temperature, one of the possible methods to identify this phenomenon in cities is the analysis of satellite images, and in particular the thermal images surface cities in conjunction with the land-use structure. In the publication is presented the application of indirect methods of determining surface characteristics of heat island in the cities of Upper Silesia Agglomeration on the basis of the analysis of the thermal images from the satellite Landsat for the period 1986-2016. It presents ways to interpret these images depending on the needs of determination the areas sensitive to the impact of the (UHI) and define the areas where adaptation actions to the climate change should be undertaken.

  3. Application of satellite images analysis to assess the variability of the surface thermal heat island distribution in urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fudała Janina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the elements of the urban plans for adapting to climate change is to identify the range the urban heat island (UHI. To a relatively rare ground station network air temperature, one of the possible methods to identify this phenomenon in cities is the analysis of satellite images, and in particular the thermal images surface cities in conjunction with the land-use structure. In the publication is presented the application of indirect methods of determining surface characteristics of heat island in the cities of Upper Silesia Agglomeration on the basis of the analysis of the thermal images from the satellite Landsat for the period 1986-2016. It presents ways to interpret these images depending on the needs of determination the areas sensitive to the impact of the (UHI and define the areas where adaptation actions to the climate change should be undertaken.

  4. Characterization of Urban Heat and Exacerbation: Development of a Heat Island Index for California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Taha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To further evaluate the factors influencing public heat and air-quality health, a characterization of how urban areas affect the thermal environment, particularly in terms of the air temperature, is necessary. To assist public health agencies in ranking urban areas in terms of heat stress and developing mitigation plans or allocating various resources, this study characterized urban heat in California and quantified an urban heat island index (UHII at the census-tract level (~1 km2. Multi-scale atmospheric modeling was carried out and a practical UHII definition was developed. The UHII was diagnosed with different metrics and its spatial patterns were characterized for small, large, urban-climate archipelago, inland, and coastal areas. It was found that within each region, wide ranges of urban heat and UHII exist. At the lower end of the scale (in smaller urban areas, the UHII reaches up to 20 degree-hours per day (DH/day; °C.hr/day, whereas at the higher end (in larger areas, it reaches up to 125 DH/day or greater. The average largest temperature difference (urban heat island within each region ranges from 0.5–1.0 °C in smaller areas to up to 5 °C or more at the higher end, such as in urban-climate archipelagos. Furthermore, urban heat is exacerbated during warmer weather and that, in turn, can worsen the health impacts of heat events presently and in the future, for which it is expected that both the frequency and duration of heat waves will increase.

  5. Assessing Heat Health Risk for Sustainability in Beijing’s Urban Heat Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Dong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This research is motivated by the increasing threat of urban heat waves that are likely worsened by pervasive global warming and urbanization. Different regions of the city including urban, borderland and rural area will experience different levels of heat health risk. In this paper, we propose an improved approach to quantitatively assess Beijing’s heat health risk based on three factors from hazard, vulnerability and especially environment which is considered as an independent factor because different land use/cover types have different influence on ambient air temperatures under the Urban Heat Island effect. The results show that the heat health risk of Beijing demonstrates a spatial-temporal pattern with higher risk in the urban area, lower risk in the borderland between urban and rural area, and lowest risk in the rural area, and the total risk fluctuated dramatically during 2008–2011. To be more specific, the heat health risk was clearly higher in 2009 and 2010 than in 2008 and 2011. Further analysis with the urban area at sub-district level signifies that the impervious surface (urban area such as buildings, roads, et al. ratio is of high correlation with the heat health risk. The validation results show that the proposed method improved the accuracy of heat health risk assessment. We recommend that policy makers should develop efficient urban planning to accomplish Beijing’s sustainable development.

  6. [Urban heat island effect based on urban heat island source and sink indices in Shenyang, Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Guang; Xu, Shen-Lai; Wang, Hong-Bo; Zhao, Zi-Qi; Cai, Fu; Wu, Jin-Wen; Chen, Peng-Shi; Zhang, Yu-Shu

    2013-12-01

    Based on the remote images in 2001 and 2010, the source and sink areas of urban heat island (UHI) in Shenyang City, Northeast China were determined by GIS technique. The effect of urban regional landscape pattern on UHI effect was assessed with land surface temperature (LST), area rate index (CI) of the source and sink areas and intensity index (LI) of heat island. The results indicated that the land use type changed significantly from 2001 to 2010, which significantly changed the source and sink areas of UHI, especially in the second and third circle regions. The source and sink areas were 94.3% and 5.7% in the first circle region, 64.0% and 36.0% in the third circle region in 2001, while they were 93.4% and 6.6%, 70.2% and 29.8% in 2010, respectively. It suggested that the land use pattern extended by a round shape in Shenyang led to the corresponding UHI pattern. The LST in the study area tended to decrease from the first circle region to the third. The UHI intensity was characterized with a single center in 2001 and with several centers in 2010, and the grade of UHI intensity was in a decreasing trend from 2001 to 2010. The absolute value of CI increased from the first circle region to the third, and the L1 was close to 1, suggesting the change in land use pattern had no significant influence on UHI in Shenyang.

  7. Islands and the offshoring possibilities and strategies of contemporary states: insights on/for the migration phenomenon on Europe’s southern flank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Baldacchino

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Islands have transitioned from being conceived as prototypes of idealised polities to being deliberately engineered as offshore enclaves where the rules of the parent state need not fully apply. With their manageable size, separation and distance from the mainland, small islands are rendered as convenient laboratories for entrepreneurial political engineering, and equally handy sites for research on the same. Island migration policies manifest this contemporary flexibility and creative governance of states. As we approach the 500th anniversary of Thomas More’s Utopia (1516, this paper explores these ideas in relation to the migration phenomenon on Europe’s southern flank. Using an island studies approach, it discusses the problematique of island spaces caught in this dynamic but which cannot be ‘offshore’ because, as unitary island states (Cyprus and Malta and unlike larger states with small outlying and peripheral island components (Italy and Australia, they must somehow be ‘both inside and outside’. The paper goes on to critique such facile binarisms, arguing for a more nuanced appreciation of islands as well as a recognition that what may be, at face value, an expression of a state’s authority is as much a manifestation of its limitations.

  8. Synergies between Urban Heat Island and Heat Waves in Athens (Greece), during an extremely hot summer (2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Founda, Dimitra; Santamouris, Mattheos

    2017-09-08

    Heat waves (HWs) are recognized as a serious threat for human health worldwide, with urban areas being more vulnerable due to the urban heat island (UHI) effect and population density. Yet, in the climate change context, HWs are becoming more frequent, stronger and longer, which, coupled with intensifying urbanization exacerbates thermal risk for urban residents. Despite the profound impact of this global phenomenon there is no clear consensus so far on possible synergies between UHIs and HWs. The study sheds light on the complex synergies between UHIs and HWs focusing on coastal sites. A quite challenging period comprising five HW episodes during summer 2012 in Athens (Greece) was selected for analysis. A positive feedback between UHIs and HWs was found, with intensification of the average UHI magnitude by up to 3.5 °C during HWs, compared to summer background conditions. Our results contribute significantly to understanding synergies between UHIs and HWs that may strongly increase thermal risk in cities and vulnerability of urban population.

  9. Satellite air temperature estimation for monitoring the canopy layer heat island of Milan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pichierri, Manuele; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    In this work, satellite maps of the urban heat island of Milan are produced using satellite-based infrared sensor data. For this aim, we developed suitable algorithms employing satellite brightness temperatures for the direct air temperature estimation 2 m above the surface (canopy layer), showing...... 2007 and 2010 were processed. Analysis of the canopy layer heat island (CLHI) maps during summer months reveals an average heat island effect of 3–4K during nighttime (with some peaks around 5K) and a weak CLHI intensity during daytime. In addition, the satellite maps reveal a well defined island shape...

  10. Investigation of Urban Heat Island Intensity in Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irem Bilgen, Simge; Unal, Yurdanur S.; Yuruk, Cemre; Goktepe, Nur; Diren, Deniz; Topcu, Sema; Mentes, Sibel; Incecik, Selahattin; Guney, Caner; Ozgur Dogru, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) is defined as the temperature difference between the urbanized areas and their surroundings due to local surface energy balance since urban materials and build up structures modify the heating and cooling rates of the ambient air. Istanbul is the largest city of Turkey with the population over 14 million inhabitants and the urbanization is drastically expanded since 1965 due to the population increase from 2 million to 14 million. In this study we investigate impacts of urban expansion on meteorological variables in relation to the UHI effect in Istanbul. To estimate the strength of UHI, temperature differences between urban and suburban stations are calculated by using temperature observations from 6 stations for 1960-2013 years, and 34 stations for 2007-2012. The results show that, the UHI intensity is stronger during summer season and Kartal experiences intensified UHI effect more than the others. The daytime(nighttime) UHI intensity defined with respect to Şile (suburban) varies between 0.41°C and 3.0°C (1.02°C and 2.18°C). The atmospheric UHI usually reaches its highest intensity on summer nights, and under calm air and a cloudless sky. Therefore, the total of 127 dry days, which have cloudiness less than 2/8 and wind speed less than 2 m/s are selected to estimate the strength of UHI in Istanbul. The hourly temperature differences between a selected urban station (Pendik) and a rural station (Terkos), are calculated as 5°C for daytime and 8°C for the nighttime. The urbanization negatively impacts the heat stress of urban areas. So that it is important to investigate what type of changes in the urban landscape affect the near-surface climate and elevate the intensity of UHI in the city. The relationship between urbanization and long-term modification of the urban climate of Istanbul is investigated by modeling the present-day spatial distribution of the urban heat load. Geographical data of the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality

  11. The footprint of urban heat island effect in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Decheng; Zhao, Shuqing; Zhang, Liangxia; Sun, Ge; Liu, Yongqiang

    2015-06-10

    Urban heat island (UHI) is one major anthropogenic modification to the Earth system that transcends its physical boundary. Using MODIS data from 2003 to 2012, we showed that the UHI effect decayed exponentially toward rural areas for majority of the 32 Chinese cities. We found an obvious urban/rural temperature "cliff", and estimated that the footprint of UHI effect (FP, including urban area) was 2.3 and 3.9 times of urban size for the day and night, respectively, with large spatiotemporal heterogeneities. We further revealed that ignoring the FP may underestimate the UHI intensity in most cases and even alter the direction of UHI estimates for few cities. Our results provide new insights to the characteristics of UHI effect and emphasize the necessity of considering city- and time-specific FP when assessing the urbanization effects on local climate.

  12. Simulations of the Montréal urban heat island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, François; Sushama, Laxmi; Fanta, Gemechu

    2017-04-01

    The current population of Montreal is around 3.8 million and this number is projected to go up in the coming years to decades, which will lead to vast expansion of urban areas. It is well known that urban morphology impacts weather and climate, and therefore should be taken into consideration in urban planning. This is particularly important in the context of a changing climate, as the intensity and frequency of temperature extremes such as hot spells are projected to increase in future climate, and Urban Heat Island (UHI) can potentially raise already stressful temperatures during such events, which can have significant effects on human health and energy consumption. High-resolution regional climate model simulations can be utilized to understand better urban-weather/climate interactions in current and future climates, particularly the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Urban Heat Island and its impact on other weather/climate characteristics such as urban flows, precipitation etc. This paper will focus on two high-resolution (250 m) simulations performed with (1) the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) and (2) CLASS and TEB (Town Energy Balance) model; TEB is a single layer urban canopy model and is used to model the urban fractions. The two simulations are performed over a domain covering Montreal for the 1960-2015 period, driven by atmospheric forcing data coming from a high-resolution Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5) simulation, driven by ERA-Interim. The two simulations are compared to assess the impact of urban regions on selected surface fields and the simulation with both CLASS and TEB is then used to study the spatio-temporal characteristics of the UHI over the study domain. Some preliminary results from a coupled simulation, i.e. CRCM5+CLASS+TEB, for selected years, including extreme warm years, will also be presented.

  13. A GPU Heterogeneous Cluster Scheduling Model for Preventing Temperature Heat Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Yun-Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of GPU general-purpose computing, GPU heterogeneous cluster has become a widely used parallel data processing solution in modern data center. Temperature management and controlling has become a new research hotspot in big data continuous computing. Temperature heat island in cluster has important influence on computing reliability and energy efficiency. In order to prevent the occurrence of GPU cluster temperature heat island, a big data task scheduling model for preventing temperature heat island was proposed. In this model, temperature, reliability and computing performance are taken into account to reduce node performance difference and improve throughput per unit time in cluster. Temperature heat islands caused by slow nodes are prevented by optimizing scheduling. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme can control node temperature and prevent the occurrence of temperature heat island under the premise of guaranteeing computing performance and reliability.

  14. A large-scale sensitivity study of urban heat islands using GFDL's earth system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Gu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Most previous sensitivity studies of urban heat islands focus on the impact of surface characteristics (including urban geometry and material properties). In this study, we analyze the influence of atmospheric forcing on simulated urban heat islands over the Continental United States (CONUS) using GFDL's earth system model coupled with a newly developed urban canopy model, with a specific focus on the impact of precipitation. It is shown that in summer the simulated urban heat islands generally increase with increasing precipitation amount over the CONUS while in winter precipitation has little impact on the simulated urban heat islands. From a simulation perspective, changing both atmospheric forcing and surface characteristics has important impacts on the simulated urban heat islands and the relative importance varies spatially. Similarly, the relative importance of precipitation among all atmospheric forcing variables varies spatially. Hotspots where precipitation is particularly important are identified.

  15. Attenuating the surface Urban Heat Island within the Local Thermal Zones through land surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiong; Ouyang, Wanlu

    2017-02-01

    Inefficient mitigation of excessive heat is attributed to the discrepancy between the scope of climate research and conventional planning practice. This study approaches this problem at both domains. Generally, the study, on one hand, claims that the climate research of the temperature phenomenon should be at local scale, where implementation of planning and design strategies can be more feasible. On the other hand, the study suggests that the land surface factors should be organized into zones or patches, which conforms to the urban planning and design manner. Thus in each zone, the land surface composition of those excessively hot places can be compared to the zonal standard. The comparison gives guidance to the modification of the land surface factors at the target places. Specifically, this study concerns the Land Surface Temperature (LST) in Wuhan, China. The land surface is classified into Local Thermal Zones (LTZ). The specifications of temperature sensitive land surface factors are relative homogeneous in each zone and so is the variation of the LST. By extending the city scale analysis of Urban Heat Island into local scale, the Local Surface Urban Heat Islands (LSUHIs) are extracted. Those places in each zone that constantly maintain as LSUHI and exceed the homogenous LST variation are considered as target places or hotspots with higher mitigation or adaptation priority. The operation is equivalent to attenuate the abnormal LST variation in each zone. The framework is practical in the form of prioritization and zoning, and mitigation strategies are essentially operated locally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Impact of Anthropogenic Heat on Formation of Urban Heat Island and Energy Consumption Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shahmohamadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the impact of anthropogenic heat on formation of urban heat island (UHI and also determines which factors can directly affect energy use in the city. It explores literally the conceptual framework of confliction between anthropogenic heat and urban structure, which produced UHI intensity and affected energy consumption balance. It then discusses how these two factors can be affected and gives implication to the city and then focuses on whether actions should be taken for balancing adaptation and mitigation of UHI effects. It will be concluded by making the three important strategies to minimise the impact of UHI on energy consumption: landscaping, using albedo materials on external surfaces of buildings and urban areas, and promoting natural ventilation.

  17. Critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon on a downward facing curved surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-06-01

    This report describes a theoretical and experimental study of the boundary layer boiling and critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing curved heating surface, including both hemispherical and toroidal surfaces. A subscale boundary layer boiling (SBLB) test facility was developed to measure the spatial variation of the critical heat flux and observe the underlying mechanisms. Transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB facility under both saturated and subcooled conditions to obtain a complete database on the critical heat flux. To complement the experimental effort, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed from the conservation laws along with sound physical arguments. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel. Based upon the CHF model, a scaling law was established for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water. The scaling law, which compares favorably with all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes, can be used to predict the local CHF limits on large commercial-size vessels. This technical information represents one of the essential elements that is needed in assessing the efficacy of external cooling of core melt by cavity flooding as a severe accident management strategy. 83 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Methods to Estimate Acclimatization to Urban Heat Island Effects on Heat- and Cold-Related Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevic, Ai; Armstrong, Ben G; Gasparrini, Antonio; Bohnenstengel, Sylvia I; Barratt, Benjamin; Wilkinson, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Investigators have examined whether heat mortality risk is increased in neighborhoods subject to the urban heat island (UHI) effect but have not identified degrees of difference in susceptibility to heat and cold between cool and hot areas, which we call acclimatization to the UHI. We developed methods to examine and quantify the degree of acclimatization to heat- and cold-related mortality in relation to UHI anomalies and applied these methods to London, UK. Case-crossover analyses were undertaken on 1993-2006 mortality data from London UHI decile groups defined by anomalies from the London average of modeled air temperature at a 1-km grid resolution. We estimated how UHI anomalies modified excess mortality on cold and hot days for London overall and displaced a fixed-shape temperature-mortality function ("shifted spline" model). We also compared the observed associations with those expected under no or full acclimatization to the UHI. The relative risk of death on hot versus normal days differed very little across UHI decile groups. A 1°C UHI anomaly multiplied the risk of heat death by 1.004 (95% CI: 0.950, 1.061) (interaction rate ratio) compared with the expected value of 1.070 (1.057, 1.082) if there were no acclimatization. The corresponding UHI interaction for cold was 1.020 (0.979, 1.063) versus 1.030 (1.026, 1.034) (actual versus expected under no acclimatization, respectively). Fitted splines for heat shifted little across UHI decile groups, again suggesting acclimatization. For cold, the splines shifted somewhat in the direction of no acclimatization, but did not exclude acclimatization. We have proposed two analytical methods for estimating the degree of acclimatization to the heat- and cold-related mortality burdens associated with UHIs. The results for London suggest relatively complete acclimatization to the UHI effect on summer heat-related mortality, but less clear evidence for cold-related mortality. Milojevic A, Armstrong BG, Gasparrini A

  19. Temporal dynamics of the urban heat island of Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Winston T. L.; Roth, Matthias

    2006-12-01

    The temporal variability of the canopy-level urban heat island (UHI) of Singapore is examined for different temporal scales on the basis of observations during a 1-year period. Temperature data obtained from different urban areas (commercial, Central Business District (CBD), high-rise and low-rise housing) are compared with rural reference data and analysed with respect to meteorological variables and differences in land use. The results indicate that the peak UHI magnitude occurs 3-4 h (>6 h) after sunset in the commercial area, (at other urban sites). Higher UHI intensities generally occur during the southwest monsoon period of May-August, with a maximum of 7 °C observed in the commercial area under ideal meteorological conditions. Variations in seasonal precipitation explain some of the differences in urban-rural cooling. No clear relationship between urban geometry and UHI intensity can be seen, and intra-urban variations of temperature are also shown to be influenced by other site factors, e.g. the extent of green space and anthropogenic heat. Lastly, results from the present study are compared with UHI data from other tropical and mid-latitude cities.

  20. Mitigating the Urban Heat Island Effect in Megacity Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Sodoudi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cities demonstrate higher nocturnal temperatures than surrounding rural areas, which is called “urban heat island” (UHI effect. Climate change projections also indicate increase in the frequency and intensity of heat waves, which will intensify the UHI effect. As megacity Tehran is affected by severe heatwaves in summer, this study investigates its UHI characteristics and suggests some feasible mitigation strategies in order to reduce the air temperature and save energy. Temperature monitoring in Tehran shows clear evidence of the occurrence of the UHI effect, with a peak in July, where the urban area is circa 6 K warmer than the surrounding areas. The mobile measurements show a park cool island of 6-7 K in 2 central parks, which is also confirmed by satellite images. The effectiveness of three UHI mitigation strategies high albedo material (HAM, greenery on the surface and on the roofs (VEG, and a combination of them (HYBRID has been studied using simulation with the microscale model ENVI-met. All three strategies show higher cooling effect in the daytime. The average nocturnal cooling effect of VEG and HYBRID (0.92, 1.10 K is much higher than HAM (0.16 K, although high-density trees show a negative effect on nocturnal cooling.

  1. Local Climate Classification and Dublin’s Urban Heat Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A recent re-evaluation of urban heat island (UHI studies has suggested that the urban effect may be expressed more meaningfully as a difference between Local Climate Zones (LCZ, defined as areas with characteristic dimensions of between one and several kilometers that have distinct effects on climate at both micro-and local-scales (city streets to neighborhoods, rather than adopting the traditional method of comparing urban and rural air temperatures. This paper reports on a UHI study in Dublin (Ireland which maps the urban area into LCZ and uses these as a basis for carrying out a UHI study. The LCZ map for Dublin is derived using a widely available land use/cover map as a basis. A small network of in-situ stations is deployed into different LCZ across Dublin and additional mobile temperature traverses carried out to examine the thermal characteristics of LCZ following mixed weather during a 1 week period in August 2010. The results show LCZ with high impervious/building coverage were on average >4 °C warmer at night than LCZ with high pervious/vegetated coverage during conditions conducive to strong UHI development. The distinction in mean LCZ nocturnal temperature allows for the generation of a heat map across the entire urban area.

  2. Results of the DUE Thermopolis Campaign with Regard to the Urban Heat Island (UHI) Effect in Athens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daglis, Ioannis A.; Rapsomanikis, Spyridon; Kourtidis, Konstantinos; Melas, Dimitrios; Papayannis, Alexandros; Keramitsoglou, Iphigenia; Giannaros, Theodoros; Amiridis, Vassilis; Petropoulos, Georgios; Georgoulias, Aristeidis; Sobrino, Jose Antonio; Manunta, Paolo; Grobner, Julian; Paganini, Marc; Bianchi, Remo

    2010-12-01

    The Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect is a typical phenomenon of urban climate, where the temperature of central urban locations is several degrees higher than that of surrounding rural areas of similar elevation; the temperature difference is especially pronounced during night-time. Although the UHI effect has long been studied through ground-based observations, the possibility of thermal remote sensing using spacecraft and/or airborne platforms has become available only relatively recently, providing innovative ways for the observation and study of the UHI effect. Following an initiative of the European Space Agency (ESA) to improve our understanding of the complexities of how urban heat islands arise, a relevant project entitled "Urban Heat Islands and Urban Thermography" has been under way to study the UHI effect in major European cities through the combination of ground-based observations and spacecraft remote sensing. In this paper we report preliminary results of this project pertaining to the metropolitan area of Athens, Greece, where also airborne remote sensing observations became available through the ESA-funded Thermopolis 2009 campaign, coordinated by the Democritus University of Thrace and implemented by a wide consortium

  3. The role of one large greenspace in mitigating London's nocturnal urban heat island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doick, Kieron J; Peace, Andrew; Hutchings, Tony R

    2014-09-15

    The term urban heat island (UHI) describes a phenomenon where cities are on average warmer than the surrounding rural area. Trees and greenspaces are recognised for their strong potential to regulate urban air temperatures and combat the UHI. Empirical data is required in the UK to inform predictions on cooling by urban greenspaces and guide planning to maximise cooling of urban populations. We describe a 5-month study to measure the temperature profile of one of central London's large greenspaces and also in an adjacent street to determine the extent to which the greenspace reduced night-time UHI intensity. Statistical modelling displayed an exponential decay in the extent of cooling with increased distance from the greenspace. The extent of cooling ranged from an estimated 20 m on some nights to 440 m on other nights. The mean temperature reduction over these distances was 1.1 °C in the summer months, with a maximum of 4 °C cooling observed on some nights. Results suggest that calculation of London's UHI using Met Stations close to urban greenspace can underestimate 'urban' heat island intensity due to the cooling effect of the greenspace and values could be in the region of 45% higher. Our results lend support to claims that urban greenspace is an important component of UHI mitigation strategies. Lack of certainty over the variables that govern the extent of the greenspace cooling influence indicates that the multifaceted roles of trees and greenspaces in the UK's urban environment merit further consideration. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Contributions to urban heat island on the local neighborhood scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Daniel; Schlink, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Already today around half of the global population is living in urban regions and recent studies expect a further increase until mid-21st century. Therefore, especially in the context of climate change, an increasing amount of urban inhabitants are affected by urban climate and air quality. One special characteristic of urban climate is the urban heat island (UHI) effect, where urbanized regions are warmer than the rural surroundings. With respect to climate change and the growing urbanization it is obvious that the UHI effect will tend to be intensified. To keep our cities worth living, it is necessary to think about adaptation and mitigation strategies which refer to both, climate protection as well as utilization of chances resulting from climate changes. One step to a more precisely adaptation, particularly on the neighborhood scale, is an improved understanding of the magnitude of bio geophysical processes (e.g.: radiation balance, convection efficiency, evapotranspiration, storage heat, anthropogenic heat etc.), which contribute to the urban warming. Considering that UHI can be expressed as temperature difference ΔT between urban and rural areas, we can interpret these processes as how they would change temperature, because of energy redistribution, from a rural area to an urbanized region. Up to now on the local scale there is a knowledge gap about these processes. The mentioned processes are parts of a surface energy balance (based on the work of Zhao et al., 2014). That means they refer to the surface UHI effect and not to the canopy layer UHI effect. Assuming that the urban region is a volume with the top at the height of the canopy layer, we can approximately identify the surface UHI effect as the canopy layer UHI effect since the information comes from both the surface and the atmosphere inside. This assumption is not valid for Zhao's approach because they analyzed whole cities and could neglect such processes within the volume. This contribution

  5. Solar Panels reduce both global warming and Urban Heat Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéry eMasson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The production of solar energy in cities is clearly a way to diminish our dependency to fossil fuels, and is a good way to mitigate global warming by lowering the emission of greenhouse gases. However, what are the impacts of solar panels locally ? To evaluate their influence on urban weather, it is necessary to parameterize their effects within the surface schemes that are coupled to atmospheric models. The present paper presents a way to implement solar panels in the Town Energy Balance scheme, taking account of the energy production (for thermal and photovoltaic panels, the impact on the building below and feedback towards the urban micro-climate through radiative and convective fluxes. A scenario of large but realistic deployment of solar panels on the Paris metropolitan area is then simulated. It is shown that solar panels, by shading the roofs, slightly increases the need for domestic heating (3%. In summer however, the solar panels reduce the energy needed for air-conditioning (by 12% and also the Urban Heat Island (UHI: 0.2K by day and up to 0.3K at night. These impacts are larger than those found in previous works, because of the use of thermal panels (that are more efficient than photovoltaic panels and the geographical position of Paris, which is relatively far from the sea. This means that it is not influenced by sea breezes, and hence that its UHI is stronger than for a coastal city of the same size. But this also means that local adaptation strategies aiming to decrease the UHI will have more potent effects. In summary, the deployment of solar panels is good both globally, to produce renewable energy (and hence to limit the warming of the climate and locally, to decrease the UHI, especially in summer, when it can constitute a health threat.

  6. Utilising green and bluespace to mitigate urban heat island intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, K R; Wells, M J; Kershaw, T

    2017-04-15

    It has long been recognised that cities exhibit their own microclimate and are typically warmer than the surrounding rural areas. This 'mesoscale' influence is known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect and results largely from modification of surface properties leading to greater absorption of solar radiation, reduced convective cooling and lower water evaporation rates. Cities typically contain less vegetation and bodies of water than rural areas, and existing green and bluespace is often under threat from increasing population densities. This paper presents a meta-analysis of the key ways in which green and bluespace affect both urban canopy- and boundary-layer temperatures, examined from the perspectives of city-planning, urban climatology and climate science. The analysis suggests that the evapotranspiration-based cooling influence of both green and bluespace is primarily relevant for urban canopy-layer conditions, and that tree-dominated greenspace offers the greatest heat stress relief when it is most needed. However, the magnitude and transport of cooling experienced depends on size, spread, and geometry of greenspaces, with some solitary large parks found to offer minimal boundary-layer cooling. Contribution to cooling at the scale of the urban boundary-layer climate is attributed mainly to greenspace increasing surface roughness and thereby improving convection efficiency rather than evaporation. Although bluespace cooling and transport during the day can be substantial, nocturnal warming is highlighted as likely when conditions are most oppressive. However, when both features are employed together they can offer many synergistic ecosystem benefits including cooling. The ways in which green and bluespace infrastructure is applied in future urban growth strategies, particularly in countries expected to experience rapid urbanisation, warrants greater consideration in urban planning policy to mitigate the adverse effects of the UHI and enhance climate

  7. ON THE PHENOMENON OF TWO-PHASE FLOW MALDISTRIBUTION IN A HEAT EXCHANGER UNDERGOING CONDENSATION

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    W. M. CHIN

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The non-uniformity of two-phase flow rates among the circuits in a heat exchanger reduces its thermal performance. In this work, the effects of a maldistributed condensing two-phase flow profile in an arbitrary cross-flow heat exchanger has been investigated. The results of a discretization numerical analysis shows that the trend of the degradation effect is similar to that found for single phase flows. The thermal performance degradation factor, D, is dependent on the standard deviation and skew of the flow profile and the change of vapour quality along the flow circuits. The magnitude of D varies as the square of normalized standard deviation and liquid Reynolds number, and linearly with the normalized skew. However, the effect of vapour quality is not as significant as compared to that caused by the statistical moments of probability function of the flow maldistribution profile. Flows with low standard deviation and positive skew are preferred to give low magnitudes of D.

  8. Urban heat island investigations in Arctic cities of northwestern Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, Oleg I.; Kasatkina, Elena A.; Kanatjev, Alexander G.

    2017-12-01

    Urban microclimate peculiarities in two Arctic cities in northwestern Russia—Kirovsk (67.62°N, 33.67°E) and Apatity (67.57°N, 33.38°E)—were investigated by using mobile temperature records. The experiment was carried out in and around Apatity and Kirovsk in February 2014 and December 2016. The DS18B20 digital thermometer was installed on the roof of a car (height: approximately 1.2 m) to measure and record temperature variations automatically. In addition to the digital thermometer, the car was also equipped with an onboard global positioning system, allowing every temperature measurement to be referenced with an altitude and a latitude/longitude position. The possibility of urban heat island formation in these polar cities, above the Arctic Circle, was studied. Our analysis indicated that on 11 February 2014, the temperature varied in accordance with the background environmental lapse rate (-0.0045°C m-1), and nearly corresponded to it (-0.0165°C m-1) on 12 February 2014. On 6 December 2016, a strong local temperature inversion with a positive value of 0.032°C m-1 was detected, seemingly caused by the formation of a cold air pool in the valley near Kirovsk. It was found that the temperature variations within and outside these cities are strongly influenced by local topographic effects and the physical conditions of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  9. Positive effects of vegetation: urban heat island and green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susca, T; Gaffin, S R; Dell'osso, G R

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to evaluate the positive effects of vegetation with a multi-scale approach: an urban and a building scale. Monitoring the urban heat island in four areas of New York City, we have found an average of 2 °C difference of temperatures between the most and the least vegetated areas, ascribable to the substitution of vegetation with man-made building materials. At micro-scale, we have assessed the effect of surface albedo on climate through the use of a climatological model. Then, using the CO(2) equivalents as indicators of the impact on climate, we have compared the surface albedo, and the construction, replacement and use phase of a black, a white and a green roof. By our analyses, we found that both the white and the green roofs are less impactive than the black one; with the thermal resistance, the biological activity of plants and the surface albedo playing a crucial role. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Seasonal Variations of the Surface Urban Heat Island in a Semi-Arid City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirous Haashemi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The process of the surface urban heat island (SUHI varies with latitude, climate, topography and meteorological conditions. This study investigated the seasonal variability of SUHI in the Tehran metropolitan area, Iran, with respect to selected surface biophysical variables. Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST was retrieved as nighttime LST data, while daytime LST was retrieved from Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS using the split-window algorithm. Both data covered the time period from September 2013 to September 2015. To assess SUHI intensity, we employed three SUHI indicators, i.e., the LST difference of urban-rural, that of urban-agriculture and that of urban-water. Physical and biophysical surface variables, including land use and land cover (LULC, elevation, impervious surface (IS, fractional vegetation cover (FVC and albedo, were selected to estimate the relationship between LST seasonal variability and the surface properties. Results show that an inversion of the SUHI phenomenon (i.e., surface urban cool island existed at daytime with the maximal value of urban-rural LST difference of −4 K in March; whereas the maximal value of SUHI at nighttime yielded 3.9 K in May. When using the indicators of urban-agriculture and urban-water LST differences, the maximal value of SUHI was found to be 8.2 K and 15.5 K, respectively. Both results were observed at daytime, suggesting the role of bare soils in the inversion of the SUHI phenomenon with the urban-rural indicator. Maximal correlation was observed in the relationship between night LST and elevation in spring (coefficient: −0.76, night LST and IS in spring (0.60, night LST and albedo in winter (−0.53 and day LST with fractional vegetation cover in summer (−0.41. The relationship between all surface properties with LST possessed large seasonal variations, and thus, using these relationships for SUHI modeling may not be

  11. The impact of heat waves on surface urban heat island and local economy in Cluj-Napoca city, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Ioana; Croitoru, Adina-Eliza; Rus, Adina Viorica; Roşca, Cristina Florina; Harpa, Gabriela Victoria; Ciupertea, Antoniu-Flavius; Rus, Ionuţ

    2017-07-01

    The association between heat waves and the urban heat island effect can increase the impact on environment and society inducing biophysical hazards. Heat stress and their associated public health problems are among the most frequent. This paper explores the heat waves impact on surface urban heat island and on the local economy loss during three heat periods in Cluj-Napoca city in the summer of 2015. The heat wave events were identified based on daily maximum temperature, and they were divided into three classes considering the intensity threshold: moderate heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 90th percentile), severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature over the 95th percentile), and extremely severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 98th percentile). The minimum length of an event was of minimum three consecutive days. The surface urban heat island was detected based on land surface temperature derived from Landsat 8 thermal infrared data, while the economic impact was estimated based on data on work force structure and work productivity in Cluj-Napoca derived from the data released by Eurostat, National Bank of Romania, and National Institute of Statistics. The results indicate that the intensity and spatial extension of surface urban heat island could be governed by the magnitude of the heat wave event, but due to the low number of satellite images available, we should consider this information only as preliminary results. Thermal infrared remote sensing has proven to be a very efficient method to study surface urban heat island, due to the fact that the synoptic conditions associated with heat wave events usually favor cloud free image. The resolution of the OLI_TIRS sensor provided good results for a mid-extension city, but the low revisiting time is still a drawback. The potential economic loss was calculated for the working days during heat waves and the estimated loss reached more than 2.5 mil. EUR for each heat wave day

  12. Data and techniques for studying the urban heat island effect in Johannesburg

    OpenAIRE

    Hardy, C. H.; A. L. Nel

    2015-01-01

    The city of Johannesburg contains over 10 million trees and is often referred to as an urban forest. The intra-urban spatial variability of the levels of vegetation across Johannesburg’s residential regions has an influence on the urban heat island effect within the city. Residential areas with high levels of vegetation benefit from cooling due to evapo-transpirative processes and thus exhibit weaker heat island effects; while their impoverished counterparts are not so fortunate. The...

  13. Influences of Urban Expansion on Urban Heat Island in Beijing during 1989–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi Qiao; Guangjin Tian; Lixiao Zhang; Xinliang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Beijing has experienced rapid urbanization and associated urban heat island (UHI) effects. This study aimed at analyzing the impact of urban form on UHI in Beijing using TM/ETM images between 1989 and 2010. Spatial analysis was proposed to explore the relationships between area, compactness ratio, the gravity centers of urban land, and UHI. The UHI in Beijing spatially represented a “NE-SW” spindle. The land surface temperature (LST) was higher in south than in north. Urban Heat Island Ratio ...

  14. Spatio-temporal variability of urban heat islands in local climate zones of Delhi-NCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhiraja, Bakul; Pathak, Prasad; Agrawal, Girish

    2017-10-01

    Land use change is at the nexus of human territory expansion and urbanization. Human intrusion disturbs the natural heat energy balance of the area, although a new equilibrium of energy flux is attained but with greater diurnal range and adversely affecting the geo/physical variables. Modification in the trend of these variables causes a phenomenon known as Urban Heat Island (UHI) i.e. a dome of heat is formed around the city which has 7-10 °C high temperature than the nearby rural area at night. The study focuses on Surface UHI conventionally studied using thermal band of the remotely sensed satellite images. Land Surface Temperature (LST) is determined for the year 2015 using Landsat 8 for Delhi National Capital Region (NCR). This region was chosen because it is the biggest urban agglomeration in India, many satellite cities are coming in periphery and it has temperate climate. Quantification of UHI is predictably done using UHI intensity that is the difference between representative Urban and rural temperature. Recently the definition of urban and rural has been questioned because of various kinds of configurations of urban spaces across the globe. Delhi NCR urban configurations vary spatially- thus one UHI intensity does not give a deep understanding of the micro-climate. Advancement was made recently to standardize UHI intensity by dividing city into Local Climate Zones (LCZ), comes with 17 broad categories. LCZ map of Delhi NCR has been acquired from World Urban Database. The seasonality in LST across LCZ has been determined along with identifying warmest and coolest LCZ.

  15. Thermal signatures of urban land cover types: High-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing of urban heat island in Huntsville, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chor Pang

    1996-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to apply airborne high-resolution thermal infrared imagery for urban heat island studies, using Huntsville, AL, a medium-sized American city, as the study area. The occurrence of urban heat islands represents human-induced urban/rural contrast, which is caused by deforestation and the replacement of the land surface by non-evaporating and non-porous materials such as asphalt and concrete. The result is reduced evapotranspiration and more rapid runoff of rain water. The urban landscape forms a canopy acting as a transitional zone between the atmosphere and the land surface. The composition and structure of this canopy have a significant impact on the thermal behavior of the urban environment. Research on the trends of surface temperature at rapidly growing urban sites in the United States during the last 30 to 50 years suggests that significant urban heat island effects have caused the temperatures at these sites to rise by 1 to 2 C. Urban heat islands have caused changes in urban precipitation and temperature that are at least similar to, if not greater than, those predicted to develop over the next 100 years by global change models. Satellite remote sensing, particularly NOAA AVHRR thermal data, has been used in the study of urban heat islands. Because of the low spatial resolution (1.1 km at nadir) of the AVHRR data, these studies can only examine and map the phenomenon at the macro-level. The present research provides the rare opportunity to utilize 5-meter thermal infrared data acquired from an airplane to characterize more accurately the thermal responses of different land cover types in the urban landscape as input to urban heat island studies.

  16. The urban climate: urban heat island of Salamanca El clima de las ciudades: isla de calor de Salamanca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Salud Alonso García

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the existence of the urban heat island (UHI in a medium-sized city, with an extreme climate and few important foci of industrial pollution. It was seen that urban warming can arise in cities of these characteristics, being able to influence in the alive beings of the zone. By comparing the temperature series in an urban area and those from a nearby rural area, we studied the temporal evolution of the intensity of the UHI for the three-year period between 1996 and 1998. We detected two phenomenons: nocturnal heat island, when the difference of temperature between city and rural zone is positive, and diurnal heat island, when is negative. The most intense nocturnal heat island was seen in autumn, and the most intense diurnal heat island was seen in spring. Statistical study of the annual series corresponding to the night-time heat island permits a definition for Salamanca: a weak island, such as the one showing an intensity lower than 2.0 oC, a moderate island, if the intensity lies between 2.0 oC and 4.0 oC, and an intense island when a values greater than 4.0 oC is passed.En este trabajo se ha determinado la existencia de la isla de calor urbana (ICU, en una ciudad de tamaño medio, con un clima extremado y focos industriales de poca actividad. Con lo que se puede comprobar cómo afecta el calentamiento urbano a ciudades de estas características, pudiendo influir en los seres vivos de la zona. La existencia del fenómeno isla de calor, y su evolución en el tiempo, se han observado comparando los datos de temperatura registrados en una estación meteorológica situada en la ciudad, con los de otra estación fuera del radio de acción de la urbe, durante el período 1996-1998. Se han detectado dos fenómenos: la isla de calor nocturna, cuando la diferencia térmica entre la ciudad y la zona rural es positiva, que presenta sus valores más altos en otoño, y la isla de calor diurna, cuando la diferencia es negativa, que

  17. Urban Heat Island Effect on the Energy Consumption of Institutional Buildings in Rome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calice, Claudia; Clemente, Carola; Salvati, Agnese; Palme, Massimo; Inostroza, Luis

    2017-10-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) effect is constantly increasing the energy consumption of buildings, especially in summer periods. The energy gap between the estimated energy performance - often simulated without considering UHI - and the real operational consumption is especially relevant for institutional buildings, where the cooling needs are in general higher than in other kind of buildings, due to more internal gains (people, appliances) and different architectural design (more transparent façades and light walls). This paper presents a calculation of the energy penalty due to UHI in two institutional buildings in Rome. Urban Weather Generator (UWG) is used to generate a modified weather file, taking into account the UHI phenomenon. Then, two building performance simulations are done for each case: the first simulation uses a standard weather file and the second uses the modified one. Results shows how is it necessary to re-develop mitigation strategies and a new energy retrofit approach, in order to include urbanization ad UHI effect, especially in this kind of buildings, characterized by very poor conditions of comfort during summer, taking into account users and occupant-driven demand.

  18. Effect of the Urban Heat Island on Aerosol pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Michael A; Douglas, Sarah; Hennigan, Christopher J

    2017-11-21

    The urban heat island (UHI) is a widely observed phenomenon whereby urban environments have higher temperatures and different relative humidities than surrounding suburban and rural areas. Temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) strongly affect the partitioning of semivolatile species found in the atmosphere, such as nitric acid, ammonia, and water. These species are inherently tied to aerosol pH, which is a key parameter driving some atmospheric chemical processes and environmental effects of aerosols. In this study, we characterized the effect of the UHI on aerosol pH in Baltimore, MD, and Chicago, IL. The T and RH differences that define the UHI lead to substantial differences in aerosol liquid water (ALW) content. The ALW differences produce urban aerosol pH that is systematically lower (more acidic) than rural aerosol pH for identical atmospheric composition. The UHI in Baltimore and Chicago are most intense during the summer and at night, with urban-rural aerosol pH differences in excess of 0.8 and 0.65 pH units, respectively. The UHI has been observed in cities of all sizes: the similarity of our results for cities with different climatologies and aerosol compositions suggests that these results have broad implications for chemistry occurring in and around urban atmospheres globally.

  19. Heat transport in the quasi-single-helicity islands of EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J.

    2009-03-01

    The heat transport inside the magnetic island generated in a quasi-single-helicity regime of a reversed-field pinch device is studied by using a numerical code that simulates the electron temperature and the soft x-ray emissivity. The heat diffusivity χe inside the island is determined by matching the simulated signals with the experimental ones. Inside the island, χe turns out to be from one to two orders of magnitude lower than the diffusivity in the surrounding plasma, where the magnetic field is stochastic. Furthermore, the heat transport properties inside the island are studied in correlation with the plasma current and with the amplitude of the magnetic fluctuations.

  20. Observed and Simulated Urban Heat Island and Urban Cool Island in Las Vegas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauceda, Daniel O.

    This research investigates the urban climate of Las Vegas and establishes long-term trends relative to the regional climate in an attempt to identify climate disturbances strictly related to urban growth. An experimental surface station network (DRI-UHI) of low-cost surface temperature (T2m) and relative humidity (RH) sensors were designed to cover under-sampled low-intensity residential urban areas, as well as complement the in-city and surrounding rural areas. In addition to the analysis of the surface station data, high-resolution gridded data products (GDPs) from Daymet (1km) and PRISM (800 m) and results from numerical simulations were used to further characterize the Las Vegas climate trends. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was coupled with three different models: the Noah Land Surface Model (LSM) and a single- and multi-layer urban canopy model (UCM) to assess the urban related climate disturbances; as well as the model sensitivity and ability to characterize diurnal variability and rural/urban thermal contrasts. The simulations consisted of 1 km grid size for five, one month-long hindcast simulations during November of 2012: (i) using the Noah LSM without UCM treatment, (ii) same as (i) with a single-layer UCM (UCM1), (iii) same as (i) with a multi-layer UCM (UCM2), (iv) removing the City of Las Vegas (NC) and replacing it with predominant land cover (shrub), and (v) same as (ii) with increasing the albedo of rooftops from 0.20 to 0.65 as a potential adaptation scenario known as "white roofing". T2m long-term trends showed a regional warming of minimum temperatures (Tmin) and negligible trends in maximum temperatures (Tmax ). By isolating the regional temperature trends, an observed urban heat island (UHI) of ~1.63°C was identified as well as a daytime urban cool island (UCI) of ~0.15°C. GDPs agree with temperature trends but tend to underpredict UHI intensity by ~1.05°C. The WRF-UCM showed strong correlations with observed T2m (0.85 UCI

  1. Energy Saving Potentials and Air Quality Benefits of Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem

    2005-08-23

    Urban areas tend to have higher air temperatures than their rural surroundings as a result of gradual surface modifications that include replacing the natural vegetation with buildings and roads. The term ''Urban Heat Island'' describes this phenomenon. The surfaces of buildings and pavements absorb solar radiation and become extremely hot, which in turn warm the surrounding air. Cities that have been ''paved over'' do not receive the benefit of the natural cooling effect of vegetation. As the air temperature rises, so does the demand for air-conditioning (a/c). This leads to higher emissions from power plants, as well as increased smog formation as a result of warmer temperatures. In the United States, we have found that this increase in air temperature is responsible for 5-10% of urban peak electric demand for a/c use, and as much as 20% of population-weighted smog concentrations in urban areas. Simple ways to cool the cities are the use of reflective surfaces (rooftops and pavements) and planting of urban vegetation. On a large scale, the evapotranspiration from vegetation and increased reflection of incoming solar radiation by reflective surfaces will cool a community a few degrees in the summer. As an example, computer simulations for Los Angeles, CA show that resurfacing about two-third of the pavements and rooftops with reflective surfaces and planting three trees per house can cool down LA by an average of 2-3K. This reduction in air temperature will reduce urban smog exposure in the LA basin by roughly the same amount as removing the basin entire onroad vehicle exhaust. Heat island mitigation is an effective air pollution control strategy, more than paying for itself in cooling energy cost savings. We estimate that the cooling energy savings in U.S. from cool surfaces and shade trees, when fully implemented, is about $5 billion per year (about $100 per air-conditioned house).

  2. Analysis and modelling of surface Urban Heat Island in 20 Canadian cities under climate and land-cover change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Abhishek; Eichenbaum, Markus Kalev; Simonovic, Slobodan P

    2018-01-15

    Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI) is an urban climate phenomenon that is expected to respond to future climate and land-use land-cover change. It is important to further our understanding of physical mechanisms that govern SUHI phenomenon to enhance our ability to model future SUHI characteristics under changing geophysical conditions. In this study, SUHI phenomenon is quantified and modelled at 20 cities distributed across Canada. By analyzing MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensed surface temperature at the cities over 2002-2012, it is found that 16 out of 20 selected cities have experienced a positive SUHI phenomenon while 4 cities located in the prairies region and high elevation locations have experienced a negative SUHI phenomenon in the past. A statistically significant relationship between observed SUHI magnitude and city elevation is also recorded over the observational period. A Physical Scaling downscaling model is then validated and used to downscale future surface temperature projections from 3 GCMs and 2 extreme Representative Concentration Pathways in the urban and rural areas of the cities. Future changes in SUHI magnitudes between historical (2006-2015) and future timelines: 2030s (2026-2035), 2050s (2046-2055), and 2090s (2091-2100) are estimated. Analysis of future projected changes indicate that 15 (13) out of 20 cities can be expected to experience increases in SUHI magnitudes in future under RCP 2.6 (RCP 8.5). A statistically significant relationship between projected future SUHI change and current size of the cities is also obtained. The study highlights the role of city properties (i.e. its size, elevation, and surrounding land-cover) towards shaping their current and future SUHI characteristics. The results from this analysis will help decision-makers to manage Canadian cities more efficiently under rapidly changing geophysical and demographical conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. ANALYSIS OF THE INTRA-CITY VARIATION OF URBAN HEAT ISLAND AND ITS RELATION TO LAND SURFACE/COVER PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gerçek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Along with urbanization, sealing of vegetated land and evaporation surfaces by impermeable materials, lead to changes in urban climate. This phenomenon is observed as temperatures several degrees higher in densely urbanized areas compared to the rural land at the urban fringe particularly at nights, so-called Urban Heat Island. Urban Heat Island (UHI effect is related with urban form, pattern and building materials so far as it is associated with meteorological conditions, air pollution, excess heat from cooling. UHI effect has negative influences on human health, as well as other environmental problems such as higher energy demand, air pollution, and water shortage. Urban Heat Island (UHI effect has long been studied by observations of air temperature from thermometers. However, with the advent and proliferation of remote sensing technology, synoptic coverage and better representations of spatial variation of surface temperature became possible. This has opened new avenues for the observation capabilities and research of UHIs. In this study, "UHI effect and its relation to factors that cause it" is explored for İzmit city which has been subject to excess urbanization and industrialization during the past decades. Spatial distribution and variation of UHI effect in İzmit is analysed using Landsat 8 and ASTER day & night images of 2015 summer. Surface temperature data derived from thermal bands of the images were analysed for UHI effect. Higher temperatures were classified into 4 grades of UHIs and mapped both for day and night. Inadequate urban form, pattern, density, high buildings and paved surfaces at the expanse of soil ground and vegetation cover are the main factors that cause microclimates giving rise to spatial variations in temperatures across cities. These factors quantified as land surface/cover parameters for the study include vegetation index (NDVI, imperviousness (NDISI, albedo, solar insolation, Sky View Factor (SVF, building

  4. Analysis of the Intra-City Variation of Urban Heat Island and its Relation to Land Surface/cover Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerçek, D.; Güven, İ. T.; Oktay, İ. Ç.

    2016-06-01

    Along with urbanization, sealing of vegetated land and evaporation surfaces by impermeable materials, lead to changes in urban climate. This phenomenon is observed as temperatures several degrees higher in densely urbanized areas compared to the rural land at the urban fringe particularly at nights, so-called Urban Heat Island. Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect is related with urban form, pattern and building materials so far as it is associated with meteorological conditions, air pollution, excess heat from cooling. UHI effect has negative influences on human health, as well as other environmental problems such as higher energy demand, air pollution, and water shortage. Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect has long been studied by observations of air temperature from thermometers. However, with the advent and proliferation of remote sensing technology, synoptic coverage and better representations of spatial variation of surface temperature became possible. This has opened new avenues for the observation capabilities and research of UHIs. In this study, "UHI effect and its relation to factors that cause it" is explored for İzmit city which has been subject to excess urbanization and industrialization during the past decades. Spatial distribution and variation of UHI effect in İzmit is analysed using Landsat 8 and ASTER day & night images of 2015 summer. Surface temperature data derived from thermal bands of the images were analysed for UHI effect. Higher temperatures were classified into 4 grades of UHIs and mapped both for day and night. Inadequate urban form, pattern, density, high buildings and paved surfaces at the expanse of soil ground and vegetation cover are the main factors that cause microclimates giving rise to spatial variations in temperatures across cities. These factors quantified as land surface/cover parameters for the study include vegetation index (NDVI), imperviousness (NDISI), albedo, solar insolation, Sky View Factor (SVF), building envelope

  5. Heat stress stimulates nitric oxide production in Symbiodinium microadriaticum: a possible linkage between nitric oxide and the coral bleaching phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Josée Nina; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2008-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gas displaying multiple physiological functions in plants, animals and bacteria. The enzymes nitrate reductase and NO synthase have been suggested to be involved in the production of NO in plants and algae, but the implication of those enzymes in NO production under physiological conditions remains obscure. Symbiodinium microadriaticum, commonly referred to as zooxanthellae, is a marine microalga commonly found in symbiotic association with a cnidarian host including reef-building corals. Here we demonstrate NO production in zooxanthellae upon supplementation of either sodium nitrite or L-arginine as a substrate. The nitrite-dependent NO production was detected electrochemically and confirmed by the application of 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), a specific NO scavenger. Cells stained with the diaminofluorescein, DAF-2 DA, an NO fluorescent probe, showed an increase in fluorescence intensity upon supplementation of both sodium nitrite and L-arginine. Microscopic observations of DAF-stained cells verified that NO was produced inside the cells. NO production in S. microadriaticum was found to increase upon exposure of cells to an acute heat stress which also caused a decline in the photosynthetic efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)). This study provides substantial evidence to confirm that zooxanthellae can synthesize NO even when they are not in a symbiotic association with a coral host. The increase in NO production at high temperatures suggests that heat stress stimulates the microalgal NO production in a temperature-dependent manner. The implications of these findings are discussed in the light of the coral bleaching phenomenon which is associated with elevated sea surface temperature due to global warming.

  6. Key Parameters for Urban Heat Island Assessment in A Mediterranean Context: A Sensitivity Analysis Using the Urban Weather Generator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvati, Agnese; Palme, Massimo; Inostroza, Luis

    2017-10-01

    Although Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a fundamental effect modifying the urban climate, being widely studied, the relative weight of the parameters involved in its generation is still not clear. This paper investigates the hierarchy of importance of eight parameters responsible for UHI intensity in the Mediterranean context. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out using the Urban Weather Generator model, considering the range of variability of: 1) city radius, 2) urban morphology, 3) tree coverage, 4) anthropogenic heat from vehicles, 5) building’s cooling set point, 6) heat released to canyon from HVAC systems, 7) wall construction properties and 8) albedo of vertical and horizontal surfaces. Results show a clear hierarchy of significance among the considered parameters; the urban morphology is the most important variable, causing a relative change up to 120% of the annual average UHI intensity in the Mediterranean context. The impact of anthropogenic sources of heat such as cooling systems and vehicles is also significant. These results suggest that urban morphology parameters can be used as descriptors of the climatic performance of different urban areas, easing the work of urban planners and designers in understanding a complex physical phenomenon, such as the UHI.

  7. Assessment of Urban Heat Islands in Small- and Mid-Sized Cities in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata dos Santos Cardoso

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Urban heat islands (UHIs in large cities and different climatic regions have been thoroughly studied; however, their effects are becoming a common concern in smaller cities as well. We assessed UHIs in three tropical cities, analyzing how synoptic conditions, urban morphology, and land cover affect the heat island magnitude. Data gathering involved mobile surveys across Paranavaí (Paraná, Rancharia (São Paulo, and Presidente Prudente (São Paulo, Brazil, during summer evenings (December 2013–January 2014. Temperature data collected over five days in each city point to heat islands with magnitudes up to 6 °C, under calm synoptic conditions, whereas summer average UHI magnitudes peak at 3.7 °C. In addition, UHI magnitudes were higher in areas with closely spaced buildings and few or no trees and building materials that are not appropriate for the region’s climate and thermal comfort.

  8. Comprehensive assessments of measures mitigating heat island phenomena in urban areas; Heat shinku wo riyoshita daikibo reibo system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yoshikado, H.; Kondo, H.; Kaneho, N.; Saegusa, N.; Inaba, A. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan); Inoue, M. [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo, (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the assessment method of measures mitigating heat island phenomena in urban areas. The heat island phenomena were classified into meso-scale with 100 km-scale, block-scale with several km-scale, and building-scale with 100 m-scale. Urban thermal environment simulation model was developed in response to each scale. For the development, regional data using aircraft and artificial satellite observations, surface observation and thermal environment observation at Shinjuku new central city of Tokyo, and artificial waste heat actual survey data in the southern Kanto district were utilized. Results of the urban thermal environment simulation were introduced as an application of this model. Temperature distributions of the heat island in the Kanto district were simulated with considering urban conditions near Tokyo and without considering it. Daily changes of wall surfaces of high buildings and road surface were calculated. Increase in the air temperature in the back stream of building roofs with increased temperature was determined. 4 figs.

  9. Different Patterns of the Urban Heat Island Intensity from Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, F. B.; Longo, K.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes the different variability patterns of the Urban Heat Island intensity (UHII) in the Metropolitan Area of Rio de Janeiro (MARJ), one of the largest urban agglomerations in Brazil. The UHII is defined as the difference in the surface air temperature between the urban/suburban and rural/vegetated areas. To choose one or more stations that represent those areas we used the technique of cluster analysis on the air temperature observations from 14 surface weather stations in the MARJ. The cluster analysis aims to classify objects based on their characteristics, gathering similar groups. The results show homogeneity patterns between air temperature observations, with 6 homogeneous groups being defined. Among those groups, one might be a natural choice for the representative urban area (Central station); one corresponds to suburban area (Afonsos station); and another group referred as rural area is compound of three stations (Ecologia, Santa Cruz and Xerém) that are located in vegetated regions. The arithmetic mean of temperature from the three rural stations is taken to represent the rural station temperature. The UHII is determined from these homogeneous groups. The first UHII is estimated from urban and rural temperature areas (Case 1), whilst the second UHII is obtained from suburban and rural temperature areas (Case 2). In Case 1, the maximum UHII occurs in two periods, one in the early morning and the other at night, while the minimum UHII occurs in the afternoon. In Case 2, the maximum UHII is observed during afternoon/night and the minimum during dawn/early morning. This study demonstrates that the stations choice reflects different UHII patterns, evidencing that distinct behaviors of this phenomenon can be identified.

  10. Urban Heat Island in the city of Bari (Italy) ant its relationship with morphological features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppi, C.; Balena, P.; Loconte, P.; Mancini, F.

    2012-04-01

    The investigation of an Urban Heat Island (UHI) and its relationship with the wide range of factors able to explain its behavior is a very difficult task: the main trouble is represented by the spatial variability of the urban temperature due to the extreme heterogeneousness of the urban coverage and morphological features. In literature it is known that the local surface temperatures are influenced by the changing characteristics in urban surface and modification of land surface processes affecting the surface energy balance and the shape of boundary layer. The whole processes could lead to distinct urban climates. This work is mainly focused on the mechanisms which are actually connecting the urban morphology with the surface temperature as derived by satellite data provided from the ASTER sensor. Urban morphology could be described by several factors depending on the selected scale of analysis. At the macroscale the UHI is more related to the land-use, environmental context and boundary conditions. At the microscale the surface characteristics, urban density, ratio between green and built areas and, construction and built typology are more involved in addition to the composite indicators such as the Sky View factor and the elevation of the built texture. The case study of the city of Bari is faced. It is a medium sized city in the southern Italy, characterized by the presence of a pervasive waterfront and presence of "lame", a natural erosive furrows shallow that are typical of the Apulia country side. Such ephemeral streams convey the stormwater from the plateau of the hilly Murgia areas to the sea. Moreover, the urban complexity of the city exacerbates the spatial variability of the phenomenon. The first step aim at the investigating of the relationship between the thermal behavior and the above mentioned factors by the construction of a set of homogeneous morphological units. The classification is built both in the urban and rural zone. The second step

  11. The use of a satellite derived vegetation index for assessment of the urban heat island effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Kevin P.; Tarpley, J. D.; Mcnab, Alan L.; Karl, Thomas R.; Brown, Jesslyn F.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite derived normalized difference (ND) vegetation index data, based on urban and rural region composed of a variety of land surface environments, are evaluated. These data are linearly related to the difference in observed urban and rural minimum temperatures. It is concluded that the difference in the ND index between urban and rural regions reflects the difference in the surface properties (evaporation and heat storage capacity) of these two environments and urban and rural minimum temperatures (the urban heat island effect).

  12. A diagnostic equation for the daily maximum urban heat island effect for cities in northwestern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theeuwes, N.E.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Ronda, R.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) effect, defined as the air temperature difference between the urban canyon and the nearby rural area, is investigated. Because not all cities around the world are equipped with an extensive measurement network, a need exists for a relatively straightforward equation for

  13. Spatiotemporal trends of urban heat island effect along the urban development intensity gradient in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decheng Zhou; Liangxia Zhang; Lu Hao; Ge Sun; Yongqiang Liu; Chao Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) represents a major anthropogenic modification to the Earth system and its relationshipwith urban development is poorly understood at a regional scale. Using AquaMODIS data and LandsatTM/ETM+images, we examined the spatiotemporal trends of the UHI effect (ΔT, relative to the rural reference) along theurban...

  14. Seasonal dependence of the urban heat island on the street canyon aspect ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theeuwes, N.E.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Ronda, R.J.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Hove, van L.W.A.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the relation between the urban heat island (UHI) in the urban canyon and street geometry, in particular the aspect ratio. Model results and observations show that two counteracting processes govern the relation between the nocturnal UHI and the building aspect ratio: i.e.

  15. The surface heat island of Rotterdam and its relationship with urban surface characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, L.; Zwart, S.; Verhagen, H.; Mauri, E.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal infrared high resolution satellite images from Landsat sensors were used to spatially quantify the surface heat island (SHI) of Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Based on surface temperature maps retrieved on 15 summer days since 1984, the average surface temperature of each district and

  16. Temporal and spatial variability of urban heat island and thermal comfort within the Rotterdam agglomeration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, van B.; Jacobs, C.M.J.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Elbers, J.A.; Driel, van B.L.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on temporal and spatial variability of local climate and outdoor human thermal comfort within the Rotterdam agglomeration. We analyse three years of meteorological observations (2010–2012) from a monitoring network. Focus is on the atmospheric urban heat island (UHI); the

  17. Refreshing the role of open water surfaces on mitigating the maximum urban heat island effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.; Koopmans, S.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Theeuwes, N.E.

    2014-01-01

    During warm summer episodes citizens in urban areas are subject to reduced human thermal comfort and negative health effects. To mitigate these adverse effects, land use planners and urban designers have used the evaporative power of water bodies as a tool to limit the urban heat island effect (UHI)

  18. Exploring the Urban Heat Island (UHI) Effect in Port Louis, Mauritius ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although many methods for heat island study have been developed, there is little attempt to link the findings to actual and hypothetical scenarios of urban developments which would help to mitigate the UHI in cities. The aim of this paper is to analyze the UHI at two sites with similar geometries within Mauritius, with ...

  19. Towards Systematic Prediction of Urban Heat Islands: Grounding Measurements, Assessing Modeling Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Voelkel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available While there exists extensive assessment of urban heat, we observe myriad methods for describing thermal distribution, factors that mediate temperatures, and potential impacts on urban populations. In addition, the limited spatial and temporal resolution of satellite-derived heat measurements may limit the capacity of decision makers to take effective actions for reducing mortalities in vulnerable populations whose locations require highly-refined measurements. Needed are high resolution spatial and temporal information for urban heat. In this study, we ask three questions: (1 how do urban heat islands vary throughout the day? (2 what statistical methods best explain the presence of temperatures at sub-meter spatial scales; and (3 what landscape features help to explain variation in urban heat islands? Using vehicle-based temperature measurements at three periods of the day in the Pacific Northwest city of Portland, Oregon (USA, we incorporate LiDAR-derived datasets, and evaluate three statistical techniques for modeling and predicting variation in temperatures during a heat wave. Our results indicate that the random forest technique best predicts temperatures, and that the evening model best explains the variation in temperature. The results suggest that ground-based measurements provide high levels of accuracy for describing the distribution of urban heat, its temporal variation, and specific locations where targeted interventions with communities can reduce mortalities from heat events.

  20. Comparison of local and regional heat transport processes into the subsurface urban heat island of Karlsruhe, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Susanne; Bayer, Peter; Menberg, Kathrin; Blum, Philipp

    2014-05-01

    Temperatures in shallow urban ground are typically elevated. They manifest as subsurface urban heat islands, which are observed worldwide in different metropolitan areas and which have a site-specific areal extent and intensity. As of right now the governing heat transport processes accumulating heat in the subsurface of cities are insufficiently understood. Based on a spatial assessment of groundwater temperatures, six individual heat flux processes could be identified: (1) heat flux from elevated ground surface temperatures (GST), (2) heat flux from basements of buildings, (3) reinjection of thermal waste water, (4) sewage drains, (5) sewage leakage, and (6) district heating. In this study, the contributions of these processes are quantified on local and regional scales for the city of Karlsruhe in Germany. For the regional scale, the Regionalized Monte Carlo (RMC) method is used. This method applies a single Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for the entire study area. At relatively low data demand, the RMC method provides basic insights into the heat contribution for the entire city. For the local scale, the Local Monte Carlo (LMC) method was developed and applied. This method analyzes all dominant heat fluxes spatially dependent by performing an MC simulation for each arbitrary sized pixel of the study area (here 10 x 10 m). This more intricate approach allows for a spatial representation of all heat flux processes, which is necessary for the local planning of geothermal energy use. In order to evaluate the heat transport processes on a regional scale, we compared the mean annual thermal energies that result from the individual heat flux processes. Both methods identify the heat flux from elevated GST and the heat flux from buildings as the dominant regional processes. However, reinjection of thermal wastewater is by far the most dominant local heat flux processes with an average heat flux of 16 ± 2 W/m2 in the affected areas. Although being dominant on the regional

  1. Comparative Analysis of Urban Heat Island Effects For Large Hungarian Cities Using Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezso, Zs.; Bartholy, J.; Pongracz, R.; Barcza, Z.

    In order to find potential mitigation strategies that facilitate the urban population to adapt to new environmental conditions urban heat islands and other climatological impacts of urbanization must be investigated. In this study detailed comparison of the urban heat island effects for the Budapest agglomeration area (capital of Hungary) and other large cities of the Carpathian Basin is provided. A new approach has been applied, namely satellite images have served as a basic tool in the present analysis. Part of the NASA's Earth Observing System satellite TERRA was launched to a po- lar orbit in December 1999. Measurements include surface temperature (both land and ocean), global vegetation, cloud characteristics, snow cover, and temperature and moisture profiles. MODIS is capable of viewing the entire globe daily at high reso- lutions, ranging from 250 m to 1 km per pixel. First validated observations started in February 2000, and regular measurements are available from July 2000. In this pa- per daytime and nighttime surface temperature time series measured in the Carpathian Basin have been analysed. First, several large cities have been selected and their pixel representations (including their rural environment) have been determined. Then, these representative areas have been divided into urban and rural pixels which have provided spatial averages of observed surface temperature values. The preliminary results sug- gest that intensity of the urban heat island detected in Hungarian cities ranges between 1K and 3K, the most intense periods include the summer season and nighttime. Fine resolution satellite images provide an excellent tool to investigate heat island struc- tures for each selected city. Using the selected representative area of these Hungarian cities spatial structures of their urban heat island have been determined depending on seasons and different macrocirculation conditions. Further analysis have been carried out by identifying special pixels

  2. Assessment of surface urban heat island across China's three main urban agglomerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonghong; Fang, Xiaoyi; Xu, Yongming; Zhang, Shuo; Luan, Qingzu

    2017-06-01

    This article proposes a method for estimating the surface urban heat island intensity (SUHI) of urban areas, which addresses prior difficulties in the determination of rural contexts that may be used as a point of comparison. Based on indexes produced using this method, as well as remotely sensed datasets, the article compares the temporal and spatial characteristics of SUHIs within three major urban agglomerations (the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei, the Yangtze River Delta, and the Pearl River Delta) and six typical metropolises. The article also examines the influence of socioeconomic factors on SUHI. The study revealed that this method is able to objectively monitor regional-scale SUHIs. The climate of the area studied is probably a determining factor in the seasonal variation of SUHIs. Research from the last 5 years (2010-2014) demonstrates that the urban heat island effect within the three urban agglomerations and five metropolises is serious. From 1994 to 2014, the average SUHI value for central urban areas rose from 0.4 to 2.3 K, while the total area where the SUHI value was >3.0 K increased from 1938 to 29,690 km2. The morphology of heat islands is significantly influenced by urbanization, meaning that heat islands within the areas studied will only continue to grow. Urban population and electricity consumption are the socioeconomic factors that exerted the greatest influence on the size of heat islands in China's major urban agglomerations. However, it is likely that economic measures designed to mitigate the UHI effect will differ in effectiveness from one urban agglomeration to another.

  3. Geospatial Strategy for Adverse Impact of Urban Heat Island in upper atmospheres of the earth Mountain Areas using LANDSAT ETM+ Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Vandana, Vandana

    2016-07-01

    We are living in the age of the rapidly growing population and changing environmental conditions with advanced technical capacity. This has been resulting in widespread land cover change. Among several human-induced environmental and urban thermal problems are reported to be negatively affecting urban residents in many ways. Urban Heat Islands exist in many large cities especially metropolitan cities and can significantly affect the permafrost layer in mountain areas. The adverse effect of urban heat island has become the subject of numerous studies in recent decades and is reflected in many major mountain cities around the world. The built-up structures in urbanized areas considerably alter land cover thereby affecting thermal energy flow which leads to the development of elevated surface and air temperature. The phenomenon Urban Heat Island implies 'island' of high temperature in cities, surrounded by relatively lower temperature in rural areas. The Urban Heat Island for the temporal period is estimated using geospatial techniques which are then utilized for the impact assessment of the climate of the surrounding regions and how it reduce the sustainability of the natural resources like air, vegetation. The knowledge of surface temperature is important for the study of urban climate and human health. The rapid growth of industries in peri-urban areas results in excessive warming and variations in weather conditions. It leads to soil degradation in frozen areas due to high temperature which leads to melting of snow in mountain areas Remotely sensed data of thermal infrared band in the region of 10.4-12.5 µm of EMR spectrum, available from LANDSAT- ETM+ is proved to be very helpful to identify urban heat islands. Thermal infrared data acquired during the daytime and night time can be used to monitor the heat island associated with urban areas as well as atmospheric pollution. The present paper describes the methodology and resolution dynamic urban heat island

  4. Assessment of the urban heat island effect through the use of satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    A recent NASA satellite is obtaining high spatial resolution thermal infrared data at times of day appropriate for the study of the urban heat island effect. Quantitative estimates of the extent and intensity of urban surface heating are obtained by analysis of digital data acquired over the New York City-New England area. In many large cities satellite sensed temperatures are 10-15 C warmer than in surrounding rural areas. A thorough interpretation of the elevated urban surface temperature will require studies of (1) the relationship between remotely sensed surface temperatures and air temperatures, and (2) compensation for observed very localized heating due to industry and/or power plants.

  5. A study of wind energy use for space heating in Prince Edward Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, L.; Dhaliwal, M.; Long, A.; Sheth, N. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, NS (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Prince Edward Island has an excellent wind resource, with a capacity factor in excess of 50 percent recorded in some locations. The provincial government has proposed that 200 megawatts (MW) of wind capacity be installed by 2010 since the province is almost entirely dependent upon imported energy (from oil for transportation and home heating to electricity for most other applications). Opportunities for using wind generated electricity for space and hot water heating on Prince Edward Island were examined. Several residential electric heating system configurations were considered and simulated using hourly wind and temperature data collected on Prince Edward Island between January 1999 and December 2005. Methods that were presented and discussed included electric baseboard heating, off-peak electric thermal storage (ETS), anytime ETS, and generator-supplied ETS. The cost of electricity, potential greenhouse gas reductions, and implications for the grid were also reviewed. It was concluded that operating an off-peak ETS system coincident with the wind requires more back-up than a wind-baseboard system since the off-peak ETS operates for one third of the day, whereas the wind-baseboard operates for the full day. It was also shown that allowing ETS to charge throughout the day almost eliminates the need for backup, reducing the cost of energy to homeowners and minimizing the output of greenhouse gases for residential space heating. 18 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Evolution of the Urban Heat Island of the city of Bologna (Italy) in the last 30 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Francesca; Gaspari, Nicola; Piana, Stefano; Rossi Pisa, Paola

    2010-05-01

    The Urban Heat Island (UHI) phenomenon is the air temperature difference between the urban area and the surrounding agricultural area of a city, due to the anthropic activities and different surfaces typical of the town. This phenomenon has been documented for many cities with different population, topography and climate (Chandler, 1962 and Oke, 1982 among the first), and has been quantified in many areas (see as an example for Italy Agnese et al, 2008). Many causes contribute to the UHI, such as different heat capacities of vegetated surfaces as compared to buildings and paving materials; different absorption due to canopy geometry; anthropogenic heat sources and so on. (for example see Camilloni and Barros, 1997) What is not so easy to find in literature is the study of the evolution of this phenomenon with time. UHI could be improved by changes in the town behaviour (increase in car traffic or winter-heating/summer-cooling), reduced by the enlargement of the suburb area, arriving to include the rural meteorological stations, or mitigated by the general growth of air temperature due to global warming. In this work, results from the analysis of two 30 years time series air temperature data are presented. The first data set comes from an agrometeorological station sited in the Botanical garden of the University of Bologna, in the centre of the town (44° 30' 05"N, 11° 21' 18" E). The second agrometeorological station is sited in the experimental farm of the University of Bologna in Cadriano (44° 33' 03" N, 11° 24' 36" E), 9 km from the first and outside of the town boundaries. Both data series range from 1978 to 2007 and are measured by mechanical thermoigrometers. Detailed information about instruments and data treatment are available in Matzneller et al. (2009). Results show an increasing trend in both stations for air maximum (Tmax) and minimum (Tmin) temperatures, more evident in the rural data. The mean UHI is of about 1.3 ± 0.7 °C as an average on the 30

  7. The use of remotely sensed data as a tool in urban heat island investigations: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orvis, K.H.; Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1992-01-01

    Remotely sensed data contribute an important tool to areawide, cost-effective studies of urban heat island phenomena. This paper provides an overview of its use dating from the first satellite thermal images of urban heat signatures in the early 1970`s, and briefly examines the range of previous uses of remotely sensed data in urban studies, including identification and analysis of heat island effects, modeling of energy budgets, attempts to analyze and classify the urban landscape, and temporal analyses. The intent is not to provide an exhaustive review but rather to describe research trends and patterns. In addition the paper lists an compares those sensing devices that have seen significant use in urban studies and briefly discusses potential strengths and weaknesses of remotely sensed data for use in urban analyses. Three annotated bibliographies, divided by subject, are included. 95 refs.

  8. Monitoring the effects of land use/landcover changes on urban heat island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Ong K.; Sarker, Md Latifur Rahman

    2013-10-01

    Urban heat island effects are well known nowadays and observed in cities throughout the World. The main reason behind the effects of urban heat island (UHI) is the transformation of land use/ land cover, and this transformation is associated with UHI through different actions: i) removal of vegetated areas, ii) land reclamation from sea/river, iii) construction of new building as well as other concrete structures, and iv) industrial and domestic activity. In rapidly developing cities, urban heat island effects increases very hastily with the transformation of vegetated/ other types of areas into urban surface because of the increasing population as well as for economical activities. In this research the effect of land use/ land cover on urban heat island was investigated in two growing cities in Asia i.e. Singapore and Johor Bahru, (Malaysia) using 10 years data (from 1997 to 2010) from Landsat TM/ETM+. Multispectral visible band along with indices such as Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Build Index (NDBI), and Normalized Difference Bareness Index (NDBaI) were used for the classification of major land use/land cover types using Maximum Likelihood Classifiers. On the other hand, land surface temperature (LST) was estimated from thermal image using Land Surface Temperature algorithm. Emissivity correction was applied to the LST map using the emissivity values from the major land use/ land cover types, and validation of the UHI map was carried out using in situ data. Results of this research indicate that there is a strong relationship between the land use/land cover changes and UHI. Over this 10 years period, significant percentage of non-urban surface was decreased but urban heat surface was increased because of the rapid urbanization. With the increase of UHI effect it is expected that local urban climate has been modified and some heat related health problem has been exposed, so appropriate measure should be taken in order to

  9. The influence of atmospheric circulation on the intensity of urban heat island and urban cold island in Poznań, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Półrolniczak, Marek; Kolendowicz, Leszek; Majkowska, Agnieszka; Czernecki, Bartosz

    2017-02-01

    The study has analyzed influence of an atmospheric circulation on urban heat island (UHI) and urban cold island (UCI) in Poznań. Analysis was conducted on the basis of temperature data from two measurement points situated in the city center and in the Ławica airport (reference station) and the data concerning the air circulation (Niedźwiedź's calendar of circulation types and reanalysis of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)). The cases with UHI constitute about 85 % of all data, and UCI phenomena appear with a frequency of 14 % a year. The intensity of UHI phenomenon is higher in the anticyclonic circulation types. During the year in anticyclonic circulation, intensity of UHI is 1.2 °C on average while in cyclonic is only 0.8 °C. The occurring of UHI phenomena is possible throughout all seasons of the year in all hours of the day usually in anticyclonic circulation types. The cases with highest UHI intensity are related mostly to nighttime. The cases of UCI phenomena occurred almost ever on the daytime and the most frequently in colder part of the year together with cyclonic circulation. Study based on reanalysis data indicates that days with large intensity of UHI (above 4, 5, and 6 °C) are related to anticyclonic circulation. Anticyclonic circulation is also promoting the formation of the strongest UCI. Results based on both reanalysis and the atmospheric circulation data (Niedźwiedź's circulation type) confirm that cases with the strongest UHI and UCI during the same day occur in strong high-pressure system with the center situated above Poland or central Europe.

  10. The impact of summer heat islands on cooling energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, H.; Huang, J.; Martien, P.; Rainer, L.; Rosenfeld, A.; Taha, H.

    1988-08-01

    It has been well documented that summer heat islands increase the demand for air conditioning. Several studies have suggested developing guidelines to mitigate this negative effect, on both micro- and meso-scales. Reducing summer heat islands saves cooling energy, reduces peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} from electric power plants. This paper summarizes some of the efforts to quantify the effects of techniques to reduce heat islands. In particular, the authors summarize simulations they have made on the effects of plating trees and switching to light colored surfaces in cities. The results indicate that these techniques effectively reduce building cooling loads and peak power in selected US cities, and are the cheapest way to save energy and reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. This paper compares the economics of technologies to mitigate summer heat islands with other types of conservation measures. The authors estimate the cost of energy conserved by planting trees and recoating surfaces on a national level and compare it with the cost of energy conserved by increasing efficiencies in electrical appliances and cars. Early results indicate that the cost of energy saved by controlling heat islands is less than 1{cents}/kWh, more attractive than efficient electric appliances ({approximately} 2{cents}/kWh), and far more attractive than new electric supplies ({approximately}10{cents}/kWh). In transportation, the cost of conserving a gallon of gasoline, though far more attractive than buying gasoline at current prices, is again more expensive than controlling heat islands. By accounting for the carbon content of the fuels used for power generation and transportation, the authors restate these comparisons in terms of cents per avoided pound of carbon emitted as CO{sub 2}. The results show that the cost of avoided CO{sub 2} from planting trees/increasing albedo is about 0.3--1.3{cents}/lb. of carbon; for buying efficient electric appliances, 2.5{cents}/lb. of

  11. The urban heat island effect, its causes, and mitigation, with reference to the thermal properties of asphalt concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajerani, Abbas; Bakaric, Jason; Jeffrey-Bailey, Tristan

    2017-07-15

    The Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a phenomenon that affects many millions of people worldwide. The higher temperatures experienced in urban areas compared to the surrounding countryside has enormous consequences for the health and wellbeing of people living in cities. The increased use of manmade materials and increased anthropogenic heat production are the main causes of the UHI. This has led to the understanding that increased urbanisation is the primary cause of the urban heat island. The UHI effect also leads to increased energy needs that further contribute to the heating of our urban landscape, and the associated environmental and public health consequences. Pavements and roofs dominate the urban surface exposed to solar irradiation. This review article outlines the contribution that pavements make to the UHI effect and analyses localized and citywide mitigation strategies against the UHI. Asphalt Concrete (AC) is one of the most common pavement surfacing materials and is a significant contributor to the UHI. Densely graded AC has low albedo and high volumetric heat capacity, which results in surface temperatures reaching upwards of 60 °C on hot summer days. Cooling the surface of a pavement by utilizing cool pavements has been a consistent theme in recent literature. Cool pavements can be reflective or evaporative. However, the urban geometry and local atmospheric conditions should dictate whether or not these mitigation strategies should be used. Otherwise both of these pavements can actually increase the UHI effect. Increasing the prevalence of green spaces through the installation of street trees, city parks and rooftop gardens has consistently demonstrated a reduction in the UHI effect. Green spaces also increase the cooling effect derived from water and wind sources. This literature review demonstrates that UHI mitigation techniques are best used in combination with each other. As a result of the study, it was concluded that the current mitigation

  12. Study on urban heat island effect and its response to the vegetation eco-environmental quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Saiping; Zhao, Qianjun; Yin, Kai; Cui, Bei; Zhang, Xiupeng

    2016-10-01

    With the development of urbanization, urban heat island effect issue is becoming more and more severe. What's more, the vegetation eco-environmental quality (VEEQ) is severely damaged, resulting in the decline of urban ecosystem function. Therefore, it is of great significance to use remote sensing technique to analyze the response of urban heat island to VEEQ quantitatively. As is known to all, vegetation is the main body in the vegetation ecological environment system. Water and heat conditions are the important driving forces for its formation and evolution. Good soil condition is the basis for vegetation survival. Besides, the terrain is conducive to the judgment of the vegetation distribution. Accordingly, several indexes involving vegetation index, heat index, soil moisture index, soil brightness index, elevation factor and slope factor were selected and extracted from Landsat8 OLI images to establish the evaluation index system of VEEQ. Based on Landsat8 TIRS images, this paper applied the radiative transfer equation method to retrieve land surface temperature (LST) and the urban island grade was divided based on the mean and standard deviation values of LST. The principal component analysis method was utilized to determine the weigh value of each index and then a comprehensive evaluation model of VEEQ was established. Furthermore, the quantitative relationship between LST and VEEQ was analyzed. The results showed that, there existed obvious heat island effects in Haidian District of Beijing city and its surrounding areas. The poor quality areas and the high quality areas of vegetation ecological environment had strengthening and weakening thermal environment effects respectively. There was a strong negative relationship between LST and VEEQ.

  13. An energy and mortality impact assessment of the urban heat island in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Scott A., E-mail: Scott.lowe@manhattan.edu

    2016-01-15

    Increased summer energy use and increased summer heat related mortality are the two most cited detrimental impacts of the urban heat island (UHI). An assessment of these impacts was made that considered the annual impact of the UHI, not just the summer impact. It was found that in north of the US there was a net decrease in energy use from the UHI, as heating energy reductions were larger than the increase in cooling energy. In the south there was a net energy increase from the UHI. The impact of the UHI on heat related deaths was an estimated increase of 1.1 deaths per million people. The impact of the UHI on cold related deaths was an estimated decrease of 4.0 deaths per million people. These estimates are caveated by the acknowledgement that compounding factors influence mortality. Hypothermia related death rates were three times higher in rural areas than urban areas. This is surprising as the homeless population is usually considered the most at risk, yet they mostly live in urban areas. - Highlights: • The urban heat island (UHI) may actually be beneficial in colder cities in the US in terms of energy use • The UHI may cause an increase in heat related mortality of ~ 1 deaths per million • In winter the UHI may decrease cold related mortality by ~ 4 deaths per million • Cold related death rates were 3 times higher in rural areas although the homeless population live mainly in urban areas.

  14. Assessing the Distribution of Urban Green Spaces and its Anisotropic Cooling Distance on Urban Heat Island Pattern in Baotou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongliga Bao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An essential part of urban natural systems, urban green spaces play a crucial role in mitigating the urban heat island effect (UHI. The UHI effect refers to the phenomenon where the temperature within a city is higher than that of the surrounding rural areas. The effects of the spatial composition and configuration of urban green spaces on urban land surface temperature (LST have recently been documented. However, few studies have examined the effects of the directionality and distribution of green spaces on LST. In this study, we used a landscape index to describe the change in pattern of heat island intensity for the city of Baotou, China. We then used a semi-variable function and nearest neighbor algorithm to analyze the cooling effects of green spaces. We found that: (1 the cooling distance of an urban green space was not only influenced by its size, vegetation cover, and shape, but also showed anisotropy. In general, the larger the area of the urban green space and the higher the value of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI; a measure of plant photosynthetic activity, the larger the cooling distance within a certain threshold. Green spaces with more regular shapes displayed higher LST mitigation; however, the cooling distance was directional, and cooling effects depended on the semi-major axis and semi-minor axis of the green space. (2 The distribution of the urban green space within the landscape played a key role in mitigating the UHI effect. Within a certain area, the cooling effect of green spaces that are evenly distributed was greater than that which was associated with either green spaces that were large in area or where greens spaces were aggregated in the landscape. Therefore, within urban areas, where space is limited, urban planning should account for green spaces that are relatively scattered and evenly distributed to maximize cooling effects. The results of this study have key implications for sustainable urban

  15. Linking potential heat source and sink to urban heat island: Heterogeneous effects of landscape pattern on land surface temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Cao, Qiwen; Lang, Kun; Wu, Jiansheng

    2017-05-15

    Rapid urbanization has significantly contributed to the development of urban heat island (UHI). Regulating landscape composition and configuration would help mitigate the UHI in megacities. Taking Shenzhen, China, as a case study area, we defined heat source and heat sink and identified strong and weak sources as well as strong and weak sinks according to the natural and socioeconomic factors influencing land surface temperature (LST). Thus, the potential thermal contributions of heat source and heat sink patches were differentiated. Then, the heterogeneous effects of landscape pattern on LST were examined by using semiparametric geographically weighted regression (SGWR) models. The results showed that landscape composition has more significant effects on thermal environment than configuration. For a strong source, the percentage of patches has a positive impact on LST. Additionally, when mosaicked with some heat sink, even a small improvement in the degree of dispersion of a strong source helps to alleviate UHI. For a weak source, the percentage and density of patches have positive impacts on LST. For a strong sink, the percentage, density, and degree of aggregation of patches have negative impacts on LST. The effects of edge density and patch shape complexity vary spatially with the fragmentation of a strong sink. Similarly, the impacts of a weak sink are mainly exerted via the characteristics of percent, density, and shape complexity of patches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling effects of urban heat island mitigation strategies on heat-related morbidity: a case study for Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Humberto R; Phelan, Patrick E; Golden, Jay S

    2010-01-01

    A zero-dimensional energy balance model was previously developed to serve as a user-friendly mitigation tool for practitioners seeking to study the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Accordingly, this established model is applied here to show the relative effects of four common mitigation strategies: increasing the overall (1) emissivity, (2) percentage of vegetated area, (3) thermal conductivity, and (4) albedo of the urban environment in a series of percentage increases by 5, 10, 15, and 20% from baseline values. In addition to modeling mitigation strategies, we present how the model can be utilized to evaluate human health vulnerability from excessive heat-related events, based on heat-related emergency service data from 2002 to 2006. The 24-h average heat index is shown to have the greatest correlation to heat-related emergency calls in the Phoenix (Arizona, USA) metropolitan region. The four modeled UHI mitigation strategies, taken in combination, would lead to a 48% reduction in annual heat-related emergency service calls, where increasing the albedo is the single most effective UHI mitigation strategy.

  17. Urban heat island detection using landsat data: A case study of Prince William county, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Jenna R.

    This study focused on finding evidence of urban heat islands in the Prince William County region of Virginia. Satellite images of the area taken over a period of 25 years were analyzed by calculating Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, classifying land cover, and calculating surface temperature. The images were classified by unsupervised and supervised classification methods, and the surface temperature was extracted and calculated from the thermal infrared band six of Landsat TM data. The evaluation of these methods determines that with a successful land classification and surface temperature findings, urban areas within the county have shown effects of an urban heat island since 1985 but have not shown an increase in intensity in 2010.

  18. Existing climate data sources and Their Use in Heat IslandResearch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Pon, Brian; Smith, Craig Kenton; Stamper-Kurn, Dan Moses

    1998-10-01

    Existing climate data sources can be used in two general types of analysis for the detection of urban heat islands. Historical analyses use long-term data records-preferentially from several locations in and around an urban area-to trace the gradual influence of urban development on its climate. Primary sources of such data include the cooperative network, first-order National Weather Service stations, and military weather stations. Analyses of short-term data use information from a dense urban weather station network to discern the location, extent, and magnitude of urban heat islands. Such analyses may use the aforementioned national networks or regional networks such as agricultural, air quality monitoring, or utility networks. We demonstrate the use of existing data sources with a historical analysis of temperature trends in Los Angeles, California, and an analysis of short-term data of the urban temperature profile for Phoenix, Arizona. The Los Angeles climate was examined with eleven long-term data records from the cooperative network. Statistically significant trends of rising temperature were detected at Los Angeles Civic Center and other stations over some parts of the year, although timing of the increase varied from station to station. Observed increases in temperatures maybe due to long-term climate changes, microclimate influences, or local-scale heat islands. The analysis of short-term data was made for Phoenix using the PRISMS station network. Mean diurnal temperature profiles for a month were examined and compared with those for adjacent rural areas. Data fi-om stations in the center of Phoenix showed clear and significant nighttime and daytime temperature differences of 1- 2K (3 - 4"F). These temperature increases maybe attributable to a local-scale heat island.

  19. Monitoring Spatiotemporal Changes of Heat Island in Babol City due to Land Use Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi Panah, S. K.; Kiavarz Mogaddam, M.; Karimi Firozjaei, M.

    2017-09-01

    Urban heat island is one of the most vital environmental risks in urban areas. The advent of remote sensing technology provides better visibility due to the integrated view, low-cost, fast and effective way to study and monitor environmental and humanistic changes. The aim of this study is a spatiotemporal evaluation of land use changes and the heat island in the time period of 1985-2015 for the studied area in the city of Babol. For this purpose, multi-temporal Landsat images were used in this study. For calculating the land surface temperature (LST), single-channel and maximum likelihood algorithms were used, to classify Images. Therefore, land use changes and LST were examined, and thereby the relationship between land-use changes was analyzed with the normalized LST. By using the average and standard deviation of normalized thermal images, the area was divided into five temperature categories, inter alia, very low, low, medium, high and very high and then, the heat island changes in the studied time period were investigated. The results indicate that land use changes for built-up lands increased by 92%, and a noticeable decrease was observed for agricultural lands. The Built-up land changes trend has direct relation with the trend of normalized surface temperature changes. Low and very low-temperature categories which follow a decreasing trend, are related to lands far away from the city. Also, high and very high-temperature categories whose areas increase annually, are adjacent to the city center and exit ways of the town. The results emphasize on the importance of attention of urban planners and managers to the urban heat island as an environmental risk.

  20. Observation and forecast on urban heat island effect based on Landsat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Cheng-zeng; Shu, An; Yang, Xin-yuan; Peng, Ling; Li, Xiang; Yao, Xiao-jing

    2017-03-01

    This paper studies the urban heat island (UHI) effect of Jinan city with remote sensing image based on qualitive analysis. By inversing temperature from Landsat image of Jinan city at 2002, 2009 and 2015, Jinan city’s UHI effect distribution and change tendency were analysed. And then, by using the Markov chain model, the UHI effect in 2021 and the steady state distribution in Jinan were predicted.

  1. The correlation of urban heat island in tropical middle-class housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazir, Zuber Angkasa

    2017-11-01

    A very limited number of green and sustainable construction studies have explored factors related to Urban Heat Island (UHI) in tropical middle-class housing. This paper aimed to investigate the correlation of Urban Heat Island in tropical middle-class housing in three urban housing for middle-class residents of Palembang, which were Taman Sari Kenten, TOP Jakabaring, and Talang Kelapa. Samples consisted of 125 Taman Sari Kenten housing, 27 Talang Kelapa housing, and 12 TOP Jakabaring housing. Independent variables were the resident density, socioeconomic status, house location, roof type, green area ratio, weather, time, air conditioner, pro-environment institution, and NEP scale. The Analytic method included correlation and regression. We identified that all housing had different UHI profiles where Taman Sari Kenten had the highest UHI (4.17 K), followed by Talang Kelapa (2.66 K) and TOP Jakabaring (0.66 K) against temperature in measuring station nearby, owned by BMKG (National Meteorological Station). UHI correlated with the resident density, roof type, green area ratio, weather, time, and air conditioner. The results should add to the design of ideal housing in the tropical climate for middle-class residents, focusing on its ability to mitigate Urban Heat Island.

  2. Raynaud's phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Christensen, N J; Olsen, N

    1980-01-01

    The reaction to body and finger cooling was recorded in seven patients with relapse of primary Raynaud's phenomenon after sufficiently performed bilateral upper thoracic sympathectomy and for comparison in eight young women with primary Raynaud's phenomenon as well as in seven normal women. The f...

  3. Urban Heat Island and Park Cool Island Intensities in the Coastal City of Aracaju, North-Eastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Anjos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an evaluation of the Urban Heat Island (UHI and Park Cool Island (PCI intensities in Aracaju, North-Eastern Brazil, was performed. The basis of our evaluation is a 2-year dataset from the urban climatological network installed with the principles and concepts defined for urban areas related to climatic scales, sitting and exposure, urban morphology, and metadata. The current findings update UHI intensities in Aracaju refuting the trend registered in previous studies. On average, the UHI was more intense in the cool season (1.3 °C than in hot season (0.5 °C, which was caused by wind speed decrease. In relation to the PCI, mitigation of high air temperatures of 1.5–2 °C on average was registered in the city. However, the urban park is not always cooler than the surrounding built environment. Consistent long-term monitoring in the cities is very important to provide more accurate climatic information about the UHI and PCI to be applied in urban planning properly, e.g., to provide pleasant thermal comfort in urban spaces.

  4. Relationship between Surface Urban Heat Island intensity and sensible heat flux retrieved from meteorological parameters observed by road weather stations in urban area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawuć, Lech

    2017-04-01

    Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a direct consequence of altered energy balance in urban areas (Oke 1982). There has been a significant effort put into an understanding of air temperature variability in urban areas and underlying mechanisms (Arnfield 2003, Grimmond 2006, Stewart 2011, Barlow 2014). However, studies that are concerned on surface temperature are less frequent. Therefore, Voogt & Oke (2003) proposed term "Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI)", which is analogical to UHI and it is defined as a difference in land surface temperature (LST) between urban and rural areas. SUHI is a phenomenon that is not only concerned with high spatial variability, but also with high temporal variability (Weng and Fu 2014). In spite of the fact that satellite remote sensing techniques give a full spatial pattern over a vast area, such measurements are strictly limited to cloudless conditions during a satellite overpass (Sobrino et al., 2012). This significantly reduces the availability and applicability of satellite LST observations, especially over areas and seasons with high cloudiness occurrence. Also, the surface temperature is influenced by synoptic conditions (e.g., wind and humidity) (Gawuc & Struzewska 2016). Hence, utilising single observations is not sufficient to obtain a full image of spatiotemporal variability of urban LST and SUHI intensity (Gawuc & Struzewska 2016). One of the possible solutions would be a utilisation of time-series of LST data, which could be useful to monitor the UHI growth of individual cities and thus, to reveal the impact of urbanisation on local climate (Tran et al., 2006). The relationship between UHI and synoptic conditions have been summarised by Arnfield (2003). However, similar analyses conducted for urban LST and SUHI are lacking. We will present analyses of the relationship between time series of remotely-sensed LST and SUHI intensity and in-situ meteorological observations collected by road weather stations network, namely: road surface

  5. Faroe Islands Wind-Powered Space Heating Microgrid Using Self-Excited 220 kW Induction Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bjarti; Guerrero, Josep M.; Thogersen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    energy and required space heating and mismatches can be reduced by using simple water tanks as heat storages. A traditional Danish induction generator wind turbine has been erected on the island of Nólsoy to produce energy for space heating. The system is designed as a stand-alone Microgrid which needs......Energy is fundamental to modern society. Increase in the oil price as well as environmental concerns have spurred the use of alternative renewable energy sources. In the Faroe Islands the readily available wind energy is an obvious source for space heating. Seasonal correlation exists between wind...

  6. Urbanisation-Induced Land Cover Temperature Dynamics for Sustainable Future Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew MacLachlan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban land cover is one of the fastest global growing land cover types which permanently alters land surface properties and atmospheric interactions, often initiating an urban heat island effect. Urbanisation comprises a number of land cover changes within metropolitan regions. However, these complexities have been somewhat neglected in temperature analysis studies of the urban heat island effect, whereby over-simplification ignores the heterogeneity of urban surfaces and associated land surface temperature dynamics. Accurate spatial information pertaining to these land cover change—temperature relationships across space is essential for policy integration regarding future sustainable city planning to mitigate urban heat impacts. Through a multi-sensor approach, this research disentangles the complex spatial heterogeneous variations between changes in land cover (Landsat data and land surface temperature (MODIS data, to understand the urban heat island effect dynamics in greater detail for appropriate policy integration. The application area is the rapidly expanding Perth Metropolitan Region (PMR in Western Australia (WA. Results indicate that land cover change from forest to urban is associated with the greatest annual daytime and nighttime temperature change of 0.40 °C and 0.88 °C respectively. Conversely, change from grassland to urban minimises temperature change at 0.16 °C and 0.77 °C for annual daytime and nighttime temperature respectively. These findings are important to consider for proposed developments of the city as such detail is not currently considered in the urban growth plans for the PMR. The novel intra-urban research approach presented can be applied to other global metropolitan regions to facilitate future transition towards sustainable cities, whereby urban heat impacts can be better managed through optimised land use planning, moving cities towards alignment with the 2030 sustainable development goals and the City

  7. Urban Heat Island Variation across a Dramatic Coastal to Desert Climate Zone: An Application to Los Angeles, CA Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyebi, A.; Jenerette, D.

    2015-12-01

    Urbanization is occurring at an unprecedented rate across the globe. The resulting urban heat island (UHI), which is a well-known phenomenon in urban areas due to the increasing number and density of buildings, leads to higher temperature in urban areas than surrounding sub-urban or rural areas. Understanding the effects of landscape pattern on UHI is crucial for improving the sustainability of cities and reducing heat vulnerability. Although a variety of studies have quantified UHI, there are a lack of studies to 1) understand UHI variation at the micro-scale (e.g., neighborhood effect) for large urban areas and 2) identify variation in the sensitivity of the UHI to environmental drivers across a megacity with a pronounced climate zone (i.e. coastal to desert climates) using advanced analytical tools. In this study, we identified the interacting relationship among various environmental and socio-economic factors to better identify UHI over the Los Angeles, CA metropolitan area. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to quantify the interacting relationships among land surface temperature (LST), land cover (NDVI), distance to ocean, elevation, and socio-economic status (neighborhood income). LST-NDVI slopes were negative across the climate zones and became progressively stronger with increasing distance from the coast. Results also showed that slopes between NDVI and neighborhood income were positive throughout the climate zone with a maximum in the relationship occurring near 25km from the coast. Because of these income-NDVI and NDVI-LST relationships we also found that slopes between LST and neighborhood income were negative throughout the climate zones and peaked at about 30km from the coast. These findings suggest assessments of urban heat vulnerability need to consider not only variation in the indicators but also variation in how the indicators influence vulnerability.

  8. The relationship between height to width ratios and the heat island intensity at 22:00 h for Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Kim Chuan; Chang, Chew Hung

    1999-07-01

    The statistical relationship between urban canyon height-to-width (H/W) ratios and nocturnal heat island intensities for public housing estates in Singapore has been examined. Although a number of similar studies have been conducted for temperate cities, this is a first attempt at correlating H/W to heat island intensities for a tropical city. Heat island intensities were examined specifically at 22:00 h because a previous study of Singapore's heat island determined that the heat islands were well developed by that time. A total of 17 Housing Development Board (HDB) estates were studied and at least two vehicle traverses were conducted for each estate on nights with a few days of antecedent dry weather conditions. H/W ratios for each estate were tabulated by proportion of building length. The statistical analysis demonstrates that there is a positive relationship between the heat island intensities and the median H/W, such that Tu-r(max)=0.952 (median H/W)-0.021, statistically significant at α=0.05 with a p-value of 0.001 and a correlation coefficient of 0.53.

  9. Heatwaves and urban heat islands: A comparative analysis of multiple cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, P.; Bou-Zeid, E.

    2017-01-01

    The recent International Panel on Climate Change report predicts the highly urbanized Northeastern U.S. to be at high risk to heat waves. Since urban residents and infrastructure are known to be highly vulnerable to extreme heat, the goal of this paper is to understand the interaction between the synoptic-scale heat wave and the city-scale urban heat island (UHI) effects. The study also qualitatively analyzes the primary factors that contribute to UHIs by comparing their intensities in different cities with distinct geo-physical characteristics. Our results, generated by using the Weather Research and Forecasting model augmented with advanced urban surface parameterizations, confirm that the amplitude of UHI is related to the physical size of the city. However, the results suggest that cities of comparabale sizes might interact differently with heat waves: in New York City; Washington, DC; and Baltimore (but not in Philadelphia) the regular UHI was amplified more strongly during heat waves compared to smaller cities. The results also establish that the pattern of UHI in different cities, its variability, and its interaction with heat waves are inherently linked to dynamic factors.

  10. Development of Two New Types of Retroreflective Materials as Countermeasures to Urban Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hideki; Iyota, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the side effects of high-reflective and ordinary retroreflective materials, used as countermeasures to urban heat islands, are discussed. In addition, two retroreflective materials are proposed in order to avoid these adverse effects. These materials could be applied to roads and building exteriors to reduce their heat absorption from solar radiation. The first proposed type is the directional retroreflective material, which reflects light only during summer; therefore, it reduces the cooling load in summer, reduces the heating load in winter, and prevents light pollution at night. However, its structure is complicated and fragile; thus, it is suited for small areas, such as roofs and walls. The second type is the rough-surface retroreflective material, which shows weak retroreflectivity but can withstand distortion; thus, it is suited for roads. These two types require little maintenance, because they have no moving parts. Hence, these materials would not experience any breakdown, which is a great advantage for roads and building materials. Combining high-reflective, ordinary retroreflective, directional retroreflective, and rough-surface retroreflective materials, and assigning each type to the appropriate application would form an advanced mitigation system against urban heat islands.

  11. Quantification of surface urban heat island intensity using impervious surface area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huidong; Sodoudi, Sahar

    2017-04-01

    Accurate quantification of urban heat island could contribute to efficiently evaluate potential heat risk. This paper come up with a new approach to calculate urban heat island intensity (UHII) using remote sensing data based on the linear regression slope between temperature and urban indicators. Urban fraction and sealing degree were used here as the urban indicators. Meanwhile, given the footprint of temperature measurement over each pixels, a new urban indicator, Urban Index, was calculated using sealing degree and Kernel Density Estimation. The results showed that the MODIS land surface temperature presents a strong linear correlation with the Urban Index, with R2 of 0.92 during the day and 0.94 at night compared to urban fraction and original sealing degree data. Further, the linear regression function between LST and Urban Index was used to analyze the SUHII characteristic. The daily SUHII show larger values in summer and during the day than in winter and at night with maximum values of 8.86, 9.22, 5.47 and 5.54 K at 11 am, 12:30am, 10 pm and 2 am, respectively. The new SUHII presents good correlation with the UHII calculated from the approach using in-situ measurements data, in particular at night. Given the good relationship between temperature and Urban Index, the potential heat stress risk is divided into five grades. The risk map is generated based on the spatial distribution of Urban Index.

  12. Exploring the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux phenomenon on a Maxwell-type nanofluid coexisting with homogeneous/heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Amit; Kundu, Prabir Kumar

    2017-12-01

    This specific article unfolds the efficacy of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux on the heat and mass transport of Maxwell nanofluid flow over a stretched sheet with changeable thickness. Homogeneous/heterogeneous reactions in the fluid are additionally considered. The Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model is initiated in the energy equation. Appropriate similarity transformations are taken up to form a system of nonlinear ODEs. The impact of related parameters on the nanoparticle concentration and temperature is inspected through tables and diagrams. It is renowned that temperature distribution increases for lower values of the thermal relaxation parameter. The rate of mass transfer is enhanced for increasing in the heterogeneous reaction parameter but the reverse tendency is ensued for the homogeneous reaction parameter. On the other side, the rate of heat transfer is getting enhanced for the Cattaneo-Christov model compared to the classical Fourier's model for some flow factors. Thus the implication of the current study is to delve its unique effort towards the generalized version of traditional Fourier's law at nano level.

  13. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Urban Heat Island and Urban Metabolism by Satellite Imagery over the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q.; Zhan, S.; Kuai, X.; Zhan, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this research is to combine DMSP-OLS nighttime light data with Landsat imagery and use spatio-temporal analysis methods to evaluate the relationships between urbanization processes and temperature variation in Phoenix metropolitan area. The urbanization process is a combination of both land use change within the existing urban environment as well as urban sprawl that enlarges the urban area through the transformation of rural areas to urban structures. These transformations modify the overall urban climate environment, resulting in higher nighttime temperatures in urban areas compared to the surrounding rural environment. This is a well-known and well-studied phenomenon referred to as the urban heat island effect (UHI). What is unknown is the direct relationship between the urbanization process and the mechanisms of the UHI. To better understand this interaction, this research focuses on using nighttime light satellite imagery to delineate and detect urban extent changes and utilizing existing land use/land cover map or newly classified imagery from Landsat to analyze the internal urban land use variations. These data are combined with summer and winter land surface temperature data extracted from Landsat. We developed a time series of these combined data for Phoenix, AZ from 1992 to 2013 to analyze the relationships among land use change, land surface temperature and urban growth.

  14. An Urban Heat Island Study of the Colombo Metropolitan Area, Sri Lanka, Based on Landsat Data (1997–2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Ranagalage

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the major impacts associated with unplanned rapid urban growth is the decrease of urban vegetation, which is often replaced with impervious surfaces such as buildings, parking lots, roads, and pavements. Consequently, as the percentage of impervious surfaces continues to increase at the expense of vegetation cover, surface urban heat island (SUHI forms and becomes more intense. The Colombo Metropolitan Area (CMA, Sri Lanka, is one of the rapidly urbanizing metropolitan regions in South Asia. In this study, we examined the spatiotemporal variations of land surface temperature (LST in the CMA in the context of the SUHI phenomenon using Landsat data. More specifically, we examined the relationship of LST with the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI and the normalized difference built-up index (NDBI at three time points (1997, 2007 and 2017. In addition, we also identified environmentally critical areas based on LST and NDVI. We found significant correlations of LST with NDVI (negative and NDBI (positive (p < 0.001 across all three time points. Most of the environmentally critical areas are located in the central business district (CBD, near the harbor, across the coastal belt, and along the main transportation network. We recommend that those identified environmentally critical areas be considered in the future urban planning and landscape development of the city. Green spaces can help improve the environmental sustainability of the CMA.

  15. Assessing population movement impacts on urban heat island of Beijing during the Chinese New Year holiday: effects of meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lingyun; Zhang, Jingyong

    2017-01-01

    Chinese New Year (CNY), or Spring Festival, is the most important of all festivals in China. We use daily observations to show that Beijing's urban heat island (UHI) effects largely depend on precipitation, cloud cover, and water vapor but are insensitive to wind speed, during the CNY holiday season. Non-precipitating, clear, and low humidity conditions favor strong UHI effects. The CNY holiday, with some 3 billion journeys made, provides a living laboratory to explore the role of population movements in the UHI phenomenon. Averaged over the period 2004-2013, with the Olympic year of 2008 excluded, Beijing's UHI effects during the CNY week decline by 0.48 °C relative to the background period (4 weeks including 2 to 3 weeks before, and 2 to 3 weeks after, the CNY week). With combined effects of precipitation, large cloud cover, and high water vapor excluded, the UHI effects during the CNY week averaged over the study period decline by 0.76 °C relative to the background period, significant at the 99% confidence level by Student's t test. These results indicate that the impacts of population movements can be more easily detected when excluding unfavorable meteorological conditions to the UHI. Population movements occur not only during the CNY holiday, but also during all the time across the globe. We suggest that better understanding the role of population movements will offer new insight into anthropogenic climate modifications.

  16. Effect of Land-Use Change on the Urban Heat Island in the Fukuoka–Kitakyushu Metropolitan Area, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Kawamoto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In coastal cities, the effect of the sea breeze in mitigating the urban heat island (UHI phenomenon has attracted attention. This study targeted the Fukuoka–Kitakyushu metropolitan area, the fourth largest metropolitan area in Japan which is also coastal. Doppler Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR observations were conducted in the summer of 2015 to clarify the transition of the wind field over the targeted area. To investigate the effects on the UHI of land-use change related to urbanization, the National Land Numerical Information (NLNI land-use datasets for Japan in 1976 (NLNI-76 and 2009 (NLNI-09 were used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. The results of the simulation showed that most of the northern part of the Kyushu region became warmer, with an average increase of +0.236 °C for the whole simulation period. Comparing the two simulations and the Doppler LiDAR observations, the simulation results with the NLNI-09 dataset (for the year closest to the study period in 2015 showed closer conformity with the observations. The results of the simulation using NLNI-76 showed faster sea breeze penetration and higher wind velocity than the observations. These results suggest that the land-use change related to urbanization weakened the sea breeze penetration in this area.

  17. Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D.E.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

  18. Urban heat island in a coastal urban area in northern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Juan A.; Arrizabalaga, Jon; Kupski, Sebastian; Katzschner, Lutz

    2013-07-01

    This work examines the characteristics of the urban heat island (UHI) in a medium-sized city in northern Spain (Bilbao) using 5-year climate data (2005-2009) and the results of three specific measurement campaigns (2009-2010). Urban climate variables are not only compared with those in rural sites but also local climatic differences occurring inside the city are analysed. The findings presented in this paper show the influence of complex topography and sea/land breeze in the urban climate. Spatial characteristics and temporal evolution of UHI is presented. Hourly maximum temperature anomaly (Δ T u-r, max) occurs just after sunrise and an urban cold island (UCI) is developed after midday. Along the year, mean UHI intensity is highest in autumn and the UCI effect increases in spring and summer in relation with sea breeze cooling potential. Diurnal and seasonal variation of air flow patterns appear to influence significantly on UHI intensity.

  19. Analysis of the ability of water resources to reduce the urban heat island in the Tokyo megalopolis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Tadanobu, E-mail: nakat@nies.go.jp [Asian Environment Research Group, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Process Hydrology Section, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Hashimoto, Shizuka [Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Simulation procedure integrated with multi-scale in horizontally regional-urban-point levels and in vertically atmosphere-surface-unsaturated-saturated layers, was newly developed in order to predict the effect of urban geometry and anthropogenic exhaustion on the hydrothermal changes in the atmospheric/land and the interfacial areas of the Japanese megalopolis. The simulated results suggested that the latent heat flux in new water-holding pavement (consisting of porous asphalt and water-holding filler made of steel by-products based on silica compound) has a strong impact on hydrologic cycle and cooling temperature in comparison with the observed heat budget. We evaluated the relationship between the effect of groundwater use as a heat sink to tackle the heat island and the effect of infiltration on the water cycle in the urban area. The result indicates that effective management of water resources would be powerful for ameliorating the heat island and recovering sound hydrologic cycle there. - Highlights: > Simulation procedure with multi-scale was newly developed. > Latent heat flux in water-holding pavement had strong impact on hydrothermal changes. > Model predicted effect of urban geometry and anthropogenic exhaustion. > Effective management of water resources is powerful for ameliorating heat island. - This study indicates that effective management of water resources would be powerful for ameliorating the heat island and recovering sound hydrologic cycle in urban area.

  20. Assessing the Urban Heat Island Effect Across Biomes in the Continental USA Using Landsat and MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, L.; Zhang, Ping; Wolfe, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Impervious surface area (ISA) from the Landsat TM and land surface temperature (LST) from MODIS averaged over three annual cycles (2003-2005) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the urban heat island (UHI) skin temperature amplitude and its relationship to development intensity, size, and ecological setting for 38 of the most populous cities in the continental United States. Development intensity zones based on %ISA are defined across urban gradients and used to stratify sampling of LST and NDVI. We find that ecological context significantly influences the amplitude of summer daytime UHI (urban - rural temperature difference) with the largest 8 C (average) for cities built in mixed forest biomes. For all cities ISA is the primary driver for increase in temperature explaining 70% of the total variance. Annually, urban areas are warmer than the non-urban fringe by 2.9 C, except in biomes with arid and semiarid climates. The average amplitude of the UHI is asymmetric with a 4.3 C difference in summer and 1.3 C in winter. In desert environments, UHI's point to a possible heat sink effect. Results show that the urban heat island amplitude increases with city size and is seasonally asymmetric for a large number of cities across most biomes. The implications are that for urban areas developed within forested ecosystems the summertime UHI can be quite high relative to the wintertime UHI suggesting that the residential energy consumption required for summer cooling is likely to increase with urban growth within those biomes.

  1. The Photovoltaic Heat Island Effect: Larger solar power plants increase local temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, N.; Minor, R. L.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.; Barron-Gafford, G.

    2016-12-01

    While photovoltaic (PV) renewable energy production has surged, concerns remain about whether or not PV power plants induce a "heat island" (PVHI) effect, much like the increase in ambient temperatures relative to wildlands generates an Urban Heat Island effect in cities. Transitions to PV plants likely alter the way that incoming energy is reflected back to the atmosphere or absorbed, stored, and reradiated as latent or sensible heat because PV plants change the albedo, vegetation, and structure of the terrain. Prior synthetic work on the PVHI has been mostly theoretical or simulated models, and past empirical work has been limited in scope to a single biome. Thus, there are large uncertainties surrounding the potential for a PHVI effect, so we examined the PVHI in empirical and experimental terms. We found temperatures over a PV plant were regularly 3-4oC warmer than wildlands at night, which is in direct contrast to modeling studies suggesting PV systems should decrease ambient temperatures. Deducing the underlying cause and scale of the PVHI effect and identifying mitigation strategies are key in supporting decision-making regarding PV development, particularly in semiarid landscapes, which are among the most likely for large-scale PV installations.

  2. Comparative Study of Msocow and New York Urban Heat Islands Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, A. S.; Rubinstein, K. G.

    The most important urban climate effect is the existing and development so called Sur- & cedil;ban heat islandT. Moscow as one of more intensively developing megalopolis of Eu- rope is the largest source of neat within the Central and Eastern Europe. New York City is the largest urban heat source at ocean costs around the world. The paper presents the study of the urban heat island trends in Moscow agglomeration using the analysis of the data set from the beginning of XX century up to year 2000 in the comparison with similar New York study made by Rosenzweig C. and Solecki W.D. (Environment. 2001. V. 43. No 3. 8-18). The new last decade date confirmed the authorsS conclusion about slight decreasing of summer temperature in Moscow and much more signifi- cant increasing of winter temperatures. The comparison Moscow and New York tem- perature and precipitation trends show that in spite of difference in the Moscow and New-York climate zones, temperature and precipitation trends in both cities are very similar. The some differences in mean values and trends came from different Moscow and New York locations U in the continental and cost areas. The mean temperature and precipitation in New York are highly than in Moscow. The long-term trends of temperature and precipitation are more significant in Moscow than in New York.

  3. [Applicability of traditional landscape metrics in evaluating urban heat island effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ai-Lian; Sun, Ran-Hao; Chen, Li-Ding

    2012-08-01

    By using 24 landscape metrics, this paper evaluated the urban heat island effect in parts of Beijing downtown area. QuickBird (QB) images were used to extract the landscape type information, and the thermal bands from Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) images were used to extract the land surface temperature (LST) in four seasons of the same year. The 24 landscape pattern metrics were calculated at landscape and class levels in a fixed window with 120 mx 120 m in size, with the applicability of these traditional landscape metrics in evaluating the urban heat island effect examined. Among the 24 landscape metrics, only the percentage composition of landscape (PLAND), patch density (PD), largest patch index (LPI), coefficient of Euclidean nearest-neighbor distance variance (ENN_CV), and landscape division index (DIVISION) at landscape level were significantly correlated with the LST in March, May, and November, and the PLAND, LPI, DIVISION, percentage of like adjacencies, and interspersion and juxtaposition index at class level showed significant correlations with the LST in March, May, July, and December, especially in July. Some metrics such as PD, edge density, clumpiness index, patch cohesion index, effective mesh size, splitting index, aggregation index, and normalized landscape shape index showed varying correlations with the LST at different class levels. The traditional landscape metrics could not be appropriate in evaluating the effects of river on LST, while some of the metrics could be useful in characterizing urban LST and analyzing the urban heat island effect, but screening and examining should be made on the metrics.

  4. Long-term changes of meteorological conditions of urban heat island development in the region of Debrecen, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    László, Elemér; Bottyán, Zsolt; Szegedi, Sándor

    2016-04-01

    Meteorological conditions have a remarkable impact on urban climate similarly to other local and microscale climates. Clear skies and calm weather are advantageous for the development of the urban heat island (UHI). There are numerous studies on the spatial and temporal features of the phenomenon. Much less attention is paid, however, to the meteorological conditions of UHI development. The aim of the present paper is to reveal the characteristics of the changes in the frequencies of advantageous and disadvantageous meteorological conditions for UHI development on the basis of a 50-year-long time series. Meteorological condition categories of UHI development have been established on the basis of wind speed values, cloudiness, and precipitation ranging from advantageous to disadvantageous conditions. Frequencies of occurrence of condition categories of UHI development were determined first. Advantageous and moderately advantageous conditions were found to be dominant in the time series. Linear trend analysis revealed a significant increasing trend in the time series of advantageous conditions. Increase of the frequencies of advantageous conditions was analyzed for the years, seasons, and months of the study period as well. Spring and summer (April and June) produced significant increasing trends of frequencies of advantageous conditions, while winter (with the exception of February) and autumn did not show significant increase of those frequencies. Change-point analyses detected a significant increase in the frequency of advantageous conditions in the time series at the turn of 1981/1982 especially in the summer and spring months. Detected tendencies have negative effects on urban energy consumption: they contribute to the increase of air conditioning energy demand in the summer and do not decrease the energy demand of heating in the winter significantly.

  5. Analysis of human factors on urban heat island and simulation of urban thermal environment in Lanzhou city, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jinghu

    2015-01-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) effect is a global phenomenon caused by urbanization. Because of the number and complexity of factors contributing to the urban thermal environment, traditional statistical methods are insufficient for acquiring data and analyzing the impact of human activities on the thermal environment, especially for identifying which factors are dominant. The UHI elements were extracted using thermal infrared remote sensing data to retrieve the land surface temperatures of Lanzhou city, and then adopting an object-oriented fractal net evolution approach to create an image segmentation of the land surface temperature (LST). The effects of urban expansion on the urban thermal environment were quantitatively analyzed. A comprehensive evaluation system of the urban thermal environment was constructed, the spatial pattern of the urban thermal environment in Lanzhou was assessed, and principal influencing factors were identified using spatial principal component analysis (SPCA) and multisource spatial data. We found that in the last 20 years, the UHI effect in Lanzhou city has been strengthened, as the UHI ratio index has increased from 0.385 in 1993 to 0.579 in 2001 and to 0.653 in 2011. The UHI expansion had a spatiotemporal consistency with the urban expansion. The four major factors that affect the spatial pattern of the urban thermal environment in Lanzhou can be ranked in the following order: landscape configuration, anthropogenic heat release, urban construction, and gradient from man-made to natural land cover. These four together accounted for 91.27% of the variance. A linear model was thus successfully constructed, implying that SPCA is helpful in identifying major contributors to UHI. Regression analysis indicated that the instantaneous LST and the simulated thermal environment have a good linear relationship, the correlation coefficient between the two reached 0.8011, highly significant at a confidence level of 0.001.

  6. The Impact of Albedo Increase to Mitigate the Urban Heat Island in Terni (Italy Using the WRF Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Morini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of the urban heat island (UHI phenomenon on energy consumption, air quality, and human health have been widely studied and described. Mitigation strategies have been developed to fight the UHI and its detrimental consequences. A potential countermeasure is the increase of urban albedo by using cool materials. Cool materials are highly reflective materials that can maintain lower surface temperatures and thus can present an effective solution to mitigate the UHI. Terni’s proven record of high temperatures along with related environmental and comfort issues in its urban areas have reflected the local consequences of global warming. On the other hand, it promoted integrated actions by the government and research institutes to investigate solutions to mitigate the UHI effects. In this study, the main goal is to investigate the effectiveness of albedo increase as a strategy to tackle the UHI, by using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF mesoscale model to simulate the urban climate of Terni (Italy. Three different scenarios through a summer heat wave in the summer of 2015 are analyzed. The Base Scenario, which simulates the actual conditions of the urban area, is the control case. In the Albedo Scenario (ALB Scenario, the albedo of the roof, walls and road of the whole urban area is increased. In the Albedo-Industrial Scenario (ALB-IND Scenario, the albedo of the roof, walls and road of the area occupied by the main industrial site of Terni, located in close proximity to the city center, is increased. The simulation results show that the UHI is decreased up to 2 °C both at daytime and at nighttime in the ALB and in ALB-IND Scenarios. Peak temperatures in the urban area can be decreased by 1 °C at daytime, and by about 2 °C at nighttime. Albedo increase in the area of interest might thus represent an opportunity to decrease the UHI effect and its consequences.

  7. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Davies, Zoe G

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface...... the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health....... temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a midsized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11...

  8. Reducing Urban Heat Island Effect with Thermal Comfort Housing and Honeycomb Townships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Mohd. Peter; Reimann, Gregers Peter; Ghazali, Mazlin

    2005-01-01

    Putra Malaysia can achieve almost passive thermal comfort without air-conditioning, even on the hottest days of the year. ‘Honeycomb townships’, a recent architectural invention by one of the authors, is a new method of subdividing land which saves greatly on roads, thereby permitting larger gardens......Serious mistakes have been made in Malaysia’s otherwise highly successful urbanisation over the last 50 years. Urban houses are too hot on about half the days of the year and Kuala Lumpur has become the world’s worse urban heat island on record. However, these problems are not the inevitable...

  9. Green Space and Deaths Attributable to the Urban Heat Island Effect in Ho Chi Minh City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Tran Ngoc; Van, Doan Quang; Kusaka, Hiroyuki; Seposo, Xerxes T; Honda, Yasushi

    2017-10-26

    To quantify heat-related deaths in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, caused by the urban heat island (UHI) and explore factors that may alleviate the impact of UHIs. We estimated district-specific meteorological conditions from 2010 to 2013 using the dynamic downscaling model and calculated the attributable fraction and number of mortalities resulting from the total, extreme, and mild heat in each district. The difference in attributable fraction of total heat between the central and outer districts was classified as the attributable fraction resulting from the UHI. The association among attributable fraction, attributable number with a green space, population density, and budget revenue of each district was then explored. The temperature-mortality relationship between the central and outer areas was almost identical. The attributable fraction resulting from the UHI was 0.42%, which was contributed by the difference in temperature distribution between the 2 areas. Every 1-square-kilometer increase in green space per 1000 people can prevent 7.4 deaths caused by heat. Green space can alleviate the impacts of UHIs, although future studies conducting a heath economic evaluation of tree planting are warranted. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print October 26, 2017: e1-e7. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304123).

  10. Effects of Urbanization and Seasonal Cycle on the Surface Urban Heat Island Patterns in the Coastal Growing Cities: A Case Study of Casablanca, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Bahi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island (UHI phenomenon is a harmful environmental problem in urban areas affecting both climatic and ecological processes. This paper aims to highlight and monitor the spatial distribution of Surface UHI (SUHI in the Casablanca region, Morocco, using remote sensing data. To achieve this goal, a time series of Landsat TM/ETM+/OLI-TIRS images was acquired from 1984 to 2016 and analyzed. In addition, nocturnal MODIS images acquired from 2005 to 2015 were used to evaluate the nighttime SUHI. In order to better analyze intense heat produced by urban core, SUHI intensity (SUHII was computed by quantifying the difference of land surface temperature (LST between urban and rural areas. The urban core SUHII appears more significant in winter seasons than during summer, while the pattern of SUHII becomes moderate during intermediate seasons. During winter, the average daytime SUHII gradually increased in the residential area of Casablanca and in some small peri-urban cities by more than 1 °C from 1984 to 2015. The industrial areas of the Casablanca region were affected by a significant rise in SUHII exceeding 15 °C in certain industrial localities. In contrast, daytime SUHII shows a reciprocal effect during summer with emergence of a heat island in rural areas and development of cool islands in urban and peri-urban areas. During nighttime, the SUHII remains positive in urban areas year-round with higher values in winter as compared to summer. The results point out that the seasonal cycle of daytime SUHII as observed in the Casablanca region is different from other mid-latitude cities, where the highest values are often observed in summer during the day.

  11. Raynaud's Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damage. For most people with Raynaud’s phenomenon, a conservative approach not using medicines is sufficient to control attacks. For people with more severe attacks, medications may be added. No drugs are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of Raynaud’s ...

  12. Ashman Phenomenon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by 12 lead surface ECG. But in difficult cases, and where facilities are available, invasive electrophysi- ological studies will be required to establish the source of an arrhythmia whether Ventricular or su- praventricular [4, 5, 8, 9, 10, l 1]. In 1983 , Fisch published a set of diagnostic criteria for Ashman phenomenon [l 2] .

  13. Physiological thermal limits predict differential responses of bees to urban heat-island effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, April L; Youngsteadt, Elsa; López-Uribe, Margarita M; Frank, Steven D

    2017-06-01

    Changes in community composition are an important, but hard to predict, effect of climate change. Here, we use a wild-bee study system to test the ability of critical thermal maxima (CTmax, a measure of heat tolerance) to predict community responses to urban heat-island effects in Raleigh, NC, USA. Among 15 focal species, CTmax ranged from 44.6 to 51.3°C, and was strongly predictive of population responses to urban warming across 18 study sites (r(2) = 0.44). Species with low CTmax declined the most. After phylogenetic correction, solitary species and cavity-nesting species (bumblebees) had the lowest CTmax, suggesting that these groups may be most sensitive to climate change. Community responses to urban and global warming will likely retain strong physiological signal, even after decades of warming during which time lags and interspecific interactions could modulate direct effects of temperature. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Energy Savings Calculations for Heat Island Reduction Strategies in Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.

    2000-03-01

    In 1997, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'', to quantify the potential benefits of Heat Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective to investigate the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City. This paper summarizes our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance and annual C02 reduction of HIR strategies in the three initial cities. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer most savings potential: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by old or new construction and with a gas furnace or an electric heat pump. We defined prototypical building characteristics for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling and heating energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.IE model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings [direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on building [direct effect], (3) combined strategies I and 2 [direct effect], (4) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces [indirect effect] and (5) combined strategies 1, 2 and 4 [direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air-conditioned buildings in each city using readily obtainable data to calculate the metropolitan-wide impact of HIR strategies. The results show, that in Baton Rouge, potential annual energy savings of $15M could be realized by

  15. The effect of urban heat island on Izmir's city ecosystem and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corumluoglu, Ozsen; Asri, Ibrahim

    2015-03-01

    Depending on the researches done on urban landscapes, it is found that the heat island intensity caused by the activities in any city has some impact on the ecosystem of the region and on the regional climate. Urban areas located in arid and semiarid lands somehow represent heat increase when it is compared with the heat in the surrounding rural areas. Thus, cities located amid forested and temperate climate regions show moderate temperatures. The impervious surfaces let the rainfall leave the city lands faster than undeveloped areas. This effect reduces water's cooling effects on these lands. More significantly, if trees and other vegetations are rare in any region, it means less evapotranspiration-the process by which trees "exhale" water. Trees also contribute to the cooling of urban lands by their shade. Land cover and land use maps can easily be produced by processing of remote sensing satellites' images, like processing of Landsat's images. As a result of this process, urban regions can be distinguished from vegetation. Analyzed GIS data produced and supported by these images can be utilized to determine the impact of urban land on energy, water, and carbon balances at the Earth's surface. Here in this study, it is found that remote sensing technique with thermal images is a liable technique to asses where urban heat islands and hot spots are located in cities. As an application area, in Izmir, it was found that the whole city was in high level of surface temperature as it was over 28 °C during the summer times. Beside this, the highest temperature values which go up to 47 °C are obtained at industrial regions especially where the iron-steel factories and the related industrial activities are.

  16. Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem

    2007-07-01

    World energy use is the main contributor to atmospheric CO2. In 2002, about 7.0 giga metric tons of carbon (GtC) were emitted internationally by combustion of gas, liquid, and solid fuels (CDIAC, 2006), 2 to 5 times the amount contributed by deforestation (Brown et al., 1988). The share of atmospheric carbon emissions for the United States from fossil fuel combustion was 1.6 GtC. Increasing use of fossil fuel and deforestation together have raised atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration some 25% over the last 150 years. According to global climate models and preliminary measurements, these changes in the composition of the atmosphere have already begun raising the Earth's average temperature. If current energy trends continue, these changes could drastically alter the Earth's temperature, with unknown but potentially catastrophic physical and political consequences. During the last three decades, increased energy awareness has led to conservation efforts and leveling of energy consumption in the industrialized countries. An important byproduct of this reduced energy use is the lowering of CO{sub 2} emissions. Of all electricity generated in the United States, about one-sixth is used to air-condition buildings. The air-conditioning use is about 400 tera-watt-hours (TWh), equivalent to about 80 million metric tons of carbon (MtC) emissions, and translating to about $40 billion (B) per year. Of this $40 B/year, about half is used in cities that have pronounced 'heat islands'. The contribution of the urban heat island to the air-conditioning demand has increased over the last 40 years and it is currently at about 10%. Metropolitan areas in the United States (e.g., Los Angeles, Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta, and New York City) have typically pronounced heat islands that warrant special attention by anyone concerned with broad-scale energy efficiency (HIG, 2006). The ambient air is primarily heated through three processes: direct absorption of solar radiation

  17. PEMBAHASAN MENGENAI EFEK URBAN HEAT ISLAND DAN SOLUSI ALTERNATIF BAGI KOTA JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V Limas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hadirnya Jakarta sebagai salah satu kota metropolitan yang berkembang di dunia, menjadikan Jakarta sebagai salah satu kota yang harus diperhitungkan konsistensinya. Letaknya yang berada di daerah tropis serta memiliki angka kepadatan penduduk yang tinggi menciptakan sebuah masalah serius bagi bangunan perkantoran dan perumahan di dalamnya, polemik yang dimaksud adalah adanya “efek pemanasan di daerah perkotaan”. Artikel ini akan membahas definisi dan aplikasi dari sistem “atap hijau” bersamaan dengan keuntungan dan keunikannya dalam menjawab kebutuhan dalam mengurangi tingginya temperatur pada pusat perkantoran dan daerah perumahan di kota Jakarta. Kata Kunci : efek pemanasan daerah perkotaan, kepadatan penduduk, sistem atap hijau Abstract Considering Jakarta as one of the developing metropolitan cities in the world creates, the need to reckon it’s consistency has emerged. Located in a tropical area with  high population density creates a serious problem to its city planning, in other words an urban heat island effect. This paper will discuss the definition and application of a green roof system along with its advantages or uniqueness to answer the need to reduce high temperature in central business district and residental areas for city of Jakarta in particular. Keywords : urban heat island effect, population density, green roof system

  18. A Quantitative Assessment of Surface Urban Heat Islands Using Satellite Multitemporal Data over Abeokuta, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Ishola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fast urban expansion has led to the transformation of the natural landscape into anthropogenic surfaces. The city of Abeokuta, for instance, is located in a region experiencing rapid urbanization, which has produced a remarkable effect on the surface thermal response. This effect significantly influences urban internal microclimatology on a regional scale. In this study, the surface temperatures and land cover types retrieved from Landsat TM and ETM+ images of Abeokuta city for 1984, 2003, and 2014 were analyzed. A quantitative approach was used to assess surface urban heat islands through the relationships among surface temperature and land cover types. Results showed that impervious surface areas were found to be correlated positively with high temperatures. Conversely, vegetated areas and bare surfaces correlated positively with mid temperature zones. This study found that areas with increasing impervious surfaces will accelerate LST rise and consequently lead to increasing effect of surface urban heat islands. These findings pose a major challenge to urban planners. However, the study would help to quantify the impacts of different scenarios (e.g., vegetation loss to accommodate urban growth on LST and consequently to devise appropriate policy measures.

  19. Urban surface temperature behaviour and heat island effect in a tropical planned city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adeb Qaid; Ossen, Dilshan Remaz; Jamei, Elmira; Manaf, Norhashima Abd; Said, Ismail; Ahmad, Mohd Hamdan

    2015-02-01

    Putrajaya is a model city planned with concepts of a "city in the garden" and an "intelligent city" in the tropics. This study presents the behaviour of the surface temperature and the heat island effect of Putrajaya. Findings show that heat island intensity is 2 °C on average at nighttime and negligible at daytime. But high surface temperature values were recorded at the main boulevard due to direct solar radiation incident, street orientation in the direction of northeast and southwest and low building height-to-street width ratio. Buildings facing each other had cooling effect on surfaces during the morning and evening hours; conversely, they had a warming effect at noon. Clustered trees along the street are effective in reducing the surface temperature compared to scattered and isolated trees. Surface temperature of built up areas was highest at noon, while walls and sidewalks facing northwest were hottest later in the day. Walls and sidewalks that face northwest were warmer than those that face southeast. The surface temperatures of the horizontal street surfaces and of vertical façades are at acceptable levels relative to the surface temperature of similar surfaces in mature cities in subtropical, temperate and Mediterranean climates.

  20. Dominant control of agriculture and irrigation on urban heat island in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Mishra, Vimal; Buzan, Jonathan; Kumar, Rohini; Shindell, Drew; Huber, Matthew

    2017-10-25

    As is true in many regions, India experiences surface Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect that is well understood, but the causes of the more recently discovered Urban Cool Island (UCI) effect remain poorly constrained. This raises questions about our fundamental understanding of the drivers of rural-urban environmental gradients and hinders development of effective strategies for mitigation and adaptation to projected heat stress increases in rapidly urbanizing India. Here we show that more than 60% of Indian urban areas are observed to experience a day-time UCI. We use satellite observations and the Community Land Model (CLM) to identify the impact of irrigation and prove for the first time that UCI is caused by lack of vegetation and moisture in non-urban areas relative to cities. In contrast, urban areas in extensively irrigated landscapes generally experience the expected positive UHI effect. At night, UHI warming intensifies, occurring across a majority (90%) of India's urban areas. The magnitude of rural-urban temperature contrasts is largely controlled by agriculture and moisture availability from irrigation, but further analysis of model results indicate an important role for atmospheric aerosols. Thus both land-use decisions and aerosols are important factors governing, modulating, and even reversing the expected urban-rural temperature gradients.

  1. Application of spatially gridded temperature and land cover data sets for urban heat island analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Kevin; Xian, George Z.

    2014-01-01

    Two gridded data sets that included (1) daily mean temperatures from 2006 through 2011 and (2) satellite-derived impervious surface area, were combined for a spatial analysis of the urban heat-island effect within the Dallas-Ft. Worth Texas region. The primary advantage of using these combined datasets included the capability to designate each 1 × 1 km grid cell of available temperature data as urban or rural based on the level of impervious surface area within the grid cell. Generally, the observed differences in urban and rural temperature increased as the impervious surface area thresholds used to define an urban grid cell were increased. This result, however, was also dependent on the size of the sample area included in the analysis. As the spatial extent of the sample area increased and included a greater number of rural defined grid cells, the observed urban and rural differences in temperature also increased. A cursory comparison of the spatially gridded temperature observations with observations from climate stations suggest that the number and location of stations included in an urban heat island analysis requires consideration to assure representative samples of each (urban and rural) environment are included in the analysis.

  2. Satellite and ground-based sensors for the Urban Heat Island analysis in the city of Rome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabrizi, Roberto; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    to the layer of air closest to the surface. UHI spatial characteristics have been assessed using air temperatures measured by both weather stations and brightness temperature maps from the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board ENVISAT polar-orbiting satellite. In total, 634 daytime......,Atmospheric humidity,Urban Heat Island,Luminance,Brightness temperatures,Polar-orbiting satellites,Geodetic satellites,Spatial characteristics,Heat island......In this work, the trend of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) of Rome is analyzed by both ground-based weather stations and a satellite-based infrared sensor. First, we have developed a suitable algorithm employing satellite brightness temperatures for the estimation of the air temperature belonging...

  3. Urban heat island in Krakow, Poland: Land use versus land form interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokwa, A.

    2012-04-01

    Urban heat island is a well known feature of urban climate, related mainly to the changes in land use in urban areas and anthropogenic heat emission. However, the interaction between the land use and land form in urban areas and its impact on air temperature spatial patterns is much less known. Krakow is a medium size city located in southern Poland, in the valley of the Vistula River. The city is surrounded with convex land forms from three sides, with height differences up to 100 m. Built-up areas of the city can be found in both the valley bottom and on nearby slopes. Numerous studies completed after the Second World War (e.g. Hess 1974, Lewinska et al. 1982, Morawska-Horawska, Cebulak 1981) showed that the characteristic features of the climate of Krakow are e.g. frequent air temperature inversions, poor natural ventilation, large precipitation horizontal gradients. More recent research (e.g. Bokwa 2010) revealed e.g. a thermal asymmetry of the area. On the basis of 3-year (2009-2011) air temperature measurements in 21 points, completed with mobile measurements and analysis of available long-term series, it was proposed to define urban heat island separately in particular vertical zones of the city. Bokwa, A., 2010, Wieloletnie zmiany struktury mezoklimatu miasta na przykladzie Krakowa [Multi-annual changes of the urban mesoclimate structure (using an example of Kraków)], Institute of Geography and Spatial Management, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, 258 pp.; available on-line: http://www.geo.uj.edu.pl/publikacje.php?&lang=1&page=monografie&menu=3&id=000155 Hess M., 1974, Klimat Krakowa {Climate of Krakow], Folia Geogr., ser. Geogr.-Phys., 8, 45-102. Lewińska J., Bartosik J., Baścik J., Czerwieniec M., Zgud K., 1982, Wpływ miasta na klimat lokalny (na przykładzie aglomeracji krakowskiej) [Impact of a city on the local climate using an example of Krakow], Inst. Kształt. Środ., Warszawa. Morawska-Horawska M., Cebulak E., 1981, Badania pionowego zasi

  4. Wintertime urban heat island modified by global climate change over Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, M.

    2015-12-01

    Urban thermal environment change, especially, surface air temperature (SAT) rise in metropolitan areas, is one of the major recent issues in urban areas. The urban thermal environmental change affects not only human health such as heat stroke, but also increasing infectious disease due to spreading out virus vectors habitat and increase of industry and house energy consumption. The SAT rise is mostly caused by global climate change and urban heat island (hereafter UHI) by urbanization. The population in Tokyo metropolitan area is over 30 millions and the Tokyo metropolitan area is one of the biggest megacities in the world. The temperature rise due to urbanization seems comparable to the global climate change in the major megacities. It is important to project how the urbanization and the global climate change affect to the future change of urban thermal environment to plan the adaptation and mitigation policy. To predict future SAT change in urban scale, we should estimate future UHI modified by the global climate change. This study investigates change in UHI intensity (UHII) of major metropolitan areas in Japan by effects of the global climate change. We performed a series of climate simulations. Present climate simulations with and without urban process are conducted for ten seasons using a high-resolution numerical climate model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Future climate projections with and without urban process are also conducted. The future projections are performed using the pseudo global warming method, assuming 2050s' initial and boundary conditions estimated by a GCM under the RCP scenario. Simulation results indicated that UHII would be enhanced more than 30% in Tokyo during the night due to the global climate change. The enhancement of urban heat island is mostly caused by change of lower atmospheric stability.

  5. Urban Heat Islands (UHI) and the influence of city parks within the urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, W.; Shandas, V.; Voelkel, J.; Espinoza, D.

    2016-12-01

    Urban Heat Islands (UHI) and the influence of city parks within the urban environment.As cities grow outward and their populations increase the Urban Heat Island (UHI) phenomena becomes an ever more important topic to reducing environmental stressors. When UHI combines with human sensitivities such as pre-existing health conditions, and other vulnerabilities, finding an effective way to cool our cities is a matter of life and death. One way to cool an area is to introduce vegetation; which is abundant is in city parks. This study measures the cooling effect and temperature gradient of city parks; characterizing the relationship between the cooling effects within parks and surrounding neighborhoods. Past studies of the UHI are largely based on satellite images and, more recently, car traverses across that describe the ambient temperatures. The present project aims to understand the effects of parks on the UHI by asking two research questions: (1) how do the physical characteristics and designs of city parks impact the variation in ambient temperatures? And (2) what effect does the park have on cooling the surrounding neighborhoods? We address these questions by using a bicycle mounted with a temperature probe, and a series of geospatial analytics. The bicycle collects temperature data every one second, and the traverse intervals are an hour long to prevent normal fluctuations of daily temperature. Preliminary analysis shows that there is a temperature gradient within the parks (Figure 1). Further, the average temperature of the urban park could cool the surrounding area by upwards of 2°C, depending on the physical characteristics of then park and neighborhood. Our results suggest that the role of smaller parks and their design can reduce heat stress particularly among the vulnerable populations. These results can help urban planners make informed decisions when developing future city infrastructure.

  6. Efficiency study about solar water heating system on the camping place Stortemelk situated in the island Vlieland

    OpenAIRE

    Giró Batalla, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    I will create two projects that are very similarn in nature. The first (Solar water heating system) is a heating system situated on an island called Vlieland in North of Holland near Leeuwarden. The system function is to create sanitary hot water and floor heating by using thermal solar energy and natural gas. The second project (heating and cooling system) is a system that is installed in my university called Hogeschool NHL. This system is reversible and is capable of producing hot and cool ...

  7. The Urban Heat Island Behavior of a Large Northern Latitude Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twine, T. E.; Snyder, P. K.; Hertel, W.; Mykleby, P.

    2012-12-01

    Urban heat islands (UHIs) occur when urban and suburban areas experience elevated temperatures relative to their rural surroundings because of differences in vegetation cover, buildings and other development, and infrastructure. Most cities in the United States are warming at twice the rate of the outlying rural areas and the planet as a whole. Temperatures in the urban center can be 2-5°C warmer during the daytime and as much as 10°C at night. Urban warming is responsible for excessive energy consumption, heat-related health effects, an increase in urban pollution, degradation of urban ecosystems, changes in the local meteorology, and an increase in thermal pollution into urban water bodies. One mitigation strategy involves manipulating the surface energy budget to either reduce the amount of solar radiation absorbed at the surface or offset absorbed energy through latent cooling. Options include using building materials with different properties of reflectivity and emissivity, increasing the reflectivity of parking lots, covering roofs with vegetation, and increasing the amount of vegetation overall through tree planting or increasing green space. The goal of the Islands in the Sun project is to understand the formation and behavior of urban heat islands and to mitigate their effects through sensible city engineering and design practices. As part of this project, we have been characterizing the UHI of the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area (TCMA), a 16,000 square kilometer urban and suburban region located in east central Minnesota that includes the two cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul, and evaluating mitigation strategies for reducing urban warming. Annually, the TCMA has a modest 2-3°C UHI that is especially apparent in winter when the urban core can be up to 5-6°C warmer than the surrounding countryside. We present an analysis of regional temperature variations from a dense network of sensors located throughout the TCMA. We focus on the diurnal and seasonal

  8. Vacuum phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Ikuto; Omori, Kazuhiko; Oode, Yasumasa; Ishikawa, Kouhei

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the theory of the formation of the vacuum phenomenon (VP), the detection of the VP, the different medical causes, the different locations of the presentation of the VP, and the differential diagnoses. In the human body, the cavitation effect is recognized on radiological studies; it is called the VP. The mechanism responsible for the formation of the VP is as follows: if an enclosed tissue space is allowed to expand as a rebound phenomenon after an external impact, the volume within the enclosed space will increase. In the setting of expanding volume, the pressure within the space will decrease. The solubility of the gas in the enclosed space will decrease as the pressure of the space decreases. Decreased solubility allows a gas to leave a solution. Clinically, the pathologies associated with the VP have been reported to mainly include the normal joint motion, degeneration of the intervertebral discs or joints, and trauma. The frequent use of CT for trauma patients and the high spatial resolution of CT images might produce the greatest number of chances to detect the VP in trauma patients. The VP is observed at locations that experience a traumatic impact; thus, an analysis of the VP may be useful for elucidating the mechanism of an injury. When the VP is located in the abdomen, it is important to include perforation of the digestive tract in the differential diagnosis. The presence of the VP in trauma patients does not itself influence the final outcome.

  9. The surface urban heat island response to urban expansion: A panel analysis for the conterminous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoma; Zhou, Yuyu; Asrar, Ghassem R; Imhoff, Marc; Li, Xuecao

    2017-12-15

    Urban heat island (UHI), the phenomenon that urban areas experience higher temperatures compared to their surrounding rural areas, has significant socioeconomic and environmental impacts. With current and anticipated rapid urbanization, improved understanding of the response of UHI to urbanization is important for developing effective adaptation measures and mitigation strategies. Current studies mainly focus on a single or a few big cities and knowledge on the response of UHI to urbanization for large areas is limited. As a major indicator of urbanization, urban area size lends itself well for representation in prognostic models. However, we have little knowledge on how UHI responds to urban area size increase and its spatial and temporal variation over large areas. In this study, we investigated the relationship between surface UHI (SUHI) and urban area size in the climate and ecological context, and its spatial and temporal variations, based on a panel analysis of about 5000 urban areas of 10km2 or larger, in the conterminous U.S. We found statistically significant positive relationship between SUHI and urban area size, and doubling the urban area size led to a SUHI increase as high as 0.7°C. The response of SUHI to the increase of urban area size shows spatial and temporal variations, with stronger SUHI increase in Northern U.S., and during daytime and summer. Urban area size alone can explain as much as 87% of the variance of SUHI among cities studied, but with large spatial and temporal variations. Urban area size shows higher association with SUHI in regions where the thermal characteristics of land cover surrounding the urban area are more homogeneous, such as in Eastern U.S., and in the summer months. This study provides a practical approach for large-scale assessment and modeling of the impact of urbanization on SUHI, both spatially and temporally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A study of the hourly variability of the urban heat island effect in the Greater Athens Area during summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidis, K; Georgoulias, A K; Rapsomanikis, S; Amiridis, V; Keramitsoglou, I; Hooyberghs, H; Maiheu, B; Melas, D

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of air temperature and humidity in the urban canopy layer during July 2009 in 26 sites in Athens, Greece, allowed for the mapping of the hourly spatiotemporal evolution of the urban heat island (UHI) effect. City districts neighboring to the mountains to the east were the hottest during the afternoon, while being among the coolest during the early morning hours. While during the early morning some coastal sites were the hottest, the warm air plume slowly moved to the densely urbanized center of the city until 14:00-15:00, moving then further west, to the Elefsis industrial area in the afternoon. Results from the UrbClim model agree fairly well with the observations. Satellite-derived land surface temperature (LST) data from AATSR, ASTER, AVHRR and MODIS, for pixels corresponding to ground stations measuring Tair, showed that LST can be up to 5K lower than the respective Tair during nighttime, while it can be up to 15K higher during the rest of the day. Generally, LST during late afternoon as acquired from AATSR is very near to Tair for all stations and all days, i.e., the AATSR LST afternoon retrieval can be used as a very good approximation of Tair. The hourly evolution of the spatial Tair distribution was almost the same during days with NE Etesian flow as in days with sea breeze circulation, indicating that the mean wind flow was not the main factor controlling the diurnal UHI evolution, although it influenced the temperatures attained. No unambiguous observation of the urban moisture excess (UME) phenomenon could be made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Generalized Scaling of Urban Heat Island Effect and Its Applications for Energy Consumption and Renewable Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-W. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous work from this laboratory, it has been found that the urban heat island intensity (UHI can be scaled with the urban length scale and the wind speed, through the time-dependent energy balance. The heating of the urban surfaces during the daytime sets the initial temperature, and this overheating is dissipated during the night-time through mean convection motion over the urban surface. This may appear to be in contrast to the classical work by Oke (1973. However, in this work, we show that if the population density is used in converting the population data into urbanized area, then a good agreement with the current theory is found. An additional parameter is the “urban flow parameter,” which depends on the urban building characteristics and affects the horizontal convection of heat due to wind. This scaling can be used to estimate the UHI intensity in any cities and therefore predict the required energy consumption during summer months. In addition, all urbanized surfaces are expected to exhibit this scaling, so that increase in the surface temperature in large energy-consumption or energy-producing facilities (e.g., solar electric or thermal power plants can be estimated.

  12. Desert heat island study in winter by mobile transect and remote sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen-Yi; Brazel, Anthony J.; Chow, Winston T. L.; Hedquist, Brent C.; Prashad, Lela

    2009-10-01

    A familiar problem in urban environments is the urban heat island (UHI), which potentially increases air conditioning demands, raise pollution levels, and could modify precipitation patterns. The magnitude and pattern of UHI effects have been major concerns of a lot of urban environment studies. Typically, research on UHI magnitudes in arid regions (such as Phoenix, AZ, USA) focuses on summer. UHI magnitudes in Phoenix (more than three million population) attain values in excess of 5°C. This study investigated the early winter period—a time when summer potential evapotranspiration >250 mm has diminished to 8.0°C, comparable to summertime UHI conditions. Through analysis of the Oke (1998) weather factor ΦW, it was determined thermally induced nighttime cool drainage winds could account for inflating the UHI magnitude in winter.

  13. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Davies, Zoe G

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface...... months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees...... in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce...

  14. [Spatiotemporal variation of urban heat island in Zhengzhou City based on RS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jin-Long; Song, Xuan; Zhang, Xue-Lei

    2011-01-01

    By using two Landsat remote sensing images (May 14, 1988 by TM sensor and May 10, 2001 by ETM+ sensor) and local meteorological data, this paper analyzed the causes and harms of urban heat island (UHI) in Zhengzhou City. The brightness temperatures of the images were calculated by mono-window algorithm, and related thematic maps were figured out. The results showed that with the expanding urban area of Zhengzhou City, the UHI effect was growing. Comparing with that in 1988, the high-temperature region of the City in 2001 had a clear shift and expansion towards northeast and southwest, being similar to the change trends of the low vegetation coverage area and urban land area. In order to alleviate the growing UHI effect, attentions should be paid on the urban greening work and the choice of reasonable greening patterns in the process of urbanization.

  15. "I Feel Suffocated:" Understandings of Climate Change in an Inner City Heat Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Merrill; Hasemann, Jose; Raynor, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    Global climate change is contributing to a range of adverse environmental and weather shifts, including more intense and more frequent heatwaves and an intensification of the urban heat island effect. These changes are known to produce a set of significant and differentially distributed health problems, with a particularly high burden among poor and marginalized populations. In this article, we report findings from a qualitative study of community knowledge, attitudes, health and other concerns, and behavioral responses regarding mounting urban temperatures and related environmental health issues among Latinos living in the city of Hartford, CT in northeast United States. Findings suggest the need for enhanced participation in knowledge dissemination and preparedness planning based on the coproduction of knowledge about climate change and community responses to it. The special role of anthropology in such efforts is highlighted.

  16. Energy effects of heat-island reduction strategies in Toronto,Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steven

    2003-08-26

    The effect of heat-island reduction (HIR) strategies on annual energy savings and peak-power avoidance of the building sector of the Greater Toronto Area is calculated, using an hourly building energy simulation model. Results show that ratepayers could realize potential annual energy savings of over $11M from the effects of HIR strategies. The residential sector accounts for over half (59%) of the total savings, offices 13% and retail stores 28%. Savings from cool roofs are about 20%, shade trees 30%, wind shielding of trees 37%, and ambient cooling by trees and reflective surfaces 12%. These results are preliminary and highly sensitive to the relative price of gas and electricity. Potential annual electricity savings are estimated at about 150GWh and potential peak-power avoidance at 250MW.

  17. A Review on Remote Sensing of Urban Heat and Cool Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rasul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The variation between land surface temperature (LST within a city and its surrounding area is a result of variations in surface cover, thermal capacity and three-dimensional geometry. The objective of this research is to review the state of knowledge and current research to quantify surface urban heat islands (SUHI and surface urban cool islands (SUCI. In order to identify open issues and gaps remaining in this field, we review research on SUHI/SUCI, the models for simulating UHIs/UCIs and techniques used in this field were appraised. The appraisal has revealed some great progress made in surface UHI mapping of cities located in humid and vegetated (temperate regions, whilst few studies have investigated the spatiotemporal variation of surface SUHI/SUCI and the effect of land use/land cover (LULC change on LST in arid and semi-arid climates. While some progress has been made, models for simulating UHI/UCI have been advancing only slowly. We conclude and suggest that SUHI/SUCI in arid and semi-arid areas requires more in-depth study.

  18. Comprehensive assessments of measures mitigating heat island phenomena in urban areas; Heat shinku wo riyoshita daikibo reibo system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishitani, H.; Yamada, K.; Yamaji, K.; Matsuhashi, T.; Iizuka, E.; Suzuki, T.; Genchi, H.; Komiyama, H. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes actual condition and measures against heat island (HI) phenomena in large urban areas with buildings. Tokyo was selected as a model. To extract typical pattern of daily change of air temperature, statistic analysis was conducted using the existing air temperature data at 100 points in and near the city of Tokyo. As a result, five patterns were obtained, i.e., central city, sea/land water affecting zone, thickly settled suburbs, garden city, and countryside. Each one point was selected in each pattern, to measure the underground temperature. It was found that the effect of HI can be easily evaluated from the underground temperature. It was suggested that the HI effect in the central city is estimated to be around 3.6 {degree}C. The measures mitigating HI were divided into the thermal balance improvement in the whole district and the temperature improvement of living space by homogenization or inhomogenization. Energy conservation was investigated for improving the thermal balance which can be practically conducted. According to the measures, it was found that the air temperature in the central city can be decreased by about 0.5 {degree}C at maximum. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A Satellite-Derived Climatological Analysis of Urban Heat Island over Shanghai during 2000–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijiao Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island is generally conducted based on ground observations of air temperature and remotely sensing of land surface temperature (LST. Satellite remotely sensed LST has the advantages of global coverage and consistent periodicity, which overcomes the weakness of ground observations related to sparse distributions and costs. For human related studies and urban climatology, canopy layer urban heat island (CUHI based on air temperatures is extremely important. This study has employed remote sensing methodology to produce monthly CUHI climatology maps during the period 2000–2013, revealing the spatiotemporal characteristics of daytime and nighttime CUHI during this period of rapid urbanization in Shanghai. Using stepwise linear regression, daytime and nighttime air temperatures at the four overpass times of Terra/Aqua were estimated based on time series of Terra/Aqua-MODIS LST and other auxiliary variables including enhanced vegetation index, normalized difference water index, solar zenith angle and distance to coast. The validation results indicate that the models produced an accuracy of 1.6–2.6 °C RMSE for the four overpass times of Terra/Aqua. The models based on Terra LST showed higher accuracy than those based on Aqua LST, and nighttime air temperature estimation had higher accuracy than daytime. The seasonal analysis shows daytime CUHI is strongest in summer and weakest in winter, while nighttime CUHI is weakest in summer and strongest in autumn. The annual mean daytime CUHI during 2000–2013 is 1.0 and 2.2 °C for Terra and Aqua overpass, respectively. The annual mean nighttime CUHI is about 1.0 °C for both Terra and Aqua overpass. The resultant CUHI climatology maps provide a spatiotemporal quantification of CUHI with emphasis on temperature gradients. This study has provided information of relevance to urban planners and environmental managers for assessing and monitoring urban thermal environments which are constantly

  20. Urban heat island research from 1991 to 2015: a bibliometric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qunfang; Lu, Yuqi

    2018-02-01

    A bibliometric analysis based on the Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCI-Expanded) database from the Web of Science was performed to review urban heat island (UHI) research from 1991 to 2015 and statistically assess its developments, trends, and directions. In total, 1822 papers published in 352 journals over the past 25 years were analyzed for scientific output; citations; subject categories; major journals; outstanding keywords; and leading countries, institutions, authors, and research collaborations. The number of UHI-related publications has continuously increased since 1991. Meteorology atmospheric sciences, environmental sciences, and construction building technology were the three most frequent subject categories. Building and Environment, International Journal of Climatology, and Theoretical and Applied Climatology were the three most popular publishing journals. The USA and China were the two leading countries in UHI research, contributing 49.56% of the total articles. Chinese Academy of Science, Arizona State University, and China Meteorological Administration published the most UHI articles. Weng QH and Santamouris M were the two most prolific authors. Author keywords were classified into four major groups: (1) research methods and indicators, e.g., remote sensing, field measurement, and models; (2) generation factors, e.g., impervious urban surfaces, urban geometry, waste heat, vegetation, and pollutants; (3) environmental effects, e.g., urban climate, heat wave, ecology, and pollution; and (4) mitigation and adaption strategies, e.g., roof technology cooling, reflective cooling, vegetation cooling, and urban geometry cooling. A comparative analysis of popular issues revealed that UHI determination (intensity, heat source, supporting techniques) remains the central topic, whereas UHI impacts and mitigation strategies are becoming the popular issues that will receive increasing scientific attention in the future. Modeling will continue to be the

  1. Urban heat island research from 1991 to 2015: a bibliometric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qunfang; Lu, Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    A bibliometric analysis based on the Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCI-Expanded) database from the Web of Science was performed to review urban heat island (UHI) research from 1991 to 2015 and statistically assess its developments, trends, and directions. In total, 1822 papers published in 352 journals over the past 25 years were analyzed for scientific output; citations; subject categories; major journals; outstanding keywords; and leading countries, institutions, authors, and research collaborations. The number of UHI-related publications has continuously increased since 1991. Meteorology atmospheric sciences, environmental sciences, and construction building technology were the three most frequent subject categories. Building and Environment, International Journal of Climatology, and Theoretical and Applied Climatology were the three most popular publishing journals. The USA and China were the two leading countries in UHI research, contributing 49.56% of the total articles. Chinese Academy of Science, Arizona State University, and China Meteorological Administration published the most UHI articles. Weng QH and Santamouris M were the two most prolific authors. Author keywords were classified into four major groups: (1) research methods and indicators, e.g., remote sensing, field measurement, and models; (2) generation factors, e.g., impervious urban surfaces, urban geometry, waste heat, vegetation, and pollutants; (3) environmental effects, e.g., urban climate, heat wave, ecology, and pollution; and (4) mitigation and adaption strategies, e.g., roof technology cooling, reflective cooling, vegetation cooling, and urban geometry cooling. A comparative analysis of popular issues revealed that UHI determination (intensity, heat source, supporting techniques) remains the central topic, whereas UHI impacts and mitigation strategies are becoming the popular issues that will receive increasing scientific attention in the future. Modeling will continue to be the

  2. Influence of Urbanization Factors on Surface Urban Heat Island Intensity: A Comparison of Countries at Different Developmental Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoping Cui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization is a global problem with demographic trends. The urban heat island plays a dominant role in local climate systems. Despite existing efforts to understand the impacts of multiple urbanization factors on the urban heat island globally, very little is known about the attribution of urban heat island magnitude to urbanization in different locations or developmental phases. In this study, based on global land surface temperature data, urban spatial domain data, gross domestic product (GDP, and population data, we analyzed the influence of multiple urbanization factors on global surface urban heat island intensity (SUHII. We also tentatively compared the abovementioned factors between different regions across the globe, especially between China and the USA, the largest countries that are experiencing or have experienced rapid urbanization in recent decades. The results showed that global SUHII had remarkable spatial heterogeneity due to the geographical and socioeconomic variation between cities. There was a significant correlation between SUHII and population as well as GDP in global cities. Moreover, this study suggested that the impacts of population on SUHII might be stronger in the early stages of urbanization, and the GDP factor would become a critical factor at a certain development level. The urban area also had non-ignorable impacts on SUHII, while the correlation between SUHII and urban shape was relatively weak. All these may imply that the best approach to slow down SUHII is to find other solutions, e.g., optimize the spatial configuration of urban internal landscapes, when the urbanization reaches a high level.

  3. Quantifying urban heat island effects and human comfort for cities of variable size and urban morphology in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.; Koopmans, S.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Hove, van B.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the canopy layer urban heat island (UHI) and human comfort in a range of small to large cities and villages in the Netherlands. So far, this subject has not been substantially studied in the Netherlands, since it has a relatively mild Cfb climate and impact was assumed to be

  4. Evaluation of the surface urban heat island effect in the city of Madrid by thermal remote sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobrino, J.; Oltra-Carrio, R; Jimenez-Munoz, J.C.; Franch, B.; Hidalgo, V.; Mattar, C.; Julien, Y.; Cuenca, J.; Romaguera Albentosa, M.R.; Gomez, J.A.; de Miguel, E.; Bianchi, R.; Paganini, M.

    2013-01-01

    The surface urban heat island (SUHI) effect is defined as the increased surface temperatures in urban areas in contrast to cooler surrounding rural areas. In this article, the evaluation of the SUHI effect in the city of Madrid (Spain) from thermal infrared (TIR) remote-sensing data is presented.

  5. Does artificial ascites induce the heat-sink phenomenon during percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of the hepatic subcapsular area?: an in vivo experimental study using a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sun; Rhim, Hyunchul; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo K

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of the heat-sink phenomenon induced by artificial ascites on the size of the ablation zone during percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the hepatic subcapsular area in an in vivo rabbit model. A total of 21 percutaneous rabbit liver RF ablations were performed with and without artificial ascites (5% dextrose aqueous solution). The rabbits were divided into three groups: a) control group (C, n = 7); b) room temperature ascites group (R, n = 7); and c) warmed ascites group (W, n = 7). The tip of a 1 cm, internally cooled electrode was placed on the subcapsular region of the hepatic dome via ultrasound guidance, and ablation was continued for 6 min. Changes in temperature of the ascites were monitored during the ablation. The size of the ablation zones of the excised livers and immediate complications rates were compared statistically between the groups (Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, linear-by-linear association, p = 0.05). One rabbit from the "W" group expired during the procedure. In all groups, the ascites temperatures approached their respective body temperatures as the ablations continued; however, a significant difference in ascites temperature was found between groups "W" and "R" throughout the procedures (39.2+/-0.4 degrees C in group W and 33.4+/-4.3 degrees C in group R at 6 min, p = 0.003). No significant difference was found between the size of the ablation zones (782.4+/-237.3 mL in group C, 1,172.0+/-468.9 mL in group R, and 1,030.6+/-665.1 mL in group W, p = 0.170) for the excised liver specimens. Diaphragmatic injury was identified in three of seven cases (42.9%) upon visual inspection of group "C" rabbits (p = 0.030). Artificial ascites are not likely to cause a significant heat-sink phenomenon in the percutaneous RF ablation of the hepatic subcapsular region.

  6. Modeling reduction of the Urban Heat Island effect to counter-act the effects of climate change in densely built-up areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Konrad; Zuvela-Aloise, Maja; Lettmayer, Gudrun; Schwaiger, Hannes Peter; Kaltenegger, Ingrid; Bird, David Neil; Woess-Gallasch, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of Urban Heat Islands (UHIs) observed in cities, caused by changes in energy balance due to the structural development of the city as well as by sealed surfaces and a lack of vegetation, is expected to strengthen in the future and will further contribute to heat stress, creating an increased need for energy for cooling and ventilation as well as lowering human comfort. Due to a changing climate, rising heat stress, pronounced by an increased intensity or frequency of heat waves, could have far reaching implications for major Austrian cities in the near future. Simultaneous to this expected increasing of the already existing UHI-effect, it is observable, that continuous densification of the core parts of cities is being intensified through implemented traditional urban planning measures. This is particular relevant for high densely populated districts of the city. Several possible counteractions how to address this challenge are already known, partly investigated in urban modeling studies on the effects of modifying the reflective properties of buildings and urban areas for the city of Vienna. On this experience, within the Austrian FFG and KLIEN Smart Cities project JACKY COOL CHECK (Project Nr. 855554), a wide set of measures to reduce heat stress, consisting of e.g. unsealed surfaces, green areas, green roofs, improve reflective properties of different surfaces etc., for the densely built-up residential and business district of Jakomini in the city of Graz/Styria is investigated, to gain decisive data pointing out the peculiarities of UHIs and the potential cooling effects of these target measures for this local specific area. These results serving as a basis for the selection of sustainable measures that will be implemented, in coordination with local stakeholders and considering their interests.

  7. Mitigating the surface urban heat island: Mechanism study and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chunlei

    2017-08-01

    In a surface urban heat island (SUHI), the urban land surface temperature (LST) is usually higher than the temperature of the surrounding rural areas due to human activities and surface characteristics. Because a SUHI has many adverse impacts on urban environment and human health, SUHI mitigation strategies are very important. This paper investigates the mechanism of a SUHI based on the basic physical laws that control the formation of a SUHI; five mitigation strategies are proposed, namely: sprinkling and watering; paving a pervious surface; reducing the anthropogenic heat (AH) release; using a "white roof"; increasing the fractional vegetation cover or leaf area index (LAI). To quantify the effect of these mitigation strategies, 26 sets of experiments are designed and implemented by running the integrated urban land model (IUM). The results of the sensitivity analysis indicate that sprinkling and watering is an effective measure for mitigating a SUHI for an entire day. Decreasing the AH release is also useful for both night- and daytime SUHI mitigation; however, the cooling extent is proportional to the diurnal cycle of AH. Increasing the albedo can reduce the LST in the daytime, especially when the solar radiation is significant; the cooling extent is approximately proportional to the diurnal cycle of the net radiation. Increasing the pervious surface percentage can mitigate the SUHI especially in the daytime. Increasing the fractional vegetation cover can mitigate the SUHI in the daytime but may aggravate the SUHI at night.

  8. Potential for Application of Retroreflective Materials instead of Highly Reflective Materials for Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on urban heat island (UHI mitigation has been carried out globally. Several strategies have been proposed or developed to mitigate UHI, including highly reflective (HR envelopes of buildings, green roofs, urban vegetation, shading, heat sinks, and air-conditioning efficiency. Among these techniques, HR envelopes have been extensively studied as an effective method to mitigate the UHI effect by reducing energy consumption. However, because most of HR materials are diffusive, HR envelopes applied to vertical surfaces can reflect both onto roads and nearby buildings. Additionally, HR roofs cannot reflect all incoming solar radiation to the sky if there are high buildings around it. Thus, HR materials applied as building envelopes have a limited effect against the solar contribution to the UHI. In order to solve this problem, retroreflective (RR materials, which reflect the solar radiation back towards the source, have been studied and developed to be applied as building envelopes instead of HR materials. This paper summarizes several previous researches on HR envelopes and cool roofs and summarizes several current researches on RR materials. The potential for application of RR envelopes in cities is proposed with consideration of economic and environmental factors.

  9. Assessment of urban heat Island for Craiova from satellite-based LST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udristioiu, Mihaela Tinca; Velea, Liliana; Bojariu, Roxana; Sararu, Silviu Constantin

    2017-12-01

    The urban heat island is defined as an excess of heating in urban areas compared with surrounding rural zones which is illustrated by higher surface and air temperatures in the inner part of the cities. The aim of this study is to identify the UHI effect for Craiova - the largest city in the South-Western part of Romania - and to assess its intensity during summer. To this end, MODIS Land surface temperature (LST) for day and night for summer months (June, July, August), in the interval 2002-2017, as well as yearly Land Cover Type (LCT) data also from MODIS were employed. Furthermore, measurements of air and soil temperature from meteorological station Craiova, available from the National Meteorological Administration database, were used to investigate their relation with LST. The analysis shows that in the urban area of Craiova the long-term summer mean LST is about 4 °C (2 °C), higher than in the rural area during daytime (nighttime). During high temperatures episodes, the mean daytime LST reaches 45-47 °C in the city, while the difference from the rural surrounding area is of 2-3 °C. A high correlation (0.77-0.83) is found between LST and air temperature for all land-use types in the area considered. Both LST and 2m-air temperature time-series manifest an increasing linear tendency over the period considered, being more pronounced during the day.

  10. The Conundrum of Impacts of Climate Change on Urbanization and the Urban Heat Island Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2011-01-01

    The twenty-first century is the first urban century according to the United Nations Development Program. The focus on cities reflects awareness of the growing percentage of the world's population that lives in urban areas. In 2000, approximately 3 billion people representing about 40% of the global population resided in urban areas. The United Nations estimates that by 2025, 60% of the world s population will live in urban areas. As a consequence, the number of megacities (those cities with populations of 10 million inhabitants or more) will increase by 100 by 2025. Thus, there is a critical need to understand the spatial growth of urban areas and what the impacts are on the environment. Moreover, there is a critical need to assess how under global climate change, cities will affect the local, regional, and even global climate. As urban areas increase in size, it is anticipated there will be a concomitant growth of the Urban Heat Island effect (UHI), and the attributes that are related to its spatial and temporal dynamics. Therefore, how climate change, including the dynamics of the UHI, will affect the urban environment, must be explored to help mitigate potential impacts on the environment (e.g., air quality, heat stress, vectorborne disease) and on human health and well being, to develop adaptation schemes to cope with these impacts.

  11. The use of a vegetation index for assessment of the urban heat island effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, K. P.; Mcnab, A. L.; Karl, T. R.; Brown, J. F.; Hood, J. J.; Tarpley, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    A vegetation index and radiative surface temperature were derived from NOAA-11 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data for the Seattle, WA region from 28 June through 4 July 1991. The vegetation index and surface temperature values were computed for locations of weather observation stations within the region and compared to observed minimum air temperatures. These comparisons were used to evaluate the use of AVHRR data to assess the influence of the urban environment on observed minimum air temperatures (the urban heat island effect). AVHRR derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and radiant surface temperature data from a one week composite product were both related significantly to observed minimum temperatures, however, the vegetation index accounted for a greater amount of the spatial variation observed in mean minimum temperatures. The difference in the NDVI between urban and rural regions appears to be an indicator of the difference in surface properties (i.e., evaporation and heat storage capacity) between the two environments that are responsible for differences in urban and rural minimum temperatures.

  12. Lisbon Urban Heat Island Updated: New Highlights about the Relationships between Thermal Patterns and Wind Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban growth implies significant modifications in the urban climate. To understand the influence of the city of Lisbon on the urban boundary layer, a mesoscale meteorological network was installed in 2004. The main goals of the present study are to update the results of the research published in 2007 and to bring more precise information about the relationship between the Urban Heat Island (UHI and the regional and local wind systems. The highest frequencies of the UHI were found in the city centre (Restauradores. In the green park of Monsanto, the highest frequency occurred between −2 and 0°C. During the summer, the effect of the breezes was observed in Belém, lowering the temperature. The “strong” UHI (intensity >4°C occurred more often during the summer, with median values of 2°C by night and 1.8°C by day. The highest frequencies of UHI occurred for winds between 2 and 6 m/s and were not associated with atmospheric calm, as pointed out in the literature. Winds above 8 m/s inhibit the occurrence of strong UHI in Lisbon. Summer nighttime strong UHI should be further investigated, due to the heat stress consequences on the population and probable increase of energy consumption.

  13. Remote Sensing of the Urban Heat Island Effect Across Biomes in the Continental USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Zhang, Ping; Wolfe, Robert E.; Bounoua, Lahouari

    2010-01-01

    Impervious surface area (ISA) from the Landsat TM-based NLCD 2001 dataset and land surface temperature (LST) from MODIS averaged over three annual cycles (2003-2005) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the urban heat island (UHI) skin temperature amplitude and its relationship to development intensity, size, and ecological setting for 38 of the most populous cities in the continental United States. Development intensity zones based on %ISA are defined for each urban area emanating outward from the urban core to the nonurban rural areas nearby and used to stratify sampling for land surface temperatures and NDVI. Sampling is further constrained by biome and elevation to insure objective intercomparisons between zones and between cities in different biomes permitting the definition of hierarchically ordered zones that are consistent across urban areas in different ecological setting and across scales. We find that ecological context significantly influences the amplitude of summer daytime UHI (urban-rural temperature difference) the largest (8 C average) observed for cities built in biomes dominated by temperate broadleaf and mixed forest. For all cities combined, ISA is the primary driver for increase in temperature explaining 70% of the total variance in LST. On a yearly average, urban areas are substantially warmer than the non-urban fringe by 2.9 C, except for urban areas in biomes with arid and semiarid climates. The average amplitude of the UHI is remarkably asymmetric with a 4.3 C temperature difference in summer and only 1.3 C in winter. In desert environments, the LST's response to ISA presents an uncharacteristic "U-shaped" horizontal gradient decreasing from the urban core to the outskirts of the city and then increasing again in the suburban to the rural zones. UHI's calculated for these cities point to a possible heat sink effect. These observational results show that the urban heat island amplitude both increases with city size and is seasonally

  14. Assessing the effect of wind speed/direction changes on urban heat island intensity of Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perim Temizoz, Huriye; Unal, Yurdanur S.

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the effect of wind speed/direction changes on urban heat island intensity of Istanbul. Perim Temizöz, Deniz H. Diren, Cemre Yürük and Yurdanur S. Ünal Istanbul Technical University, Department of Meteorological Engineering, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey City or metropolitan areas are significantly warmer than the outlying rural areas since the urban fabrics and artificial surfaces which have different radiative, thermal and aerodynamic features alter the surface energy balance, interact with the regional circulation and introduce anthropogenic sensible heat and moisture into the atmosphere. The temperature contrast between urban and rural areas is most prominent during nighttime since heat is absorbed by day and emitted by night. The intensity of the urban heat island (UHI) vary considerably depending on the prevailent meteorological conditions and the characteristics of the region. Even though urban areas cover a small fraction of Earth, their climate has greater impact on the world's population. Over half of the world population lives in the cities and it is expected to rise within the coming decades. Today almost one fifth of the Turkey's population resides in Istanbul with the percentage expected to increase due to the greater job opportunities compared to the other cities. Its population has been increased from 2 millions to 14 millions since 1960s. Eventually, the city has been expanded tremendously within the last half century, shifting the landscape from vegetation to built up areas. The observations of the last fifty years over Istanbul show that the UHI is most pronounced during summer season. The seasonal temperature differences between urban and suburban sites reach up to 3 K and roughly haft degree increase in UHI intensity is observed after 2000. In this study, we explore the possible range of heat load and distribution over Istanbul for different prevailing wind conditions by using the non-hydrostatic MUKLIMO3 model developed by DWD

  15. Spatially Analyzing the Inequity of the Hong Kong Urban Heat Island by Socio-Demographic Characteristics

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    Man Sing Wong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that some disadvantaged socio-demographic groups face serious environmental-related inequities in Hong Kong due to the rising ambient urban temperatures. Identifying heat-vulnerable groups and locating areas of Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI inequities is thus important for prioritizing interventions to mitigate death/illness rates from heat. This study addresses this problem by integrating methods of remote sensing retrieval, logistic regression modelling, and spatial autocorrelation. In this process, the SUHI effect was first estimated from the Land Surface Temperature (LST derived from a Landsat image. With the scale assimilated to the SUHI and socio-demographic data, a logistic regression model was consequently adopted to ascertain their relationships based on Hong Kong Tertiary Planning Units (TPUs. Lastly, inequity “hotspots” were derived using spatial autocorrelation methods. Results show that disadvantaged socio-demographic groups were significantly more prone to be exposed to an intense SUHI effect: over half of 287 TPUs characterized by age groups of 60+ years, secondary and matriculation education attainment, widowed, divorced and separated, low and middle incomes, and certain occupation groups of workers, have significant Odds Ratios (ORs larger than 1.2. It can be concluded that a clustering analysis stratified by age, income, educational attainment, marital status, and occupation is an effective way to detect the inequity hotspots of SUHI exposure. Additionally, inequities explored using income, marital status and occupation factors were more significant than the age and educational attainment in these areas. The derived maps and model can be further analyzed in urban/city planning, in order to mitigate the physical and social causes of the SUHI effect.

  16. Roles of Urban Tree Canopy and Buildings in Urban Heat Island Effects: Parameterization and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Allen, Dale J.; Zhang, Da-Lin; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Landry, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) effects can strengthen heat waves and air pollution episodes. In this study, the dampening impact of urban trees on the UHI during an extreme heat wave in the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan area is examined by incorporating trees, soil, and grass into the coupled Weather Research and Forecasting model and an urban canopy model (WRF-UCM). By parameterizing the effects of these natural surfaces alongside roadways and buildings, the modified WRF-UCM is used to investigate how urban trees, soil, and grass dampen the UHI. The modified model was run with 50% tree cover over urban roads and a 10% decrease in the width of urban streets to make space for soil and grass alongside the roads and buildings. Results show that, averaged over all urban areas, the added vegetation decreases surface air temperature in urban street canyons by 4.1 K and road-surface and building-wall temperatures by 15.4 and 8.9 K, respectively, as a result of tree shading and evapotranspiration. These temperature changes propagate downwind and alter the temperature gradient associated with the Chesapeake Bay breeze and, therefore, alter the strength of the bay breeze. The impact of building height on the UHI shows that decreasing commercial building heights by 8 m and residential building heights by 2.5 m results in up to 0.4-K higher daytime surface and near-surface air temperatures because of less building shading and up to 1.2-K lower nighttime temperatures because of less longwave radiative trapping in urban street canyons.

  17. Analysis of the Urban Heat Island Effect in Shijiazhuang, China Using Satellite and Airborne Data

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    Kai Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island (UHI effect resulting from rapid urbanization generally has a negative impact on urban residents. Shijiazhuang, the capital of Hebei Province in China, was selected to assess surface thermal patterns and its correlation with Land Cover Types (LCTs. This study was conducted using Landsat TM images on the mesoscale level and airborne hyperspectral thermal images on the microscale level. Land surface temperature (LST was retrieved from four scenes of Landsat TM data in the summer days to analyze the thermal spatial patterns and intensity of surface UHI (SUHI. Surface thermal characteristics were further examined by relating LST to percentage of imperious surface area (ISA% and four remote sensing indices (RSIs, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, Universal Pattern Decomposition method (VIUPD, Normalized Difference Built-up Index (NDBI and Biophysical Composition Index (BCI. On the other hand, fives scenes of airborne TASI (Thermal Airborne Spectrographic Imager sensor images were utilized to describe more detailed urban thermal characteristics of the downtown of Shijiazhuang city. Our results show that an obvious surface heat island effect existed in the study area during summer days, with a SUHI intensity of 2–4 °C. The analyses reveal that ISA% can provide an additional metric for the study of SUHI, yet its association with LST is not straightforward and this should a focus in future work. It was also found that two physically based indices, VIUPD and BCI, have the potential to account for the variation in urban LST. The results concerning on TASI indicate that diversity of impervious surfaces (rooftops, concrete, and mixed asphalt contribute most to the SUHI, among all of the land cover features. Moreover, the effect of impervious surfaces on LST is complicated, and the composition and arrangement of land cover features may play an important role in determining the magnitude and intensity of SUHI. Overall

  18. Suburban heat island effect in groundwater energy utilisation in Nordic climate - case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arola, Teppo

    2017-04-01

    We present the preliminary results from the initial thermogeological characterization of Finland's first-ever planned large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) facility. The site is located in the Asko area (Lahti), at a latitude of 60°59'N. In particular, emphasis is put on the results from an aquifer's pumping test performed in July / August 2016 to investigate the potential implication of suburban heat island (SUHI) effect to ATES system on the naturally cold groundwater area. The site has been under geological investigation since July 2015. At a regional scale, the groundwater's natural temperature is about 5.8- 6°C. However, preliminary measurements during the investigations revealed that local groundwater temperature ranged between 7.5 to 8.7 °C in Asko area. The highest temperature was observed underneath buildings, suggesting that higher-than-average temperature is most likely influenced due to anthropogenic heat flux into the ground. The pumping test was performed for 39 days, of which 28 days with groundwater withdrawal and 11 days of heads recovery. The pumped volumes range from 350 to 540 m3/d leading the total volume of 10400 m3 of groundwater. Groundwater temperatures were continuously measured from pumping test well and two observation piezometers during the entire test. The results indicated that aquifer's temperature remained nearly constant being between 7.4 to 7.9 °C during the test period. Heat pulses with temperature variation of 0.1 to 0.3 °C were observed in the pumping well and nearest monitoring well (19 meters from pumping well) during the pumping test and recovery phase. We estimate that the pulses were due to rapidly changed groundwater flowing conditions and pulse indicate "new groundwater" flow to the well. Overall, the preliminary test suggests that groundwater temperature are expected to remain elevated during the ATES system operation. Elevated temperature due the SUHI effect increases groundwater heating potential

  19. Climate Change, Pacific Ocean and Land Use Influences on Los Angeles' Urban Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamelin, B.; Hsu, F.; LaDochy, S.; Ramirez, P. C.; Ye, H.; Sequera, P.; Gonzalez, J.; McDonald, K.; Patzert, W. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Los Angeles urban heat island (UHI) is a complex entity that is changing in time, space and intensity. The major influences on its characteristics appear to be population, landuse, and Pacific Ocean variability. Since 1950, the city of Los Angeles has nearly tripled in population from 1,333,300 to 3,792,621 in 2010. The downtown skyline has also changed as more high-rises replace lower density buildings and parking lots. Downtown average temperatures have increased rapidly, rising over 3oC in the last century. Tmin values have increased faster than Tmax similar to other UHI cities. However the Los Angeles UHI is unique among most cities, with its complex terrain and dominant land/sea breeze circulations. Also, the city is part of a regional megalopolis, where the surrounding rural areas are distant and ill-defined, in contrast to most UHIs. Our study looks at the diurnal and seasonal patterns in the urban thermal regime and how they have changed over recent decades. Temporal changes in land use, particularly vegetation, coastal sea surface temperatures, Pacific climatic indices such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and coastal upwelling all seem to contribute to the changes in city temperatures. The PDO especially correlates well with Los Angeles temperatures. The spatial changes in an UHI are described combining surface met data and aircraft remote sensing, using the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER) sensors at spatial resolutions of 30 and 50 m, respectively. In our study recent sea breeze enhancement will be investigated in its influence on coastal cooling. Implications of the role of the intensifying UHI in the increases in Los Angeles heat waves will also be discussed.

  20. Responses of urban heat island in Atlanta to different land-use scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peng; Weng, Qihao

    2017-06-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) effect changes heat and water cycles in urban areas, and has been accused of elevating energy consumption, deteriorating living environment, and increasing mortality rates. Understanding various UHI effects necessitates a systematic modeling approach. A major problem in UHI simulations is that urban areas were either considered to have only one category of land use/cover or outdated in land use/cover patterns due to the lack of high resolution data. Therefore, this study aims at integrating up-to-date remotely sensed land use/cover data with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF/UCM)/Urban Canopy Model modeling systems to simulate surface temperature patterns in Atlanta, Georgia. In addition, three land-use scenarios, i.e., spontaneous scenario (SS), concentrated scenario (CS), and local policy scenario (LPS), were designed and incorporated into the modeling. Five numerical experiments were conducted by using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to explore the impact of urbanization-induced land-cover changes on temperature patterns. Land use and land-cover patterns under all three scenarios suggested that urban growth would continue through in-filling development and outward expansion. Compared to temperature simulations in 2011, temperature maps corresponding to the three urban growth scenarios showed warmer and cooler temperature patterns outside and inside the urban core, respectively. Analysis of the mean diurnal temperature cycle suggested that the highest temperature difference of 3.9 K was observed between 2011 and the LPS, and occurred around 22:00 local time. Overall, the simulations showed different UHI effects respond to the land-use scenarios in the summer. It is recommended for urban managers and policy makers to reflect on the potential impacts of alternative urban growth policies on thermal environment.

  1. The effects of Sao Paulo urban heat island on lightning activity: Decadal analysis (1999-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourscheidt, Vandoir; Pinto, Osmar; Naccarato, Kleber P.

    2016-05-01

    Eleven years of lightning data from the Brazilian Integrated National Lightning Detection Network were used to analyze the effects of the urban heat island (UHI) of Sao Paulo on lightning activity, extending the investigation of previous works. Cloud-to-ground lightning data were analyzed in both spatial and temporal perspectives, using different approaches: flash density, flash rate, thunderstorm hours (TH), and the cell initiation technique (CIT), which aims to identify the onset of thunderstorms. Land surface temperature (LST) from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) was used to analyze the UHI evolution over the years. MODIS data were validated using ground stations, distributed within the urban area. Different time intervals (seasonal and intraday) were used in an attempt to separate local convective systems from synoptic-scale events. The results indicate significant effects of the UHI (using LST) on THs and CIT. The CIT showed a nearly ring pattern, especially during the afternoon (14:00-18:00 LT) of summer months, reinforcing temperature contrast as a condition for storm initiation. The results also suggest an amplification of the UHI effects on thunderstorm activity by local factors (sea and country breeze, synoptic events, and terrain). Higher flash rates were also observed throughout the urban region, which influences the lightning density. Temporal analysis indicates that minimum temperature and lightning activity increase in wintertime. In summary, the results agree with previous studies about the UHI and indicate its importance on lightning occurrence, especially by increasing the temperature contrast and the instability in these regions.

  2. Assessing the relationship between surface urban heat islands and landscape patterns across climatic zones in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiquan; Huang, Xin; Li, Jiayi

    2017-08-24

    The urban heat island (UHI) effect exerts a great influence on the Earth's environment and human health and has been the subject of considerable attention. Landscape patterns are among the most important factors relevant to surface UHIs (SUHIs); however, the relationship between SUHIs and landscape patterns is poorly understood over large areas. In this study, the surface UHI intensity (SUHII) is defined as the temperature difference between urban and suburban areas, and the landscape patterns are quantified by the urban-suburban differences in several typical landscape metrics (ΔLMs). Temperature and land-cover classification datasets based on satellite observations were applied to analyze the relationship between SUHII and ΔLMs in 332 cities/city agglomerations distributed in different climatic zones of China. The results indicate that SUHII and its correlations with ΔLMs are profoundly influenced by seasonal, diurnal, and climatic factors. The impacts of different land-cover types on SUHIs are different, and the landscape patterns of the built-up and vegetation (including forest, grassland, and cultivated land) classes have the most significant effects on SUHIs. The results of this study will help us to gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between the SUHI effect and landscape patterns.

  3. Shifting the urban heat island clock in a megacity: a case study of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuan; Jeong, Su-Jong

    2018-01-01

    With increasing levels of urbanization in the near future, understanding the impact of urbanization on urban heat islands (UHIs) is critical to adapting to regional climate and environmental changes. However, our understanding of the UHI effect relies mainly on its intensity or magnitude. The present study evaluates the impact of urbanization on UHI duration changes by comparing three stations with different rates of urbanization, including highly developed and developing urban areas throughout Hong Kong, from 1990–2015. Results show that the 26 year average UHI intensity in highly urbanized regions is much higher than that in developing areas, and the 26 year average of UHI duration is similar. Over the past 25 years, however, UHI duration has increased only in developing urban areas, from 13.59–17.47 hours. Both earlier UHI starting and later UHI ending times concurrently contribute to the UHI effect being experienced for a longer duration. The differences in UHI duration change between the two areas are supported by population and by night light changes from space. Increasing night light, which suggests enhancements in the economic infrastructure, occurred only in the developing urban areas. Our results suggest that changes in UHI duration should be included in an assessment of regional climate change as well as in urban planning in a megacity.

  4. A Quantitative Approach for Analyzing the Relationship between Urban Heat Islands and Land Cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa da Silva Brum Bastos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available With more than 80% of Brazilians living in cities, urbanization has had an important impact on climatic variations. São José dos Campos is located in a region experiencing rapid urbanization, which has produced a remarkable Urban Heat Island (UHI effect. This effect influences the climate, environment and socio-economic development on a regional scale. In this study, the brightness temperatures and land cover types from Landsat TM images of São José dos Campos from 1986, 2001 and 2010 were analyzed for the spatial distribution of changes in temperature and land cover. A quantitative approach was used to explore the relationships among temperature, land cover areas and several indices, including the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI and Normalized Difference Built-up Index (NDBI. The results showed that urban and bare areas correlated positively with high temperatures. Conversely, areas covered in vegetation and water correlated positively with low temperatures. The indices showed that correlations between the NDVI and NDWI and temperature were low (<0.5; however, a moderate correlation was found between the NDBI and temperature.

  5. Spatiotemporal trends of urban heat island effect along the urban development intensity gradient in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Decheng; Zhang, Liangxia; Hao, Lu; Sun, Ge; Liu, Yongqiang; Zhu, Chao

    2016-02-15

    Urban heat island (UHI) represents a major anthropogenic modification to the Earth system and its relationship with urban development is poorly understood at a regional scale. Using Aqua MODIS data and Landsat TM/ETM+ images, we examined the spatiotemporal trends of the UHI effect (ΔT, relative to the rural reference) along the urban development intensity (UDI) gradient in 32 major Chinese cities from 2003 to 2012. We found that the daytime and nighttime ΔT increased significantly (pclimate-vegetation conditions, while that across years were dominated by human activities. Our results highlight the strong and highly diverse urbanization effects on local climate cross China and offer limitations on how these certain methods should be used to quantify UHI intensity over large areas. Furthermore, the impacts of urbanization on climate are complex, thus future research efforts should focus more toward direct observation and physical-based modeling to make credible predictions of the effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling and measuring neighborhood scale flow, turbulence, and temperature within Chicago heat island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conry, Patrick; Sharma, Ashish; Leo, Laura; Fernando, H. J. S.; Potosnak, Mark; Hellmann, Jessica

    2013-11-01

    The modeling of urban heat island (UHI) requires a multi-scale approach as it involves numerous physical phenomena spanning a range of scales. We have performed a comprehensive study of Chicago's UHI via coupling of mesoscale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and micro-scale ENVI-met models. The application of the latter model to a Lincoln Park neighborhood and a parallel observational campaign will be the primary focus of this presentation. ENVI-met employs a computational fluid dynamics model to represent heterogeneity of urban areas, providing fine resolution output of UHI dynamics. In the field campaign, two stations located on rooftops of DePaul University buildings were each equipped with a sonic anemometer and vertical array of thermocouples, allowing investigations of spatial variability of flow, turbulent fluxes, and temperature profiles in an urban roughness sublayer. One of these was located above a rooftop garden and the other above a conventional rooftop. Downscaled output from the WRF model or a set of observational data served as initial and boundary conditions for the ENVI-met model. The model's predicative capabilities were assessed through comparison with another set of observational data, and dynamical causes for the model's poor behavior were identified. Funded by NSF Grant No. 0934592 and ND-ECI.

  7. Hypothesis: Urbanization and exposure to urban heat islands contribute to increasing prevalence of kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, David S; Hirsch, Jacqueline

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Various etiologies may in part explain this observation including increased prevalence of diabetes, obesity and the metabolic syndrome, increased dietary protein and salt content, and decreased dietary dairy products. We hypothesize an additional and novel potential contributor to increasing kidney stone prevalence: migration to urban settings, or urbanization, and resultant exposure of the population to the higher temperatures of urban heat islands (UHIs). Both urbanization and exposure to UHIs are worldwide, continuous trends. Because the difference in temperature between rural and urban settings is greater than the increase in temperature caused by global warming, the potential effect of urbanization on stone prevalence may be of greater magnitude. However, demonstration of a convincing link between urbanization and kidney stones is confounded by many variables simultaneously affected by migration to cities, such as changes in occupation, income, and diet. No data have yet been published supporting this proposed association. We explore the plausibility and limitations of this possible etiology of increasing kidney stone prevalence. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J L; Stott, I; Davies, Z G; Gaston, K J; Leake, J R

    2016-09-19

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health.

  9. Dynamic analysis and ecological evaluation of urban heat islands in Raipur city, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Subhanil; Govil, Himanshu; Mukherjee, Sandip

    2017-07-01

    Spatial-temporal distribution of the urban heat islands (UHI) and their changes over Raipur city have been analyzed using multitemporal Landsat satellite data from 1995 to 2016. Land surface temperature (LST) was retrieved through a mono-window algorithm. Some selected land use/land cover (LU-LC) indices were analyzed with LST using linear regression. The urban thermal field variance index (UTFVI) was applied to measure the thermal comfort level of the city. Results show that during the observed period, the study area experienced a gradual increasing rate in mean LST (>1% per annum). The UHI developed especially along the north-western industrial area and south-eastern bare land of the city. A difference in mean LST between UHI and non-UHI for different time periods (2.6°C in 1995, 2.85°C in 2006, 3.42°C in 2009, and 3.63°C in 2016) reflects the continuous warming status of the city. The LST map also shows the existence of a few urban hot spots near the industrial areas, metal roofs, and high density transport parking lots, which are more abundant in the north-western part of the city. The UTFVI map associated with UHI indicates that the inner parts of the city are ecologically more comfortable than the outer peripheries.

  10. The extent and intensity of the urban heat island in Iași city, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfîcă, Lucian; Ichim, Pavel; Apostol, Liviu; Ursu, Adrian

    2017-10-01

    The study underlines the characteristics of the urban heat island of Iași (Iași's UHI) on the basis of 3 years of air temperature measurements obtained by fixed-point observations. We focus on the identification of UHI development and intensity as it is expressed by the temperature differences between the city centre and the rural surroundings. Annual, seasonal and daily characteristics of Iaşi's UHI are investigated at the level of the classical weather observation. In brief, an intensity of 0.8 °C of UHI and a spatial extension which corresponds to the densely built area of the city were delineated. The Iaşi UHI is stronger during summer calm nights—when the inner city is warmer with 2.5-3 °C than the surroundings—and is weaker during windy spring days. The specific features of Iași's UHI bear a profound connection to the specificity of the urban structure, the high atmospheric stability in the region and the local topography. Also, the effects of Iași's UHI upon some environmental aspects are presented as study cases. For instance, under the direct influence of UHI, we have observed that in the city centre, the apricot tree blossoms earlier (with up to 4 days) and the depth of the snow cover is significantly lower (with up to 10 cm for a rural snow depth of 30 cm) than in the surrounding areas.

  11. Spatio-temporal variance and meteorological drivers of the urban heat island in a European city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnds, Daniela; Böhner, Jürgen; Bechtel, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Urban areas are especially vulnerable to high temperatures, which will intensify in the future due to climate change. Therefore, both good knowledge about the local urban climate as well as simple and robust methods for its projection are needed. This study has analysed the spatio-temporal variance of the mean nocturnal urban heat island (UHI) of Hamburg, with observations from 40 stations from different suppliers. The UHI showed a radial gradient with about 2 K in the centre mostly corresponding to the urban densities. Temporarily, it has a strong seasonal cycle with the highest values between April and September and an inter-annual variability of approximately 0.5 K. Further, synoptic meteorological drivers of the UHI were analysed, which generally is most pronounced under calm and cloud-free conditions. Considered were meteorological parameters such as relative humidity, wind speed, cloud cover and objective weather types. For the stations with the highest UHI intensities, up to 68.7 % of the variance could be explained by seasonal empirical models and even up to 76.6 % by monthly models.

  12. Highly Reflective Roofing Sheets Installed on a School Building to Mitigate the Urban Heat Island Effect in Osaka

    OpenAIRE

    Jihui Yuan; Kazuo Emura; Craig Farnham

    2016-01-01

    Currently, strategies to mitigate urban heat island (UHI) effects and reduce building energy consumption are implemented worldwide. In Japan, as an effective means of mitigating UHI effects and saving energy of buildings, highly reflective (HR) roofs have increasingly been used. In this study, in order to evaluate the effect of HR roofs on building energy conservation, we investigated the solar reflectivity of a subject school roof in Osaka, Japan, in which HR roofing sheets were installed on...

  13. Analysis of the ability of water resources to reduce the urban heat island in the Tokyo megalopolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tadanobu; Hashimoto, Shizuka

    2011-01-01

    Simulation procedure integrated with multi-scale in horizontally regional-urban-point levels and in vertically atmosphere-surface-unsaturated-saturated layers, was newly developed in order to predict the effect of urban geometry and anthropogenic exhaustion on the hydrothermal changes in the atmospheric/land and the interfacial areas of the Japanese megalopolis. The simulated results suggested that the latent heat flux in new water-holding pavement (consisting of porous asphalt and water-holding filler made of steel by-products based on silica compound) has a strong impact on hydrologic cycle and cooling temperature in comparison with the observed heat budget. We evaluated the relationship between the effect of groundwater use as a heat sink to tackle the heat island and the effect of infiltration on the water cycle in the urban area. The result indicates that effective management of water resources would be powerful for ameliorating the heat island and recovering sound hydrologic cycle there. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect modification of the association between short-term meteorological factors and mortality by urban heat islands in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggins, William B; Chan, Emily Y Y; Ng, Edward; Ren, Chao; Chen, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies from around the world have indicated that very high temperatures tend to increase summertime mortality. However possible effect modification by urban micro heat islands has only been examined by a few studies in North America and Europe. This study examined whether daily mortality in micro heat island areas of Hong Kong was more sensitive to short term changes in meteorological conditions than in other areas. An urban heat island index (UHII) was calculated for each of Hong Kong's 248 geographical tertiary planning units (TPU). Daily counts of all natural deaths among Hong Kong residents were stratified according to whether the place of residence of the decedent was in a TPU with high (above the median) or low UHII. Poisson Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) were used to estimate the association between meteorological variables and mortality while adjusting for trend, seasonality, pollutants and flu epidemics. Analyses were restricted to the hot season (June-September). Mean temperatures (lags 0-4) above 29 °C and low mean wind speeds (lags 0-4) were significantly associated with higher daily mortality and these associations were stronger in areas with high UHII. A 1 °C rise above 29 °C was associated with a 4.1% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7%, 7.6%) increase in natural mortality in areas with high UHII but only a 0.7% (95% CI: -2.4%, 3.9%) increase in low UHII areas. Lower mean wind speeds (5(th) percentile vs. 95(th) percentile) were associated with a 5.7% (95% CI: 2.7, 8.9) mortality increase in high UHII areas vs. a -0.3% (95% CI: -3.2%, 2.6%) change in low UHII areas. The results suggest that urban micro heat islands exacerbate the negative health consequences of high temperatures and low wind speeds. Urban planning measures designed to mitigate heat island effects may lessen the health effects of unfavorable summertime meteorological conditions.

  15. Effect modification of the association between short-term meteorological factors and mortality by urban heat islands in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B Goggins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prior studies from around the world have indicated that very high temperatures tend to increase summertime mortality. However possible effect modification by urban micro heat islands has only been examined by a few studies in North America and Europe. This study examined whether daily mortality in micro heat island areas of Hong Kong was more sensitive to short term changes in meteorological conditions than in other areas. METHOD: An urban heat island index (UHII was calculated for each of Hong Kong's 248 geographical tertiary planning units (TPU. Daily counts of all natural deaths among Hong Kong residents were stratified according to whether the place of residence of the decedent was in a TPU with high (above the median or low UHII. Poisson Generalized Additive Models (GAMs were used to estimate the association between meteorological variables and mortality while adjusting for trend, seasonality, pollutants and flu epidemics. Analyses were restricted to the hot season (June-September. RESULTS: Mean temperatures (lags 0-4 above 29 °C and low mean wind speeds (lags 0-4 were significantly associated with higher daily mortality and these associations were stronger in areas with high UHII. A 1 °C rise above 29 °C was associated with a 4.1% (95% confidence interval (CI: 0.7%, 7.6% increase in natural mortality in areas with high UHII but only a 0.7% (95% CI: -2.4%, 3.9% increase in low UHII areas. Lower mean wind speeds (5(th percentile vs. 95(th percentile were associated with a 5.7% (95% CI: 2.7, 8.9 mortality increase in high UHII areas vs. a -0.3% (95% CI: -3.2%, 2.6% change in low UHII areas. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that urban micro heat islands exacerbate the negative health consequences of high temperatures and low wind speeds. Urban planning measures designed to mitigate heat island effects may lessen the health effects of unfavorable summertime meteorological conditions.

  16. Daily variation of urban heat island effect and its correlations to urban greenery: A case study of Adelaide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Soltani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban structure and landscape cause an artificial temperature increase in cities, known as the urban heat island effect. The magnitude of such urban–rural temperature difference varies in daily and seasonal basis. Daily patterns of urban heat accumulation in Adelaide is under investigation. In this paper, East–West air temperature profile of Adelaide metropolitan area was mapped in 60 journeys alongside a straight cross route connecting Adelaide Hills to the West Beach under clear sky between 26 July and 15 August 2013. The most intense urban–rural temperature differences of 5.9 °C occurred during midnight in Adelaide. However, maximum urban heat variation occurred during the late afternoon when the near-surface urban heat fluctuates by 2 °C between the CBD East and Western Parklands. During summer heatwaves, the afternoon heat stress limits public life vibrancy in Adelaide. Increased urban greenery can facilitate resilience to heat by providing shadow and evaporative cooling. A better understanding of daily urban heat variations and the cooling effect of urban greenery assists urban policy making and public life management in the context of climate change.

  17. "Urban heat island" effect on tree growth at several cities of Northern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, O. I.; Kasatkina, E. A.; Timonen, M.; Herva, H.; Kirtsideli, I.; Kanatjev, A. G.

    2010-05-01

    We investigated growth of larches being planted at several cities of Northern Europe: St. Petersburg (59°57'N, 30°19'E), Rovaniemi (66°30'N, 25°44'E), Apatity (67°34'N, 33°23'E). The data were collected at several sites inside of each city, and at one site in the rural area outside of each cities (about 50 km apart). Totally we studied 10 series. The longest chronology was about 190 years (in St. Petersburg). However, the most others were not very long (about 50 - 70 years). Firstly, it was shown that tree-rings of planted (not typical) larch trees don't reflect the influence of external (solar) factors in contrast with natural species. That is it could not be possible to detect some warming for the 1930-1960 period and some cooling later on. This effect was observed for both series inside the cities and outside of them. Secondly, it was revealed that for both northern cities (Apatity and Rovaniemi) variability of tree-ring indexes was more pronounced in series collected inside of them. Another situation was found for St. Petersburg. Growth of larch trees was stable inside of this megapolis. The preliminary interpretation of the results obtained seems to be connected to different influence of "urban heat island" effect on planted trees inside and outside of the cities for megapolis and relatively small towns. This work is financially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 09-04-98801), by the Program of the Russian Academy and by the Regional Scientific Program of Murmansk region.

  18. The impact of green areas in mitigation of urban heat island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaninovic, Ksenija

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the project REPUBLICMED (REtroffiting PUBLic spaces in Intelligent MEDiterranean Cities) co-financed by the European Union, the changes in urban structure have to be proposed in order to mitigate the urban heat island in Zadar, Croatia. The intention is to compare thermal perception for selected locations in Zadar in the present situation and after proposed changes in different parts of the year. For that purpose, four days in different seasons were selected. For winter and summer, the days with extreme minimum and maximum temperatures were selected, whilst for spring and autumn the days in the middle of seasons (April and October) with mean temperatures similar to the corresponding mean seasonal temperatures were selected. All selected days were mainly clear or with small cloudiness resulting with maximum solar radiation. The thermal perception was calculated by means of biometeorological index based on energy equilibrium between human body and environment - physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). In the first analysis, daily courses of biometeorological index for selected situations based on hourly data were compared. During warmest parts of the day in summer the thermal perception differs up to 5°C under the tree shadow, while the differences in other seasons are smaller. The second analysis included the differences in the distribution of frequencies of thermal perception in the warmest part of the day (2 p.m.) throughout the year for selected locations. It is performed using meteorological data measured at the meteorological station Zadar in the 30-year climate period 1981-2010. The results have revealed the reduction in the frequency of sensations of hot and very hot (PET > 35°C or 41°C) under the shadow of the trees during summer, at the rate of up to 25% comparing to the situation before modification (without trees).

  19. Urban heat island (UHI) influence on secondary pollutant formation in a tropical humid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Gsnvksn; Nagendra, S M Shiva; Schlink, Uwe

    2017-10-01

    The combined action of urbanization (change in land use) and increase in vehicular emissions intensifies the urban heat island (UHI) effect in many cities in the developed countries. The urban warming (UHI) enhances heat-stress-related diseases and ozone (O3) levels due to a photochemical reaction. Even though UHI intensity depends on wind speed, wind direction, and solar flux, the thermodynamic properties of surface materials can accelerate the temperature profiles at the local scale. This mechanism modifies the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) structure and mixing height in urban regions. These changes further deteriorate the local air quality. In this work, an attempt has been made to understand the interrelationship between air pollution and UHI intensity at selected urban areas located at tropical environment. The characteristics of ambient temperature profiles associated with land use changes in the different microenvironments of Chennai city were simulated using the Envi-Met model. The simulated surface 24-hr average air temperatures (11 m above the ground) for urban background and commercial and residential sites were found to be 30.81 ± 2.06, 31.51 ± 1.87, and 31.33 ± 2.1ºC, respectively. The diurnal variation of UHI intensity was determined by comparing the daytime average air temperatures to the diurnal air temperature for different wind velocity conditions. From the model simulations, we found that wind speed of 0.2 to 5 m/sec aggravates the UHI intensity. Further, the diurnal variation of mixing height was also estimated at the study locations. The estimated lowest mixing height at the residential area was found to be 60 m in the middle of night. During the same period, highest ozone (O3) concentrations were also recorded at the continuous ambient air quality monitoring station (CAAQMS) located at the residential area. An attempt has made to study the diurnal variation of secondary pollution levels in different study regions. This paper focuses

  20. The Dynamical Linkage of Atmospheric Blocking to Drought, Heatwave and Urban Heat Island in Southeastern US: A Multi-Scale Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Dong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric blocking is a long standing structure stalled in the mid-troposphere which is often associated with extreme weather events such as droughts, heatwaves, flood and cold air outbreak. A striking atmospheric blocking is identified to persist over the US during 13–17 August 2007, exacerbating the existing drought over the Southeastern US. This pronounced blocking event not only intensified the concurrent drought conditions, but also led to a record-breaking heatwave over the Southeast of the US. The excessive heat observed during this heatwave is attributable to the subsidence-associated adiabatic warming as well as the dry-and-warm air advection over Alabama and the neighboring states. At the local scale, we choose Birmingham, AL, as the study area for exploring the blocking influence on urban heat island. Based on the remote sensing data, the surface (skin urban heat island is found to be 8 ∘ C in this area on the block-onset day. This provides partial evidences that the surface urban heat island intensity is likely amplified by the blocking-induced heat waves. The present work provides a unique case study in which blocking, drought, heatwave and urban heat island all occur concurrently, and interplay across a spectrum of spatial scales. We conclude that atmospheric blocking is capable of reinforcing droughts, initiating heatwaves, and probably amplifying the urban heat island intensity during the concurrent period.

  1. Natural Ventilation: A Mitigation Strategy to Reduce Overheating In Buildings under Urban Heat Island Effect in South American Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, Massimo; Carrasco, Claudio; Ángel Gálvez, Miguel; Inostroza, Luis

    2017-10-01

    Urban heat island effect often produces an increase of overheating sensation inside of buildings. To evacuate this heat, the current use of air conditioning increases the energy consumption of buildings. As a good alternative, natural ventilation is one of the best strategies to obtain indoor comfort conditions, even in summer season, if buildings and urban designs are appropriated. In this work, the overheating risk of a small house is evaluated in four South American cities: Guayaquil, Lima, Antofagasta and Valparaíso, with and without considering the UHI effect. Then, natural ventilation is assessed in order to understand the capability of this passive strategy to assure comfort inside the house. Results show that an important portion of the indoor heat can be evacuated, however the temperature rising (especially during the night) due to UHI can generate a saturation effect if appropriate technical solutions, like the increase in the air speed that can be obtained with good urban design, are not considered.

  2. Urban heat : natural and anthropogenic factors influencing urban air temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    N. E. Theeuwes

    2015-01-01

    The urban heat island effect is a phenomenon observed worldwide, i.e. evening and nocturnal temperatures in cities are usually several degrees higher than in the surrounding countryside. The main goal of this thesis is to understand the processes that drive the urban air temperature and the urban heat island. First, the effects of street geometry and open water bodies on the diurnal cycle of the urban air temperatures were investigated. This was followed by a search for a universal scaling of...

  3. Effects of the urban heat island on the phenology of Odonata in London, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos-Jiménez, Giovanna; Hassall, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    Urbanisation is one of the major drivers of ecosystem change and includes increased temperatures in cities leading to an urban heat island (UHI). This study quantified the phenological response of odonates across London, UK, from 1990 to 2012, using a database of 1,031,277 historical sightings. The ordinal flight dates of each species were used to calculate the leading edge, middle and trailing edge of the flight period (P5, P50 and P95, respectively). The results suggest that the phenology of odonates is affected by the UHI only at a community level: no significant changes in the P5 or P50 of the flight period were found, although the P95 shows a mean advance of 4.13 days compared to rural areas, thus suggesting a contraction of the flight period in urban areas. However, only one individual species ( Sympetrum striolatum) exhibited an advance in the P95 of the flight period in urban areas compared to rural areas. On the other hand, climate change (minimum temperature) had a much stronger impact on the phenology of odonates at the community level with a significant advance of 6.9 days °C-1 in the P5 of the flight period, 3.1 days °C-1 in the P50 and 3.3 days °C-1 in the P95 flight date. Similarly, a significant advance in P5 was found in 7 of the 15 species tested in response to minimum temperature, and 2 species showed a significant advance in P50 in response to minimum temperature, but no species showed a shift in the P95 flight date due to minimum temperature. As shown in previous studies, life history influences the phenological response of odonates, with spring species and those species lacking an egg diapause being the most responsive to increased temperatures, although summer species and species with obligate egg diapause also respond to the UHI by advancing the P95 by 3.8 and 4.5 days, respectively, compared to rural areas, thus contracting the flight period. The present study shows that the UHI has negligible impacts on emergence patterns of odonates

  4. Reducing urban heat island effects to improve urban comfort and balance energy consumption in Bucharest (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Dan; Ochinciuc, Cristina Victoria; Cheval, Sorin; Comşa, Ionuţ; Sîrodoev, Igor; Andone, Radu; Caracaş, Gabriela; Crăciun, Cerasella; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Georgescu, Mihaela; Ianoş, Ioan; Merciu, Cristina; Moraru, Dan; Opriş, Ana; Paraschiv, Mirela; Raeţchi, Sonia; Saghin, Irina; Schvab, Andrei; Tătui-Văidianu, Nataşa

    2017-04-01

    In the recent decades, extreme temperature events and derived hazards are frequent and trigger noteworthy impacts in Romania, especially over the large urban areas. The cities produce significant disturbances of many elements of the regional climate, and generates adverse effects such as Urban Heat Islands (UHI). This presentation condenses the outputs of an ongoing research project (REDBHI) developed through (2013-2017) focused on developing a methodology for monitoring and forecasting indoor climate and energy challenges related to the intensity of UHI of Bucharest (Romania), based on relevant urban climate zones (UCZs). Multi-criteria correlations between the UHI and architectural, urban and landscape variables were determined, and the vulnerability of buildings expressed in the form of transfer function between indoor micro-climate and outdoor urban environment. The vulnerability of civil buildings was determined in relation with the potential for amplifying the thermal hazards intensity through the anthropogenic influence. The project REDBHI aims at developing innovative and original products, with direct applicability, which can be used in any urban settlement and have market potential with regards to energy design and consulting. The concrete innovative outcomes consist of a) localization of the Bucharest UCZs according to the UHI intensity, identifying reference buildings and sub-zones according to urban anthropic factors and landscape pattern; b) typology of representative buildings with regards to energy consumption and CO2 emitted as a result of building exploitation; c) 3D modelling of the reference buildings and of the thermal/energy reaction to severe climatic conditions d) empirical validation of the dynamic thermal/energy analysis; d) development of an pilot virtual studio capable to simulate climate alerts, analyse scenarios and suggest measures to mitigate the UHI effects, and disseminate the outcomes for educational purposes; e) compendium of

  5. Understanding Diurnality and Inter-Seasonality of a Sub-tropical Urban Heat Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Tirthankar; Sarangi, Chandan; Tripathi, Sachchida Nand

    2017-05-01

    We quantify the spatial and temporal aspects of the urban heat-island (UHI) effect for Kanpur, a major city in the humid sub-tropical monsoon climate of the Gangetic basin. Fixed station measurements are used to investigate the diurnality and inter-seasonality in the urban-rural differences in surface temperature ({Δ } T_s) and air temperature ({Δ } T_c) separately. The extent of the spatial variations of the nighttime {Δ } T_c and {Δ } T_s is investigated through mobile campaigns and satellite remote sensing respectively. Nighttime {Δ } T_c values dominate during both the pre-monsoon (maximum of 3.6°C) and the monsoon (maximum of 2.0°C). However, the diurnality in {Δ } T_s is different, with higher daytime values during the pre-monsoon, but very little diurnality during the monsoon. The nighttime {Δ } T_s value is mainly associated with differences in the urban-rural incoming longwave radiative flux (r2=0.33 during the pre-monsoon; 0.65 during the monsoon), which, in turn, causes a difference in the outgoing longwave radiative flux. This difference may modulate the nighttime {Δ } T_c value as suggested by significant correlations (r2=0.68 for the pre-monsoon; 0.50 for the monsoon). The magnitude of {Δ } T_c may also be modulated by advection, as it is inversely related with the urban wind speed. A combination of in situ, remotely sensed, and model simulation data were used to show that the inter-seasonality in {Δ } T_s, and, to a lesser extent, in {Δ } T_c, may be related to the change in the land use of the rural site between the pre-monsoon and the monsoon periods. Results suggest that the degree of coupling of {Δ } T_s and {Δ } T_c may be a strong function of land use and land cover.

  6. Streams in the urban heat island: spatial and temporal variability in temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Kayleigh A.; Bernhardt, Emily S.; Grace, James B.; Hassett, Brooke A.; Sudduth, Elizabeth B.; Wang, Siyi; Urban, Dean L.

    2013-01-01

    Streams draining urban heat islands tend to be hotter than rural and forested streams at baseflow because of warmer urban air and ground temperatures, paved surfaces, and decreased riparian canopy. Urban infrastructure efficiently routes runoff over hot impervious surfaces and through storm drains directly into streams and can lead to rapid, dramatic increases in temperature. Thermal regimes affect habitat quality and biogeochemical processes, and changes can be lethal if temperatures exceed upper tolerance limits of aquatic fauna. In summer 2009, we collected continuous (10-min interval) temperature data in 60 streams spanning a range of development intensity in the Piedmont of North Carolina, USA. The 5 most urbanized streams averaged 21.1°C at baseflow, compared to 19.5°C in the 5 most forested streams. Temperatures in urban streams rose as much as 4°C during a small regional storm, whereas the same storm led to extremely small to no changes in temperature in forested streams. Over a kilometer of stream length, baseflow temperature varied by as much as 10°C in an urban stream and as little as 2°C in a forested stream. We used structural equation modeling to explore how reach- and catchment-scale attributes interact to explain maximum temperatures and magnitudes of storm-flow temperature surges. The best predictive model of baseflow temperatures (R2  =  0.461) included moderately strong pathways directly (extent of development and road density) and indirectly, as mediated by reach-scale factors (canopy closure and stream width), from catchment-scale factors. The strongest influence on storm-flow temperature surges appeared to be % development in the catchment. Reach-scale factors, such as the extent of riparian forest and stream width, had little mitigating influence (R2  =  0.448). Stream temperature is an essential, but overlooked, aspect of the urban stream syndrome and is affected by reach-scale habitat variables, catchment-scale urbanization

  7. CORRELATION ANALYSIS OF SURFACE TEMPERATURE OF ROOFTOPS, STREETSCAPES AND URBAN HEAT ISLAND EFFECT: CASE STUDY OF CENTRAL SYDNEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Sharifi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cities are frequently experiencing artificial heat stress, known as the Urban Heat Island (UHI effect. The UHI effect is commonly present in cities due to increased urbanization, where anthropogenic heat and human modifications have altered the characteristics of surfaces and atmosphere. Urban structure, land cover and metabolism are underlined as UHI key contributors and can result in higher urban densities being up to 10°C hotter compared to their peri-urban surroundings. The UHI effect increases the health-risk of spending time outdoors and boosts the need for energy consumption, particularly for air-conditioning during summer. Under investigation is what urban features are more resilient to the surface layer Urban Heat Island (sUHI effect in precinct scale. In the context of Sydney, this ongoing research aims to explore the most heat resilient urban features at precinct scale. This UHI investigation covers five highdensity precincts in central Sydney and is based on a nocturnal remote-sensing thermal image of central Sydney taken on 6 February 2009. Comparing the surface temperature of streetscapes and buildings’ rooftops (dominant urban horizontal surfaces, indicates that open spaces and particularly streetscapes are the most sensitive urban elements to the sUHI effect. The correlations between street network intensity, open space ratio, urban greenery ratio and the sUHI effect is being analysed in Sydney’s high-density precincts. Results indicate that higher open space ratio and street network intensity correlate significantly to higher sUHI effect at precinct scale. Meanwhile, 10% increase in the urban greenery can effectively decrease the precinct temperature by 0.6°C.

  8. Interactions Between Urban Vegetation and Surface Urban Heat Islands: A Case Study in the Boston Metropolitan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaas, E. K.; Miller, D. L.; Wang, J.; Friedl, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Many studies have used thermal data from remote sensing to characterize how land use and surface properties modify the climate of cities. However, relatively few studies have examined the impact of elevated temperature on ecophysiological processes in urban areas. In this paper, we use time series of Landsat data to characterize and quantify how geographic variation in Boston's surface urban heat island (SUHI) affects the growing season of vegetation in and around the city, and explore how the quality and character of vegetation patches in Boston affect local heat island intensity. Results from this analysis show strong coupling between Boston's SUHI and vegetation phenology at the scale of both individual landscape units and for the region as a whole, with significant detectable signatures in both surface temperature and growing season length extending 15 km from Boston's urban core. On average, land surface temperatures were about 7 °C warmer and the growing season was 18-22 days longer in Boston relative to adjacent rural areas. Within Boston's urban core, patterns of temperature and timing of phenology in areas with higher vegetation amounts (e.g., parks) were similar to those in adjacent rural areas, suggesting that vegetation patches provide an important ecosystem service that offsets the urban heat island at local scales. Local relationships between phenology and temperature were affected by the intensity of urban land use surrounding vegetation patches and possibly by the presence of exotic tree species that are common in urban areas. Results from this analysis show how species composition, land cover configuration, and vegetation patch sizes jointly influence the nature and magnitude of coupling between vegetation phenology and SUHIs, and demonstrate that urban vegetation provides a significant ecosystem service in cities by decreasing the local intensity of SUHIs.

  9. Energy impacts of heat island reduction strategies in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, Steven; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-11-30

    In 2000, the Toronto Atmospheric Fund (TAF) embarked on an initiative to quantify the potential benefits of Heat Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (shade trees, reflective roofs and pavements) in reducing cooling energy use in buildings, lowering the ambient air temperature and improve air quality. This report summarizes the efforts of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to assess the impacts of HIR measures on building cooling- and heating-energy use. We discuss our efforts to calculate annual energy savings and peak-power avoidance of HIR strategies in the building sector of the Greater Toronto Area. The analysis is focused on three major building types that offer most saving potentials: residence, office and retail store. Using an hourly building energy simulation model, we quantify the energy saving potentials of (1) using cool roofs on individual buildings [direct effect], (2) planting deciduous shade trees near south and west walls of building [direct effect], (3) planting coniferous wind-shielding vegetation near building [direct effect], (4) ambient cooling by a large-scale program of urban reforestation with reflective building roofs and pavements [indirect effect], (5) and the combined direct and indirect effects. Results show potential annual energy savings of over $11M (with uniform residential and commercial electricity and gas prices of $0.084/kWh and $5.54/GJ) could be realized by ratepayers from the combined direct and indirect effects of HIR strategies. Of that total, about 88 percent was from the direct impact roughly divided equally among reflective roofs, shade trees and wind-shielding, and the remainder (12 percent) from the indirect impact of the cooler ambient air temperature. The residential sector accounts for over half (59 percent) of the total, offices 13 percent and retail stores 28 percent. Savings from cool roofs were about 20 percent, shade trees 30 percent, wind shielding of tree 37 percent, and indirect effect 12 percent

  10. Modelling of the Annual Mean Urban Heat Island Pattern for Planning of Representative Urban Climate Station Network

    OpenAIRE

    Unger, János; Savić, Stevan; Gál, Tamás

    2011-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the annual mean urban heat island (UHI) intensity pattern was analysed for the medium-sized city Novi Sad, Serbia, located on the low and flat Great Hungarian Plain. The UHI pattern was determined by an empirical modelling method developed by (Balázs et al. 2009). This method was based on datasets from urban areas of Szeged and Debrecen (Hungary). The urban study area in Novi Sad (60 km2) was established as a grid network of 240 cells (0.5 km ×0.5 km). A Landsat sa...

  11. Heat wave phenomenon in southern Slovakia: long-term changes and variability of daily maximum air temperature in Hurbanovo within the 1901-2009 period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecho, J.; Výberči, D.; Jarošová, M.; Å¥Astný, P. Å.

    2010-09-01

    Analysis of long-term changes and temporal variability of heat waves incidence in the region of southern Slovakia within the 1901-2009 periods is a goal of the presented contribution. It is expected that climate change in terms of global warming would amplify temporal frequency and spatial extension of extreme heat wave incidence in region of central Europe in the next few decades. The frequency of occurrence and amplitude of heat waves may be impacted by changes in the temperature regime. Heat waves can cause severe thermal environmental stress leading to higher hospital admission rates, health complications, and increased mortality. These effects arise because of one or more meteorology-related factors such as higher effective temperatures, sunshine, more consecutive hot days and nights, stagnation, increased humidity, increased pollutant emissions, and accelerated photochemical smog and particulate formation. Heat waves bring about higher temperatures, increased solar heating of buildings, inhibited ventilation, and a larger number of consecutive warm days and nights. All of these effects increase the thermal loads on buildings, reduce their ability to cool down, and increase indoor temperatures. The paper is focused to analysis of long-term and inter-decadal temporal variability of heat waves occurrence at meteorological station Hurbanovo (time-series of daily maximum air temperature available from at least 1901). We can characterize the heat waves by its magnitude and duration, hence both of these characteristics need to be investigated together using sophisticated statistical methods developed particularly for the analysis of extreme hydrological events. We investigated particular heat wave periods either from the severity point of view using HWI index. In the paper we also present the results of statistical analysis of daily maximum air temperature within 1901-2009 period. Apart from these investigation efforts we also focused on synoptic causes of heat wave

  12. UPEI (University of Prince Edward Island) wood chip boiler to feed second Charlottetown area district heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    A new $4.3 million district heating system will deliver heat to 31 subscribers from UPEI's wood-fired heating plant. The plan is to convert UPEI's own campus-wide heat distribution system from steam to more efficient hot water. The total plant output is 13.7 MW, enough to heat the campus and the 31 subcribers' buildings. During the 1987-88 fiscal year, the more northern part of the system will be completed. A year later the system will be extended south. When finished, the project will displace nearly 2 million l of fuel oil annually with just over 7000 green tonnes of wood chips. Hot water from the UPEI boiler plant travels along each route though buried insulated pipes. At the end of a run, the water reverses direction and returns to the boiler in another insulated pipe. It passes through small cylindrical heat exchangers in each building. Boiler and burner maintenance costs are eliminated. Once the user is familiar with the system, the old boiler and hot water tanks can be removed - making space available for other purposes. District heating is virtually noiseless. Insurance costs go down in many cases when boilers and combustion systems are no longer used. The Island's currently underutilized wood resource will be put to better use. These woodchips are made from wood that has been damaged by budworm and other diseases, or wood that is overmature. The project has sound environmental benefits ranging from reduced sulpher emissions to the possible long-term benefit of eliminating a number of underground fuel storage tanks and their potential for leaks.

  13. A study of the Merritt Island, Florida sea breeze flow regimes and their effect on surface heat and moisture fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubes, M. T.; Cooper, H. J.; Smith, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Data collected during the Convective and Precipitation/Electrification Experiment were analyzed as part of an investigation of the sea breeze in the vicinity of Merritt Island, Florida. Analysis of near-surface divergence fields shows that the classical 24-hour oscillation in divergence over the island due to the direct sea breeze circulation is frequently disrupted and exhibits two distinct modes: the classical sea breeze pattern and deviations from that pattern. A comparison of clear day surface energy fluxes with fluxes on other days indicates that changes in magnitudes were dominated by the presence or absence of clouds. Non-classical sea breeze days tended to lose more available energy in the morning than classical sea breeze days due to earlier development of small cumulus over the island. A composite storm of surface winds, surface energy fluxes, rainfall, and satellite visible data was constructed. A spectral transmittance over the visible wavelengths for the cloud cover resulting from the composite storm was calculated. It is shown that pre-storm transmittances of 0.8 fall to values near 0.1 as the downdraft moves directly over the site. It is also found that under post-composite storm conditions of continuous clear sky days, 3.5 days are required to evaporate back into the atmosphere the latent heat energy lost to the surface by rainfall.

  14. Urban weather data and building models for the inclusion of the urban heat island effect in building performance simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palme

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This data article presents files supporting calculation for urban heat island (UHI inclusion in building performance simulation (BPS. Methodology is used in the research article “From urban climate to energy consumption. Enhancing building performance simulation by including the urban heat island effect” (Palme et al., 2017 [1]. In this research, a Geographical Information System (GIS study is done in order to statistically represent the most important urban scenarios of four South-American cities (Guayaquil, Lima, Antofagasta and Valparaíso. Then, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA is done to obtain reference Urban Tissues Categories (UTC to be used in urban weather simulation. The urban weather files are generated by using the Urban Weather Generator (UWG software (version 4.1 beta. Finally, BPS is run out with the Transient System Simulation (TRNSYS software (version 17. In this data paper, four sets of data are presented: 1 PCA data (excel to explain how to group different urban samples in representative UTC; 2 UWG data (text to reproduce the Urban Weather Generation for the UTC used in the four cities (4 UTC in Lima, Guayaquil, Antofagasta and 5 UTC in Valparaíso; 3 weather data (text with the resulting rural and urban weather; 4 BPS models (text data containing the TRNSYS models (four building models.

  15. Urban weather data and building models for the inclusion of the urban heat island effect in building performance simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, M; Inostroza, L; Villacreses, G; Lobato, A; Carrasco, C

    2017-10-01

    This data article presents files supporting calculation for urban heat island (UHI) inclusion in building performance simulation (BPS). Methodology is used in the research article "From urban climate to energy consumption. Enhancing building performance simulation by including the urban heat island effect" (Palme et al., 2017) [1]. In this research, a Geographical Information System (GIS) study is done in order to statistically represent the most important urban scenarios of four South-American cities (Guayaquil, Lima, Antofagasta and Valparaíso). Then, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is done to obtain reference Urban Tissues Categories (UTC) to be used in urban weather simulation. The urban weather files are generated by using the Urban Weather Generator (UWG) software (version 4.1 beta). Finally, BPS is run out with the Transient System Simulation (TRNSYS) software (version 17). In this data paper, four sets of data are presented: 1) PCA data (excel) to explain how to group different urban samples in representative UTC; 2) UWG data (text) to reproduce the Urban Weather Generation for the UTC used in the four cities (4 UTC in Lima, Guayaquil, Antofagasta and 5 UTC in Valparaíso); 3) weather data (text) with the resulting rural and urban weather; 4) BPS models (text) data containing the TRNSYS models (four building models).

  16. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of the Mitigating Effects of Industrial Relocation on the Surface Urban Heat Island over China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization is typically accompanied by the relocation and reconstruction of industrial areas due to limited space and environmental requirements, particularly in the case of a capital city. Shougang Group, one of the largest steel mill operators in China, was relocated from Beijing to Hebei Province. To study the thermal environmental changes at the Shougang industrial site before and after relocation, four Landsat images (from 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2016 were used to calculate the land surface temperature (LST. Using the urban heat island ratio index (URI, we compared the LST values for the four images of the investigated area. Following the relocation of Shougang Group, the URI values decreased from 0.55 in 2005 to 0.21 in 2016, indicating that the surface urban heat island effect in the area was greatly mitigated; we infer that this effect was related to steel production. This study shows that the use of Landsat images to assess industrial thermal pollution is feasible. Accurate and rapid extraction of thermal pollution data by remote sensing offers great potential for the management of industrial pollution sources and distribution, and for technical support in urban planning departments.

  17. Study of the Relationships between the Spatial Extent of Surface Urban Heat Islands and Urban Characteristic Factors Based on Landsat ETM+ Data

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jinqu; Wang, Yunpeng

    2008-01-01

    Ten cities with different population and urban sizes located in the Pearl River Delta, Guangdong Province, P.R. China were selected to study the relationships between the spatial extent of surface urban heat islands (SUHI) and five urban characteristic factors such as urban size, development area, water proportion, mean NDVI (Normalized Vegetation Index) and population density, etc. The spatial extent of SUHI was quantified by using the hot island area (HIA). All the cities are almost at the ...

  18. Cool city mornings by urban heat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pietersen-Theeuwes, N.E.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Ronda, R.J.; Rotach, M.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The urban heat island effect is a phenomenon observed worldwide, i.e. evening and nocturnal temperatures in cities are usually several degrees higher than in the surrounding countryside. In contrast, cities are sometimes found to be cooler than their rural surroundings in the morning and early

  19. [Temporal change in annual air temperature and heat island effect in a coastal city and an inland city at mid-latitude in China during 1956-1998].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Lu-men; Sun, Jian-xin

    2009-12-01

    Temporal changes in air temperature and urban heat island (UHI) effects during 1956-1998 were compared between a coastal city, Ji' nan, and an inland city, Xi' an, which were similar in latitude, size and development. During 1956-1978, except that the annual mean minimum temperature in Ji' nan increased by 0.37 degrees C x 10 a(-1), the temperature variables in the two cities did not display any apparent trend. During 1979-1998, all temperature variables of the two cities showed an increasing trend. Comparing with that in Ji' nan, the increasing rate of annual mean maximum temperature and annual mean temperature in Xi' an was greater, but that of annual mean minimum temperature was smaller. In the two cities, heat island effect occurred during 1956-1978 but without any apparent trend, whereas during 1979-1998, this effect increased with time, especially in Xi' an where the annual mean minimum temperature and annual mean temperature increased by 0.22 degrees C x 10 a(-1) and 0.32 degrees C x 10 a(-1), respectively. Both the level and the inter-annual variation of the heat island effect were much greater in Ji' nan than in Xi' an, but the increasing rate of this effect was greater in Xi' an than in Ji' nan. Obvious differences were observed in the increasing rate of annual mean maximum air temperature, annual mean air temperature, and annual mean minimum temperature as well as the heat island effect in Ji' nan, whereas negligible differences were found in Xi' an. Among the three temperature variables, annual mean minimum temperature displayed the most obvious increasing trend and was most affected by heat island effect, while annual mean maximum temperature was most variable inter-annually. Geographical location not only affected the magnitude of urban warming, but also affected the mode of urban warming and the strength of heat island effect.

  20. Class and Home Problems. Identify-Solve-Broadcast Your Own Transport Phenomenon: Student-Created YouTube Videos to Foster Active Learning in Mass and Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fei; Khera, Eshita

    2016-01-01

    Despite the instinctive perception of mass and heat transfer principles in daily life, productive learning in this course continues to be one of the greatest challenges for undergraduate students in chemical engineering. In an effort to enhance student learning in classroom, we initiated an innovative active-learning method titled…

  1. Effects of landscape composition and pattern on land surface temperature: An urban heat island study in the megacities of Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estoque, Ronald C; Murayama, Yuji; Myint, Soe W

    2017-01-15

    Due to its adverse impacts on urban ecological environment and the overall livability of cities, the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon has become a major research focus in various interrelated fields, including urban climatology, urban ecology, urban planning, and urban geography. This study sought to examine the relationship between land surface temperature (LST) and the abundance and spatial pattern of impervious surface and green space in the metropolitan areas of Bangkok (Thailand), Jakarta (Indonesia), and Manila (Philippines). Landsat-8 OLI/TIRS data and various geospatial approaches, including urban-rural gradient, multiresolution grid-based, and spatial metrics-based techniques, were used to facilitate the analysis. We found a significant strong correlation between mean LST and the density of impervious surface (positive) and green space (negative) along the urban-rural gradients of the three cities, depicting a typical UHI profile. The correlation of impervious surface density with mean LST tends to increase in larger grids, whereas the correlation of green space density with mean LST tends to increase in smaller grids, indicating a stronger influence of impervious surface and green space on the variability of LST in larger and smaller areas, respectively. The size, shape complexity, and aggregation of the patches of impervious surface and green space also had significant relationships with mean LST, though aggregation had the most consistent strong correlation. On average, the mean LST of impervious surface is about 3°C higher than that of green space, highlighting the important role of green spaces in mitigating UHI effects, an important urban ecosystem service. We recommend that the density and spatial pattern of urban impervious surfaces and green spaces be considered in landscape and urban planning so that urban areas and cities can have healthier and more comfortable living urban environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Highly Reflective Roofing Sheets Installed on a School Building to Mitigate the Urban Heat Island Effect in Osaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui Yuan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, strategies to mitigate urban heat island (UHI effects and reduce building energy consumption are implemented worldwide. In Japan, as an effective means of mitigating UHI effects and saving energy of buildings, highly reflective (HR roofs have increasingly been used. In this study, in order to evaluate the effect of HR roofs on building energy conservation, we investigated the solar reflectivity of a subject school roof in Osaka, Japan, in which HR roofing sheets were installed on the roof from 2010. Additionally, monthly and annual thermal loads, including the cooling load and heating load of the top floor of the school, were calculated using the thermal load calculation software New HASP/ACLD-β. Comparing the calculated thermal loads of the school after HR roofing sheet installation to before, the annual thermal load decreased about 25 MJ/m2/year, and the cooling load decreased about 112 MJ/m2/year. However, the heating load increased about 87 MJ/m2/year in winter. To minimize the annual thermal load, thermal insulation of the roof was also considered to be used together with HR roofing sheets. Thermal load calculations showed that the combination of HR roofing sheets and thermal insulation can be effective in further reducing the annual thermal load.

  3. Examining the Role of Local Climate Zones in Urban Heat Island Assessment Using Remotely-Sensed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satcher, P. S.; Brunsell, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    More than half of the world population resides in urban areas where the urban heat island (UHI) effect enhances heat-related hazards. To mitigate the impacts of rising temperatures, it is necessary to develop tools to help public administrators formulate strategies to reduce heat exposure, increase access to cooling, and modify building design. We used Google Earth Engine's Landsat archive to classify local climate zones (LCZ) that consist of ten urban and seven non-urban classifications of land cover. To examine the influence of urban morphology on the surface energy balance (SEB) in high-density, medium-density, and low-density urban regions over one annual cycle, we used Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) products. We used the triangle method to examine variability in energy balance partitioning in relation to urban density. As urban density decreases, the variation of evapotranspiration increases. These results indicate that variations in the SEB can be detected using the LCZ classification method. The results from analysis in Fr-LST space of the annual cycles over several years can be used to detect changes in the SEB as urbanization increases.

  4. Cool city as a sustainable example of heat island management case study of the coolest city in the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeman Mohammed Rehan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization negatively impacts the urban environment mainly by the production of waste heat from refrigeration systems, although industrial processes and motorized vehicular traffic have also been recognized as additional causes of the urban heat island (UHI effect. The UHI negatively impacts the residents, with spillover effects for environmental aspects. In urbanized areas, it is a critical factor for air quality management and public health. The UHI and strategies to implement its mitigation are becoming increasingly important for governmental agencies and researchers. The problem is how to deal with UHI effects? Accordingly, the main aim of this paper is to determine the UHI mitigation strategies and their effectiveness in terms of cooling and temperature reduction in cities at the level of urban design. This goal is achieved through exploring the concept of the cool city, as it is the key factor, from the theoretical, analytical, and practical viewpoints, to diminishing the urban heat release. Then, the paper analyzes how the concept of the coolest city in the world (Stuttgart, Germany is developed and explores a practical approach toward cool cities. Finally, it suggests a set of recommendations to develop the urban environment in Greater Cairo by applying the cool city concept.

  5. Satellite-Observed Urbanization Characters in Shanghai, China: Aerosols, Urban Heat Island Effect, and Land–Atmosphere Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization reflects how human-activities affect natural climate system. Accurately assessing the urban system by comparing it with the nearby rural regions helps to identify the impacts of urbanization. This work uses the recent satellite observed aerosol, skin temperature, land cover, albedo, cloud fraction and water vapor measurements to reveal how the city of Shanghai, one of the biggest, dense urban areas in East Asia, affects land surface and atmosphere conditions. In addition, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA ground observations from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET is also used to reveal diurnal, seasonal, and interannual variations of the heavy aerosol load over Shanghai region. Furthermore, Shanghai reduces surface albedo, total column water vapor, cloud fraction and increases land skin temperature than rural region. These observations prove that Shanghai significantly modifies local and regional land surface physical properties as well as physical processes, which lead to the urban heat island effect (UHI.

  6. An approach to analyzing the intensity of the daytime surface urban heat island effect at a local scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shenlai

    2009-04-01

    A landscape index LI is proposed to evaluate the intensity of the daytime surface urban heat island (SUHI) effect at a local scale. Three aspects of this landscape index are crucial: the source landscape, the sink landscape, and the contribution of source and sink landscapes to the intensity of the SUHI. Source and sink landscape types are identified using the thermo-band of Landsat 7 with a spatial resolution of 60 m, along with appropriate threshold values for the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, Modified Normalized Difference Water Index, and Normalized Difference Built-up Index. The landscape index was defined as the ratio of the contributions of the source and sink landscapes to the intensity of the SUHI. The intensity of the daytime SUHI is assessed with the help of the landscape index. Our analysis indicates the landscape index can be used to evaluate and compare the intensity of the daytime SUHI for different areas.

  7. Seasonal and Spatial Variation of Surface Urban Heat Island Intensity in a Small Urban Agglomerate in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elis Dener Lima Alves

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, SUHIs (surface urban heat islands have been greatly emphasized in urban climate studies, since it is one of the climate phenomena most influenced by human action. In this study, temporal and spatial variations of SUHIs in the cities of Ceres and Rialma (Brazil were investigated; satellite Landsat 8 TIRS/OLI images from 2013 to 2016 were used for this purpose. The results showed that in all seasons, two relationships were observed, one positive and one negative. An N D V I (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index of 0.2 is the divider of this relationship: up to this value, the relationship is positive, that is, the higher the N D V I value, the higher the surface temperature, while the relationship is negative at an N D V I greater than 0.2. There was high seasonal variation in the SUHIs, with the highest intensities recorded in the spring and summer (±12 °C, and the lowest in the winter. These temporal variations were attributed to the annual cycle of precipitation, which directly involves the robustness of the Cerrado vegetation. SUHIs occupied, on average, an area three times larger than the area of SUCIs (surface urban cool islands. The highest values of SUCIs were observed in water bodies and in valley bottoms. Overall, SUHIs showed high intensities; however, a more intense core area, such as in large cities, was not observed.

  8. The urban heat island in the city of Poznań as derived from Landsat 5 TM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkowska, Agnieszka; Kolendowicz, Leszek; Półrolniczak, Marek; Hauke, Jan; Czernecki, Bartosz

    2017-05-01

    To study urban heat island (UHI), Landsat 5 TM data and in situ measurements of air temperature from nine points in Poznań (Poland) for the period June 2008-May 2013 were used. Based on data from measurement points located in different types of land use, the surface urban heat island (SUHI) maps were created. All available and quality-controlled Landsat 5 TM images from 15 unique days were used to obtain the characteristics of land surface temperature (LST) and UHI intensity. In addition, spatial analysis of UHI was conducted on the basis of Corine Land Cover 2006 dataset. In situ measurements at a height of 2 m above ground level show that the UHI is a common occurrence in Poznań with a mean annual intensity of 1.0 °C. The UHI intensity is greater during the warm half of the year. Moreover, results based on the remote sensing data and the Corine Land Cover 2006 indicate that the highest value of the mean LST anomalies (3.4 °C) is attained by the continuous urban fabric, while the lowest value occurs within the broad-leaved forests (-3.1 °C). To re-count from LST to the air temperature at a height of 2 m above ground level ( T agl), linear and non-linear regression models were created. For both models, coefficients of determination equal about 0.80, with slightly higher value for the non-linear approach, which was applied to estimate the T agl spatial variability over the city of Poznań.

  9. Evaluation of Air Pollution Tolerance Index of Plants and Ornamental Shrubs in Enugu City: Implications for Urban Heat Island Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study compared the air pollution tolerance indices (APTI of five plant species and five ornamental shrubs in Enugu Urban Center. Laboratory analysis was performed on the four physiological and biological parameters including leaf relative water content (RWC, ascorbic acid (AA content, total leaf chlorophyll (TCH and leaf extract pH. These parameters were used to develop an air pollution tolerance index. Factor analysis and descriptive statistics were utilized in the analysis to examine the interactions between these parameters. Vegetation monitoring in terms of its APTI acts as a \\'Bioindicator\\' of air pollution. The study also showed the possibility of utilizing APTI as a tool for selecting plants or ornamental shrubs for urban heat Island mitigation in Enugu City. The result of APTI showed order of tolerance for plants as Anacarduim occidentale (23.20, Pinus spp (22.35, Catalpa burgei (22.57, Magifera indica (23.37, and Psidum guajava (24.15.The result of APTI showed increasing order of sensitivity for ornamental shrubs from ixora red (14.32, yellow ficus(12.63, masquerade pine(12.26, Tuja pine(11.000,to Yellow bush(10.60. The APTI of all the plants examined were higher than those of ornamental shrubs. Thus suggesting that plants in general were more tolerant to air pollution than ornamental shrubs. The ornamental shrubs with lower APTI values (sensitive were recommended as bioindicator of poor urban air quality while plants with high APTI values (tolerant are planted around areas anticipated to have high air pollution load. The result of this current study is therefore handy for future planning and as well provides tolerant species for streetscape and urban heat island mitigation.

  10. Application of High-Resolution Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing and GIS to Assess the Urban Heat Island Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. P.; Quattrochi, D. A.; Luvall, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Day and night airborne thermal infrared image data at 5 m spatial resolution acquired with the 15-channel (0.45 micron - 12.2 micron) Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) over Alabama, Huntsville on 7 September, 1994 were used to study changes in the thermal signatures of urban land cover types between day and night. Thermal channel number 13 (9.6 micron - 10.2 micron) data with the best noise-equivalent temperature change (NEAT) of 0.25 C after atmospheric corrections and temperature calibration were selected for use in this analysis. This research also examined the relation between land cover irradiance and vegetation amount, using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), obtained by ratioing the difference and the sum of the red (channel number 3: 0.60-0.63 micron) and reflected infrared (channel number 6: 0.76-0.90 micron) ATLAS data. Based on the mean radiance values, standard deviations, and NDVI extracted from 351 pairs of polygons of day and night channel number 13 images for the city of Huntsville, a spatial model of warming and cooling characteristics of commercial, residential, agricultural, vegetation, and water features was developed using a GIS approach. There is a strong negative correlation between NDVI and irradiance of residential, agricultural, and vacant/transitional land cover types, indicating that the irradiance of a land cover type is greatly influenced by the amount of vegetation present. The predominance of forests, agricultural, and residential uses associated with varying degrees of tree cover showed great contrasts with commercial and services land cover types in the center of the city, and favors the development of urban heat islands. The high-resolution thermal infrared images match the complexity of the urban environment, and are capable of characterizing accurately the urban land cover types for the spatial modeling of the urban heat island effect using a GIS approach.

  11. Impact of differences in land cover on the urban heat island in villages - case studies from Northern, Middle and Southern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienst, Manuel; Lindén, Jenny; Esper, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The urbanization of an area alters the landscape, implying a gradual replacement of vegetation and bare soil by buildings and paved surfaces. Since the newly introduced structure and materials amplify warming, an urban heat island (UHI) originates, referring to the cooler temperatures in the rural surroundings. This phenomenon has been studied in various great cities throughout the world, whereas there is limited work on small urban settlements like villages. In order to address this issue, our study focusses on the impact of land cover on urban temperatures in three similar sized European villages (Spain, Germany, Sweden). Temperature loggers were installed in representative locations throughout the villages and the rural surroundings to assess spatial differences for one year. Since several studies proved land cover to be important for local temperatures within a 1000m radius, digitization was performed for each measurement spot in accordance to that distance. In all three villages, the highest values could be assessed for locations with the most buildings and paved surfaces in its vicinity in summer, especially if minimum temperatures were regarded. In that case, the UHI intensity in the centre exceeds 1°C in comparison to a rural reference. Significantly lower temperatures could be observed if the amount of vegetation was increased. A separation in low and high vegetation seemed necessary since open fields tended to show higher maximum but lower minimum temperatures in comparison to forested areas. A very prominent cooling effect could be found when taking into account the sensor data from the dense vegetation near the river in the Spanish village during the summer heat at night (approx. 5°C cooler than centre). Even though the rivers in the German as well as in the Swedish village are by far bigger than the Spanish counterpart, less cooling could be observed, suggesting either the vegetation to be a more important factor than water bodies or an amplification

  12. Spatial distribution of urban heat island in Hangzhou and its mitigation countermeasures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W.-W.; Li, G.-L.; Xue, J.

    2009-01-01

    of the evolution of urban landuse types, the changes of urban spatial pattern, the rationality of the urban land layout, and the emission of anthropogenic heat. Finally, in the perspective of urban planning, some mitigation countermeasures including the reasonable control of the expansion of urban landuse...

  13. FINE STRUCTURE IN MANHATTAN’S DAYTIME URBAN HEAT ISLAND: A NEW DATASET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Vant-Hull

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A street-level temperature and humidity dataset with high resol ution spatial and temporal components has been created for the island of Manhattan, suitab le for use by the urban health and modelling communities. It cons ists of a set of pedestrian measurements over the course of two summers converted into anomaly maps, and a set of ten light -post mounted installations measuring temperature, relative humidity, and illumination at t hree minute intervals over three months. The quality control and data reduction used to produce the anomaly maps is described, and the relationships between spatial and temporal v ariability are investigated. The data sets are available for down load via the project website.

  14. Acquisition and Processing of High Resolution Hyperspectral Imageries for the 3d Mapping of Urban Heat Islands and Microparticles of Montreal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongeau, R.; Baudouin, Y.; Cavayas, F.

    2017-10-01

    Ville de Montreal wanted to develop a system to identify heat islands and microparticles at the urban scale and to study their formation. UQAM and UdeM universities have joined their expertise under the framework "Observatoire Spatial Urbain" to create a representative geospatial database of thermal and atmospheric parameters collected during the summer months. They innovated in the development of a methodology for processing high resolution hyperspectral images (1-2 m). In partnership with Ville de Montreal, they integrated 3D geospatial data (topography, transportation and meteorology) in the process. The 3D mapping of intraurban heat islands as well as air micro-particles makes it possible, initially, to identify the problematic situations for future civil protection interventions during extreme heat. Moreover, it will be used as a reference for the Ville de Montreal to establish a strategy for public domain tree planting and in the analysis of urban development projects.

  15. The impostor phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringby, Betina; Østergaard, Gert Værge; Bønnelykke, Helle

    Persons suffering from the impostor phenomenon often fail to thrive and might be in danger of dropping out of studies. The impostor-phenomenon relates to people who are both skillful and capable, but sees themselves as frauds and as someone who is not worthy of good grades, appraisal for their work...

  16. Experimental Studies on the Effects of Green Space and Evapotranspiration on Urban Heat Island in a Subtropical Megacity in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Z.; Qiu, G. Y.; Li, X.; Li, H.; Guo, Q.; Yan, C.; Tan, S.

    2016-12-01

    Urbanization is one of the most important driving forces of global change. With the quick expansion of the urban environment's size and population, its urban heat island intensity (UHII) has rapidly increased. The situation is even worse in megacities. However, very few studies quantitatively revealed the effects of green space and land use/land cover (LULC) on the urban thermal environment because they lack detailed measurements. This study focuses on quantifying the effects of green space and LULC on the urban heat island (UHI) in Shenzhen, a subtropical megacity in China. Extensive measurements of air temperature were taken at 2-hour intervals for 2 years, using a mobile traverse method in a transect 8 km in length, where a variety of LULC types were included. The relationship between evapotranspiration (ET) and UHII was also studied to understand the mechanism of the cooling effect of vegetation. The main conclusions obtained are as follows: (1) There are obvious differences in the air temperature and UHII among the five different urban landscapes. The ranking of temperatures from highest to lowest is commercial area > urban village > urban water body > urban green space > suburb. The difference in the UHII is also obvious, especially from 20:00 PM to 06:00 AM, when the UHII is usually greater than 2ºC. (2) There are significant linear relationships between air temperature, UHII, and green space. Both air temperature and the UHII decrease linearly with an increase in urban green space. (3) Green space and water bodies in the urban environment have obvious effects on reducing the air temperature by evapotranspiration. Compared to commercial areas, urban water bodies can mitigate the UHII up to 0.9 ºC, while urban green spaces can relieve the UHII up to 1.57 ºC. The cooling effect of urban green spaces is better than that of urban water bodies. (4) Obvious correlation between ET and UHII was observed and a good positive linear relationship between ET and the

  17. Urbanization-induced urban heat island and aerosol effects on climate extremes in the Yangtze River Delta region of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shi; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Ruby; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Ben; Fan, Jiwen; Yan, Huiping; Yang, Xiu-Qun; Liu, Dongqing

    2017-04-01

    The WRF-Chem model coupled with a single-layer urban canopy model (UCM) is integrated for 5 years at convection-permitting scale to investigate the individual and combined impacts of urbanization-induced changes in land cover and pollutant emissions on regional climate in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region in eastern China. Simulations with the urbanization effects reasonably reproduced the observed features of temperature and precipitation in the YRD region. Urbanization over the YRD induces an urban heat island (UHI) effect, which increases the surface temperature by 0.53 °C in summer and increases the annual heat wave days at a rate of 3.7 d yr-1 in the major megacities in the YRD, accompanied by intensified heat stress. In winter, the near-surface air temperature increases by approximately 0.7 °C over commercial areas in the cities but decreases in the surrounding areas. Radiative effects of aerosols tend to cool the surface air by reducing net shortwave radiation at the surface. Compared to the more localized UHI effect, aerosol effects on solar radiation and temperature influence a much larger area, especially downwind of the city cluster in the YRD. Results also show that the UHI increases the frequency of extreme summer precipitation by strengthening the convergence and updrafts over urbanized areas in the afternoon, which favor the development of deep convection. In contrast, the radiative forcing of aerosols results in a surface cooling and upper-atmospheric heating, which enhances atmospheric stability and suppresses convection. The combined effects of the UHI and aerosols on precipitation depend on synoptic conditions. Two rainfall events under two typical but different synoptic weather patterns are further analyzed. It is shown that the impact of urban land cover and aerosols on precipitation is not only determined by their influence on local convergence but also modulated by large-scale weather systems. For the case with a strong synoptic forcing

  18. Urbanization-induced urban heat island and aerosol effects on climate extremes in the Yangtze River Delta region of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Shi; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Ruby; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Ben; Fan, Jiwen; Yan, Huiping; Yang, Xiu-Qun; Liu, Dongqing

    2017-01-01

    The WRF-Chem model coupled with a single-layer urban canopy model (UCM) is integrated for 5 years at convection-permitting scale to investigate the individual and combined impacts of urbanization-induced changes in land cover and pollutant emissions on regional climate in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region in eastern China. Simulations with the urbanization effects reasonably reproduced the observed features of temperature and precipitation in the YRD region. Urbanization over the YRD induces an urban heat island (UHI) effect, which increases the surface temperature by 0.53 °C in summer and increases the annual heat wave days at a rate of 3.7 d yr-1 in the major megacities in the YRD, accompanied by intensified heat stress. In winter, the near-surface air temperature increases by approximately 0.7 °C over commercial areas in the cities but decreases in the surrounding areas. Radiative effects of aerosols tend to cool the surface air by reducing net shortwave radiation at the surface. Compared to the more localized UHI effect, aerosol effects on solar radiation and temperature influence a much larger area, especially downwind of the city cluster in the YRD.

    Results also show that the UHI increases the frequency of extreme summer precipitation by strengthening the convergence and updrafts over urbanized areas in the afternoon, which favor the development of deep convection. In contrast, the radiative forcing of aerosols results in a surface cooling and upper-atmospheric heating, which enhances atmospheric stability and suppresses convection. The combined effects of the UHI and aerosols on precipitation depend on synoptic conditions. Two rainfall events under two typical but different synoptic weather patterns are further analyzed. It is shown that the impact of urban land cover and aerosols on precipitation is not only determined by their influence on local convergence but also modulated by large-scale weather systems. For the case with a

  19. Urban heat : natural and anthropogenic factors influencing urban air temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theeuwes, N.E.

    2015-01-01

    The urban heat island effect is a phenomenon observed worldwide, i.e. evening and nocturnal temperatures in cities are usually several degrees higher than in the surrounding countryside. The main goal of this thesis is to understand the processes that drive the urban air temperature and the urban

  20. A Mesoscale Meteorological Model of Modified Land Cover to the Effect of Urban Heat Island in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yopi Ilhamsyah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A mesoscale meteorological model of modified land cover to the effect of urban heat island (UHI in Jakarta was done. Although higher temperature in the city has been generally known, factors and issues that result in the increase of temperature particularly nighttime temperature over the city, however, are not well-understood. Jakarta, the capital of Indonesia, is encountering urbanization problems foremost. The increasing demand of housing as well as rapid development of sky crapper building, market places and highway diminishes the vegetation which in turn trap heat in the troposphere throughout the year, particularly during dry season on June-August. The fifth-generation mesoscale meteorological model (MM5 was employed in the study. The model involves medium range forecast planetary boundary layer (MRF PBL scheme and land surface with two following parameters: i.e. roughness length over land and thermal inertia of land. These two parameters are chosen to enhance the characteristics of land surface. The simulation was carried out for 3 days on August 5-7, 2004 during dry season. The results showed that the simulation of surface temperature done by MM5 modified land cover described a good comparison to that of weather observation data. As a result, the effect of UHI was also well-observed during day-time. In addition, MM5 modified land cover simulation also illustrated a well-development of sea-breeze and country-breeze during mid-day and nighttime, respectively. However, long-term simulation is still required. Thus, daily diurnal cycles of air temperature and their differences can be well-observed in detail.

  1. Impact of land surface heterogeneity on urban heat island circulation and sea-land breeze circulation in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Di Sabatino, S.; Martilli, A.; Li, Y.; Wong, M. S.; Gutiérrez, E.; Chan, P. W.

    2017-04-01

    Hong Kong is one of the most high-rise and highly compact cities in the world. The urban land surface is highly heterogeneous, which creates low-level convergence zones in urban areas, particularly the Kowloon Peninsula. The low-level convergence zone is due to the combined effect of urban heat island circulation (UHIC) and sea-land breeze circulation (SLBC) under weak northeasterly synoptic flow. To study the impacts of anthropogenic fluxes and built-up areas on the local circulation, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model is combined with the multilayer urban canopy building effect parameterization/building energy model (BEP/BEM) parameterization to produce a 3 day simulation of an air pollution episode in Hong Kong in September 2012. To better represent the city land surface features, building information is assimilated in the central part of the Kowloon Peninsula. The WRF-BEP-BEM model captures the 2 m temperature distribution and local wind rotation reasonably well but overestimates the 10 m wind speed with a mean bias error of 0.70 m/s. A dome-shaped feature with a high level of moisture is captured in the convergence zones due to intensified UHIC and inflowing SLBC. The anthropogenic heat increases the air temperature by around 0.3°C up to 250 m, which in turn modifies the SLBC. A new drag coefficient based on λP, plan area per unit ground area, is tested. Besides the basic physical characteristics captured by the WRF-BEP-BEM model, the stagnation of wind in the lower level convergence zone is better captured by this approach than by the traditional constant value coefficient.

  2. The spatial variability of air temperature and nocturnal urban heat island intensity in the city of Brno, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrovolný Petr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to quantify the effects of a number of factors on the nocturnal air temperature field in a medium-sized central European city located in complex terrain. The main data sources consist of mobile air temperature measurements and a geographical database. Temperature measurements were taken along several profiles through the city centre and were made under a clear sky with no advection. Altogether nine sets of detailed measurements, in all seasons, were assembled. Altitude, quantity of vegetation, density of buildings and the structure of the transportation (road system were considered as explanatory variables. The result is that the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI and the density of buildings were the most important factors, each of them explaining a substantial part (more than 50% of overall air temperature variability. Mobile measurements with NDVI values as a covariate were used for interpolation of air temperature for the entire study area. The spatial variability of nocturnal air temperature and UHI intensity in Brno is the main output presented. Air temperatures interpolated from mobile measurements and NDVI values indicate that the mean urban heat island (UHI intensity in the early night in summer is at its highest (approximately 5 °C in the city centre and decreases towards the suburban areas.

  3. Assessing the Effects of Urban Morphology Parameters on Microclimate in Singapore to Control the Urban Heat Island Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to alleviate the “heat island effect” in urban areas, especially tropical cities. Microclimate is normally affected by the urban morphology parameters. The objective of this work is to investigate the correlation between air temperature variations and urban morphology parameters in tropical cities. Field measurement was carried out to record the air temperature at 27 points within an 8 km2 urban area continuously in Singapore for one year. Geographical information system was applied to extract the urban morphology parameters. Generally, the maximum and minimum air temperature spatial differences in the study area ranged from 3.2 to 6.5 °C, indicating the significant effects of urban morphology on the air temperatures. Based on the fitting results of created multilinear regression models, parametric study has been performed to investigate the specific effects of urban morphology parameters on air temperatures. This work has proposed a much more precise regression model to predict the air temperature with various urban morphology parameters. In addition, meaningful value of reference has been offered for urban planners and landscape designers to effectively control the air temperature in tropical cities such as Singapore.

  4. Modeling of urban heat island and its impacts on thermal circulations in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Tijian; Xie, Min; Zhuang, Bingliang; Li, Shu; Han, Yong; Cheng, Nianliang

    2017-05-01

    Through regulating the land-atmosphere energy balance, urbanization plays an important role in modifying local circulations and cross-border transport of air pollutants. The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) metropolitan area in northern China is frequently influenced by complex atmospheric thermal circulations due to its special topography and geographic position. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model combined with remote sensing is used to explore the urbanization impacts on local circulations in the BTH region. The urban heat island (UHI) effect generated around Beijing and Tianjin shows complex interactions with local thermal circulations. Due to the combined effects of UHI and topography, the UHI circulation around Beijing and valley breeze at the southern slopes of Yan Mountain are coupled together to reinforce each other. At the coastal cities, the increased land/sea temperature gradient considerably accelerates the sea breeze along Bohai Bay and moves the sea breeze front further inland to reach as far as Beijing. This study may lay a foundation for the better understanding of air pollutant dispersion on complex terrain.

  5. HISTORICAL GIS DATA AND CHANGES IN URBAN MORPHOLOGICAL PARAMETERS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF URBAN HEAT ISLANDS IN HONG KONG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Peng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid urban development between the 1960 and 2010 decades have changed the urban landscape and pattern in the Kowloon Peninsula of Hong Kong. This paper aims to study the changes of urban morphological parameters between the 1985 and 2010 and explore their influences on the urban heat island (UHI effect. This study applied a mono-window algorithm to retrieve the land surface temperature (LST using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM images from 1987 to 2009. In order to estimate the effects of local urban morphological parameters to LST, the global surface temperature anomaly was analysed. Historical 3D building model was developed based on aerial photogrammetry technique using aerial photographs from 1964 to 2010, in which the urban digital surface models (DSMs including elevations of infrastructures and buildings have been generated. Then, urban morphological parameters (i.e. frontal area index (FAI, sky view factor (SVF, vegetation fractional cover (VFC, global solar radiation (GSR, Normalized Difference Built-Up Index (NDBI, wind speed were derived. Finally, a linear regression method in Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis (WEKA was used to build prediction model for revealing LST spatial patterns. Results show that the final apparent surface temperature have uncertainties less than 1 degree Celsius. The comparison between the simulated and actual spatial pattern of LST in 2009 showed that the correlation coefficient is 0.65, mean absolute error (MAE is 1.24 degree Celsius, and root mean square error (RMSE is 1.51 degree Celsius of 22,429 pixels.

  6. Modelling of the Annual Mean Urban Heat Island Pattern for Planning of Representative Urban Climate Station Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Unger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of the annual mean urban heat island (UHI intensity pattern was analysed for the medium-sized city Novi Sad, Serbia, located on the low and flat Great Hungarian Plain. The UHI pattern was determined by an empirical modelling method developed by (Balázs et al. 2009. This method was based on datasets from urban areas of Szeged and Debrecen (Hungary. The urban study area in Novi Sad (60 km2 was established as a grid network of 240 cells (0.5 km ×0.5 km. A Landsat satellite image (from June 2006 was used in order to evaluate normalized difference vegetation index and built-up ratio by cells. The pattern of the obtained UHI intensity values show concentric-like shapes when drawn as isotherms, mostly increase from the suburbs towards the inner urban areas. Results of this thermal pattern and determination of one of the local climate classification systems were used for recommending 10 locations for representative stations of an urban climate network in Novi Sad.

  7. LEED, Its Efficacy and Fallacy in a Regional Context—An Urban Heat Island Case in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ho Shin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of energy in the building sector has increased rapidly over the past two decades. Accordingly, various building assessment methods have developed in green building practices. However, the questions still remain in regard to how positively green buildings affect regional surroundings. This study investigates the possible relationship between LEED-certified buildings and urban heat island effect. Using GIS with spatial regression, the study found that constructing an LEED building in a 30-m boundary could possibly lower the temperature of the surrounding environment by 0.35 °C. Also, having a higher certification level, such as Gold or Platinum, increased the lowering effect by 0.48 °C, while a lower certification level, such as Certified or Silver, had a lowering effect of 0.26 °C. Although LEED has gained a substantial amount of interest and skepticism at the same time, the study results could be a potential sign that the Sustainable Sites Credits or energy-efficient materials play a positive role in lowering the temperature.

  8. The Effect of Urban Heat Island on Climate Warming in the Yangtze River Delta Urban Agglomeration in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qunfang; Lu, Yuqi

    2015-07-27

    The Yangtze River Delta (YRD) has experienced rapid urbanization and dramatic economic development since 1978 and the Yangtze River Delta urban agglomeration (YRDUA) has been one of the three largest urban agglomerations in China. We present evidence of a significant urban heat island (UHI) effect on climate warming based on an analysis of the impacts of the urbanization rate, urban population, and land use changes on the warming rate of the daily average, minimal (nighttime) and maximal (daytime) air temperature in the YRDUA using 41 meteorological stations observation data. The effect of the UHI on climate warming shows a large spatial variability. The average warming rates of average air temperature of huge cities, megalopolises, large cities, medium-sized cities, and small cities are 0.483, 0.314 ± 0.030, 0.282 ± 0.042, 0.225 ± 0.044 and 0.179 ± 0.046 °C/decade during the period of 1957-2013, respectively. The average warming rates of huge cities and megalopolises are significantly higher than those of medium-sized cities and small cities, indicating that the UHI has a significant effect on climate warming (t-test, p urbanization rate, population, built-up area and warming rate of average air temperature (p urbanization is 0.124 ± 0.074 °C/decade in the YRDUA. Urbanization has a measurable effect on the observed climate warming in the YRD aggravating the global climate warming.

  9. Identifying Local Scale Climate Zones of Urban Heat Island from HJ-1B Satellite Data Using Self-Organizing Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, C. Z.; Blaschke, T.

    2016-10-01

    With the increasing acceleration of urbanization, the degeneration of the environment and the Urban Heat Island (UHI) has attracted more and more attention. Quantitative delineation of UHI has become crucial for a better understanding of the interregional interaction between urbanization processes and the urban environment system. First of all, our study used medium resolution Chinese satellite data-HJ-1B as the Earth Observation data source to derive parameters, including the percentage of Impervious Surface Areas, Land Surface Temperature, Land Surface Albedo, Normalized Differential Vegetation Index, and object edge detector indicators (Mean of Inner Border, Mean of Outer border) in the city of Guangzhou, China. Secondly, in order to establish a model to delineate the local climate zones of UHI, we used the Principal Component Analysis to explore the correlations between all these parameters, and estimate their contributions to the principal components of UHI zones. Finally, depending on the results of the PCA, we chose the most suitable parameters to classify the urban climate zones based on a Self-Organization Map (SOM). The results show that all six parameters are closely correlated with each other and have a high percentage of cumulative (95%) in the first two principal components. Therefore, the SOM algorithm automatically categorized the city of Guangzhou into five classes of UHI zones using these six spectral, structural and climate parameters as inputs. UHI zones have distinguishable physical characteristics, and could potentially help to provide the basis and decision support for further sustainable urban planning.

  10. THE INTEGRATED WRF/URBAN MODELING SYSTEM AND ITS APPLICATION TO MONITORING URBAN HEAT ISLAND IN JAKARTA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laras Tursilowati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Population growth and urbanization will impact on city development through constructions of buildings, parking lots, streets, highways and driveways. These changes lead to the Urban Heat Island (UHI, which is an important factor for future urban planning. In this context, mesoscale climate models such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model are useful for studying the potential deficit in open green areas. The analysis of remote sensing images can provide input data indispensable to such climate model studies. In this work, we analyze the land use/land cover information inside and around the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, to study how the land use (LU change affects UHI that is characterized by the highest surface air temperature (Ta of 306 K. It is found that LU modification with the addition of 25% urban area will expand the UHI area by around 43 km2 (5%. On the contrary, with the addition of 58, 95 and 440% vegetation (grassland in the urban area, the UHI area is reduced significantly, which are 255 km2 (48%, 289 km2 (54% and 466 km² (88%, respectively. This indicates that the addition of more area with open green coverage results in more reduction of UHI area. The quantitative features of this relationship will be useful for urban planners to control the UHI effects that might degrade the living conditions in this megacity.

  11. Monitoring the changes in impervious surface ratio and urban heat island intensity between 1987 and 2011 in Szeged, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henits, László; Mucsi, László; Liska, Csilla Mariann

    2017-02-01

    Landsat time series data make it possible to continuously map and examine urban land cover changes and effects on urban environments. The objectives of this study are (1) to map and analyse an impervious surface and its changes within a census district and (2) to monitor the effects of increasing impervious surface ratios on population and environment. We used satellite images from 1987, 2003 and 2011 to map the impervious surface ratio in the census district of Szeged, Hungary through normalized spectral mixture analysis. Significant increases were detected from 1987 to 2011 in industrial areas (5.7-9.1%) and inner residential areas (2.5-4.8%), whereas decreases were observed in the city centre and housing estates due to vegetation growth. Urban heat island (UHI) values were derived from the impervious surface fraction map to analyse the impact of urban land cover changes. In 2011, the average value in the industrial area was 1.76 °C, whereas that in the inner residential area was 1.35-1.69 °C. In the city centre zones and housing estates, values ranging from 1.4 to 1.5 °C and from 1.29 to 1.5 °C, respectively, were observed. Our study reveals that long-term land cover changes can be derived at the district level from Landsat images and that their effects can be identified and analysed, providing important information for city planners and policy makers.

  12. Examples of cooler reflective streets for urban heat-island mitigation : Portland cement concrete and chip seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerantz, M.; Akbari, H.; Chang, S.-C.; Levinson, R.; Pon, B.

    2003-04-30

    Part of the urban heat island effect can be attributed to dark pavements that are commonly used on streets and parking lots. In this paper we consider two light colored, hence cooler, alternative paving materials that are in actual use in cities today. These are Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and chip seals. We report measurements of the albedos of some PCC and chip sealed pavements in the San Francisco Bay Area. The albedos of the PCC pavements ranged from about 0.18 to 0.35. The temperatures of some PCC pavements are also measured and calculated. We then consider how the albedos of the constituent materials of the PCC (stone, sand and cement) contribute to the albedos of the resulting finished concrete. The albedos of a set of chip sealed pavements in San Jose, CA, were measured and correlated with the times of their placement. It is found that the albedos decrease with age (and use) but remain higher than that of standard asphalt concrete (AC) for about five years. After t hat, the albedos of the chip seals are about 0.12, similar to aged AC. The fact that many PCC pavements have albedos at least twice as high as aged AC suggests that it is possible to have pavement albedos that remain high for many years.

  13. IDENTIFYING LOCAL SCALE CLIMATE ZONES OF URBAN HEAT ISLAND FROM HJ-1B SATELLITE DATA USING SELF-ORGANIZING MAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Z. Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing acceleration of urbanization, the degeneration of the environment and the Urban Heat Island (UHI has attracted more and more attention. Quantitative delineation of UHI has become crucial for a better understanding of the interregional interaction between urbanization processes and the urban environment system. First of all, our study used medium resolution Chinese satellite data-HJ-1B as the Earth Observation data source to derive parameters, including the percentage of Impervious Surface Areas, Land Surface Temperature, Land Surface Albedo, Normalized Differential Vegetation Index, and object edge detector indicators (Mean of Inner Border, Mean of Outer border in the city of Guangzhou, China. Secondly, in order to establish a model to delineate the local climate zones of UHI, we used the Principal Component Analysis to explore the correlations between all these parameters, and estimate their contributions to the principal components of UHI zones. Finally, depending on the results of the PCA, we chose the most suitable parameters to classify the urban climate zones based on a Self-Organization Map (SOM. The results show that all six parameters are closely correlated with each other and have a high percentage of cumulative (95% in the first two principal components. Therefore, the SOM algorithm automatically categorized the city of Guangzhou into five classes of UHI zones using these six spectral, structural and climate parameters as inputs. UHI zones have distinguishable physical characteristics, and could potentially help to provide the basis and decision support for further sustainable urban planning.

  14. Correlation analysis of the urban heat island effect and the spatial and temporal distribution of atmospheric particulates using TM images in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L Y; Xie, X D; Li, S

    2013-07-01

    This study combines the methods of observation statistics and remote sensing retrieval, using remote sensing information including the urban heat island (UHI) intensity index, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), the normalized difference water index (NDWI), and the difference vegetation index (DVI) to analyze the correlation between the urban heat island effect and the spatial and temporal concentration distributions of atmospheric particulates in Beijing. The analysis establishes (1) a direct correlation between UHI and DVI; (2) an indirect correlation among UHI, NDWI and DVI; and (3) an indirect correlation among UHI, NDVI, and DVI. The results proved the existence of three correlation types with regional and seasonal effects and revealed an interesting correlation between UHI and DVI, that is, if UHI is below 0.1, then DVI increases with the increase in UHI, and vice versa. Also, DVI changes more with UHI in the two middle zones of Beijing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Monitoring the effect of urban green areas on the heat island in Athens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoulia, I; Santamouris, M; Dimoudi, A

    2009-09-01

    The role of urban green areas in the microclimatic conditions of cities, during summer, is investigated in this paper through monitoring campaigns carried out at the National garden, at the city centre of Athens. Two types of investigations were carried out: i) a microscopic one that investigated the thermal conditions inside the Garden and the immediate surrounding urban area and ii) a macroscopic one that compared the temperature profile of the Garden with that of the greater city centre area. It was concluded that in microscopic level, the temperature profile inside the National Garden and the immediate surrounding urban area did not showed a clear evidence of the influence of the Garden and it was dependent on the characteristics of each location. In a macroscopic scale, the Garden was found cooler than the other monitored urban locations and temperature differences were mainly greater during the night, especially in streets with high building height to street width (H/W) ratio and low traffic, while in streets with high anthropogenic heat during the day, the biggest temperature differences were recorded during the day.

  16. A new phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganci, S.

    2017-03-01

    This letter describes an interesting optical phenomenon engaging the reflected images of a new tube LED lamp (an array of high luminosity LEDs substituting the old fluorescent lamps) on any convex glossy black surface.

  17. The Urban Heat Island and its spatial scale dependent impact on survival and development in butterflies of different thermal sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Aurélien; Merckx, Thomas; Van Dyck, Hans

    2016-06-01

    Climate alteration is one of the most cited ecological consequences of urbanization. However, the magnitude of this impact is likely to vary with spatial scale. We investigated how this alteration affects the biological fitness of insects, which are especially sensitive to ambient conditions and well-suited organisms to study urbanization-related changes in phenotypic traits. We monitored temperature and relative air humidity in wooded sites characterized by different levels of urbanization in the surroundings. Using a split-brood design experiment, we investigated the effect of urbanization at the local (i.e., 200 × 200 m) and landscape (i.e., 3 × 3 km) scale on two key traits of biological fitness in two closely related butterfly species that differ in thermal sensitivity. In line with the Urban Heat Island concept, urbanization led to a 1°C increase in daytime temperature and an 8% decrease in daytime relative humidity at the local scale. The thermophilous species Lasiommata megera responded at the local scale: larval survival increased twofold in urban compared to rural sites. Urbanized sites tended to produce bigger adults, although this was the case for males only. In the woodland species Pararge aegeria, which has recently expanded its ecological niche, we did not observe such a response, neither at the local, nor at the landscape scale. These results demonstrate interspecific differences in urbanization-related phenotypic plasticity and larval survival. We discuss larval pre-adaptations in species of different ecological profiles to urban conditions. Our results also highlight the significance of considering fine-grained spatial scales in urban ecology.

  18. Correlation or Causality between Land Cover Patterns and the Urban Heat Island Effect? Evidence from Brisbane, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Deilami

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have identified associations between the surface urban heat island (SUHI effect (i.e., SUHI, hereinafter is referred to as UHI and urban growth, particularly changes in land cover patterns. This research questions their causal links to answer a key policy question: If cities restrict urban expansion and encourage people to live within existing urban areas, will that help in controlling UHI? The question has been answered by estimating four models using data from Brisbane, Australia: Model 1—cross-sectional ordinary least square (OLS regression—to examine the association between the UHI effect and land cover patterns in 2013; Model 2—cross-sectional geographically weighted regression (GWR—to examine whether the outputs generated from Model 1 possess significant spatial variations; Model 3—longitudinal OLS—to examine whether changes in land cover patterns led to changes in UHI effects between 2004 and 2013; and Model 4—longitudinal GWR—to examine whether the outputs generated from Model 3 vary significantly over space. All estimations were controlled for potential confounding effects (e.g., population, employment and dwelling densities. Results from the cross-sectional OLS and GWR models were consistent with previous findings and showed that porosity is negatively associated with the UHI effect in 2013. In contrast, population density has a positive association. Results from the longitudinal OLS and GWR models confirm their causal linkages and showed that an increase in porosity level reduced the UHI effect, whereas an increase in population density increased the UHI effect. The findings suggest that even a containment of population growth within existing urban areas will lead to the UHI effect. However, this can be significantly minimized through proper land use planning, by creating a balance between urban and non-urban uses of existing urban areas.

  19. Modelling the fine-scale spatiotemporal pattern of urban heat island effect using land use regression approach in a megacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuan; Katzschner, Lutz; Ng, Edward

    2017-10-30

    Urban heat island (UHI) effect significantly raises the health burden and building energy consumption in the high-density urban environment of Hong Kong. A better understanding of the spatiotemporal pattern of UHI is essential to health risk assessments and energy consumption management but challenging in a high-density environment due to the sparsely distributed meteorological stations and the highly diverse urban features. In this study, we modelled the spatiotemporal pattern of UHI effect using the land use regression (LUR) approach in geographic information system with meteorological records of the recent 4years (2013-2016), sounding data and geographic predictors in Hong Kong. A total of 224 predictor variables were calculated and involved in model development. As a result, a total of 10 models were developed (daytime and nighttime, four seasons and annual average). As expected, meteorological records (CLD, Spd, MSLP) and sounding indices (KINX, CAPV and SHOW) are temporally correlated with UHI at high significance levels. On the top of the resultant LUR models, the influential spatial predictors of UHI with regression coefficients and their critical buffer width were also identified for the high-density urban scenario of Hong Kong. The study results indicate that the spatial pattern of UHI is largely determined by the LU/LC (RES1500, FVC500) and urban geomorphometry (h¯, BVD, λ¯F, Ψsky and z0) in a high-density built environment, especially during nighttime. The resultant models could be adopted to enrich the current urban design guideline and help with the UHI mitigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of the intensity and spatial variability of urban heat islands over the Indian cities for Regional Climate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, S.; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.

    2016-12-01

    The Urban heat island (UHI) in general developed over cities, due to the drastic changes in land use and land cover (LULC), has profound impact on the atmospheric circulation patterns due to the changes in the energy transport mechanism which in turn affect the regional climate. In this study, an attempt has been made to quantify the intensity of UHI, and to identify the pockets of UHI over cities during last decade over fast developing cosmopolitan Indian cities such as New Delhi, Mumbai and Kolkata. For this purpose, Landsat TM and ETM+ images during winter period, in about 5 year intervals from 2002 to 2013, has been selected to retrieve the brightness temperatures and land use/cover, from which Land Surface Temperature (LST) has been estimated using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Normalized Difference Build-up Index (NDBI) and Normalized Difference Bareness Index (NDBaI) are estimated to extract build-up areas and bare land from the satellite images to identify the UHI pockets over the study area. For this purpose image processing and GIS tools were employed. Results reveal a significant increase in the intensity of UHI and increase in its area of influence over all the three cities. An increase of 2 to 2.5 oC of UHI intensity over the study regions has been noticed. The range of increase in UHI intensity is found to be more over New Delhi compared to Mumbai and Kolkata which is more or less same. The number of hotspot pockets of UHI has also been increased as seen from the spatial distribution of LST, NDVI and NDBI. This result signifies the impact of rapid urbanization and infrastructural developments has a direct consequence in modulating the regional climate over the Indian cities.

  1. The urban heat island in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in the last 30 years using remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Leonardo de Faria; Lucena, Andrews José de; Rotunno Filho, Otto Corrêa; França, José Ricardo de Almeida

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this work is to study urban heat island (UHI) in Metropolitan Area of Rio de Janeiro (MARJ) based on the analysis of land-surface temperature (LST) and land-use patterns retrieved from Landsat-5/Thematic Mapper (TM), Landsat-7/Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and Landsat-8/Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal Infrared Sensors (TIRS) data covering a 32-year period between 1984 and 2015. LST temporal evolution is assessed by comparing the average LST composites for 1984-1999 and 2000-2015 where the parametric Student t-test was conducted at 5% significance level to map the pixels where LST for the more recent period is statistically significantly greater than the previous one. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon rank sum test has also confirmed at the same 5% significance level that the more recent period (2000-2015) has higher LST values. UHI intensity between ;urban; and ;rural/urban low density; (;vegetation;) areas for 1984-1999 and 2000-2015 was established and confirmed by both parametric and non-parametric tests at 1% significance level as 3.3 °C (5.1 °C) and 4.4 °C (7.1 °C), respectively. LST has statistically significantly (p-value < 0.01) increased over time in two of three land cover classes (;urban; and ;urban low density;), respectively by 1.9 °C and 0.9 °C, except in ;vegetation; class. A spatial analysis was also performed to identify the urban pixels within MARJ where UHI is more intense by subtracting the LST of these pixels from the LST mean value of ;vegetation; land-use class.

  2. The Effect of Urban Heat Island on Climate Warming in the Yangtze River Delta Urban Agglomeration in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunfang Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Yangtze River Delta (YRD has experienced rapid urbanization and dramatic economic development since 1978 and the Yangtze River Delta urban agglomeration (YRDUA has been one of the three largest urban agglomerations in China. We present evidence of a significant urban heat island (UHI effect on climate warming based on an analysis of the impacts of the urbanization rate, urban population, and land use changes on the warming rate of the daily average, minimal (nighttime and maximal (daytime air temperature in the YRDUA using 41 meteorological stations observation data. The effect of the UHI on climate warming shows a large spatial variability. The average warming rates of average air temperature of huge cities, megalopolises, large cities, medium-sized cities, and small cities are 0.483, 0.314 ± 0.030, 0.282 ± 0.042, 0.225 ± 0.044 and 0.179 ± 0.046 °C/decade during the period of 1957–2013, respectively. The average warming rates of huge cities and megalopolises are significantly higher than those of medium-sized cities and small cities, indicating that the UHI has a significant effect on climate warming (t-test, p < 0.05. Significantly positive correlations are found between the urbanization rate, population, built-up area and warming rate of average air temperature (p < 0.001. The average warming rate of average air temperature attributable to urbanization is 0.124 ± 0.074 °C/decade in the YRDUA. Urbanization has a measurable effect on the observed climate warming in the YRD aggravating the global climate warming.

  3. Impact of Urban Heat Island under the Hanoi Master Plan 2030 on Cooling Loads in Residential Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Hoang Hai Nam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the influence of urban heat island (UHI under the Hanoi Master Plan 2030 on the energy consumption for space cooling in residential buildings. The weather conditions under the current and future status (master plan condition simulated in the previous study (Trihamdani et al., 2014 were used and cooling loads in all the residential buildings in Hanoi over the hottest month were estimated under the simulated current and future conditions by using the building simulation program, TRNSYS (v17. Three most typical housing types in the city were selected for the simulation. The cooling loads of respective housing types were obtained in each of the districts in Hanoi. The results show that the total cooling loads over June 2010 is approximately 683 Terajoule (TJ under the current status, but it is predicted to increase to 903 TJ under the master plan condition. The increment is largely due to the increase in number of households (203 TJ or 92%, but partially due to the increase in urban temperature, i.e. UHI effect (17 TJ or 8%. The increments in new built-up areas were found to be larger than those in existing built-up areas. The cooling load in apartment is approximately half of that in detached house, which is approximately half of that in row house. Moreover, it was seen that although sensible cooling loads increased with the increase in outdoor temperature, the latent cooling loads decreased due to the decrease in absolute humidity and the increase in air temperature.

  4. The Urban Heat Island Effect and the Role of Vegetation to Address the Negative Impacts of Local Climate Changes in a Small Brazilian City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elis Dener Lima Alves

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the influence of urban-geographical variables on determining heat islands and proposes a model to estimate and spatialize the maximum intensity of urban heat islands (UHI. Simulations of the UHI based on the increase of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, using multiple linear regression, in Iporá (Brazil are also presented. The results showed that the UHI intensity of this small city tended to be lower than that of bigger cities. Urban geometry and vegetation (UI and NDVI were the variables that contributed the most to explain the variability of the maximum UHI intensity. It was observed that areas located in valleys had lower thermal values, suggesting a cool island effect. With the increase in NDVI in the central area of a maximum UHI, there was a significant decrease in its intensity and size (a 45% area reduction. It is noteworthy that it was possible to spatialize the UHI to the whole urban area by using multiple linear regression, providing an analysis of the urban set from urban-geographical variables and thus performing prognostic simulations that can be adapted to other small tropical cities.

  5. The Michelangelo phenomenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusbult, C.E.; Finkel, E.J.; Kumashiro, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews theory and research regarding the "Michelangelo phenomenon." The Michelangelo model suggests that close partners sculpt one another's selves, shaping one another's skills and traits and promoting versus inhibiting one another's goal pursuits. As a result of the manner in which

  6. Urban Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Rickman, Doug L.; Estes, Maury G.

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated that by the year 2025, 80% of the world's population will live in cities. This conversion of the natural landscape vegetation into man-made urban structures such as roads and buildings drastically alter the regional surface energy budgets, hydrology, precipitation patterns, and meteorology. Research studies from many cities have documented these effects range from decreases in air quality, increased energy consumption and alteration of regional climate to direct effects on human health.

  7. Urban heat island 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühler, Oliver; Jensen, Marina Bergen; Tøttrup, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Målinger af overfladetemperaturer viser, at der er betydelige temperaturforskelle mellem de forskellige bydele i København. De områder, der bliver allervarmest, er dem med den mindste andel af grønt. Det konkluderes i en rapport fra Skov & Landskab....

  8. Heat island effect on the quality of life in the city; Hitte-eilandeffect zet leefbaarheid in de stad verder onder druk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Harmelen, T.; Klok, L.; Doepp, S.; Dolevo, R.; Janssen, S. [Business Unit Milieu en Leefomgeving, TNO Bouw en Ondergrond, Delft (Netherlands)

    2008-12-15

    The global rise in temperature as a result of climate change becomes increasingly perceptible. The health effects of these changes, combined with air quality, are extra high in urban areas. It seems worth while to examine the consequences of increasing heat in urban areas in the Netherlands. In order to deal with the consequences in a responsible manner and to prepare for an even warmer future, answers will have to be found for the following two questions: (1) How large is the heat island effect in Dutch cities an what can we expect in the future?; and (2) What are the consequences of the heat island effect that we will have to take into account? [mk]. [Dutch] De mondiale temperatuurstijging ten gevolge van klimaatverandering is ook in Nederland steeds duidelijker waarneembaar. De gezondheidseffecten van deze veranderingen in combinatie met luchtkwaliteit zijn in het stedelijk gebied extra groot. Het lijkt daarom de moeite waard om onderzoek te doen naar de gevolgen van toenemende hitte in stedelijke gebieden in Nederland. Om op verantwoorde wijze met de gevolgen om te gaan en om voorbereid te zijn op een nog warmere toekomst zullen antwoorden moeten worden gevonden op twee wagen: (1) Hoe groot is het hitte-eilandeffect in de Nederlandse stad nu en wat kunnen we verwachten in de toekomst?; en (2) Met welke gevolgen van het hitte-eilandeffect moeten we rekening houden?.

  9. A Parametric Optimization Approach to Mitigating the Urban Heat Island Effect: A Case Study in Ancona, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Cocci Grifoni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to identify a parameterization method that considers existing connections and relationships between traditional indicators of environmental sustainability as a step in combating climate change via urban strategies. A typical Mediterranean city (Ancona, Italy is investigated with a multi-objective optimization platform called modeFrontier, which uses Pareto optimality. This concept formalizes the trade-off between a given set of mutually contradicting objectives, such as high thermal comfort and low energy consumption, to identify a set of Pareto solutions. A solution is Pareto optimal when it is not possible to improve one objective without deteriorating at least one of the others. The optimization process employs given constraints (for example, meteorological scenarios with high temperature and low winds or morphological building parameters, custom procedural algorithms (recursive algorithms to generate the set of all non-dominated objective parameters, and genetic algorithms (inspired by the natural selection process to examine a wide urban space and identify interesting relationships among relevant variables for typical summer scenarios. Multi-objective optimizers involve many evaluations of two objectives (i.e., energy consumption and thermal comfort in this study while considering many analytical constraints. This approach entails a considerably more exhaustive search of environmental variables that can help the urban planning process to mitigate the urban heat island (UHI effect. Three quantitative metrics related to urban morphology and local climate conditions, as well as a thermal comfort indicator (the predicted mean vote, are defined and applied to Ancona to examine the potential for new sustainability in urban design. The results show that two parameters examined—compacity and a building-scale energy indicator—can offer insight when designing comfortable cities, while a citywide energy indicator shows

  10. The surface urban heat island response to urban expansion: A panel analysis for the conterminous United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaoma; Zhou, Yuyu; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Imhoff, Marc; Li, Xuecao

    2017-12-01

    Abstract: Urban heat island (UHI), a major concern worldwide, affects human health and energy use. With current and anticipated rapid urbanization, improved understanding of the response of UHI to urbanization is important for impact analysis and developing effective adaptation measures and mitigation strategies. Current studies mainly focus on a single or a few big cities and knowledge on the response of UHI to urbanization for large areas is very limited. Modelling UHI caused by urbanization for large areas that encompass multiple metropolitans remains a major scientific challenge/opportunity. As a major indicator of urbanization, urban area size lends itself well for representation in prognostic models to investigate the impacts of urbanization on UHI and the related socioeconomic and environmental effects. However, we have little knowledge on how UHI responds to the increase of urban area size, namely urban expansion, and its spatial and temporal variation over large areas. In this study, we investigated the relationship between surface UHI (SUHI) and urban area size in the climate and ecological context, and its spatial and temporal variations, based on a panel analysis of about 5000 urban areas of 10 km2 or larger, in the conterminous U.S. We found statistically significant positive relationship between SUHI and urban area size, and doubling the urban area size led to a SUHI increase of higher than 0.7 °C. The response of SUHI to the increase of urban area size shows spatial and temporal variations, with stronger SUHI increase in the Northern region of U.S., and during daytime and summer. Urban area size alone can explain as much as 87% of the variance of SUHI among cities studied, but with large spatial and temporal variations. Urban area size shows higher association with SUHI in regions where the thermal characteristics of land cover surrounding the urban are more homogeneous, such as in Eastern U.S., and in the summer months. This study provides a

  11. A Remote Sensing-based Characterization of the Urban Heat Island and its Implications for Modeled Estimates of Urban Biogenic Carbon Fluxes in Boston, MA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Friedl, M. A.; Hutyra, L.; Hardiman, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Urban land use occupies a small but critical proportion of global land area for the carbon cycle, and in the coming decades, urban land area is expected to nearly double. Conversion of natural land cover to urban land cover imposes myriad ecological effects, including increased land surface and air temperatures via the urban heat island effect. In this study, we characterize the seasonal and spatial characteristics of the urban heat island over Boston, MA and estimate its consequences on biogenic carbon fluxes with a remote sensing-based model. Using a 12-year time series of emissivity- and atmospherically-corrected land surface temperatures from Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery, we find a high degree of spatial heterogeneity and consistent seasonal patterns in the thermal properties of Boston, controlled mainly by variations in vegetative cover. Field measurements of surface air temperature across an urbanization gradient show season- and vegetation-dependent patterns consistent with those observed in the Landsat data. With a fused data set that combines surface air temperature, MODIS, and Landsat observations, we modify and run the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) to explore 1) how elevated temperatures affect diurnal and seasonal patterns of hourly urban biogenic carbon fluxes in Massachusetts in 2013 and 2014 and 2) to what extent these fluxes follow spatial patterns found in the urban heat island. Model modifications simulate the ecological effects of urbanization, including empirical adjustments to reanalysis-driven air temperatures (up to 5 K) and ecosystem respiration reduced by impervious surface area. Model results reveal spatio-temporal patterns consistent with strong land use and vegetation cover controls on biogenic carbon fluxes, with non-trivial biogenic annual net ecosystem exchange occurring in urban and suburban areas (up to -2.5 MgC/ha/yr). We specifically consider the feedbacks between Boston's urban heat island and landscape

  12. Surface thermal analysis of North Brabant cities and neighbourhoods during heat waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Echevarria Icaza, L.; van der Hoeven, F.D.; van den Dobbelsteen, A.A.J.F.

    2016-01-01

    The urban heat island effect is often associated with large metropolises. However, in the Netherlands even small cities will be affected by the phenomenon in the future (Hove et al., 2011), due to the dispersed or mosaic urbanisation patterns in particularly the southern part of the country: the

  13. Heat

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Is it possible to make heat by rubbing your hands together? Why does an ice cube melt when you hold it? In this title, students will conduct experiments to help them understand what heat is. Kids will also investigate concepts such as which materials are good at conducting heat and which are the best insulators. Using everyday items that can easily be found around the house, students will transform into scientists as they carry out step-by-step experiments to answer interesting questions. Along the way, children will pick up important scientific skills. Heat includes seven experiments with detailed, age-appropriate instructions, surprising facts and background information, a "conclusions" section to pull all the concepts in the book together, and a glossary of science words. Colorful, dynamic designs and images truly put the FUN into FUN-damental Experiments.

  14. Mapping urban heat islands of arctic cities using combined data on field measurements and satellite images based on the example of the city of Apatity (Murmansk Oblast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, P. I.; Grishchenko, M. Y.; Varentsov, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the results of a study of the urban heat island (UHI) in the city of Apatity during winter that were obtained according to the data of field meteorological measurements and satellite images. Calculations of the surface layer temperature have been made based on the surface temperature data obtained from satellite images. The experimental data on air temperature were obtained as a result of expeditionary meteorological observations, and the experimental data on surface temperature were obtained based on the data of the space hyperspectral Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) system, channels 31 and 32 (10.78-11.28 and 11.77-12.27 micrometers, respectively). As a result of the analysis of temperature fields, an intensive heat island (up to 3.2°C) has been identified that was estimated based on the underlying surface temperature, and its mean intensity over the observation period significantly exceeds the representative data for European cities in winter. It has also been established that the air temperature calculated according to the MODIS data is systematically higher under winter conditions than the air temperature from direct measurement data.

  15. A simple method to estimate the urban heat island intensity in data sets used for the simulation of the thermal behaviour of buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wienert

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Test Reference Years (TRY are data sets tailored for use in the context of simulations with respect to the thermal behaviour of buildings. They are based on measurements and observations from weather stations of the German Meteorological Service (Deutscher Wetterdienst, DWD and represent the climate conditions of a larger area with an order of magnitude of 100 km x 100 km. The data sets cannot, however, be readily applied to urban areas. The air temperature as one of the most important meteorological elements for the building-related simulations frequently is subject to an increase with respect to the conditions outside the city area due to what is called the urban heat island effect. Numerous field measurements have led to the development of empirical relations to assess the urban temperature modification. These relations were implemented in a straightforward method. It applies a set of easily accessible parameters in a combination of different empirical formulae to derive an estimate of the urban air temperature modification. An intercomparison of calculated versus measured air temperature data showed that this method might yield a realistic representation of the urban heat island intensity.

  16. Study of the Relationships between the Spatial Extent of Surface Urban Heat Islands and Urban Characteristic Factors Based on Landsat ETM+ Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinqu Zhang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ten cities with different population and urban sizes located in the Pearl River Delta, Guangdong Province, P.R. China were selected to study the relationships between the spatial extent of surface urban heat islands (SUHI and five urban characteristic factors such as urban size, development area, water proportion, mean NDVI (Normalized Vegetation Index and population density, etc. The spatial extent of SUHI was quantified by using the hot island area (HIA. All the cities are almost at the same latitude, showing similar climate and solar radiation, the influence of which could thus be eliminated during our computation and comparative study. The land surface temperatures (LST were retrieved from the data of Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ band 6 using a mono-window algorithm. A variance-segmenting method was proposed to compute HIA for each city from the retrieved LST. Factors like urban size, development area and water proportion were extracted directly from the classification images of the same ETM+ data and the population density factor is from the official census. Correlation and regression analyses were performed to study the relationships between the HIA and the related factors, and the results show that HIA is highly correlated to urban size (r=0.95, population density (r=0.97 and development area (r=0.83 in this area. It was also proved that a weak negative correlation existed between HIA and both mean NDVI and water proportion for each city. Linear functions between HIA and its related factors were established, respectively. The HIA can reflect the spatial extent and magnitude of the surface urban heat island effect, and can be used as reference in the urban planning.

  17. Study of the Relationships between the Spatial Extent of Surface Urban Heat Islands and Urban Characteristic Factors Based on Landsat ETM+ Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinqu; Wang, Yunpeng

    2008-11-20

    Ten cities with different population and urban sizes located in the Pearl River Delta, Guangdong Province, P.R. China were selected to study the relationships between the spatial extent of surface urban heat islands (SUHI) and five urban characteristic factors such as urban size, development area, water proportion, mean NDVI (Normalized Vegetation Index) and population density, etc. The spatial extent of SUHI was quantified by using the hot island area (HIA). All the cities are almost at the same latitude, showing similar climate and solar radiation, the influence of which could thus be eliminated during our computation and comparative study. The land surface temperatures (LST) were retrieved from the data of Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) band 6 using a mono-window algorithm. A variance-segmenting method was proposed to compute HIA for each city from the retrieved LST. Factors like urban size, development area and water proportion were extracted directly from the classification images of the same ETM+ data and the population density factor is from the official census. Correlation and regression analyses were performed to study the relationships between the HIA and the related factors, and the results show that HIA is highly correlated to urban size (r=0.95), population density (r=0.97) and development area (r=0.83) in this area. It was also proved that a weak negative correlation existed between HIA and both mean NDVI and water proportion for each city. Linear functions between HIA and its related factors were established, respectively. The HIA can reflect the spatial extent and magnitude of the surface urban heat island effect, and can be used as reference in the urban planning.

  18. The statistical stability phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Gorban, Igor I

    2017-01-01

    This monograph investigates violations of statistical stability of physical events, variables, and processes and develops a new physical-mathematical theory taking into consideration such violations – the theory of hyper-random phenomena. There are five parts. The first describes the phenomenon of statistical stability and its features, and develops methods for detecting violations of statistical stability, in particular when data is limited. The second part presents several examples of real processes of different physical nature and demonstrates the violation of statistical stability over broad observation intervals. The third part outlines the mathematical foundations of the theory of hyper-random phenomena, while the fourth develops the foundations of the mathematical analysis of divergent and many-valued functions. The fifth part contains theoretical and experimental studies of statistical laws where there is violation of statistical stability. The monograph should be of particular interest to engineers...

  19. The alien limb phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Rubin, Mark N; Jones, David T; Aksamit, Allen J; Ahlskog, J Eric; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Boeve, Bradley F; Josephs, Keith A

    2013-07-01

    Alien limb phenomenon refers to involuntary motor activity of a limb in conjunction with the feeling of estrangement from that limb. Alien limb serves as a diagnostic feature of corticobasal syndrome. Our objective was to determine the differential diagnoses of alien limb and to determine the features in a large group of patients with the alien limb with different underlying etiologies. We searched the Mayo Clinic Medical Records Linkage system to identify patients with the diagnosis of alien limb seen between January 1, 1996, and July 11, 2011. One hundred and fifty patients with alien limb were identified. Twenty-two were followed in the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. Etiologies of alien limb included corticobasal syndrome (n = 108), stroke (n = 14), Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (n = 9), hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (n = 5), tumor (n = 4), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy(n = 2), demyelinating disease (n = 2), progressive dementia not otherwise specified (n = 2), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (n = 1), corpus callosotomy (n = 1), intracerebral hemorrhage (n = 1) and thalamic dementia (n = 1). Ten of 14 cerebrovascular cases were right hemisphere in origin. All cases involved the parietal lobe. Of the 44 patients with corticobasal syndrome from the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center cohort, 22 had alien limb, and 73 % had the alien limb affecting the left extremities. Left sided corticobasal syndrome was significantly associated with the presence of alien limb (p = 0.004). These findings support the notion that the alien limb phenomenon is partially related to damage underlying the parietal cortex, especially right parietal, disconnecting it from other cortical areas.

  20. The Offshoring Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mery Patricia Tamayo Plata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains some definitions which are necessary in order to understand the offshoring concept, going through the most relevant works about the development of the offshoring phenomenon and its impact on the demand for labor and on the most skilled workers' income. It is evidenced that the offshoring processes not only deal with the purchase and sale of goods anymore, but that the service sector has an increasingly important role, and that the lower cost is not the only aspect that matters when offshoring, but aspects such as the language and culture are also considered. It is also found that technology and research related services flow not only from the parent companies towards its subsidiaries, but from firms in less developed countries to other companies in advanced countries. It concludes with a review of the works that explores the relationship between offshoring, employment and wages, from both, a macro and microeconomic outlook. In the latter case, special consideration is given to the work carried out by Amity and Wei (2006, Crinó (2010, and Geishecker and Görg (2013.

  1. The tsunami phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röbke, B. R.; Vött, A.

    2017-12-01

    With human activity increasingly concentrating on coasts, tsunamis (from Japanese tsu = harbour, nami = wave) are a major natural hazard to today's society. Stimulated by disastrous tsunami impacts in recent years, for instance in south-east Asia (2004) or in Japan (2011), tsunami science has significantly flourished, which has brought great advances in hazard assessment and mitigation plans. Based on tsunami research of the last decades, this paper provides a thorough treatise on the tsunami phenomenon from a geoscientific point of view. Starting with the wave features, tsunamis are introduced as long shallow water waves or wave trains crossing entire oceans without major energy loss. At the coast, tsunamis typically show wave shoaling, funnelling and resonance effects as well as a significant run-up and backflow. Tsunami waves are caused by a sudden displacement of the water column due to a number of various trigger mechanisms. Such are earthquakes as the main trigger, submarine and subaerial mass wastings, volcanic activity, atmospheric disturbances (meteotsunamis) and cosmic impacts, as is demonstrated by giving corresponding examples from the past. Tsunamis are known to have a significant sedimentary and geomorphological off- and onshore response. So-called tsunamites form allochthonous high-energy deposits that are left at the coast during tsunami landfall. Tsunami deposits show typical sedimentary features, as basal erosional unconformities, fining-upward and -landward, a high content of marine fossils, rip-up clasts from underlying units and mud caps, all reflecting the hydrodynamic processes during inundation. The on- and offshore behaviour of tsunamis and related sedimentary processes can be simulated using hydro- and morphodynamic numerical models. The paper provides an overview of the basic tsunami modelling techniques, including discretisation, guidelines for appropriate temporal and spatial resolution as well as the nesting method. Furthermore, the

  2. The Atlanta Urban Heat Island Mitigation and Air Quality Modeling Project: How High-Resoution Remote Sensing Data Can Improve Air Quality Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William L.; Khan, Maudood N.

    2006-01-01

    The Atlanta Urban Heat Island and Air Quality Project had its genesis in Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land use Analysis: Temperature and Air quality) that began in 1996. Project ATLANTA examined how high-spatial resolution thermal remote sensing data could be used to derive better measurements of the Urban Heat Island effect over Atlanta. We have explored how these thermal remote sensing, as well as other imaged datasets, can be used to better characterize the urban landscape for improved air quality modeling over the Atlanta area. For the air quality modeling project, the National Land Cover Dataset and the local scale Landpro99 dataset at 30m spatial resolutions have been used to derive land use/land cover characteristics for input into the MM5 mesoscale meteorological model that is one of the foundations for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to assess how these data can improve output from CMAQ. Additionally, land use changes to 2030 have been predicted using a Spatial Growth Model (SGM). SGM simulates growth around a region using population, employment and travel demand forecasts. Air quality modeling simulations were conducted using both current and future land cover. Meteorological modeling simulations indicate a 0.5 C increase in daily maximum air temperatures by 2030. Air quality modeling simulations show substantial differences in relative contributions of individual atmospheric pollutant constituents as a result of land cover change. Enhanced boundary layer mixing over the city tends to offset the increase in ozone concentration expected due to higher surface temperatures as a result of urbanization.

  3. Mapping the Influence of Land Use/Land Cover Changes on the Urban Heat Island Effect—A Case Study of Changchun, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaobin Yang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatio-temporal patterns of land use/land cover changes (LUCC can significantly affect the distribution and intensity of the urban heat island (UHI effect. However, few studies have mapped a clear picture of the influence of LUCC on UHI. In this study, both qualitative and quantitative models are employed to explore the effect of LUCC on UHI. UHI and LUCC maps were retrieved from Landsat data acquired from 1984, 1992, 2000, 2007, and 2014 to show their spatiotemporal patterns. The results showed that: (1 both the patterns of LUCC and UHI have had dramatic changes in the past 30 years. The urban area of Changchun increased more than four times, from 143.15 km2 in 1984 to 577.45 km2 in 2014, and the proportion of UHI regions has increased from 15.27% in 1984 to 29.62% in 2014; (2 the spatiotemporal changes in thermal environment were consistent with the process of urbanization. The average LST of the study area has been continuously increasing as many other land use types have been transformed to urban regions. The mean temperatures were higher in urban regions than rural areas over all of the periods, but the UHI intensity varied based on different measurements; and (3 the thermal environment inside the city varied widely even within a small area. The LST possesses a very strong positive relationship with impervious surface area (ISA, and the relationship has become stronger in recent years. The UHI we employ, specifically in this study, is SUHI (surface urban heat island.

  4. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of the Atlanta, Georgia, Urban Heat Island Effect and Its Impacts on the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2007-01-01

    The twenty-first century is the first "urban century" according to the United Nations Development Program. The focus of cities reflects awareness of the growing percentage of the world's population that lives in urban areas. In environmental terms, cities are the original producers of many of the global problems related to waste disposal, air and water pollution, and associated environmental and ecological challenges. Expansion of cities, both in population and areal extent, is a relentless process. In 2000, approximately 3 billion people representing about 40% of the global population, resided in urban areas. Urban population will continue to rise substantially over the next several decades according to UN estimates, and most of this growth will Occur in developing countries. The UN estimates that by 2025, 60% of the world's population will live in urban areas. As a consequence, the number of"megacities" (those cities with populations of 10 million inhabitants or more) will increase by 100 by 2025. Thus, there is a critical need to understand urban areas and what their impacts are on environmental, ecological and hydrologic resources, as well as on the local, regional, and even global climate. One of the more egregious side effects of urbanization is the increase in surface and air temperatures that lead to deterioration in air quality. In the United States, under the more stringent air quality guidelines established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1997, nearly 300 counties in 34 states will not meet these new air quality standards for ground level ozone. Mitigation of the urban heat island (UHI) effect is actively being evaluated as a possible way to reduce ground ozone levels in cities and assist states in improving air quality. Foremost in the analysis of how the UHI affects air quality and other environmental factors is the use of remote sensing technology and data to characterize urban land covers in sufficient detail to quantifiably measure

  5. HOOLIGANISM – CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA LULESCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The proposed scientific theme is going to approach and study the hooliganism phenomenon as a contemporary social matter, in terms of conceptual and etiological. The present work has four main purposes: (1- that of explaining the meaning of hooliganism social phenomenon; (2- that of discovering the origins of hooliganism; (3- that of knowing which are the causes that encourages the occurence of the hooliganism; (4- that of knowing how to control and minimize this phenomenon.

  6. A comprehensive approach for the simulation of the Urban Heat Island effect with the WRF/SLUCM modeling system: The case of Athens (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaros, Christos; Nenes, Athanasios; Giannaros, Theodore M.; Kourtidis, Konstantinos; Melas, Dimitrios

    2018-03-01

    This study presents a comprehensive modeling approach for simulating the spatiotemporal distribution of urban air temperatures with a modeling system that includes the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Single-Layer Urban Canopy Model (SLUCM) with a modified treatment of the impervious surface temperature. The model was applied to simulate a 3-day summer heat wave event over the city of Athens, Greece. The simulation, using default SLUCM parameters, is capable of capturing the observed diurnal variation of urban temperatures and the Urban Heat Island (UHI) in the greater Athens Area (GAA), albeit with systematic biases that are prominent during nighttime hours. These biases are particularly evident over low-intensity residential areas, and they are associated with the surface and urban canopy properties representing the urban environment. A series of sensitivity simulations unravels the importance of the sub-grid urban fraction parameter, surface albedo, and street canyon geometry in the overall causation and development of the UHI effect. The sensitivities are then used to determine optimal values of the street canyon geometry, which reproduces the observed temperatures throughout the simulation domain. The optimal parameters, apart from considerably improving model performance (reductions in mean temperature bias from 0.30 °C to 1.58 °C), are also consistent with actual city building characteristics - which gives confidence that the model set-up is robust, and can be used to study the UHI in the GAA in the anticipated warmer conditions in the future.

  7. Deciphering the Paleoproterozoic cooling history of the northeastern Trans-Hudson Orogen, Baffin Island (Canada), using 40Ar/39Ar step-heating and UV laser thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipton, D. R.; Schneider, D. A.; Kellett, D. A.; Joyce, N. L.

    2017-07-01

    The previously unstudied cooling and exhumation history of mid-crustal rocks exposed on southeastern Baffin Island (Canada) provides new insights into the post-orogenic evolution of the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO). New 40Ar/39Ar step-heat analyses of biotite, muscovite and phlogopite and core-to-rim intra-grain 40Ar/39Ar analyses of muscovite have a range of apparent ages compatible with slow regional cooling following peak metamorphism. Twenty-nine amphibolite- to granulite-facies rocks were dated using the 40Ar/39Ar step-heating laser (CO2) method. 40Ar/39Ar spot analyses were performed across muscovite grains from three samples using an ultraviolet (UV) laser to investigate intra-grain 40Ar/39Ar age variations. Step-heating apparent ages range from ca. 1788-1622 Ma for biotite, 1720-1630 Ma for phlogopite and 1729-1657 Ma for muscovite. UV spot 40Ar/39Ar analyses in the three muscovite grains range from ca. 1661-1640 Ma, 1675-1645 Ma and 1680-1652 Ma, with core-to-rim apparent age gradients of 20-30 Myr. Previous studies resolved peak metamorphism in this region to between ca. 1860 and 1820 Ma and identified late- to post-THO zircon and monazite populations at ca. 1800-1750 Ma. Numerical diffusion models for Ar in muscovite were conducted to test different Proterozoic cooling and exhumation scenarios. Comparisons with our 40Ar/39Ar ages attest to cooling rates of 1-2 °C/Myr following peak metamorphism and 1.5-2.5 °C/Myr after ca. 1740 Ma. Anomalously old apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages, in cases equivalent to U-Pb zircon rim and monazite ages, likely result from incorporation of excess Ar. The results suggest that mid-crustal rocks on southeastern Baffin Island remained hotter than 420-450 °C for 150-200 Myr after peak metamorphism, with subsequent slow cooling and denudation rates that are typical of Proterozoic orogens. The apparent absence of orogenic collapse implies that, despite high temperatures and estimated maximum crustal thicknesses

  8. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Remote Sensing of the Urban Heat Island Effect: Assessment of Risks to Human Health and Development of Mitigation Strategies for Sustainable Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Laymon, Charles A.; Crosson, William; Howell, Burgess F.; Gillani, Noor V.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of cities, both in population and in areal extent, appears as an inexorable process. Urbanization continues at a rapid rate, and it is estimated that by the year 2025, 80% of the world's population will live in cities. One of the more egregious side effects of urbanization is the deterioration in air quality as a result of increased vehicular traffic, industrialization and related activities. In the United States alone, under the more stringent air quality guidelines established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1997, nearly 300 counties in 34 states will not meet the new air quality standards for ground level ozone. The mitigation of one the physical/environmental characteristics of urbanization known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect, is now being looked at more closely as a possible way to bring down ground level ozone levels in cities and assist states in improving air quality. The UHI results from the replacement of "natural" land covers (e.g., trees, grass) with urban land surface types, such as pavement and buildings. Heat stored in these surfaces is released into the air and results in a "dome" of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities. The effect of this dome of elevated air temperatures is known as the UHI, which is most prevalent about 2-3 hours after sunset on days with intense solar radiation and calm winds. Given the local and regional impacts of the UHI, there are significant potential affects on human health, particularly as related to heat stress and ozone on body temperature regulation and on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. In this study we are using airborne and satellite remote sensing data to analyze how differences in the urban landscape influence or drive the development of the UHI over four U.S. cities. Additionally, we are assessing what the potential impact is on risks to human health, and developing mitigation strategies to make urban areas more environmentally sustainable.

  9. Remote Sensing of the Urban Heat Island Effect: Assessment of Risks to Human Health and Development of Mitigation Strategies for Sustainable Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Laymon, Charles A.; Crosson, William; Howell, Burgess F.; Gillani, Noor V.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The growth of cities, both in population and in areal extent, appears as an inexorable process. Urbanization continues at a rapid rate, and it is estimated that by the year 2025, 80% of the world's population will live in cities. One of the more egregious side effects of urbanization is the deterioration in air quality as a result of increased vehicular traffic, industrialization and related activities. In the United States alone, under the more stringent air quality guidelines established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1997, nearly 300 counties in 34 states will not meet the new air quality standards for ground level ozone. The mitigation of one the physical/environmental characteristics of urbanization known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect, is now being looked at more closely as a possible way to bring down ground level ozone levels in cities and assist states in improving air quality. The UHI results from the replacement of "natural" land covers (e.g., trees, grass) with urban land surface types, such as pavement and buildings. Heat stored in these surfaces is released into the air and results in a "dome" of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities. The effect of this dome of elevated air temperatures is known as the UHI, which is most prevalent about 2-3 hours after sunset on days with intense solar radiation and calm winds. Given the local and regional impacts of the UHI, there are significant potential affects on human health, particularly as related to heat stress and ozone on body temperature regulation and on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. In this study we are using airborne and satellite remote sensing data to analyze how differences in the urban landscape influence or drive the development of the UHI over four U.S. cities. Additionally, we are assessing what the potential impact is on risks to human health, and developing mitigation strategies to make urban areas more environmentally sustainable.

  10. Diffusion phenomenon for linear dissipative wave equations

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we prove the diffusion phenomenon for the linear wave equation. To derive the diffusion phenomenon, a new method is used. In fact, for initial data in some weighted spaces, we prove that for {equation presented} decays with the rate {equation presented} [0,1] faster than that of either u or v, where u is the solution of the linear wave equation with initial data {equation presented} [0,1], and v is the solution of the related heat equation with initial data v 0 = u 0 + u 1. This result improves the result in H. Yang and A. Milani [Bull. Sci. Math. 124 (2000), 415-433] in the sense that, under the above restriction on the initial data, the decay rate given in that paper can be improved by t -γ/2. © European Mathematical Society.

  11. Turning up the heat: increasing temperature and coral bleaching at the high latitude coral reefs of the Houtman Abrolhos Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, David A; Bellchambers, Lynda M; Evans, Scott N

    2012-01-01

    Coral reefs face increasing pressures particularly when on the edge of their distributions. The Houtman Abrolhos Islands (Abrolhos) are the southernmost coral reef system in the Indian Ocean, and one of the highest latitude reefs in the world. These reefs have a unique mix of tropical and temperate marine fauna and flora and support 184 species of coral, dominated by Acropora species. A significant La Niña event during 2011 produced anomalous conditions of increased temperature along the whole Western Australian coastline, producing the first-recorded widespread bleaching of corals at the Abrolhos. We examined long term trends in the marine climate at the Abrolhos using historical sea surface temperature data (HadISST data set) from 1900-2011. In addition in situ water temperature data for the Abrolhos (from data loggers installed in 2008, across four island groups) were used to determine temperature exposure profiles. Coupled with the results of coral cover surveys conducted annually since 2007; we calculated bleaching thresholds for monitoring sites across the four Abrolhos groups. In situ temperature data revealed maximum daily water temperatures reached 29.54°C in March 2011 which is 4.2°C above mean maximum daily temperatures (2008-2010). The level of bleaching varied across sites with an average of ∼12% of corals bleached. Mortality was high, with a mean ∼50% following the 2011 bleaching event. Prior to 2011, summer temperatures reached a mean (across all monitoring sites) of 25.1°C for 2.5 days. However, in 2011 temperatures reached a mean of 28.1°C for 3.3 days. Longer term trends (1900-2011) showed mean annual sea surface temperatures increase by 0.01°C per annum. Long-term temperature data along with short-term peaks in 2011, outline the potential for corals to be exposed to more frequent bleaching risk with consequences for this high latitude coral reef system at the edge of its distribution.

  12. Analysis of Urban Heat Island (UHI in Relation to Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI: A Comparative Study of Delhi and Mumbai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakriti Grover

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation and occurrence of urban heat island (UHI is a result of rapid urbanization and associated concretization. Due to intensification of heat combined with high pollution levels, urban areas expose humans to unexpected health risks. In this context, the study aims at comparing the UHI in the two largest metropolitan cities of India, i.e., Delhi and Mumbai. The presence of surface UHI is analyzed using the Landsat 5 TM image of 5 May 2010 for Delhi and the 17 April 2010 image for Mumbai. The validation of the heat island is done in relation to the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI patterns. The study reveals that built-up and fallow lands record high temperatures, whereas the vegetated areas and water bodies exhibit lower temperatures. Delhi, an inland city, possesses mixed land use and the presence of substantial tree cover along roads; the Delhi Ridge forests and River Yamuna cutting across the city have a high influence in moderating the surface temperatures. The temperature reaches a maximum of 35 °C in West Delhi and a minimum of 24 °C in the east at the River Yamuna. Maximum temperature in East Delhi goes to 30 °C, except the border areas. North, Central and south Delhi have low temperatures (28 °C–31 °C, but the peripheral areas have high temperatures (36 °C–37 °C. The UHI is not very prominent in the case of Delhi. This is proven by the correlations of surface temperature with NDVI. South Delhi, New Delhi and areas close to River Yamuna have high NDVI and, therefore, record low temperatures. Mumbai, on the other hand, is a coastal city with lower tree cover than Delhi. The Borivilli National Park (BNP is in the midst of dense horizontal and vertical growth of buildings. The UHI is much stronger where the heat is trapped that is, the built-up zones. There are four small rivers in Mumbai, which have low carrying capacity. In Mumbai suburban district, the areas adjoining the creeks, sea and the lakes act as

  13. Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Xu, Tengfang; Taha, Haider; Wray, Craig; Sathaye, Jayant; Garg, Vishal; Tetali, Surekha; Babu, M. Hari; Reddy, K. Niranjan

    2011-05-25

    energy in India. Meteorological simulations in this study indicated that a reduction of 2C in air temperature in the Hyderabad area would be likely if a combination of increased surface albedo and vegetative cover are used as urban heat-island control strategies. In addition, air-temperature reductions on the order of 2.5-3.5C could be achieved if moderate and aggressive heat-island mitigation measures are adopted, respectively. A large-scale deployment of mitigation measures can bring additional indirect benefit to the urban area. For example, cooling outside air can improve the efficiency of cooling systems, reduce smog and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and indirectly reduce pollution from power plants - all improving environmental health quality. This study has demonstrated the effectiveness of cool-roof technology as one of the urban heat-island control strategies for the Indian industrial and scientific communities and has provided an estimate of the national energy savings potential of cool roofs in India. These outcomes can be used for developing cool-roof building standards and related policies in India. Additional field studies, built upon the successes and lessons learned from this project, may be helpful to further confirm the scale of potential energy savings from the application of cooler roofs in various regions of India. In the future, a more rigorous meteorological simulation using urbanized (meso-urban) meteorological models should be conducted, which may produce a more accurate estimate of the air-temperature reductions for the entire urban area.

  14. Effects of Green Space and Land Use/Land Cover on Urban Heat Island in a Subtropical Mega-city in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, G. Y.; Li, X.; Li, H.; Guo, Q.

    2014-12-01

    With the quick expansion of urban in size and population, its urban heat island intensity (UHII, expressed as the temperature difference between urban and rural areas) increased rapidly. However, very few studies could quantitatively reveal the effects of green space and land use/land cover (LULC) on urban thermal environment because of lacking of the detailed measurement. This study focuses on quantifying the effects of green space and LULC on urban Heat Island (UHI) in Shenzhen, a mega subtropical city in China. Extensive measurements (air temperature and humidity) were made by mobile traverse method in a transect of 8 km in length, where a variety of LULC types were included. Measurements were carried out at 2 hours interval for 2 years (totally repeated for 7011 times). According to LULC types, we selected 5 different LULC types for studying, including water body, village in the city, shopping center (commercial area), urban green space (well-vegetated area) and suburb (forest). The main conclusions are obtained as follows: (1) The temperature difference between the 5 different urban landscapes is obvious, i.e. shopping center > village in the city > urban water body > urban green space > suburb; (2) Air temperature and UHII decreases linearly with the increase of green space in urban; (3) Green space and water body in urban have obvious effects to reduce the air temperature by evapotranspiration. Compared to the commercial areas, urban water body can relieve the IUHI by 0.9℃, while the urban green space can relieve the IUHI by 1.57℃. The cooling effect of the urban green space is better than that of the urban water body; (4) Periodic activity of human being has obvious effects on urban air temperature. The UHII on Saturday and Sunday are higher than that from Monday to Friday, respectively higher for 0.65, 0.57, 0.26 and 0.21℃. Thursday and Friday have the minimum air temperature and UHII. These results indicate that increase in urban evapotranspiration

  15. Integrating local urban climate modelling and mobile sensor data for personal exposure assessments in the context of urban heat island effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueberham, Maximilian; Hertel, Daniel; Schlink, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Deeper knowledge about urban climate conditions is getting more important in the context of climate change, urban population growth, urban compaction and continued surface sealing. Especially the urban heat island effect (UHI) is one of the most significant human induced alterations of Earth's surface climate. According to this the appearance frequency of heat waves in cities will increase with deep impacts on personal thermal comfort, human health and local residential quality of citizens. UHI can be very heterogenic within a city and research needs to focus more on the neighborhood scale perspective to get further insights about the heat burden of individuals. However, up to now, few is known about local thermal environmental variances and personal exposure loads. To monitor these processes and the impact on individuals, improved monitoring approaches are crucial, complementing data recorded at conventional fixed stations. Therefore we emphasize the importance of micro-meteorological modelling and mobile measurements to shed new light on the nexus of urban human-climate interactions. Contributing to this research we jointly present the approaches of our two PhD-projects. Firstly we illustrate on the basis of an example site, how local thermal conditions in an urban district can be simulated and predicted by a micro-meteorological model. Secondly we highlight the potentials of personal exposure measurements based on an evaluation of mobile micro-sensing devices (MSDs) and analyze and explain differences between model predictions and mobile records. For the examination of local thermal conditions we calculated ENVI-met simulations within the "Bayerischer Bahnhof" quarter in Leipzig (Saxony, Germany; 51°20', 12°22'). To accomplish the maximum temperature contrasts within the diverse built-up structures we chose a hot summer day (25 Aug 2016) under autochthonous weather conditions. From these simulations we analyzed a UHI effect between the model core (urban area

  16. An Experimental Insight into the Smoldering-Flaming Transition Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poorva Shrivastava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional phenomena of smoldering combustion over thin solid fuels are investigated. An experimental setup was upraised and implications of both smoldering and flaming external heat sources are estimated. Incense sticks were used as potential fuel and external smoldering heat source along with a fixed candle flame. The role of key controlling parameters, namely, separation distance and number of external heat sources in horizontal and vertical direction, was extensively examined. The surfacing issues of enclosure effect and the external heat sources orientation are addressed. The study primarily aims at understanding the feasibility and spontaneity of transition owing to external heat sources (both flaming and smoldering. Forward heat transfer significantly deviates qualitatively and quantitatively with varying separation distance in both directions. Number of external heat sources intensifies the transition phenomenon in smoldering combustion. With practical considerations, external heat sources arrangement and orientation have substantial effect on the combustion process.

  17. Modeling nexus of urban heat island mitigation strategies with electricity/power usage and consumer costs: a case study for Phoenix, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Humberto; Fillpot, Baron S.

    2018-01-01

    A reduction in both power and electricity usage was determined using a previously validated zero-dimensional energy balance model that implements mitigation strategies used to reduce the urban heat island (UHI) effect. The established model has been applied to show the change in urban characteristic temperature when executing four common mitigation strategies: increasing the overall (1) emissivity, (2) vegetated area, (3) thermal conductivity, and (4) albedo of the urban environment in a series of increases by 5, 10, 15, and 20% from baseline values. Separately, a correlation analysis was performed involving meteorological data and total daily energy (TDE) consumption where the 24-h average temperature was shown to have the greatest correlation to electricity service data in the Phoenix, Arizona, USA, metropolitan region. A methodology was then developed for using the model to predict TDE consumption reduction and corresponding cost-saving analysis when implementing the four mitigation strategies. The four modeled UHI mitigation strategies, taken in combination, would lead to the largest percent reduction in annual energy usage, where increasing the thermal conductivity is the single most effective mitigation strategy. The single least effective mitigation strategy, increasing the emissivity by 5% from the baseline value, resulted in an average calculated reduction of about 1570 GWh in yearly energy usage with a corresponding 157 million dollar cost savings. When the four parameters were increased in unison by 20% from baseline values, an average calculated reduction of about 2050 GWh in yearly energy usage was predicted with a corresponding 205 million dollar cost savings.

  18. Environmental Risks or Costs? Exploring Flooding and the Urban Heat Island Effect in Planning for Policymaking: A Case Study in the Southern Taiwan Science Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiwen Lu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined a specific case of planning for policymaking in response to two physical environmental issues: flooding and the urban heat island effect (UHI. The Southern Taiwan Science Park (STSP was selected as a case study. Data were primarily collected through interviews as well as through policy review. The assessment showed significant differences in policymaking when comparing these two issues. The issue of flooding was considered and managed well. The UHI, however, was poorly considered or ignored altogether in policymaking, even though it has shown an increasing trend over the last decades, to a greater degree in the STSP than in the city centre. The results implied that the neoliberal approach to planning of decision-making performed better in managing risks (i.e., flooding and relevant disasters which had occurred in the past than costs (i.e., the UHI and the future threats resulting from development. The STSP’s spatial development strategy, underpinned by the neoliberal approach with an agenda for maximising economic growth, was questionable for environmental management toward resilience.

  19. SPATIOTEMPORAL VARIATIONS IN THE IMPACTS OF URBAN LAND USE TYPES ON URBAN HEAT ISLAND EFFECTS: THE CASE OF RIYADH, SAUDI ARABIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Aina

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Urban heat island (UHI effect is considered to be one of the key indicators of the impacts of urbanization and the climate changes on the environment. Thus, the growing interest in studying the impacts of urbanization on changes in land surface temperature (LST. The literature on LST indicates the need for more studies on the relationship between changes in LST and land use types, especially in the arid environment. This paper examines the spatial and temporal changes in land surface temperature influenced by land use/land cover types in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Multi-temporal Landsat images of the study area, 1985, 1995, 2002 and 2015, were processed to derive land surface temperatures. UHI index was computed for the different land use/land cover types (high-density residential, medium-density residential, low-density residential, industrial, vegetation, and desert in the study area. The results indicate a trend of rising temperatures in all the land use types in the study area. This is probably due to climate change. The industrial area has the highest temperatures among the land use types. The lowest temperatures are found in the vegetation area as expected. There is a need to implement mitigating measures to reduce the effects of rising temperatures in the study area.

  20. Urban Heat Island Simulations in Guangzhou, China, Using the Coupled WRF/UCM Model with a Land Use Map Extracted from Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model coupled with an Urban Canopy Model (UCM was used for studying urban environmental issues. Because land use data employed in the WRF model do not agree with the current situation around Guangzhou, China, the performance of WRF/UCM with new land-use data extracted from Remote Sensing (RS data was evaluated in early August 2012. Results from simulations reveal that experiments with the extracted data are capable of reasonable reproductions of the majority of the observed temporal characteristics of the 2-m temperature, and can capture the characteristics of Urban Heat Island (UHI. The “UCM_12” simulation, which employed the extracted land-use data with the WRF/UCM model, provided the best reproduction of the 2-m temperature data evolution and the smallest minimum absolute average error when compared with the other two experiments without coupled UCM. The contributions of various factors to the UHI effect were analyzed by comparing the energy equilibrium processes of “UCM_12” in urban and suburban areas. Analysis revealed that energy equilibrium processes with new land use data can explain the diurnal character of the UHI intensity variation. Furthermore, land use data extracted from RS can be used to simulate the UHI.

  1. Islands, Island Studies, Island Studies Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Baldacchino

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Islands are sites of innovative conceptualizations, whether of nature or human enterprise, whether virtual or real. The study of islands on their own terms today enjoys a growing and wide-ranging recognition. This paper celebrates the launch of Island Studies Journal in the context of a long and thrilling tradition of island studies scholarship.

  2. Koebner Phenomenon and Mycosis Fungoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Lebas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycosis fungoides (MF is the most frequent type of primary cutaneous T-cell/NK-cell lymphoma. The Koebner phenomenon is defined as the appearance of cutaneous lesions on previously noninvolved skin following trauma and is observed in a series of cutaneous diseases including psoriasis, lichen planus, viral warts, molluscum contagiosum, etc. In this case report, 3 patients with longstanding MF are presented, the 1st with the appearance of a circumscribed early-stage type MF lesion rapidly following a surgical excision of an infundibular cyst, the 2nd with the appearance of a unique unilateral palmar tumoral MF lesion at the pressure site of a crutch, and the 3rd presented localized MF early stage lesions at the friction site of a belt. This report suggests that some MF patients may experience Koebner phenomenon-induced MF lesions and that MF should be added to the long list of skin diseases potentially exhibiting the Koebner phenomenon.

  3. Macrostabilization of the Migration Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Burghelea

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available MacLabour migration is a present phenomenon in the European Union. This phenomenon takes over the entire European continent, but especially in the EU countries. The labor market in Europe is increasingly affected by population aging. Economic differences between European countries make workforce in developing countries to move to developed countries where they find it easier to work and receive higher remuneration than in their home countries. This article tracks labor migration from/to EU, employment in Romania and Romanian migration towards the countries of Western Europe. It also presents statistics on labor migration in the EU and its impact on the labor market

  4. Resurrecting Dead-water Phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Mercier, Matthieu; Dauxois, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    We revisit experimental studies performed by Ekman on dead-water using modern techniques in order to present new insights on this peculiar phenomenon. We extend its description to more general situations such as a three-layer fluid or a linearly stratified fluid in presence of a pycnocline, showing the robustness of dead-water phenomenon. We observe large amplitude nonlinear internal waves which are coupled to the boat dynamics, and we emphasize that the modeling of the wave-induced drag requires more analysis, taking into account nonlinear effects.

  5. A rare phenomenon: oculonasal synkinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciloglu, N Sinem; Duran, Alpay; Buyukdogan, Hasan

    2014-10-01

    Oculonasal synkinesis is the simultaneous contraction of the orbicularis oculi and the compressor narium minor muscles. The etiology of this phenomenon is still unclear; congenital and traumatic reasons are considered to be responsible. Here we report a case of oculonasal synkinesis.

  6. Does Quality Control Matter? a Revisit of Surface Urban Heat Island Intensity Estimated by Satellite-Derived Land Surface Temperature Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J.; Zhan, W.; Huang, F.

    2017-09-01

    Temporally regular and spatially continuous monitoring of surface urban heat island (SUHI) has been extremely difficult until the advent of spaceborne land surface temperature (LST) products. The higher errors of these LST products compared with in-situ measurements, nevertheless, have resulted in a comparatively inaccuracy and may distort the interpretation of SUHI. Although reports have shown that LST quality matters to the SUHI interpretation, a systematic investigation on how the SUHI indicators are responsive to the LST quality across cities within dissimilar bioclimates remains rare. With regard to this issue, our study chose eighty-six major cities across the mainland China and analyzed the SUHI intensity (SUHII) discrepancies (referred to as ΔSUHII) between using and not using quality control (QC) flags from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data. Our major findings include: (1) the SUHII can be significantly impacted by the MODIS QC flags, and the associated seasonal ΔSUHIIs generally account for 25.5 % (29.6 %) of the total intensity in the day (night). (2) The ΔSUHIIs differ season-by-season and significant discrepancies also appear among northern and southern cities, with northern ones often possessing a higher annual mean ΔSUHII. (3) The internal ΔSUHIIs within an individual city are also heterogeneous, with the variations exceeding 5.0 K (3.0 K) in northern (southern) cities. (4) The ΔSUHII is significantly negatively related to the SUHII and cloud cover percentage mostly in transitional seasons. Our findings highlight that one needs to be very careful when using the LST-product-based SUHII to interpret the SUHI.

  7. Simulation of Urban Heat Island Mitigation Strategies in Atlanta, GA Using High-Resolution Land Use/Land Cover Data Set to Enhance Meteorological Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosson, William L.; Dembek, Scott; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Lapenta, William; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Johnson, Hoyt; Khan, Maudood

    2006-01-01

    The specification of land use/land cover (LULC) and associated land surface parameters in meteorological models at all scales has a major influence on modeled surface energy fluxes and boundary layer states. In urban areas, accurate representation of the land surface may be even more important than in undeveloped regions due to the large heterogeneity within the urban area. Deficiencies in the characterization of the land surface related to the spatial or temporal resolution of the data, the number of LULC classes defined, the accuracy with which they are defined, or the degree of heterogeneity of the land surface properties within each class may degrade the performance of the models. In this study, an experiment was conducted to test a new high-resolution LULC data set for meteorological simulations for the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area using a mesoscale meteorological model and to evaluate the effects of urban heat island (UHI) mitigation strategies on modeled meteorology for 2030. Simulation results showed that use of the new LULC data set reduced a major deficiency of the land use data used previously, specifically the poor representation of urban and suburban land use. Performance of the meteorological model improved substantially, with the overall daytime cold bias reduced by over 30%. UHI mitigation strategies were projected to offset much of a predicted urban warming between 2000 and 2030. In fact, for the urban core, the cooling due to UHI mitigation strategies was slightly greater than the warming associated with urbanization over this period. For the larger metropolitan area, cooling only partially offset the projected warming trend.

  8. Exploring the Influence of Impervious Surface Density and Shape on Urban Heat Islands in the Northeast USA Using MODIS and Landsat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, Lahouri; Wolfe, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Impervious surface area (ISA) from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2001 and land surface temperature (LST) from MODIS averaged over three annual cycles (2003-2005) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the urban heat island (UHI) signature and its relationship to settlement size and shape, development intensity distribution, and land cover composition for 42 urban settlements embedded in forest biomes in the Northeastern United States. Development intensity zones, based on percent ISA, are defined for each urban area emanating outward from the urban core to nearby rural areas and are used to stratify land surface temperature. The stratification is further constrained by biome type and elevation to insure objective intercomparisons between urban zones within an urban settlement and between settlements. Stratification based on ISA allows the definition of hierarchically ordered urban zones that are consistent across urban settlements and scales. In addition to the surrounding ecological context, we find that the settlement size and shape as well as the development intensity distribution significantly influence the amplitude of summer daytime UHI. Within the Northeastern US temperate broadleaf mixed forest, UHI magnitude is positively related to the logarithm of the urban area size. Our study indicates that for similar urban area sizes, the development intensity distribution is one of the major drivers of UHI. In addition to urban area size and development intensity distribution, this analysis shows that both the shape of the urban area and the land cover composition in the surrounding rural area play an important role in modulating the UHI magnitude in different urban settlements. Our results indicate that remotely sensed urban area size and shape as well as the development intensity distribution influence UHI amplitude across regional scales.

  9. Cool city mornings by urban heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeuwes, Natalie E.; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Ronda, Reinder J.; Rotach, Mathias W.; Holtslag, Albert A. M.

    2015-11-01

    The urban heat island effect is a phenomenon observed worldwide, i.e. evening and nocturnal temperatures in cities are usually several degrees higher than in the surrounding countryside. In contrast, cities are sometimes found to be cooler than their rural surroundings in the morning and early afternoon. Here, a general physical explanation for this so-called daytime urban cool island (UCI) effect is presented and validated for the cloud-free days in the BUBBLE campaign in Basel, Switzerland. Simulations with a widely evaluated conceptual atmospheric boundary-layer model coupled to a land-surface model, reveal that the UCI can form due to differences between the early morning mixed-layer depth over the city (deeper) and over the countryside (shallower). The magnitude of the UCI is estimated for various types of urban morphology, categorized by their respective local climate zones.

  10. Rescuing--a universal phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, John

    2014-12-01

    Rescuing, where the person is delivered from the immediacy of their conundrum by another, complicates management. The object of this paper is to understand the difficulty in relinquishing the rescuing role. Rescuing is a universal phenomenon in parenting, teaching and therapy that has developed over time through a variety of interwoven social, economic, psychological and clinical variables. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  11. Simulations of Moscow megacity heat island with the COSMO-CLM model using two different urban canopy schemes and realistic building parameters, derived from OpenStreetMap data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varentsov, Mikhail; Wouters, Hendrik; Trusilova, Kristina; Samsonov, Timofey; Konstantinov, Pavel

    2017-04-01

    In this study we present the application of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM to simulate urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon for Moscow megacity, which is the biggest agglomeration in Europe (with modern population of more than 17 million people). Significant differences of Moscow from the cities of Western Europe are related with much more continental climate with higher diurnal and annual temperature variations, and with specific building features such as its high density and almost total predominance of high-rise and low-rise blocks of flats on the private low-rise houses. Because of these building and climate features, the UHI of Moscow megacity is stronger than UHIs of many other cities of the similar size, with a mean intensity is about 2 °C and maximum intensity reaching up to 13 °C (Lokoschenko, 2014). Such a pronounced UHI together with the existence of an extensive observation network (more than 50 weather and air quality monitoring stations and few microwave temperature profilers) within the city and its surrounding make Moscow an especially interesting place for urban climate researches and good testbed for urban canopy models. In our numerical experiments, regional climate model firstly was adapted for investigated region with aim to improve quality of its simulations of rural areas. Then, to take into account urban canopy effects on thermal regime of the urbanized areas, we used two different versions of COSMO-CLM model. First is coupled with TEB (Town Energy Balance) single layer urban canopy model (Trusilova, 2013), and second is extended with bulk urban canopy scheme TERRA_URB using the Semi-empircal URban-canopY dependency parametriation SURY (Wouters et. al, 2016). Numerical experiments with these two versions of the model were run with spatial resolution about 1 km for several summer and winter months. To provide specific parameters, required for urban parameterizations, such as urban fraction, building height and street canyon aspect ratio

  12. Urban 'Dry Island' in Moscow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokoshchenko, Mikhail A.

    2017-04-01

    The urban 'dry island' (UDI) phenomenon over Moscow city has been studied and analyzed for the period since the end of the 19th century till recent years using the data of the ground meteorological network. It concludes into less values of relative humidity in a city in the comparison with surrounding rural zone. The reason of this phenomenon is, firstly, limited areas of forest zones and less number of other water vapor sources inside a city and, besides, indirect influence of the urban heat island (UHI), i.e. higher air temperature T inside a city. Mean-annual water vapor pressure E doesn't demonstrate systematic changes in Moscow during the last 146 years. The linear regression coefficient K of its course is equal to only 0.0015 [hPa/year], thus since 1870 the average water content in the ground air layer above Moscow increased on average only a little: by 0.2 hPa; such a small difference seems to be negligible and statistically non-significant. Unlike this parameter mean-annual relative humidity F demonstrates quick and systematic (steady in time) fall with the average rate of K = -0.06 [%/year] during the last 146 years; in other words, it decreased from 81 % in 1870s to nearly 72 % in recent years. Inside the city it is the result of general T increase due to both global warming and, besides, intensification of Moscow UHI. Long-term changes of the F spatial field in Moscow city have been studied in details for separate periods since 1890s till recent years. As a result the urban 'dry island' is found as a real physical phenomenon which is closely connected with UHI; the absolute value of its intensity as well as for the UHI is increasing in time: from -4 % at the end of the 19th century to -8 ÷-9 % now. During last two decades UDI as well as UHI became much stronger in Moscow than before. For instance, on average of five years from 2010 to 2014 the F value at 'Balchug' station at the city centre (close to Moscow Kremlin) is the lowest among all other

  13. Advantages of using a fast urban boundary layer model as compared to a full mesoscale model to simulate the urban heat island of Barcelona

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Díez, Markel; Lauwaet, Dirk; Hooyberghs, Hans; Ballester, Joan; De Ridder, Koen; Rodó, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    As most of the population lives in urban environments, the simulation of the urban climate has become a key problem in the framework of the climate change impact assessment. However, the high computational power required by high-resolution (sub-kilometre) fully coupled land-atmosphere simulations using urban canopy parameterisations is a severe limitation. Here we present a study on the performance of UrbClim, an urban boundary layer model designed to be several orders of magnitude faster than a full-fledged mesoscale model. The simulations are evaluated with station data and land surface temperature observations from satellites, focusing on the urban heat island (UHI). To explore the advantages of using a simple model like UrbClim, the results are compared with a simulation carried out with a state-of-the-art mesoscale model, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model, which includes an urban canopy model. This comparison is performed with driving data from ERA-Interim reanalysis (70 km). In addition, the effect of using driving data from a higher-resolution forecast model (15 km) is explored in the case of UrbClim. The results show that the performance of reproducing the average UHI in the simple model is generally comparable to the one in the mesoscale model when driven with reanalysis data (70 km). However, the simple model needs higher-resolution data from the forecast model (15 km) to correctly reproduce the variability of the UHI at a daily scale, which is related to the wind speed. This lack of accuracy in reproducing the wind speed, especially the sea-breeze daily cycle, which is strong in Barcelona, also causes a warm bias in the reanalysis driven UrbClim run. We conclude that medium-complexity models as UrbClim are a suitable tool to simulate the urban climate, but that they are sensitive to the ability of the input data to represent the local wind regime. UrbClim is a well suited model for impact and adaptation studies at city scale without high

  14. Analysis of seasonal variation in urban heat island effect for West Mediterranean Region of Turkey using Landsat 8 OLI/TIRS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Nagihan; KOC-SAN, Dilek

    2016-07-01

    Technological developments are accelerating day by day in 21st century which has brought social and economic developments. Besides, the word population is increasing rapidly and the majority of population lives in city center. Large and crowded cities, industrial areas and shopping centers are being built for providing human needs and wishes. For these purposes, natural resources are destroyed and urban climate is affected. The temperatures of urban areas can be warmer than the rural areas and differences in temperature between urban and surrounding rural areas were defined as Urban Heat Island (UHI). The objectives of this study are (i) to calculate Land Surface Temperatures (LST) for urban and vegetation areas in the selected cities, (ii) to determine the UHI effects and its change between seasons, (iii) to examine the relationship between city size and UHI effect magnitude. In this study, Landsat 8 OLI/TIRS imageries for winter (23 December 2013), summer (17 June 2014) and autumn (7 October 2014) seasons were used. The Antalya, Burdur and Isparta provinces that are placed in West Mediterranean Region of Turkey were selected as study areas. These three provinces have different characteristics. Antalya is the fifth biggest city of Turkey and its population growth is quite high. In addition, the summer population of this city increases severely, because of its tourism potential. On the other hand, Isparta and Burdur are relatively small cities when compared to Antalya with respect to population and urban area. In this study, firstly, the brightness temperatures and LST values are calculated from Landsat 8 thermal images. Secondly, urban areas are identified by an approach that combines emissivity image, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program - Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime lights data and ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM). In addition, the vegetation areas are defined by using emissivity image. Finally, the UHI effect is determined

  15. Impact of land cover data on the simulation of urban heat island for Berlin using WRF coupled with bulk approach of Noah-LSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huidong; Wolter, Michael; Wang, Xun; Sodoudi, Sahar

    2017-09-01

    Urban-rural difference of land cover is the key determinant of urban heat island (UHI). In order to evaluate the impact of land cover data on the simulation of UHI, a comparative study between up-to-date CORINE land cover (CLC) and Urban Atlas (UA) with fine resolution (100 and 10 m) and old US Geological Survey (USGS) data with coarse resolution (30 s) was conducted using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) coupled with bulk approach of Noah-LSM for Berlin. The comparison between old data and new data partly reveals the effect of urbanization on UHI and the historical evolution of UHI, while the comparison between different resolution data reveals the impact of resolution of land cover on the simulation of UHI. Given the high heterogeneity of urban surface and the fine-resolution land cover data, the mosaic approach was implemented in this study to calculate the sub-grid variability in land cover compositions. Results showed that the simulations using UA and CLC data perform better than that using USGS data for both air and land surface temperatures. USGS-based simulation underestimates the temperature, especially in rural areas. The longitudinal variations of both temperature and land surface temperature show good agreement with urban fraction for all the three simulations. To better study the comprehensive characteristic of UHI over Berlin, the UHI curves (UHIC) are developed for all the three simulations based on the relationship between temperature and urban fraction. CLC- and UA-based simulations show smoother UHICs than USGS-based simulation. The simulation with old USGS data obviously underestimates the extent of UHI, while the up-to-date CLC and UA data better reflect the real urbanization and simulate the spatial distribution of UHI more accurately. However, the intensity of UHI simulated by CLC and UA data is not higher than that simulated by USGS data. The simulated air temperature is not dominated by the land cover as much as the land

  16. Mapping the frugal innovation phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mokter

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at mapping the frugal innovation phenomenon. The study reveals that scholars affiliated with Indian institutes and originated from India have played a key role in this research discipline. Country wise, the highest number of frugal innovation cases is from India. The articles...... on frugal innovation have published in a wide range of disciplines and journals. Scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers have understood frugal innovation concept in various ways. Studies are predominantly in sectors, such as healthcare, electric and electronics, transport, finance, ICT, and energy....... On the contrary, despite high importance, agriculture and education sectors have received limited attention...

  17. Water condensation: a multiscale phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kasper Risgaard; Fojan, Peter; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Gurevich, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    The condensation of water is a phenomenon occurring in multiple situations in everyday life, e.g., when fog is formed or when dew forms on the grass or on windows. This means that this phenomenon plays an important role within the different fields of science including meteorology, building physics, and chemistry. In this review we address condensation models and simulations with the main focus on heterogeneous condensation of water. The condensation process is, at first, described from a thermodynamic viewpoint where the nucleation step is described by the classical nucleation theory. Further, we address the shortcomings of the thermodynamic theory in describing the nucleation and emphasize the importance of nanoscale effects. This leads to the description of condensation from a molecular viewpoint. Also presented is how the nucleation can be simulated by use of molecular models, and how the condensation process is simulated on the macroscale using computational fluid dynamics. Finally, examples of hybrid models combining molecular and macroscale models for the simulation of condensation on a surface are presented.

  18. Translation as a psycholinguistic phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasyekin, Serhiy

    2010-06-01

    The article sketches the outlines of a theoretical framework for the analysis of translation of literary texts, viewed as psycho-semiotic phenomenon and based on evaluation of earlier attempts in this direction, and on the results of a psycholinguistic empirical study of translations. Central to this framework is the recent insight that the human cerebral hemisphere functional asymmetry somehow plays a role in structuring the fictional text by its author and in its processing by the interpreter. It is argued that the texts of modernism and post-modernism contain information blocks describing a character's perception of events in altered states of consciousness. This model helps to explain how a translator's inappropriate linguistic choice may influence the target language reader's aesthetic reaction.

  19. Are Earthquakes a Critical Phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, O.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes, granular avalanches, superconducting vortices, solar flares, and even stock markets are known to evolve through power-law distributed events. During decades, the formalism of equilibrium phase transition has coined these phenomena as critical, which implies that they are also unpredictable. This work revises these ideas and uses earthquakes as the paradigm to demonstrate that slowly driven systems evolving through uncorrelated and power-law distributed avalanches (UPLA) are not necessarily critical systems, and therefore not necessarily unpredictable. By linking the correlation length to the pdf of the distribution, and comparing it with the one obtained at a critical point, a condition of criticality is introduced. Simulations in the classical Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) earthquake model confirm the findings, showing that earthquakes are not a critical phenomenon. However, one single catastrophic earthquake may show critical properties and, paradoxically, the emergence of this temporal critical behaviour may eventually carry precursory signs of catastrophic events.

  20. Cell phenomenology: The first phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattee, H H

    2015-12-01

    As a broad academic discipline phenomenology may be summarized as the study from a first person point of view of what appears to subjective human conscious experience. As a historical philosophical movement phenomenology was often motivated by the belief that subjective human experience is the proper foundation of all philosophy. I explore phenomena from a broader evolutionary and physical point of view. I consider a phenomenon as the subjective consequence of a physical interaction with an individual organism. In physical terms, a phenomenon requires some form of detection or measurement. What is detected is determined by the organism, and is potentially functional for the organism as a self or subject. The concept of function has meaning only for living organisms. The classical human mind-body problem is an ill-defined complicated case of the more general epistemic subject-object problem, which at the origin of life I reduce to the primitive symbol-matter problem. I argue that the first memory-based self-replicating unit, like a cell, is the most primitive case of a necessary symbol-matter distinction. The first phenomena, which include all forms or sensing, detection, and measurement, require a subject-object distinction, called the epistemic cut. It is only because of such a subject-object distinction that populations of individual subjects can selectively adapt to their environment by heritable variations. This basic evolutionary process requires distinguishing the individual's subjective phenomena from the objective events of inexorable physical laws. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lisbet

    2015-01-01

    An update introduction including recent legislative changes on the Folkchurch of the Faroe Islands......An update introduction including recent legislative changes on the Folkchurch of the Faroe Islands...

  2. The heat spells of Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Jáuregui

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The warning of urban air has been documented to increase in intensity and area as cities grow (Oke, 1982. As the cities grow the so called “heat island” tends to increase the risk of more frequent heat waves as well as their impacts (IPCC, 2001. Threshold values to define a heat wave vary geographically. For the case of Mexico City located in a high inland valley in the tropics, values above 30° C (daily maximum observed for three or more consecutive days and 25° C or more as mean temperature have been adopted to define the phenomenon. These events occur at the end of the dry season during March to May when afternoon relative humidity is quite low (∼20% and thus reducing the stress. Maximum temperatute data from the Observatory of the National Meteorological Service were used. Results show that during the second half of the XXth century the frequency of heat waves as defined above has doubled from 6 events/decade to 16/decade in the 1990s with a marked increase in the last third of the last century when population of the city grew from 8.5 to 18.5 million (CONAPO, 2000. During this time the average urban/rural contrast grew considerably from about 6° C to 10° C (Jáuregui, 1986. While these heat waves may be considered as “mild”they receive attention from the media and prompt actions by the population to relieve the heat stress. Application of heat indices based on the human energy balance (PET and PMV result in moderate to strong heat stress during these events. Because climate change is expected to raise nighttime minimum temperatures more than daytime highs (as suggested by the IPCC, 2001 urban heat islands and their related heat waves are likely to be a significant health concern in days to come in large urban centers especially in the developing countries.

  3. Metamaterial phenomenons via uniform motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Tom G.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2007-05-01

    Metamaterials offer exotic electromagnetic possibilities, beyond those usually associated with conventional materials. Two general phenomenons associated with metamaterials have attracted much recent attention: negative- phase-velocity (NPV) propagation, and cloaking and invisibility. Relatively simple materials may (i) support NPV propagation, and (ii) offer concealment to a substantial degree, by means of translation at constant velocity. By virtue of the Minkowski constitutive relations, planewave propagation in a homogeneous, instantaneously responding, dielectric-magnetic material that is isotropic in the co-moving reference frame, can be classified as positive-, negative-, and orthogonal-phase-velocity (PPV, NPV, and OPV) propagation in a non-co-moving reference frame, depending upon the magnitude and direction of that reference frame's velocity relative to the material. The perceived lateral position of a transmitted beam, upon propagating at an oblique angle through a slab of homogeneous, instantaneously responding, isotropic, dielectric material, can be controlled via the velocity of the slab. Therefore, by appropriate choice of the slab's velocity, the transmitted beam can emerge from the slab with no lateral shift in position, and a substantial degree of concealment may be achieved.

  4. Oscillating heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the fundamental fluid flow and heat transfer principles occurring in oscillating heat pipes and also provides updated developments and recent innovations in research and applications of heat pipes. Starting with fundamental presentation of heat pipes, the focus is on oscillating motions and its heat transfer enhancement in a two-phase heat transfer system. The book covers thermodynamic analysis, interfacial phenomenon, thin film evaporation,  theoretical models of oscillating motion and heat transfer of single phase and two-phase flows, primary  factors affecting oscillating motions and heat transfer,  neutron imaging study of oscillating motions in an oscillating heat pipes, and nanofluid’s effect on the heat transfer performance in oscillating heat pipes.  The importance of thermally-excited oscillating motion combined with phase change heat transfer to a wide variety of applications is emphasized. This book is an essential resource and learning tool for senior undergraduate, gradua...

  5. Risk as a social phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Wesley V

    2003-01-01

    What do nuclear power, smoking, and eating beef have in common? The answer is multifaceted. They all share aspects of mass production and consumption, and therefore consumer confidence comes into play in evaluating each of the products' merits. They all produce some level of anxiety--be it in response to adverse media coverage, or the successes of adversarial interest groups in publicizing those products' weaknesses--among consumers who wonder what if any level of the product should be consumed. Finally, nuclear power, smoking, and eating beef all share risk; that is, the perceived and real detriments of producing and consuming those products. Whether or not the associated risks--from increased cancer to increased heart disease--are real is beside the point. When talking about risk, scientific education must deal with the perception of risk as much as its reality. Risk is a socially defined phenomenon, and as such, the successful scientists/communicator must understand the social evaluations of it. While many scientists take a rational view of risk evaluation and consumers often make rational decisions about technological and scientific risk based upon the costs and benefits of that technology, this approach is problematic for three reasons. First, the nature of modern risks has changed in that risk is complex, incomprehensible and uncontrollable to the average person. Second, the rational approach assumes that all costs and benefits of a technology, both real and potential, both current and future, can be known and therefore rationally evaluated. This is not the case. Third, evidence from Europe indicates that trust in information sources about risk has fallen, and thus classic scientific education campaigns that rely upon increasing public knowledge and acceptance of technological and scientific risk are problematic. Because of these factors we argue that effective scientific response must begin to understand the social components of risk if campaigns to shape

  6. Island tameness: living on islands reduces flight initiation distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, William E; Pyron, R Alexander; Garland, Theodore

    2014-02-22

    One of Darwin's most widely known conjectures is that prey are tame on remote islands, where mammalian predators are absent. Many species appear to permit close approach on such islands, but no comparative studies have demonstrated reduced wariness quantified as flight initiation distance (FID; i.e. predator-prey distance when the prey begins to flee) in comparison with mainland relatives. We used the phylogenetic comparative method to assess influence of distance from the mainland and island area on FID of 66 lizard species. Because body size and predator approach speed affect predation risk, we included these as independent variables. Multiple regression showed that FID decreases as distance from mainland increases and is shorter in island than mainland populations. Although FID increased as area increased in some models, collinearity made it difficult to separate effects of area from distance and island occupancy. FID increases as SVL increases and approach speed increases; these effects are statistically independent of effects of distance to mainland and island occupancy. Ordinary least-squares models fit the data better than phylogenetic regressions, indicating little or no phylogenetic signal in residual FID after accounting for the independent variables. Our results demonstrate that island tameness is a real phenomenon in lizards.

  7. Decoupled Hierarchical Structures for Suppression of Leidenfrost Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhnia, Nazanin; Sajadi, Seyed Mohammad; Irajizad, Peyman; Ghasemi, Hadi

    2017-03-14

    Thermal management of high temperature systems through cooling droplets is limited by the existence of the Leidenfrost point (LFP), at which the formation of a continuous vapor film between a hot solid and a cooling droplet diminishes the heat transfer rate. This limit results in a bottleneck for the advancement of the wide spectrum of systems including high-temperature power generation, electronics/photonics, reactors, and spacecraft. Despite a long time effort on development of surfaces for suppression of this phenomenon, this limit has only shifted to higher temperatures, but still exists. Here, we report a new multiscale decoupled hierarchical structure that suppress the Leidenfrost state and provide efficient heat dissipation at high temperatures. The architecture of these structures is composed of a nanomembrane assembled on top of a deep micropillar structure. This architecture allows to independently tune the involved forces and to suppress LFP. Once a cooling droplet contacts these surfaces, by rerouting the path of vapor flow, the cooling droplet remains attached to the hot solid substrates even at high temperatures (up to 570 °C) for heat dissipation with no existence of Leidenfrost phenomenon. These new surfaces offer unprecedented heat dissipation capacity at high temperatures (2 orders of magnitude higher than the other state-of-the-art surfaces). We envision that these surfaces open a new avenue in thermal management of high-temperature systems through spray cooling.

  8. A Study of the Oklahoma City Urban Heat Island Effect Using a WRF/Single-Layer Urban Canopy Model, a Joint Urban 2003 Field Campaign, and MODIS Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengyue Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island effect (UHI for inner land regions was investigated using satellite data, ground observations, and simulations with an Single-Layer Urban Canopy Parameterization (SLUCP coupled into the regional Weather Research Forecasting model (WRF, http://wrf-model.org/index.php. Specifically, using the satellite-observed surface skin temperatures (Tskin, the intensity of the UHI was first compared for two inland cities (Xi’an City, China, and Oklahoma City (OKC, which have different city populations and building densities. The larger population density and larger building density in Xi’an lead to a stronger skin-level UHI by 2 °C. However, the ground observed 2 m surface air temperature (Tair observations showed an urban cooling island effect (UCI over the downtown region in OKC during the daytime of 19 July 2003, from a DOE field campaign (Joint Urban 2003. To understand this contrast between satellite-based Tskin and ground-based Tair, a sensitivity study using WRF/SLUCP was analyzed. The model reproduced a UCI in OKC. Furthermore, WRF/Noah/SLUCM simulations were also compared with the Joint Urban 2003 ground observations, including wind speeds, wind directions, and energy fluxes. Although the WRF/SLUCM model failed to simulate these variables accurately, it reproduced the diurnal variations of surface temperatures, wind speeds, wind directions, and energy fluxes reasonably well.

  9. Surface Heat Balance Analysis of Tainan City on March 6, 2001 Using ASTER and Formosat-2 Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yi Sun

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island phenomenon occurs as a mixed result of anthropogenic heat discharge, decreased vegetation, and increased artificial impervious surfaces. To clarify the contribution of each factor to the urban heat island, it is necessary to evaluate the surface heat balance. Satellite remote sensing data of Tainan City, Taiwan, obtained from Terra ASTER and Formosat-2 were used to estimate surface heat balance in this study. ASTER data is suitable for analyzing heat balance because of the wide spectral range. We used Formosat-2 multispectral data to classify the land surface, which was used to interpolate some surface parameters for estimating heat fluxes. Because of the high spatial resolution of the Formosat-2 image, more roads, open spaces and small vegetation areas could be distinguished from buildings in urban areas; however, misclassifications of land cover in such areas using ASTER data would overestimate the sensible heat flux. On the other hand, the small vegetated areas detected from the Formosat-2 image slightly increased the estimation of latent heat flux. As a result, the storage heat flux derived from Formosat-2 is higher than that derived from ASTER data in most areas. From these results, we can conclude that the higher resolution land coverage map increases accuracy of the heat balance analysis. Storage heat flux occupies about 60 to 80% of the net radiation in most of the artificial surface areas in spite of their usages. Because of the homogeneity of the building roof materials, there is no contrast between the storage heat flux in business and residential areas. In sparsely vegetated urban areas, more heat is stored and latent heat is smaller than that in the forested suburbs. This result implies that density of vegetation has a significant influence in decreasing temperatures.

  10. Effects of Land Use/Cover Changes and Urban Forest Configuration on Urban Heat Islands in a Loess Hilly Region: Case Study Based on Yan’an City, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinping; Hao, Hongke; Zhang, Fangfang; Hu, Youning

    2017-01-01

    In this study Yan’an City, a typical hilly valley city, was considered as the study area in order to explain the relationships between the surface urban heat island (SUHI) and land use/land cover (LULC) types, the landscape pattern metrics of LULC types and land surface temperature (LST) and remote sensing indexes were retrieved from Landsat data during 1990–2015, and to find factors contributed to the green space cool island intensity (GSCI) through field measurements of 34 green spaces. The results showed that during 1990–2015, because of local anthropogenic activities, SUHI was mainly located in lower vegetation cover areas. There was a significant suburban-urban gradient in the average LST, as well as its heterogeneity and fluctuations. Six landscape metrics comprising the fractal dimension index, percentage of landscape, aggregation index, division index, Shannon’s diversity index, and expansion intensity of the classified LST spatiotemporal changes were paralleled to LULC changes, especially for construction land, during the past 25 years. In the urban area, an index-based built-up index was the key positive factor for explaining LST increases, whereas the normalized difference vegetation index and modified normalized difference water index were crucial factors for explaining LST decreases during the study periods. In terms of the heat mitigation performance of green spaces, mixed forest was better than pure forest, and the urban forest configuration had positive effects on GSCI. The results of this study provide insights into the importance of species choice and the spatial design of green spaces for cooling the environment. PMID:28933770

  11. Effects of Land Use/Cover Changes and Urban Forest Configuration on Urban Heat Islands in a Loess Hilly Region: Case Study Based on Yan'an City, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinping; Wang, Dexiang; Hao, Hongke; Zhang, Fangfang; Hu, Youning

    2017-07-26

    In this study Yan'an City, a typical hilly valley city, was considered as the study area in order to explain the relationships between the surface urban heat island (SUHI) and land use/land cover (LULC) types, the landscape pattern metrics of LULC types and land surface temperature (LST) and remote sensing indexes were retrieved from Landsat data during 1990-2015, and to find factors contributed to the green space cool island intensity (GSCI) through field measurements of 34 green spaces. The results showed that during 1990-2015, because of local anthropogenic activities, SUHI was mainly located in lower vegetation cover areas. There was a significant suburban-urban gradient in the average LST, as well as its heterogeneity and fluctuations. Six landscape metrics comprising the fractal dimension index, percentage of landscape, aggregation index, division index, Shannon's diversity index, and expansion intensity of the classified LST spatiotemporal changes were paralleled to LULC changes, especially for construction land, during the past 25 years. In the urban area, an index-based built-up index was the key positive factor for explaining LST increases, whereas the normalized difference vegetation index and modified normalized difference water index were crucial factors for explaining LST decreases during the study periods. In terms of the heat mitigation performance of green spaces, mixed forest was better than pure forest, and the urban forest configuration had positive effects on GSCI. The results of this study provide insights into the importance of species choice and the spatial design of green spaces for cooling the environment.

  12. Effects of Land Use/Cover Changes and Urban Forest Configuration on Urban Heat Islands in a Loess Hilly Region: Case Study Based on Yan’an City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinping Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study Yan’an City, a typical hilly valley city, was considered as the study area in order to explain the relationships between the surface urban heat island (SUHI and land use/land cover (LULC types, the landscape pattern metrics of LULC types and land surface temperature (LST and remote sensing indexes were retrieved from Landsat data during 1990–2015, and to find factors contributed to the green space cool island intensity (GSCI through field measurements of 34 green spaces. The results showed that during 1990–2015, because of local anthropogenic activities, SUHI was mainly located in lower vegetation cover areas. There was a significant suburban-urban gradient in the average LST, as well as its heterogeneity and fluctuations. Six landscape metrics comprising the fractal dimension index, percentage of landscape, aggregation index, division index, Shannon’s diversity index, and expansion intensity of the classified LST spatiotemporal changes were paralleled to LULC changes, especially for construction land, during the past 25 years. In the urban area, an index-based built-up index was the key positive factor for explaining LST increases, whereas the normalized difference vegetation index and modified normalized difference water index were crucial factors for explaining LST decreases during the study periods. In terms of the heat mitigation performance of green spaces, mixed forest was better than pure forest, and the urban forest configuration had positive effects on GSCI. The results of this study provide insights into the importance of species choice and the spatial design of green spaces for cooling the environment.

  13. Electron string phenomenon: physics and use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, Evgeny D.

    2004-01-01

    Electron string phenomenon arises as a result of phase transition of a state of multiply reflected electron beam to this new discovered state of one component electron plasma and can be easily observed in the reflex mode of EBIS operation. The transition goes via a strong instability, which causes considerable electron energy spread, which in its turn suppresses the instability. Electron string state is a stationary state of hot pure electron plasma, which is heated by injected electron beam and cooled because of electron loses. Electron string is quiet in broad regions of experimental parameters, so that it is used for confinement and ionization of positive ions by electron impact to highly charge states similar to electron beams in EBIS. Application of electron strings instead of electron beams for ion production allows to save about 99% of electric power of electron beam and simultaneously to improve reliability of an ion source considerably. The JINR EBIS `Krion-2' in the string mode of operation is used for production of N7+, Ar16+ and Fe24+ ion beams and their acceleration to relativistic energies on the facility of the JINR super conducting one turn injection synchrotron `Nuklotron'. The tubular electron string possibly can exist and it is under study now theoretically and experiments are prepared now. Estimations show that a Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) could have up to three orders of magnitude higher ion output then a Linear one (LESIS). In frames of nuclear astrophysics electron strings can be used for research of fusion nuclear reactions at low energies in conditions when both beam and target nuclei do not carry orbital electrons. The project NARITA — Nuclear Astrophysics Researches in an Ion Trap Apparatus is proposed. Polarization effects also can be studied.

  14. Pacific Island Polygons, Pacific Islands, NAVTEQ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NAVTEQ Islands for the United States. The Islands layer contains all islands within a NAVSTREETS coverage area. An island is represented as a polygonal feature. The...

  15. Spatial temporal analysis of urban heat hazard in Tangerang City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Adi; Kuswantoro; Ardiansyah; Rustanto, Andry; Putut Ash Shidiq, Iqbal

    2016-11-01

    Urban heat is a natural phenomenon which might caused by human activities. The human activities were represented by various types of land-use such as urban and non-urban area. The aim of this study is to identify the urban heat behavior in Tangerang City as it might threats the urban environment. This study used three types of remote sensing data namely, Landsat TM, Landsat ETM+ and Landsat OLI-TIRS, to capture the urban heat behavior and to analysis the urban heat signature of Tangerang City in 2001, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. The result showed that urban heat signature change dynamically each month based on the sun radiation. The urban heat island covered only small part of Tangerang City in 2001, but it was significantly increased and reached 50% of the area in 2012. Based on the result on urban heat signature, the threshold for threatening condition is 30 oC which recognized from land surface temperature (LST). The effective temperature (ET) index explains that condition as warm, uncomfortable, increase stress due to sweating and blood flow and may causing cardiovascular disorder.

  16. Terrorism as a Social and Legal Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrennikova, Anna; Mashkova, Yekaterina

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the concept of terrorism as a social and legal phenomenon, its international legal and criminal-legal characteristics. Highlighted are the main aspects of cooperation of the states and the international community to counter terrorist activities. Terrorism as a social phenomenon is determined by paragraph 1 of article 3 of the…

  17. CHINCHIRISI: THE PHENOMENON OF "SPIRIT CHILDREN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    religio-cultural phenomenon a challenge to euthanasia, human rights and rural development in the contemporary :;ociety? This paper examines the phenomenon of 'spirit children' from an insider perspective. I. Introduction. The shift from generalizations to specific contextual studies in the study of Africa's religio-cultural ...

  18. MOBBING PHENOMENON - FACTORS OF DISCRIMINATION AND STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMANESCU MARCEL LAURENTIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on exemplifying the features of discrimination phenomenon in the workplace, a phenomenon that has appeared in the Romanian social studies only in the last 4 years. Mobbing phenomenon has been analyzed by several countries in Europe such as England, France, Germany; after these analyzes it has been found that this phenomenon refers only to actions of intense psychological pressure. Actions are geared to a single employee, in order to cause it to leave its job. Without these measures, dismissal of the employee would lead to numerous legal problems on the employer. In conclusion, employee who is the subject of mobbing phenomenon must endure a long period of time a series of injustices focused on himself, but also extremely high humiliation, which determines him to mentally give up and take the decision to resign.

  19. Correlates of the Third Victim Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Mark J

    2017-12-01

    The third victim phenomenon refers to a system-wide organizational response to a serious untoward event in health care settings. The objective of this report is to describe possible measurable correlates of this phenomenon. A serious incident on one unit in the hospital is described. Utilization of constant observation and rate of discharge in the aftermath throughout the hospital were assessed. There was a hospital-wide uptick in conservative decision making following the serious incident, exemplified by an increase in the utilization of constant observation and decreased rate of discharges. These findings lend support to the validity of the concept of the third victim phenomenon and underscore the imperative for a coherent leadership response to prevent damage to institutional core values, morale, and reputation. Systematic investigation of this phenomenon and its potential effects on clinical practice in the aftermath of serious incidents is warranted.

  20. Koebner phenomenon of the ear canal skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, O

    2009-02-01

    The Koebner phenomenon originally described the appearance of psoriatic lesions in the uninvolved skin of patients with psoriasis as a consequence of trauma. We describe a case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the auditory canal, which represents an unusual manifestation of the Koebner phenomenon. This is the first case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the head and neck region and highlights the need for biopsy to allow accurate histopathological diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Koebner phenomenon of the ear canal skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, O

    2012-02-01

    The Koebner phenomenon originally described the appearance of psoriatic lesions in the uninvolved skin of patients with psoriasis as a consequence of trauma. We describe a case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the auditory canal, which represents an unusual manifestation of the Koebner phenomenon. This is the first case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the head and neck region and highlights the need for biopsy to allow accurate histopathological diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Completion Phenomenon in Transcortical Sensory Aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawa, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Ikeda, M; H. Kazui; Ito, K.; Inoue, N; Y. Hatakenaka; Sawada, T; Ikeda, H; Shiraishi, J

    1993-01-01

    We investigated completion phenomenon for proverbs in cases demonstrating transcortical sensory aphasia due to a variety of diseases. Lack of this completion was exclusively observed in patients with focal atrophy. These patients showed a selective and consistent impairment in word comprehension without phonemic cue effects in naming. The completion phenomenon was present in patients demonstrating transcortical sensory aphasia due to other cerebral diseases. In these patients, comprehension d...

  3. Job Insecurity as a Social Psychological Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuykova T.S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses a relatively new phenomenon of job insecurity. It provides an analysis of the various interpretations of the phenomenon given by Russian and foreign researchers, focuses on its social economical determinants and consequences for individuals and organizations. The paper concludes with an outline of some possible ways of overcoming the negative consequences of job insecurity — as for individuals, as for organizations, as for the society as a whole.

  4. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaukimath, SP; Patil, PS

    2015-01-01

    A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports however where the phenomenon of sexual activity has been a trigger for epileptic seizures. Most of these cases reported are in women so far, and were found to be localized to right cerebral hemisphere. We report a case of a 36-year-old male with orgasm-induced seizures, with other atypical features compared to majority of previous reports. PMID:27057393

  5. SSME main injector 4000 Hertz phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    Several Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) have experienced very high acceleration responses measured in the main injector of the powerhead during static firings. Data from previous hot fire SSME tests relating to the 4000 hertz phenomenon were reviewed to provide a better understanding of the nature of this structural response. The objective was to technically understand the way this phenomenon works, recommend a fix and test the fix.

  6. Open source innovation phenomenon, participant behaviour, impact

    CERN Document Server

    Herstatt, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Open Source Innovation (OSI) has gained considerable momentum within the last years. Academic and management practice interest grows as more and more end-users consider and even participate in Open Source product development like Linux, Android, or Wikipedia. Open Source Innovation: Phenomenon, Participant Behaviour, Impact brings together rigorous academic research and business importance in scrutinizing OCI from three perspectives: The Phenomenon, Participants' Behavior, and Business Implications. The first section introduces OCI artefacts, including who is participating and why, and provide

  7. Identificação de ilhas de calor na área urbana de Ilha Solteira - SP através da utilização de geotecnologias Identification of urban heat islands in Ilha Solteira - SP municipality using geotecnologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas F. da Costa

    2010-10-01

    and the recreation area, showed surface temperatures between 21 ºC and 23 ºC. The areas that showed higher temperatures (41 ºC to 44 ºC were located in the regions in which occur the largest percentages of classes "buildings" and "paved-building", thus characterizing the phenomenon of heat islands. These results could be used to support urban planning strategies to minimize the effects of thermal discomfort of the areas identified as heat islands.

  8. Floating phenomenon and mode of color appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hironobu; Shinoda, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Mitsuo

    2002-06-01

    We found an interesting phenomenon concerning the motion perception and the mode of color appearance. We suppose you are holding a stiff sheet of picture and move it laterally to and fro in front of the eye. Though the picture and all items in it move physically altogether with your hand, your perception is not always so. But when the picture that is a figure appears light-source color mode and a background of object color, a figure appears to slip on a background. We call this a 'floating phenomenon.' We predicted the occurrence of floating phenomenon depends on whether the color is perceived to belong to an object or not. To examine the relation between the floating phenomenon and the mode of color appearance, we measured the luminance threshold of floating phenomenon and the transition luminance between two color modes by constant stimulus method to use a mondrian. Our results show the floating never occurred when the target appeared as object color mode. The floating phenomenon may be caused by the separation of the light-source color from an object or week-belonging.

  9. [The knowledge of animal respiration as a combustion phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The different stages leading to knowledge of the phenomenon of animal breathing are going from some writings in Corpus Hippocraticum to Aristoteles' and Galen's works, who considered the heart as the source of the animal heat. Later, Miguel Servet suggested that the inspired air can achieve other functions besides cooling the blood. After that, different explications of the animal heat were raised. About 1770, due to progress of knowledge in the chemistry field, first Mayow and later Black began to consider the animal respiration as a combustion. The important treatise Méthode de nomenclature chimique, published by Guyton de Morveau et al. in 1787 and soon after the Traité élémentaire de chimie de Lavoisier (1789) provided a solid support to Lavoisier's thought. This way on arrived to consider analogous the respiration and combustion phenomena. Studies on the animal respiration phenomenon continued in xix century and in the following century it was possible to apply thermodynamic principles to biology: "generalized thermodynamics". Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Historical Aspects in Tolerance Phenomenon Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janat A. Karmanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the historical aspect of the tolerance phenomenon research, particularly the study of tolerance in the age of Antiquity, Middle Ages, New Times, Enlightenment. It is remarkable that the problem of tolerance, emerged in Western civilization on religious grounds, laid the foundation for all other freedoms, attained in many countries. Besides, the article attaches special attention to the researchers of the East, such as Abu Nasr al-Farabi, Khoja Ahmed Yasawi, studies the historical aspect of works by Kazakhstan thinkers A. Kunanbayev, C. Valikhanova, K.B. Zharikbayev, S.K. Kaliyev, A.N. Nysanbayev, A.I. Artemev and others. The analysis of historical research of the tolerance phenomenon brings the author to the conclusion that religious freedom was the starting point for the emergence of new areas of tolerance display. The content of this phenomenon changed according to the historical peculiarities of the societies’ development

  11. Hysteresis phenomenon in nuclear reactor dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirayesh, Behnam; Pazirandeh, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch; Akbari, Monireh [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mathematics

    2017-05-15

    This paper applies a nonlinear analysis method to show that hysteresis phenomenon, due to the Saddle-node bifurcation, may occur in the nuclear reactor. This phenomenon may have significant effects on nuclear reactor dynamics and can even be the beginning of a nuclear reactor accident. A system of four dimensional nonlinear ordinary differential equations was considered to study the hysteresis phenomenon in a typical nuclear reactor. It should be noted that the reactivity was considered as a nonlinear function of state variables. The condition for emerging hysteresis was investigated using Routh-Hurwitz criterion and Sotomayor's theorem for saddle node bifurcation. A numerical analysis is also provided to illustrate the analytical results.

  12. Orthostatic proteinuria with nutcracker phenomenon: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Noh Hyuck; Song, Soon Young; Lee, En Ja; Kim, Mi Sung; Kim, Byung Gil [College of Medicine, Kwandong Univ., Koyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Orthostatic proteinuria has been recognized as a benign condition with a good prognosis and has not been associated with any underlying glomerular disease. The pathogenesis of orthostatic proteinuria is unclear. Recently, a few foreign reports suggested that the nutcracker phenomenon, which is known as a cause of asymptomatic hematuria, may also be a major cause of orthostatic proteinuria. We report a case of a 12-year-old female patient presenting only with orthostatic proteinuria, who was diagnosed as having nutcracker phenomenon by Doppler study and venography.

  13. Social Media: A Phenomenon to be Analyzed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    danah boyd

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of “social media” has more to do with its cultural positioning than its technological affordances. Rooted in the broader “Web 2.0” landscape, social media helped engineers, entrepreneurs, and everyday people reimagine the role that technology could play in information dissemination, community development, and communication. While the technologies invoked by the phrase social media have a long history, what unfolded in the 2000s reconfigured socio-technical practices in significant ways. Reflecting on the brief history of social media, this essay argues for the need to better understand this phenomenon.

  14. Island biogeography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whittaker, Robert James; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Matthews, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    older to younger land masses, and syndromes including loss of dispersability and secondary woodiness in herbaceous plant lineages. Further developments in Earth system science, molecular biology, and trait data for islands hold continued promise for unlocking many of the unresolved questions...

  15. A Case Study of Urbanization Impact on Summer Precipitation in the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area. Urban Heat Island Versus Aerosol Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Shi [Nanjing Univ. (China); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qian, Yun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Chun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leung, Lai-Yung R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Yang, Xiuqun [Nanjing Univ. (China)

    2015-10-23

    Convection-resolving ensemble simulations using the WRF-Chem model coupled with a single-layer Urban Canopy Model (UCM) are conducted to investigate the individual and combined impacts of land use and anthropogenic pollutant emissions from urbanization on a heavy rainfall event in the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area (GBMA) in China. The simulation with the urbanization effect included generally captures the spatial pattern and temporal variation of the rainfall event. An improvement of precipitation is found in the experiment including aerosol effect on both clouds and radiation. The expanded urban land cover and increased aerosols have an opposite effect on precipitation processes, with the latter playing a more dominant role, leading to suppressed convection and rainfall over the upstream (northwest) area, and enhanced convection and more precipitation in the downstream (southeast) region of the GBMA. In addition, the influence of aerosol indirect effect is found to overwhelm that of direct effect on precipitation in this rainfall event. Increased aerosols induce more cloud droplets with smaller size, which favors evaporative cooling and reduce updrafts and suppress convection over the upstream (northwest) region in the early stage of the rainfall event. As the rainfall system propagates southeastward, more latent heat is released due to the freezing of larger number of smaller cloud drops that are lofted above the freezing level, which is responsible for the increased updraft strength and convective invigoration over the downstream (southeast) area.

  16. Methods to Minimize Zero-Missing Phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria; Bak, Claus Leth; Gudmundsdottir, Unnur Stella

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing use of high-voltage AC cables at transmission levels, phenomena such as current zero-missing start to appear more often in transmission systems. Zero-missing phenomenon can occur when energizing cable lines with shunt reactors. This may considerably delay the opening of the ci...

  17. Concept "Medical Museum" as a Sociocultural Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizh, Nina V.; Slyshkin, Gennady G.; Zheltukhina, Marina R.; Privalova, Irina V.; Kravchenko, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    The article examines the concept "medical museum" as a sociocultural phenomenon. The register of medical museums in Russia makes the material of research. The complex methods of analysis of the concept "medical museum" are used. The philosophical, historical, cultural, structural, communicative and semantic analysis is carried…

  18. A NEW LOOK AT THE BOWL PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro B. Castellucci

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An interesting empirical result in the assembly line literature states that slightly unbalanced assembly lines (in the format of a bowl - with central stations less loaded than the external ones present higher throughputs than perfectly balanced ones. This effect is known as the bowl phenomenon. In this study, we analyze the presence of this phenomenon in assembly lines with integer task times. For this purpose, we modify existing models for the simple assembly line balancing problem and assembly line worker assignment and balancing problem in order to generate configurations exhibiting the desiredformat. These configurations are implemented in a stochastic simulation model, which is run for a large set of recently introduced instances. The obtained results are analyzed and the findings obtained here indicate,for the first time, the existence of the bowl phenomenon in a large set of configurations (corresponding to the wide range of instances tested and also the possibility of reproducing such phenomenon in lines witha heterogeneous workforce.

  19. Historical memory as an ethnopolitical phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribanov Valeriy Vladimirovich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Historical memory turns out to be an important ethnopolitical phenomenon, when the events of the past of the peoples are used as an argument in the political activities of any entity. The example of the Finno-Ugric peoples of the Russian Federation is used to show the practice of using facts of the past for political purposes.

  20. Laser Sintering Technology and Balling Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyar, Perihan

    2017-10-13

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the balling phenomenon which occurs typically in Selective Laser Sintering (SLS). The balling phenomenon is a typical SLS defect, and observed in laser sintered powder, significantly reduces the quality of SLS, and hinders the further development of SLS Technology. Electronic database searches were performed using Google Scholar. The keywords "laser sintering, selective laser sintering, direct metal laser melting, and balling phenomenon" were searched in title/abstract of publications, limited to December 31, 2016. The inclusion criteria were SLS, balling phenomenon, some alloys (such as Cr-Co, iron, stainless steel, and Cu-based alloys) mechanical properties, microstructure and bond strength between metal-ceramic crown, laboratory studies, full text, and in English language. A total of 100 articles were found the initial search and yielded a total of 50 studies, 30 of which did not fulfill the inclusion criteria and were therefore excluded. In addition, 20 studies were found by screening the reference list of all included publications. Finally, 40 studies were selected for this review. The method in question is regulated by powder material characteristics and the conditions of laser processing. The procedure of formation, affecting factors, and the mechanism of the balling effect are very complex.

  1. Key-Phenomenon and Religious Meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomuscio Vincenzo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I develop a phenomenology of religious experience through the notion of keyphenomenon. My analysis moves from a general phenomenology of situation, in which we have to relate different phenomena according to a sense. What does “according to a sense” mean? My suggestion is that we should look for a relationship among these data when we find a key-phenomenon (among a series of phenomena that would enlighten all the others. This key-phenomenon would show a non-phenomenal meaning which would make all the others understandable. Each other datum, therefore, becomes the witness of invisible meaning through a key-witness. The key-phenomenon we choose determines the role (i.e., the truth of each datum within its situation. This phenomenological relationship belongs to both the sense of day-life situations, and that one of possible religious situations. If the religious interpretation of a situation depends on our choice of key-phenomenon, or key-witness, we have to define what kind of keyphenomenon constitutes a religious intuition.

  2. Flocculation phenomenon of a mutant flocculent Saccharomyces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flocculation phenomenon of a mutant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain: Effects of metal ions, sugars, temperature, pH, protein-denaturants and ... was in the early stationary growth phase, which coincided with glucose depletion in the batch fermentation for the production of ethanol from kitchen refuse medium.

  3. Koebner's phenomenon in vitiligo: European position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geel, Nanja; Speeckaert, Reinhart; Taieb, Alain; Picardo, Mauro; Böhm, Markus; Gawkrodger, David J.; Schallreuter, Karin; Bennett, Dorothy C.; van der Veen, Wietze; Whitton, Maxine; Moretti, Silvia; Westerhof, Wiete; Ezzedine, Khaled; Gauthier, Yvon

    2011-01-01

    P>Koebner's phenomenon (KP) has been observed in a number of skin diseases, including vitiligo. Its clinical significance in vitiligo with respect to disease activity and course is still debatable, while its relevance for surgical techniques has been demonstrated in some reports. We present a

  4. Overeducation: A Short or Long Run Phenomenon for Individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubb, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Examines whether overeducation is a short-run or long-run phenomenon for individuals. Finds that for some individuals overeducation is not just a short-run phenomenon, but a permanent, multiyear phenomenon. (Contains 23 references.) (PKP)

  5. Island Lives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Heinz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2010-2011, the Vancouver Island Transgender Needs Assessment, a community-based, applied research project, sought to identify the health and social needs of trans people on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. An advisory board consisting of trans-identified community members and trans-service providers guided this descriptive analysis. A total of 54 individuals identifying as transgender participated in a survey modeled after the TransPULSE Ontario instrument. Of the participants, 43% identified on the transmasculine spectrum, 39% on the transfeminine spectrum, and 18% as transgender/genderqueer only. Participants were surveyed in regard to education, employment, and income; housing; health care needs and services; suicidality; violence; life satisfaction and attitudes toward self; posttransition experiences; and community belonging. They reported health care, social support, and public education/acceptance as top needs. The article concludes with a specific needs profile and a community-generated set of recommendations stressing the need for an island-based information and resourcing center.

  6. Development, Testing, and Application of a Coupled Hydrodynamic Surface-Water/Groundwater Model (FTLOADDS) with Heat and Salinity Transport in the Ten Thousand Islands/Picayune Strand Restoration Project Area, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Eric D.; Decker, Jeremy D.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model application was developed for the coastal area inland of the Ten Thousand Islands (TTI) in southwestern Florida using the Flow and Transport in a Linked Overland/Aquifer Density-Dependent System (FTLOADDS) model. This model couples a two-dimensional dynamic surface-water model with a three-dimensional groundwater model, and has been applied to several locations in southern Florida. The model application solves equations for salt transport in groundwater and surface water, and also simulates surface-water temperature using a newly enhanced heat transport algorithm. One of the purposes of the TTI application is to simulate hydrologic factors that relate to habitat suitability for the West Indian Manatee. Both salinity and temperature have been shown to be important factors for manatee survival. The inland area of the TTI domain is the location of the Picayune Strand Restoration Project, which is designed to restore predevelopment hydrology through the filling and plugging of canals, construction of spreader channels, and the construction of levees and pump stations. The effects of these changes are simulated to determine their effects on manatee habitat. The TTI application utilizes a large amount of input data for both surface-water and groundwater flow simulations. These data include topography, frictional resistance, atmospheric data including rainfall and air temperature, aquifer properties, and boundary conditions for tidal levels, inflows, groundwater heads, and salinities. Calibration was achieved by adjusting the parameters having the largest uncertainty: surface-water inflows, the surface-water transport dispersion coefficient, and evapotranspiration. A sensitivity analysis did not indicate that further parameter changes would yield an overall improvement in simulation results. The agreement between field data from GPS-tracked manatees and TTI application results demonstrates that the model can predict the salinity and temperature

  7. Condensation phenomenon detection through surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Joyce; Al Masri, Mostafa; Veillas, Colette; Celle, Frédéric; Cioulachtjian, Serge; Verrier, Isabelle; Lefèvre, Frédéric; Parriaux, Olivier; Jourlin, Yves

    2017-10-02

    The aim of this work is to optically detect the condensation of acetone vapor on an aluminum plate cooled down in a two-phase environment (liquid/vapor). Sub-micron period aluminum based diffraction gratings with appropriate properties, exhibiting a highly sensitive plasmonic response, were successfully used for condensation experiments. A shift in the plasmonic wavelength resonance has been measured when acetone condensation on the aluminum surface takes place due to a change of the surrounding medium close to the surface, demonstrating that the surface modification occurs at the very beginning of the condensation phenomenon. This paper presents important steps in comprehending the incipience of condensate droplet and frost nucleation (since both mechanisms are similar) and thus to control the phenomenon by using an optimized engineered surface.

  8. Phenomenon of displacement in Arabic language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Displacement is one of the characteristics of language and common phenomena in the Arabic language. Not only is this phenomenon limited to Arabic poetry and prose, but it is also broadened, so we can see examples of this in the Qur'an. Because of this phenomenon extensively in Arabic literature and also because of its essence that leads to the transmission of the elements for the first visibility to the other visibility in the sentence and sometimes had to change the grammatical role of the words, its identify helps us in a better understanding of text and the correct translation of it and protects the reader from mistakes. This paper in the descriptive analytical approach tries studying of the phenomenon of the displacement in the Arabic language and bringing its instances in Arabic poetry and prose as well as verses contained in the Holy Quran, to show that through the types and characteristics in the Arabic language and to response to several questions, including: how important is the displacement and what is its types in rhetoric, and the reasons of the displacement, and etc... Of the most important results of this study may refer to the undeniable role of the displacement as a rhetorical method to better understanding of the texts including: one of the most important reasons of the displacement in the use of language is to improve speech verbally and morally, and violation of the standard language and create a poetic atmosphere, and the recognition of the occurrence of the phenomenon of displacement in the Arabic language that uphold different interpretations remote and estimates when faced with the displacement in the text and help us to understand it and etc...

  9. Multiplayer computer games as youth's leisure phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    HADERKOVÁ, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    The thesis is dedicated to multiplayer computer games as youth's leisure phenomenon of this time. The theoretical part is focused on computer games history, multiplayer computer games and their types, gaming platforms, community of multiplayer games players and potential negatives and positives, which follows from playing this type of games. The practical part contains a qualitative survey using interviews with multiplayer computer games players aged from 15 to 26 years from city of České Bud...

  10. What Is Heat? Inquiry regarding the Science of Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascoe, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This lab activity uses inquiry to help students define heat. It is generic in that it can be used to introduce a plethora of science content across middle and high school grade levels and across science disciplines that include biology, Earth and space science, and physical science. Even though heat is a universal science phenomenon that is…

  11. The Migration Phenomenon in Republic of Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Neacsu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Migration is a phenomenon which experienced an unprecedented scale in the last twenty years. The socio-geo-political and economic changes which took place in Europe after 1990 led to an influx of people from east to west. Most often those who left their countries came from among the former socialist countries. This paper is a continuation of a study published last year entitled “Employment of Labor Force in Albania and Moldova - Evolution and Trends” in which was made a” snapshot “of the labor situation in the two countries aspiring to accede to the European Union. In this paper, we focused on the Republic of Moldova as Romania’s neighbor, followed by a future study to address the phenomenon of migration in Albania. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the phenomenon of migration from the Republic of Moldova and its immediate consequences upon Romania and the European Union. The hypothesis from which we started this study is that: Romania, as a friend and neighbor country of the Republic of Moldova, attracts a large number of Moldovan citizens who become full citizens, Romanian or of other nationalities in the EU. The study was conducted during 2001-2010 and was based on: the census in Moldova in 2004 (last done in this country, information from the National Bureau of Statistics of the Republic of Moldova, the statistical database respectively, and information processed from the Romanian Statistical Yearbook 2008.

  12. Phenomenon of political actionism in modern society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Bavykina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Political actionism is the fenomen in social and art space, that appeared in middle of XX century as the practice of critic and protest with using different artistic methods and techniques. Political actionism as art and political tradition exist in postsoviet space, especially in Russia where actionism appeared in 1990 years and develops for actually days. In other countries this phenomenon not such systematic.  But analyze and compare actions in different countries appears the possibility to understand social and cultural context, their difference and similarity. Actionism is a reaction to external public, social and political situation, but its appearance more like the symptom of some problem than its critic or display – traditional approaches in art.  Appearance of actionism also connected with inability of manifestation of personal and civil liberty, that’s why in actions liberty affairs in such radical and hyperbolized forms. First volume of Russian political actionism began in 1990 years (Oleg Kulik, Alexander Brener, Anatoly Osmolovsky etc. and Second volume in 2010 (art-group Voina, Pussy Riot, Pyotr Pavlensky. This process not only a transformation of artistic and traditional space, but also modification of reaction on social and political situation. Actionism becomes a source of new type of knowledge, that give a possibility to see the habitual reality from another side and find in it new pointes and concepts. Political actionism contracting own interpretation of already well-established phenomenon. Usual concepts of liberty, authority, social control are deconstructed in actions. Those destructions of reality and cultural reorientation destroys traditional imposed patterns of interaction and social structure. But new views, that appeared in daily life from actions, often has mistaken interpretations. Exist a problem about identification of actions, its correct interpretations and understanding of its causes. In article was

  13. Gauge fixing and the gibbs phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandula, Jeffrey E.

    1999-03-01

    We address the question of why global gauge fixing, specifically to the lattice Landau gauge, becomes an extremely lengthy process for large lattices. We construct an artificial "gauge-fixing" problem which has the essential features encountered in actuality. In the limit in which the size of the system to be gauge fixed becomes infinite, the problem becomes equivalent to finding a series expansion in functions which are related to the Jacobi polynomials. The series converges slowly, as expected. It also converges non-uniformly, which is an observed characteristic of gauge fixing. In the limiting example, the non-uniformity arises through the Gibbs phenomenon.

  14. Gauge fixing and the gibbs phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandula, Jeffrey E

    1999-03-01

    We address the question of why global gauge fixing, specifically to the lattice Landau gauge, becomes an extremely lengthy process for large lattices. We construct an artificial 'gauge-fixing' problem which has the essential features encountered in actuality. In the limit in which the size of the system to be gauge fixed becomes infinite, the problem becomes equivalent to finding a series expansion in functions which are related to the Jacobi polynomials. The series converges slowly, as expected. It also converges non-uniformly, which is an observed characteristic of gauge fixing. In the limiting example, the non-uniformity arises through the Gibbs phenomenon.

  15. Computer Games as a New Media Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Rylich, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Computer Games as a New Media Phenomenon Jan Rylich 1 1 [ T H E S I S ] Jan Rylich Abstract: This thesis is focused on the development of computer games and video games, evolution of gaming and game technologies and their impact on our society. In addition to an important historical context and practical and theoretical analysis of game genres and potential of games, key chapters of this thesis are devoted to the importance of games and their impact on various aspects of our lives, from econo...

  16. Experimental investigations of the ozone zero phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, K.; Matsumura, N.; Taguchi, M.; Katoh, Y.; Teranishi, K.; Suzuki, S.; Itoh, H.

    2009-08-01

    An experimental study is carried out to clarify the mechanism of the ozone zero phenomenon. Temporal variations of both the discharge characteristics and the metallic electrode surface in the ozone generator are investigated by the Lissajous figure method and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), respectively. The AES results suggest that a number of oxygen atoms penetrate into the stainless-steel electrode owing to the exposure to ozone. Such a surface change would result in the temporal variation of the discharge characteristics of the generator.

  17. Youth slang is the linguistic interesting phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Barannyk, E.; Vereshchak, A.; Malyi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Raising of problem. That such the Ukrainian youth slang? He is named now the interesting linguistic phenomenon existence of that limit not only by certain age–old scopes, as it clear from his name, but also by social, temporal, spatial scopes. He exists mainly in the environment of young people, that studies, but is clear for other.Analysis of previous researches. The problem of youth slang plenty of scientific works is sanctified to: to research of Ukrainian–language slangy and substandard v...

  18. Acoustical phenomenon in ancient Totonac's monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Ha˚Kansson, Andreas; Cervera, Francisco; Meseguer, Francisco; Manzanares-Martínez, Betsabé; Ramos-Mendieta, Felipe

    2004-05-01

    The circle of gladiators is a monument built by Totonac Indians in the ceremonial site of Cempoala, which is located near Veracruz (Mexico). The city is believed to date to around 1200 A.D. The monument is a round structure with crenellated wall tops, and it has a diameter of 13.4 m. Though the deterioration of this monument is noticeable, it presents a singular acoustical phenomenon whose strength had to be probably extraordinary on the date of its construction. In brief, along any diameter in the circle, one can find two focal points such that if one person speaks on one focus, another person located on the other hears the sound reinforced. In other words, this circular place acoustically behaves as if it were elliptical. Here, we report the experimental characterization of the phenomenon and present a theoretical explanation. Also, the intentionality of the Totonacs is speculated since these people are associated with the Mayan culture, which is known by its realizations of environments with astonishing sonic properties. [Work supported by CEAL-UAM of Spain.

  19. Completion Phenomenon in Transcortical Sensory Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Nakagawa

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated completion phenomenon for proverbs in cases demonstrating transcortical sensory aphasia due to a variety of diseases. Lack of this completion was exclusively observed in patients with focal atrophy. These patients showed a selective and consistent impairment in word comprehension without phonemic cue effects in naming. The completion phenomenon was present in patients demonstrating transcortical sensory aphasia due to other cerebral diseases. In these patients, comprehension deficits were not selective for words, or words not comprehended were inconsistent and some phonemic cue effects were observed. In a previous study, we reported that completion phenomena for multiplication tables, serial numbers and names of days were frequently noted in patients with focal atrophy. Together with the present findings, these results suggest that lack of proverb completion may be attributed to a selective, systematic and complete loss of the meaning representations for language units such as words and proverbs. In addition, pathological processes of focal atrophy with temporal predominance might selectively affect the semantic memory for language as a unit.

  20. Completion phenomenon in transcortical sensory aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Y; Tanabe, H; Ikeda, M; Kazui, H; Ito, K; Inoue, N; Hatakenaka, Y; Sawada, T; Ikeda, H; Shiraishi, J

    1993-01-01

    We investigated completion phenomenon for proverbs in cases demonstrating transcortical sensory aphasia due to a variety of diseases. Lack of this completion was exclusively observed in patients with focal atrophy. These patients showed a selective and consistent impairment in word comprehension without phonemic cue effects in naming. The completion phenomenon was present in patients demonstrating transcortical sensory aphasia due to other cerebral diseases. In these patients, comprehension deficits were not selective for words, or words not comprehended were inconsistent and some phonemic cue effects were observed. In a previous study, we reported that completion phenomena for multiplication tables, serial numbers and names of days were frequently noted in patients with focal atrophy. Together with the present findings, these results suggest that lack of proverb completion may be attributed to a selective, systematic and complete loss of the meaning representations for language units such as words and proverbs. In addition, pathological processes of focal atrophy with temporal predominance might selectively affect the semantic memory for language as a unit.

  1. The happy victimizer phenomenon: Not found here

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevtić Ana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Children’s attribution of emotions to a moral transgressor is an important research topic in the psychology of moral and emotional development. This is especially because of the so-called Happy Victimizer Phenomenon (HVP where younger children attribute positive emotions to a moral transgressor described in a story. In the two studies that we have conducted (children aged 5, 7 and 9, 20 of each age; 10 of each age in the second study we have tested the possible influence of the fear of sanctions and the type of transgression (stealing and inflicting body injuries on the attribution of emotions. Children were presented with stories that described transgressions and they were asked to answer how the transgressor felt. The fear of sanctions did not make a significant difference in attribution but the type of transgression did - more negative emotions were attributed for inflicting body injuries than for stealing. Positive emotions were explained with situational-instrumental explanations in 84% of cases while negative emotions were explained with moral explanations in 63,5%. Girls attributed more positive emotions (61% than boys (39%. However, our main finding was that, for the aforementioned age groups, we did not find the HVP effect although it has regularly been registered in foreign studies. This finding denies the generalizability of the phenomenon and points to the significance of disciplining styles and, even more so, culture for children’s attribution of emotions to moral transgressors.

  2. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Shea Rose, Leanna

    2007-06-14

    Data on materials and surface types that comprise a city, i.e. urban fabric, are needed in order to estimate the effects of light-colored surfaces (roofs and pavements) and urban vegetation (trees, grass, shrubs) on the meteorology and air quality of a city. We discuss the results of a semi-automatic statistical approach used to develop data on surface-type distribution and urban-fabric makeup using aerial color orthophotography, for four metropolitan areas of Chicago, IL, Houston, TX, Sacramento, CA, and Salt Lake City, UT. The digital high resolution (0.3 to 0.5-m) aerial photographs for each of these metropolitan areas covers representative urban areas ranging from 30 km{sup 2} to 52 km{sup 2}. Major land-use types examined included: commercial, residential, industrial, educational, and transportation. On average, for the metropolitan areas studied, vegetation covers about 29-41% of the area, roofs 19-25%, and paved surfaces 29-39%. For the most part, trees shade streets, parking lots, grass, and sidewalks. At ground level, i.e., view from below the tree canopies, vegetation covers about 20-37% of the area, roofs 20-25%, and paved surfaces 29-36%.

  3. Improving Heat Health Resilience through Urban Infrastructure Planning and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    This webinar will explore ways in which public health and environmental agencies can collaborate to reduce the heat island effect, increase resilience to extreme heat events, and help each other further their respective missions.

  4. Island Formation: Constructing a Coral Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Heather; Edd, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    The process of coral island formation is often difficult for middle school students to comprehend. Coral island formation is a dynamic process, and students should have the opportunity to experience this process in a synergistic context. The authors provide instructional guidelines for constructing a coral island. Students play an interactive role…

  5. Nothingness and the placebo effect phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine

    The placebo effect is a pharmacological conundrum, since it is a medical effect that is produced by “nothing” because no pharmacologically active substance is present in placebo. Placebo has, among other things, been defined as an inert substance, often a calcium pill. Simultaneously it presents...... a psychophysiological challenge in the question of what it is exactly that the subject reacts to. In other words, the relation between the subject and the placebo is a precarious one. There is a vast amount of literature on the placebo effect, and it has been studied as a separate field of investigation since the late...... 1940’ies, mainly for pre-elimination from medical trials. It has been studied as an effect of personality traits, as an expectational effect, and as a psychophysiological phenomenon. Through history "Placebo reactants" have been labelled, difficult, simple minded and hypochondriacs. But all attempts...

  6. The Phenomenon of the Urban Mummy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Brett E; Wolf, Barbara C

    2015-11-01

    The environmental mummification of a body in an urban setting is an unusual event. Florida is known for its high temperatures and humidity, which typically result in the rapid putrefaction of bodies. However, under certain circumstances, Florida's climate provides an environment suitable for mummification, typically in isolated areas. We previously reported a case of a homicide/suicide in a residential neighborhood in which the mummified remains were undetected for several years. We have subsequently encountered two additional cases in which mummified bodies were discovered in urban settings. Presented in the historical context of the environmental conditions and postmortem processes involved in mummification, these cases illustrate the particular constellation of human behaviors and scenarios, as well as environmental conditions, which must coincide for this phenomenon to occur and highlight the necessity of the multidisciplinary approach to the medicolegal investigation of such deaths and the determination of the cause and manner of death. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Reading the Historical Phenomenon of Australian Bushrangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohanes Hartadi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Outlaws in their various images have been important parts of history. In Australia, the longest lasting image of outlaws is the bushranger. Despite its popularity, there is a range of depictions of bushrangers and these are not necessarily similar. Interpretation of the bushrangers in colonial time differs from contemporary imagining. This papers aims at unfolding the various interpretations of the bushrangers in different periods in many types of artifact. Information was collected and interpreted by library research. The artifact analysis will be seen through a postmodernism theory by Michel Foucault and Roland Barthes. Since the phenomenon of bushranger stemmed from the colonial period, this study will commence from the period up to contemporary period. It can be concluded that a study of the different periods finds out that knowledge of the bushrangers does not make up a linear history, but rather a discontinuity in the historical narratives. 

  8. PUBLIC RELATIONS AS AN INFORMATION PROCESS PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TKACH L. M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Formulation of the problem. If public relations as a phenomenon of information management are examined, we deal with the question of knowledge content and nature of relationship of PR with environment, ability to manage the perception and attitude of people to events in the environment; ensure priority of information over other resources. Goal. To investigate the concept of "public relations" of foreign and domestic experts; consider the typology of the public and the "laws" of public opinion; define the basic principles according to which relations with public should be built, and to identify PR activities as a kind of social communication. Conclusions. Public relations on the basis of advanced information and communication technologies create fundamentally new opportunities for information control and influence on public consciousness.

  9. [Electroencephalographic characteristics of the deja vu phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, P N; Cherviakov, A V; Gnezdinsiĭ, V V

    2013-01-01

    Déjà vu (DV, from French "already seen") is an aberration of psychic activity associated with transitory erroneous perception of novel circumstances, objects, or people as already known. An aim of the study was to investigate EEG characteristics of DV in patients with epilepsy. We studied 166 people (63.2% women, mean age 25.17±9.19 years). The DV phenomenon was studied in patients (27 people) and in a control group (139 healthy people). Patients were interviewed for DV characteristics and underwent a long (12-16 h) ambulatory EEG-monitoring study. In EEG, DV episodes in patients began with polyspike activity in the right temporal lobe and, in some cases, ended with the slow-wave theta-delta activity in the right hemisphere.

  10. War as a Social-Psychological Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Natolochnaya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes war as a social-psychological phenomenon. The author dwells upon the difficulties of war veterans’ shift from military to peaceful life. The primary sources for this work are letters, diaries, and memoirs by World War II servicemen and veterans. The author concludes the article by pointing out that the capacity for survival in the extreme conditions of the early post-war years had been buoyed up both by post-victory optimism and hopes engendered by it and the need to withstand post-war hardship – an unsettled everyday life, famine, disease, and crime. Amid all this, Soviet society exhibited a great capacity for life, which testified to its considerable mobilization potential.

  11. Physics of cryogenics an ultralow temperature phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2018-01-01

    Physics of Cryogenics: An Ultralow Temperature Phenomenon discusses the significant number of advances that have been made during the last few years in a variety of cryocoolers, such as Brayton, Joule-Thomson, Stirling, pulse tube, Gifford-McMahon and magnetic refrigerators. The book reviews various approaches taken to improve reliability, a major driving force for new research areas. The advantages and disadvantages of different cycles are compared, and the latest improvements in each of these cryocoolers is discussed. The book starts with the thermodynamic fundamentals, followed by the definition of cryogenic and the associated science behind low temperature phenomena and properties. This book is an ideal resource for scientists, engineers and graduate and senior undergraduate students who need a better understanding of the science of cryogenics and related thermodynamics.

  12. Ethnic consciousness: theoretical construct and mental phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Erokhina

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of concepts of ethnicity as they were developed in Russian science in the 20th and 21st centuries, in their interconnection with foreign doctrines of nationalism. Studies on this issue are important for understanding the role of mental phenomena in the processes of ethnic mobilization, the importance of ethnic consciousness and ethnic identity for building positive inter-ethnic relations. At the moment, the conceptions of ethnic mentality, ethnic consciousness and ethnic identity are often used terminologically inaccurately, most often as synonyms of human awareness of the process of reproduction of the ethnicity. Soviet scholars first mentioned the importance of consciousness as ethnic determinant back in 1940s (P. Kushner and then in 1960s (S. Tokarev, Yu. Bromley. But the main body of studies in ethnicity theory usually relied on the formational principle which categorized ethnic communities by stages of their development (tribes, nationalities, nations. Until 1970s, self-consciousness was not put on the list of ethno-forming features. However, there was a confrontation between supporters of a creative and a conservative interpretation of Marxism. In the 1970s, Yu. Bromley recognized ethnicity (without classification into stages as an object of ethnographic research, independent from ideological doctrines. Soviet theory of ethnos was close to Western concepts of ethnicity (F. Bart. In the 1990s, Russian ethnology saw the rise of the theory of ethnic processuality (V.A. Tishkov. In this article, the author treats ethnic and national self-consciousness as a phenomenon of collective (supra-individual consciousness, and ethnic identity, as a personality-based phenomenon. The author concludes that ethnic self-consciousness is an element within ethnic mentality, which also includes other categories, such as ‘the Other’, Space, Time, Material World, Social Organization and other significant universals of culture.

  13. Prussian phenomenon and its historical distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Y. Plenkov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the phenomenon of Prussia. Once, Prussia had been the largest continental Protestant state in Europe. The main issue of this phenomenon is that upon the tragic events of the World War II Prussian history and heritage had been considerably distorted, in order to compensate somehow for the dreadful casualties suffered by the victorious powers. The common European misconception implied that Prussia had been the bulwark of militarism, and therefore had to bear all the responsibility for the atrocities of war. Unfortunately, the majority of modern German historians share such misinterpretation of Prussian heritage in order to please false political correctness, perhaps, as an act of contrition for National Socialism and its crimes. However, the Prussian tradition and history go far beyond this militarism, and this article explains what ways. The authors believe that there should not be any prejudices and biases, that any subject should be examined sine ira et studio. Moreover, given that it is possible to characterize the Great French Revolution as a juristic one, and the Great October revolution – as a social one, the Prussian revolution “from above”, led by the first representatives of the Hohenzollern family, may be well considered as a pedagogical revolution. This revolution did bring definitely positive changes; they are surveyed in the article. The French Revolution has not eliminated the covetousness of the bourgeoisie after 1789; despotism of the authorities and people’s passiveness similarly have remained unaltered in Russia after 1917. On the contrary, Federal Republic of Germany of nowadays, distinctive for its law, order and effective responsible government is unthinkable without Prussian heritage.

  14. SUBJECTIVE RESOURCESTHE PSYCHOLOGICAL AND ACMEOLOGICAL PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ivanovna Ilyushina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the moment the subject – resources of a person. Be caused, “loss” possible resources: lack of personal self-realization, the maladjustment of the individual in a social environment, obstructed line of identity, which in some cases is accompanied by incomplete personal self-actualization and self-sufficiency. The article emphasizes the importance of the subjective component in understanding, identifying, understanding, mobilization, conservation and accumulation of resources of the individual. Man is an active Converter to your reality, where he and reality are the result of the conversion and source conversion. The author proposed the concept of “subjective resource” as a necessary factor for quality of life of the individual, achievement of tops of her self-improvement and self-development, both professionally and personally. Subjective component emphasizes the role of the individual in the conservation, transformation, accumulation, the reallocation of resources. Purpose. The subject of analysis is the awareness, understanding person own resources – the subjective resourcest. The author aims to describe the subjective resourcest as psychological and acmeological phenomenon to reveal its essence and to suggest the methodology of the study of this phenomenon, showing the importance of verbalization resources through associative image without relying on the visibility and relying on her. Methodology. The basis of the study form a General theoretical methods (theoretical analysis, including psychological analysis, generalization, systematization, system description. Results. The results of the work lies in the fact that the author has defined the concept of “subjective resourcesthe” and proposed methodology of the study. The obtained results may be of interest to improve the efficiency of the work to define the resources of the individual. The results and method of determining a subjective resource

  15. Island studies as a decolonial project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaso Nadarajah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of colonialism influenced the cultures, economies, and politics of the majority of the world’s population. The subsequent decolonization process has likewise had profound affects on colonized societies. Island societies undergoing decolonization face many of the same pressures and challenges as do mainland societies, yet island spatiality and the history of island colonization itself has left former and present-day island colonies with distinctive colonial legacies. From the Caribbean to the Arctic to the Pacific to the Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean, colonial and decolonial processes are creating tensions between maintenance of the culture of indigenous peoples, economic development, cultivation of cultural heritage, political modernization, status on the global stage, democratic governance, and educational achievement. We call for an island studies perspective on decolonization, emphasizing the importance of appropriately positioning expert knowledge relative to the needs of colonized and indigenous peoples and highlighting the pitfalls of neocolonialsim. We thus lay the groundwork for island studies as a decolonial project.

  16. Surface thermal analysis of North Brabant cities and neighbourhoods during heat waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyre Echevarria Icaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island effect is often associated with large metropolises. However, in the Netherlands even small cities will be affected by the phenomenon in the future (Hove et al., 2011, due to the dispersed or mosaic urbanisation patterns in particularly the southern part of the country: the province of North Brabant. This study analyses the average night time land surface temperature (LST of 21 North-Brabant urban areas through 22 satellite images retrieved by Modis 11A1 during the 2006 heat wave and uses Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper to map albedo and normalized difference temperature index (NDVI values. Albedo, NDVI and imperviousness are found to play the most relevant role in the increase of night-time LST. The surface cover cluster analysis of these three parameters reveals that the 12 “urban living environment” categories used in the region of North Brabant can actually be reduced to 7 categories, which simplifies the design guidelines to improve the surface thermal behaviour of the different neighbourhoods thus reducing the Urban Heat Island (UHI effect in existing medium size cities and future developments adjacent to those cities.

  17. Dispute Resolutions Sea Border Between the Province of Bangka Belitung Islands in Riau Islands Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoko Sulistyono

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted and based on the existence of “persistence” claims of the province of Bangka Belitung islands and Riau islands province that seven islands groups, which is disputes region territory. Therefore, this study would be likely to provide a solution in resolving the dispute between the two provinces. This study uses qualitative methods with descriptive analytical approach. This method is used, because the phenomenon of inter-regional constellation boundary disputes (including sea boundary is considered to be multidimensional. The data were taken from both the research field of primary data and secondary data, conducted through in-depth interviews with selected key informants and field observations, and combined with the study of literature through a search of the authentic evidence disputes the relevant past. Government (the Ministry of Home Affairs should immediately resolves disputes in the sea boundary segment cluster seven islands involving the provincial government Bangka Belitung islands and Riau islands provincial government with reference to the four approaches, namely: a the historical side; b juridical side; c side of the rule; d the social side of the culture. And coupled with the desire not to deny the people who live on the islands so expect to be appreciated by the government well.

  18. Empirical Study on the Creative Accounting Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cernusca Lucian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyze the accounting professionals’ point of view as opposed to the students and master students’ one, regarding the creative accounting phenomenon existence and manifestation forms. In order to accomplish this objective, there has been used the poll/investigation, as a research method and the questionnaire, as a research instrument. Within the study, there is suggested the testing of more hypotheses that contribute to the clarifying of the aspects wished to be analyzed through the research. These hypotheses’ acceptance or rejection is based on the „chi-square“ (Karl Pearson statistical test and rank ordering method. Trying to elaborate a global conclusion of the questionnaire, there could be noticed the fact that over 50% from the questioned accounting students are not tempted to use the creative accounting practices and techniques in order to optimize the taxation without breaking the actual law regulations. At the opposite side, more than a half from the questioned accounting professionals would use these practices without breaking the law regulations that lead to the taxation’s optimization. The creative accounting has a negative connotation if the accurate image of the financial position and of the performance is not targeted because it represents the essential factor for elaborating and grounding the accounting policies. However, the positive side of the creative accounting is not excluded, given that one appeals to the „fair“ professional judgment of the accounting professionals and to the good faith of managers.

  19. The Outsider Phenomenon in Teenage Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuminskya E.A.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of outsidership in groups of younger and older adolescents. We assumed that there are personal qualities that distinguish outsiders from other students, which allows us to speak of outsidership as a separate group and personal phenomenon. The study involved 246 students of Moscow schools of younger and older adolescents, 60 of whom took an outsider position in the group. To test the hypothesis were used: a personal questionnaire for adolescents HSPQ (R. Cattell, questionnaire Emin to determine the level of emotional intelligence (D.V. Lyusin, the technique of " Suggestibility " (O.E. Rybakov. To identify statistical differences, the Student's t-test and the Mann-Whitney U-test were used, p ≤ 0.05. The results of the study showed that outsiders of adolescence are indeed characterized by a number of personal characteristics that distinguish them from their peers. Differences in personal characteristics of outsiders at different stages of adolescence have their own characteristics.

  20. Doctor shopping: a phenomenon of many themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2012-11-01

    Doctor shopping is defined as seeing multiple treatment providers, either during a single illness episode or to procure prescription medications illicitly. According to the available literature, prevalence rates of doctor shopping vary widely, from 6.3 to 56 percent. However, this variability is partially attributable to research methodology, including the study definition of doctor shopping as well as the patient sample. The reasons for doctor shopping are varied. Some patient explanations for this phenomenon relate to clinician factors, such as inconvenient office hours or locations, long waiting times, personal characteristics or qualities of the provider, and/or insufficient communication time between the patient and clinician. Some patient explanations relate to personal factors and include both illness factors (e.g., symptom persistence, lack of understanding or nonacceptance of the diagnosis or treatment) as well as psychological factors (e.g., somatization, prescription drug-seeking). Importantly, not all doctor shopping is driven by suspect motivations. Being aware of these various patient justifications for doctor shopping is important in understanding and managing these challenging patients in the clinical setting, whether they emerge in psychiatric or primary care environments.

  1. Informal worker phenomenon in housing construction project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayaningtyas, Maranatha; Sipan, Ibrahim; Lukiyanto, Kukuh

    2017-11-01

    The informal workers phenomenon on housing construction projects in Indonesia is different from workers in other sectors who would always request as permanent employees. Substantively, the informal workers are disinclined to be bound as permanent employees which different from the general labor paradigm. Hence, the objective of this study is to find out how the labour selection process, the factors that affected their performance, and the suitable wage system to achieve the target completion of housing construction project. The qualitative method is used to uncover and understand the meaning behind the phenomena (numina) of informal workers action and their influence on housing construction project which called phenomenological approach. Five informal workers and two project managers were selected as informants based on predetermined criteria with in-depth interviews. The results showed that the informal worker were more satisfied with the wage based on unit price while working in the housing construction project for the flexibility in working hours. In addition, the developer was also relieved because they only control the quality and the achievement of the project completion time which supported by informal worker leader. Therefore, these findings are beneficial for both of developer and government as policy maker to succeed the housing program in Indonesia.

  2. Priming intelligent behavior: an elusive phenomenon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Shanks

    Full Text Available Can behavior be unconsciously primed via the activation of attitudes, stereotypes, or other concepts? A number of studies have suggested that such priming effects can occur, and a prominent illustration is the claim that individuals' accuracy in answering general knowledge questions can be influenced by activating intelligence-related concepts such as professor or soccer hooligan. In 9 experiments with 475 participants we employed the procedures used in these studies, as well as a number of variants of those procedures, in an attempt to obtain this intelligence priming effect. None of the experiments obtained the effect, although financial incentives did boost performance. A Bayesian analysis reveals considerable evidential support for the null hypothesis. The results conform to the pattern typically obtained in word priming experiments in which priming is very narrow in its generalization and unconscious (subliminal influences, if they occur at all, are extremely short-lived. We encourage others to explore the circumstances in which this phenomenon might be obtained.

  3. The Sexting Phenomenon in Spanish Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Puertas, Vanesa; Gutiérrez-Puertas, Lorena; Aguilera-Manrique, Gabriel; Baños-Martín, María Del Mar; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva; Márquez-Hernández, Verónica V

    2017-08-01

    One of the adverse effects arising among young people who engage in various social practices is the phenomenon of sexting. Sexting involves the production and delivery of sexual content voluntarily and freely and, in many cases, without the consent of the recipient. The aim of this study was to describe the presence of sexting in undergraduate students at the College of Nursing of the University of Almeria in Spain. It is a descriptive cross-sectional quantitative study. A total of 105 undergraduate nursing students completed the sexuality and technology questionnaire. The questionnaire consists of seven dimensions with 59 items. Depending on size, statistically significant differences between the use of social networks and the dimension "sexting actions completed" and the dimension "position on statements about sexting" were found. No statistically significant differences between gender and the practice of sexting were found. The three main reasons for sexting match in both genders, these being "to draw attention," "as a sexy gift," and "to feel sexy." Nursing students associated behaviors to show sexting, being a standard practice, common in both genders. Future research should consider the possible influence of this behavior on future professionals and on the field of nursing.

  4. Observation of MHD phenomenon for SST-1 superconducting tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandarkar, Manisha; Dhongde, Jasraj; Pradhan, Subrata

    2017-04-01

    Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) is a medium size Tokamak (major radius = 1.1 m, minor radius = 0.2 m) and is operational at the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India. In the last few experimental campaigns SST-1 has successfully achieved plasma current in order of 60-70kA and plasma duration in excess of ∼ 500 ms at a central magnetic field of 1.5T. An attempt has made to study the behavior of the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) activity during different phases of plasma pulse which leads to major/minor disruptions, its present modes (poloidal/toroidal mode number i.e. m = 2, n = 1) impact on plasma confinement and signature of lock mode and its frequency in the SST-1 plasma using experimental data from Mirnov signals. Observed MHD phenomenon has also been correlated with other diagnostics (i.e. ECE, Density, Soft X-Ray etc.) and heating system (ECRH) for the recent campaigns of SST-1.

  5. THE BOOK PHENOMENON: (Theoretical-gnoseological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnikov, Mikhail

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Any modern science that knows its object finally moves from a subject to a systemic cognitive level, from unambiguous to having multiple meanings, from linear to hierarchical, from singlemeasured to multi-dimensional, from co-ordination to subordination. The reason for this is to expand the cognitive borders of the object, to receive more knowledge about it and to form a system of this knowledge. Therefore, the subject of cognition changes from the structure and elements of an object to the relations of the elements, laws of organisational systems, the continuum of the interacting categories, specific causes, particularities, foundations and regularities. The complexity of the object of science, its main parameters, attributes and functions cause this process. Therefore, the first condition of cognition is to divide a system into qualitatively coherent entities (elements, parts, structures, attributes, etc.. The dissecting of a complex object into parts and attributes should eliminate the approach to it as to an aggregate of chaotic elements, structures, and particularities. From now on it is approached as a multi-systematic entity, marking relevant system of methodological factors, the limits and levels of the analysis of an object.All this can be applied to a book as to a complex, multi-systemic and multi-dimensional object. The aim of this article is to make an attempt to discuss a book as a theoretical and gnoseological phenomenon, to define the contours of its main qualitative entities. The objective is to distinguish the most important parts of a book as a system and to define their methodological factors.

  6. The Trump phenomenon: An explanation from sociophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galam, Serge

    2017-04-01

    The Trump phenomenon is argued to depart from current populist rise in Europe. According to a model of opinion dynamics from sociophysics the machinery of Trump’s amazing success obeys well-defined counter-intuitive rules. Therefore, his success was in principle predictable from the start. The model uses local majority rule arguments and obeys a threshold dynamics. The associated tipping points are found to depend on the leading collective beliefs, cognitive biases and prejudices of the social group which undertakes the public debate. And here comes the open sesame of the Trump campaign, which develops along two successive steps. During a first moment, Trump’s statement produces a majority of voters against him. But at the same time, according to the model the shocking character of the statement modifies the prejudice balance. In case the prejudice is present even being frozen among voters, the tipping point is lowered at Trump’s benefit. Nevertheless, although the tipping point has been lowered by the activation of frozen prejudices it is instrumental to preserve enough support from openly prejudiced people to be above the threshold. Then, as infuriated voters launch intense debate, occurrence of ties will drive progressively hostile people to shift their voting intention without needing to endorse the statement which has infuriated them. The ongoing debate does drive towards a majority for Trump. The possible Trump victory at November Presidential election is discussed. In particular, the model shows that to eventually win the Presidential election, Trump must not modify his past shocking attitude but to appeal to a different spectrum of frozen prejudices, which are common to both Democrats and Republicans.

  7. Cognitive approach in studying of entrepreneur phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulakovsky T.Yu.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The research indicates that there is no prospect of searching specific entrepreneurial traits that are necessary for conducting successful entrepreneurial activity. It is pointed on the impossibility to fully explain the negative state of domestic business exclusively by the influence of environmental factors. The paper points on the necessity of concentrating the scientific search on the cognitive features of personality, as factors that contribute to success of entrepreneurial activities. It is revealed that the decision-making process directed on problem-solving in entrepreneurial activity, from an entrepreneurial idea to obtaining an appropriate result, cannot be algorithmized. The author points out on the insufficiency of attempts to model cognitive processes of entrepreneurs, in which their cognitive activity is regarded as an information processing system that resembles a computer. The results obtained in the framework of the cognitive approach in studying the phenomenon of the entrepreneur are analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on the features of heuristics and cognitive biases. It is stated that the high levels of uncertainty, novelty, time deficit, information overload and emotional tension facilitate influence of cognitive biases on the cognitive processes of the entrepreneur. The role of «availability heuristic», «anchoring and adjustment heuristic», «confirmation bias», «hindsight bias» and self-efficacy in making decisions about starting an entrepreneurial activity are considered. The article points to the role of «belief in the law of small numbers» and the illusion of control in establishing optimistic bias (overly positive self-esteem, excessive optimism about future plans and events that lead to reducing the subjective perception of entrepreneurial risk.

  8. Classifying Pacific islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Patrick D.; Kumar, Lalit; Eliot, Ian; McLean, Roger F.

    2016-12-01

    An earth-science-based classification of islands within the Pacific Basin resulted from the preparation of a database describing the location, area, and type of 1779 islands, where island type is determined as a function of the prevailing lithology and maximum elevation of each island, with an island defined as a discrete landmass composed of a contiguous land area ≥1 ha (0.01 km2) above mean high-water level. Reefs lacking islands and short-lived (vulnerability to various disasters, coastal erosion, or ocean pollution as well as human populations, built infrastructure and natural resources.

  9. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and ... having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - Slow down. Avoid strenuous ...

  10. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Astronomers studying archival data from an Australian radio telescope have discovered a powerful, short-lived burst of radio waves that they say indicates an entirely new type of astronomical phenomenon. Region of Strong Radio Burst Visible-light (negative greyscale) and radio (contours) image of Small Magellanic Cloud and area where burst originated. CREDIT: Lorimer et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file ( 114 KB) "This burst appears to have originated from the distant Universe and may have been produced by an exotic event such as the collision of two neutron stars or the death throes of an evaporating black hole," said Duncan Lorimer, Assistant Professor of Physics at West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The research team led by Lorimer consists of Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University in Australia, Maura McLaughlin of WVU and NRAO, David Narkevic of WVU, and Fronefield Crawford of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The astronomers announced their findings in the September 27 issue of the online journal Science Express. The startling discovery came as WVU undergraduate student David Narkevic re-analyzed data from observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud made by the 210-foot Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The data came from a survey of the Magellanic Clouds that included 480 hours of observations. "This survey had sought to discover new pulsars, and the data already had been searched for the type of pulsating signals they produce," Lorimer said. "We re-examined the data, looking for bursts that, unlike the usual ones from pulsars, are not periodic," he added. The survey had covered the Magellanic Clouds, a pair of small galaxies in orbit around our own Milky Way Galaxy. Some 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Magellanic Clouds are prominent features in the Southern sky. Ironically, the new discovery is not part of these galaxies, but rather is much more distant

  11. Marion Island and Prince Edward Island

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    yellow-nosed albatross Thalassarche carteri breed at. Marion Island. Of the remaining species, the lesser or black-faced sheathbill Chionis minor breeds at both islands, but is not strictly a seabird. It is one of two sheathbills that to- gether constitute the family Chionidae. Sheathbills for- age within seabird, especially penguin, ...

  12. Researching Pacific island livelihoods:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund Christensen, Andreas; Mertz, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Small island literature is vast in focus and aim, and is rooted in many different disciplines. The challenge is to find common grounds for researching small islands conceptually and theoretically. The aim of this article is to comment on how to research small islands, including a discussion...... and interdisciplinary in focus and link socio-economic and ecological processes of small island societies at temporal and analytical scales....

  13. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - Bahamas (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-02-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the electricity generation or reduction technologies, including solar hot water heating, available to the Commonwealth of the Bahamas - a country consisting of more than 700 islands, cays, and islets - of which only 30 are actually inhabited. Heating and transportation fuels are not addressed.

  14. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - St. Lucia (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-02-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the electricity generation or reduction technologies, including solar hot water heating, available to Saint Lucia, one of six Caribbean countries that make up the Windward Islands - the southern arc of the Lesser Antilles chain - at the eastern end of the Caribbean Sea. Heating and transportation fuels are not addressed.

  15. Influence of atmospheric phenomenon in the evaluation of solar plate collectors efficiency; Influencia de los episodios de calima en la evaluacion de la eficiencia de captadores solares planos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, R. P.

    2004-07-01

    Canary Islands are occasionally affected by an atmospheric phenomenon produced when a haze of sand or dust microscope particles filled the atmosphere. It can be as light as mist or as thick as smog. This paper describes the influence of this phenomenon in the thermal performance of already installed solar collectors and in the results of efficiency tests (according to EN-12975-2), which are necessary in order to calculate the efficiency curve. The Solar Collector Test Laboratory of Canary Islands Institute of Technology has verified that this phenomenon is sometimes compatible with the climatic conditions detailed in EN 12975-2. This study is made with the purpose of assure the test results. (Author)

  16. Raynaud's phenomenon of the nipple associated with labetalol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Naomi; Cording, Vicky

    2013-02-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon of the nipple is an unusual cause of severe nipple pain. Precipitants for Raynaud's phenomenon of the nipple are known to be cold temperatures, caffeine, and emotional stress. Nipple pain is quoted as the most common cause of cessation of breastfeeding. It is important that lactation consultants and other health care professionals are aware of Raynaud's phenomenon of the nipple and the treatment options available. This is a case of a 37-year-old woman, Gravida 2, Para 1, who was first seen in the antenatal clinic at 34 weeks gestation. A diagnosis of Raynaud's phenomenon of the nipple was made after she began taking labetalol for pregnancy-induced hypertension. The phenomenon had occurred in both of her previous pregnancies on commencing labetalol and resolved postnatally on cessation of the drug. We aim to raise awareness of both the condition itself and the potential role of labetalol in the development of Raynaud's phenomenon of the nipple.

  17. Determination of Ground Heat Exchangers Temperature Field in Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhurmilova, I.; Shtym, A.

    2017-11-01

    For the heating and cooling supply of buildings and constructions geothermal heat pumps using low-potential ground energy are applied by means of ground exchangers. The process of heat transfer in a system of ground exchangers is a phenomenon of complex heat transfer. The paper presents a mathematical modeling of heat exchange processes, the temperature fields are built which are necessary for the determination of the ground array that ensures an adequate supply of low potential energy excluding the freezing of soil around the pipes in the ground heat exchangers and guaranteeing a reliable operation of geothermal heat pumps.

  18. ROOTS AND CONSEQUENCES OF THE EMPLOYEE DISENGAGEMENT PHENOMENON

    OpenAIRE

    Heikkeri, Elena

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is to explore the phenomenon of employee disengagement. The main aim of this research is to understand the nature of this phenomenon, its roots and consequences, as well as provide a description of why an organization would be interested in improving employee engagement and what human resource practices can be used for this purpose. To get a clear picture of the phenomenon, this study examines an academic literature and earlier practitioners’ works on the subjec...

  19. Moe fenomen. The Phenomenon of Fashion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Piibeleht

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the last quarter of the 20th century, particularly after the “cultural turn”, the interest in fashion has been increasing in a variety of different disciplines. Fashion has begun to be investigated in many different contexts, using new theoretical approaches. Fashion can be regarded as a social phenomenon, a sign system, as art, myth, or the product of the fashion industry. The purpose of this article is not to provide a definition of fashion, but rather to raise the question of how to approach the experience of fashion analytically. The methodological issues discussed here emerged in the course of preparing for empirical research on fashion. The observations and comparisons that constitute the core of this article are the result of efforts to juxtapose different methods. The traditional history of fashion used a historical-epistemological strategy but, depending on how one defines culture, the meaning of fashion can also be analysed using methods based on different epistemological strategies. The phenomenological method elaborated by Edmund Husserl, which I have chosen for my analysis of the experience of fashion, defines culture through the experiential acts of individuals. Simply stated, phenomenology considers the world as it is given to us in our consciousness. What is most important for empirical research is that the phenomenological method makes it possible to study the structure of a concrete experience and to focus on the mechanisms of the subjective creation of meaning. Thus this article has two main foci: a theoretical analysis of how the experience of fashion can be analytically revealed using the phenomenological method, and a comparison of the phenomenological approach with methods based on other strategies. The analysis of descriptions in the first person makes it possible to highlight how experience has been constructed. People “see” fashion based on structures of meaning; when they describe their own experience

  20. One Foot on the Island: Second Home Use on the Island of Zlarin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geran-Marko Miletić

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available As the 2011 Census results show, Croatian islands have a large increase in the num¬ber of apartments for temporary residence, mostly of second homes. Second home use is a strong factor in socio-spatial transformation, and this type of dwelling is particularly interesting for Croatian islands because it contributes, though only tem¬porarily, to islands population increase. Having that in mind, this paper, based on the example of the island of Zlarin (Croatia, Šibenik archipelago, tries to highlight the main contours of the phenomenon of the islands’ second home use. The data pre¬sented in this paper were collected through an online survey conducted from March till May 2013. A total of 114 users of second homes on the island of Zlarin responded to the questionnaire. The results showed that the majority of the respondents’ ho¬useholds started to use second homes in Zlarin 30 and more years ago. Analysis of the reasons and ways of second home use revealed that the respondents associated the owning a second home more often with the inversion of the everyday life and family gathering than with some more pragmatic motives. Most respondents use second homes in Zlarin only occasionally but for longer periods, while part of the respondents prefer using second homes for short weekend brakes. With respect to frequency, second home use has a seasonal character, and analysis of the activities performed while staying on the island showed that the respondents spent much of their time socialising outside their second homes. These findings suggest that a signi¬ficant part of the Zlarin second home users have become attached both to the settle¬ment and the island. Furthermore, they are present in the life of the local community and also show interest in further development of the island.

  1. Reading as a Sociocultural Phenomenon: Its Nature and Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazutina, Tatyana V.; Shuler, Irina V.; Pletyago, Tatyana Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The article analyzes reading as a sociocultural phenomenon in terms of the philosophy of culture. The purpose of the study is the identification of reading functions in contemporary culture. Research concept is defined by reading comprehension as a multifunctional phenomenon. In the course of reading genesis research it is revealed that reading…

  2. Chinchirisi: The Phenomenon of "Spirit Children" Among the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... what others say or do, 'it is in our blood', they say. This raises concerns. In what ways and to what extent is this religio-cultural phenomenon a challenge to euthanasia, human rights and rural development in the contemporary society? This paper examines the phenomenon of 'spirit children' from an insider perspective.

  3. Fluorescence: An Interdisciplinary Phenomenon for Different Education Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, J. A.; Moreno, J. M.; Perales, F. J.; Romero, J.; Sánchez, P.; Gómez-Robledo, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper shows the scientific foundations of a natural phenomenon of undoubted interest and applicability in our day, fluorescence, and its possibilities for teaching at three educational levels: primary, secondary and university. It begins by describing the nature of the phenomenon and continues by explaining how we work with students of the…

  4. An Evaluation of the 'New History' Phenomenon | Moyo | Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article was to evaluate the 'New History' approach. This paper explores the argument that the new 'New History' phenomenon was an attempt to rejuvenate an interest in History. The 'New History' phenomenon was launched because of the fear that History was in danger as it faced possible extinction ...

  5. Addressing the Phenomenon of Child Marriage in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Child marriage is a class phenomenon which is rooted in culture and religion. This phenomenon is classified among features of developing countries which has been highlighted in anthropological literature as well as old and current demographical data. It is often based on the belief that virginity can only be guaranteed ...

  6. Phenomenon of isomorphic provoking responses in cases of limited scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talnikova Е.Е.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the historical origin of the term "Koebner phenomenon". The literature data reflect the etiology, pathogenesis and epidemiology of isomorphic mechanisms provoking responses in lichen planus, psoriasis, scleroder-ma, syphilis. Variants of the Koebner phenomenon's classifications are given. The clinical cases of limited scleroderma after mechanical injury are described.

  7. Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir NEW OSHA- ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  8. Paradise Islands? Island States and Environmental Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverker C. Jagers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Island states have been shown to outperform continental states on a number of large-scale coordination-related outcomes, such as levels of democracy and institutional quality. The argument developed and tested in this article contends that the same kind of logic may apply to islands’ environmental performance, too. However, the empirical analysis shows mixed results. Among the 105 environmental outcomes that we analyzed, being an island only has a positive impact on 20 of them. For example, island states tend to outcompete continental states with respect to several indicators related to water quality but not in aspects related to biodiversity, protected areas, or environmental regulations. In addition, the causal factors previously suggested to make islands outperform continental states in terms of coordination have weak explanatory power in predicting islands’ environmental performance. We conclude the paper by discussing how these interesting findings can be further explored.

  9. Transport properties of interacting magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianakon, T.A.; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1993-10-01

    This paper explores the equilibrium and transient transport properties of a mixed magnetic topology model for tokamak equilibria. The magnetic topology is composed of a discrete set of mostly non-overlapping magnetic islands centered on the low-order rational surfaces. Transport across the island regions is fast due to parallel transport along the stochastic magnetic field lines about the separatrix of each island. Transport between island regions is assumed to be slow due to a low residual cross-field transport. In equilibrium, such a model leads to: a nonlinear dependence of the heat flux on the pressure gradient; a power balance diffusion coefficient which increases from core to edge; and profile resiliency. Transiently, such a model also exhibits a heat pulse diffusion coefficient larger than the power balance diffusion coefficient.

  10. Hockey Stick Phenomenon: Supply Chain Management Challenge in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Meyer Sanches

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate a phenomenon that occurs in Brazil, specifically the spike in demand at the end of the sales period, known as the hockey stick phenomenon. This analysis will encompass the causes as well as the impacts of this phenomenon, in a way that allows alternative policies to be evaluated. Data was collected from a Brazilian branch of a large multinational in the non-durable consumer goods industry and in semi-structured interviews conducted face-to-face with executives of 26 clients. The data was used to generate a continuous simulation model based on the methods of systems dynamics. The findings showed that the phenomenon negatively impacted the manufacturer’s financial performance in the long term and indicated required changes necessary to remediate the phenomenon. This is an empirical study on the hockey stick phenomenon, a problem that affects diverse companies in Brazil. The study showed that companies should not assume the hockey stick phenomenon to be an exogenous problem; it showed that there are policies able to improve financial performance; and it provided ideas regarding ways to carry out the change process.

  11. Atmospheric Vortices near Guadalupe Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    These MISR images from June 11, 2000 (Terra orbit 2569) demonstrate a turbulent atmospheric flow pattern known as the von Karman vortex street. This phenomenon is named after aerodynamicist Theodore von Karman, who theoretically derived the conditions under which it occurs. The alternating double row of vortices can form in the wake of an obstacle, in this instance the eastern Pacific island of Guadalupe. The rugged terrain of this volcanic Mexican island reaches a maximum elevation of 1.3 kilometers. The island is about 35 kilometers long and is located 260 kilometers west of Baja California.The vortex pattern is made visible by the marine stratocumulus clouds around Guadalupe Island. The upper image is a color view obtained by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. North is toward the left. The orientation of the vortex street indicates that the wind direction is from lower left to upper right (northwest to southeast). The areas within the vortex centers tend to be clear because the rotating motions induce a vertical wind component that can break up the cloud deck.The lower view is a stereo picture generated from data acquired by MISR's fore- and aft-viewing 70-degree cameras. A 3-D effect is obtained by viewing the image with red/blue glasses and placing the red filter over your left eye. Note how the downwelling atmospheric motion (change in elevation from high to low) is accompanied by a clearing in the center of the first vortex. As the vortices propagate downstream, their rotational velocities weaken. As a consequence, the induced vertical motion and cloud-clearing effect weakens as well.Theodore von Karman was a Professor of Aeronautics at Caltech and Director of Caltech's Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory from 1930-1949. He was one of the principal founders of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by

  12. Tanzania - Mafia Island Airport

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The evaluation design and subsequent data gathering activities will address the following key research questions: a) Has the Mafia Island Airport Upgrade Project...

  13. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Macmichael, DBA

    1988-01-01

    A fully revised and extended account of the design, manufacture and use of heat pumps in both industrial and domestic applications. Topics covered include a detailed description of the various heat pump cycles, the components of a heat pump system - drive, compressor, heat exchangers etc., and the more practical considerations to be taken into account in their selection.

  14. New Finding in Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis: Splendore-Hoeppli Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Mohammad; Tabatabaei, Seyed Ali; Mirshahi, Reza; Nozarian, Zohreh; Jabbarvand Behrbouz, Mahmoud

    2016-06-01

    To report 2 cases of Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon, a rare histopathologic observation, as a late clinical finding in vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC). We report the cases of 2 young women with subconjunctival nodules as a manifestation of Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon with a history of severe VKC. After eliminating other conditions causing such a reaction, both patients were treated using frequent topical corticosteroid, plus topical cyclosporine 2% in one of patient. Complete resolution was observed in both patients. The Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon could be a part of VKC manifestations.

  15. The "nutcracker phenomenon" with orthostatic proteinuria: case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekim, M; Ozçakar, Z B; Fitoz, S; Soygür, T; Yüksel, S; Acar, B; Yalçinkaya, F; Arikan, N

    2006-04-01

    The nutcracker phenomenon refers to compression of the left renal vein between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. Clinical features are hematuria, abdominal pain, left flank pain, pelvic or scrotal discomfort due to varicocele or ovarian vein syndrome. In this report, 2 patients with orthostatic proteinuria, in whom nutcracker phenomenon was detected as a cause, are presented. One of them had posterior nutcracker with also asymptomatic varicocele that was detected during ultrasonographic examination. Nutcracker phenomenon is a rare but important clinical condition that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with proteinuria and hematuria.

  16. Low-Flow Film Boiling Heat Transfer on Vertical Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe Andersen, J. G.; Dix, G. E.; Leonard, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The phenomenon of film boiling heat transfer for high wall temperatures has been investigated. Based on the assumption of laminar flow for the film, the continuity, momentum, and energy equations for the vapor film are solved and a Bromley-type analytical expression for the heat transfer...... length, an average film boiling heat transfer coefficient is obtained....

  17. Local influences of geothermal anomalies on permafrost distribution in an active volcanic island (Deception Island, Antarctica)

    OpenAIRE

    Goyanes, G.; Vieira, G.; Caselli, A.; Cardoso, M.; Marmy, Antoine; Santos, F.; Bernardo, I.; Hauck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at understanding the spatial distribution and characteristics of the frozen and unfrozen terrain in an alluvial fan on Deception Island, which is an active strato-volcano located in the Bransfield Strait (South Shetland Islands) with recent eruptions in 1967, 1969 and 1970. The alluvial fan is dominated by debris-flow, run-off and rock fall processes and permafrost occurs in several parts in the vicinity of anomalous geothermal heat flux. The aim is to assess the ways volcanic...

  18. First Report of Vermamoeba vermiformis in the Island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Reyes-Batlle

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Free-living amoebae (FLA are group of protozoa distributed worldwide in many habitats mainly water and soil related sources. Some members of FLA are able to act as opportunistic pathogens and are environmental carriers of other pathogenic agents such as bacteria and viruses. Vermamoeba vermiformis is a highly abundant FLA species in water bodies and has recently gained environmental importance as it acts as a vehicle of many pathogenic bacteria such as Legionella pneumophila.Cases Report: In this study, water samples were collected from the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain during 2015. El Hierro island was designated by UNESCO as a biosphere reserve and it is currently the less populated of the Canary Islands. The water samples were culture on 2 % Non-Nutrient Agar (NNA plates covered with a thin layer of heat killed E. coli and checked daily for the presence of FLA. After a week, V. vermiformis amoebae were observed in the plates incubated at room temperature and 37 ºC. Molecular characterization was carried out by amplifying the 18S rDNA gene and DNA sequencing, confirming that the isolated strain belonged to Vermamoeba vermiformis species.Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Vermamoeba vermiformis isolation in the island of El Hierro and the second report of this species in the Canary Islands.

  19. EVOLUTION OF THE PHENOMENON INTEGRATION IN LATIN AMERICA (SOUTH AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMILIAN M. DOBRESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With the end of the Cold War, the creation of a South American economic space has become an important priority of regional powers (Brazil, Argentina, Chile, and the great powers after the war, the U.S. and the European Union (the current name. This integration process has had particular features derived from characteristics of Latin American countries. Multitude of organizations integrative role once again demonstrates the specificity of this process in Latin America to other areas of the world: Africa, Asia, Europe, etc. Contradictory developments phenomenon / Latin American integration process gives substance its characteristic and I will make, probably deeply and future. The purpose of the work and objectives are: know the main features of the phenomenon in Latin American integrationist Objectives: following our vision of a historical phenomenon; brief characterization of the most important Latin American organizations, establishing current and future consequences of integrationist phenomenon in this part of the world.

  20. Rock’n’Roll as a Local Musical Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Ristivojević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the process of localization of a pop cultural and musical phenomenon – rock ’n’ roll. My basic premise is that rock ’n’ roll as a global music genre can be perceived as local, and hence represents a recognizable identification element for the local population. In this case the label r ’n’ r pertain to the phenomenon of Belgrade "new wave" music, which was popular during the 1980’s. Based on the analysis of narratives from relevant documentary films, it is my intention to find out whether "new wave" was initially perceived as a local phenomenon, and what the means of constructing this image are, as well as what it is that gives this phenomenon local legitimacy and credibility.

  1. Benign "setting sun" phenomenon in full-term infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hideto

    2003-06-01

    I report two normally developed infants showing benign" setting sun" phenomenon. A 2(2-12)-year-old boy and a 7-year-old boy, who were born without any complications at full term, developed brief episodes of downward gazing during sucking and crying after birth However, there were no other clinical or laboratory findings, and they developed normally. The phenomenon was not visible until 6 months and 7 months, respectively. The "setting sun" phenomenon usually indicates underlying severe brain damage and can also be seen, although rarely, in healthy full-term infants until 1 to 5 months. However, the benign "setting sun" phenomenon might exist until 6 or 7 months of age in normal infants.

  2. Vacuum facet phenomenon: a computed tomographic sign of degenerative spondylolisthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkowitz, D.M.; Quencer, D.M.

    1982-08-01

    A vacuum facet phenomenon, seen on computed tomography as a lens-shaped lucency within a lumbar facet joint, was observed as a consequence of degenerative spondylolisthesis. The significance of this finding is discussed.

  3. Professor Nambu, string theory, and the moonshine phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Eguchi, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    I first recall the last occasion I met the late Professor Yoichiro Nambu, in a hospital in Osaka. I then present a brief introduction to a moonshine phenomenon in string theory that have recently come under investigation.

  4. [Psychiatric investigation of Tyrolean patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Iris; Klein-Weigel, Peter; Kinzl, Johann; Biebl, Wilfried; Fraedrich, Gustav; Heidrich, Heinz

    2005-09-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is provoked by digital vasospasm, mostly induced by cold and emotional strain. While studies dealing with other vasospastic disorders, e. g. migraine, described an increased comorbidity with affective and anxiety disorders, only little evidence has been reported for such an association in Raynaud's phenomenon. 70 Tyrolean patients (55 females and 15 males) with primary Raynaud's phenomenon presented more often with psychiatric morbidity on DSM-IV axis-I during their life-time than prevalence studies in the general population of North America and Europe would have led to expect. No psychotic (0%) and fewer somatoform disorders (2.9%) were found whereas anxiety disorders (77.1%), affective disorders (48.6%), and eating disorders (14.3%) were clearly overrepresented. We would therefore recommend a psychiatric evaluation in primary Raynaud's phenomenon along with the vascular diagnostic assessment to ensure that any psychiatric co-morbidity can be identified and treated.

  5. Earthquake source parameters that display the first digit phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    P. A. Toledo; S. R. Riquelme; J. A. Campos

    2015-01-01

    We study the main parameters of earthquakes from the perspective of the first digit phenomenon: the nonuniform probability of the lower first digit different from 0 compared to the higher ones. We found that source parameters like coseismic slip distributions at the fault and coseismic inland displacements show first digit anomaly. We also found the tsunami runups measured after the earthquake to display the phenomenon. Other parameters found to obey first digit anomaly are ...

  6. Earthquake source parameters which display first digit phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    P. A. Toledo; S. R. Riquelme; J. A. Campos

    2015-01-01

    We study main parameters of earthquakes from the perspective of the first digit phenomenon: the nonuniform probability of the lower first digit different from zero compared to the higher ones. We found that source parameters like coseismic slip distributions at the fault and coseismic inland displacements show first digit anomaly. We also found the tsunami runups measured after the earthquake to display the phenomenon. Other parameters found to obey first di...

  7. Tourism Development and the ‘Hidden’ Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo ASERO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focus on ‘hidden’ tourism phenomenon, that is the touristdemand that in many destinations eludes the official survey system. Estimationof hidden tourism requires information drawn from tourism demand and supply,using different indicators. The critical points are: the availability and validity ofdata, the data collection time and the application of the analysis models todifferent non-homogeneous areas. Economic value of the phenomenon relies onan estimate of consumption.

  8. VALUE OF THE PHENOMENON OF DEJA VU IN HEALTHY EXAMINEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Nikolaevich Vlasov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the investigation was to study the clinical value of the deja vu phenomenon in healthy examinees as it may occur in healthy individuals, on the one hand, and is a symptom of a number of psychoneurological diseases, on the other. One hundred and twenty-nine subjects, mean age 25,2±4,4 years, were examined. All the examinees were questioned by the original questionnaire developed by the authors, which was to reveal the characteristics of the phenomenon, and the Cambridge depersonalization questionnaire; standard electroencephalography was also performed. The deja vu phenomenon was detected in 97% of the respondents. In healthy individuals, the phenomenon was most common at the age of 21-25 years; 52,2% experienced deja vu several times a year; 64,5% of the respondents reported the 10-sec state; 85% did not associate the occurrence of the phenomenon with any provoking factor; 66% perceived deja vu with a positive emotional tinge, and only 4% of the respondents were afraid of the onset of this phenomenon. These criteria may be used to rule out pathological deja vu

  9. Cataphoresis Phenomenon of Fluorescent Lamps with HF Electronic Ballasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hideo; Honda, Kouji; Hashimoto, Nozomu; Sato, Keisuke; Miki, Nobukazu; Yamanaka, Yukio

    Recently, the T8-4ft. fluorescent lamp systems with high frequency (HF) electronic ballasts have been promoted as a strategic energy-saving product even into the outdoor lighting fields. In such a situation, the troublesome pinkish-colored cataphoresis phenomenon of these lamps is observed especially in the outdoor fields of winter seasons. The cataphoresis phenomenon of FLs is currently considered to occur only in the DC operation and hardly in the AC operation. Nevertheless, conventional HF electronic ballasts keep inherently the superimposed DC voltage component VDC, attributed mostly to the duty unbalance in the HF inverter circuit. This paper shows that the cataphoresis phenomenon of T8-4ft. fluorescent lamp systems with HF electronic ballasts is analyzed in relation to definitive parameters of the coldest tube wall temperature Tc and the superimposed DC voltage component VDC. This has clarified the critical cataphoresis phenomenon outbreak conditions, given by the equation VDC=0.56 Tc-4.3. In addition, through the experiments on the lamp burming hours to the cataphoresis phenomenon outbreak, the ballast design requirement of VDC less than 2V is proposed as an actual suppression measure against the cataphoresis phenomenon.

  10. Back to Treasure Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriki, Atara

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the Treasure Island problem and some inquiry activities derived from the problem. Trying to find where pirates buried a treasure leads to a surprising answer, multiple solutions, and a discussion of problem solving. The Treasure Island problem is an example of an inquiry activity that can be implemented in…

  11. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Brodowicz, Kazimierz; Wyszynski, M L; Wyszynski

    2013-01-01

    Heat pumps and related technology are in widespread use in industrial processes and installations. This book presents a unified, comprehensive and systematic treatment of the design and operation of both compression and sorption heat pumps. Heat pump thermodynamics, the choice of working fluid and the characteristics of low temperature heat sources and their application to heat pumps are covered in detail.Economic aspects are discussed and the extensive use of the exergy concept in evaluating performance of heat pumps is a unique feature of the book. The thermodynamic and chemical properties o

  12. Solar cooling system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harber, H.

    1981-01-01

    The operational and thermal performance of a variety of solar systems are described. The Solar Cooling System was installed in a hotel at St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands. The system consists of the evacuated glass tube collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, computerized controller, a large solar optimized industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat.

  13. Marion Island and Prince Edward Island

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    . Surveys were undertaken from 19 November to 13 December 1997 and from 18 to 31 December 2001. At Marion Island, eggs are laid between 23 October and 19 December, with 70% laid from 2 to 14 November (Williams 1980). The area.

  14. The WTO's telecommunications commitments and the credibility of telecommunications regulatory reforms in small island developing states

    OpenAIRE

    'Ofa, Siope Vakataki

    2009-01-01

    Telecommunications regulatory reform is a recent phenomenon in small island developing states, including in five Pacific island states in the past five years. Opportunities for regulatory capture exist when independent regulators are vulnerable to political pressure. There is therefore a case for external multilateral policy restraint to deter policymakers from reneging on policies. This study estimates the impact of the telecommunications commitments of the WTO on a panel data set of 160 ...

  15. [Psychometric investigation of Tyrolean patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Iris; Klein-Weigel, Peter; Kinzl, Johannes; Biebl, Wilfried; Fraedrich, Gustav; Heidrich, Heinz

    2006-11-01

    Primary Raynaud's phenomenon (PRP) is provoked by digital vasospasm induced by cold and emotional strain. By use of established psychometric test instruments (Freiburger Aggressionsfragebogen (FAF), Fragebogen zur Abschätzung psychosomatischen Krankheitserlebens (FAPK), Stressverarbeitungsfragebogen (SVF 120)) we examined the patients' ways of dealing with aggression and distress as well as their experience of psychosomatic illness. In all psychometric tests performed there were no statistically significant differences between the patients and the controls, indicating that patients with PRP depict no specific ways of dealing with aggression and distress, and do not experience psychosomatic illness. The subgroup of patients with affective disorders and the subgroup of patients with impaired psychological well-being, displayed a 'depressive style' of dealing with life events. Patients with major physical complaints of symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon showed either an inability or a propensity to deny aggression. Patients with impaired psychological well-being tended to complain more often about severe physical symptoms associated with Raynaud's phenomenon. Psychometric testing in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon cannot be recommended without additional psychiatric diagnostic. In patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and psychiatric comorbidity psychometric testing can additionally provide useful clinical information.

  16. HEAT RECUPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Rovin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat recovery is an effective method of shortening specific energy consumption. new constructions of recuperators for heating and cupola furnaces have been designed and successfully introduced. two-stage recuperator with computer control providing blast heating up to 600 °C and reducing fuel consumption by 30% is of special interest.

  17. Kernohan's phenomenon associated with left ruptured occipital arteriovenous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, A; Sato, H; Katayama, W; Nakai, K; Tsunoda, T; Kobayashi, E; Nose, T

    2004-05-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with ipsilateral hemiparesia due to rupture of a left occipital arteriovenous malformation (AVM). Emergency decompression (the onset-operation interval was 46 minutes,) was carried out and the patient could leave the hospital upon recovery without neurological deficits. In general, Kernohan's phenomenon is caused by the gradual displacement of the cerebral peduncle against the tentorial edge caused by compression by the contralateral mass. This phenomenon is very rare among the cases with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and only three cases including the present one have been reported in the literature. In all cases the onset-operation intervals of were very short. Kernohan's phenomenon associated with a ruptured AVM is a rare condition and emergency decompression is required.

  18. Ringing phenomenon based whispering-gallery-mode sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ming-Yong; Shen, Mei-Xia; Lin, Xiu-Min

    2016-01-22

    Highly sensitive sensing is one of the most important applications of whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonators, which is usually accomplished through a tunable continuous-wave laser sweeping over a whispering-gallery mode with the help of a fiber taper in a relative slow speed. It is known that if a tunable continuous-wave laser sweeps over a high quality whispering-gallery mode in a fast speed, a ringing phenomenon will be observed. The ringing phenomenon in WGM microresonators is mainly used to measure the Q factors and mode-coupling strengths. Here we experimentally demonstrate that the WGM sensing can be achieved based on the ringing phenomenon. This kind of sensing is accomplished in a much shorter time and is immune to the noise caused by the laser wavelength drift.

  19. DERECHO - CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PHENOMENON, THE DANGER ZONE IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CELIŃSKI-MYSŁAW D.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to characterize the occurrence of derecho phenomenon in Poland between 2007 and 2014 and to describe threats that this phenomenon causes. The number of derecho cases in Central Europe in that period was determined on the basis of the identification criteria proposed by R. Johns and W. Hirt. Also, conditions for the occurrence of derecho were characterized and destruction that it caused was described. Additionally, the ranges of the individual derecho cases enabled the determination of the most vulnerable areas of Poland to the occurrence of this phenomenon. Reports on dangerous meteorological phenomena, SYNOP and METAR reports, MSL pressure maps, upper air maps at 500 hPa and 850 hPa, upper air sounding plots, radar depictions and satellite images were used in this paper.

  20. Statistical Agent Based Modelization of the Phenomenon of Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Clemente, Riccardo; Pietronero, Luciano

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a statistical agent based model to describe the phenomenon of drug abuse and its dynamical evolution at the individual and global level. The agents are heterogeneous with respect to their intrinsic inclination to drugs, to their budget attitude and social environment. The various levels of drug use were inspired by the professional description of the phenomenon and this permits a direct comparison with all available data. We show that certain elements have a great importance to start the use of drugs, for example the rare events in the personal experiences which permit to overcame the barrier of drug use occasionally. The analysis of how the system reacts to perturbations is very important to understand its key elements and it provides strategies for effective policy making. The present model represents the first step of a realistic description of this phenomenon and can be easily generalized in various directions.