WorldWideScience

Sample records for heat island investigations

  1. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  2. Urban heat island investigations in Arctic cities of northwestern Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, Oleg I.; Kasatkina, Elena A.; Kanatjev, Alexander G.

    2017-12-01

    Urban microclimate peculiarities in two Arctic cities in northwestern Russia—Kirovsk (67.62°N, 33.67°E) and Apatity (67.57°N, 33.38°E)—were investigated by using mobile temperature records. The experiment was carried out in and around Apatity and Kirovsk in February 2014 and December 2016. The DS18B20 digital thermometer was installed on the roof of a car (height: approximately 1.2 m) to measure and record temperature variations automatically. In addition to the digital thermometer, the car was also equipped with an onboard global positioning system, allowing every temperature measurement to be referenced with an altitude and a latitude/longitude position. The possibility of urban heat island formation in these polar cities, above the Arctic Circle, was studied. Our analysis indicated that on 11 February 2014, the temperature varied in accordance with the background environmental lapse rate (-0.0045°C m-1), and nearly corresponded to it (-0.0165°C m-1) on 12 February 2014. On 6 December 2016, a strong local temperature inversion with a positive value of 0.032°C m-1 was detected, seemingly caused by the formation of a cold air pool in the valley near Kirovsk. It was found that the temperature variations within and outside these cities are strongly influenced by local topographic effects and the physical conditions of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  3. Heat Island Compendium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat islands can be mitigated through measures like planting trees and vegetation, installing green roofs and cool roofs, and using cool pavements. The compendium describes all of these strategies and shows how communities around the country are being used

  4. The use of remotely sensed data as a tool in urban heat island investigations: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orvis, K.H.; Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1992-01-01

    Remotely sensed data contribute an important tool to areawide, cost-effective studies of urban heat island phenomena. This paper provides an overview of its use dating from the first satellite thermal images of urban heat signatures in the early 1970`s, and briefly examines the range of previous uses of remotely sensed data in urban studies, including identification and analysis of heat island effects, modeling of energy budgets, attempts to analyze and classify the urban landscape, and temporal analyses. The intent is not to provide an exhaustive review but rather to describe research trends and patterns. In addition the paper lists an compares those sensing devices that have seen significant use in urban studies and briefly discusses potential strengths and weaknesses of remotely sensed data for use in urban analyses. Three annotated bibliographies, divided by subject, are included. 95 refs.

  5. Urban heat island 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühler, Oliver; Jensen, Marina Bergen; Petersen, Karen Sejr

    2010-01-01

    Urban Heat Island beskriver det forhold, at temperaturen i byområder er højere end temperaturen i tilgrænsede landområder. Årsagen hertil ligger i den urbane arealanvendelse, hvor en mindre andel af arealerne er dækket af vegetation, og en større andel består af forseglede arealer.......Urban Heat Island beskriver det forhold, at temperaturen i byområder er højere end temperaturen i tilgrænsede landområder. Årsagen hertil ligger i den urbane arealanvendelse, hvor en mindre andel af arealerne er dækket af vegetation, og en større andel består af forseglede arealer....

  6. An urban heat island in tropical area investigated by remote sensing: Belo Horizonte City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastelois, B.C.R.J.; de Assis, E.S.

    1992-01-01

    The inappropriate urbanization process in tropical areas causes local climatic alterations forming heat islands over the cities. In order to guide urban planning in the control of the environmental urban quality, as for the thermal comfort is concerned, it has developed a method to evaluate the thermal behavior of built and urban green areas. Two TM-LANDSAT images from Belo Horizonte City, the study area, were chosen based on summer and winter typical days statistically characterized. Bands 3 and 4 of these images were combined to produce a local vegetation index map. Band 6 was used to observe the warmer and cooler areas in the city. Some heat nucleons were identified through data analysis of remote sensing, meteorological and urban land use. The mean maximum temperature of the principal heat nuclei exceeds, in summer, the limit value of diurnal thermal comfort for the city climate, using Givoni's Bioclimatic Chart. During the day period, the areas with a lower vegetation index, more density and predominating horizontal settlements were the most warmer. The cooling effect of urban green areas was very local. Thus, it should be regularly distributed in the built areas. The limits of occupation density and edification could be fixed, too, considering its impacts on the urban thermal environment

  7. Investigating the vertical dimension of Singapore's urban heat island through quadcopter platforms: an pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Winston; Ho, Dawn

    2016-04-01

    In numerous cities, measurements of urban warmth in most urban heat island (UHI) studies are generally constrained towards surface or near-surface (quadcopter platforms to measure urban temperature profiles up to 100 m above ground level in Singapore, which is a rapidly urbanizing major tropical metropolis. Three different land use/land cover categories were sampled; a high-rise residential estate, a university campus, and an urban park/green-space. Sorties were flown repeatedly at four different times - sunrise, noon, sunset and midnight. Initial results indicate significant variations in intra-site stability and inversion development between the urban canopy and boundary layers. These profiles are also temporally dynamic, depending on the time of day and larger-scale weather conditions.

  8. Retroreflective façades for urban heat island mitigation: Experimental investigation and energy evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Federico; Castellani, Beatrice; Presciutti, Andrea; Morini, Elena; Filipponi, Mirko; Nicolini, Andrea; Santamouris, Matheos

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Retro-reflective (RR) materials are an effective strategy for mitigating UHI. • Optical properties of RR materials are assessed by a new experimental facility. • Angular distribution of reflected radiation is assessed during daytime. • RR component is treated as a diffusely reflected radiation by a reduction factor. • An algorithm evaluates the cooling potential of RR materials in urban canyons. - Abstract: The optimization of optical properties of buildings’ envelope and urban paving represents an important research field for reducing the urban heat island effect. The overheating of a surface exposed to sunlight can be reduced by improving solar reflectance. In this sense, several studies have demonstrated the positive effect of cool materials on UHI mitigation. In addition to traditional cool materials, retroreflective (RR) materials have been recently proposed for this application. The present paper aims at the assessment of angular reflectance of RR films for several inclination angles of solar radiation. To reproduce variation of solar radiation’s inclination during the daytime, an ad hoc experimental setup was designed and used. Characterization of RR materials when hit by solar radiation with different inclinations allows to assess their behaviour on daytime if used as novel urban coatings for mitigation of the UHI phenomenon. Measurement results are used as input for an original algorithm which allows to quantify cooling potential of RR materials in terms of energy reflected and sent beyond the urban canyon. The experimental characterization and energy evaluations showed that RR materials could be effectively applied as coatings on urban paving and building envelope, in order to reduce the circulating energy into the canyon

  9. Urban Heat Island Effect Actions - Neighborhood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisville Metro Government — The urban heat island effect — defined as the difference in temperature between the core of Louisville and its suburbs — contributes to heat-related illnesses and...

  10. The urban heat island in Akron, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank P. Martin; Grace L. Powell

    1977-01-01

    Data gathered by automobile traverse were used to describe the urban heat of Akron, Ohio. Observations were made at 2100 or 2200 EST on four nights-17 April, 11 July, 10 October, and 2 January. Weather conditions not conducive to heat-island development were avoided. Temperatures in the center of the heat island were 6 to 14?F warmer than rural areas outside the city....

  11. Causes of Potential Urban Heat Island Space Using Heat flux Budget Under Urban Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Y. J.; Lee, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    Raised concerns about possible contribution from urban heat island to global warming is about 30 percent. Therefore, mitigating urban heat island became one of major issues to solve among urban planners, urban designers, landscape architects, urban affair decision makers and etc. Urban heat island effect on a micro-scale is influenced by factors such as wind, water vapor and solar radiation. Urban heat island effect on a microscale is influenced by factors like wind, water vapor and solar radiation. These microscopic climates are also altered by factors affecting the heat content in space, like SVF and aspect ratio depending on the structural characteristics of various urban canyon components. Indicators of heat mitigation in urban design stage allows us to create a spatial structure considering the heat balance budget. The spatial characteristics affect thermal change by varying heat storage, emitting or absorbing the heat. The research defines characteristics of the space composed of the factors affecting the heat flux change as the potential urban heat island space. Potential urban heat island spaces are that having higher heat flux than periphery space. The study is to know the spatial characteristics that affects the subsequent temperature rise by the heat flux. As a research method, four types of potential heat island space regions were analyzed. I categorized the spatial types by comparing parameters' value of energy balance in day and night: 1) day severe areas, 2) day comfort areas, 3) night severe areas, 4) night comfort areas. I have looked at these four types of potential urban heat island areas from a microscopic perspective and investigated how various forms of heat influences on higher heat flux areas. This research was designed to investigate the heat indicators to be reflected in the design of urban canyon for heat mitigation. As a result, severe areas in daytime have high SVF rate, sensible heat is generated. Day comfort areas have shadow effect

  12. Interactions between urban heat islands and heat waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Oppenheimer, Michael; Zhu, Qing; Baldwin, Jane W.; Ebi, Kristie L.; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Guan, Kaiyu; Liu, Xu

    2018-03-01

    Heat waves (HWs) are among the most damaging climate extremes to human society. Climate models consistently project that HW frequency, severity, and duration will increase markedly over this century. For urban residents, the urban heat island (UHI) effect further exacerbates the heat stress resulting from HWs. Here we use a climate model to investigate the interactions between the UHI and HWs in 50 cities in the United States under current climate and future warming scenarios. We examine UHI2m (defined as urban-rural difference in 2m-height air temperature) and UHIs (defined as urban-rural difference in radiative surface temperature). Our results show significant sensitivity of the interaction between UHI and HWs to local background climate and warming scenarios. Sensitivity also differs between daytime and nighttime. During daytime, cities in the temperate climate region show significant synergistic effects between UHI and HWs in current climate, with an average of 0.4 K higher UHI2m or 2.8 K higher UHIs during HWs than during normal days. These synergistic effects, however, diminish in future warmer climates. In contrast, the daytime synergistic effects for cities in dry regions are insignificant in the current climate, but emerge in future climates. At night, the synergistic effects are similar across climate regions in the current climate, and are stronger in future climate scenarios. We use a biophysical factorization method to disentangle the mechanisms behind the interactions between UHI and HWs that explain the spatial-temporal patterns of the interactions. Results show that the difference in the increase of urban versus rural evaporation and enhanced anthropogenic heat emissions (air conditioning energy use) during HWs are key contributors to the synergistic effects during daytime. The contrast in water availability between urban and rural land plays an important role in determining the contribution of evaporation. At night, the enhanced release of stored

  13. Cooling urban heat islands with sustainable landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson

    1994-01-01

    This paper is directed to the policy-makers who are responsible for urban design and its climatological consequences. It summarizes our current knowledge on the structure, energetics, and mitigation of the urban heat island. Special attention is given to physical features of the environment that can be easily manipulated, particularly vegetation. Prototypical designs...

  14. Stabilization of sawtooty oscillation by island heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Monticello, D.A.; Chu, T.K.

    1986-10-01

    Using the compressible resistive MHD equations in a finite aspect ratio cylinder, it is found that the m = 1 mode (the sawtooth oscillation) can saturate when the pressure inside the magnetic island is higher than that of the original core plasma. The saturation condition is of the form Δβ/sub p/ ≥ 8 ε -1 /sub q = 1/ (1 - q 0 ) 2 . This saturation effect can be used to actively stabilize sawteeth by heating the island and/or by cooling the core plasma. This mechanism together with a stabilizing toroidal effect may also explain recent lower-hybrid-wave-driven tokamak experiments where the saturation of sawteeth has been observed

  15. Can Aerosol Offset Urban Heat Island Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, M. S.; Shepherd, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Urban Heat Island effect (UHI) refers to urban skin or air temperature exceeding the temperatures in surrounding non-urban regions. In a warming climate, the UHI may intensify extreme heat waves and consequently cause significant health and energy problems. Aerosols reduce surface insolation via the direct effect, namely, scattering and absorbing sunlight in the atmosphere. Combining the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) observations over large cities together with Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) simulations, we find that the aerosol direct reduction of surface insolation range from 40-100 Wm-2, depending on seasonality and aerosol loads. As a result, surface skin temperature can be reduced by 1-2C while 2-m surface air temperature by 0.5-1C. This study suggests that the aerosol direct effect is a competing mechanism for the urban heat island effect (UHI). More importantly, both aerosol and urban land cover effects must be adequately represented in meteorological and climate modeling systems in order to properly characterize urban surface energy budgets and UHI.

  16. Reduced Urban Heat Island intensity under warmer conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Anna A.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Zaitchik, Ben F.

    2018-06-01

    The Urban Heat Island (UHI), the tendency for urban areas to be hotter than rural regions, represents a significant health concern in summer as urban populations are exposed to elevated temperatures. A number of studies suggest that the UHI increases during warmer conditions, however there has been no investigation of this for a large ensemble of cities. Here we compare urban and rural temperatures in 54 US cities for 2000–2015 and show that the intensity of the Urban Heat Island, measured here as the differences in daily-minimum or daily-maximum temperatures between urban and rural stations or ΔT, in fact tends to decrease with increasing temperature in most cities (38/54). This holds when investigating daily variability, heat extremes, and variability across climate zones and is primarily driven by changes in rural areas. We relate this change to large-scale or synoptic weather conditions, and find that the lowest ΔT nights occur during moist weather conditions. We also find that warming cities have not experienced an increasing Urban Heat Island effect.

  17. Paving materials for heat island mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerantz, M.; Akbari, H.; Chen, A.; Taha, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Rosenfeld, A.H. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report summarizes paving materials suitable for urban streets, driveways, parking lots and walkways. The authors evaluate materials for their abilities to reflect sunlight, which will reduce their temperatures. This in turn reduces the excess air temperature of cities (the heat island effect). The report presents the compositions of the materials, their suitability for particular applications, and their approximate costs (in 1996). Both new and resurfacing are described. They conclude that, although light-colored materials may be more expensive than conventional black materials, a thin layer of light-colored pavement may produce energy savings and smog reductions whose long-term worth is greater than the extra cost.

  18. Subsurface urban heat islands in German cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menberg, Kathrin; Bayer, Peter; Zosseder, Kai; Rumohr, Sven; Blum, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the intensity and extension of subsurface urban heat islands (UHI), and the individual role of the driving factors has not been revealed either. In this study, we compare groundwater temperatures in shallow aquifers beneath six German cities of different size (Berlin, Munich, Cologne, Frankfurt, Karlsruhe and Darmstadt). It is revealed that hotspots of up to +20K often exist, which stem from very local heat sources, such as insufficiently insulated power plants, landfills or open geothermal systems. When visualizing the regional conditions in isotherm maps, mostly a concentric picture is found with the highest temperatures in the city centers. This reflects the long-term accumulation of thermal energy over several centuries and the interplay of various factors, particularly in heat loss from basements, elevated ground surface temperatures (GST) and subsurface infrastructure. As a primary indicator to quantify and compare large-scale UHI intensity the 10-90%-quantile range UHII(10-90) of the temperature distribution is introduced. The latter reveals, in comparison to annual atmospheric UHI intensities, an even more pronounced heating of the shallow subsurface. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The urban heat island and its impact on heat waves and human health in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jianguo; Zheng, Youfei; Tang, Xu; Guo, Changyi; Li, Liping; Song, Guixiang; Zhen, Xinrong; Yuan, Dong; Kalkstein, Adam J; Li, Furong

    2010-01-01

    With global warming forecast to continue into the foreseeable future, heat waves are very likely to increase in both frequency and intensity. In urban regions, these future heat waves will be exacerbated by the urban heat island effect, and will have the potential to negatively influence the health and welfare of urban residents. In order to investigate the health effects of the urban heat island (UHI) in Shanghai, China, 30 years of meteorological records (1975-2004) were examined for 11 first- and second-order weather stations in and around Shanghai. Additionally, automatic weather observation data recorded in recent years as well as daily all-cause summer mortality counts in 11 urban, suburban, and exurban regions (1998-2004) in Shanghai have been used. The results show that different sites (city center or surroundings) have experienced different degrees of warming as a result of increasing urbanization. In turn, this has resulted in a more extensive urban heat island effect, causing additional hot days and heat waves in urban regions compared to rural locales. An examination of summer mortality rates in and around Shanghai yields heightened heat-related mortality in urban regions, and we conclude that the UHI is directly responsible, acting to worsen the adverse health effects from exposure to extreme thermal conditions.

  20. Impacts of urban growth and heat waves events on the urban heat island in Bucharest city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoran, Maria A.; Savastru, Roxana S.; Savastru, Dan M.; Dida, Adrian I.

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the influences of urban growth and heat waves events on Urban Heat Island in relationship with several biophysical variables in Bucharest metropolitan area of Romania through satellite and in-situ monitoring data. Remote sensing data from Landsat TM/ETM+ and time series MODIS Terra/Aqua sensors have been used to assess urban land cover- temperature interactions over period between 2000 and 2016 years. Vegetation abundances and percent impervious surfaces were derived by means of linear spectral mixture model, and a method for effectively enhancing impervious surface has been developed to accurately examine the urban growth. The land surface temperature (Ts), a key parameter for urban thermal characteristics analysis, was also analyzed in relation with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) at city level. Based on these parameters, the urban growth, urban heat island effect (UHI) and the relationships of Ts to other biophysical parameters (surface albedo, precipitations, wind intensity and direction) have been analyzed. Results show that in the metropolitan area ratio of impervious surface in Bucharest increased significantly during investigated period, the intensity of urban heat island and heat wave events being most significant. The correlation analyses revealed that, at the pixel-scale, Ts possessed a strong positive correlation with percent impervious surfaces and negative correlation with vegetation abundances at the regional scale, respectively. This analysis provided an integrated research scheme and the findings can be very useful for urban ecosystem modeling.

  1. Urban heat islands in the subsurface of German cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menberg, K.; Blum, P.; Zhu, K.; Bayer, P.

    2012-04-01

    In the subsurface of many cities there are widespread and persistent thermal anomalies (subsurface urban heat islands) that result in a warming of urban aquifers. The reasons for this heating are manifold. Possible heat sources are basements of buildings, leakage of sewage systems, buried district heating networks, re-injection of cooling water and solar irradiation on paved surfaces. In the current study, the reported groundwater temperatures in several German cities, such as Berlin, Munich, Cologne and Karlsruhe, are compared. Available data sets are supplemented by temperature measurements and depth profiles in observation wells. Trend analyses are conducted with time series of groundwater temperatures, and three-dimensional groundwater temperature maps are provided. In all investigated cities, pronounced positive temperature anomalies are present. The distribution of groundwater temperatures appears to be spatially and temporally highly variable. Apparently, the increased heat input into the urban subsurface is controlled by very local and site-specific parameters. In the long-run, the superposition of various heat sources results in an extensive temperature increase. In many cases, the maximum temperature elevation is found close to the city centre. Regional groundwater temperature differences between the city centre and the rural background are up to 5 °C, with local hot spots of even more pronounced anomalies. Particular heat sources, like cooling water injections or case-specific underground constructions, can cause local temperatures > 20°C in the subsurface. Examination of the long-term variations in isotherm maps shows that temperatures have increased by about 1°C in the city, as well as in the rural background areas over the last decades. This increase could be reproduced with trend analysis of temperature data gathered from several groundwater wells. Comparison between groundwater and air temperatures in Karlsruhe, for example, also indicates a

  2. A Global Characterization of Urban Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, T.; Lee, X.

    2017-12-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) effect refers to the higher temperatures in urban areas, and it is one of the most well-known consequences of urbanization on local climate. In the present study, we define a new simplified urban-boundary (SUB) algorithm to quantify the daytime and nighttime surface UHIs on a global scale based on 16 years of MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data. The results from the algorithm are validated against previous studies and used to determine the diurnal, monthly, and long-term variation in the surface UHI for over 9000 urban clusters situated in the different Koppen-Geiger climate zones,namely equatorial, arid, warm temperate, snow, and polar. Thus, the variability of the surface UHI for each climate class is determined using a consistent methodology for the first time. The 16-year mean global daytime surface UHI is 0.71 ± 0.93 °C at 1030 LT and 1.00 ± 1.17 °C at 1330 LT, while the nighttime surface UHI is 0.51 ± 0.50 °C at 2230 LT and 0.42 ± 0.52 °C at 0130 LT. This is in good agreement with the results from previous studies, which have looked at the UHI for multiple cities. Summer surface UHI is larger than winter surface UHI across all climate zones. The annual daytime surface UHI is highest in the polar urban clusters (1.77 ± 1.61 °C), followed by snow (1.39 ± 1.17 °C), equatorial (1.21 ± 1.32 °C), warm temperate (1.02 ± 0.98 °C), and arid (0.18 ± 1.27 °C). Urban clusters in the arid climate are found to show different diurnal and seasonal patterns, with higher nighttime surface UHI (0.65 ± 0.58 °C) and two seasonal peaks during the year. The diurnal variation in surface UHI is highest in the polar zone (1.16 °C) and lowest in the arid zone (0.57 °C). The inter-seasonality is also highest in the polar Zone (2.20 °C) and lowest in the arid zone (0.80 °C). Finally, we investigate the change in the surface UHI in more than a decade (2001 to 2013 for MODIS TERRA and 2003 to 2013 for MODIS AQUA) and find a gradual

  3. Urban Heat Island phenomenon in extreme continental climate (Astana, Kazakhstan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Pavel; Akhmetova, Alina

    2015-04-01

    Urban Heat Island (UHI) phenomenon is well known in scientific literature since first half of the 19th century [1]. By now a wide number of world capitals is described from climatological point of view, especially in mid-latitudes. In beginning of XXI century new studies focus on heat island of tropical cities. However dynamics UHI in extreme continental climates is insufficiently investigated, due to the fact that there isn't large cities in Europe and Northern America within that climate type. In this paper we investigate seasonal and diurnal dynamics UHI intensity for Astana, capital city of Kazakhstan (population larger than 835 000 within the city) including UHI intensity changes on different time scales. Now (since 1998) Astana is the second coldest capital city in the world after Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia [3] For this study we use the UHI investigation technology, described in [2]. According to this paper, we selected three stations: one located into city in high and midrise buildings area (including extensive lowrise and high-energy industrial - LCZ classification) and two others located in rural site (sparsely built or open-set and lightweight lowrise according LCZ classification). Also these stations must be close by distance (less than 100 km) and altitude. Therefore, first for Astana city were obtained numerical evaluations for UHI climate dynamics, UHI dependence of synoptic situations and total UHI climatology on monthly and daily averages. References: 1.Howard, L. (1833) The Climate of London, Deduced from Meteorological Observations. Volume 2, London. 2.Kukanova E.A., Konstantinov P.I. An urban heat islands climatology in Russia and linkages to the climate change In Geophysical Research Abstracts, volume 16 of EGU General Assembly, pages EGU2014-10833-1, Germany, 2014. Germany. 3.www.pogoda.ru.net

  4. Foundation Investigation for Ground Based Radar Project-Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    iL_ COPY MISCELLANEOUS PAPER GL-90-5 i iFOUNDATION INVESTIGATION FOR GROUND BASED RADAR PROJECT--KWAJALEIN ISLAND, MARSHALL ISLANDS by Donald E...C!assification) Foundatioa Investigation for Ground Based Radar Project -- Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Yule, Donald E...investigation for the Ground Based Radar Project -- Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands , are presented.- eophysical tests comprised of surface refrac- tion

  5. Stabilization of a magnetic island by localized heating in a tokamak with stiff temperature profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maget, Patrick; Widmer, Fabien; Février, Olivier; Garbet, Xavier; Lütjens, Hinrich

    2018-02-01

    In tokamaks plasmas, turbulent transport is triggered above a threshold in the temperature gradient and leads to stiff profiles. This particularity, neglected so far in the problem of magnetic island stabilization by a localized heat source, is investigated analytically in this paper. We show that the efficiency of the stabilization is deeply modified compared to the previous estimates due to the strong dependence of the turbulence level on the additional heat source amplitude inside the island.

  6. Global Urban Heat Island (UHI) Data Set, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect represents the relatively higher temperatures found in urban areas compared to surrounding rural areas owing to higher proportions...

  7. Detection of urban heat island in Ankara, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicek, I.; Dogan, U.

    2006-01-01

    Ankara is the second largest city in Turkey after Istanbul, and the rate of population increase and urbanization are quite high. In this study, the effects of urbanization on temperature variation due to urbanization in Ankara were investigated. The intensities of urban heat island (UHI) for long and short term were analyzed. Analysis of both long- and short-term data revealed that there is a significant increase in the intensity of UHI (AT(u-r)) in winter during the period analyzed. Analysis of data collected for period of October 2001-September 2002 shows that intensity of maximum UHI is in February. In this month, positive UHI was observed in 26 nights and on all these days wind speed was less than 0.5ms.1. UHI is positive in all seasons and frequency and intensity of UHI in winter are higher than in the other seasons. This characteristic makes Ankara different from other temperate latitude cities

  8. Mitigating the Urban Heat Island Effect in Megacity Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Sodoudi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cities demonstrate higher nocturnal temperatures than surrounding rural areas, which is called “urban heat island” (UHI effect. Climate change projections also indicate increase in the frequency and intensity of heat waves, which will intensify the UHI effect. As megacity Tehran is affected by severe heatwaves in summer, this study investigates its UHI characteristics and suggests some feasible mitigation strategies in order to reduce the air temperature and save energy. Temperature monitoring in Tehran shows clear evidence of the occurrence of the UHI effect, with a peak in July, where the urban area is circa 6 K warmer than the surrounding areas. The mobile measurements show a park cool island of 6-7 K in 2 central parks, which is also confirmed by satellite images. The effectiveness of three UHI mitigation strategies high albedo material (HAM, greenery on the surface and on the roofs (VEG, and a combination of them (HYBRID has been studied using simulation with the microscale model ENVI-met. All three strategies show higher cooling effect in the daytime. The average nocturnal cooling effect of VEG and HYBRID (0.92, 1.10 K is much higher than HAM (0.16 K, although high-density trees show a negative effect on nocturnal cooling.

  9. Experimental investigation of a manifold heat-pipe heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konev, S.V.; Wang Tszin' Lyan'; D'yakov, I.I.

    1995-01-01

    Results of experimental investigations of a heat exchanger on a manifold water heat pipe are given. An analysis is made of the temperature distribution along the heat-transfer agent path as a function of the transferred heat power. The influence of the degree of filling with the heat transfer agent on the operating characteristics of the construction is considered

  10. The urban heat island dynamics during heat waves: a study of cities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Leiqiu

    2016-04-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) is a common phenomenon describing that metropolitan areas are usually warmer than their rural surroundings. This effect is compounded by extreme heat events, which are a leading cause of weather-related human mortality in many countries worldwide. However, the spatial and diurnal variability of temperature and humidity in urban and adjacent rural areas during extreme heat events is not well measured and therefore not well understood. The recently developed dataset of near-surface air and dew temperature from MODIS atmospheric profiles and the new method for the UHI quantification--urban heat island curve are used to quantify the urban climatic changes during heat waves in cities of the United States. The enhanced and weakened UHIs are observed in various cities. The causes of UHI changes during heat waves are discussed, including climate region, vegetation type and amount, city geolocation, etc.

  11. Air pollution prevention through urban heat island mitigation: An update on the urban heat island pilot project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsevski, V.; Taha, H.; Quattrochi, D.; Luvall, J.

    1998-07-01

    Urban heat islands increase the demand for cooling energy and accelerate the formation of smog. They are created when natural vegetation is replaced by heat-absorbing surfaces such as building roofs and walls, parking lots, and streets. Through the implementation of measures designed to mitigate the urban heat island, communities can decrease their demand for energy and effectively cool the metropolitan landscape. In addition to the economic benefits, using less energy leads to reductions in emission of CO{sub 2}--a greenhouse gas--as well as ozone (smog) precursors such as NOx and VOCs. Because ozone is created when NOx and VOCs photochemically combine with heat and solar radiation, actions taken to lower ambient air temperature can significantly reduce ozone concentrations in certain areas. Measures to reverse the urban heat island include afforestation and the widespread use of highly reflective surfaces. To demonstrate the potential benefits of implementing these measures, EPA has teamed up with NASA and LBNL to initiate a pilot project with three US cities. As part of the pilot, NASA will use remotely-sensed data to quantify surface temperature, albedo, the thermal response number and NDVI vegetation of each city. This information will be used by scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) along with other data as inputs to model various scenarios that will help quantify the potential benefits of urban heat island mitigation measures in terms of reduced energy use and pollution. This paper will briefly describe this pilot project and provide an update on the progress to date.

  12. The footprint of urban heat island effect in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decheng Zhou; Shuqing Zhao; Liangxia Zhang; Ge Sun; Yongqiang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) is one major anthropogenic modification to the Earth system that transcends its physical boundary. Using MODIS data from 2003 to 2012, we showed that the UHI effect decayed exponentially toward rural areas for majority of the 32 Chinese cities. We found an obvious urban/ rural temperature “cliff”, and estimated that the footprint of UHI effect (...

  13. Role of City Texture in Urban Heat Islands at Nighttime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobstyl, J. M.; Emig, T.; Qomi, M. J. Abdolhosseini; Ulm, F.-J.; Pellenq, R. J.-M.

    2018-03-01

    An urban heat island (UHI) is a climate phenomenon that results in an increased air temperature in cities when compared to their rural surroundings. In this Letter, the dependence of an UHI on urban geometry is studied. Multiyear urban-rural temperature differences and building footprints data combined with a heat radiation scaling model are used to demonstrate for more than 50 cities worldwide that city texture—measured by a building distribution function and the sky view factor—explains city-to-city variations in nocturnal UHIs. Our results show a strong correlation between nocturnal UHIs and the city texture.

  14. Surface urban heat island across 419 global big cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shushi; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ottle, Catherine; Bréon, François-Marie; Nan, Huijuan; Zhou, Liming; Myneni, Ranga B

    2012-01-17

    Urban heat island is among the most evident aspects of human impacts on the earth system. Here we assess the diurnal and seasonal variation of surface urban heat island intensity (SUHII) defined as the surface temperature difference between urban area and suburban area measured from the MODIS. Differences in SUHII are analyzed across 419 global big cities, and we assess several potential biophysical and socio-economic driving factors. Across the big cities, we show that the average annual daytime SUHII (1.5 ± 1.2 °C) is higher than the annual nighttime SUHII (1.1 ± 0.5 °C) (P < 0.001). But no correlation is found between daytime and nighttime SUHII across big cities (P = 0.84), suggesting different driving mechanisms between day and night. The distribution of nighttime SUHII correlates positively with the difference in albedo and nighttime light between urban area and suburban area, while the distribution of daytime SUHII correlates negatively across cities with the difference of vegetation cover and activity between urban and suburban areas. Our results emphasize the key role of vegetation feedbacks in attenuating SUHII of big cities during the day, in particular during the growing season, further highlighting that increasing urban vegetation cover could be one effective way to mitigate the urban heat island effect.

  15. Intensity of Urban Heat Islands in Tropical and Temperate Climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarete Cristiane de Costa Trindade Amorim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, most of the Earth’s population lives in urban areas. The replacement of vegetation by buildings and the general soil sealing, associated with human activity, lead to a rise in cities temperature, resulting in the formation of urban heat islands. This article aims to evaluate the intensity and the hourly maintenance of the atmospheric heat islands in two climates: one tropical (Presidente Prudente, Brazil and one temperate (Rennes, France throughout 2016. For this, air temperature and hourly averages were measured and calculated using both a HOBO datalogger (U23-002—protected under the same RS3 brand and weather stations Davis Vantage PRO 2. The daily evolution of the heat islands presented characteristics that varied according to the hours and seasons of the year. For both Rennes and Presidente Prudente, the largest magnitudes occurred overnight, being more greatly expressed in the tropical environment and during the driest months (winter in the tropical city and summer in the temperate one. The variability of synoptic conditions from one month to another also leads to a great heterogeneity of UHI intensity throughout the year.

  16. Comparative and Combinative Study of Urban Heat island in Wuhan City with Remote Sensing and CFD Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Yu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Urban heat islands are one of the most critical urban environment heat problems. Landsat ETM+ satellite data were used to investigate the land surface temperature and underlying surface indices such as NDVI and NDBI. A comparative study of the urban heat environment at different scales, times and locations was done to verify the heat island characteristics. Since remote sensing technology has limitations for dynamic flow analysis in the study of urban spaces, a CFD simulation was used to validate the improvement of the heat environment in a city by means of wind. CFD technology has its own shortcomings in parameter setting and verification, while RS technology is helpful to remedy this. The city of Wuhan and its climatological condition of being hot in summer and cold in winter were chosen to verify the comparative and combinative application of RS with CFD in studying the urban heat island.

  17. Marine investigations in the Lakshadweep Islands, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    to navigators through the ages. Recent discoveries made during marine archaeological exploration and excavations in the Lakshadweep have revealed evidences of early settlement and shipwrecks. The findings suggest that the islands had been inhabited much before...

  18. Agriculture and irrigation as potential drivers of urban heat island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Buzan, J. R.; Mishra, V.; Kumar, R.; Shindell, D. T.; Huber, M.

    2017-12-01

    More than half the population are urban dwellers and are most vulnerable to global environmental changes. Urban extents are more prone to intense heating as compared to the surroundings rural area. Presently about 33% of India's population lives in the urban area and is expected to rise steeply, so a better understanding of the phenomenon affecting the urban population is very much important. Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a well-known phenomenon which potentially affects energy consumption, spreading of diseases and mortality. In general, almost all (90%) of the major urban area of the country faces UHI at night time in the range (1-5 °C) while 60% of the regions face Urban Cool Island (UCI) in the range of -1 to 6 °C in day time. Our observations and simulations show that vegetation and irrigation in the surrounding non urban directly affects day time Urban Cool Island effects. This is due to the relative cooling by vegetation and irrigated lands in the vicinity of these urban regions. There is a contrasting variation in UHI/UCI intensities in different seasons and in different time of the day. Most of the urban regions face UHI effect in summers whereas this phenomenton reverses in winters. Daytime UCI is more prominent in the months of April and May due to minimum availability of moisture. We observed that apart from vegetation and irrigation, aerosol is also an important factor governing UHI phenomenon.

  19. Urban heat island research of Novi Sad (Serbia: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Stevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the second part of the 20th century, urbanization accelerated and reached enormous magnitude, which results more and more people live in urbanized regions. Nowadays, about half of the human population is affected by the burdens of urban environments and furthermore the modified parameters of the urban atmosphere compared to the natural environment. Novi Sad (45°15’N, 19°50’E is located in the northern part of Serbia, i.e. on the southern part of the Pannonian Plain and it is the second largest city in the country with a population of about 320,000 in a built-up area of approximately 80 km2. The geographical area is plain, from 80 to 86 m a.s.l., with a gentle relief, so its climate is free from orographic effects. According to Köppen-Geiger climate classification, this region is categorised as Cfa climate (temperate warm climate with a rather uniform annual distribution of precipitation. In the last 20 years, a few papers have been published considering urban heat island (UHI investigations of Novi Sad. The first publication in 1994 is theoretically based and presents all parameters, methods and measurements, which have to be used in order to work on UHI research of Novi Sad. The next studies from 1995 and 2006 analyzed various temperature parameters based on 30-40 year long time series and used rural and urban stations in order to get urban-rural temperature differences. Based on meteorological parameters and the structure of urban area, in 2010 the necessity of defining locations of an urban climate network was showed in order to advance further UHI research. In the last two publications from 2011 a new empirical modeling method, adjusted for cities located on plains, has been used in order to determine locations for representative stations of an urban climate network in Novi Sad.

  20. Urban environment and vegetation: comfort and urban heat island mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Magliocco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the outcomes of an experimental simulation on the microclimatic effects and on thermal comfort of vegetation in urban environment, conducted by means of a three-dimensional microclimate model, ENVI- met 3.1. The simulation considers a wide range of hypothetical cases of typical city areas with different characteristics related to: building density, building height, vegetation type and density. The results of the study show how different combinations of amount and type of vegetation, density and height of buildings affect the urban heat island phenomenon in Mediterranean climate.

  1. Observing the Vertical Dimensions of Singapore's Urban Heat Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, W. T. L.; Ho, D. X. Q.

    2015-12-01

    In numerous cities, measurements of urban warmth in most urban heat island (UHI) studies are generally constrained towards surface or near-surface (quadcopter platforms to measure urban temperature and humidity profiles in Singapore, which is a rapidly urbanizing major tropical metropolis. These profiles were measured from the surface to ~100 m above ground level, a height which includes all of the urban canopy and parts of the urban boundary layer. Initial results indicate significant variations in stability measured over different land uses (e.g. urban park, high-rise residential, commercial); these profiles are also temporally dynamic, depending on the time of day and larger-scale weather conditions.

  2. Monitoring the effects of land use/landcover changes on urban heat island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Ong K.; Sarker, Md Latifur Rahman

    2013-10-01

    Urban heat island effects are well known nowadays and observed in cities throughout the World. The main reason behind the effects of urban heat island (UHI) is the transformation of land use/ land cover, and this transformation is associated with UHI through different actions: i) removal of vegetated areas, ii) land reclamation from sea/river, iii) construction of new building as well as other concrete structures, and iv) industrial and domestic activity. In rapidly developing cities, urban heat island effects increases very hastily with the transformation of vegetated/ other types of areas into urban surface because of the increasing population as well as for economical activities. In this research the effect of land use/ land cover on urban heat island was investigated in two growing cities in Asia i.e. Singapore and Johor Bahru, (Malaysia) using 10 years data (from 1997 to 2010) from Landsat TM/ETM+. Multispectral visible band along with indices such as Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Build Index (NDBI), and Normalized Difference Bareness Index (NDBaI) were used for the classification of major land use/land cover types using Maximum Likelihood Classifiers. On the other hand, land surface temperature (LST) was estimated from thermal image using Land Surface Temperature algorithm. Emissivity correction was applied to the LST map using the emissivity values from the major land use/ land cover types, and validation of the UHI map was carried out using in situ data. Results of this research indicate that there is a strong relationship between the land use/land cover changes and UHI. Over this 10 years period, significant percentage of non-urban surface was decreased but urban heat surface was increased because of the rapid urbanization. With the increase of UHI effect it is expected that local urban climate has been modified and some heat related health problem has been exposed, so appropriate measure should be taken in order to

  3. On the urban heat island effect dependence on temperature trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilloni, I.; Barros, V.

    1997-01-01

    For US, Argentine and Australian cities, yearly mean urban to rural temperature differences (ΔT u-r ) and rural temperatures (T r ) are negatively correlated in almost every case, suggesting that urban heat island intensity depends, among other parameters on the temperature itself. This negative correlation is related to the fact that interannual variability of temperature is generally lower in urban environments than in rural areas. This seems to hold true at low frequencies leading to opposite trends in the two variables. Hence, urban stations are prone to have lower trends in absolute value than rural ones. Therefore, regional data sets including records from urban locations, in addition to urban growth bias may have a second type of urban bias associated with temperature trends. A bulk estimate of this second urban bias trend for the contiguous United States during 1901-1984 indicates that it could be of the same order as the urban growth bias and of opposite sign. If these results could be extended to global data, it could be expected that the spurious influence of urban growth on global temperature trends during warming periods will be offset by the diminishing of the urban heat island intensity. 36 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Use of GLOBE Observations to Derive a Landsat 8 Split Window Algorithm for Urban Heat Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerstrom, L.; Czajkowski, K. P.

    2017-12-01

    Surface temperature has been studied to investigate the warming of urban climates, also known as urban heat islands, which can impact urban planning, public health, pollution levels, and energy consumption. However, the full potential of remotely sensed images is limited when analyzing land surface temperature due to the daunting task of correcting for atmospheric effects. Landsat 8 has two thermal infrared sensors. With two bands in the infrared region, a split window algorithm (SWA), can be applied to correct for atmospheric effects. This project used in situ surface temperature measurements from NASA's ground observation program, the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE), to derive the correcting coefficients for use in the SWA. The GLOBE database provided land surface temperature data that coincided with Landsat 8 overpasses. The land surface temperature derived from Landsat 8 SWA can be used to analyze for urban heat island effect.

  5. Investigation of internally finned LED heat sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Xiong, Lun; Lai, Chuan; Tang, Yumei

    2018-03-01

    A novel heat sink is proposed, which is composed of a perforated cylinder and internally arranged fins. Numerical studies are performed on the natural convection heat transfer from internally finned heat sinks; experimental studies are carried out to validate the numerical results. To compare the thermal performances of internally finned heat sinks and externally finned heat sinks, the effects of the overall diameter, overall height, and installation direction on maximum temperature, air flow and heat transfer coefficient are investigated. The results demonstrate that internally finned heat sinks show better thermal performance than externally finned heat sinks; the maximum temperature of internally finned heat sinks decreases by up to 20% compared with the externally finned heat sinks. The existence of a perforated cylinder and the installation direction of the heat sink affect the thermal performance significantly; it is shown that the heat transfer coefficient of the heat sink with the perforated cylinder is improved greater than that with the imperforated cylinder by up to 34%, while reducing the mass of the heat sink by up to 13%. Project supported by the Scientific Research Fund of Sichuan Provincial Education Department (No. 18ZB0516) and the Sichuan University of Arts and Science (No. 2016KZ009Y).

  6. Characterization of Urban Heat and Exacerbation: Development of a Heat Island Index for California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Taha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To further evaluate the factors influencing public heat and air-quality health, a characterization of how urban areas affect the thermal environment, particularly in terms of the air temperature, is necessary. To assist public health agencies in ranking urban areas in terms of heat stress and developing mitigation plans or allocating various resources, this study characterized urban heat in California and quantified an urban heat island index (UHII at the census-tract level (~1 km2. Multi-scale atmospheric modeling was carried out and a practical UHII definition was developed. The UHII was diagnosed with different metrics and its spatial patterns were characterized for small, large, urban-climate archipelago, inland, and coastal areas. It was found that within each region, wide ranges of urban heat and UHII exist. At the lower end of the scale (in smaller urban areas, the UHII reaches up to 20 degree-hours per day (DH/day; °C.hr/day, whereas at the higher end (in larger areas, it reaches up to 125 DH/day or greater. The average largest temperature difference (urban heat island within each region ranges from 0.5–1.0 °C in smaller areas to up to 5 °C or more at the higher end, such as in urban-climate archipelagos. Furthermore, urban heat is exacerbated during warmer weather and that, in turn, can worsen the health impacts of heat events presently and in the future, for which it is expected that both the frequency and duration of heat waves will increase.

  7. Sensitivities Affecting Heat and Urban Heat Island Effect on Local Scale Projected to Neighborhood Scale in Baltimore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, C.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Scott, A.

    2015-12-01

    Urban regions are often impacted more by heat than adjacent rural areas, which is a phenomenon known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban areas are also highly heterogeneous and notoriously difficult to monitor using standard meteorological protocols—the hottest microclimates within a city often occur in locations that lack open, representative installation sites that are an adequate distance from buildings and direct heat sources. To investigate the challenges of monitoring urban heat, this study examines the sensitivity of temperature and humidity sensors currently used in a Baltimore UHI monitoring network to differences in sun exposure, material on which the data collecting instrument is attached, and land cover class of the vicinity. Sensitivity to sun exposure and attachment site can be interpreted as sources of uncertainty for urban heat monitoring, while sensitivity to land cover may reflect a true source of local temperature and humidity variability. In this study, we present results from a test deployment designed to assess the sensitivity of heat measurements to each of these three factors. We then apply these results to interpret measurements taken across the entire Baltimore UHI monitoring network. These results can then be used to improve heat measurements and more accurately represent and quantify the UHI effect on a broader scale, such as in neighborhoods or urban centers.

  8. Impact of the urban heat island on residents’ energy consumption: a case study of Qingdao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Pang, Huaji; Guo, Wenhui

    2018-02-01

    This paper examines impact of urban heat island on residents’ energy consumption through comparative analyses of monthly air temperature data observed in Qingdao, Laoshan and Huangdao weather stations. The results show effect of urban heat island is close related with urbanization speed. Recently, effects of urban heat island of Laoshan and Huangdao exceed that of Qingdao, consistent with rapid urbanization in Laoshan and Huangdao. Enhanced effect of urban heat island induces surface air temperature to rise up, further increase electricity energy consumption for air conditioning use in summer and reduce coal consumption for residents heating in winter. Comparing change of residents’ energy consumption in summer and winter, increments in summer are less than reduction in winter. This implicates effect of urban heat island is more obvious in winter than in summer.

  9. The Impact of the Urban Heat Island during an Intense Heat Wave in Oklahoma City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B. Basara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During late July and early August 2008, an intense heat wave occurred in Oklahoma City. To quantify the impact of the urban heat island (UHI in Oklahoma City on observed and apparent temperature conditions during the heat wave event, this study used observations from 46 locations in and around Oklahoma City. The methodology utilized composite values of atmospheric conditions for three primary categories defined by population and general land use: rural, suburban, and urban. The results of the analyses demonstrated that a consistent UHI existed during the study period whereby the composite temperature values within the urban core were approximately 0.5∘C warmer during the day than the rural areas and over 2∘C warmer at night. Further, when the warmer temperatures were combined with ambient humidity conditions, the composite values consistently revealed even warmer heat-related variables within the urban environment as compared with the rural zone.

  10. Assessing Heat Health Risk for Sustainability in Beijing’s Urban Heat Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Dong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This research is motivated by the increasing threat of urban heat waves that are likely worsened by pervasive global warming and urbanization. Different regions of the city including urban, borderland and rural area will experience different levels of heat health risk. In this paper, we propose an improved approach to quantitatively assess Beijing’s heat health risk based on three factors from hazard, vulnerability and especially environment which is considered as an independent factor because different land use/cover types have different influence on ambient air temperatures under the Urban Heat Island effect. The results show that the heat health risk of Beijing demonstrates a spatial-temporal pattern with higher risk in the urban area, lower risk in the borderland between urban and rural area, and lowest risk in the rural area, and the total risk fluctuated dramatically during 2008–2011. To be more specific, the heat health risk was clearly higher in 2009 and 2010 than in 2008 and 2011. Further analysis with the urban area at sub-district level signifies that the impervious surface (urban area such as buildings, roads, et al. ratio is of high correlation with the heat health risk. The validation results show that the proposed method improved the accuracy of heat health risk assessment. We recommend that policy makers should develop efficient urban planning to accomplish Beijing’s sustainable development.

  11. The correlation of urban heat island in tropical middle-class housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazir, Zuber Angkasa

    2017-11-01

    A very limited number of green and sustainable construction studies have explored factors related to Urban Heat Island (UHI) in tropical middle-class housing. This paper aimed to investigate the correlation of Urban Heat Island in tropical middle-class housing in three urban housing for middle-class residents of Palembang, which were Taman Sari Kenten, TOP Jakabaring, and Talang Kelapa. Samples consisted of 125 Taman Sari Kenten housing, 27 Talang Kelapa housing, and 12 TOP Jakabaring housing. Independent variables were the resident density, socioeconomic status, house location, roof type, green area ratio, weather, time, air conditioner, pro-environment institution, and NEP scale. The Analytic method included correlation and regression. We identified that all housing had different UHI profiles where Taman Sari Kenten had the highest UHI (4.17 K), followed by Talang Kelapa (2.66 K) and TOP Jakabaring (0.66 K) against temperature in measuring station nearby, owned by BMKG (National Meteorological Station). UHI correlated with the resident density, roof type, green area ratio, weather, time, and air conditioner. The results should add to the design of ideal housing in the tropical climate for middle-class residents, focusing on its ability to mitigate Urban Heat Island.

  12. Monitoring Spatiotemporal Changes of Heat Island in Babol City due to Land Use Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi Panah, S. K.; Kiavarz Mogaddam, M.; Karimi Firozjaei, M.

    2017-09-01

    Urban heat island is one of the most vital environmental risks in urban areas. The advent of remote sensing technology provides better visibility due to the integrated view, low-cost, fast and effective way to study and monitor environmental and humanistic changes. The aim of this study is a spatiotemporal evaluation of land use changes and the heat island in the time period of 1985-2015 for the studied area in the city of Babol. For this purpose, multi-temporal Landsat images were used in this study. For calculating the land surface temperature (LST), single-channel and maximum likelihood algorithms were used, to classify Images. Therefore, land use changes and LST were examined, and thereby the relationship between land-use changes was analyzed with the normalized LST. By using the average and standard deviation of normalized thermal images, the area was divided into five temperature categories, inter alia, very low, low, medium, high and very high and then, the heat island changes in the studied time period were investigated. The results indicate that land use changes for built-up lands increased by 92%, and a noticeable decrease was observed for agricultural lands. The Built-up land changes trend has direct relation with the trend of normalized surface temperature changes. Low and very low-temperature categories which follow a decreasing trend, are related to lands far away from the city. Also, high and very high-temperature categories whose areas increase annually, are adjacent to the city center and exit ways of the town. The results emphasize on the importance of attention of urban planners and managers to the urban heat island as an environmental risk.

  13. MONITORING SPATIOTEMPORAL CHANGES OF HEAT ISLAND IN BABOL CITY DUE TO LAND USE CHANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Alavi Panah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Urban heat island is one of the most vital environmental risks in urban areas. The advent of remote sensing technology provides better visibility due to the integrated view, low-cost, fast and effective way to study and monitor environmental and humanistic changes. The aim of this study is a spatiotemporal evaluation of land use changes and the heat island in the time period of 1985-2015 for the studied area in the city of Babol. For this purpose, multi-temporal Landsat images were used in this study. For calculating the land surface temperature (LST, single-channel and maximum likelihood algorithms were used, to classify Images. Therefore, land use changes and LST were examined, and thereby the relationship between land-use changes was analyzed with the normalized LST. By using the average and standard deviation of normalized thermal images, the area was divided into five temperature categories, inter alia, very low, low, medium, high and very high and then, the heat island changes in the studied time period were investigated. The results indicate that land use changes for built-up lands increased by 92%, and a noticeable decrease was observed for agricultural lands. The Built-up land changes trend has direct relation with the trend of normalized surface temperature changes. Low and very low-temperature categories which follow a decreasing trend, are related to lands far away from the city. Also, high and very high-temperature categories whose areas increase annually, are adjacent to the city center and exit ways of the town. The results emphasize on the importance of attention of urban planners and managers to the urban heat island as an environmental risk.

  14. Heat islands over Mumbai as revealed by autorecorded thermograph data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Voogt, James; Kshirsagar, S. R.; Srivastava, Kavita

    2016-02-01

    This study examined hourly temperature data of two locations of Mumbai metropolitan city. One data point (Coloba, Mumbai) is in centre of the city and the other one (Santacruz, Mumbai) is at the airport. The study finds that there were many occasions when night-time hourly temperatures over the city centre were considerably higher than that of the airport, even though temperature at the time of sunset at both the places was nearly same. In this study, the occasions, when hourly night-time temperature over city was more than that of the airport by objectively defined threshold value (3.0 ∘C in this study) for most of the hours in the night, were termed as heat island events. Analysis of the study reveals that these events are mostly confined to November-February months. The study also found that frequency of such events has doubled in recent two decades in comparison to the earlier two decades.

  15. Positive effects of vegetation: Urban heat island and green roofs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susca, T.; Gaffin, S.R.; Dell'Osso, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to evaluate the positive effects of vegetation with a multi-scale approach: an urban and a building scale. Monitoring the urban heat island in four areas of New York City, we have found an average of 2 deg. C difference of temperatures between the most and the least vegetated areas, ascribable to the substitution of vegetation with man-made building materials. At micro-scale, we have assessed the effect of surface albedo on climate through the use of a climatological model. Then, using the CO 2 equivalents as indicators of the impact on climate, we have compared the surface albedo, and the construction, replacement and use phase of a black, a white and a green roof. By our analyses, we found that both the white and the green roofs are less impactive than the black one; with the thermal resistance, the biological activity of plants and the surface albedo playing a crucial role. - Highlights: → The local morphology and the scarcity of vegetation in NYC core determines its UHI. → We introduce the evaluation of the effects of the surface albedo on climate change. → We use it to compare a black roof with a white and a green one. → Surface albedo has a crucial role in the evaluation of the environmental loads of the roofs. → Vegetation has positive effects on both the urban and the building scale. - Vegetation has positive effects both on an urban scale, mitigating the urban heat island effect; and on a building scale, where albedo, thermal insulation and biological activity of plants play a crucial role.

  16. Satellite air temperature estimation for monitoring the canopy layer heat island of Milan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pichierri, Manuele; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    across the city center from June to September confirming that, in Milan, urban heating is not an occasional phenomenon. Furthermore, this study shows the utility of space missions to monitor the metropolis heat islands if they are able to provide nighttime observations when CLHI peaks are generally......In this work, satellite maps of the urban heat island of Milan are produced using satellite-based infrared sensor data. For this aim, we developed suitable algorithms employing satellite brightness temperatures for the direct air temperature estimation 2 m above the surface (canopy layer), showing...... 2007 and 2010 were processed. Analysis of the canopy layer heat island (CLHI) maps during summer months reveals an average heat island effect of 3–4K during nighttime (with some peaks around 5K) and a weak CLHI intensity during daytime. In addition, the satellite maps reveal a well defined island shape...

  17. Urban heat island and linkage with air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuillet, C.; Galsomies, L.

    2013-01-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) effect can be noticed in cities where the temperature is higher than the surrounding countryside, on average 2 deg. C above. In summer during a heat wave, the gap can up to over ten-degree. UHI causes a thermal stress which induces some repercussions on health. The formation of UHI is more and more documented but further studies have to be conducted in order to qualify and quantify the impacts on our health and environment, and the link with atmospheric pollution. Studies have shown air quality deterioration in UHI areas: Both phenomena can be simultaneous because their conditions of appearance are often linked. Henceforth the stake is to manage and if possible reduce UHI to adapt cities to the expected climate change. Dense cities in the future will also have to be naturally cooled down. In order to do so, we will have to act on the most influential UHI formation factors, namely: vegetation and water, buildings (shapes and materials), production and consumption of energy. (authors)

  18. Strong contributions of local background climate to urban heat islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Lee, Xuhui; Smith, Ronald B.; Oleson, Keith

    2014-07-01

    The urban heat island (UHI), a common phenomenon in which surface temperatures are higher in urban areas than in surrounding rural areas, represents one of the most significant human-induced changes to Earth's surface climate. Even though they are localized hotspots in the landscape, UHIs have a profound impact on the lives of urban residents, who comprise more than half of the world's population. A barrier to UHI mitigation is the lack of quantitative attribution of the various contributions to UHI intensity (expressed as the temperature difference between urban and rural areas, ΔT). A common perception is that reduction in evaporative cooling in urban land is the dominant driver of ΔT (ref. 5). Here we use a climate model to show that, for cities across North America, geographic variations in daytime ΔT are largely explained by variations in the efficiency with which urban and rural areas convect heat to the lower atmosphere. If urban areas are aerodynamically smoother than surrounding rural areas, urban heat dissipation is relatively less efficient and urban warming occurs (and vice versa). This convection effect depends on the local background climate, increasing daytime ΔT by 3.0 +/- 0.3 kelvin (mean and standard error) in humid climates but decreasing ΔT by 1.5 +/- 0.2 kelvin in dry climates. In the humid eastern United States, there is evidence of higher ΔT in drier years. These relationships imply that UHIs will exacerbate heatwave stress on human health in wet climates where high temperature effects are already compounded by high air humidity and in drier years when positive temperature anomalies may be reinforced by a precipitation-temperature feedback. Our results support albedo management as a viable means of reducing ΔT on large scales.

  19. Coupling Analysis of Heat Island Effects, Vegetation Coverage and Urban Flood in Wuhan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Liu, Q.; Fan, W.; Wang, G.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, satellite image, remote sensing technique and geographic information system technique are main technical bases. Spectral and other factors comprehensive analysis and visual interpretation are main methods. We use GF-1 and Landsat8 remote sensing satellite image of Wuhan as data source, and from which we extract vegetation distribution, urban heat island relative intensity distribution map and urban flood submergence range. Based on the extracted information, through spatial analysis and regression analysis, we find correlations among heat island effect, vegetation coverage and urban flood. The results show that there is a high degree of overlap between of urban heat island and urban flood. The area of urban heat island has buildings with little vegetation cover, which may be one of the reasons for the local heavy rainstorms. Furthermore, the urban heat island has a negative correlation with vegetation coverage, and the heat island effect can be alleviated by the vegetation to a certain extent. So it is easy to understand that the new industrial zones and commercial areas which under constructions distribute in the city, these land surfaces becoming bare or have low vegetation coverage, can form new heat islands easily.

  20. Urban and regional heat island adaptation measures in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyre Echevarria Icaza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The urban planner´s role should be adapted to the current globalised and overspecialised economic and environmental context, envisioning a balance at the regional scale, apprehending not only new technologies, but also new mapping principles, that allow obtaining multidisciplinary integral overviews since the preliminary stages of the design process. The urban heat Island (UHI is one of the main phenomena affecting the urban climate. In the Netherlands, during the heat wave of 2006, more than 1,000 extra deaths were registered. UHI-related parameters are an example of new elements that should be taken into consideration since the early phases of the design process. Problem statement Thus, the development of urban design guidelines to reduce the heat islands in Dutch cities and regions requires first an overall reflection on the heat island phenomenom (relevance of the large scale assessment, existing tools, instruments and proposal of integrative and catalysing mapping strategies and then a specific assessment of the phenomenom at the selected locations in The Netherlands (testing those principles. Main research question Could the use of satellite imagery help analyse the UHI in the Netherlands and contribute to suggest catalysing mitigation acions actions implementable in the existing urban context of the cities, regions and provinces assessed? Method The development of urban design principles that aim at reaching a physical balance at the regional scale is critical to ensure a reduction of the UHI effect. Landsat and Modis satellite imagery can be analysed and processed using ATCOR 2/3, ENVI 4.7 and GIS, allowing not only a neighbourhood, city and regional scale assessment, but also generating holistic catalysing mapping typologies: game-board, rhizome, layering and drift, which are critical to ensure the integration of all parameters. The scientific inputs need to be combined not only with other disciplines but often also with existing urban

  1. Utilising green and bluespace to mitigate urban heat island intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, K R; Wells, M J; Kershaw, T

    2017-04-15

    It has long been recognised that cities exhibit their own microclimate and are typically warmer than the surrounding rural areas. This 'mesoscale' influence is known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect and results largely from modification of surface properties leading to greater absorption of solar radiation, reduced convective cooling and lower water evaporation rates. Cities typically contain less vegetation and bodies of water than rural areas, and existing green and bluespace is often under threat from increasing population densities. This paper presents a meta-analysis of the key ways in which green and bluespace affect both urban canopy- and boundary-layer temperatures, examined from the perspectives of city-planning, urban climatology and climate science. The analysis suggests that the evapotranspiration-based cooling influence of both green and bluespace is primarily relevant for urban canopy-layer conditions, and that tree-dominated greenspace offers the greatest heat stress relief when it is most needed. However, the magnitude and transport of cooling experienced depends on size, spread, and geometry of greenspaces, with some solitary large parks found to offer minimal boundary-layer cooling. Contribution to cooling at the scale of the urban boundary-layer climate is attributed mainly to greenspace increasing surface roughness and thereby improving convection efficiency rather than evaporation. Although bluespace cooling and transport during the day can be substantial, nocturnal warming is highlighted as likely when conditions are most oppressive. However, when both features are employed together they can offer many synergistic ecosystem benefits including cooling. The ways in which green and bluespace infrastructure is applied in future urban growth strategies, particularly in countries expected to experience rapid urbanisation, warrants greater consideration in urban planning policy to mitigate the adverse effects of the UHI and enhance climate

  2. Solar Panels reduce both global warming and Urban Heat Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéry eMasson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The production of solar energy in cities is clearly a way to diminish our dependency to fossil fuels, and is a good way to mitigate global warming by lowering the emission of greenhouse gases. However, what are the impacts of solar panels locally ? To evaluate their influence on urban weather, it is necessary to parameterize their effects within the surface schemes that are coupled to atmospheric models. The present paper presents a way to implement solar panels in the Town Energy Balance scheme, taking account of the energy production (for thermal and photovoltaic panels, the impact on the building below and feedback towards the urban micro-climate through radiative and convective fluxes. A scenario of large but realistic deployment of solar panels on the Paris metropolitan area is then simulated. It is shown that solar panels, by shading the roofs, slightly increases the need for domestic heating (3%. In summer however, the solar panels reduce the energy needed for air-conditioning (by 12% and also the Urban Heat Island (UHI: 0.2K by day and up to 0.3K at night. These impacts are larger than those found in previous works, because of the use of thermal panels (that are more efficient than photovoltaic panels and the geographical position of Paris, which is relatively far from the sea. This means that it is not influenced by sea breezes, and hence that its UHI is stronger than for a coastal city of the same size. But this also means that local adaptation strategies aiming to decrease the UHI will have more potent effects. In summary, the deployment of solar panels is good both globally, to produce renewable energy (and hence to limit the warming of the climate and locally, to decrease the UHI, especially in summer, when it can constitute a health threat.

  3. The impact of heat waves on surface urban heat island and local economy in Cluj-Napoca city, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Ioana; Croitoru, Adina-Eliza; Rus, Adina Viorica; Roşca, Cristina Florina; Harpa, Gabriela Victoria; Ciupertea, Antoniu-Flavius; Rus, Ionuţ

    2017-07-01

    The association between heat waves and the urban heat island effect can increase the impact on environment and society inducing biophysical hazards. Heat stress and their associated public health problems are among the most frequent. This paper explores the heat waves impact on surface urban heat island and on the local economy loss during three heat periods in Cluj-Napoca city in the summer of 2015. The heat wave events were identified based on daily maximum temperature, and they were divided into three classes considering the intensity threshold: moderate heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 90th percentile), severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature over the 95th percentile), and extremely severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 98th percentile). The minimum length of an event was of minimum three consecutive days. The surface urban heat island was detected based on land surface temperature derived from Landsat 8 thermal infrared data, while the economic impact was estimated based on data on work force structure and work productivity in Cluj-Napoca derived from the data released by Eurostat, National Bank of Romania, and National Institute of Statistics. The results indicate that the intensity and spatial extension of surface urban heat island could be governed by the magnitude of the heat wave event, but due to the low number of satellite images available, we should consider this information only as preliminary results. Thermal infrared remote sensing has proven to be a very efficient method to study surface urban heat island, due to the fact that the synoptic conditions associated with heat wave events usually favor cloud free image. The resolution of the OLI_TIRS sensor provided good results for a mid-extension city, but the low revisiting time is still a drawback. The potential economic loss was calculated for the working days during heat waves and the estimated loss reached more than 2.5 mil. EUR for each heat wave day

  4. Heat transport in the quasi-single-helicity islands of EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J.

    2009-03-01

    The heat transport inside the magnetic island generated in a quasi-single-helicity regime of a reversed-field pinch device is studied by using a numerical code that simulates the electron temperature and the soft x-ray emissivity. The heat diffusivity χe inside the island is determined by matching the simulated signals with the experimental ones. Inside the island, χe turns out to be from one to two orders of magnitude lower than the diffusivity in the surrounding plasma, where the magnetic field is stochastic. Furthermore, the heat transport properties inside the island are studied in correlation with the plasma current and with the amplitude of the magnetic fluctuations.

  5. Energy Savings Calculations for Heat Island Reduction Strategies in Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.

    2000-03-01

    In 1997, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'', to quantify the potential benefits of Heat Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective to investigate the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City. This paper summarizes our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance and annual C02 reduction of HIR strategies in the three initial cities. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer most savings potential: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by old or new construction and with a gas furnace or an electric heat pump. We defined prototypical building characteristics for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling and heating energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.IE model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings [direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on building [direct effect], (3) combined strategies I and 2 [direct effect], (4) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces [indirect effect] and (5) combined strategies 1, 2 and 4 [direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air-conditioned buildings in each city using readily obtainable data to calculate the metropolitan-wide impact of HIR strategies. The results show, that in Baton Rouge, potential annual energy savings of $15M could be realized by

  6. Urban heat island effect on cicada densities in metropolitan Seoul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoa Q. Nguyen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Urban heat island (UHI effect, the ubiquitous consequence of urbanization, is considered to play a major role in population expansion of numerous insects. Cryptotympana atrata and Hyalessa fuscata are the most abundant cicada species in the Korean Peninsula, where their population densities are higher in urban than in rural areas. We predicted a positive relationship between the UHI intensities and population densities of these two cicada species in metropolitan Seoul. Methods To test this prediction, enumeration surveys of cicada exuviae densities were conducted in 36 localities located within and in the vicinity of metropolitan Seoul. Samples were collected in two consecutive periods from July to August 2015. The abundance of each species was estimated by two resource-weighted densities, one based on the total geographic area, and the other on the total number of trees. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to identify factors critical for the prevalence of cicada species in the urban habitat. Results C. atrata and H. fuscata were major constituents of cicada species composition collected across all localities. Minimum temperature and sampling period were significant factors contributing to the variation in densities of both species, whereas other environmental factors related to urbanization were not significant. More cicada exuviae were collected in the second rather than in the first samplings, which matched the phenological pattern of cicadas in metropolitan Seoul. Cicada population densities increased measurably with the increase in temperature. Age of residential complex also exhibited a significantly positive correlation to H. fuscata densities, but not to C. atrata densities. Discussion Effects of temperature on cicada densities have been discerned from other environmental factors, as cicada densities increased measurably in tandem with elevated temperature. Several mechanisms may contribute to the abundance of

  7. Urban Heat Islands and Their Mitigation vs. Local Impacts of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, H.

    2007-12-01

    Urban heat islands and their mitigation take on added significance, both negative and positive, when viewed from a climate-change perspective. In negative terms, urban heat islands can act as local exacerbating factors, or magnifying lenses, to the effects of regional and large-scale climate perturbations and change. They can locally impact meteorology, energy/electricity generation and use, thermal environment (comfort and heat waves), emissions of air pollutants, photochemistry, and air quality. In positive terms, on the other hand, mitigation of urban heat islands (via urban surface modifications and control of man-made heat, for example) can potentially have a beneficial effect of mitigating the local negative impacts of climate change. In addition, mitigation of urban heat islands can, in itself, contribute to preventing regional and global climate change, even if modestly, by helping reduce CO2 emissions from power plants and other sources as a result of decreased energy use for cooling (both direct and indirect) and reducing the rates of meteorology-dependent emissions of air pollutants. This presentation will highlight aspects and characteristics of heat islands, their mitigation, their modeling and quantification techniques, and recent advances in meso-urban modeling of California (funded by the California Energy Commission). In particular, the presentation will focus on results from quantitative, modeling-based analyses of the potential benefits of heat island mitigation in 1) reducing point- and area-source emissions of CO2, NOx, and VOC as a result of reduced cooling energy demand and ambient/surface temperatures, 2) reducing evaporative and fugitive hydrocarbon emissions as a result of lowered temperatures, 3) reducing biogenic hydrocarbon emissions from existing vegetative cover, 4) slowing the rates of tropospheric/ground-level ozone formation and/or accumulation in the urban boundary layer, and 5) helping improve air quality. Quantitative estimates

  8. The Urban Heat Island Impact in Consideration of Spatial Pattern of Urban Landscape and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Lee, D. K.; Jeong, W.; Sung, S.; Park, J.

    2015-12-01

    Preceding study has established a clear relationship between land surface temperature and area of land covers. However, only few studies have specifically examined the effects of spatial patterns of land covers and urban structure. To examine how much the local climate is affected by the spatial pattern in highly urbanized city, we investigated the correlation between land surface temperature and spatial patterns of land covers. In the analysis of correlation, we categorized urban structure to four different land uses: Apartment residential area, low rise residential area, industrial area and central business district. Through this study, we aims to examine the types of residential structure and land cover pattern for reducing urban heat island and sustainable development. Based on land surface temperature, we investigated the phenomenon of urban heat island through using the data of remote sensing. This study focused on Daegu in Korea. This city, one of the hottest city in Korea has basin form. We used high-resolution land cover data and land surface temperature by using Landsat8 satellite image to examine 100 randomly selected sample sites of 884.15km2 (1)In each land use, we quantified several landscape-levels and class-level landscape metrics for the sample study sites. (2)In addition, we measured the land surface temperature in 3 year hot summer seasons (July to September). Then, we investigated the pattern of land surface temperature for each land use through Ecognition package. (3)We deducted the Pearson correlation coefficients between land surface temperature and each landscape metrics. (4)We analyzed the variance among the four land uses. (5)Using linear regression, we determined land surface temperature model for each land use. (6)Through this analysis, we aims to examine the best pattern of land cover and artificial structure for reducing urban heat island effect in highly urbanized city. The results of linear regression showed that proportional land

  9. Diffusive heat transport across magnetic islands and stochastic layers in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelzl, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Heat transport in tokamak plasmas with magnetic islands and ergodic field lines was simulated at realistic plasma parameters in realistic tokamak geometries. This requires the treatment of anisotropic heat diffusion, which is more efficient along magnetic field lines by up to ten orders of magnitude than perpendicular to them. Comparisons with analytical predictions and experimental measurements allow to determine the stability properties of neoclassical tearing modes as well as the experimental heat diffusion anisotropy.

  10. Wintertime urban heat island modified by global climate change over Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, M.

    2015-12-01

    Urban thermal environment change, especially, surface air temperature (SAT) rise in metropolitan areas, is one of the major recent issues in urban areas. The urban thermal environmental change affects not only human health such as heat stroke, but also increasing infectious disease due to spreading out virus vectors habitat and increase of industry and house energy consumption. The SAT rise is mostly caused by global climate change and urban heat island (hereafter UHI) by urbanization. The population in Tokyo metropolitan area is over 30 millions and the Tokyo metropolitan area is one of the biggest megacities in the world. The temperature rise due to urbanization seems comparable to the global climate change in the major megacities. It is important to project how the urbanization and the global climate change affect to the future change of urban thermal environment to plan the adaptation and mitigation policy. To predict future SAT change in urban scale, we should estimate future UHI modified by the global climate change. This study investigates change in UHI intensity (UHII) of major metropolitan areas in Japan by effects of the global climate change. We performed a series of climate simulations. Present climate simulations with and without urban process are conducted for ten seasons using a high-resolution numerical climate model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Future climate projections with and without urban process are also conducted. The future projections are performed using the pseudo global warming method, assuming 2050s' initial and boundary conditions estimated by a GCM under the RCP scenario. Simulation results indicated that UHII would be enhanced more than 30% in Tokyo during the night due to the global climate change. The enhancement of urban heat island is mostly caused by change of lower atmospheric stability.

  11. A Numerical Study on Impact of Taiwan Island Surface Heat Flux on Super Typhoon Haitang (2005)

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Hongxiong

    2015-01-01

    Three to four tropical cyclones (TCs) by average usually impact Taiwan every year. This study, using the Developmental Tested Center (DTC) version of the Hurricane WRF (HWRF) model, examines the effects of Taiwan’s island surface heat fluxes on typhoon structure, intensity, track, and its rainfall over the island. The numerical simulation successfully reproduced the structure and intensity of super Typhoon Haitang. The model, especially, reproduced the looped path and landfall at nearly the ...

  12. Desert heat island study in winter by mobile transect and remote sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen-Yi; Brazel, Anthony J.; Chow, Winston T. L.; Hedquist, Brent C.; Prashad, Lela

    2009-10-01

    A familiar problem in urban environments is the urban heat island (UHI), which potentially increases air conditioning demands, raise pollution levels, and could modify precipitation patterns. The magnitude and pattern of UHI effects have been major concerns of a lot of urban environment studies. Typically, research on UHI magnitudes in arid regions (such as Phoenix, AZ, USA) focuses on summer. UHI magnitudes in Phoenix (more than three million population) attain values in excess of 5°C. This study investigated the early winter period—a time when summer potential evapotranspiration >250 mm has diminished to 8.0°C, comparable to summertime UHI conditions. Through analysis of the Oke (1998) weather factor ΦW, it was determined thermally induced nighttime cool drainage winds could account for inflating the UHI magnitude in winter.

  13. Investigation of a possible 18th century Dutch shipwreck on Christmas Island or the Cocos (Keeling) Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariese, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of an unidentified 18th century Dutch shipwreck emerges periodically in books, letters and conversations about Christmas Island and the Cocos (Keeling) Islands. An investigation of these sources indicated that different ships may be responsible for these rumours, but it is equally

  14. Assessment of Urban Heat Islands in Small- and Mid-Sized Cities in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata dos Santos Cardoso

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Urban heat islands (UHIs in large cities and different climatic regions have been thoroughly studied; however, their effects are becoming a common concern in smaller cities as well. We assessed UHIs in three tropical cities, analyzing how synoptic conditions, urban morphology, and land cover affect the heat island magnitude. Data gathering involved mobile surveys across Paranavaí (Paraná, Rancharia (São Paulo, and Presidente Prudente (São Paulo, Brazil, during summer evenings (December 2013–January 2014. Temperature data collected over five days in each city point to heat islands with magnitudes up to 6 °C, under calm synoptic conditions, whereas summer average UHI magnitudes peak at 3.7 °C. In addition, UHI magnitudes were higher in areas with closely spaced buildings and few or no trees and building materials that are not appropriate for the region’s climate and thermal comfort.

  15. Adaptation measures for climate change and the urban heat island in Japan's built environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoda, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Climate change scenarios are discussed for Japan with clear implications drawn for the built environment in terms of increased temperatures of 4-5 o C, rising sea levels and subterranean water tables. Research on the impacts and adaptation measures for global warming in Japan is reviewed. One of the most significant impacts of climate change in Japan will exacerbate the existing heat island phenomenon in cities by absorbing increased solar radiation. This will lead to further increases in temperatures in an urban microclimate with negative implications for energy and water consumption, human health and discomfort, and local ecosystems. The current urban heat island phenomenon and its impacts are described. The relationships between climate change and urban heat island impacts are discussed. Potential adaptation measures to those impacts are also discussed and proposed. (author)

  16. Avery Island heater tests: measured data for 1000 days of heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sambeek, L.L.; Stickney, R.G.; DeJong, K.B.

    1983-10-01

    Three heater tests were conducted in the Avery Island salt mine. The measurements of temperature and displacement, and the calculation of stress in the vicinity of each heater are of primary importance in the understanding of the thermal and thermomechanical response of the salt to an emplaced heat source. This report presents the temperature, displacement, and calculated stress data gathered during the heating phase of the three heater tests. The data presented have application in the ongoing studies of the response of geologicic media to an emplaced heat source. Specifically, electric heaters, which simulate canisters of heat-generating nuclear waste, were placed in the floor of the Avery Island salt mine, and measurements were made of the response of the salt caused by the heating. The purpose of this report is to transmit the data to the scientific community; rigorous analysis and interpretation of the data are considered beyond the scope of this data report. 11 references, 46 figures

  17. Monitoring of urban heat island over Shenzhen, China using remotely sensed measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weimin; Hong, Liang; Yang, Lijun; He, Lihuan; Dong, Guihua

    2016-05-01

    In the past three decades, the Shenzhen city, which is located in south of China, has experienced a rapid urbanization process characterized by sharp decrease in farmland and increases in urban area. This rapid urbanization is one of the main causes of many environmental and ecological problems including urban heat island (UHI). Therefore, the monitoring of rapid urbanization regions and the environment is of critical importance for their sustainable development. In this study, Landsat-8 OLI and TIR images, which were acquired on 2013, are used to monitor urban heat island. After radiometric calibration and atmospheric correction with a simplified method for the atmospheric correction (SMAC) are applied to OLI image, an index-based build-up index (IBI), which is based on the soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI), the modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI) and the normalized difference built-up index (NDBI), is employed to extract the build-up land features with a given thresholds. A single-channel algorithm is used to retrieve land surface temperature while the land surface emissivity is derived from a normalized differential vegetation index (NDVI) thresholds method. Surface urban heat island index (SUHII) and urban heat island ratio index (URI) are computed for ten districts of Shenzhen based on build-up land distribution and land surface temperature data. A correlation analysis is conducted between heat island index (including SUHII and URI) and socio-economic statistics (including total population and population density) also are included in this analysis. The results show that, a weak relationship between urban heat island and socio-economic statistics are found.

  18. The Urban Heat Island Behavior of a Large Northern Latitude Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twine, T. E.; Snyder, P. K.; Hertel, W.; Mykleby, P.

    2012-12-01

    Urban heat islands (UHIs) occur when urban and suburban areas experience elevated temperatures relative to their rural surroundings because of differences in vegetation cover, buildings and other development, and infrastructure. Most cities in the United States are warming at twice the rate of the outlying rural areas and the planet as a whole. Temperatures in the urban center can be 2-5°C warmer during the daytime and as much as 10°C at night. Urban warming is responsible for excessive energy consumption, heat-related health effects, an increase in urban pollution, degradation of urban ecosystems, changes in the local meteorology, and an increase in thermal pollution into urban water bodies. One mitigation strategy involves manipulating the surface energy budget to either reduce the amount of solar radiation absorbed at the surface or offset absorbed energy through latent cooling. Options include using building materials with different properties of reflectivity and emissivity, increasing the reflectivity of parking lots, covering roofs with vegetation, and increasing the amount of vegetation overall through tree planting or increasing green space. The goal of the Islands in the Sun project is to understand the formation and behavior of urban heat islands and to mitigate their effects through sensible city engineering and design practices. As part of this project, we have been characterizing the UHI of the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area (TCMA), a 16,000 square kilometer urban and suburban region located in east central Minnesota that includes the two cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul, and evaluating mitigation strategies for reducing urban warming. Annually, the TCMA has a modest 2-3°C UHI that is especially apparent in winter when the urban core can be up to 5-6°C warmer than the surrounding countryside. We present an analysis of regional temperature variations from a dense network of sensors located throughout the TCMA. We focus on the diurnal and seasonal

  19. Study of the heat island phenomenon in large cities and the measures to prevent it; Daitoshi ni okeru heat island gensho to sono taisaku ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, T.; Ishitani, H.; Matsuhashi, T. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-01-30

    The paper made an analysis of the heat island phenomenon in the Kanto area using 3-D numerical analysis models and a study on the effectiveness of the measures to prevent it. The models are composed of advection/diffusion models of heat/steam in the wind-velocity field and atmospheric air, heat diffusion models in the underground and undersea, and heat balance models on the ground surface and sea surface. In the calculation, a simulation was conducted of the case of taking the following three measures: the case where the exhaust heat was reduced 30% in the assumed typical day of summer; the case where the heat volume of buildings/trunk roads was reduced; the case where the evaporation efficiency of buildings/trunk roads was raised. The result of the study was as follows: The reduction effect of the exhaust heat is totally large, but precisely observing, some meshes contrarily showed rises in temperature in the suburbs. Also in the case of reducing the heat volume, the same phenomenon occurred, but the effect was large in the center of a city. It was found that the effect was unexpectedly large in the case of increasing the evaporation efficiency. 7 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Effectiveness of Different Urban Heat Island Mitigation Methods and Their Regional Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N.

    2017-12-01

    Cool roofs and green roofs are two popular methods to mitigate urban heat island and improve urban climate. The effectiveness of different urban heat island mitigation strategies in the summer of 2013 in the Yangtze River Delta, China is investigated using the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model coupled with a physically based urban canopy model. The modifications to the roof surface changed the urban surface radiation balance and then modified the local surface energy budget. Both cool roofs and green roofs led to lower surface skin temperature and near-surface air temperature. Increasing the roof albedo to 0.5 caused a similar effectiveness as covering 25% of urban roofs with vegetation; increasing roof albedo to 0.7 caused a similar near-surface air temperature decrease as 75% green roof coverage. The near-surface relative humidity increased in both cool roof and green roof experiments because of the combination of the impacts of increases in specific humidity and decreases in air temperature. The regional impacts of cool roofs and green roofs were evaluated using the regional effect index. The regional effect could be found in both near-surface air temperature and surface specific/relative humidity when the percentage of roofs covered with high albedo materials or green roofs reached a higher fraction (greater than 50%). The changes in the vertical profiles of temperature cause a more stable atmospheric boundary layer over the urban area; at the same time, the crossover phenomena occurred above the boundary layer due to the decrease in vertical wind speed.

  1. Investigation Status of Heat Exchange while Boiling Hydrocarbon Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Obukhov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains analysis of heat exchange investigations while boiling hydrocarbon fuel. The obtained data are within the limits of the S.S. Kutateladze dependence proposed in 1939. Heat exchange at non-stationary heat release has not been investigated. The data for hydrocarbon fuel with respect to critical density of heat flow are not available even for stationary conditions.

  2. Comprehensive assessments of measures mitigating heat island phenomena in urban areas; Heat shinku wo riyoshita daikibo reibo system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, T; Yamamoto, S; Yoshikado, H; Kondo, H; Kaneho, N; Saegusa, N; Inaba, A [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan); Inoue, M [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo, (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the assessment method of measures mitigating heat island phenomena in urban areas. The heat island phenomena were classified into meso-scale with 100 km-scale, block-scale with several km-scale, and building-scale with 100 m-scale. Urban thermal environment simulation model was developed in response to each scale. For the development, regional data using aircraft and artificial satellite observations, surface observation and thermal environment observation at Shinjuku new central city of Tokyo, and artificial waste heat actual survey data in the southern Kanto district were utilized. Results of the urban thermal environment simulation were introduced as an application of this model. Temperature distributions of the heat island in the Kanto district were simulated with considering urban conditions near Tokyo and without considering it. Daily changes of wall surfaces of high buildings and road surface were calculated. Increase in the air temperature in the back stream of building roofs with increased temperature was determined. 4 figs.

  3. Physical model of the dispersion of a radioactive contaminant in the atmosphere above a heat island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toly, J.A.; Tenchine, D.

    1984-01-01

    The project deals with the impact of surface heating in urban areas on the dispersion of contaminants in the atmosphere. - The atmospheric boundary layer is simulated in a water flume. Ground heating is applied locally reproducing the heat flux of an urban region. Fission products for which internal heat source is neglected are simulated by horizontal plumes at pHs different from the original pH of the flume. - The main results of the study concern: the characterization of the internal boundary layer downstream of the leading edge of the heated ground; the comparison of the concentration distributions of pollutants with and without surface heating. - A transposition of the results, expressed in terms of global parameters, enables information on the heat island effect due to urban regions on the dispersion of contaminants in the atmosphere to be obtained

  4. Modifications of the urban heat island characteristics under exceptionally hot weather - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Founda, Dimitra; Pierros, Fragiskos; Santamouris, Mathew

    2016-04-01

    Considerable recent research suggests that heat waves are becoming more frequent, more intense and longer in the future. Heat waves are characterised by the dominance of prolonged abnormally hot conditions related to synoptic scale anomalies, thus they affect extensive geographical areas. Heat waves (HW) have a profound impact on humans and they have been proven to increase mortality. Urban areas are known to be hotter than the surrounding rural areas due to the well documented urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon. Urban areas face increased risk under heat waves, due to the added heat from the urban heat island and increased population density. Given that urban populations keep increasing, citizens are exposed to significant heat related risk. Mitigation and adaptation strategies require a deep understanding of the response of the urban heat islands under extremely hot conditions. The response of the urban heat island under selected episodes of heat waves is examined in the city of Athens, from the comparison between stations of different characteristics (urban, suburban, coastal and rural). Two distinct episodes of heat waves occurring during summer 2000 were selected. Daily maximum air temperature at the urban station of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) exceeded 40 0C for at least three consecutive days for both episodes. The intensity of UHI during heat waves was compared to the intensity under 'normal' conditions, represented from a period 'before' and 'after' the heat wave. Striking differences of UHI features between HW and no HW cases were observed, depending on the time of the day and the type of station. The comparison between the urban and the coastal station showed an increase of the order of 3 0C in the intensity of UHI during the HW days, as regards both daytime and nighttime conditions. The comparison between urban and a suburban (inland) station, revealed some different behaviour during HWs, with increases of the order of 3 0C in the nocturnal

  5. Using Remote Sensing Data and Research Results for Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Maury; Luvall, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides information on the characteristics of the urban heat island, research designed to provide the data needed to develop effective urban heat island reduction strategies, and the development of local working groups to develop implementation plans. As background, an overview of research results on the urban heat island phenomenon and the resultant effect on energy usage and air quality will be explored. The use of more reflective roofing materials, paving materials, tree planting, and other initiatives will be explored as a basis for strategies to mitigate urban heat islands and improve the urban environment. Current efforts to use aircraft remote sensing data in Atlanta, Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City and our work with non-profit organizations designated to lead public education and strategic development efforts will be presented. Efforts to organize working groups comprised of key stakeholders, the process followed in communicating research results, and methodology for soliciting feedback and incorporating ideas into local plans, policies and decision-making will be discussed. Challenges in developing and transferring data products and research results to stakeholders will be presented. It is our ultimate goal that such efforts be integrated into plans and/or decision models that encourage sustainable development.

  6. Exploring the Urban Heat Island (UHI) Effect in Port Louis, Mauritius

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012r

    2014-10-13

    Oct 13, 2014 ... namely: environmental contamination stemming from traffic congestion, the ... problem of UHI may become a more important issue than global warming because the rate of ..... MIGRATION, population distribution and development in the world. ... Urban Heat Island and Climate Change: An Assessment of.

  7. The urban physical environment: temperature and urban heat islands. Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon M. Heisler; Anthony J. Brazel

    2010-01-01

    The term urban heat island (UHI) describes the phenomenon in which cities are generally warmer than adjacent rural areas. The UHI effect is strongest with skies free of clouds and with low wind speeds. In moist temperate climates, the UHI effect causes cities to be slightly warmer in midday than rural areas, whereas in dry climates, irrigation of vegetation in cites...

  8. The relation between land-cover and the urban heat island in northeastern Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J.R. Murphy; Myrna Hall; Charles Hall; Gordon Heisler; Steve Stehman

    2007-01-01

    As development continues in Puerto Rico, forests and grasslands are being converted to impervious cover, changing the magnitude and geographic range of the Urban Heat Island (UHI). As part of the U.S. National Science Foundation Long Term Ecological Research Program, this study aims to quantify the various meteorological effects that urbanization may be imparting on...

  9. Assessment of urban heat Island for Craiova from satellite-based LST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udristioiu, Mihaela Tinca; Velea, Liliana; Bojariu, Roxana; Sararu, Silviu Constantin

    2017-12-01

    The urban heat island is defined as an excess of heating in urban areas compared with surrounding rural zones which is illustrated by higher surface and air temperatures in the inner part of the cities. The aim of this study is to identify the UHI effect for Craiova - the largest city in the South-Western part of Romania - and to assess its intensity during summer. To this end, MODIS Land surface temperature (LST) for day and night for summer months (June, July, August), in the interval 2002-2017, as well as yearly Land Cover Type (LCT) data also from MODIS were employed. Furthermore, measurements of air and soil temperature from meteorological station Craiova, available from the National Meteorological Administration database, were used to investigate their relation with LST. The analysis shows that in the urban area of Craiova the long-term summer mean LST is about 4 °C (2 °C), higher than in the rural area during daytime (nighttime). During high temperatures episodes, the mean daytime LST reaches 45-47 °C in the city, while the difference from the rural surrounding area is of 2-3 °C. A high correlation (0.77-0.83) is found between LST and air temperature for all land-use types in the area considered. Both LST and 2m-air temperature time-series manifest an increasing linear tendency over the period considered, being more pronounced during the day.

  10. Mitigating the surface urban heat island: Mechanism study and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chunlei

    2017-08-01

    In a surface urban heat island (SUHI), the urban land surface temperature (LST) is usually higher than the temperature of the surrounding rural areas due to human activities and surface characteristics. Because a SUHI has many adverse impacts on urban environment and human health, SUHI mitigation strategies are very important. This paper investigates the mechanism of a SUHI based on the basic physical laws that control the formation of a SUHI; five mitigation strategies are proposed, namely: sprinkling and watering; paving a pervious surface; reducing the anthropogenic heat (AH) release; using a "white roof"; increasing the fractional vegetation cover or leaf area index (LAI). To quantify the effect of these mitigation strategies, 26 sets of experiments are designed and implemented by running the integrated urban land model (IUM). The results of the sensitivity analysis indicate that sprinkling and watering is an effective measure for mitigating a SUHI for an entire day. Decreasing the AH release is also useful for both night- and daytime SUHI mitigation; however, the cooling extent is proportional to the diurnal cycle of AH. Increasing the albedo can reduce the LST in the daytime, especially when the solar radiation is significant; the cooling extent is approximately proportional to the diurnal cycle of the net radiation. Increasing the pervious surface percentage can mitigate the SUHI especially in the daytime. Increasing the fractional vegetation cover can mitigate the SUHI in the daytime but may aggravate the SUHI at night.

  11. A global analysis of the urban heat island effect based on multisensor satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, J.; Frolking, S. E.; Milliman, T. E.; Schneider, A.; Friedl, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Human population is rapidly urbanizing. In much of the world, cities are prone to hotter weather than surrounding rural areas - so-called `urban heat islands' - and this effect can have mortal consequences during heat waves. During the daytime, when the surface energy balance is driven by incoming solar radiation, the magnitude of urban warming is strongly influenced by surface albedo and the capacity to evaporate water (i.e., there is a strong relationship between vegetated land fraction and the ratio of sensible to latent heat loss or Bowen ratio). At nighttime, urban cooling is often inhibited by the thermal inertia of the built environment and anthropogenic heat exhaust from building and transportation energy use. We evaluated a suite of global remote sensing data sets representing a range of urban characteristics against MODIS-derived land-surface temperature differences between urban and surrounding rural areas. We included two new urban datasets in this analysis - MODIS-derived change in global urban extent and global urban microwave backscatter - along with several MODIS standard products and DMSP/OLS nighttime lights time series data. The global analysis spanned a range of urban characteristics that likely influence the magnitude of daytime and/or nighttime urban heat islands - urban size, population density, building density, state of development, impervious fraction, eco-climatic setting. Specifically, we developed new satellite datasets and synthesizing these with existing satellite data into a global database of urban land surface parameters, used two MODIS land surface temperature products to generate time series of daytime and nighttime urban heat island effects for 30 large cities across the globe, and empirically analyzed these data to determine specifically which remote sensing-based characterizations of global urban areas have explanatory power with regard to both daytime and nighttime urban heat islands.

  12. Comprehensive assessments of measures mitigating heat island phenomena in urban areas; Heat shinku wo riyoshita daikibo reibo system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishitani, H; Yamada, K; Yamaji, K; Matsuhashi, T; Iizuka, E; Suzuki, T; Genchi, H; Komiyama, H [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes actual condition and measures against heat island (HI) phenomena in large urban areas with buildings. Tokyo was selected as a model. To extract typical pattern of daily change of air temperature, statistic analysis was conducted using the existing air temperature data at 100 points in and near the city of Tokyo. As a result, five patterns were obtained, i.e., central city, sea/land water affecting zone, thickly settled suburbs, garden city, and countryside. Each one point was selected in each pattern, to measure the underground temperature. It was found that the effect of HI can be easily evaluated from the underground temperature. It was suggested that the HI effect in the central city is estimated to be around 3.6 {degree}C. The measures mitigating HI were divided into the thermal balance improvement in the whole district and the temperature improvement of living space by homogenization or inhomogenization. Energy conservation was investigated for improving the thermal balance which can be practically conducted. According to the measures, it was found that the air temperature in the central city can be decreased by about 0.5 {degree}C at maximum. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Fiscal 1993 investigational report on heat pump heat storage technology; 1993 nendo heat pump chikunetsu gijutsu ni kansuru chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    This project is for an investigation into the heat pump (HP) use heat storage technology, with the aim of clarifying the present status of HP heat storage technology, the utilization status, and the developmental trend of technology and of contributing to the spread of heat energy effective use using HP heat storage technology and to the promotion of the technical development. Accordingly, the evaluation of the following was made: sensible heat (SH), latent heat (LH), chemical heat storage technology (CH), and heat storage technology (HS). Investigations were made on the sensible heat use heat storage technology of water, brine, stone, soil, etc. in terms of SH; the phase change sensible heat use heat storage technology of ice, hydrate salt, paraffins, etc. in terms of LH; hydration, hydroxide, 2-propanol pyrolysis, adsorption of silica gel, zeolite and water, and heat storage technology using metal hydride, etc. in terms of CH. In terms of HS, the following were studied and evaluated from the study results of the heat storage system in which HP is applied to the sensible heat and latent heat type heat storage technology: contribution to the power load levelling and the reduction of heat source capacity, heat recovery and the use of unused energy, improvement of the system efficiency by combining HP and heat storage technology. 24 refs., 242 figs., 56 tabs.

  14. Daily variation of urban heat island effect and its correlations to urban greenery: A case study of Adelaide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Soltani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban structure and landscape cause an artificial temperature increase in cities, known as the urban heat island effect. The magnitude of such urban–rural temperature difference varies in daily and seasonal basis. Daily patterns of urban heat accumulation in Adelaide is under investigation. In this paper, East–West air temperature profile of Adelaide metropolitan area was mapped in 60 journeys alongside a straight cross route connecting Adelaide Hills to the West Beach under clear sky between 26 July and 15 August 2013. The most intense urban–rural temperature differences of 5.9 °C occurred during midnight in Adelaide. However, maximum urban heat variation occurred during the late afternoon when the near-surface urban heat fluctuates by 2 °C between the CBD East and Western Parklands. During summer heatwaves, the afternoon heat stress limits public life vibrancy in Adelaide. Increased urban greenery can facilitate resilience to heat by providing shadow and evaporative cooling. A better understanding of daily urban heat variations and the cooling effect of urban greenery assists urban policy making and public life management in the context of climate change.

  15. Roles of Urban Tree Canopy and Buildings in Urban Heat Island Effects: Parameterization and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Allen, Dale J.; Zhang, Da-Lin; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Landry, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) effects can strengthen heat waves and air pollution episodes. In this study, the dampening impact of urban trees on the UHI during an extreme heat wave in the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan area is examined by incorporating trees, soil, and grass into the coupled Weather Research and Forecasting model and an urban canopy model (WRF-UCM). By parameterizing the effects of these natural surfaces alongside roadways and buildings, the modified WRF-UCM is used to investigate how urban trees, soil, and grass dampen the UHI. The modified model was run with 50% tree cover over urban roads and a 10% decrease in the width of urban streets to make space for soil and grass alongside the roads and buildings. Results show that, averaged over all urban areas, the added vegetation decreases surface air temperature in urban street canyons by 4.1 K and road-surface and building-wall temperatures by 15.4 and 8.9 K, respectively, as a result of tree shading and evapotranspiration. These temperature changes propagate downwind and alter the temperature gradient associated with the Chesapeake Bay breeze and, therefore, alter the strength of the bay breeze. The impact of building height on the UHI shows that decreasing commercial building heights by 8 m and residential building heights by 2.5 m results in up to 0.4-K higher daytime surface and near-surface air temperatures because of less building shading and up to 1.2-K lower nighttime temperatures because of less longwave radiative trapping in urban street canyons.

  16. Urban Heat Island Versus Air Quality - a Numerical Modelling Study for a European City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallmann, J.; Forkel, R.; Emeis, S.

    2014-12-01

    In 2050 70% of the global population is expected to live in urban areas. Climate change will render these areas more vulnerable to heat waves, which often are accompanied by severe air pollution problems. The Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a feature that adds to the general temperature increase that is expected. Decreasing the UHI can impact air quality as well, because heat influences atmospheric dynamics and accelerates air chemical processes and often also increases the emission of primary pollutants due to increased demand of energy. The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of, e.g., high reflective surfaces and urban greening on mitigating the UHI and the related impact on air quality. A multi-layer urban canopy model is coupled to the mesoscale model WRF-Chem and the urban area of Stuttgart (South-West Germany) is taken as one example. Different scenario runs are executed for short time periods and are compared to a control run. The results show that the UHI effect can be substantially reduced when changing the albedo of roof surfaces, whereas the effect of urban greening is minor. Both scenarios have in common, that they evoke changes in secondary circulation patterns. The effects of these mitigation strategies on chemical composition of the urban atmosphere are complex, attributed to both chemical and dynamical features. Increasing the reflectivity of roof surfaces in the model results in a net decrease of the surface ozone concentration, because ozone formation is highly correlated to temperature. With regard to primary pollutants, e.g. NO, CO and PM10 concentrations are increased when increasing reflectivity. This effect primarily can be ascribed to a reduction of turbulent motion, convection and a decrease of the boundary layer height, coming along with lower temperatures in the urban canopy layer due to increased reflectivity. The table below shows the effect on grid cell mean concentrations for different chemical species and scenarios.

  17. Suburban heat island effect in groundwater energy utilisation in Nordic climate - case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arola, Teppo

    2017-04-01

    We present the preliminary results from the initial thermogeological characterization of Finland's first-ever planned large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) facility. The site is located in the Asko area (Lahti), at a latitude of 60°59'N. In particular, emphasis is put on the results from an aquifer's pumping test performed in July / August 2016 to investigate the potential implication of suburban heat island (SUHI) effect to ATES system on the naturally cold groundwater area. The site has been under geological investigation since July 2015. At a regional scale, the groundwater's natural temperature is about 5.8- 6°C. However, preliminary measurements during the investigations revealed that local groundwater temperature ranged between 7.5 to 8.7 °C in Asko area. The highest temperature was observed underneath buildings, suggesting that higher-than-average temperature is most likely influenced due to anthropogenic heat flux into the ground. The pumping test was performed for 39 days, of which 28 days with groundwater withdrawal and 11 days of heads recovery. The pumped volumes range from 350 to 540 m3/d leading the total volume of 10400 m3 of groundwater. Groundwater temperatures were continuously measured from pumping test well and two observation piezometers during the entire test. The results indicated that aquifer's temperature remained nearly constant being between 7.4 to 7.9 °C during the test period. Heat pulses with temperature variation of 0.1 to 0.3 °C were observed in the pumping well and nearest monitoring well (19 meters from pumping well) during the pumping test and recovery phase. We estimate that the pulses were due to rapidly changed groundwater flowing conditions and pulse indicate "new groundwater" flow to the well. Overall, the preliminary test suggests that groundwater temperature are expected to remain elevated during the ATES system operation. Elevated temperature due the SUHI effect increases groundwater heating potential

  18. Experimental investigation on Heat Transfer Performance of Annular Flow Path Heat Pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Guk; Kim, Kyung Mo; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Mochizuki et al. was suggested the passive cooling system to spent nuclear fuel pool. Detail analysis of various heat pipe design cases was studied to determine the heat pipes cooling performance. Wang et al. suggested the concept PRHRS of MSR using sodium heat pipes, and the transient performance of high temperature sodium heat pipe was numerically simulated in the case of MSR accident. The meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants alarmed to the dangers of station blackout (SBO) accident. After the SBO accident, passive decay heat removal systems have been investigated to prevent the severe accidents. Mochizuki et al. suggested the heat pipes cooling system using loop heat pipes for decay heat removal cooling and analysis of heat pipe thermal resistance for boiling water reactor (BWR). The decay heat removal systems for pressurized water reactor (PWR) were suggested using natural convection mechanisms and modification of PWR design. Our group suggested the concept of a hybrid heat pipe with control rod as Passive IN-core Cooling System (PINCs) for decay heat removal for advanced nuclear power plant. Hybrid heat pipe is the combination of the heat pipe and control rod. In the present research, the main objective is to investigate the effect of the inner structure to the heat transfer performance of heat pipe containing neutron absorber material, B 4 C. The main objective is to investigate the effect of the inner structure in heat pipe to the heat transfer performance with annular flow path. ABS pellet was used instead of B 4 C pellet as cylindrical structures. The thermal performances of each heat pipes were measured experimentally. Among them, concentric heat pipe showed the best performance compared with others. 1. Annular evaporation section heat pipe and annular flow path heat pipe showed heat transfer degradation. 2. AHP also had annular vapor space and contact cooling surface per unit volume of vapor was increased. Heat transfer coefficient of

  19. TREND ASSESSMENT OF SPATIO-TEMPORAL CHANGE OF TEHRAN HEAT ISLAND USING SATELLITE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Saradjian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous investigations on Urban Heat Island (UHI show that land cover change is the main factor of increasing Land Surface Temperature (LST in urban areas, especially conversion of vegetation and bare soil to concrete, asphalt and other man-made structures. On the other hand, other human activities like those which cause to burning fossil fuels, that increase the amount of carbon dioxide, may raise temperature in global scale in comparison with small scales (urban areas. In this study, multiple satellite images with different spatial and temporal resolutions have been used to determine Land Surface Temperature (LST variability in Tehran metropolitan area. High temporal resolution of AVHRR images have been used as the main data source when investigating temperature variability in the urban area. The analysis shows that UHI appears more significant at afternoon and night hours. But the urban class temperature is almost equal to its surrounding vegetation and bare soil classes at around noon. It also reveals that there is no specific difference in UHI intense during the days throughout the year. However, it can be concluded that in the process of city expansion in years, UHI has been grown both spatially and in magnitude. In order to locate land-cover types and relate them to LST, Thematic Mapper (TM images have been exploited. The influence of elevation on the LST has also been studied, using digital elevation model derived from SRTM database.

  20. A Numerical Study on Impact of Taiwan Island Surface Heat Flux on Super Typhoon Haitang (2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiong Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Three to four tropical cyclones (TCs by average usually impact Taiwan every year. This study, using the Developmental Tested Center (DTC version of the Hurricane WRF (HWRF model, examines the effects of Taiwan’s island surface heat fluxes on typhoon structure, intensity, track, and its rainfall over the island. The numerical simulation successfully reproduced the structure and intensity of super Typhoon Haitang. The model, especially, reproduced the looped path and landfall at nearly the right position. Sensitive experiments indicated that Taiwan’s surface heat fluxes have significant influence on the super Typhoon Haitang. Compared to sensible heat (SH fluxes, latent heat (LH is the dominant factor affecting the intensity and rainfall, but they showed opposite effects on intensity and rainfall. LH (SH flux of Taiwan Island intensified (weakened Typhoon Haitang’s intensity and structure by transferring more energy from (to surface. However, only LH played a major role in the looped path before the landfall of the Typhoon Haitang.

  1. Monitoring Urban Heat Island Through Google Earth Engine: Potentialities and Difficulties in Different Cities of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanelli, R.; Nascetti, A.; Cirigliano, R. V.; Di Rico, C.; Monti, P.; Crespi, M.

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this work is to exploit the large-scale analysis capabilities of the innovative Google Earth Engine platform in order to investigate the temporal variations of the Urban Heat Island phenomenon as a whole. A intuitive methodology implementing a largescale correlation analysis between the Land Surface Temperature and Land Cover alterations was thus developed.The results obtained for the Phoenix MA are promising and show how the urbanization heavily affects the magnitude of the UHI effects with significant increases in LST. The proposed methodology is therefore able to efficiently monitor the UHI phenomenon.

  2. Analysis of the effect of local heat island in Seoul using LANDSAT image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. I.; Ryu, J.; Jeon, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    The increase in the rate of industrialization due to urbanization has caused the Urban Heat Island phenomenon which means that the temperature of the city is higher than the surrounding area, and its intensity is increasing with climate change. Among the cities where heat island phenomenon occur, Seoul city has different degree of urbanization, green area ratio, energy consumption, and population density by each district unit. As a result, the strength of heat island phenomenon is also different. The average maximum temperature in each region may differ by more than 3 °, which is bigger than the suburbs in Seoul and it means that analysis of UHI effect by regional unit is needed. Therefore, this study is to extract the UHI Intensity of the regional unit of the Seoul Metropolitan City using the satellite image, analyzed the difference of intensity according to the regional unit. And do linear regression analysis with variables included in three categories(regional meteorological conditions, anthropogenic heat generation, land use factors). As a result, The UHI Intensity value of the Gu unit is significantly different from the UHI Intensity distribution of the Dong unit. The variable having the greatest positive correlation with UHI Intensity was NDBI(Normalized Difference Built-up Index) which shows the distribution of urban area, and Urban area ratio also has high correlation. There was a negative correlation between mean wind speed but there was no significant correlation between population density and power consumption. The result of this study is to identify the regional difference of UHI Intensity and to identify the factors inducing heat island phenomenon. so It is expected that it will provide direction in urban thermal environment design and policy development in the future.

  3. The effectiveness of cool and green roofs as urban heat island mitigation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mitigation of the urban heat island (UHI) effect at the city-scale is investigated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in conjunction with the Princeton Urban Canopy Model (PUCM). Specifically, the cooling impacts of green roof and cool (white/high-albedo) roof strategies over the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area during a heat wave period (7 June–10 June 2008) are assessed using the optimal set-up of WRF-PUCM described in the companion paper by Li and Bou-Zeid (2014). Results indicate that the surface UHI effect (defined based on the urban–rural surface temperature difference) is reduced significantly more than the near-surface UHI effect (defined based on urban–rural 2 m air temperature difference) when these mitigation strategies are adopted. In addition, as the green and cool roof fractions increase, the surface and near-surface UHIs are reduced almost linearly. Green roofs with relatively abundant soil moisture have comparable effect in reducing the surface and near-surface UHIs to cool roofs with an albedo value of 0.7. Significant indirect effects are also observed for both green and cool roof strategies; mainly, the low-level advection of atmospheric moisture from rural areas into urban terrain is enhanced when the fraction of these roofs increases, thus increasing the humidity in urban areas. The additional benefits or penalties associated with modifications of the main physical determinants of green or cool roof performance are also investigated. For green roofs, when the soil moisture is increased by irrigation, additional cooling effect is obtained, especially when the ‘unmanaged’ soil moisture is low. The effects of changing the albedo of cool roofs are also substantial. These results also underline the capabilities of the WRF-PUCM framework to support detailed analysis and diagnosis of the UHI phenomenon, and of its different mitigation strategies. (letter)

  4. Experimental investigation of an active magnetic regenerative heat circulator applied to self-heat recuperation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotani, Yui; Kansha, Yasuki; Ishizuka, Masanori; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation into an active magnetic regenerative (AMR) heat circulator based on self-heat recuperation technology, was conducted to evaluate its energy saving potential in heat circulation. In an AMR heat circulator, magnetocaloric effect is applied to recuperate the heat exergy of the process fluid. The recuperated heat can be reused to heat the feed process fluid and realize self-heat recuperation. In this paper, AMR heat circulator has newly been constructed to determine the amount of heat circulated when applied to self-heat recuperation and the energy consumption of the heat circulator. Gadolinium and water was used as the magnetocaloric working material and the process fluid, respectively. The heat circulated amount was determined by measuring the temperature of the process fluid and gadolinium. The net work input for heat circulation was obtained from the magnetizing and demagnetizing forces and the distance travelled by the magnetocaloric bed. The results were compared with the minimum work input needed for heat circulation derived from exergy loss during heat exchange. It was seen that the experimentally obtained value was close to the minimum work input needed for heat circulation. - Highlights: • AMR heat circulator has newly been constructed for experimental evaluation. • Heat circulation in the vicinity of Curie temperature was observed. • Energy consumption of an AMR heat circulator has been measured. • Energy saving for processes near Curie temperature of working material was seen

  5. Seasonal Variations of the Surface Urban Heat Island in a Semi-Arid City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirous Haashemi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The process of the surface urban heat island (SUHI varies with latitude, climate, topography and meteorological conditions. This study investigated the seasonal variability of SUHI in the Tehran metropolitan area, Iran, with respect to selected surface biophysical variables. Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST was retrieved as nighttime LST data, while daytime LST was retrieved from Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS using the split-window algorithm. Both data covered the time period from September 2013 to September 2015. To assess SUHI intensity, we employed three SUHI indicators, i.e., the LST difference of urban-rural, that of urban-agriculture and that of urban-water. Physical and biophysical surface variables, including land use and land cover (LULC, elevation, impervious surface (IS, fractional vegetation cover (FVC and albedo, were selected to estimate the relationship between LST seasonal variability and the surface properties. Results show that an inversion of the SUHI phenomenon (i.e., surface urban cool island existed at daytime with the maximal value of urban-rural LST difference of −4 K in March; whereas the maximal value of SUHI at nighttime yielded 3.9 K in May. When using the indicators of urban-agriculture and urban-water LST differences, the maximal value of SUHI was found to be 8.2 K and 15.5 K, respectively. Both results were observed at daytime, suggesting the role of bare soils in the inversion of the SUHI phenomenon with the urban-rural indicator. Maximal correlation was observed in the relationship between night LST and elevation in spring (coefficient: −0.76, night LST and IS in spring (0.60, night LST and albedo in winter (−0.53 and day LST with fractional vegetation cover in summer (−0.41. The relationship between all surface properties with LST possessed large seasonal variations, and thus, using these relationships for SUHI modeling may not be

  6. An energy and mortality impact assessment of the urban heat island in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Increased summer energy use and increased summer heat related mortality are the two most cited detrimental impacts of the urban heat island (UHI). An assessment of these impacts was made that considered the annual impact of the UHI, not just the summer impact. It was found that in north of the US there was a net decrease in energy use from the UHI, as heating energy reductions were larger than the increase in cooling energy. In the south there was a net energy increase from the UHI. The impact of the UHI on heat related deaths was an estimated increase of 1.1 deaths per million people. The impact of the UHI on cold related deaths was an estimated decrease of 4.0 deaths per million people. These estimates are caveated by the acknowledgement that compounding factors influence mortality. Hypothermia related death rates were three times higher in rural areas than urban areas. This is surprising as the homeless population is usually considered the most at risk, yet they mostly live in urban areas. - Highlights: • The urban heat island (UHI) may actually be beneficial in colder cities in the US in terms of energy use • The UHI may cause an increase in heat related mortality of ~ 1 deaths per million • In winter the UHI may decrease cold related mortality by ~ 4 deaths per million • Cold related death rates were 3 times higher in rural areas although the homeless population live mainly in urban areas

  7. An energy and mortality impact assessment of the urban heat island in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Scott A., E-mail: Scott.lowe@manhattan.edu

    2016-01-15

    Increased summer energy use and increased summer heat related mortality are the two most cited detrimental impacts of the urban heat island (UHI). An assessment of these impacts was made that considered the annual impact of the UHI, not just the summer impact. It was found that in north of the US there was a net decrease in energy use from the UHI, as heating energy reductions were larger than the increase in cooling energy. In the south there was a net energy increase from the UHI. The impact of the UHI on heat related deaths was an estimated increase of 1.1 deaths per million people. The impact of the UHI on cold related deaths was an estimated decrease of 4.0 deaths per million people. These estimates are caveated by the acknowledgement that compounding factors influence mortality. Hypothermia related death rates were three times higher in rural areas than urban areas. This is surprising as the homeless population is usually considered the most at risk, yet they mostly live in urban areas. - Highlights: • The urban heat island (UHI) may actually be beneficial in colder cities in the US in terms of energy use • The UHI may cause an increase in heat related mortality of ~ 1 deaths per million • In winter the UHI may decrease cold related mortality by ~ 4 deaths per million • Cold related death rates were 3 times higher in rural areas although the homeless population live mainly in urban areas.

  8. METAL CHIP HEATING PROCESS INVESTIGATION (Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Dyakonov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main calculation methods for heat- and mass transfer in porous heterogeneous medium have been considered. The paper gives an evaluation of the possibility to apply them for calculation of metal chip heating process. It has been shown that a description of transfer processes in a chip has its own specific character that is attributed to difference between thermal and physical properties of chip material and lubricant-coolant components on chip surfaces. It has been determined that the known expressions for effective heat transfer coefficients can be used as basic ones while approaching mutually penetrating continuums. A mathematical description of heat- and mass transfer in chip medium can be considered as a basis of mathematical modeling, numerical solution and parameter optimization of the mentioned processes.

  9. Experimental investigation of cryogenic oscillating heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, A.J.; Ma, H.B.; Critser, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    A novel cryogenic heat pipe, oscillating heat pipe (OHP), which consists of an 4 × 18.5 cm evaporator, a 6 × 18.5 cm condenser, and 10 cm length of adiabatic section, has been developed and experimental characterization conducted. Experimental results show that the maximum heat transport capability of the OHP reached 380W with average temperature difference of 49 °C between the evaporator and condenser when the cryogenic OHP was charged with liquid nitrogen at 48% (v/v) and operated in a horizontal direction. The thermal resistance decreased from 0.256 to 0.112 while the heat load increased from 22.5 to 321.8 W. When the OHP was operated at a steady state and an incremental heat load was added to it, the OHP operation changed from a steady state to an unsteady state until a new steady state was reached. This process can be divided into three regions: (I) unsteady state; (II) transient state; and (III) new steady state. In the steady state, the amplitude of temperature change in the evaporator is smaller than that of the condenser while the temperature response keeps the same frequency both in the evaporator and the condenser. The experimental results also showed that the amplitude of temperature difference between the evaporator and the condenser decreased when the heat load increased. PMID:20585410

  10. Dengue transmission in the small-island setting: investigations from the Caribbean island of Grenada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Karin Linda; Macpherson, Calum N

    2009-01-01

    The Caribbean region has experienced a major surge in dengue activity in recent decades. Yet, for many, and especially the smaller islands, the true extent and general epidemiology of dengue transmission remains unclear because of inadequate systems of surveillance and reporting. We established...... benign dengue fever. A shift in serotype activity and modal age was evident during the noted transition, with the more densely populated south end of the island presenting the focus of transmission....

  11. Linking potential heat source and sink to urban heat island: Heterogeneous effects of landscape pattern on land surface temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Cao, Qiwen; Lang, Kun; Wu, Jiansheng

    2017-05-15

    Rapid urbanization has significantly contributed to the development of urban heat island (UHI). Regulating landscape composition and configuration would help mitigate the UHI in megacities. Taking Shenzhen, China, as a case study area, we defined heat source and heat sink and identified strong and weak sources as well as strong and weak sinks according to the natural and socioeconomic factors influencing land surface temperature (LST). Thus, the potential thermal contributions of heat source and heat sink patches were differentiated. Then, the heterogeneous effects of landscape pattern on LST were examined by using semiparametric geographically weighted regression (SGWR) models. The results showed that landscape composition has more significant effects on thermal environment than configuration. For a strong source, the percentage of patches has a positive impact on LST. Additionally, when mosaicked with some heat sink, even a small improvement in the degree of dispersion of a strong source helps to alleviate UHI. For a weak source, the percentage and density of patches have positive impacts on LST. For a strong sink, the percentage, density, and degree of aggregation of patches have negative impacts on LST. The effects of edge density and patch shape complexity vary spatially with the fragmentation of a strong sink. Similarly, the impacts of a weak sink are mainly exerted via the characteristics of percent, density, and shape complexity of patches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The mitigation effect of configuration and context optimization of urban holdings on heat island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y P; Yu, D Y; Xun, B

    2014-01-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon has become a serious problem in recent years. It is necessary to study the mitigation methods and quantify their effects on UHI. In this paper, based on the remote sensed data, an empirical model was established as a negative function of land surface temperature (LST) to vegetation coverage. Urban heat island intensity (UHII) was estimated by a robust statistic algorithm. Compared with the current condition (vegetation coverage equaling to 0%), five high vegetation coverage building scenarios (10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50%) were designed to explore mitigation effects on UHI separately. The results showed that the mean LST increase by about 0.5°C when vegetation coverage decrease by 0.1. UHII has a considerable decrease when the scenarios of vegetation coverage equaling to 20% and 40%, respectively. The reasonable vegetation configuration is the effective UHI mitigation

  13. Existing climate data sources and Their Use in Heat IslandResearch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Pon, Brian; Smith, Craig Kenton; Stamper-Kurn, Dan Moses

    1998-10-01

    Existing climate data sources can be used in two general types of analysis for the detection of urban heat islands. Historical analyses use long-term data records-preferentially from several locations in and around an urban area-to trace the gradual influence of urban development on its climate. Primary sources of such data include the cooperative network, first-order National Weather Service stations, and military weather stations. Analyses of short-term data use information from a dense urban weather station network to discern the location, extent, and magnitude of urban heat islands. Such analyses may use the aforementioned national networks or regional networks such as agricultural, air quality monitoring, or utility networks. We demonstrate the use of existing data sources with a historical analysis of temperature trends in Los Angeles, California, and an analysis of short-term data of the urban temperature profile for Phoenix, Arizona. The Los Angeles climate was examined with eleven long-term data records from the cooperative network. Statistically significant trends of rising temperature were detected at Los Angeles Civic Center and other stations over some parts of the year, although timing of the increase varied from station to station. Observed increases in temperatures maybe due to long-term climate changes, microclimate influences, or local-scale heat islands. The analysis of short-term data was made for Phoenix using the PRISMS station network. Mean diurnal temperature profiles for a month were examined and compared with those for adjacent rural areas. Data fi-om stations in the center of Phoenix showed clear and significant nighttime and daytime temperature differences of 1- 2K (3 - 4"F). These temperature increases maybe attributable to a local-scale heat island.

  14. Shallow geothermal field in Lanzarote (Canary Island). Potential evaluation and heat extraction test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez-Gil, J.L.; Valentin, A. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain); Torres, F. [Universidad de Barcelona (Spain); Albert, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    Boreholes were used to perform various experiments. A thermometry was carried out, as well as chemical analysis and an hydrodynamic modelling. This paper presents the scientific aims and conclusions of the whole project called ``Shallow H.D.R. geothermal field`` in Lanzarote (Canary Islands). Potential evaluation and heat extraction test are presented. (Project JOUG-0004 ES -JR - JOULE Program of the EEC). (TEC). 2 tabs.

  15. Urban Heat Island and Park Cool Island Intensities in the Coastal City of Aracaju, North-Eastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Anjos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an evaluation of the Urban Heat Island (UHI and Park Cool Island (PCI intensities in Aracaju, North-Eastern Brazil, was performed. The basis of our evaluation is a 2-year dataset from the urban climatological network installed with the principles and concepts defined for urban areas related to climatic scales, sitting and exposure, urban morphology, and metadata. The current findings update UHI intensities in Aracaju refuting the trend registered in previous studies. On average, the UHI was more intense in the cool season (1.3 °C than in hot season (0.5 °C, which was caused by wind speed decrease. In relation to the PCI, mitigation of high air temperatures of 1.5–2 °C on average was registered in the city. However, the urban park is not always cooler than the surrounding built environment. Consistent long-term monitoring in the cities is very important to provide more accurate climatic information about the UHI and PCI to be applied in urban planning properly, e.g., to provide pleasant thermal comfort in urban spaces.

  16. Quality and sensitivity of high-resolution numerical simulation of urban heat islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution numerical simulations of the urban heat island (UHI) effect with the widely-used Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are assessed. Both the sensitivity of the results to the simulation setup, and the quality of the simulated fields as representations of the real world, are investigated. Results indicate that the WRF-simulated surface temperatures are more sensitive to the planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme choice during nighttime, and more sensitive to the surface thermal roughness length parameterization during daytime. The urban surface temperatures simulated by WRF are also highly sensitive to the urban canopy model (UCM) used. The implementation in this study of an improved UCM (the Princeton UCM or PUCM) that allows the simulation of heterogeneous urban facets and of key hydrological processes, together with the so-called CZ09 parameterization for the thermal roughness length, significantly reduce the bias (Changing UCMs and PBL schemes does not alter the performance of WRF in reproducing bulk boundary layer temperature profiles significantly. The results illustrate the wide range of urban environmental conditions that various configurations of WRF can produce, and the significant biases that should be assessed before inferences are made based on WRF outputs. The optimal set-up of WRF-PUCM developed in this paper also paves the way for a confident exploration of the city-scale impacts of UHI mitigation strategies in the companion paper (Li et al 2014).

  17. The extent and intensity of the urban heat island in Iași city, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfîcă, Lucian; Ichim, Pavel; Apostol, Liviu; Ursu, Adrian

    2017-10-01

    The study underlines the characteristics of the urban heat island of Iași (Iași's UHI) on the basis of 3 years of air temperature measurements obtained by fixed-point observations. We focus on the identification of UHI development and intensity as it is expressed by the temperature differences between the city centre and the rural surroundings. Annual, seasonal and daily characteristics of Iaşi's UHI are investigated at the level of the classical weather observation. In brief, an intensity of 0.8 °C of UHI and a spatial extension which corresponds to the densely built area of the city were delineated. The Iaşi UHI is stronger during summer calm nights—when the inner city is warmer with 2.5-3 °C than the surroundings—and is weaker during windy spring days. The specific features of Iași's UHI bear a profound connection to the specificity of the urban structure, the high atmospheric stability in the region and the local topography. Also, the effects of Iași's UHI upon some environmental aspects are presented as study cases. For instance, under the direct influence of UHI, we have observed that in the city centre, the apricot tree blossoms earlier (with up to 4 days) and the depth of the snow cover is significantly lower (with up to 10 cm for a rural snow depth of 30 cm) than in the surrounding areas.

  18. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J L; Stott, I; Davies, Z G; Gaston, K J; Leake, J R

    2016-09-19

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health.

  19. Temperature and heat flow measurements in a fumarolic area: Vulcano Island (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guern, F.L. (Centre des Faibles Radioactivites C.N.R.S., Gifsur Yvette, France); Carbonnelle, J.; D' Amore, F.

    1980-01-01

    Vulcano, the southern Aeolian Island, is in fumarolic activity. The possibilities of measurements are limited by the field conditions as well as by the technological feasibility. In the present work different tests were made in the field to measure temperature continuously: only the measurements made in dry steam gave good results because they avoid corrosion, and solution of the acid gases in the condensed steam in the ground. Field measurements show that the heat transfer is mainly due to convection. The values obtained in the field can be used to quantify the remote sensing of heat transfer.

  20. Seasonal and Spatial Characteristics of Urban Heat Islands (UHIs in Northern West Siberian Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Miles

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic heat and modified landscapes raise air and surface temperatures in urbanized areas around the globe. This phenomenon is widely known as an urban heat island (UHI. Previous UHI studies, and specifically those based on remote sensing data, have not included cities north of 60°N. A few in situ studies have indicated that even relatively small cities in high latitudes may exhibit significantly amplified UHIs. The UHI characteristics and factors controlling its intensity in high latitudes remain largely unknown. This study attempts to close this knowledge gap for 28 cities in northern West Siberia (NWS. NWS cities are convenient for urban intercomparison studies as they have relatively similar cold continental climates, and flat, rather homogeneous landscapes. We investigated the UHI in NWS cities using the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS MOD 11A2 land surface temperature (LST product in 8-day composites. The analysis reveals that all 28 NWS cities exhibit a persistent UHI in summer and winter. The LST analysis found differences in summer and winter regarding the UHI effect, and supports the hypothesis of seasonal differences in the causes of UHI formation. Correlation analysis found the strongest relationships between the UHI and population (log P. Regression models using log P alone could explain 65–67% of the variability of UHIs in the region. Additional explanatory power—at least in summer—is provided by the surrounding background temperatures, which themselves are strongly correlated with latitude. The performed regression analysis thus confirms the important role of the surrounding temperature in explaining spatial–temporal variation of UHI intensity. These findings suggest a climatological basis for these phenomena and, given the importance of climatic warming, an aspect that deserves future study.

  1. Experimental investigation on an integrated thermal management system with heat pipe heat exchanger for electric vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Huiming; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Guiying; Qin, Fei; Tian, Changqing; Yan, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    An integrated thermal management system combining a heat pipe battery cooling/preheating system with the heat pump air conditioning system is presented to fulfill the comprehensive energy utilization for electric vehicles. A test bench with battery heat pipe heat exchanger and heat pump air conditioning for a regular five-chair electric car is set up to research the performance of this integrated system under different working conditions. The investigation results show that as the system is d...

  2. Land Use and Land Cover Change, Urban Heat Island Phenomenon, and Health Implications: A Remote Sensing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. P.; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2003-01-01

    Land use and land cover maps of Atlanta Metropolitan Area in Georgia were produced from Landsat MSS and TM images for 1973,1979,1983,1987,1992, and 1997, spanning a period of 25 years. Dramatic changes in land use and land cover have occurred with loss of forest and cropland to urban use. In particular, low-density urban use, which includes largely residential use, has increased by over 119% between 1973 and 1997. These land use and land cover changes have drastically altered the land surface characteristics. An analysis of Landsat images revealed an increase in surface temperature and a decline in NDVI from 1973 to 1997. These changes have forced the development of a significant urban heat island effect and an increase in ground level ozone production to such an extent, that Atlanta has violated EPA's ozone level standard in recent years. The urban heat island initiated precipitation events that were identified between 1996 and 2000 tended to occur near high-density urban areas but outside the I-285 loop that traverses around the Central Business District, i.e. not in the inner city area, but some in close proximity to the highways. The health implications were investigated by comparing the spatial patterns of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, the two ingredients that form ozone by reacting with sunlight, with those of rates of cardiovascular and chronic lower respiratory diseases. A clear core-periphery pattern was revealed for both VOC and NOx emissions, but the spatial pattern was more random in the cases of rates of cardiovascular and chronic lower respiratory diseases. Clearly, factors other than ozone pollution were involved in explaining the rates of these diseases. Further research is therefore needed to understand the health geography and its relationship to land use and land cover change as well as urban heat island effect. This paper illustrates the usefulness of a remote sensing approach for this purpose.

  3. Numerical Investigation of Floor Heating Systems in Low Energy Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzmann, Peter; Kragh, Jesper; Jensen, Claus Franceos

    2002-01-01

    In this paper an investigation of floor heating systems is performed with respect to heating demand and room temperature. Presently (2001) no commercially available building simulation programs that can be used to evaluate heating demand and thermal comfort in buildings with building integrated....... The model calculates heating demand, room temperatures, and thermal comfort parameters for a person in the room. The model is based on a numerical Finite Control Volume (FCV) method for the heat transfer in walls, ceiling, windows and floor. The model uses both convective and radiative heat transfer...... to the room air and between the room surfaces. The simulation model has been used to calculate heating demand and room temperature in a typical well insulated Danish single-family house with a heating demand of approximately 6000 kWh per year, for a 130 m² house. Two different types of floor heating systems...

  4. Analytical approach for evaluating temperature field of thermal modified asphalt pavement and urban heat island effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jiaqi; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Hongzhou

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Derive an analytical approach to predict temperature fields of multi-layered asphalt pavement based on Green’s function. • Analyze the effects of thermal modifications on heat output from pavement to near-surface environment. • Evaluate pavement solutions for reducing urban heat island (UHI) effect. - Abstract: This paper aims to present an analytical approach to predict temperature fields in asphalt pavement and evaluate the effects of thermal modification on near-surface environment for urban heat island (UHI) effect. The analytical solution of temperature fields in the multi-layered pavement structure was derived with the Green’s function method, using climatic factors including solar radiation, wind velocity, and air temperature as input parameters. The temperature solutions were validated with an outdoor field experiment. By using the proposed analytical solution, temperature fields in the pavement with different pavement surface albedo, thermal conductivity, and layer combinations were analyzed. Heat output from pavement surface to the near-surface environment was studied as an indicator of pavement contribution to UHI effect. The analysis results show that increasing pavement surface albedo could decrease pavement temperature at various depths, and increase heat output intensity in the daytime but decrease heat output intensity in the nighttime. Using reflective pavement to mitigate UHI may be effective for an open street but become ineffective for the street surrounded by high buildings. On the other hand, high-conductivity pavement could alleviate the UHI effect in the daytime for both the open street and the street surrounded by high buildings. Among different combinations of thermal-modified asphalt mixtures, the layer combination of high-conductivity surface course and base course could reduce the maximum heat output intensity and alleviate the UHI effect most.

  5. The other side of the coin: urban heat islands as shields from extreme cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Bou-Zeid, E.

    2017-12-01

    Extensive studies focusing on urban heat islands (UHIs) during hot periods create a perception that UHIs are invariably hazardous to human health and the sustainability of cities. Consequently, cities have invested substantial resources to try to mitigate UHIs. These urban policies can have serious repercussions since the health risks associated with cold weather are in fact higher than for heat episodes, yet wintertime UHIs have hardly been explored. We combine ground observations from 12 U.S. cities and high-resolution simulations to show that UHIs not only warm urban areas in the winter, but also further intensify during cold waves by up to 1.32 ± 0.78 oC (mean ± standard deviation) at night. Urban heat islands serve as shelters against extreme colds and provide invaluable benefits of reducing health risks and heating demand. More importantly, our simulations indicate that standard UHI mitigation measures such as green or cool roofs reduce these cold time amenities to different extents. Cities, particularly in cool and cold temperate climates, should hence revisit policies and efforts that are only desgined for hot periods. A paradigm shift is urgently needed to give an equal weight to the wintertime benefits of UHIs in the sustainability and resilience blueprints of cities.

  6. Heatwaves and urban heat islands: A comparative analysis of multiple cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, P.; Bou-Zeid, E.

    2017-01-01

    The recent International Panel on Climate Change report predicts the highly urbanized Northeastern U.S. to be at high risk to heat waves. Since urban residents and infrastructure are known to be highly vulnerable to extreme heat, the goal of this paper is to understand the interaction between the synoptic-scale heat wave and the city-scale urban heat island (UHI) effects. The study also qualitatively analyzes the primary factors that contribute to UHIs by comparing their intensities in different cities with distinct geo-physical characteristics. Our results, generated by using the Weather Research and Forecasting model augmented with advanced urban surface parameterizations, confirm that the amplitude of UHI is related to the physical size of the city. However, the results suggest that cities of comparabale sizes might interact differently with heat waves: in New York City; Washington, DC; and Baltimore (but not in Philadelphia) the regular UHI was amplified more strongly during heat waves compared to smaller cities. The results also establish that the pattern of UHI in different cities, its variability, and its interaction with heat waves are inherently linked to dynamic factors.

  7. Investigations of Intelligent Solar Heating Systems for Single Family House

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Chen, Ziqian; Fan, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Three differently designed intelligent solar heating systems are investigated experimentally in a test facility. The systems provide all the needed yearly heating demand in single family houses. The systems are based on highly stratified tanks with variable auxiliary heated volumes. The tank is a......, the control strategy of intelligent solar heating systems is investigated and the yearly auxiliary energy use of the systems and the electricity price for supplying the consumers with domestic hot water and space heating are calculated....... systems.The system will be equipped with an intelligent control system where the control of the electrical heating element(s)/heat pump is based on forecasts of the variable electricity price, the heating demand and the solar energy production.By means of numerical models of the systems made in Trnsys......Three differently designed intelligent solar heating systems are investigated experimentally in a test facility. The systems provide all the needed yearly heating demand in single family houses. The systems are based on highly stratified tanks with variable auxiliary heated volumes. The tank...

  8. What land covers are effective in mitigating a heat island in urban building rooftop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Ryu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Since the 20th century, due to the rapid urbanization many urban environment problems have got blossomed and above all heat island has been recognized as an important issue. There are several causes of urban heat island, but land cover change occupies the largest portion of them. Owing to urban expansion, vegetation is changed into asphalt pavements and concrete buildings, which reduces latent heat flux. To mitigate the problems, people enlarge vegetation covers such as planting street trees, making rooftop gardens and constructing parks or install white roofs that feature high albedo on a building. While the white roofs reflect about 70% of solar radiation and absorb less radiation, vegetation has low albedo but cools the air through transpiration and fixes carbon dioxide through photosynthesis. There are some studies concerning which one is more effective to mitigate heat island between the green roof and white roof. This study compares the green roof and white roof and additionally considers carbon fixation that has not been treated in other studies. Furthermore, this study ascertains an efficiency of solar-cell panel that is used for building roof recently. The panel produces electric power but has low albedo which could warm the air. The experiment is conducted at the rooftop in Seoul, Korea and compares green roof (grass), white roof (painted cover), black roof (solar panel) and normal painted roof. Surface temperature and albedo are observed for the four roof types and incoming shortwave, outgoing longwave and carbon flux are measured in green roof solely. In the case of solar panels, the electricity generation is calculated from the incoming radiation. We compute global warming potentials for the four roof types and test which roof type is most effective in reducing global warming potential.

  9. Experimental investigation for the optimization of heat pipe performance in latent heat thermal storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladekar, Chandrakishor; Choudhary, S. K. [RTM Nagpur University, Wardha (India); Khandare, S. S. [B. D. College of Engineering, Wardha (India)

    2017-06-15

    We investigated the optimum performance of heat pipe in Latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES), and compared it with copper pipe. Classical plan of experimentation was used to optimize the parameters of heat pipe. Heat pipe fill ratio, evaporator section length to condenser section length ratio i.e., Heat pipe length ratio (HPLR) and heat pipe diameter, was the parameter used for optimization, as result of parametric analysis. Experiment with flow rate of 10 lit./min. was conducted for different fill ratio, HPLR and different diameter. Fill ratio of 80 %, HPLR of 0.9 and heat pipe with diameter of 18 mm showed better trend in charging and discharging. Comparison between the storage tank with optimized heat pipe and copper pipe showed almost 186 % improvement in charging and discharging time compared with the copper pipe embedded thermal storage. Heat transfer between Heat transferring fluid (HTF) and Phase change material (PCM) increased with increase in area of heat transferring media, but storage density of storage tank decreased. Storage tank with heat pipe embedded in place of copper pipe is a better option in terms of charging and discharging time as well heat storage capacity due to less heat lost. This justifies the better efficiency and effectiveness of storage tank with embedded optimized heat pipe.

  10. FY1995 comprehensive assessments of measures mitigating heat island phenomena in urban areas; 1995 nendo heat shinku wo riyoshita daikibo reibo system no kaihatsu (daitoshi ni okeru kaki koonka taisaku gijutsu no hyoka shuho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The urban heat-island phenomenon is one of the man-made changes of local climate. The objectives of this research are to develop a heat-island model to cover the building scale to mesoscale and to assess the countermeasures to heat- island effects. The analysis of Tokyo by remote-sensing, field observation and estimates of anthropogenically exhausted heat using energy consumption data were conducted. And, techniques to assess the most effective countermeasure against the urban warming were developed. (NEDO)

  11. Heat island and spatio-temporal changes of temperature in the city of Bogota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel, L; Ramirez, A; Dominguez, E.

    2010-01-01

    The planet Earth, as a whole, has experienced a warming process caused principally by the accumulation of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Otherwise, it has been well demonstrated that thermic islands exist inside of cities, essentially as a result of the replacement of forest areas with urban materials such as asphalt, concrete, bricks, etc. Based on this foundation, this research evaluated the minimum, median and maximum temperature changes that occurred in the city of Bogota over the last 40 years. This research makes evident the presence of a heat island 3o Cover the periphery median temperature in most of the city. There were also periods with increases and decreases in city temperatures, not affected in its main tendency by the Nino Phenomena which in contrast affected the periphery.

  12. A volcanological and geochemical investigation of Boa Vistta, Cape Verde Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhr, Charlotte Thorup; Holm, Paul Martin

    2009-01-01

    Boa Vista, the easternmost island in the Cape Verde archipelago, consists of volcanic products, minor intrusions and a thin partial sedimentary cover. The first 15 age results from 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating analysis of groundmass separates from volcanic and plutonic rocks from Boa Vista are p...

  13. Investigations of anthropogenic sediments in Qaranilaca, Vanuabalavu Island, Fiji

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunn, P.D.; Matararaba, S.; Ramos, J.

    2000-01-01

    Fieldwork throughout the Vanuabalavu group of islands in northeast Fiji in July 1999 by a team from the University of the South Pacific and the Fiji Museum focused on locating evidence for early (Lapita-age) settlement largely through the collection of potsherds from the surface and in test pits. Another site of especial interest was the large cave named Qaranilaca or 'sail cave' (qara = cave, laca = sail) at the southernmost tip of the main island, Vanuabalavu. The oral tradition states that a man named Ravuravu from Totoya Island in southeast Fiji travelled by outrigger canoe (takia) to Vanuabalavu and, upon arrival, put his sail in this cave to dry before going on to club a hunchbacked man to death farther north. It was originally hoped that the extraordinarily voluminous anthropogenic fill of Qaranilaca might contain a record of human occupation extending back further than the last millenium. Although 14 C dating has demonstrated this not to be so, there is undoubtedly a complex story preserved here which is worthy of more detailed excavation than was possible on this occasion. 10 refs., 3 figs

  14. Key Parameters for Urban Heat Island Assessment in A Mediterranean Context: A Sensitivity Analysis Using the Urban Weather Generator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvati, Agnese; Palme, Massimo; Inostroza, Luis

    2017-10-01

    Although Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a fundamental effect modifying the urban climate, being widely studied, the relative weight of the parameters involved in its generation is still not clear. This paper investigates the hierarchy of importance of eight parameters responsible for UHI intensity in the Mediterranean context. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out using the Urban Weather Generator model, considering the range of variability of: 1) city radius, 2) urban morphology, 3) tree coverage, 4) anthropogenic heat from vehicles, 5) building’s cooling set point, 6) heat released to canyon from HVAC systems, 7) wall construction properties and 8) albedo of vertical and horizontal surfaces. Results show a clear hierarchy of significance among the considered parameters; the urban morphology is the most important variable, causing a relative change up to 120% of the annual average UHI intensity in the Mediterranean context. The impact of anthropogenic sources of heat such as cooling systems and vehicles is also significant. These results suggest that urban morphology parameters can be used as descriptors of the climatic performance of different urban areas, easing the work of urban planners and designers in understanding a complex physical phenomenon, such as the UHI.

  15. a Temporal and Spatial Analysis of Urban Heat Island in Basin City Utilizing Remote Sensing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiao-Tung

    2016-06-01

    Urban Heat Island (UHI) has been becoming a key factor in deteriorating the urban ecological environment. Spatial-temporal analysis on its prototype of basin city's UHI and quantitatively evaluating effect from rapid urbanization will provide theoretical foundation for relieving UHI effect. Based on Landsat 8, ETM+ and TM images of Taipei basin areas from 1900 to 2015, this article has retrieved the land surface temperature (LST) at summer solstice of each year, and then analysed spatial-temporal pattern and evolution characters of UHI in Taipei basin in this decade. The results showed that the expansion built district, UHI area constantly expanded from centre city to the suburb areas. The prototype of UHI in Taipei basin that showed in addition to higher temperatures in the centre city also were relatively high temperatures gathered boundaries surrounded by foot of mountains side. It calls "sinking heat island". From 1900 to 2000, the higher UHI areas were different land use type change had obvious difference by public infrastructure works. And then, in next 15 years till 2015, building density of urban area has been increasing gradually. It has the trend that UHI flooding raises follow urban land use density. Hot spot of UHI in Taipei basin also has the same characteristics. The results suggest that anthropogenic heat release probably plays a significant role in the UHI effect, and must be considered in urban planning adaptation strategies.

  16. Analysis of the ability of water resources to reduce the urban heat island in the Tokyo megalopolis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Tadanobu, E-mail: nakat@nies.go.jp [Asian Environment Research Group, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Process Hydrology Section, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Hashimoto, Shizuka [Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Simulation procedure integrated with multi-scale in horizontally regional-urban-point levels and in vertically atmosphere-surface-unsaturated-saturated layers, was newly developed in order to predict the effect of urban geometry and anthropogenic exhaustion on the hydrothermal changes in the atmospheric/land and the interfacial areas of the Japanese megalopolis. The simulated results suggested that the latent heat flux in new water-holding pavement (consisting of porous asphalt and water-holding filler made of steel by-products based on silica compound) has a strong impact on hydrologic cycle and cooling temperature in comparison with the observed heat budget. We evaluated the relationship between the effect of groundwater use as a heat sink to tackle the heat island and the effect of infiltration on the water cycle in the urban area. The result indicates that effective management of water resources would be powerful for ameliorating the heat island and recovering sound hydrologic cycle there. - Highlights: > Simulation procedure with multi-scale was newly developed. > Latent heat flux in water-holding pavement had strong impact on hydrothermal changes. > Model predicted effect of urban geometry and anthropogenic exhaustion. > Effective management of water resources is powerful for ameliorating heat island. - This study indicates that effective management of water resources would be powerful for ameliorating the heat island and recovering sound hydrologic cycle in urban area.

  17. Analysis of the ability of water resources to reduce the urban heat island in the Tokyo megalopolis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Tadanobu; Hashimoto, Shizuka

    2011-01-01

    Simulation procedure integrated with multi-scale in horizontally regional-urban-point levels and in vertically atmosphere-surface-unsaturated-saturated layers, was newly developed in order to predict the effect of urban geometry and anthropogenic exhaustion on the hydrothermal changes in the atmospheric/land and the interfacial areas of the Japanese megalopolis. The simulated results suggested that the latent heat flux in new water-holding pavement (consisting of porous asphalt and water-holding filler made of steel by-products based on silica compound) has a strong impact on hydrologic cycle and cooling temperature in comparison with the observed heat budget. We evaluated the relationship between the effect of groundwater use as a heat sink to tackle the heat island and the effect of infiltration on the water cycle in the urban area. The result indicates that effective management of water resources would be powerful for ameliorating the heat island and recovering sound hydrologic cycle there. - Highlights: → Simulation procedure with multi-scale was newly developed. → Latent heat flux in water-holding pavement had strong impact on hydrothermal changes. → Model predicted effect of urban geometry and anthropogenic exhaustion. → Effective management of water resources is powerful for ameliorating heat island. - This study indicates that effective management of water resources would be powerful for ameliorating the heat island and recovering sound hydrologic cycle in urban area.

  18. Experimental Investigation of A Heat Pipe-Assisted Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiari, Saeed; Mahdavi, Mahboobe; Qiu, Songgang

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, different operation modes of a latent heat thermal energy storage system assisted by a heat pipe network were studied experimentally. Rubitherm RT55 enclosed by a vertical cylindrical container was used as the Phase Change Material (PCM). The embedded heat pipe network consisting of a primary heat pipe and an array of four secondary heat pipes were employed to transfer heat to the PCM. The primary heat pipe transports heat from the heat source to the heat sink. The secondary heat pipes transfer the extra heat from the heat source to PCM during charging process or retrieve thermal energy from PCM during discharging process. The effects of heat transfer fluid (HTF) flow rate and temperature on the thermal performance of the system were investigated for both charging and discharging processes. It was found that the HTF flow rate has a significant effect on the total charging time of the system. Increasing the HTF flow rate results in a remarkable increase in the system input thermal power. The results also showed that the discharging process is hardly affected by the HTF flow rate but HTF temperature plays an important role in both charging and discharging processes. The authors would like to acknowledge the financial supports by Temple University for the project.

  19. Quality and sensitivity of high-resolution numerical simulation of urban heat islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution numerical simulations of the urban heat island (UHI) effect with the widely-used Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are assessed. Both the sensitivity of the results to the simulation setup, and the quality of the simulated fields as representations of the real world, are investigated. Results indicate that the WRF-simulated surface temperatures are more sensitive to the planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme choice during nighttime, and more sensitive to the surface thermal roughness length parameterization during daytime. The urban surface temperatures simulated by WRF are also highly sensitive to the urban canopy model (UCM) used. The implementation in this study of an improved UCM (the Princeton UCM or PUCM) that allows the simulation of heterogeneous urban facets and of key hydrological processes, together with the so-called CZ09 parameterization for the thermal roughness length, significantly reduce the bias (<1.5 °C) in the surface temperature fields as compared to satellite observations during daytime. The boundary layer potential temperature profiles are captured by WRF reasonable well at both urban and rural sites; the biases in these profiles relative to aircraft-mounted senor measurements are on the order of 1.5 °C. Changing UCMs and PBL schemes does not alter the performance of WRF in reproducing bulk boundary layer temperature profiles significantly. The results illustrate the wide range of urban environmental conditions that various configurations of WRF can produce, and the significant biases that should be assessed before inferences are made based on WRF outputs. The optimal set-up of WRF-PUCM developed in this paper also paves the way for a confident exploration of the city-scale impacts of UHI mitigation strategies in the companion paper (Li et al 2014). (letter)

  20. [Applicability of traditional landscape metrics in evaluating urban heat island effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ai-Lian; Sun, Ran-Hao; Chen, Li-Ding

    2012-08-01

    By using 24 landscape metrics, this paper evaluated the urban heat island effect in parts of Beijing downtown area. QuickBird (QB) images were used to extract the landscape type information, and the thermal bands from Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) images were used to extract the land surface temperature (LST) in four seasons of the same year. The 24 landscape pattern metrics were calculated at landscape and class levels in a fixed window with 120 mx 120 m in size, with the applicability of these traditional landscape metrics in evaluating the urban heat island effect examined. Among the 24 landscape metrics, only the percentage composition of landscape (PLAND), patch density (PD), largest patch index (LPI), coefficient of Euclidean nearest-neighbor distance variance (ENN_CV), and landscape division index (DIVISION) at landscape level were significantly correlated with the LST in March, May, and November, and the PLAND, LPI, DIVISION, percentage of like adjacencies, and interspersion and juxtaposition index at class level showed significant correlations with the LST in March, May, July, and December, especially in July. Some metrics such as PD, edge density, clumpiness index, patch cohesion index, effective mesh size, splitting index, aggregation index, and normalized landscape shape index showed varying correlations with the LST at different class levels. The traditional landscape metrics could not be appropriate in evaluating the effects of river on LST, while some of the metrics could be useful in characterizing urban LST and analyzing the urban heat island effect, but screening and examining should be made on the metrics.

  1. Investigation of energy confinement during ICRF heating on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. Q.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Qin, C. M.; Cheng, Y.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yang, H.; Yuan, S.; Wang, L.; Ju, S. Q.; Chen, G.; Zhang, J. H.; Wang, J. H.; Chen, Z.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Qian, J. P.; Zhang, T.; Li, J. G.; Song, Y. T.; Lin, Y.; Taylor, G.; Hosea, J. C.; Perkins, R. J.; Wukitch, S.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.

    2017-09-01

    A summary is given on recent experiments in L-mode with ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of hydrogen minority in deuterium plasmas on EAST. Experiments show a degradation of confinement with increasing power. Furthermore, the energy confinement time increases with plasma current and magnetic field, whereas it is insensitive to line averaged density. Minority heating has been found to be efficient, and parameters were optimized to maximize its efficiency. ICRH in lower hybrid waves heated plasma was also investigated.

  2. Contrasting responses of urban and rural surface energy budgets to heat waves explain synergies between urban heat islands and heat waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Sun, Ting; Liu, Maofeng; Yang, Long; Wang, Linlin; Gao, Zhiqiu

    2015-01-01

    Heat waves (HWs) are projected to become more frequent and last longer over most land areas in the late 21st century, which raises serious public health concerns. Urban residents face higher health risks due to synergies between HWs and urban heat islands (UHIs) (i.e., UHIs are higher under HW conditions). However, the responses of urban and rural surface energy budgets to HWs are still largely unknown. This study analyzes observations from two flux towers in Beijing, China and reveals significant differences between the responses of urban and rural (cropland) ecosystems to HWs. It is found that UHIs increase significantly during HWs, especially during the nighttime, implying synergies between HWs and UHIs. Results indicate that the urban site receives more incoming shortwave radiation and longwave radiation due to HWs as compared to the rural site, resulting in a larger radiative energy input into the urban surface energy budget. Changes in turbulent heat fluxes also diverge strongly for the urban site and the rural site: latent heat fluxes increase more significantly at the rural site due to abundant available water, while sensible heat fluxes and possibly heat storage increase more at the urban site. These comparisons suggest that the contrasting responses of urban and rural surface energy budgets to HWs are responsible for the synergies between HWs and UHIs. As a result, urban mitigation and adaption strategies such as the use of green roofs and white roofs are needed in order to mitigate the impact of these synergies. (letter)

  3. Green Space and Deaths Attributable to the Urban Heat Island Effect in Ho Chi Minh City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Tran Ngoc; Van, Doan Quang; Kusaka, Hiroyuki; Seposo, Xerxes T; Honda, Yasushi

    2018-04-01

    To quantify heat-related deaths in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, caused by the urban heat island (UHI) and explore factors that may alleviate the impact of UHIs. We estimated district-specific meteorological conditions from 2010 to 2013 using the dynamic downscaling model and calculated the attributable fraction and number of mortalities resulting from the total, extreme, and mild heat in each district. The difference in attributable fraction of total heat between the central and outer districts was classified as the attributable fraction resulting from the UHI. The association among attributable fraction, attributable number with a green space, population density, and budget revenue of each district was then explored. The temperature-mortality relationship between the central and outer areas was almost identical. The attributable fraction resulting from the UHI was 0.42%, which was contributed by the difference in temperature distribution between the 2 areas. Every 1-square-kilometer increase in green space per 1000 people can prevent 7.4 deaths caused by heat. Green space can alleviate the impacts of UHIs, although future studies conducting a heath economic evaluation of tree planting are warranted.

  4. Heat stress control in the TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] defueling and decontamination activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schork, J.S.; Parfitt, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the initial stages of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling and decontamination activities for the reactor building, it was realized that the high levels of loose radioactive contamination would require the use of extensive protective clothing by entry personnel. While there was no doubt that layered protective clothing protects workers from becoming contaminated, it was recognized that these same layers of clothing would impose a very significant heat stress burden. To prevent the potentially serious consequences of a severe reaction to heat stress by workers in the hostile environment of the TMI-2 reactor building and yet maintain the reasonable work productivity necessary to perform the recovery adequately, an effective program of controlling worker exposure to heat stress had to be developed. Body-cooling devices produce a flow of cool air, which is introduced close to the skin to remove body heat through convection and increased sweat evaporation. The cooling effect produced by the Vortex tube successfully protected the workers from heat stress, however, there were several logistical and operational problems that hindered extensive use of these devices. The last type of cooling garment examined was the frozen water garment (FWG) developed by Elizier Kamon at the Pennsylvania State University as part of an Electric Power Research Institute research grant. Personal protection, i.e., body cooling, engineering controls, and administrative controls, have been implemented successfully

  5. Investigation of heat flux processes governing the increase of groundwater temperatures beneath cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, P.; Menberg, K.; Zhu, K.; Blum, P.

    2012-12-01

    In the subsurface of many cities there are widespread and persistent thermal anomalies. These so-called subsurface urban heat islands (UHIs), which also stimulate warming of urban aquifers, are triggered by various processes. Possible heat sources are basements of buildings, leakage of sewage systems, buried district heating networks, re-injection of cooling water and solar irradiation on paved surfaces. In the current study, the reported groundwater temperatures in several Central European cities, such as Berlin, Cologne (Germany) and Zurich (Switzerland) are compared. Available data sets are supplemented by temperature measurements and depth profiles in observation wells. Trend analyses are conducted with time series of groundwater temperatures, and three-dimensional groundwater temperature maps are provided. In all investigated cities, pronounced positive temperature anomalies are present. The distribution of groundwater temperatures appears to be spatially and temporally highly variable. Apparently, the increased heat input into the urban subsurface is controlled by very local and site-specific parameters. In the long-run, the combination of various heat sources results in an extensive temperature increase. In many cases, the maximum temperature elevation is found close to the city center. Regional groundwater temperature differences between the city center and the rural background are up to 5 °C, with local hot spots of even more pronounced anomalies. Particular heat sources, like cooling water injections or case-specific underground constructions, can cause local temperatures > 20 °C in the subsurface. Examination of the long-term variations in isotherm maps shows that temperatures have increased by about 1 °C in the city, as well as in the rural background areas over the last decades. This increase could be reproduced with trend analysis of temperature data gathered from several groundwater wells. Comparison between groundwater and air temperatures in the

  6. An experimental investigation of turbulent flow heat transfer through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the turbulent flow heat transfer and to determine the pressure drop characteristics of air, flowing through a tube with insert. An insert of special geometry is used inside the tube. The test section is electrically heated, and air is allowed to flow as the working fluid ...

  7. Molecular investigations on grain filling rate under terminal heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grain yield under post anthesis high temperature stress is largely influenced by grain filling rate (GFR). To investigate molecular basis of this trait, a set of 111 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from Raj 4014, a heat sensitive genotype and WH 730, heat tolerant cultivar was phenotyped during 2009-2010 and ...

  8. Investigation of Heat Sink Efficiency for Electronic Component Cooling Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staliulionis, Ž.; Zhang, Zhe; Pittini, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Research and optimisation of cooling of electronic components using heat sinks becomes increasingly important in modern industry. Numerical methods with experimental real-world verification are the main tools to evaluate efficiency of heat sinks or heat sink systems. Here the investigation...... of relatively simple heat sink application is performed using modeling based on finite element method, and also the potential of such analysis was demonstrated by real-world measurements and comparing obtained results. Thermal modeling was accomplished using finite element analysis software COMSOL and thermo...

  9. Spatial distribution of urban heat island in Hangzhou and its mitigation countermeasures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W.-W.; Li, G.-L.; Xue, J.

    2009-01-01

    of the evolution of urban landuse types, the changes of urban spatial pattern, the rationality of the urban land layout, and the emission of anthropogenic heat. Finally, in the perspective of urban planning, some mitigation countermeasures including the reasonable control of the expansion of urban landuse......, construction of the urban ecological open space, optimization of the layout of urban landuse, and planning for underlaying surface were put forward. This aims to provide a reference to work in improving the thermal environment of Hangzhou City.......Taking Hangzhou City in summer as a case, the thermal infrared remote sensing image (Landsat 5 TM) was used to extract and inverse the surface land cover types and surface temperature of Hangzhou City. The spatial distribution characteristics of urban heat island was analyzed in the city...

  10. Investigations on post-dryout heat transfer in bilaterally heated annular channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, W.X.; Qiu, S.Z.; Jia, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Post-dryout heat transfer in bilaterally heated vertical narrow annular channels with 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm gap size has been experimentally investigated with deionized water under the condition of pressure ranging from 1.38 to 5.9 MPa and low mass flow rate from 42.9 to 150.2 kg/m 2 s. The experimental data was compared with well known empirical correlations including Groeneveld, Mattson, etc., and none of them gave an ideal prediction. Theoretical investigations were also carried out on post-dryout heat transfer in annular channels. Based on analysis of heat exchange processes arising among the droplets, the vapor and two tube walls of annular channel, a non-equilibrium mechanistic heat transfer model was developed. Comparison indicated that the present model prediction showed a good agreement with our experimental data. Theoretical calculation result showed that the forced convective heat transfer between the heated wall and vapor dominate the overall heat transfer. The heat transfer caused by the droplets direct contact to the wall and the interfacial convection/evaporation of droplets in superheated vapors also had an indispensable contribution. The radiation heat transfer would be neglected because of its small contribution (less than 0.11%) to the total heat transfer

  11. The effect of urban heat island on Izmir's city ecosystem and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corumluoglu, Ozsen; Asri, Ibrahim

    2015-03-01

    Depending on the researches done on urban landscapes, it is found that the heat island intensity caused by the activities in any city has some impact on the ecosystem of the region and on the regional climate. Urban areas located in arid and semiarid lands somehow represent heat increase when it is compared with the heat in the surrounding rural areas. Thus, cities located amid forested and temperate climate regions show moderate temperatures. The impervious surfaces let the rainfall leave the city lands faster than undeveloped areas. This effect reduces water's cooling effects on these lands. More significantly, if trees and other vegetations are rare in any region, it means less evapotranspiration-the process by which trees "exhale" water. Trees also contribute to the cooling of urban lands by their shade. Land cover and land use maps can easily be produced by processing of remote sensing satellites' images, like processing of Landsat's images. As a result of this process, urban regions can be distinguished from vegetation. Analyzed GIS data produced and supported by these images can be utilized to determine the impact of urban land on energy, water, and carbon balances at the Earth's surface. Here in this study, it is found that remote sensing technique with thermal images is a liable technique to asses where urban heat islands and hot spots are located in cities. As an application area, in Izmir, it was found that the whole city was in high level of surface temperature as it was over 28 °C during the summer times. Beside this, the highest temperature values which go up to 47 °C are obtained at industrial regions especially where the iron-steel factories and the related industrial activities are.

  12. Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem

    2007-07-01

    World energy use is the main contributor to atmospheric CO2. In 2002, about 7.0 giga metric tons of carbon (GtC) were emitted internationally by combustion of gas, liquid, and solid fuels (CDIAC, 2006), 2 to 5 times the amount contributed by deforestation (Brown et al., 1988). The share of atmospheric carbon emissions for the United States from fossil fuel combustion was 1.6 GtC. Increasing use of fossil fuel and deforestation together have raised atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration some 25% over the last 150 years. According to global climate models and preliminary measurements, these changes in the composition of the atmosphere have already begun raising the Earth's average temperature. If current energy trends continue, these changes could drastically alter the Earth's temperature, with unknown but potentially catastrophic physical and political consequences. During the last three decades, increased energy awareness has led to conservation efforts and leveling of energy consumption in the industrialized countries. An important byproduct of this reduced energy use is the lowering of CO{sub 2} emissions. Of all electricity generated in the United States, about one-sixth is used to air-condition buildings. The air-conditioning use is about 400 tera-watt-hours (TWh), equivalent to about 80 million metric tons of carbon (MtC) emissions, and translating to about $40 billion (B) per year. Of this $40 B/year, about half is used in cities that have pronounced 'heat islands'. The contribution of the urban heat island to the air-conditioning demand has increased over the last 40 years and it is currently at about 10%. Metropolitan areas in the United States (e.g., Los Angeles, Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta, and New York City) have typically pronounced heat islands that warrant special attention by anyone concerned with broad-scale energy efficiency (HIG, 2006). The ambient air is primarily heated through three processes: direct absorption of solar radiation

  13. Experimental investigation on an integrated thermal management system with heat pipe heat exchanger for electric vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Huiming; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Guiying; Qin, Fei; Tian, Changqing; Yan, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An integrated thermal management system is proposed for electric vehicle. • The parallel branch of battery chiller can supply additional cooling capacity. • Heat pipe performance on preheating mode is better than that on cooling mode. • Heat pipe heat exchanger is a feasible choice for battery thermal management. - Abstract: An integrated thermal management system combining a heat pipe battery cooling/preheating system with the heat pump air conditioning system is presented to fulfill the comprehensive energy utilization for electric vehicles. A test bench with battery heat pipe heat exchanger and heat pump air conditioning for a regular five-chair electric car is set up to research the performance of this integrated system under different working conditions. The investigation results show that as the system is designed to meet the basic cabinet cooling demand, the additional parallel branch of battery chiller is a good way to solve the battery group cooling problem, which can supply about 20% additional cooling capacity without input power increase. Its coefficient of performance for cabinet heating is around 1.34 at −20 °C out-car temperature and 20 °C in-car temperature. The specific heat of the battery group is tested about 1.24 kJ/kg °C. There exists a necessary temperature condition for the heat pipe heat exchanger to start action. The heat pipe heat transfer performance is around 0.87 W/°C on cooling mode and 1.11 W/°C on preheating mode. The gravity role makes the heat transfer performance of the heat pipe on preheating mode better than that on cooling mode.

  14. Numerical investigation of heat transfer effects in small wave rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Shi; Okamoto, Koji; Teramoto, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Although a wave rotor is expected to enhance the performance of the ultra-micro gas turbine, the device itself may be affected by downsizing. Apart from the immediate effect of viscosity on flow dynamics when downscaled, the effects of heat transfer on flow field increase at such small scales. To gain an insight into the effects of heat transfer on the internal flow dynamics, numerical investigations were carried out with adiabatic, isothermal and conjugate heat transfer boundary treatments at the wall, and the results compared and discussed in the present study. With the light shed by the discussion of adiabatic and conjugate heat transfer boundary treatments, this work presents investigations of the heat flux distributions, as well as the effects of heat transfer on the internal flow dynamics and the consequent charging and discharging processes for various sizes. When heat transfer is taken into account, states of fluid in the cell before compression process varies, shock waves in compression process are found to be weaker, and changes in the charging and discharging processes are observed. Heat transfer differences between conjugate heat transfer boundary treatment and isothermal boundary treatment are addressed through comparisons of local wall temperature and heat flux. As a result, the difference in discharging temperature of high pressure fluid is noticeable in all sizes investigated, and the rapid increase of differences between results of isothermal and conjugate heat transfer boundary treatment in small size reveals that for certain small sizes (length of cell < 23 mm) the thermal boundary treatment should be taken care of.

  15. Dominant control of agriculture and irrigation on urban heat island in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Mishra, Vimal; Buzan, Jonathan; Kumar, Rohini; Shindell, Drew; Huber, Matthew

    2017-10-25

    As is true in many regions, India experiences surface Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect that is well understood, but the causes of the more recently discovered Urban Cool Island (UCI) effect remain poorly constrained. This raises questions about our fundamental understanding of the drivers of rural-urban environmental gradients and hinders development of effective strategies for mitigation and adaptation to projected heat stress increases in rapidly urbanizing India. Here we show that more than 60% of Indian urban areas are observed to experience a day-time UCI. We use satellite observations and the Community Land Model (CLM) to identify the impact of irrigation and prove for the first time that UCI is caused by lack of vegetation and moisture in non-urban areas relative to cities. In contrast, urban areas in extensively irrigated landscapes generally experience the expected positive UHI effect. At night, UHI warming intensifies, occurring across a majority (90%) of India's urban areas. The magnitude of rural-urban temperature contrasts is largely controlled by agriculture and moisture availability from irrigation, but further analysis of model results indicate an important role for atmospheric aerosols. Thus both land-use decisions and aerosols are important factors governing, modulating, and even reversing the expected urban-rural temperature gradients.

  16. Detailed Urban Heat Island Projections for Cities Worldwide: Dynamical Downscaling CMIP5 Global Climate Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Lauwaet

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new dynamical downscaling methodology to analyze the impact of global climate change on the local climate of cities worldwide is presented. The urban boundary layer climate model UrbClim is coupled to 11 global climate models contained in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 archive, conducting 20-year simulations for present (1986–2005 and future (2081–2100 climate conditions, considering the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 climate scenario. The evolution of the urban heat island of eight different cities, located on three continents, is quantified and assessed, with an unprecedented horizontal resolution of a few hundred meters. For all cities, urban and rural air temperatures are found to increase strongly, up to 7 °C. However, the urban heat island intensity in most cases increases only slightly, often even below the range of uncertainty. A potential explanation, focusing on the role of increased incoming longwave radiation, is put forth. Finally, an alternative method for generating urban climate projections is proposed, combining the ensemble temperature change statistics and the results of the present-day urban climate.

  17. Urban surface temperature behaviour and heat island effect in a tropical planned city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adeb Qaid; Ossen, Dilshan Remaz; Jamei, Elmira; Manaf, Norhashima Abd; Said, Ismail; Ahmad, Mohd Hamdan

    2015-02-01

    Putrajaya is a model city planned with concepts of a "city in the garden" and an "intelligent city" in the tropics. This study presents the behaviour of the surface temperature and the heat island effect of Putrajaya. Findings show that heat island intensity is 2 °C on average at nighttime and negligible at daytime. But high surface temperature values were recorded at the main boulevard due to direct solar radiation incident, street orientation in the direction of northeast and southwest and low building height-to-street width ratio. Buildings facing each other had cooling effect on surfaces during the morning and evening hours; conversely, they had a warming effect at noon. Clustered trees along the street are effective in reducing the surface temperature compared to scattered and isolated trees. Surface temperature of built up areas was highest at noon, while walls and sidewalks facing northwest were hottest later in the day. Walls and sidewalks that face northwest were warmer than those that face southeast. The surface temperatures of the horizontal street surfaces and of vertical façades are at acceptable levels relative to the surface temperature of similar surfaces in mature cities in subtropical, temperate and Mediterranean climates.

  18. PEMBAHASAN MENGENAI EFEK URBAN HEAT ISLAND DAN SOLUSI ALTERNATIF BAGI KOTA JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V Limas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hadirnya Jakarta sebagai salah satu kota metropolitan yang berkembang di dunia, menjadikan Jakarta sebagai salah satu kota yang harus diperhitungkan konsistensinya. Letaknya yang berada di daerah tropis serta memiliki angka kepadatan penduduk yang tinggi menciptakan sebuah masalah serius bagi bangunan perkantoran dan perumahan di dalamnya, polemik yang dimaksud adalah adanya “efek pemanasan di daerah perkotaan”. Artikel ini akan membahas definisi dan aplikasi dari sistem “atap hijau” bersamaan dengan keuntungan dan keunikannya dalam menjawab kebutuhan dalam mengurangi tingginya temperatur pada pusat perkantoran dan daerah perumahan di kota Jakarta. Kata Kunci : efek pemanasan daerah perkotaan, kepadatan penduduk, sistem atap hijau Abstract Considering Jakarta as one of the developing metropolitan cities in the world creates, the need to reckon it’s consistency has emerged. Located in a tropical area with  high population density creates a serious problem to its city planning, in other words an urban heat island effect. This paper will discuss the definition and application of a green roof system along with its advantages or uniqueness to answer the need to reduce high temperature in central business district and residental areas for city of Jakarta in particular. Keywords : urban heat island effect, population density, green roof system

  19. Satellite-based detection of global urban heat-island temperature influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, K.P.; Adegoke, Jimmy O.; Owen, T.W.; Elvidge, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes a satellite-based methodology to assess the urban heat-island influence during warm season months for over 4400 stations included in the Global Historical Climatology Network of climate stations. The methodology includes local and regional satellite retrievals of an indicator of the presence green photosynthetically active vegetation at and around the stations. The difference in local and regional samples of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to estimate differences in mean air temperature. Stations classified as urban averaged 0.90??C (N. Hemisphere) and 0.92??C (S. Hemisphere) warmer than the surrounding environment on the basis of the NDVI-derived temperature estimates. Additionally, stations classified as rural averaged 0.19??C (N. Hemisphere) and 0.16??C (S. Hemisphere) warmer than the surrounding environment. The NDVI-derived temperature estimates were found to be in reasonable agreement with temperature differences observed between climate stations. The results suggest that satellite-derived data sets can be used to estimate the urban heat-island temperature influence on a global basis and that a more detailed analysis of rural stations and their surrounding environment may be necessary to assure that temperature trends derived from assumed rural environments are not influenced by changes in land use/land cover. Copyright 2002 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Investigation of Condensation Heat Transfer Correlation of Heat Exchanger Design in Secondary Passive Cooling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yun Jae; Lee, Hee Joon [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hanok; Lee, Taeho; Park, Cheontae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Recently, condensation heat exchangers have been studied for applications to the passive cooling systems of nuclear plants. To design vertical-type condensation heat exchangers in secondary passive cooling systems, TSCON (Thermal Sizing of CONdenser), a thermal sizing program for a condensation heat exchanger, was developed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). In this study, the existing condensation heat transfer correlation of TSCON was evaluated using 1,157 collected experimental data points from the heat exchanger of a secondary passive cooling system for the case of pure steam condensation. The investigation showed that the Shah correlation, published in 2009, provided the most satisfactory results for the heat transfer coefficient with a mean absolute error of 34.8%. It is suggested that the Shah correlation is appropriate for designing a condensation heat exchanger in TSCON.

  1. Satellite and ground-based sensors for the Urban Heat Island analysis in the city of Rome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabrizi, Roberto; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the trend of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) of Rome is analyzed by both ground-based weather stations and a satellite-based infrared sensor. First, we have developed a suitable algorithm employing satellite brightness temperatures for the estimation of the air temperature belonging...... and nighttime scenes taken between 2003 and 2006 have been processed. Analysis of the Canopy Layer Heat Island (CLHI) during summer months reveals a mean growth in magnitude of 3-4 K during nighttime and a negative or almost zero CLHI intensity during daytime, confirmed by the weather stations. © 2010...... by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Keyword: Thermal pollution,Summer months,Advanced-along track scanning radiometers,Urban heat island,Remote sensing,Canopy layer,Atmospheric temperature,Ground based sensors,Weather information services,Satellite remote sensing,Infra-red sensor,Weather stations...

  2. The use of reflective and permeable pavements as a potential practice for heat island mitigation and stormwater management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H; Harvey, J T; Holland, T J; Kayhanian, M

    2013-01-01

    To help address the built environmental issues of both heat island and stormwater runoff, strategies that make pavements cooler and permeable have been investigated through measurements and modeling of a set of pavement test sections. The investigation included the hydraulic and thermal performance of the pavements. The permeability results showed that permeable interlocking concrete pavers have the highest permeability (or infiltration rate, ∼0.5 cm s −1 ). The two permeable asphalt pavements showed the lowest permeability, but still had an infiltration rate of ∼0.1 cm s −1 , which is adequate to drain rainwater without generating surface runoff during most typical rain events in central California. An increase in albedo can significantly reduce the daytime high surface temperature in summer. Permeable pavements under wet conditions could give lower surface temperatures than impermeable pavements. The cooling effect highly depends on the availability of moisture near the surface layer and the evaporation rate. The peak cooling effect of watering for the test sections was approximately 15–35 °C on the pavement surface temperature in the early afternoon during summer in central California. The evaporative cooling effect on the pavement surface temperature at 4:00 pm on the third day (25 h after watering) was still 2–7 °C lower compared to that on the second day, without considering the higher air temperature on the third day. A separate and related simulation study performed by UCPRC showed that full depth permeable pavements, if designed properly, can carry both light-duty traffic and certain heavy-duty vehicles while retaining the runoff volume captured from an average California storm event. These preliminarily results indicated the technical feasibility of combined reflective and permeable pavements for addressing the built environment issues related to both heat island mitigation and stormwater runoff management. (letter)

  3. Experimental Investigation of Heat Pipe Startup Under Reflux Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2018-01-01

    In the absence of body forces such as gravity, a heat pipe will start as soon as its evaporator temperature reaches the saturation temperature. If the heat pipe operates under a reflux mode in ground testing, the liquid puddle will fill the entire cross sectional area of the evaporator. Under this condition, the heat pipe may not start when the evaporator temperature reaches the saturation temperature. Instead, a superheat is required in order for the liquid to vaporize through nucleate boiling. The amount of superheat depends on several factors such as the roughness of the heat pipe internal surface and the gravity head. This paper describes an experimental investigation of the effect of gravity pressure head on the startup of a heat pipe under reflux mode. In this study, a heat pipe with internal axial grooves was placed in a vertical position with different tilt angles relative to the horizontal plane. Heat was applied to the evaporator at the bottom and cooling was provided to the condenser at the top. The liquid-flooded evaporator was divided into seven segments along the axial direction, and an electrical heater was attached to each evaporator segment. Heat was applied to individual heaters in various combinations and sequences. Other test variables included the condenser sink temperature and tilt angle. Test results show that as long as an individual evaporator segment was flooded with liquid initially, a superheat was required to vaporize the liquid in that segment. The amount of superheat required for liquid vaporization was a function of gravity pressure head imposed on that evaporator segment and the initial temperature of the heat pipe. The most efficient and effective way to start the heat pipe was to apply a heat load with a high heat flux to the lowest segment of the evaporator.

  4. Urban Heat Islands (UHI) and the influence of city parks within the urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, W.; Shandas, V.; Voelkel, J.; Espinoza, D.

    2016-12-01

    Urban Heat Islands (UHI) and the influence of city parks within the urban environment.As cities grow outward and their populations increase the Urban Heat Island (UHI) phenomena becomes an ever more important topic to reducing environmental stressors. When UHI combines with human sensitivities such as pre-existing health conditions, and other vulnerabilities, finding an effective way to cool our cities is a matter of life and death. One way to cool an area is to introduce vegetation; which is abundant is in city parks. This study measures the cooling effect and temperature gradient of city parks; characterizing the relationship between the cooling effects within parks and surrounding neighborhoods. Past studies of the UHI are largely based on satellite images and, more recently, car traverses across that describe the ambient temperatures. The present project aims to understand the effects of parks on the UHI by asking two research questions: (1) how do the physical characteristics and designs of city parks impact the variation in ambient temperatures? And (2) what effect does the park have on cooling the surrounding neighborhoods? We address these questions by using a bicycle mounted with a temperature probe, and a series of geospatial analytics. The bicycle collects temperature data every one second, and the traverse intervals are an hour long to prevent normal fluctuations of daily temperature. Preliminary analysis shows that there is a temperature gradient within the parks (Figure 1). Further, the average temperature of the urban park could cool the surrounding area by upwards of 2°C, depending on the physical characteristics of then park and neighborhood. Our results suggest that the role of smaller parks and their design can reduce heat stress particularly among the vulnerable populations. These results can help urban planners make informed decisions when developing future city infrastructure.

  5. Experimental investigations on solar heating/heat pump systems for single family houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Perers, Bengt

    In the period 2013-2017 the project “Experimental investigations on solar heat pump systems for single family houses” is carried out at Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark. The aim of this project is to increase the knowledge of the heat and mass transfer in the combi...

  6. Diurnal and Seasonal Variation of Surface Urban Cool and Heat Islands in the Semi-Arid City of Erbil, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rasul

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of land surface temperature (LST makes the near-surface layer of the troposphere a key driver of urban climate. This paper assesses the temporal formation of the daytime Surface Urban Cool Island (SUCI and night-time Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI effect in Erbil, Iraq, situated in a semi-arid climate region. LST retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Aqua and Terra and MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI from January 2003 to December 2014 are analysed. The relationships of LST with NDVI and the Normalized Multi-band Drought Index (NMDI are investigated in order to assess the influence of vegetation and moisture on the observed patterns of LST and the SUCI/SUHI. The results indicate that during the daytime, in summer, autumn and winter, densely built-up areas had lower LST acting as a SUCI compared to the non-urbanised area around the city. In contrast, at night-time, Erbil experienced higher LST and demonstrated a significant SUHI effect. The relationship between LST and NDVI is affected by seasonality and is strongly inverted during spring (r2 = 0.73; p < 0.01. Contrary to previous studies of semi-arid cities, a SUCI was detected, not only in the morning, but also during the afternoon.

  7. Seasonal and Spatial Variation of Surface Urban Heat Island Intensity in a Small Urban Agglomerate in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elis Dener Lima Alves

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, SUHIs (surface urban heat islands have been greatly emphasized in urban climate studies, since it is one of the climate phenomena most influenced by human action. In this study, temporal and spatial variations of SUHIs in the cities of Ceres and Rialma (Brazil were investigated; satellite Landsat 8 TIRS/OLI images from 2013 to 2016 were used for this purpose. The results showed that in all seasons, two relationships were observed, one positive and one negative. An N D V I (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index of 0.2 is the divider of this relationship: up to this value, the relationship is positive, that is, the higher the N D V I value, the higher the surface temperature, while the relationship is negative at an N D V I greater than 0.2. There was high seasonal variation in the SUHIs, with the highest intensities recorded in the spring and summer (±12 °C, and the lowest in the winter. These temporal variations were attributed to the annual cycle of precipitation, which directly involves the robustness of the Cerrado vegetation. SUHIs occupied, on average, an area three times larger than the area of SUCIs (surface urban cool islands. The highest values of SUCIs were observed in water bodies and in valley bottoms. Overall, SUHIs showed high intensities; however, a more intense core area, such as in large cities, was not observed.

  8. Non-Markovian Investigation of an Autonomous Quantum Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ketan

    A systematic study of a quantum heat engine is presented in this thesis. In particular, we study heat conduction through a two-two level composite system, which is then connected to a photon cavity to extract work, forming an autonomous quantum heat engine. The question as to what extent quantum effects such as quantum coherence and correlations impact thermodynamic properties of such a system is addressed. The investigated heat engine has been previously studied using the popular Born-Markovian quantum master equation under weak internal coupling approximation. However, we show that the used approach is quite limited in addressing such problems as it is incapable of correctly accounting for the quantum effects. By using a non-Markovian approach involving hierarchical equations of motion, we show that quantum coherence and correlations between system and environments play a significant role in energy transfer processes of heat conduction and work.

  9. Investigation of anodic oxide coatings on zirconium after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, Maciej; Dercz, Grzegorz; Suchanek, Katarzyna; Simka, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxide layers prepared via PEO of zirconium were subjected to heat treatment. • Surface characteristics were determined for the obtained oxide coatings. • Heat treatment led to the partial destruction of the anodic oxide layer. • Pitting corrosion resistance of zirconium was improved after the modification. - Abstract: Herein, results of heat treatment of zirconium anodised under plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) conditions at 500–800 °C are presented. The obtained oxide films were investigated by means of SEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance of the zirconium specimens was evaluated in Ringer's solution. A bilayer oxide coatings generated in the course of PEO of zirconium were not observed after the heat treatment. The resulting oxide layers contained a new sublayer located at the metal/oxide interface is suggested to originate from the thermal oxidation of zirconium. The corrosion resistance of the anodised metal was improved after the heat treatment

  10. Numerical simulations of heat transfer considering hydraulic discontinuity for an enhanced geothermal system development in Seokmo Island, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J.; Kim, K.; Hyun, Y.; Lee, K.; Lee, T.

    2011-12-01

    The construction of the first geothermal plant in Korea is under planning in Seokmo Island, where a few artesian wells showing relatively high water temperature of around 70 degrees were discovered lately. Geologic structure in this region is characterized by the fractured granite. Numerical simulations for the temperature evolution in a fractured geothermal reservoir in Seokmo Island under the supposed injection-extraction operating conditions were carried out using TOUGH2. A MINC model including a hydraulic discontinuity in Seokmo Island region, which reflected the analysis from several geophysical explorations and drilled rock core, was generated. Supposing the N05°E, NW83° fracture zone containing the pumping range, the numerical simulation results show that temperature of the extracted geothermal water decreases after 15 years of operation, which decreases the overall efficiency of the expected geothermal plant. This is because the colder water from the injection well, which is 400 m apart, begins to flow into the more permeable fracture zone from the 15th year, resulting in a decrease in temperature near the pumping well. Temperature distribution calculated from the simulation also shows a rise of relatively hot geothermal water along the fracture plane. All of the results are different from the non-fracture MINC model, which shows a low temperature contour in concentric circle shape around the injection well and relatively consistent extracting temperature. This demonstrates that the distribution and the structure of fracture system influence the major mass and heat flow mechanisms in geologic medium. Therefore, an intensive geologic investigation for the fractures including their structure, permeability and connecting relation is important. Acknowledgement This study was financially supported by KIGAM, KETEP and BK21.

  11. Investigation of heat transfer inside a PCM-air heat exchanger: a numerical parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbinger, Florent; Bhouri, Maha; Groulx, Dominic

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the use of PCMs for thermal storage of energy in HVAC applications was investigated by studying numerically the thermal performance of a PCM-air heat exchanger. The PCM used in this study was dodecanoic acid. A symmetric 3D model, incorporating conductive and convective heat transfer (air only) as well as laminar flow, was created in COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0. Simulations examined the dependence of the heat transfer rate on the temperature and velocity of the incoming air as well as the size of the channels in the heat exchanger. Results indicated that small channels size lead to a higher heat transfer rates. A similar trend was also obtained for high incoming air temperature, whereas the heat transfer rate was less sensitive to the incoming air velocity.

  12. Streamlined energy-savings calculations for heat-island reduction strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steven J.

    2003-03-15

    We have developed summary tables (sorted by heating- and cooling-degree-days) to estimate the potential of Heat-Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., solar-reflective roofs, shade trees, reflective pavements, and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling-energy use in buildings. The tables provide estimates of savings for both direct effect (reducing heat gain through the building shell) and indirect effect (reducing the ambient air temperature). In this analysis, we considered three building types that offer the most savings potential : residences, offices, and retail stores. Each building type was characterized in detail by Pre-1980 (old) or 1980+ (new) construction vintage and with natural gas or electricity as heating fuel. We defined prototypical-building characteristics for each building type and simulated the effects of HIR strategies on building cooling and heating energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.1E model and weather data for about 240 locations in the U.S. A statistical analysis of previously completed simulations for five cities was used to estimate the indirect savings. Our simulations included the effect of (1) solar-reflective roofing material on building [direct effect], (2) placement of deciduous shade trees near south and west walls of building [direct effect], and (3) ambient cooling achieved by urban reforestation and reflective building surfaces and pavements [indirect effect]. Upon completion of estimating the direct and indirect energy savings for all the selected locations, we integrated the results in tables arranged by heating- and cooling-degree-days. We considered 15 bins for heating-degree-days, and 11 bins for cooling-degree-days. Energy use and savings are presented per 1000 ft2 of roof area. In residences heated with gas and in climates with greater than 1000 cooling-degree-days, the annual electricity savings in Pre-1980 stock ranged from 650 to 1300 kWh/1000ft2; for 1980+ stock savings ranged 300 to 600 kWh/1000 ft2

  13. The micrometeorological investigation of heat flux and moisture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diurnal and seasonal variations of heat flux and the moisture content in the soil at a site for the Nigeria Mesoscale Experiment (NIMEX) in the University of Ibadan, Nigeria (7.380 N and 3.930 E), had been investigated. The study also investigated effects of the atmospheric phenomena on magnitudes of the surface layer ...

  14. Generalized Scaling of Urban Heat Island Effect and Its Applications for Energy Consumption and Renewable Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-W. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous work from this laboratory, it has been found that the urban heat island intensity (UHI can be scaled with the urban length scale and the wind speed, through the time-dependent energy balance. The heating of the urban surfaces during the daytime sets the initial temperature, and this overheating is dissipated during the night-time through mean convection motion over the urban surface. This may appear to be in contrast to the classical work by Oke (1973. However, in this work, we show that if the population density is used in converting the population data into urbanized area, then a good agreement with the current theory is found. An additional parameter is the “urban flow parameter,” which depends on the urban building characteristics and affects the horizontal convection of heat due to wind. This scaling can be used to estimate the UHI intensity in any cities and therefore predict the required energy consumption during summer months. In addition, all urbanized surfaces are expected to exhibit this scaling, so that increase in the surface temperature in large energy-consumption or energy-producing facilities (e.g., solar electric or thermal power plants can be estimated.

  15. A TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF URBAN HEAT ISLAND IN BASIN CITY UTILIZING REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-T. Chang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Urban Heat Island (UHI has been becoming a key factor in deteriorating the urban ecological environment. Spatial-temporal analysis on its prototype of basin city’s UHI and quantitatively evaluating effect from rapid urbanization will provide theoretical foundation for relieving UHI effect. Based on Landsat 8, ETM+ and TM images of Taipei basin areas from 1900 to 2015, this article has retrieved the land surface temperature (LST at summer solstice of each year, and then analysed spatial-temporal pattern and evolution characters of UHI in Taipei basin in this decade. The results showed that the expansion built district, UHI area constantly expanded from centre city to the suburb areas. The prototype of UHI in Taipei basin that showed in addition to higher temperatures in the centre city also were relatively high temperatures gathered boundaries surrounded by foot of mountains side. It calls “sinking heat island”. From 1900 to 2000, the higher UHI areas were different land use type change had obvious difference by public infrastructure works. And then, in next 15 years till 2015, building density of urban area has been increasing gradually. It has the trend that UHI flooding raises follow urban land use density. Hot spot of UHI in Taipei basin also has the same characteristics. The results suggest that anthropogenic heat release probably plays a significant role in the UHI effect, and must be considered in urban planning adaptation strategies.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  17. "I Feel Suffocated:" Understandings of Climate Change in an Inner City Heat Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Merrill; Hasemann, Jose; Raynor, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    Global climate change is contributing to a range of adverse environmental and weather shifts, including more intense and more frequent heatwaves and an intensification of the urban heat island effect. These changes are known to produce a set of significant and differentially distributed health problems, with a particularly high burden among poor and marginalized populations. In this article, we report findings from a qualitative study of community knowledge, attitudes, health and other concerns, and behavioral responses regarding mounting urban temperatures and related environmental health issues among Latinos living in the city of Hartford, CT in northeast United States. Findings suggest the need for enhanced participation in knowledge dissemination and preparedness planning based on the coproduction of knowledge about climate change and community responses to it. The special role of anthropology in such efforts is highlighted.

  18. The role of one large greenspace in mitigating London's nocturnal urban heat island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doick, Kieron J; Peace, Andrew; Hutchings, Tony R

    2014-09-15

    The term urban heat island (UHI) describes a phenomenon where cities are on average warmer than the surrounding rural area. Trees and greenspaces are recognised for their strong potential to regulate urban air temperatures and combat the UHI. Empirical data is required in the UK to inform predictions on cooling by urban greenspaces and guide planning to maximise cooling of urban populations. We describe a 5-month study to measure the temperature profile of one of central London's large greenspaces and also in an adjacent street to determine the extent to which the greenspace reduced night-time UHI intensity. Statistical modelling displayed an exponential decay in the extent of cooling with increased distance from the greenspace. The extent of cooling ranged from an estimated 20 m on some nights to 440 m on other nights. The mean temperature reduction over these distances was 1.1 °C in the summer months, with a maximum of 4 °C cooling observed on some nights. Results suggest that calculation of London's UHI using Met Stations close to urban greenspace can underestimate 'urban' heat island intensity due to the cooling effect of the greenspace and values could be in the region of 45% higher. Our results lend support to claims that urban greenspace is an important component of UHI mitigation strategies. Lack of certainty over the variables that govern the extent of the greenspace cooling influence indicates that the multifaceted roles of trees and greenspaces in the UK's urban environment merit further consideration. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Satellite-Derived Climatological Analysis of Urban Heat Island over Shanghai during 2000–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijiao Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island is generally conducted based on ground observations of air temperature and remotely sensing of land surface temperature (LST. Satellite remotely sensed LST has the advantages of global coverage and consistent periodicity, which overcomes the weakness of ground observations related to sparse distributions and costs. For human related studies and urban climatology, canopy layer urban heat island (CUHI based on air temperatures is extremely important. This study has employed remote sensing methodology to produce monthly CUHI climatology maps during the period 2000–2013, revealing the spatiotemporal characteristics of daytime and nighttime CUHI during this period of rapid urbanization in Shanghai. Using stepwise linear regression, daytime and nighttime air temperatures at the four overpass times of Terra/Aqua were estimated based on time series of Terra/Aqua-MODIS LST and other auxiliary variables including enhanced vegetation index, normalized difference water index, solar zenith angle and distance to coast. The validation results indicate that the models produced an accuracy of 1.6–2.6 °C RMSE for the four overpass times of Terra/Aqua. The models based on Terra LST showed higher accuracy than those based on Aqua LST, and nighttime air temperature estimation had higher accuracy than daytime. The seasonal analysis shows daytime CUHI is strongest in summer and weakest in winter, while nighttime CUHI is weakest in summer and strongest in autumn. The annual mean daytime CUHI during 2000–2013 is 1.0 and 2.2 °C for Terra and Aqua overpass, respectively. The annual mean nighttime CUHI is about 1.0 °C for both Terra and Aqua overpass. The resultant CUHI climatology maps provide a spatiotemporal quantification of CUHI with emphasis on temperature gradients. This study has provided information of relevance to urban planners and environmental managers for assessing and monitoring urban thermal environments which are constantly

  20. Experimental investigation on a pulsating heat pipe with hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, H R; Liu, Y M; Ma, R F; Han, D Y; Gan, Z H; Pfotenhauer, J M

    2015-01-01

    The pulsating heat pipe (PHP) has been increasingly studied in cryogenic application, for its high transfer coefficient and quick response. Compared with Nb 3 Sn and NbTi, MgB 2 whose critical transformation temperature is 39 K, is expected to replace some high-temperature superconducting materials at 25 K. In order to cool MgB 2 , this paper designs a Hydrogen Pulsating Heat Pipe, which allows a study of applied heat, filling ratio, turn number, inclination angle and length of adiabatic section on the thermal performance of the PHP. The thermal performance of the hydrogen PHP is investigated for filling ratios of 35%, 51%, 70% at different heat inputs, and provides information regarding the starting process is received at three filling ratios. (paper)

  1. Investigation into the heat transfer performance of helically ribbed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, R.J.

    1981-12-01

    The first part of an investigation into flow and heat transfer in annular channels and seven pin clusters is described. One of the main aims of the project is to improve cluster heat transfer prediction codes for helically ribbed surfaces. A study is made of the heat transfer and flow characteristics of a helically ribbed pin in an annular channel. It is shown that the swirling flow, which is induced by the helical ribs, gives rise to substantially enhanced diffusivity levels. This phenomenon had not been taken into account by previous analysis techniques. The methods for analysing heat transfer and pressure drop data from annular channels which were originally developed for non-swirling flow are generalised to accommodate swirling flow. The new methods are shown to be consistent with empirical data. Roughness parameter data is presented for helically ribbed surfaces with an axial rib pitch into height ratio of about 7. (author)

  2. Investigations into the dynamic behaviour of finned tube heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandbrink, J.; Stegemann, D.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric disturbances due to thunder storms, side wind effects on the shell or ground inversion can impair the heat dissipation of a cooling tower. These effects react on the overall power plant, which is reflected in the varied electrical output. This uncontrolled behaviour has been investigated in detail for the case of a boiling water reactor nuclear power station with indirect natural draught dry cooling and compared with controlled performance. A computer model, which has been checked out by means of experimental investigations on three different types of tube, is presented to describe the dynamic behaviour of finned tube heat exchangers. (orig.) [de

  3. Influence of Urbanization Factors on Surface Urban Heat Island Intensity: A Comparison of Countries at Different Developmental Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoping Cui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization is a global problem with demographic trends. The urban heat island plays a dominant role in local climate systems. Despite existing efforts to understand the impacts of multiple urbanization factors on the urban heat island globally, very little is known about the attribution of urban heat island magnitude to urbanization in different locations or developmental phases. In this study, based on global land surface temperature data, urban spatial domain data, gross domestic product (GDP, and population data, we analyzed the influence of multiple urbanization factors on global surface urban heat island intensity (SUHII. We also tentatively compared the abovementioned factors between different regions across the globe, especially between China and the USA, the largest countries that are experiencing or have experienced rapid urbanization in recent decades. The results showed that global SUHII had remarkable spatial heterogeneity due to the geographical and socioeconomic variation between cities. There was a significant correlation between SUHII and population as well as GDP in global cities. Moreover, this study suggested that the impacts of population on SUHII might be stronger in the early stages of urbanization, and the GDP factor would become a critical factor at a certain development level. The urban area also had non-ignorable impacts on SUHII, while the correlation between SUHII and urban shape was relatively weak. All these may imply that the best approach to slow down SUHII is to find other solutions, e.g., optimize the spatial configuration of urban internal landscapes, when the urbanization reaches a high level.

  4. Urban heat island research from 1991 to 2015: a bibliometric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qunfang; Lu, Yuqi

    2018-02-01

    A bibliometric analysis based on the Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCI-Expanded) database from the Web of Science was performed to review urban heat island (UHI) research from 1991 to 2015 and statistically assess its developments, trends, and directions. In total, 1822 papers published in 352 journals over the past 25 years were analyzed for scientific output; citations; subject categories; major journals; outstanding keywords; and leading countries, institutions, authors, and research collaborations. The number of UHI-related publications has continuously increased since 1991. Meteorology atmospheric sciences, environmental sciences, and construction building technology were the three most frequent subject categories. Building and Environment, International Journal of Climatology, and Theoretical and Applied Climatology were the three most popular publishing journals. The USA and China were the two leading countries in UHI research, contributing 49.56% of the total articles. Chinese Academy of Science, Arizona State University, and China Meteorological Administration published the most UHI articles. Weng QH and Santamouris M were the two most prolific authors. Author keywords were classified into four major groups: (1) research methods and indicators, e.g., remote sensing, field measurement, and models; (2) generation factors, e.g., impervious urban surfaces, urban geometry, waste heat, vegetation, and pollutants; (3) environmental effects, e.g., urban climate, heat wave, ecology, and pollution; and (4) mitigation and adaption strategies, e.g., roof technology cooling, reflective cooling, vegetation cooling, and urban geometry cooling. A comparative analysis of popular issues revealed that UHI determination (intensity, heat source, supporting techniques) remains the central topic, whereas UHI impacts and mitigation strategies are becoming the popular issues that will receive increasing scientific attention in the future. Modeling will continue to be the

  5. Summary report of RAMONA investigations into passive decay heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, H.; Marten, K.; Weinberg, D.; Frey, H.H.; Rust, K.; Ieda, Y.; Kamide, H.; Ohshima, H.; Ohira, H.

    1995-07-01

    An important safety feature of an advanced sodium-cooled reactor (e.g. European Fast Reactor, EFR) is the passive decay heat removal. This passive concept is based on several direct reactor cooling systems operating independently from each other. Each of the systems consists of a sodium/sodium decay heat exchanger immersed in the primary vessel and connected via an intermediate sodium loop to a heat sink formed by a sodium/air heat exchanger installed in a stack with air inlet and outlet dampers. The decay heat is removed by natural convection on the sodium side and natural draft on the air side. To demonstrate the coolability of the pool-type primary system by buoyancy-driven natural circulation, tests were performed under steady-state and transient conditions in facilities of different scale and detail. All these investigations serve to understand the physical processes and to verify computer codes used to transfer the results to reactor conditions. RAMONA is the three-dimensional 1:20-scaled apparatus equipped with all active components. Water is used as simulant fluid for sodium. The maximum core power is 75 kW. The facility is equipped with about 250 thermocouples to register fluid temperatures. Velocities and mass flows are measured by Laser Doppler Anemometers and magneto-inductive flowmeters. Flow paths are visualized by tracers. The conclusion of the investigations is that the decay heat can be removed from the primary system by means of natural convection. Always flow paths develop, which ensure an effective cooling of all regions. This is even proved for extreme conditions, e.g. in case of delays of the decay heat exchanger startup, failures of several DHR chains, and a drop of the fluid level below the inlet windows of the IHXs and decay heat exchangers. (orig.) [de

  6. Birds and Aircraft on Midway Islands, 1959-63 Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, C.S.

    1966-01-01

    At Midway Naval Station, 1.100 miles west-northwest of Honolulu, military aircraft collide with flying albatrosses at the rate of about 300 to 400 per year. One aircraft out of every five that hits an albatross on takeoff either aborts (stops before it is airborne), or dumps fuel and returns for appraisal of damage. About 70,000 pairs of Laysan albatrosses and 7,000 pairs of blackfooted albatrosses nest at Midway in any given year. The population is declining. Two-thirds or more of the birds of breeding age nest each year. The minimum breeding age recorded is 5 years (each species), but many individuals do not nest until at least 7 years of age. Young birds begin to return to Midway at 3 years of age and are found more frequently as breeding age approaches. They come ashore more frequently in March and April (the high bird strike months) than in midwinter. Even in midwinter the number of 'walkers' (birds not on nests) may comprise more than 40 percent of the albatrosses present on Sand Island, Midway. Maximum longevity of the Laysan albatross is believed to exceed 40 years; 6 out of 99 birds banded as breeding adults (7+ years old) were still alive 24 years after banding. Control methods tested experimentally include disturbance, gunfire, other sounds, radar beams, smoke, odors, destruction of nests, eggs, chicks, and adults, moving of birds, eggs, and chicks, erection of obstacles to flight, and habitat management. Habitat management (leveling and hardsurfacing of shoulders of runways) has been the most effective. Albatrosses were counted over the runways at 10 locations in 1957, 1958, and 1960 to determine the effects of wind direction, wind speed, and topography on the numbers of flying birds. Birds were most concentrated in areas where rising air currents were created as winds blew against dunes or tall trees. Soaring and strike rate both increased with greater wind speeds. There was a highly significant correlation between strike frequency and wind direction

  7. Heat transfer investigations within dry spent fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitsche, F.

    1986-07-01

    For studying the heat transfer processes and predicting the maximum spent fuel element surface temperature in a spent fuel assembly (SFA) transported in a dry cask, model experiments have been performed with a gas-filled model cask containing a simplified electrically heated model of a WWER-type SFA with 90 fuel elements. The temperature distribution of the SFA model is measured for different heat rates under vacuum in the model cask, and under normal pressure and overpressure (0.1 ... 0.7 MPa) for several cooling gases (air, argon, helium) in order to separately investigate heat transfer processes by radiation and convection/conduction. The measuring results were compared with the calculations. Computer programmes as well as simplified calculation methods for temperature prediction were developed and checked. The results obtained are also useful for thermal analyses in the field of the dry storage of SFAs in a cask or can. Specifically it was found that: The heat removal from the SFA can be considerably improved by increasing the internal cask pressure or by using helium as coolant. The radiant heat exchange in the SFA model can be calculated with sufficient accuracy by means of a computer programme developed in 1978 or by means of a simplified analytical representation shown in the final report. Both methods are directly applicable to the original SFA and useful in order to approximately calculate the maximum SFE surface temperature under normal pressure, if the fraction of heat transferred by radiation is allowed for. For the calculation of the total heat transfer a computer programme was developed and verified, which completely permits the temperature prediction of the SFA model in dependence on heat rate, type of gaseous coolant and coolant pressure. This computer programme can be directly applied to the original SFA for the calculation of the maximum SFE surface temperature

  8. Summer in the City - Assessing and Communicating the Richmond, VA Urban Heat Island to the Public and Policymakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, J. S.; Maurakis, E. G.; Shandas, V.

    2017-12-01

    The local impacts of global climate change are generally underestimated or misunderstood by the public and policymakers as far-off, future problems. However, differential and regional surface warming trends are exacerbated in urban areas due to the radiative properties of impervious surfaces like buildings and roads relative to natural landscapes. Decades of research illustrate that this unnatural radiative imbalance in the built environment gives rise to the well-studied urban heat island effect, whereby air temperatures in urban areas are several degrees warmer than in surrounding non-urbanized areas. In this way, the urban heat island effect presents a unique opportunity to highlight the human influence on Earth systems and at the same time mobilize local community-scale action to mitigate and become resilient to climate change impacts on tangible, experiential time scales. However, public stakeholders, city planners, and policymakers may view the urban heat island effect and its mitigation strategies through varying degrees of climatological, public health, and urban development knowledge and interest. This variation in stakeholder engagement highlights the need for individualized science communication strategies for each audience in order to maximize understanding of the scientific outcomes and tactics for mitigating the urban heat island effect. The City of Richmond, Virginia is currently developing a climate action plan as part of their greenhouse gas emission reduction initiative, RVAgreen 2050, and its recently announced "Richmond 300," a 20-year city development master plan. These initiatives provide the policy backdrop for a public and stakeholder education campaign centered on communicating urban heat island effects and resilience strategies. As such, the Science Museum of Virginia led the city's first urban heat island assessment using citizen science and leveraging a network of local university, non-profit, and city government stakeholders. Here, we

  9. Numerical investigation on pulsating heat pipes with nitrogen or hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Han, D.; Sun, X.; Gan, Z. H.; Y Luo, R.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.; Jiao, B.

    2017-12-01

    With flexible structure and excellent performance, pulsating heat pipes (PHP) are regarded as a great solution to distribute cooling power for cryocoolers. The experiments on PHPs with cryogenic fluids have been carried out, indicating their efficient performances in cryogenics. There are large differences in physical properties between the fluids at room and cryogenic temperature, resulting in their different heat transfer and oscillation characteristics. Up to now, the numerical investigations on cryogenic fluids have rarely been carried out. In this paper, the model of the closed-loop PHP with multiple liquid slugs and vapor plugs is performed with nitrogen and hydrogen as working fluids, respectively. The effects of heating wall temperature on the performance of close-looped PHPs are investigated and compared with that of water PHP.

  10. Experimental investigation on subcooled boiling heat transfer in a vertical double-face heated narrow annulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Mingyu; Qiu Suizheng; Jia Dounan

    2005-01-01

    Experimental investigation on the subcooled boiling heat transfer was carried out in a vertical up-flow double narrow annulus with 1.5 mm gap. The working fluid is deionized water. The ranges of parameters as follows: pressure 0.84-6.09 MPa, mass flux 41.9-300.2 kg/(m 2 ·s), heat flux 2.61-114.41kW/m 2 . An empiric correlation used to predict the heat transfer of subcooled boiling in narrow annulus is induced from the experimental data. (author)

  11. The Conundrum of Impacts of Climate Change on Urbanization and the Urban Heat Island Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2011-01-01

    The twenty-first century is the first urban century according to the United Nations Development Program. The focus on cities reflects awareness of the growing percentage of the world's population that lives in urban areas. In 2000, approximately 3 billion people representing about 40% of the global population resided in urban areas. The United Nations estimates that by 2025, 60% of the world s population will live in urban areas. As a consequence, the number of megacities (those cities with populations of 10 million inhabitants or more) will increase by 100 by 2025. Thus, there is a critical need to understand the spatial growth of urban areas and what the impacts are on the environment. Moreover, there is a critical need to assess how under global climate change, cities will affect the local, regional, and even global climate. As urban areas increase in size, it is anticipated there will be a concomitant growth of the Urban Heat Island effect (UHI), and the attributes that are related to its spatial and temporal dynamics. Therefore, how climate change, including the dynamics of the UHI, will affect the urban environment, must be explored to help mitigate potential impacts on the environment (e.g., air quality, heat stress, vectorborne disease) and on human health and well being, to develop adaptation schemes to cope with these impacts.

  12. The urban heat island of a city in an arid zone: the case of Eilat, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, M.; Potchter, O.

    2006-05-01

    This study presents the results of a preliminary research that was conducted in the city of Eilat, located in an extreme hot and arid zone on the northern coast of the Red Sea. The purpose was to analyse the characteristics of the local urban heat island (UHI). Diurnal pre-dawn and early-afternoon measurements were taken in winter and summer weather conditions on three separate occasions for two consecutive years. The results show the development of a moderate UHI located around the most intensive area of human activity; the city business centre and dense hotel belt. The UHI is more significant at midday during the summer period, while early morning inversions in winter have a weakening effect on the UHI intensity. It was found that the topography and wind regime have a dominant effect on the location and intensity of the UHI, while the sea has a very marginal effect. Due to the UHI influences on the spatial distribution of the heat stress in the city, it is suggested that further applied UHI research should be focused on the summer period.

  13. The role of city size and urban form in the surface urban heat island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Rybski, Diego; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2017-07-06

    Urban climate is determined by a variety of factors, whose knowledge can help to attenuate heat stress in the context of ongoing urbanization and climate change. We study the influence of city size and urban form on the Urban Heat Island (UHI) phenomenon in Europe and find a complex interplay between UHI intensity and city size, fractality, and anisometry. Due to correlations among these urban factors, interactions in the multi-linear regression need to be taken into account. We find that among the largest 5,000 cities, the UHI intensity increases with the logarithm of the city size and with the fractal dimension, but decreases with the logarithm of the anisometry. Typically, the size has the strongest influence, followed by the compactness, and the smallest is the influence of the degree to which the cities stretch. Accordingly, from the point of view of UHI alleviation, small, disperse, and stretched cities are preferable. However, such recommendations need to be balanced against e.g. positive agglomeration effects of large cities. Therefore, trade-offs must be made regarding local and global aims.

  14. Remote Sensing of the Urban Heat Island Effect Across Biomes in the Continental USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Zhang, Ping; Wolfe, Robert E.; Bounoua, Lahouari

    2010-01-01

    Impervious surface area (ISA) from the Landsat TM-based NLCD 2001 dataset and land surface temperature (LST) from MODIS averaged over three annual cycles (2003-2005) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the urban heat island (UHI) skin temperature amplitude and its relationship to development intensity, size, and ecological setting for 38 of the most populous cities in the continental United States. Development intensity zones based on %ISA are defined for each urban area emanating outward from the urban core to the nonurban rural areas nearby and used to stratify sampling for land surface temperatures and NDVI. Sampling is further constrained by biome and elevation to insure objective intercomparisons between zones and between cities in different biomes permitting the definition of hierarchically ordered zones that are consistent across urban areas in different ecological setting and across scales. We find that ecological context significantly influences the amplitude of summer daytime UHI (urban-rural temperature difference) the largest (8 C average) observed for cities built in biomes dominated by temperate broadleaf and mixed forest. For all cities combined, ISA is the primary driver for increase in temperature explaining 70% of the total variance in LST. On a yearly average, urban areas are substantially warmer than the non-urban fringe by 2.9 C, except for urban areas in biomes with arid and semiarid climates. The average amplitude of the UHI is remarkably asymmetric with a 4.3 C temperature difference in summer and only 1.3 C in winter. In desert environments, the LST's response to ISA presents an uncharacteristic "U-shaped" horizontal gradient decreasing from the urban core to the outskirts of the city and then increasing again in the suburban to the rural zones. UHI's calculated for these cities point to a possible heat sink effect. These observational results show that the urban heat island amplitude both increases with city size and is seasonally

  15. Experimental investigation of water sprayed finned heat exchanger tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, A.

    1987-07-01

    Experimental investigations have been made to study the performance of two finned tube-bundle heat exchangers (FORGO type) when wetted by water sprays. The heat exchangers are designed to cool water in a dry cooling tower. The test-elements had a frontal area of 1 m 2 . The water sprays were created by 20 nozzles, 200 mm in front of the heat exchangers. Air velocities at the inlet of the coolers were in the range 0,8 m/s to 12 m/s and initial temperature differences ITD reached 45 degrees C. The test facility was designed to determine the combined latent and sensible heat fluxes in the wetted heat exchanger, the airside pressure drop and the air humidity and temperature at the exchanger inlet and outlet, and to measure the weight of the water wetting the cooler's surface. The sprayed test elements were investigated in different positions, but most of the experiments were carried out in the position with the fins horizontal

  16. Assessing the effect of wind speed/direction changes on urban heat island intensity of Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perim Temizoz, Huriye; Unal, Yurdanur S.

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the effect of wind speed/direction changes on urban heat island intensity of Istanbul. Perim Temizöz, Deniz H. Diren, Cemre Yürük and Yurdanur S. Ünal Istanbul Technical University, Department of Meteorological Engineering, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey City or metropolitan areas are significantly warmer than the outlying rural areas since the urban fabrics and artificial surfaces which have different radiative, thermal and aerodynamic features alter the surface energy balance, interact with the regional circulation and introduce anthropogenic sensible heat and moisture into the atmosphere. The temperature contrast between urban and rural areas is most prominent during nighttime since heat is absorbed by day and emitted by night. The intensity of the urban heat island (UHI) vary considerably depending on the prevailent meteorological conditions and the characteristics of the region. Even though urban areas cover a small fraction of Earth, their climate has greater impact on the world's population. Over half of the world population lives in the cities and it is expected to rise within the coming decades. Today almost one fifth of the Turkey's population resides in Istanbul with the percentage expected to increase due to the greater job opportunities compared to the other cities. Its population has been increased from 2 millions to 14 millions since 1960s. Eventually, the city has been expanded tremendously within the last half century, shifting the landscape from vegetation to built up areas. The observations of the last fifty years over Istanbul show that the UHI is most pronounced during summer season. The seasonal temperature differences between urban and suburban sites reach up to 3 K and roughly haft degree increase in UHI intensity is observed after 2000. In this study, we explore the possible range of heat load and distribution over Istanbul for different prevailing wind conditions by using the non-hydrostatic MUKLIMO3 model developed by DWD

  17. Spatially Analyzing the Inequity of the Hong Kong Urban Heat Island by Socio-Demographic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Sing Wong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that some disadvantaged socio-demographic groups face serious environmental-related inequities in Hong Kong due to the rising ambient urban temperatures. Identifying heat-vulnerable groups and locating areas of Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI inequities is thus important for prioritizing interventions to mitigate death/illness rates from heat. This study addresses this problem by integrating methods of remote sensing retrieval, logistic regression modelling, and spatial autocorrelation. In this process, the SUHI effect was first estimated from the Land Surface Temperature (LST derived from a Landsat image. With the scale assimilated to the SUHI and socio-demographic data, a logistic regression model was consequently adopted to ascertain their relationships based on Hong Kong Tertiary Planning Units (TPUs. Lastly, inequity “hotspots” were derived using spatial autocorrelation methods. Results show that disadvantaged socio-demographic groups were significantly more prone to be exposed to an intense SUHI effect: over half of 287 TPUs characterized by age groups of 60+ years, secondary and matriculation education attainment, widowed, divorced and separated, low and middle incomes, and certain occupation groups of workers, have significant Odds Ratios (ORs larger than 1.2. It can be concluded that a clustering analysis stratified by age, income, educational attainment, marital status, and occupation is an effective way to detect the inequity hotspots of SUHI exposure. Additionally, inequities explored using income, marital status and occupation factors were more significant than the age and educational attainment in these areas. The derived maps and model can be further analyzed in urban/city planning, in order to mitigate the physical and social causes of the SUHI effect.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Heat Transfer during Night-Time Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Manz, H.

    2010-01-01

    is the heat transfer at the internal room surfaces. Increased convection is expected due to high air flow rates and the possibility of a cold air jet flowing along the ceiling, but the magnitude of these effects is hard to predict. In order to improve the predictability, heat transfer during night......-time ventilation in case of mixing and displacement ventilation has been investigated in a full scale test room. The results show that for low air flow rates displacement ventilation is more efficient than mixing ventilation. For higher air flow rates the air jet flowing along the ceiling has a significant effect...

  19. Investigation of the tube side flow distribution in heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AbuRomia, M.M.; Pyare, R.

    1977-01-01

    The tube side flow distribution in heat exchangers is being investigated through the solution of the governing equations of fluid mechanics with distributed resistances that simulate the presence of the tubes. The modeling scheme used in the analysis and the numerical methods of solving the governing equations are described. The analysis is applied to the CRBRP-Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX), where its tube side plenum is simulated by several models that approximate its spherical boundary. The flow field within the plenum and the distribution of the total flow rate among the tubes are determined by the analysis

  20. Numerical investigation on the convective heat transfer in a spiral coil with radiant heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Milan Lj.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to numerically investigate the heat transfer in spiral coil tube in the laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow regimes. The Archimedean spiral coil was exposed to radiant heating and should represent heat absorber of parabolic dish solar concentrator. Specific boundary conditions represent the uniqueness of this study, since the heat flux upon the tube external surfaces varies not only in the circumferential direction, but also in the axial direction. The curvature ratio of spiral coil varies from 0.029 at the flow inlet to 0.234 at the flow outlet, while the heat transfer fluid is water. The 3-D steady-state transport equations were solved using the Reynolds stress turbulence model. Results showed that secondary flows strongly affect the flow and that the heat transfer is strongly asymmetric, with higher values near the outer wall of spiral. Although overall turbulence levels were lower than in a straight pipe, heat transfer rates were larger due to the curvature-induced modifications of the mean flow and temperature fields. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 42006

  1. Experimental investigate of heat transfer for graphene/water nanofluid in micro heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Elhafez, S. E.; Abo-Zahhad, E. M.; El-Shazly, A. H.; El-Kady, M. F.

    2017-02-01

    In this investigation, the heat transfer characteristics of graphene nano platelets (GNPs)/water nanofluid were studied in a micro heat exchanger (MHE). The micro heat exchanger performance was also examined. The test setup was worked out in the laminar regime with Reynold numbers varying between 100 and 400GNPs/water nanofluid was prepared three different concentrations (0.025 wt. %, 0.05 wt. % and 0.1 wt. %) using ultrasonic wave. The influence of mass flow rate, inlet temperatures and weight fraction on the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) and logarithmic mean temperature (LMTD) were examined. The results showed considerable enhancement on the overall heat transfer coefficient of graphene/water nanofluid and the MHE effectiveness. A maximum enhancement on overall heat transfer coefficient was reached to 150% at Re=100 by 0.1wt% nanofluid. The effectiveness of micro heat exchanger was enhanced by increase weight fraction of graphene nanoparticle. Moreover, the experimental results showed that 0.1 wt. % GNPs/water nanofluid, flowing through MHE, has had high pressure drop, and pumping power, when it has been compared with 0.5 wt. % and 0.025 wt.%.

  2. Experimental investigation on EV battery cooling and heating by heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Jiang, B.; Xue, Q.F.; Sun, H.L.; Li, B.; Zou, H.M.; Yan, Y.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing battery safety and thermal behaviour are critical for electric vehicles (EVs) because they affect the durability, energy storage, lifecycle, and efficiency of the battery. Prior studies of using air, liquid or phase change materials (PCM) to manage the battery thermal environment have been investigated over the last few years, but only a few take heat pipes into account. This paper aims to provide a full experimental characterisation of heat pipe battery cooling and heating covering a range of battery ‘off-normal’ conditions. Two representative battery cells and a substitute heat source ranging from 2.5 to 40 W/cell have been constructed. Results show that the proposed method is able to keep the battery surface temperature below 40 °C if the battery generates less than 10 W/cell, and helps reduce the battery temperature down to 70 °C under uncommon thermal abuse conditions (e.g. 20–40 W/cell). Additionally, the feasibility of using sintered copper-water heat pipes under sub-zero temperatures has been assessed experimentally by exposing the test rig to −15 °C/−20 °C for more than 14 h. Data indicates that the heat pipe was able to function immediately after long hours of cold exposure and that sub-zero temperature conditions had little impact on heat pipe performance. We therefore conclude that the proposed method of battery cooling and heating via heat pipes is a viable solution for EVs

  3. A novel investigation of heat transfer characteristics in rifled tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegan, C. Dhayananth; Azhagesan, N.

    2018-05-01

    The experimental investigation of heat transfer of water flowing in a rifled tube was explored at different pressures and at various operating conditions in a rifled tube heat exchanger. The specifications for the inner and outer diameters of the inner tube are 25.8 and 50.6 mm, respectively. The working fluids used in shell side and tube side are cold and hot water. The rifled tube was made of the stainless steel with 4 ribs, 50.6 mm outer diameter, 0.775 mm rib height, 58o helix angle and the length 1500 mm. The effect of pressure, wall heat flux and friction factor were discussed. The results confirm that even at low pressures the rifled tubes has an obvious enhancement in heat transfer compared with smooth tube. Results depicts that the Nusselt number increases with Reynolds number and the friction factor decreases with increase in Reynolds number and the heat transfer rate is higher for the rifled tube when compared to smooth tube, because of strong swirl flow due to centrifugal action. It also confirms that, the friction factor obtained from the rifled tube is significantly higher than that of smooth tube.

  4. Investigation of Hypersonic Laminar Heating Augmentation in the Stagnation Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marineau, Eric C.; Lewis, Daniel R.; Smith, Michael S.; Lafferty, John F.; White, Molly E.; Amar, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    Laminar stagnation region heating augmentation is investigated in the AEDC Tunnel 9 at Mach 10 by performing high frequency surface pressure and heat transfer measurements on the Orion CEV capsule at zero degree angle-of-attack for unit Reynolds numbers between 0.5 and 15 million per foot. Heating augmentation increases with Reynolds number, but is also model size dependent as it is absent on a 1.25-inch diameter model at Reynolds numbers where it reaches up to 15% on a 7-inch model. Heat transfer space-time correlations on the 7-inch model show that disturbances convect at the boundary layer edge velocity and that the streamwise integral scale increases with distance. Therefore, vorticity amplification due to stretching and piling-up in the stagnation region appears to be responsible for the stagnation point heating augmentation on the larger model. This assumption is reinforced by the f(exp -11/3) dependence of the surface pressure spectrum compared to the f(exp -1) dependence in the free stream. Vorticity amplification does not occur on the 1.25- inch model because the disturbances are too large. Improved free stream fluctuation measurements will be required to determine if significant vorticity is present upstream or mostly generated behind the bow shock.

  5. Effect of urbanization activities towards the formation of urban heat island in Cameron Highlands, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M. H.; Latiff, N. A. A.; Ismail, K.; Isa, N. K. M.

    2018-04-01

    This study carried out to study the effect of urbanization activities towards the formation of Urban Heat Islands (UHI) in Cameron Highlands (CH).The aim of this study is to identify the formation of UHI in CH following the urbanization activities. This study also involved two main data that are primary through field survey and secondary data from collection data. In addition, this study was used qualitative and quantitative method. The data was taken two times a day, at a day and night between the hours of 12:00 to 14:00 and 19:00 to 21:00. Data in this study analyzed by using correlation analysis and analysis of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) which known as interpolation. Result found the formation of UHI in CH was concentrated at city centre namely in Pekan Tanah Rata. From the whole average value, city centre was recorded the highest reading of temperatures which is 30.5°C, while reading of temperature for subtown and suburban was recorded 28.6°C and 23.8°C. Average of humidity in CH during the day was recorded as highest reading in the suburban area namely Tringkap Bee Farm (station 11) which is 58.4%. Then, average of humidity in CH at night was recorded highest reading in the suburban area namely Habu Mini Market 91 (station 9) which the value is 83.2%. The reading of wind speed in CH during the day recorded the highest reading day at the suburban namely Tringkap Bee Farm (station 11) which the value is 2.3 m/s. While, following the reading of wind speed in CH at night, suburban namely Habu Mini Market 91(station 9) was recorded the highest reading which is 0.8 m/s. The Intensity of Urban Heat Island in CH during the day was recorded 2.8°C, while at night intensity of UHI was recorded 1.4°C. Overall, the urbanization activities in CH had caused the formation of UHI. Therefore, measures of legislation such as protect forest from development by control the urbanization activities need to be implemented so that the formation of UHI can be reduced and

  6. A study of the Oklahoma City urban heat island using ground measurements and remote sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M. J. (Michael J.); Ivey, A. (Austin); McPherson, T. N. (Timothy N.); Boswell, D. (David); Pardyjak, E. R. (Eric R.)

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of temperature and position were collected during the night from an instrumented van on routes through Oklahoma City and the rural outskirts. The measurements were taken as part of the Joint URBAN 2003 Tracer Field Experiment conducted in Oklahoma City from June 29, 2003 to July 30, 2003 (Allwine et al., 2004). The instrumented van was driven over four primary routes that included legs from the downtown core to four different 'rural' areas. Each route went through residential areas and most often went by a line of permanently fixed temperature probes (Allwine et al., 2004) for cross-checking purposes. Each route took from 20 to 40 minutes to complete. Based on seven nights of data, initial analyses indicate that there was a temperature difference of 0.5-6.5 C between the urban core and nearby 'rural' areas. Analyses also suggest that there were significant fine scale temperature differences over distances of tens of meters within the city and in the nearby rural areas. The temperature measurements that were collected are intended to supplement the meteorological measurements taken during the Joint URBAN 2003 Field Experiment, to assess the importance of the urban heat island phenomenon in Oklahoma City, and to test new urban canopy parameterizations that have been developed for regional scale meteorological codes (e.g., Chin et al., 2000; Holt and Shi, 2004). In addition to the ground measurements, skin temperature measurements were also analyzed from remotely sensed images taken from the Earth Observing System's Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). A surface kinetic temperature thermal infrared image captured by the ASTER of the Oklahoma City area on July 21, 2001 was analyzed within ESRI's ArcGIS 8.3 to correlate variations in temperature with land use type. Analysis of this imagery suggests distinct variations in temperature across different land use categories. Through the use of

  7. The Impact of Albedo Increase to Mitigate the Urban Heat Island in Terni (Italy Using the WRF Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Morini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of the urban heat island (UHI phenomenon on energy consumption, air quality, and human health have been widely studied and described. Mitigation strategies have been developed to fight the UHI and its detrimental consequences. A potential countermeasure is the increase of urban albedo by using cool materials. Cool materials are highly reflective materials that can maintain lower surface temperatures and thus can present an effective solution to mitigate the UHI. Terni’s proven record of high temperatures along with related environmental and comfort issues in its urban areas have reflected the local consequences of global warming. On the other hand, it promoted integrated actions by the government and research institutes to investigate solutions to mitigate the UHI effects. In this study, the main goal is to investigate the effectiveness of albedo increase as a strategy to tackle the UHI, by using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF mesoscale model to simulate the urban climate of Terni (Italy. Three different scenarios through a summer heat wave in the summer of 2015 are analyzed. The Base Scenario, which simulates the actual conditions of the urban area, is the control case. In the Albedo Scenario (ALB Scenario, the albedo of the roof, walls and road of the whole urban area is increased. In the Albedo-Industrial Scenario (ALB-IND Scenario, the albedo of the roof, walls and road of the area occupied by the main industrial site of Terni, located in close proximity to the city center, is increased. The simulation results show that the UHI is decreased up to 2 °C both at daytime and at nighttime in the ALB and in ALB-IND Scenarios. Peak temperatures in the urban area can be decreased by 1 °C at daytime, and by about 2 °C at nighttime. Albedo increase in the area of interest might thus represent an opportunity to decrease the UHI effect and its consequences.

  8. Investigation of Characteristics of Passive Heat Removal System Based on the Assembled Heat Transfer Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangcheng Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To get an insight into the operating characteristics of the passive residual heat removal system of molten salt reactors, a two-phase natural circulation test facility was constructed. The system consists of a boiling loop absorbing the heat from the drain tank, a condensing loop consuming the heat, and a steam drum. A steady-state experiment was carried out, in which the thimble temperature ranged from 450°C to 700°C and the system pressure was controlled at levels below 150 kPa. When reaching a steady state, the system was operated under saturated conditions. Some important parameters, including heat power, system resistance, and water level in the steam drum and water tank were investigated. The experimental results showed that the natural circulation system is feasible in removing the decay heat, even though some fluctuations may occur in the operation. The uneven temperature distribution in the water tank may be inevitable because convection occurs on the outside of the condensing tube besides boiling with decreasing the decay power. The instabilities in the natural circulation loop are sensitive to heat flux and system resistance rather than the water level in the steam drum and water tank. RELAP5 code shows reasonable results compared with experimental data.

  9. Investigation of characteristics of passive heat removal system based on the assembled heat transfer tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiang Cheng; Yan, Changqi; Meng, Zhao Ming; Chen, Kailun; Song, Shao Chuang; Yang, Zong Hao; Yu, Jie [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2016-12-15

    To get an insight into the operating characteristics of the passive residual heat removal system of molten salt reactors, a two-phase natural circulation test facility was constructed. The system consists of a boiling loop absorbing the heat from the drain tank, a condensing loop consuming the heat, and a steam drum. A steady-state experiment was carried out, in which the thimble temperature ranged from 450 .deg. C to 700 .deg. C and the system pressure was controlled at levels below 150 kPa. When reaching a steady state, the system was operated under saturated conditions. Some important parameters, including heat power, system resistance, and water level in the steam drum and water tank were investigated. The experimental results showed that the natural circulation system is feasible in removing the decay heat, even though some fluctuations may occur in the operation. The uneven temperature distribution in the water tank may be inevitable because convection occurs on the outside of the condensing tube besides boiling with decreasing the decay power. The instabilities in the natural circulation loop are sensitive to heat flux and system resistance rather than the water level in the steam drum and water tank. RELAP5 code shows reasonable results compared with experimental data.

  10. GEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF PALAEOTSUNAMIS IN THE SAMOAN ISLANDS: INTERIM REPORT AND RESEARCH DIRECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Davies

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The September 29, 2009 Samoa Tsunami provided the opportunity to sample the sediments deposited in the Samoan Islands landscape by the tsunami. Analysing the characteristics of the sediment deposits using an established suite of diagnostic criteria, and assessing how they differ from cyclone deposits enables the identification and dating of similar events in the geologic record. This helps to better understand the long-term frequency and likely magnitude of these events. Here we report on a pilot palaeotsunami field-sampling investigation carried out in 2010 at selected sites on Upolu and Savaii Islands in the Independent State of Samoa, and on Ta’u Island in American Samoa. We present empirical stratigraphic data for the investigated sites, and we demonstrate the existence of high energy marine inundation deposits at some of these sites which were laid down by past tsunamis and/or cyclones. We review and discuss the analytical outcomes, as well as summarise the overarching directions of this research. We propose that there is a need for this study to continue and for such studies to be carried out in other islands in the Pacific. By doing this, we can build on the sparse palaeotsunami database in the region, thereby helping to improve our understanding of the long-term frequency, impact distribution, and likely magnitude of these events. Further, we can start assessing their likely sources and the long-term risk these hazards pose to coastal cities and communities in the Pacific.

  11. A new structure of permeable pavement for mitigating urban heat island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Li, Tian; Peng, Hangyu

    2018-09-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) effect has been a great threat to human habitation, and how to mitigate this problem has been a global concern over decades. This paper addresses the cooling effect of a novel permeable pavement called evaporation-enhancing permeable pavement, which has capillary columns in aggregate and a liner at the bottom. To explore the efficiency of mitigating the UHI, bench-scale permeable pavement units with capillary columns were developed and compared with conventional permeable pavement. Criteria of capillary capacities of the column, evaporation rates, and surface temperature of the pavements were monitored under simulated rainfall and Shanghai local weather conditions. Results show the capillary column was important in increasing evaporation by lifting water from the bottom to the surface, and the evaporation-enhancing permeable pavement was cooler than a conventional permeable pavement by as much as 9.4°C during the experimental period. Moreover, the cooling effect of the former pavement could persist more than seven days under the condition of no further rainfall. Statistical analysis result reveals that evaporation-enhancing permeable pavement can mitigate the UHI effect significantly more than a conventional permeable pavement. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing the relationship between surface urban heat islands and landscape patterns across climatic zones in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiquan; Huang, Xin; Li, Jiayi

    2017-08-24

    The urban heat island (UHI) effect exerts a great influence on the Earth's environment and human health and has been the subject of considerable attention. Landscape patterns are among the most important factors relevant to surface UHIs (SUHIs); however, the relationship between SUHIs and landscape patterns is poorly understood over large areas. In this study, the surface UHI intensity (SUHII) is defined as the temperature difference between urban and suburban areas, and the landscape patterns are quantified by the urban-suburban differences in several typical landscape metrics (ΔLMs). Temperature and land-cover classification datasets based on satellite observations were applied to analyze the relationship between SUHII and ΔLMs in 332 cities/city agglomerations distributed in different climatic zones of China. The results indicate that SUHII and its correlations with ΔLMs are profoundly influenced by seasonal, diurnal, and climatic factors. The impacts of different land-cover types on SUHIs are different, and the landscape patterns of the built-up and vegetation (including forest, grassland, and cultivated land) classes have the most significant effects on SUHIs. The results of this study will help us to gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between the SUHI effect and landscape patterns.

  13. An Evidence-Based Review of Impacts, Strategies and Tools to Mitigate Urban Heat Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Leal Filho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of climate changes on cities, which are home to over half of the world’s population, are already being felt. In many cases, the intensive speed with which urban centres have been growing means that little attention has been paid to the role played by climatic factors in maintaining quality of life. Among the negative consequences of rapid city growth is the expansion of the problems posed by urban heat islands (UHIs, defined as areas in a city that are much warmer than other sites, especially in comparison with rural areas. This paper analyses the consistency of the UHI-related literature in three stages: first it outlines its characteristics and impacts in a wide variety of cities around the world, which poses pressures to public health in many different countries. Then it introduces strategies which may be employed in order to reduce its effects, and finally it analyses available tools to systematize the initial high level assessment of the phenomenon for multidisciplinary teams involved in the urban planning process. The analysis of literature on the characteristics, impacts, strategies and digital tools to assess on the UHI, reveals the wide variety of parameters, methods, tools and strategies analysed and suggested in the different studies, which does not always allow to compare or standardize the diagnosis or solutions.

  14. Landscape Classifications for Landscape Metrics-based Assessment of Urban Heat Island: A Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, X F; Deng, L; Wang, H N; Chen, F; Hua, L Z

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, some studies have been carried out on the landscape analysis of urban thermal patterns. With the prevalence of thermal landscape, a key problem has come forth, which is how to classify thermal landscape into thermal patches. Current researches used different methods of thermal landscape classification such as standard deviation method (SD) and R method. To find out the differences, a comparative study was carried out in Xiamen using a 20-year winter time-serial Landsat images. After the retrieval of land surface temperature (LST), the thermal landscape was classified using the two methods separately. Then landscape metrics, 6 at class level and 14 at landscape level, were calculated and analyzed using Fragstats 3.3. We found that: (1) at the class level, all the metrics with SD method were evened and did not show an obvious trend along with the process of urbanization, while the R method could. (2) While at the landscape level, 6 of the 14 metrics remains the similar trends, 5 were different at local turn points of the curve, 3 of them differed completely in the shape of curves. (3) When examined with visual interpretation, SD method tended to exaggerate urban heat island effects than the R method

  15. Spatiotemporal Variation in Surface Urban Heat Island Intensity and Associated Determinants across Major Chinese Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Urban heat islands (UHIs created through urbanization can have negative impacts on the lives of people living in cities. They may also vary spatially and temporally over a city. There is, thus, a need for greater understanding of these patterns and their causes. While previous UHI studies focused on only a few cities and/or several explanatory variables, this research provides a comprehensive and comparative characterization of the diurnal and seasonal variation in surface UHI intensities (SUHIIs across 67 major Chinese cities. The factors associated with the SUHII were assessed by considering a variety of related social, economic and natural factors using a regression tree model. Obvious seasonal variation was observed for the daytime SUHII, and the diurnal variation in SUHII varied seasonally across China. Interestingly, the SUHII varied significantly in character between northern and southern China. Southern China experienced more intense daytime SUHIIs, while the opposite was true for nighttime SUHIIs. Vegetation had the greatest effect in the day time in northern China. In southern China, annual electricity consumption and the number of public buses were found to be important. These results have important theoretical significance and may be of use to mitigate UHI effects.

  16. An Evidence-Based Review of Impacts, Strategies and Tools to Mitigate Urban Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal Filho, Walter; Echevarria Icaza, Leyre; Emanche, Victoria Omeche; Quasem Al-Amin, Abul

    2017-01-01

    The impacts of climate changes on cities, which are home to over half of the world’s population, are already being felt. In many cases, the intensive speed with which urban centres have been growing means that little attention has been paid to the role played by climatic factors in maintaining quality of life. Among the negative consequences of rapid city growth is the expansion of the problems posed by urban heat islands (UHIs), defined as areas in a city that are much warmer than other sites, especially in comparison with rural areas. This paper analyses the consistency of the UHI-related literature in three stages: first it outlines its characteristics and impacts in a wide variety of cities around the world, which poses pressures to public health in many different countries. Then it introduces strategies which may be employed in order to reduce its effects, and finally it analyses available tools to systematize the initial high level assessment of the phenomenon for multidisciplinary teams involved in the urban planning process. The analysis of literature on the characteristics, impacts, strategies and digital tools to assess on the UHI, reveals the wide variety of parameters, methods, tools and strategies analysed and suggested in the different studies, which does not always allow to compare or standardize the diagnosis or solutions. PMID:29257100

  17. Spatio-Temporal Variability of Urban Heat Island and Urban Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, B.; Omitaomu, O.

    2017-12-01

    A 2016 report by the U.S. Census stated that while the rural areas cover 97% of the U.S. landmass, these areas house only 19.7% of the nation's population. Given that the U.S. coastal counties are home to more than 50% of the U.S. population, these urban areas are clustered along the coast that is susceptible to sea level rise induced impacts. In light of increasing climate variability and extreme events, it is pertinent to understand the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect that results from increasing population density and mobility in the urban areas, and that contributes to increased energy consumption and temperature as well as unmitigated flooding events. For example, in Illinois, warmer summers contribute to heavy precipitation that overwhelms the region's drainage capacity. This study focuses on understanding the spatio-temporal variability of the relationship between population density and mobility distribution, and creation of UHI due to temperature change in selected cities across the U.S. This knowledge will help us understand the role of UHI in energy-water nexus in urban areas, specifically, energy consumption.

  18. Dynamic analysis and ecological evaluation of urban heat islands in Raipur city, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Subhanil; Govil, Himanshu; Mukherjee, Sandip

    2017-07-01

    Spatial-temporal distribution of the urban heat islands (UHI) and their changes over Raipur city have been analyzed using multitemporal Landsat satellite data from 1995 to 2016. Land surface temperature (LST) was retrieved through a mono-window algorithm. Some selected land use/land cover (LU-LC) indices were analyzed with LST using linear regression. The urban thermal field variance index (UTFVI) was applied to measure the thermal comfort level of the city. Results show that during the observed period, the study area experienced a gradual increasing rate in mean LST (>1% per annum). The UHI developed especially along the north-western industrial area and south-eastern bare land of the city. A difference in mean LST between UHI and non-UHI for different time periods (2.6°C in 1995, 2.85°C in 2006, 3.42°C in 2009, and 3.63°C in 2016) reflects the continuous warming status of the city. The LST map also shows the existence of a few urban hot spots near the industrial areas, metal roofs, and high density transport parking lots, which are more abundant in the north-western part of the city. The UTFVI map associated with UHI indicates that the inner parts of the city are ecologically more comfortable than the outer peripheries.

  19. Spatio-temporal variance and meteorological drivers of the urban heat island in a European city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnds, Daniela; Böhner, Jürgen; Bechtel, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Urban areas are especially vulnerable to high temperatures, which will intensify in the future due to climate change. Therefore, both good knowledge about the local urban climate as well as simple and robust methods for its projection are needed. This study has analysed the spatio-temporal variance of the mean nocturnal urban heat island (UHI) of Hamburg, with observations from 40 stations from different suppliers. The UHI showed a radial gradient with about 2 K in the centre mostly corresponding to the urban densities. Temporarily, it has a strong seasonal cycle with the highest values between April and September and an inter-annual variability of approximately 0.5 K. Further, synoptic meteorological drivers of the UHI were analysed, which generally is most pronounced under calm and cloud-free conditions. Considered were meteorological parameters such as relative humidity, wind speed, cloud cover and objective weather types. For the stations with the highest UHI intensities, up to 68.7 % of the variance could be explained by seasonal empirical models and even up to 76.6 % by monthly models.

  20. Shifting the urban heat island clock in a megacity: a case study of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuan; Jeong, Su-Jong

    2018-01-01

    With increasing levels of urbanization in the near future, understanding the impact of urbanization on urban heat islands (UHIs) is critical to adapting to regional climate and environmental changes. However, our understanding of the UHI effect relies mainly on its intensity or magnitude. The present study evaluates the impact of urbanization on UHI duration changes by comparing three stations with different rates of urbanization, including highly developed and developing urban areas throughout Hong Kong, from 1990-2015. Results show that the 26 year average UHI intensity in highly urbanized regions is much higher than that in developing areas, and the 26 year average of UHI duration is similar. Over the past 25 years, however, UHI duration has increased only in developing urban areas, from 13.59-17.47 hours. Both earlier UHI starting and later UHI ending times concurrently contribute to the UHI effect being experienced for a longer duration. The differences in UHI duration change between the two areas are supported by population and by night light changes from space. Increasing night light, which suggests enhancements in the economic infrastructure, occurred only in the developing urban areas. Our results suggest that changes in UHI duration should be included in an assessment of regional climate change as well as in urban planning in a megacity.

  1. Experimental investigation on transcritical heat transfer in He II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerdtner, M. v.

    1988-01-01

    The propagation of plane second-sound waves has been investigated in a quadratic channel of 2.6x2.6 cm 2 cross section and 8 cm length. The evolution of temperature, counterflow velocity, and superfluid vortex-line density has been measured. In agreement with current theories, the initial value of the vortex-line density remaining from the previous heat pulse increases induced by the counterflow velocity. If during the passage of the pulse enough vortex lines have been produced, the mutual friction force leads to a decrease of the counterflow velocity and hence of the heat flux. Then near the heater the energy is stored leading to a large rise in temperature instead of being transported by the second-sound wave. Further downstream, the mutual friction force is less significant, due to the decrease in counterflow velocity, resulting in the production of fewer superfluid vortex lines. Thus a (strongly damped) second-sound propagation takes place, superimposed by a diffusion process that causes the pulse to diverge during propagation. From a large number of temperature measurements, a criterion for the occurence of supercritical heat transport has been derived, taking into account bath temperature, pulse duration, heat flux and, in addition, the repetition rate, thus leading to a better approach to the measured values than current theories. (orig.)

  2. Daytime urban heat islands from Landsat ETM+ and Corine land cover data: An application to major cities in Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stathopoulou, Marina; Cartalis, Constantinos [Remote Sensing and Image Processing Laboratory, Division of Applied Physics, Department of Physics, Building PHYS-5, University Campus, 157 84 Athens (Greece)

    2007-03-15

    Satellite images in the thermal infrared can be used for assessing the thermal urban environment as well as for defining heat islands in urban areas. In this study, the thermal environment of major cities in Greece (Athens, Thessaloniki, Patra, Volos and Heraklion) is examined using satellite images provided by the Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) sensor on board Landsat 7 satellite corresponding to the daytime and warm period when the surface urban heat island (SUHI) phenomenon is best observed. The spatial structure of the thermal urban environment is analyzed in each case study and the ''hottest'' surfaces within the urban settings are identified and related to the urban surface characteristics and land use. For the needs of the study, the Corine land cover (CLC) database for Greece is also used, in an effort to define more effectively the link between surface emissivities, land surface temperatures and urban surface characteristics. (author)

  3. Satellite and Ground-Based Sensors for the Urban Heat Island Analysis in the City of Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Fabrizi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the trend of the Urban Heat Island (UHI of Rome is analyzed by both ground-based weather stations and a satellite-based infrared sensor. First, we have developed a suitable algorithm employing satellite brightness temperatures for the estimation of the air temperature belonging to the layer of air closest to the surface. UHI spatial characteristics have been assessed using air temperatures measured by both weather stations and brightness temperature maps from the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR on board ENVISAT polar-orbiting satellite. In total, 634 daytime and nighttime scenes taken between 2003 and 2006 have been processed. Analysis of the Canopy Layer Heat Island (CLHI during summer months reveals a mean growth in magnitude of 3–4 K during nighttime and a negative or almost zero CLHI intensity during daytime, confirmed by the weather stations.

  4. FINE STRUCTURE IN MANHATTAN’S DAYTIME URBAN HEAT ISLAND: A NEW DATASET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Vant-Hull

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A street-level temperature and humidity dataset with high resol ution spatial and temporal components has been created for the island of Manhattan, suitab le for use by the urban health and modelling communities. It cons ists of a set of pedestrian measurements over the course of two summers converted into anomaly maps, and a set of ten light -post mounted installations measuring temperature, relative humidity, and illumination at t hree minute intervals over three months. The quality control and data reduction used to produce the anomaly maps is described, and the relationships between spatial and temporal v ariability are investigated. The data sets are available for down load via the project website.

  5. LEED, Its Efficacy and Fallacy in a Regional Context—An Urban Heat Island Case in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ho Shin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of energy in the building sector has increased rapidly over the past two decades. Accordingly, various building assessment methods have developed in green building practices. However, the questions still remain in regard to how positively green buildings affect regional surroundings. This study investigates the possible relationship between LEED-certified buildings and urban heat island effect. Using GIS with spatial regression, the study found that constructing an LEED building in a 30-m boundary could possibly lower the temperature of the surrounding environment by 0.35 °C. Also, having a higher certification level, such as Gold or Platinum, increased the lowering effect by 0.48 °C, while a lower certification level, such as Certified or Silver, had a lowering effect of 0.26 °C. Although LEED has gained a substantial amount of interest and skepticism at the same time, the study results could be a potential sign that the Sustainable Sites Credits or energy-efficient materials play a positive role in lowering the temperature.

  6. Effect of Land-Use Change on the Urban Heat Island in the Fukuoka–Kitakyushu Metropolitan Area, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Kawamoto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In coastal cities, the effect of the sea breeze in mitigating the urban heat island (UHI phenomenon has attracted attention. This study targeted the Fukuoka–Kitakyushu metropolitan area, the fourth largest metropolitan area in Japan which is also coastal. Doppler Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR observations were conducted in the summer of 2015 to clarify the transition of the wind field over the targeted area. To investigate the effects on the UHI of land-use change related to urbanization, the National Land Numerical Information (NLNI land-use datasets for Japan in 1976 (NLNI-76 and 2009 (NLNI-09 were used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. The results of the simulation showed that most of the northern part of the Kyushu region became warmer, with an average increase of +0.236 °C for the whole simulation period. Comparing the two simulations and the Doppler LiDAR observations, the simulation results with the NLNI-09 dataset (for the year closest to the study period in 2015 showed closer conformity with the observations. The results of the simulation using NLNI-76 showed faster sea breeze penetration and higher wind velocity than the observations. These results suggest that the land-use change related to urbanization weakened the sea breeze penetration in this area.

  7. The urban climate: urban heat island of Salamanca El clima de las ciudades: isla de calor de Salamanca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Salud Alonso García

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the existence of the urban heat island (UHI in a medium-sized city, with an extreme climate and few important foci of industrial pollution. It was seen that urban warming can arise in cities of these characteristics, being able to influence in the alive beings of the zone. By comparing the temperature series in an urban area and those from a nearby rural area, we studied the temporal evolution of the intensity of the UHI for the three-year period between 1996 and 1998. We detected two phenomenons: nocturnal heat island, when the difference of temperature between city and rural zone is positive, and diurnal heat island, when is negative. The most intense nocturnal heat island was seen in autumn, and the most intense diurnal heat island was seen in spring. Statistical study of the annual series corresponding to the night-time heat island permits a definition for Salamanca: a weak island, such as the one showing an intensity lower than 2.0 oC, a moderate island, if the intensity lies between 2.0 oC and 4.0 oC, and an intense island when a values greater than 4.0 oC is passed.En este trabajo se ha determinado la existencia de la isla de calor urbana (ICU, en una ciudad de tamaño medio, con un clima extremado y focos industriales de poca actividad. Con lo que se puede comprobar cómo afecta el calentamiento urbano a ciudades de estas características, pudiendo influir en los seres vivos de la zona. La existencia del fenómeno isla de calor, y su evolución en el tiempo, se han observado comparando los datos de temperatura registrados en una estación meteorológica situada en la ciudad, con los de otra estación fuera del radio de acción de la urbe, durante el período 1996-1998. Se han detectado dos fenómenos: la isla de calor nocturna, cuando la diferencia térmica entre la ciudad y la zona rural es positiva, que presenta sus valores más altos en otoño, y la isla de calor diurna, cuando la diferencia es negativa, que

  8. Urban heat island and bioclimatological conditions in a hot-humid tropical city: the example of Akure, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balogun, Ifeoluwa A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of weather on human health has become an issue of increased significance in recent times, considering the increasing rate of urbanisation and the much associated heat island phenomenon. This study examines the urbanisation influence on human bioclimatic conditions in Akure, a medium sized hot-humid tropical city in Nigeria, utilising data from measurements at urban and rural sites in the city. Differences in the diurnal, monthly and seasonal variation of human bioclimatic characteristics between both environments were evaluated and tested for statistical significance. Higher frequencies of high temperatures observed in the city centre suggest a significant heat stress and health risk in this hot-humid city.

  9. Urban heat island effect: A systematic review of spatio-temporal factors, data, methods, and mitigation measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deilami, Kaveh; Kamruzzaman, Md.; Liu, Yan

    2018-05-01

    Despite research on urban heat island (UHI) effect has increased exponentially over the last few decades, a systematic review of factors contributing to UHI effect has scarcely been reported in the literature. This paper provides a systematic and overarching review of different spatial and temporal factors affecting the UHI effect. UHI is a phenomenon when urban areas experience a higher temperature than their surrounding non-urban areas and is considered as a critical factor contributing to global warming, heat related mortalities, and unpredictable climatic changes. Therefore, there is a pressing need to identify the spatio-temporal factors that contribute to (or mitigate) the UHI effect in order to develop a thorough understanding of their causal mechanism so that these are addressed through urban planning policies. This paper systematically identified 75 eligible studies on UHI effect and reviews the nature and type of satellite images used, the techniques applied to classify land cover/use changes, the models to assess the link between spatio-temporal factors and UHI effect, and the effects of these factors on UHI. The review results show that: a) 54% of the studies used Landsat TM images for modelling the UHI effect followed by Landsat ETM (34%), and MODIS (28%); b) land cover indices (46%), followed by supervised classification (17%) were the dominant methods to derive land cover/use changes associated with UHI effect; c) ordinary least square regression is the most commonly applied method (68%) to investigate the link between different spatio-temporal factors and the UHI effect followed by comparative analysis (33%); and d) the most common factors affecting the UHI effect as reported in the reviewed studies, include vegetation cover (44%), season (33%), built-up area (28%), day/night (25%), population density (14%), water body (12%) together with others. This research discusses the findings in policy terms and provides directions for future research.

  10. Cavity Heating Experiments Supporting Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Berger, Karen T.; Bey, Kim S.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.

    2011-01-01

    The two-color thermographic phosphor method has been used to map the local heating augmentation of scaled idealized cavities at conditions simulating the windward surface of the Shuttle Orbiter Columbia during flight STS-107. Two experiments initiated in support of the Columbia Accident Investigation were conducted in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Generally, the first test series evaluated open (length-to-depth less than 10) rectangular cavity geometries proposed as possible damage scenarios resulting from foam and ice impact during launch at several discrete locations on the vehicle windward surface, though some closed (length-to-depth greater than 13) geometries were briefly examined. The second test series was designed to parametrically evaluate heating augmentation in closed rectangular cavities. The tests were conducted under laminar cavity entry conditions over a range of local boundary layer edge-flow parameters typical of re-entry. Cavity design parameters were developed using laminar computational predictions, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred from the heating measurements. An analysis of the aeroheating caused by cavities allowed exclusion of non-breeching damage from the possible loss scenarios being considered during the investigation.

  11. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-SRS and dominateing initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-SRS plasma waves with high phase velocities. This tow-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  12. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvazian, A.; Haji Sharifi, K.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-stimulated Raman scattering and dominating initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-stimulated Raman scattering plasma waves with high phase velocities. This two-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  13. Geochemical Investigations In Soils And Waters Of Ischia Island (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avino, R.; Capaldi, G.; Di Matteo, V.; Pece, R.

    The island of Ischia is localized in the Gulf of Naples and is a volcanic field belonging to the volcanic district of the Phlegraean Fields. It covers an area of about 42 Km2 and is characterized by a complex system of faults and fractures of tectonic and volcano- tectonic origin. The highest peak of the island is Mt Epomeo (787 m), situated in the central part of Ischia. The last eruption on this island took place in 1302 (Arso) and from that time the volcanic activity has reduced only to hydrothermal manifestations (fumaroles and thermal springs) localized especially along the faults that border Mt Epomeo. So the area around the Epomeo is an area of great interest for geochemical investigations, and in fact in this place high concentration of mercury, carbon dioxide and radon have been measured. In this work are presented the data of a study on the concentration of CO2 and mercury and of the activity of radon in the soils and in the waters of the island of Ischia. For these investigations 184 samples of soils have been collected and analyzed in laboratory to calculate the concentration of mercury using the Jerome 511 Mercury Vapor Analyzer. In the same sampling sites measurements of CO2 and of the activity of radon-222 in the soils have also been made using the Track- etch@ method. As regards the waters, a sampling of 50 wells localized all around the coast of the island has been carried out. In these waters measures of mercury and of the activity of some radioactive elements have been done. The measures of radioactivity has been carried out by gamma spectrometry with a HPE Ge detector. All the investigations (in soils and in waters) allow to have preliminary information about the concentrations of these investigated elements and will be a starting-point for a more detailed sampling in those place where anomalies have been found. This set of data can also help to better understand the degassing process of these elements through the principal structures of the

  14. At the foot of the smoking mountains: The 2014 scientific investigations in the Islands of the Four Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Virginia; Bruner, Kale; West, Dixie; Savinetsky, Arkady; Krylovich, Olga; Khasanov, Bulat; Vasyukov, Dmitry; Antipushina, Zhanna; Okuno, Mitsuru; Crockford, Susan; Nicolaysen, Kirsten; MacInnes, Breanyn; Persico, Lyman; Izbekov, Pavel; Neal, Christina; Bartlett, Thomas; Loopesko, Lydia; Fulton, Anne

    2016-01-01

    An interdisciplinary research team conducted archaeological, geological, and biological investigations in the Islands of the Four Mountains, Alaska during the summer of 2014 as part of a three-year project to study long-term geological and ecological patterns and processes with respect to human settlement. Researchers investigated three archaeological sites on Chuginadak Island (SAM-0014, SAM-0016 and SAM-0047) and two archaeological sites on Carlisle Island (AMK-0003 and SAM-0034) as well as peat, tephra, and lava deposition on those islands. These investigations resulted in the delineation of archaeological sites, documentation of geological and cultural stratigraphy, excavation of house-pit features, visual characterization and sampling of potential lithic sources, and documentation of Unangan occupation in the Islands of the Four Mountains from roughly 3,800 years ago to Russian contact.

  15. Multiple timescale analysis of the urban heat island effect based on the Community Land Model: a case study of the city of Xi'an, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meiling; Shen, Huanfeng; Han, Xujun; Li, Huifang; Zhang, Liangpei

    2017-12-06

    Urban heat islands (UHIs) are the phenomenon of urban regions usually being warmer than rural regions, which significantly impacts both the regional ecosystem and societal activities. Numerical simulation can provide spatially and temporally continuous datasets for UHI analysis. In this study, a spatially and temporally continuous ground temperature dataset of Xi'an, China was obtained through numerical simulation based on the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5), at a temporal resolution of 30 min and a spatial resolution of 0.05 ∘ × 0.05 ∘ . Based on the ground temperature, the seasonal average UHI intensity (UHII) was calculated and the seasonal variation of the UHI effect was analyzed. The monthly variation tendency of the urban heat stress was also investigated. Based on the diurnal cycle of ground temperature and the UHI effect in each season, the variation tendencies of the maximum, minimum, and average UHII were analyzed. The results show that the urban heat stress in summer is the strongest among all four seasons. The heat stress in urban areas is very significant in July, and the UHII is the weakest in January. Regarding the diurnal cycle of UHII, the maximum always appears at 06:30 UTC to 07:30 UTC, while the minimum intensity of the UHI effect occurs at different times in the different seasons. The results of this study could provide a reference for policymakers about how to reduce the damage caused by heat stress.

  16. Literature review and experimental investigation of heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsch, W. O.; Schoenhals, R. J.; Viskanta, R.; Winter, E. R. F.

    1971-01-01

    Tests on heat pipes determine operational limits, external boundary conditions, noncondensable gas effects, startup behavior, and geometric configurations. Experiment consists of design, construction, and testing of an apparatus for measuring wick properties, conventional heat pipes and coplanar heat pipes.

  17. Vulnerability to Urban Heat Island in São Paulo Municipality: An Approach to Support the Mitigation Measures Implementation in Urban Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Siqueira-Gay

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the practice of urban and environmental planning, especially in the context of adaptation to environmental changes, there is a demand for studies that integrate social, economic and environmental information of the population and related risk. Particularly in large urban centers, waterproofing and verticalization have the potential to increase local air temperature, triggering the phenomenon of heat islands. Therefore, this phenomenon has side effects such as public health problems, pollution and changes in the air circulation. In view of the risks and consequences of the urban heat islands, this paper aims to analyze the priority areas for implementing measures to mitigate the effects of the urban heat islands phenomenon in São Paulo City (Brazil. A vulnerability index was proposed considering the social and environmental dimensions, relating the capacity of adaptation, sensitivity and exposure to the occurrence of the phenomenon of urban heat islands. Besides that, measures to mitigate the effects associated with heat islands in urban planning were identified. The central regions are critical for exposure and the outskirts, for adaptive capacity and sensitivity, both considered priorities for the implementation of mitigation measures. In addition, strategies such as implementation and conservation of green spaces, preservation of water bodies, urban design change, as well as use of materials with high reflectance are also listed and partially foreseen in the Municipal Strategic Master Plan to mitigate the effects of urban heat island.

  18. External heating of electrical cables and auto-ignition investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courty, L., E-mail: leo.courty@univ-orleans.fr [Univ. Orleans, PRISME EA 4229, 63 Avenue de Lattre de Tassigny, 18020 Bourges (France); Garo, J.P. [Institut P’, UPR 3346 CNRS, ENSMA, Univ. Poitiers, 1 Av. Clément Ader, Téléport 2, BP 40109, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Electrical cables pyrolysis and flammability have been studied. • Two different experimental setups were used to study cables mass loss and flammability. • A 1-D thermal model for cables mass loss and temperature is proposed. • Spontaneous and piloted ignitions have been investigated. - Abstract: Electric cables are now extensively used for both residential and industrial applications. During more than twenty years, multi-scale approaches have been developed to study fire behavior of such cables that represents a serious challenge. Cables are rather complicated materials because they consist of an insulated part and jacket of polymeric materials. These polymeric materials can have various chemical structures, thicknesses and additives and generally have a char-forming tendency when exposed to heat source. In this work, two test methods are used for the characterization of cable pyrolysis and flammability. The first one permits the investigation of cable pyrolysis. A description of the cable mass loss is obtained, coupling an Arrhenius expression with a 1D thermal model of cables heating. Numerical results are successfully compared with experimental data obtained for two types of cable commonly used in French nuclear power plants. The second one is devoted to ignition investigations (spontaneous or piloted) of these cables. All these basic observations, measurements and modelling efforts are of major interest for a more comprehensive fire resistance evaluation of electric cables.

  19. External heating of electrical cables and auto-ignition investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courty, L.; Garo, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrical cables pyrolysis and flammability have been studied. • Two different experimental setups were used to study cables mass loss and flammability. • A 1-D thermal model for cables mass loss and temperature is proposed. • Spontaneous and piloted ignitions have been investigated. - Abstract: Electric cables are now extensively used for both residential and industrial applications. During more than twenty years, multi-scale approaches have been developed to study fire behavior of such cables that represents a serious challenge. Cables are rather complicated materials because they consist of an insulated part and jacket of polymeric materials. These polymeric materials can have various chemical structures, thicknesses and additives and generally have a char-forming tendency when exposed to heat source. In this work, two test methods are used for the characterization of cable pyrolysis and flammability. The first one permits the investigation of cable pyrolysis. A description of the cable mass loss is obtained, coupling an Arrhenius expression with a 1D thermal model of cables heating. Numerical results are successfully compared with experimental data obtained for two types of cable commonly used in French nuclear power plants. The second one is devoted to ignition investigations (spontaneous or piloted) of these cables. All these basic observations, measurements and modelling efforts are of major interest for a more comprehensive fire resistance evaluation of electric cables.

  20. Characterization Urban Heat Island Effect and Modelling of Secondary Pollutant Formations at Urban Hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undi, G. S. N. V. K. S. N. S.

    2017-12-01

    More than 60 percent of the world population is living the urban zones by 2020. This socio of economic transformations will bring considerable changes to the ambient atmosphere. More than 70 percent of the air pollutants in the urban hotspots are from vehicular emissions. in the urban hotspots. In the urban hotspots, the meteorological and dispersion conditions will have different characteristics than in surrounding rural areas. Reactive pollutants transformations are drastically influenced by the local meteorological conditions. The complexity of urban structure alters the pollutants dispersion in the hotspots. This relationship between urban meteorology and air pollution is an important aspect of consideration. In the atmosphere, drastic changes have been noticed from micro to regional and global scales. However, the characteristics of air pollutant emissions vary with time and space, favorable dispersion conditions transport them from local to regional scale. In the present study, the impact of land cover change on Urban Heat Island effect (UHI) has been characterized by considering the three different zones with varying land use patterns. An attempt has been made to estimate the impact of UHI on secondary pollutants (O3) transformations. Envi-Met model has been used to characterize the UHI intensity for the selected zones. Meteorological and air quality measurements were carried out at the selected locations. The diurnal variations of Ozone (O3) concentration for three zones are correlated with the UHI intensity. And the monitoring and model results of O3 concentrations are in good agreement. It is observed from the obtained model results that the metrological parameters influence on local air quality is significant in urban zones.

  1. Different Patterns of the Urban Heat Island Intensity from Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, F. B.; Longo, K.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes the different variability patterns of the Urban Heat Island intensity (UHII) in the Metropolitan Area of Rio de Janeiro (MARJ), one of the largest urban agglomerations in Brazil. The UHII is defined as the difference in the surface air temperature between the urban/suburban and rural/vegetated areas. To choose one or more stations that represent those areas we used the technique of cluster analysis on the air temperature observations from 14 surface weather stations in the MARJ. The cluster analysis aims to classify objects based on their characteristics, gathering similar groups. The results show homogeneity patterns between air temperature observations, with 6 homogeneous groups being defined. Among those groups, one might be a natural choice for the representative urban area (Central station); one corresponds to suburban area (Afonsos station); and another group referred as rural area is compound of three stations (Ecologia, Santa Cruz and Xerém) that are located in vegetated regions. The arithmetic mean of temperature from the three rural stations is taken to represent the rural station temperature. The UHII is determined from these homogeneous groups. The first UHII is estimated from urban and rural temperature areas (Case 1), whilst the second UHII is obtained from suburban and rural temperature areas (Case 2). In Case 1, the maximum UHII occurs in two periods, one in the early morning and the other at night, while the minimum UHII occurs in the afternoon. In Case 2, the maximum UHII is observed during afternoon/night and the minimum during dawn/early morning. This study demonstrates that the stations choice reflects different UHII patterns, evidencing that distinct behaviors of this phenomenon can be identified.

  2. Satellite Images and Gaussian Parameterization for an Extensive Analysis of Urban Heat Islands in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaiyapon Keeratikasikorn

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, an extensive study of the surface urban heat island (SUHI in Thailand’s six major cities is reported, using 728 MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer images for each city. The SUHI analysis was performed at three timescales—diurnal, seasonal, and multiyear. The diurnal variation is represented by the four MODIS passages (10:00, 14:00, 22:00, and 02:00 local time and the seasonal variation by summer and winter maps, with images covering a 14-year interval (2003–2016. Also, 126 Landsat scenes were processed to classify and map land cover changes for each city. To analyze and compare the SUHI patterns, a least-square Gaussian fitting method has been applied and the corresponding empirical metrics quantified. Such an approach represents, when applicable, an efficient quantitative tool to perform comparisons that a visual inspection of a great number of maps would not allow. Results point out that SUHI does not show significant seasonality differences, while SUHI in the daytime is a more evident phenomenon with respect to nighttime, mainly due to solar forcing and intense human activities and traffic. Across the 14 years, the biggest city, Bangkok, shows the highest SUHI maximum intensities during daytime, with values ranging between 4 °C and 6 °C; during nighttime, the intensities are rather similar for all the six cities, between 1 °C and 2 °C. However, these maximum intensities are not correlated with the urban growth over the years. For each city, the SUHI spatial extension represented by the Gaussian footprint is generally not affected by the urban area sprawl across the years, except for Bangkok and Chiang Mai, whose daytime SUHI footprints show a slight increase over the years. Orientation angle and central location of the fitted surface also provide information on the SUHI layout in relation to the land use of the urban texture.

  3. Characterizing Urban Heat Islands of Global Settlements Using MODIS and Nighttime Lights Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Imhoff, Marc L.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Bounoua, Lahouari

    2010-01-01

    Impervious surface area (ISA) from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and land surface temperature (LST) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) averaged over three annual cycles (2003-2005) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the urban heat island (UHI) signature on LST amplitude and its relationship with development intensity, size, and ecological setting for more than 3000 urban settlements globally. Development intensity zones based on fractional ISA are defined for each urban area emanating outward from the urban core to the nearby nonurban rural areas and used to stratify sampling for LST. Sampling is further constrained by biome type and elevation data to ensure objective intercomparisons between zones and between cities in different biomes. We find that the ecological context and settlement size significantly influence the amplitude of summer daytime UHI. Globally, an average of 3.8 C UHI is found in cities built in biomes dominated by forests; 1.9 C UHI in cities embedded in grass shrubs biomes; and only a weak UHI or sometimes an urban heat sink (UHS) in cities in arid and semi-arid biomes. Overall, the amplitude of the UHI is negatively correlated (R = -0.66) with the difference in vegetation density between urban and rural zones represented by the MODIS normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Globally averaged, the daytime UHI amplitude for all settlements is 2.6 C in summer and 1.4 C in winter. Globally, the average summer daytime UHI is 4.7 C for settlements larger than 500 square kilometers compared with 2.5 C for settlements smaller than 50 square kilometers and larger than 10 square kilometers. The stratification of cities by size indicates that the aggregated amount of ISA is the primary driver of UHI amplitude, with variations between ecological contexts and latitudinal zones. More than 60% of the total LST variance is explained by ISA for urban settlements within forests at mid to high latitudes. This

  4. The Impact of Energy Consumption on the Surface Urban Heat Island in China’s 32 Major Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilin Liao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Supported by the rapid economic development in the last few decades, China has become the largest energy consumer in the world. Alongside this, the effect of the anthropogenic heat released from energy consumption is increasingly apparent. We quantified the daytime and nighttime surface urban heat island intensity (SUHII for the 32 major cities in mainland China, using MODIS land surface temperature data from 2008 to 2012, and estimated the energy consumption intensity (ECI based on the correlation between energy consumption and the sum of nighttime lights. On this basis, the impact of energy consumption on the surface urban heat island in China’s 32 major cities was analyzed, by directly examining the relationship between SUHII and the urban-suburban difference in ECI. The results show that energy consumption has a significantly positive correlation with the nighttime SUHII, but no correlation with the daytime SUHII. It indicates that the cities with a larger urban-suburban difference in ECI have a far greater impact on SUHII during the nighttime. Therefore, the statistical analysis of the historical observation data in this study provides evidence for a long-held hypothesis that the anthropogenic heat released from energy consumption is an important contributor to the urban thermal environment.

  5. Investigation of Thin Layered Cobalt Oxide Nano-Islands on Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajdich, Michal; Walton, Alex S.; Fester, Jakob; Arman, Mohammad A.; Osiecki, Jacek; Knudsen, Jan; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Lauritsen, Jeppe V.

    2015-03-01

    Layered cobalt oxides have been shown to be highly active catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), but the synergistic effect of contact with gold is yet to be fully understood. The synthesis of three distinct types of thin-layered cobalt oxide nano-islands supported on a single crystal gold (111) substrate is confirmed by combination of STM and XAS methods. In this work, we present DFT+U theoretical investigation of above nano-islands using several previously known structural models. Our calculations confirm stability of two low-oxygen pressure phases: (a) rock-salt Co-O bilayer and (b) wurtzite Co-O quadlayer and single high-oxygen pressure phase: (c) O-Co-O trilayer. The optimized geometries agree with STM structures and calculated oxidation states confirm the conversion from Co2+ to Co3+ found experimentally in XAS. The O-Co-O trilayer islands have the structure of a single layer of CoOOH proposed to be the true active phase for OER catalyst. For that reason, the effect of water on the Pourbaix stabilities of basal planes and edge sites is fully investigated. Lastly, we also present the corresponding OER theoretical overpotentials.

  6. Influences of population, building, and traffic densities on urban heat island intensity in Chiang Mai City, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kammuang-Lue Niti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to evaluate the Urban Heat Island Intensity (UHII and study the influences of population density, building density, and traffic density on the UHII in Chiang Mai city on each season and time. The surrounding air temperature was measured by thermocouples at a constant height of 2 m above the road by mobile surveying approach. The surveyed routes were divided into urban routes and rural routes. The UHII was calculated from the average surrounding air temperature difference between the urban and the rural areas. Experimental investigations were carried out in two seasons, consisting of summer (March-May, 2014 and winter (December 2013-February 2014. Experimental investigations were carried out in two periods, which were a daytime period (01.00-03.00 pm and a nighttime period (10.00 pm-00.00 am on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Sundays. The results show that the UHII in summer day, summer night, winter day, and winter night were 1.07°C, 1.27°C, 0.58°C, and 1.34°C, respectively. This implies that the temperature in Chiang Mai city’s urban area is higher than that in the rural area the entire year. Moreover, it was found that the UHII in summer day, winter day, and winter night were primarily affected by the traffic density with the sensitivity percentage of 87.50%, 72.73%, and 63.33%, respectively. In contrast, the UHII in summer night was mainly affected by the building density with the sensitivity percentage of 50.00%.

  7. Investigation on Solar Heating System with Building-Integrated Heat Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Alfred

    1996-01-01

    Traditional solar heating systems cover between 5 and 10% of the heat demand fordomestic hot water and comfort heating. By applying storage capacity this share can beincreased much. The Danish producer of solar heating systems, Aidt-Miljø, markets such a system including storage of dry sand heated...... by PP-pipe heat exchanger. Heat demand is reduced due to direct solar heating and due to storage. The storage affects the heat demand passively due to higher temperatures. Hence heat loss is reduced and passive heating is optioned. In theory, by running the system flow backwards, active heating can...... solar collector area of the system, was achieved. Active heating from the sand storage was not observed. The pay-back time for the system can be estimated to be similar to solar heated domestic hot water systems in general. A number of minor improvements on the system could be pointed out....

  8. External heating of electrical cables and auto-ignition investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courty, L; Garo, J P

    2017-01-05

    Electric cables are now extensively used for both residential and industrial applications. During more than twenty years, multi-scale approaches have been developed to study fire behavior of such cables that represents a serious challenge. Cables are rather complicated materials because they consist of an insulated part and jacket of polymeric materials. These polymeric materials can have various chemical structures, thicknesses and additives and generally have a char-forming tendency when exposed to heat source. In this work, two test methods are used for the characterization of cable pyrolysis and flammability. The first one permits the investigation of cable pyrolysis. A description of the cable mass loss is obtained, coupling an Arrhenius expression with a 1D thermal model of cables heating. Numerical results are successfully compared with experimental data obtained for two types of cable commonly used in French nuclear power plants. The second one is devoted to ignition investigations (spontaneous or piloted) of these cables. All these basic observations, measurements and modelling efforts are of major interest for a more comprehensive fire resistance evaluation of electric cables. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Natural Ventilation: A Mitigation Strategy to Reduce Overheating In Buildings under Urban Heat Island Effect in South American Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, Massimo; Carrasco, Claudio; Ángel Gálvez, Miguel; Inostroza, Luis

    2017-10-01

    Urban heat island effect often produces an increase of overheating sensation inside of buildings. To evacuate this heat, the current use of air conditioning increases the energy consumption of buildings. As a good alternative, natural ventilation is one of the best strategies to obtain indoor comfort conditions, even in summer season, if buildings and urban designs are appropriated. In this work, the overheating risk of a small house is evaluated in four South American cities: Guayaquil, Lima, Antofagasta and Valparaíso, with and without considering the UHI effect. Then, natural ventilation is assessed in order to understand the capability of this passive strategy to assure comfort inside the house. Results show that an important portion of the indoor heat can be evacuated, however the temperature rising (especially during the night) due to UHI can generate a saturation effect if appropriate technical solutions, like the increase in the air speed that can be obtained with good urban design, are not considered.

  10. CFD prediction of heat island formation on growing Asian cities. Effect of urbanization in Shanghai; Kyodaikasuru Asia no toshi ni okeru heat island keisei ni kansuru CFD yosoku. Shanghai no toshika ga oyobosu eikyo ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojima, T.; Murakami, S. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science; Mitsumoto, K. [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering

    1997-10-01

    Study is conducted of the effect of change in land use and increase in artificial exhaust heat on heat island formation in Shanghai. Concerning the land use distribution in Shanghai, a point sampling survey was conducted in the 1930s using topographic charts, when the area was broken down into building-occupied region, paddy field, bare ground, and waters. In the 1990s, thanks to data from satellites, high-density and low-density urban regions have added. Calculation for Shanghai is performed, based on the rate of increase in Tokyo`s population and data predicted for Shanghai`s population, on the assumption that Shanghai`s population in the 2050s will grow 2.3 times larger than it is in the 1990s. The prediction thus produced indicates that the urban area in Shanghai in the 2050s will be as large as that of the present-day Tokyo that covers a 50km zone. Heat island formation prediction for Shanghai is worked out using computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-aided simulation. According to the prediction, while the maximum temperature in the 1930s was 29.6degC or 4degC higher than in the suburbs, it is 33.2degC or 7.6deg higher in the 1990s, and will be 34.4degC or 8.6degC higher in the 2050s. 16 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Investigation of heat distribution during magnetic heating treatment using a polyurethane–ferrofluid phantom-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, F.; Rahn, H.; Odenbach, S.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic heating treatment can be used as an adjuvant treatment for cancer therapy. In this therapy, magnetic nanoparticles are enriched inside the tumour and exposed to an alternating magnetic field. Due to magnetic losses the temperature in the tumour rises. The resulting temperature profile inside the tumour is useful for the therapeutic success. In this context heat transfer between tissue with nanoparticles and tissue without nanoparticles is a highly important feature which is actually not understood in detail. In order to investigate this, a phantom has been created which can be used to measure the temperature profile around a region enriched with magnetic nanoparticles. This phantom is composed of a material, which has similar thermal conductivity as human tissue. A tempered water bath surrounds the phantom to establish a constant surrounding temperature simulating the heat sink provided by the human body in a real therapeutic application. It has been found that even at a low concentration of magnetic nanoparticles around 13 mg/ml, sufficient heating of the enriched region can be achieved. Moreover it has been observed that the temperature drops rapidly in the material surrounding the enriched region. Corresponding numerical investigations provide a basis for future recalculations of the temperature inside the tumour using temperature data obtained in the surrounding tissue. - Highlights: • The temperature profile by magnetic hyperthermia was examined. • A model was built to get a deeper understanding of the temperature profile. • The temperature profile of the model inside magnetic fields was measured. • Based on the model a simulation of the temperature profile was performed. • The simulated temperature profile agreed well with the measured profile

  12. ANALYSIS OF THE INTRA-CITY VARIATION OF URBAN HEAT ISLAND AND ITS RELATION TO LAND SURFACE/COVER PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gerçek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Along with urbanization, sealing of vegetated land and evaporation surfaces by impermeable materials, lead to changes in urban climate. This phenomenon is observed as temperatures several degrees higher in densely urbanized areas compared to the rural land at the urban fringe particularly at nights, so-called Urban Heat Island. Urban Heat Island (UHI effect is related with urban form, pattern and building materials so far as it is associated with meteorological conditions, air pollution, excess heat from cooling. UHI effect has negative influences on human health, as well as other environmental problems such as higher energy demand, air pollution, and water shortage. Urban Heat Island (UHI effect has long been studied by observations of air temperature from thermometers. However, with the advent and proliferation of remote sensing technology, synoptic coverage and better representations of spatial variation of surface temperature became possible. This has opened new avenues for the observation capabilities and research of UHIs. In this study, "UHI effect and its relation to factors that cause it" is explored for İzmit city which has been subject to excess urbanization and industrialization during the past decades. Spatial distribution and variation of UHI effect in İzmit is analysed using Landsat 8 and ASTER day & night images of 2015 summer. Surface temperature data derived from thermal bands of the images were analysed for UHI effect. Higher temperatures were classified into 4 grades of UHIs and mapped both for day and night. Inadequate urban form, pattern, density, high buildings and paved surfaces at the expanse of soil ground and vegetation cover are the main factors that cause microclimates giving rise to spatial variations in temperatures across cities. These factors quantified as land surface/cover parameters for the study include vegetation index (NDVI, imperviousness (NDISI, albedo, solar insolation, Sky View Factor (SVF, building

  13. Analysis of the Intra-City Variation of Urban Heat Island and its Relation to Land Surface/cover Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerçek, D.; Güven, İ. T.; Oktay, İ. Ç.

    2016-06-01

    Along with urbanization, sealing of vegetated land and evaporation surfaces by impermeable materials, lead to changes in urban climate. This phenomenon is observed as temperatures several degrees higher in densely urbanized areas compared to the rural land at the urban fringe particularly at nights, so-called Urban Heat Island. Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect is related with urban form, pattern and building materials so far as it is associated with meteorological conditions, air pollution, excess heat from cooling. UHI effect has negative influences on human health, as well as other environmental problems such as higher energy demand, air pollution, and water shortage. Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect has long been studied by observations of air temperature from thermometers. However, with the advent and proliferation of remote sensing technology, synoptic coverage and better representations of spatial variation of surface temperature became possible. This has opened new avenues for the observation capabilities and research of UHIs. In this study, "UHI effect and its relation to factors that cause it" is explored for İzmit city which has been subject to excess urbanization and industrialization during the past decades. Spatial distribution and variation of UHI effect in İzmit is analysed using Landsat 8 and ASTER day & night images of 2015 summer. Surface temperature data derived from thermal bands of the images were analysed for UHI effect. Higher temperatures were classified into 4 grades of UHIs and mapped both for day and night. Inadequate urban form, pattern, density, high buildings and paved surfaces at the expanse of soil ground and vegetation cover are the main factors that cause microclimates giving rise to spatial variations in temperatures across cities. These factors quantified as land surface/cover parameters for the study include vegetation index (NDVI), imperviousness (NDISI), albedo, solar insolation, Sky View Factor (SVF), building envelope

  14. Experimental Investigation of Turbine Vane Heat Transfer for Alternative Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nix, Andrew Carl [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-03-23

    The focus of this program was to experimentally investigate advanced gas turbine cooling schemes and the effects of and factors that contribute to surface deposition from particulate matter found in coal syngas exhaust flows on turbine airfoil heat transfer and film cooling, as well as to characterize surface roughness and determine the effects of surface deposition on turbine components. The program was a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary collaborative effort between aero-thermal and materials faculty researchers and the Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The primary technical objectives of the program were to evaluate the effects of combustion of syngas fuels on heat transfer to turbine vanes and blades in land-based power generation gas turbine engines. The primary questions to be answered by this investigation were; What are the factors that contribute to particulate deposition on film cooled gas turbine components? An experimental program was performed in a high-temperature and pressure combustion rig at the DOE NETL; What is the effect of coal syngas combustion and surface deposition on turbine airfoil film cooling? Deposition of particulate matter from the combustion gases can block film cooling holes, decreasing the flow of the film coolant and the film cooling effectiveness; How does surface deposition from coal syngas combustion affect turbine surface roughness? Increased surface roughness can increase aerodynamic losses and result in decreased turbine hot section efficiency, increasing engine fuel consumption to maintain desired power output. Convective heat transfer is also greatly affected by the surface roughness of the airfoil surface; Is there any significant effect of surface deposition or erosion on integrity of turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings (TBC) and do surface deposits react with the TBC in any way to decrease its thermal insulating capability? Spallation and erosion of TBC is a persistent problem in

  15. Energy savings for heat-island reduction strategies in Chicago and Houston (including updates for Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.

    2002-02-28

    In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'' to quantify the potential benefits of Heat-Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling-energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective of investigating the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, LA; Sacramento, CA; and Salt Lake City, UT. Later two other cities, Chicago, IL and Houston, TX were added to the UHIPP. In an earlier report we summarized our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance, and annual CO2 reduction obtainable from the introduction of HIR strategies in the initial three cities. This report summarizes the results of our study for Chicago and Houston. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer the highest potential savings: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by vintage and system type (i.e., old and new building constructions, and gas and electric heat). We used the prototypical building characteristics developed earlier for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling- and heating-energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.1E model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings [direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on the building [direct effect], (3) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces [indirect effect] and (4) combined strategies 1, 2, and 3 [direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air

  16. Energy savings for heat-island reduction strategies in Chicago and Houston (including updates for Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City); FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'' to quantify the potential benefits of Heat-Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling-energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective of investigating the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, LA; Sacramento, CA; and Salt Lake City, UT. Later two other cities, Chicago, IL and Houston, TX were added to the UHIPP. In an earlier report we summarized our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance, and annual CO2 reduction obtainable from the introduction of HIR strategies in the initial three cities. This report summarizes the results of our study for Chicago and Houston. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer the highest potential savings: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by vintage and system type (i.e., old and new building constructions, and gas and electric heat). We used the prototypical building characteristics developed earlier for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling- and heating-energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.1E model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings[direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on the building[direct effect], (3) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces[indirect effect] and (4) combined strategies 1, 2, and 3[direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air-conditioned buildings in each

  17. Effects of the urban heat island on the phenology of Odonata in London, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos-Jiménez, Giovanna; Hassall, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    Urbanisation is one of the major drivers of ecosystem change and includes increased temperatures in cities leading to an urban heat island (UHI). This study quantified the phenological response of odonates across London, UK, from 1990 to 2012, using a database of 1,031,277 historical sightings. The ordinal flight dates of each species were used to calculate the leading edge, middle and trailing edge of the flight period (P5, P50 and P95, respectively). The results suggest that the phenology of odonates is affected by the UHI only at a community level: no significant changes in the P5 or P50 of the flight period were found, although the P95 shows a mean advance of 4.13 days compared to rural areas, thus suggesting a contraction of the flight period in urban areas. However, only one individual species ( Sympetrum striolatum) exhibited an advance in the P95 of the flight period in urban areas compared to rural areas. On the other hand, climate change (minimum temperature) had a much stronger impact on the phenology of odonates at the community level with a significant advance of 6.9 days °C-1 in the P5 of the flight period, 3.1 days °C-1 in the P50 and 3.3 days °C-1 in the P95 flight date. Similarly, a significant advance in P5 was found in 7 of the 15 species tested in response to minimum temperature, and 2 species showed a significant advance in P50 in response to minimum temperature, but no species showed a shift in the P95 flight date due to minimum temperature. As shown in previous studies, life history influences the phenological response of odonates, with spring species and those species lacking an egg diapause being the most responsive to increased temperatures, although summer species and species with obligate egg diapause also respond to the UHI by advancing the P95 by 3.8 and 4.5 days, respectively, compared to rural areas, thus contracting the flight period. The present study shows that the UHI has negligible impacts on emergence patterns of odonates

  18. Streams in the urban heat island: spatial and temporal variability in temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Kayleigh A.; Bernhardt, Emily S.; Grace, James B.; Hassett, Brooke A.; Sudduth, Elizabeth B.; Wang, Siyi; Urban, Dean L.

    2013-01-01

    Streams draining urban heat islands tend to be hotter than rural and forested streams at baseflow because of warmer urban air and ground temperatures, paved surfaces, and decreased riparian canopy. Urban infrastructure efficiently routes runoff over hot impervious surfaces and through storm drains directly into streams and can lead to rapid, dramatic increases in temperature. Thermal regimes affect habitat quality and biogeochemical processes, and changes can be lethal if temperatures exceed upper tolerance limits of aquatic fauna. In summer 2009, we collected continuous (10-min interval) temperature data in 60 streams spanning a range of development intensity in the Piedmont of North Carolina, USA. The 5 most urbanized streams averaged 21.1°C at baseflow, compared to 19.5°C in the 5 most forested streams. Temperatures in urban streams rose as much as 4°C during a small regional storm, whereas the same storm led to extremely small to no changes in temperature in forested streams. Over a kilometer of stream length, baseflow temperature varied by as much as 10°C in an urban stream and as little as 2°C in a forested stream. We used structural equation modeling to explore how reach- and catchment-scale attributes interact to explain maximum temperatures and magnitudes of storm-flow temperature surges. The best predictive model of baseflow temperatures (R2  =  0.461) included moderately strong pathways directly (extent of development and road density) and indirectly, as mediated by reach-scale factors (canopy closure and stream width), from catchment-scale factors. The strongest influence on storm-flow temperature surges appeared to be % development in the catchment. Reach-scale factors, such as the extent of riparian forest and stream width, had little mitigating influence (R2  =  0.448). Stream temperature is an essential, but overlooked, aspect of the urban stream syndrome and is affected by reach-scale habitat variables, catchment-scale urbanization

  19. Three-Dimensional City Determinants of the Urban Heat Island: A Statistical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Bum Seok

    There is no doubt that the Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a mounting problem in built-up environments, due to the energy retention by the surface materials of dense buildings, leading to increased temperatures, air pollution, and energy consumption. Much of the earlier research on the UHI has used two-dimensional (2-D) information, such as land uses and the distribution of vegetation. In the case of homogeneous land uses, it is possible to predict surface temperatures with reasonable accuracy with 2-D information. However, three-dimensional (3-D) information is necessary to analyze more complex sites, including dense building clusters. Recent research on the UHI has started to consider multi-dimensional models. The purpose of this research is to explore the urban determinants of the UHI, using 2-D/3-D urban information with statistical modeling. The research includes the following stages: (a) estimating urban temperature, using satellite images, (b) developing a 3-D city model by LiDAR data, (c) generating geometric parameters with regard to 2-/3-D geospatial information, and (d) conducting different statistical analyses: OLS and spatial regressions. The research area is part of the City of Columbus, Ohio. To effectively and systematically analyze the UHI, hierarchical grid scales (480m, 240m, 120m, 60m, and 30m) are proposed, together with linear and the log-linear regression models. The non-linear OLS models with Log(AST) as dependent variable have the highest R2 among all the OLS-estimated models. However, both SAR and GSM models are estimated for the 480m, 240m, 120m, and 60m grids to reduce their spatial dependency. Most GSM models have R2s higher than 0.9, except for the 240m grid. Overall, the urban characteristics having high impacts in all grids are embodied in solar radiation, 3-D open space, greenery, and water streams. These results demonstrate that it is possible to mitigate the UHI, providing guidelines for policies aiming to reduce the UHI.

  20. Reducing urban heat island effects to improve urban comfort and balance energy consumption in Bucharest (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Dan; Ochinciuc, Cristina Victoria; Cheval, Sorin; Comşa, Ionuţ; Sîrodoev, Igor; Andone, Radu; Caracaş, Gabriela; Crăciun, Cerasella; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Georgescu, Mihaela; Ianoş, Ioan; Merciu, Cristina; Moraru, Dan; Opriş, Ana; Paraschiv, Mirela; Raeţchi, Sonia; Saghin, Irina; Schvab, Andrei; Tătui-Văidianu, Nataşa

    2017-04-01

    In the recent decades, extreme temperature events and derived hazards are frequent and trigger noteworthy impacts in Romania, especially over the large urban areas. The cities produce significant disturbances of many elements of the regional climate, and generates adverse effects such as Urban Heat Islands (UHI). This presentation condenses the outputs of an ongoing research project (REDBHI) developed through (2013-2017) focused on developing a methodology for monitoring and forecasting indoor climate and energy challenges related to the intensity of UHI of Bucharest (Romania), based on relevant urban climate zones (UCZs). Multi-criteria correlations between the UHI and architectural, urban and landscape variables were determined, and the vulnerability of buildings expressed in the form of transfer function between indoor micro-climate and outdoor urban environment. The vulnerability of civil buildings was determined in relation with the potential for amplifying the thermal hazards intensity through the anthropogenic influence. The project REDBHI aims at developing innovative and original products, with direct applicability, which can be used in any urban settlement and have market potential with regards to energy design and consulting. The concrete innovative outcomes consist of a) localization of the Bucharest UCZs according to the UHI intensity, identifying reference buildings and sub-zones according to urban anthropic factors and landscape pattern; b) typology of representative buildings with regards to energy consumption and CO2 emitted as a result of building exploitation; c) 3D modelling of the reference buildings and of the thermal/energy reaction to severe climatic conditions d) empirical validation of the dynamic thermal/energy analysis; d) development of an pilot virtual studio capable to simulate climate alerts, analyse scenarios and suggest measures to mitigate the UHI effects, and disseminate the outcomes for educational purposes; e) compendium of

  1. Does quality control matter? Surface urban heat island intensity variations estimated by satellite-derived land surface temperature products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jiameng; Zhan, Wenfeng; Huang, Fan; Quan, Jinling; Hu, Leiqiu; Gao, Lun; Ju, Weimin

    2018-05-01

    The temporally regular and spatially comprehensive monitoring of surface urban heat islands (SUHIs) have been extremely difficult, until the advent of satellite-based land surface temperature (LST) products. However, these LST products have relatively higher errors compared to in situ measurements. This has resulted in comparatively inaccurate estimations of SUHI indicators and, consequently, may have distorted interpretations of SUHIs. Although reports have shown that LST qualities are important for SUHI interpretations, systematic investigations of the response of SUHI indicators to LST qualities across cities with dissimilar bioclimates are rare. To address this issue, we chose eighty-six major cities across mainland China and analyzed SUHI intensity (SUHII) derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST data. The LST-based SUHII differences due to inclusion or exclusion of MODIS quality control (QC) flags (i.e., ΔSUHII) were evaluated. Our major findings included, but are not limited to, the following four aspects: (1) SUHIIs can be significantly impacted by MODIS QC flags, and the associated QC-induced ΔSUHIIs generally accounted for 24.3% (29.9%) of the total SUHII value during the day (night); (2) the ΔSUHIIs differed between seasons, with considerable differences between transitional (spring and autumn) and extreme (summer and winter) seasons; (3) significant discrepancies also appeared among cities located in northern and southern regions, with northern cities often possessing higher annual mean ΔSUHIIs. The internal variations of ΔSUHIIs within individual cities also showed high heterogeneity, with ΔSUHII variations that generally exceeded 5.0 K (3.0 K) in northern (southern) cities; (4) ΔSUHIIs were negatively related to SUHIIs and cloud cover percentages (mostly in transitional seasons). No significant relationship was found in the extreme seasons. Our findings highlight the need to be extremely cautious when using LST

  2. Investigation into information flow during the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This report was prepared in response to a request from NRC Chairman Ahearne that directed the Office of Inspection and Enforcement to resume its investigation of information flow during the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) that occurred on March 28, 1979. This investigation was resumed on March 21, 1980. The transfer of information among individuals, agencies, and personnel from Metropolitan Edison was analyzed to ascertain what knowledge was held by various individuals of the specific events, parameters, and systems during the accident at TMI. Maximum use was made of existing records, and additional interviews were conducted to clarify areas that had not been pursued during earlier investigations. Although the passage of time between the accident and post-accident interviews hampered precise recollections of events and circumstances, the investigation revealed that information was not intentionally withheld during the accident and that the system for effective transfer of information was inadequate during the accident

  3. Investigation heat stress in small enterprise in Qom city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. hajizadeh

    2014-02-01

    .Conclusion: Heat stress in almost all of the studied workplaces are higher than the recommended limits, and the outdoor workshops had the highest thermal stress, although heat stress did not show a significant correlation with the studied strains.

  4. Energy impacts of heat island reduction strategies in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopacki, Steven; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-01-01

    In 2000, the Toronto Atmospheric Fund (TAF) embarked on an initiative to quantify the potential benefits of Heat Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (shade trees, reflective roofs and pavements) in reducing cooling energy use in buildings, lowering the ambient air temperature and improve air quality. This report summarizes the efforts of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to assess the impacts of HIR measures on building cooling- and heating-energy use. We discuss our efforts to calculate annual energy savings and peak-power avoidance of HIR strategies in the building sector of the Greater Toronto Area. The analysis is focused on three major building types that offer most saving potentials: residence, office and retail store. Using an hourly building energy simulation model, we quantify the energy saving potentials of (1) using cool roofs on individual buildings[direct effect], (2) planting deciduous shade trees near south and west walls of building[direct effect], (3) planting coniferous wind-shielding vegetation near building[direct effect], (4) ambient cooling by a large-scale program of urban reforestation with reflective building roofs and pavements[indirect effect], (5) and the combined direct and indirect effects. Results show potential annual energy savings of over$11M (with uniform residential and commercial electricity and gas prices of$0.084/kWh and$5.54/GJ) could be realized by ratepayers from the combined direct and indirect effects of HIR strategies. Of that total, about 88 percent was from the direct impact roughly divided equally among reflective roofs, shade trees and wind-shielding, and the remainder (12 percent) from the indirect impact of the cooler ambient air temperature. The residential sector accounts for over half (59 percent) of the total, offices 13 percent and retail stores 28 percent. Savings from cool roofs were about 20 percent, shade trees 30 percent, wind shielding of tree 37 percent, and indirect effect 12 percent. These

  5. AN INVESTIGATION OF POISONOUS AND VENOMOUS FISHES AT PALMYRA ISLAND, LINE ISLANDS, DURING 13 APRIL TO 2 MAY 1953

    Science.gov (United States)

    puffers were edible . Collections were made in April during the reproduction period when toxicity was at a maximum. Hook and line, spear, dynamite, and...flavimarginatus; the sea bass Variola louti; the pomacentrids Abudefduf spp. and lethrinids. Underwater movies were taken for food chain studies. A shipment of reef fishes of Fanning Island was also procured.

  6. Study on a heat recovery system for the thermal power plant utilizing air cooling island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jian; Fu, Lin; Sun, Fangtian; Zhang, Shigang

    2014-01-01

    A new heat recovery system for CHP (combined heat and power) systems named HRU (heat recovery unit) is presented, which could recover the low grade heat of exhausted steam from the turbine at the thermal power plant directly. Heat recovery of exhausted steam is often accomplished by recovering the heat of cooling water in current systems. Therefore, two processes of heat transfer is needed at least. However, exhausted steam could be condensed in the evaporator of HRU directly, which reduce one process of heat transfer. A special evaporator is designed condense the exhausted steam directly. Simulated results are compared to experiments, which could include the calculation of heat transfer coefficients of different parts of HRU. It is found that about 25Mw of exhausted steam is recovered by this system. HRU could be promising for conventional CHP systems, which could increase the total energy efficiency obviously and enlarge the heating capacity of a built CHP system. - Highlights: • A new heat recovery system for thermal power plant is presented. • A mathematical model including heat transfer coefficients calculation is given. • This heat recovery system is experimented at a thermal power plant. • Performances of this system under different working conditions are simulated

  7. The Heat Is on: An Inquiry-Based Investigation for Specific Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Deborah G.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial number of upper-level science students and practicing physical science teachers demonstrate confusion about thermal equilibrium, heat transfer, heat capacity, and specific heat capacity. The traditional method of instruction, which involves learning the related definitions and equations, using equations to solve heat transfer…

  8. Numerical investigation of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Andrijana D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidimensional numerical simulation of the atmospheric saturated pool boiling is performed. The applied modelling and numerical methods enable a full representation of the liquid and vapour two-phase mixture behaviour on the heated surface, with included prediction of the swell level and heated wall temperature field. In this way the integral behaviour of nucleate pool boiling is simulated. The micro conditions of bubble generation at the heated wall surface are modelled by the bubble nucleation site density, the liquid wetting contact angle and the bubble grow time. The bubble nucleation sites are randomly located within zones of equal size, where the number of zones equals the nucleation site density. The conjugate heat transfer from the heated wall to the liquid is taken into account in wetted heated wall areas around bubble nucleation sites. The boiling curve relation between the heat flux and the heated wall surface temperature in excess of the saturation temperature is predicted for the pool boiling conditions reported in the literature and a good agreement is achieved with experimentally measured data. The influence of the nucleation site density on the boiling curve characteristic is confirmed. In addition, the influence of the heat flux intensity on the spatial effects of vapour generation and two-phase flow are shown, such as the increase of the swell level position and the reduced wetting of the heated wall surface by the heat flux increase. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-33018 i br. OI-174014

  9. Experimental investigation of turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, W. A.; Johnson, B. V.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer was conducted to provide an experimental data base that can guide the aerodynamic and thermal design of turbine disks and blade attachments for flow conditions and geometries simulating those of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) turbopump drive turbines. Experiments were conducted to define the nature of the aerodynamics and heat transfer of the flow within the disk cavities and blade attachments of a large scale model simulating the SSME turbopump drive turbines. These experiments include flow between the main gas path and the disk cavities, flow within the disk cavities, and leakage flows through the blade attachments and labyrinth seals. Air was used to simulate the combustion products in the gas path. Air and carbon dioxide were used to simulate the coolants injected at three locations in the disk cavities. Trace amounts of carbon dioxide were used to determine the source of the gas at selected locations on the rotors, the cavity walls, and the interstage seal. The measurements on the rotor and stationary walls in the forward and aft cavities showed that the coolant effectiveness was 90 percent or greater when the coolant flow rate was greater than the local free disk entrainment flow rate and when room temperature air was used as both coolant and gas path fluid. When a coolant-to-gas-path density ratio of 1.51 was used in the aft cavity, the coolant effectiveness on the rotor was also 90 percent or greater at the aforementioned condition. However, the coolant concentration on the stationary wall was 60 to 80 percent at the aforementioned condition indicating a more rapid mixing of the coolant and flow through the rotor shank passages. This increased mixing rate was attributed to the destabilizing effects of the adverse density gradients.

  10. Experimental investigation of heat transfer performance for a novel microchannel heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y; Ding, G-F

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrated a novel microchannel heat sink with a high local heat transfer efficiency contributed by a complicated microchannel system, which comprises parallel longitudinal microchannels etched in a silicon substrate and transverse microchannels electroplated on a copper heat spreader. The thermal boundary layer develops in transverse microchannels. Meanwhile, the heat transfer area is increased compared with the conventional microchannel heat sink only having parallel longitudinal microchannels. Both benefits yield high local heat transfer efficiency and enhance the overall heat transfer, which is attractive for the cooling of high heat flux electronic devices. Infrared tests show the temperature distribution in the test objects. The effects of flow rate and heat flux levels on heat transfer characteristics are presented. A uniform temperature distribution is obtained through the heating area. The reference temperatures decrease with the increasing flow rate from 0.64 ml min −1 to 6.79 ml min −1 for a constant heat flux of 10.4 W cm −2 . A heat flux of 18.9 W cm −2 is attained at a flow rate of 6.79 ml min −1 for assuring the maximum temperature of the microchannel heat sink less than the maximum working temperature of electronic devices

  11. Investigation and optimization of the depth of flue gas heat recovery in surface heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalov, V. V.; Bespalov, V. I.; Melnikov, D. V.

    2017-09-01

    Economic issues associated with designing deep flue gas heat recovery units for natural gas-fired boilers are examined. The governing parameter affecting the performance and cost of surface-type condensing heat recovery heat exchangers is the heat transfer surface area. When firing natural gas, the heat recovery depth depends on the flue gas temperature at the condenser outlet and determines the amount of condensed water vapor. The effect of the outlet flue gas temperature in a heat recovery heat exchanger on the additionally recovered heat power is studied. A correlation has been derived enabling one to determine the best heat recovery depth (or the final cooling temperature) maximizing the anticipated reduced annual profit of a power enterprise from implementation of energy-saving measures. Results of optimization are presented for a surface-type condensing gas-air plate heat recovery heat exchanger for the climatic conditions and the economic situation in Tomsk. The predictions demonstrate that it is economically feasible to design similar heat recovery heat exchangers for a flue gas outlet temperature of 10°C. In this case, the payback period for the investment in the heat recovery heat exchanger will be 1.5 years. The effect of various factors on the optimal outlet flue gas temperature was analyzed. Most climatic, economical, or technological factors have a minor effect on the best outlet temperature, which remains between 5 and 20°C when varying the affecting factors. The derived correlation enables us to preliminary estimate the outlet (final) flue gas temperature that should be used in designing the heat transfer surface of a heat recovery heat exchanger for a gas-fired boiler as applied to the specific climatic conditions.

  12. Urban weather data and building models for the inclusion of the urban heat island effect in building performance simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, M; Inostroza, L; Villacreses, G; Lobato, A; Carrasco, C

    2017-10-01

    This data article presents files supporting calculation for urban heat island (UHI) inclusion in building performance simulation (BPS). Methodology is used in the research article "From urban climate to energy consumption. Enhancing building performance simulation by including the urban heat island effect" (Palme et al., 2017) [1]. In this research, a Geographical Information System (GIS) study is done in order to statistically represent the most important urban scenarios of four South-American cities (Guayaquil, Lima, Antofagasta and Valparaíso). Then, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is done to obtain reference Urban Tissues Categories (UTC) to be used in urban weather simulation. The urban weather files are generated by using the Urban Weather Generator (UWG) software (version 4.1 beta). Finally, BPS is run out with the Transient System Simulation (TRNSYS) software (version 17). In this data paper, four sets of data are presented: 1) PCA data (excel) to explain how to group different urban samples in representative UTC; 2) UWG data (text) to reproduce the Urban Weather Generation for the UTC used in the four cities (4 UTC in Lima, Guayaquil, Antofagasta and 5 UTC in Valparaíso); 3) weather data (text) with the resulting rural and urban weather; 4) BPS models (text) data containing the TRNSYS models (four building models).

  13. Urban weather data and building models for the inclusion of the urban heat island effect in building performance simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palme

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This data article presents files supporting calculation for urban heat island (UHI inclusion in building performance simulation (BPS. Methodology is used in the research article “From urban climate to energy consumption. Enhancing building performance simulation by including the urban heat island effect” (Palme et al., 2017 [1]. In this research, a Geographical Information System (GIS study is done in order to statistically represent the most important urban scenarios of four South-American cities (Guayaquil, Lima, Antofagasta and Valparaíso. Then, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA is done to obtain reference Urban Tissues Categories (UTC to be used in urban weather simulation. The urban weather files are generated by using the Urban Weather Generator (UWG software (version 4.1 beta. Finally, BPS is run out with the Transient System Simulation (TRNSYS software (version 17. In this data paper, four sets of data are presented: 1 PCA data (excel to explain how to group different urban samples in representative UTC; 2 UWG data (text to reproduce the Urban Weather Generation for the UTC used in the four cities (4 UTC in Lima, Guayaquil, Antofagasta and 5 UTC in Valparaíso; 3 weather data (text with the resulting rural and urban weather; 4 BPS models (text data containing the TRNSYS models (four building models.

  14. An outbreak investigation of scrub typhus in Western Province, Solomon Islands, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Marks

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the etiology and risk factors of undifferentiated fever in a cluster of patients in Western Province, Solomon Islands, May 2014. Methods: An outbreak investigation with a case control study was conducted. A case was defined as an inpatient in one hospital in Western Province, Solomon Islands with high fever (> 38.5 °C and a negative malaria microscopy test admitted between 1 and 31 May 2014. Asymptomatic controls matched with the cases residentially were recruited in a ratio of 1:2. Serum samples from the subjects were tested for rickettsial infections using indirect micro-immunofluorescence assay. Results: Nine cases met the outbreak case definition. All cases were male. An eschar was noted in five cases (55%, and one developed pneumonitis. We did not identify any environmental factors associated with illness. Serum samples of all five follow-up cases (100% had strong-positive IgG responses to scrub typhus. All but one control (10% had a moderate response against scrub typhus. Four controls had low levels of antibodies against spotted fever group rickettsia, and only one had a low-level response to typhus group rickettsia. Discussion: This outbreak represents the first laboratory-confirmed outbreak of scrub typhus in the Western Province of Solomon Islands. The results suggest that rickettsial infections are more common than currently recognized as a cause of an acute febrile illness. A revised clinical case definition for rickettsial infections and treatment guidelines were developed and shared with provincial health staff for better surveillance and response to future outbreaks of a similar kind.

  15. Investigating collapse structures in oceanic islands using magnetotelluric surveys: The case of Fogo Island in Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, F. J.; Monteiro Santos, F. A.; Madeira, J.; Pous, J.; Bernardo, I.; Soares, A.; Esteves, M.; Adão, F.; Ribeiro, J.; Mata, J.; Brum da Silveira, A.

    2018-05-01

    One of the most remarkable natural events on Earth are the large lateral flank collapses of oceanic volcanoes, involving volumes of rock exceeding tens of km3. These collapses are relatively frequent in recent geological times as supported by evidence found in the geomorphology of volcanic island edifices and associated debris flows deposited on the proximal ocean floor. The Island of Fogo in the Cape Verde archipelago is one of the most active and prominent oceanic volcanoes on Earth. The island has an average diameter of 25 km and reaches a maximum elevation of 2829 m above sea level (m a.s.l.) at Pico do Fogo, a young stratovolcano located within a summit depression open eastward due to a large lateral flank collapse. The sudden collapse of the eastern flank of Fogo Island produced a megatsunami 73 ky ago. The limits of the flank collapse were deduced as well from geomorphologic markers within the island. The headwall of the collapse scar is interpreted as either being located beneath the post-collapse volcanic infill of the summit depression or located further west, corresponding to the Bordeira wall that partially surrounds it. The magnetotelluric (MT) method provides a depth distribution of the ground resistivity obtained by the simultaneous measurement of the natural variations of the electric and magnetic field of the Earth. Two N-S magnetotelluric profiles were acquired across the collapsed area to determine its geometry and boundaries. The acquired MT data allowed the determination of the limits of the collapsed area more accurately as well as its morphology at depth and thickness of the post-collapse infill. According to the newly obtained MT data and the bathymetry of the eastern submarine flank of Fogo, the volume involved in the flank collapse is estimated in 110 km3. This volume -the first calculated onshore- stands between the previously published more conservative and excessive calculations -offshore- that were exclusively based in geomorphic

  16. The surface urban heat island response to urban expansion: A panel analysis for the conterminous United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaoma; Zhou, Yuyu; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Imhoff, Marc; Li, Xuecao

    2017-12-01

    Abstract: Urban heat island (UHI), a major concern worldwide, affects human health and energy use. With current and anticipated rapid urbanization, improved understanding of the response of UHI to urbanization is important for impact analysis and developing effective adaptation measures and mitigation strategies. Current studies mainly focus on a single or a few big cities and knowledge on the response of UHI to urbanization for large areas is very limited. Modelling UHI caused by urbanization for large areas that encompass multiple metropolitans remains a major scientific challenge/opportunity. As a major indicator of urbanization, urban area size lends itself well for representation in prognostic models to investigate the impacts of urbanization on UHI and the related socioeconomic and environmental effects. However, we have little knowledge on how UHI responds to the increase of urban area size, namely urban expansion, and its spatial and temporal variation over large areas. In this study, we investigated the relationship between surface UHI (SUHI) and urban area size in the climate and ecological context, and its spatial and temporal variations, based on a panel analysis of about 5000 urban areas of 10 km2 or larger, in the conterminous U.S. We found statistically significant positive relationship between SUHI and urban area size, and doubling the urban area size led to a SUHI increase of higher than 0.7 °C. The response of SUHI to the increase of urban area size shows spatial and temporal variations, with stronger SUHI increase in the Northern region of U.S., and during daytime and summer. Urban area size alone can explain as much as 87% of the variance of SUHI among cities studied, but with large spatial and temporal variations. Urban area size shows higher association with SUHI in regions where the thermal characteristics of land cover surrounding the urban are more homogeneous, such as in Eastern U.S., and in the summer months. This study provides a

  17. Urban Heat Island Growth Modeling Using Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Regression: A case study of Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherafati, Sh. A.; Saradjian, M. R.; Niazmardi, S.

    2013-09-01

    Numerous investigations on Urban Heat Island (UHI) show that land cover change is the main factor of increasing Land Surface Temperature (LST) in urban areas. Therefore, to achieve a model which is able to simulate UHI growth, urban expansion should be concerned first. Considerable researches on urban expansion modeling have been done based on cellular automata. Accordingly the objective of this paper is to implement CA method for trend detection of Tehran UHI spatiotemporal growth based on urban sprawl parameters (such as Distance to nearest road, Digital Elevation Model (DEM), Slope and Aspect ratios). It should be mentioned that UHI growth modeling may have more complexities in comparison with urban expansion, since the amount of each pixel's temperature should be investigated instead of its state (urban and non-urban areas). The most challenging part of CA model is the definition of Transfer Rules. Here, two methods have used to find appropriate transfer Rules which are Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Support Vector Regression (SVR). The reason of choosing these approaches is that artificial neural networks and support vector regression have significant abilities to handle the complications of such a spatial analysis in comparison with other methods like Genetic or Swarm intelligence. In this paper, UHI change trend has discussed between 1984 and 2007. For this purpose, urban sprawl parameters in 1984 have calculated and added to the retrieved LST of this year. In order to achieve LST, Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) night-time images have exploited. The reason of implementing night-time images is that UHI phenomenon is more obvious during night hours. After that multilayer feed-forward neural networks and support vector regression have used separately to find the relationship between this data and the retrieved LST in 2007. Since the transfer rules might not be the same in different regions, the satellite image of the city has

  18. Theoretical investigation of the performance of a novel loop heat pipe solar water heating system for use in Beijing, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xudong; Wang Zhangyuan; Tang Qi

    2010-01-01

    A novel loop heat pipe (LHP) solar water heating system for typical apartment buildings in Beijing was designed to enable effective collection of solar heat, distance transport, and efficient conversion of solar heat into hot water. Taking consideration of the heat balances occurring in various parts of the loop, such as the solar absorber, heat pipe loop, heat exchanger and storage tank, a computer model was developed to investigate the thermal performance of the system. With the specified system structure, the efficiency of the solar system was found to be a function of its operational characteristics - working temperature of the loop heat pipe, water flow rate across the heat exchanger, and external parameters, including ambient temperature, temperature of water across the exchanger and solar radiation. The relationship between the efficiency of the system and these parameters was established, analysed and discussed in detail. The study suggested that the loop heat pipe should be operated at around 72 deg. C and the water across the heat exchanger should be maintained at 5.1 l/min. Any variation in system structure, i.e., glazing cover and height difference between the absorber and heat exchanger, would lead to different system performance. The glazing covers could be made using either borosilicate or polycarbonate, but borosilicate is to be preferred as it performs better and achieves higher efficiency at higher temperature operation. The height difference between the absorber and heat exchanger in the design was 1.9 m which is an adequate distance causing no constraint to heat pipe heat transfer. These simulation results were validated with the primary testing results.

  19. Experimental investigation of natural convection induced by internal heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Y; Kudoh, Y; Takeda, Y; Yanagisawa, T

    2005-01-01

    Dilatation of a convection cell with respect to its Rayleigh number, one of the problems in internally heated convection, was quantitatively investigated by analyzing temperature field in a cell. The temperature field visualized by a thermo-chromic liquid crystal (TLC) expresses the cell dilatation. A calibration system was developed to convert the visualized photographs of the temperature field to the temperature field. A calibration curve correlating color information extracted from the photograph and temperature was determined from the approximately linear temperature distribution in the horizontal fluid layer using the hue method. Photos taken at various internal Rayleigh numbers were converted to the temperature field by the obtained curve. Extracting individual cells from a temperature field achieves a quantitative expression of the cell dilatation as the variation of the wavenumber of the cell with Rayleigh number increases. The temperature profile in a cell shows that high temperature areas appear at the apexes of the cell, largely different from the profile obtained by linear theory

  20. Thermal signatures of urban land cover types: High-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing of urban heat island in Huntsville, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chor Pang

    1996-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to apply airborne high-resolution thermal infrared imagery for urban heat island studies, using Huntsville, AL, a medium-sized American city, as the study area. The occurrence of urban heat islands represents human-induced urban/rural contrast, which is caused by deforestation and the replacement of the land surface by non-evaporating and non-porous materials such as asphalt and concrete. The result is reduced evapotranspiration and more rapid runoff of rain water. The urban landscape forms a canopy acting as a transitional zone between the atmosphere and the land surface. The composition and structure of this canopy have a significant impact on the thermal behavior of the urban environment. Research on the trends of surface temperature at rapidly growing urban sites in the United States during the last 30 to 50 years suggests that significant urban heat island effects have caused the temperatures at these sites to rise by 1 to 2 C. Urban heat islands have caused changes in urban precipitation and temperature that are at least similar to, if not greater than, those predicted to develop over the next 100 years by global change models. Satellite remote sensing, particularly NOAA AVHRR thermal data, has been used in the study of urban heat islands. Because of the low spatial resolution (1.1 km at nadir) of the AVHRR data, these studies can only examine and map the phenomenon at the macro-level. The present research provides the rare opportunity to utilize 5-meter thermal infrared data acquired from an airplane to characterize more accurately the thermal responses of different land cover types in the urban landscape as input to urban heat island studies.

  1. The Effect of Tree Spacing and Size in Urban Areas: Strategies for Mitigating High Temperature in Urban Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, R.; Shandas, V.; Makido, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Many cities are unintentionally designed to be heat sinks, which absorb the sun's short-wave radiation and reemit as long-wave radiation. Long time reorganization of this `urban heat island' (UHI) phenomena has led researchers and city planners into developing strategies for reducing ambient temperatures through urban design. Specifically, greening areas have proven to reduce the temperature in UHI's, including strategies such as green streets, green facades, and green roofs have been implemented. Among the scientific community there is promoted study of how myriad greening strategies can reduce temperature, relatively limited work has focused on the distribution, density, and quantity of tree campaigns. This paper examines how the spacing and size of trees reduce temperatures differently. A major focus of the paper is to understand how to lower the temperature through tree planting, and provide recommendations to cities that are attempting to solve their own urban heat island issues. Because different cities have different room for planting greenery, we examined which strategies are more efficient given an area constraint. Areas that have less available room might not be able to plant a high density of trees. We compared the different experimental groups varying in density and size of trees against the control to see the effect the trees had. Through calibration with local weather stations, we used a micrometeorology program (ENVI-Met) to model and simulate the different experimental models and how they affect the temperature. The results suggest that some urban designs can reduce ambient temperatures by over 7 0C, and the inclusion of large form trees have the greatest contribution, by reducing temperatures over 15 0C. The results suggest that using specific strategies that combine placement of specific tree configurations with alternative distribution of urban development patterns can help to solve the current challenges of UHI's, and thereby support management

  2. Experimental investigation on heat transport in gravel-sand materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maureschat, Gerald; Heller, Alfred

    1997-01-01

    in sand-gravel material, the storage media is to be water satured. In this case, handling of such material on site is rather complex. The conduction is highly dependent on the thermal properties of the storage media and so is the overall thermal performance of a storage applying such media. For sandy...... out in a small size experiment. The experiment consists of a highly insulated box filled with two kinds of sand material crossed by a plastic heat pipe. Heat transfer is measured under dry and water satured conditions in a cross-section.The conclusions are clear. To obtain necessary heat conduction...

  3. Transient heat pipe investigations for space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    A 4-meter long, high temperature, high power, molybdenum-lithium heat pipe has been fabricated and tested in transient and steady state operation at temperatures to 1500 K. Maximum power throughput during the tests was approximately 37 kW/cm 2 for the 1.4 cm diameter vapor space of the annular wick heat pipe. The evaporator flux density for the tests was 150.0 W/cm 2 over a length of 40 cm. Condenser length was approximately 3.0 m with radiant heat rejection from the condenser to a coaxial, water cooled radiation calorimeter. A variable radiation shield, controllable from the outside of the vacuum enclosure, was used to vary the load on the heat pipe during the tests. 1 ref., 9 figs

  4. Experimental investigation of heat transfer in the transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, K.; Weber, P.; Feng, Q.

    1990-10-01

    An experimental study of forced convective boiling heat transfer for upflow of water in a circular tube has been performed using a heat transfer system with temperature-controlled indirect Joule heating. By this way, complete boiling curves from incipience of boiling to fully established film boiling could be measured including the transition boiling regime. The boiling curves were traversed in a quasi-steady mode, usually by increasing the set-point wall temperature average at a constant time rate of 3.5 K/min. The vast majority of results covers the pressure range from 0.1 to 1.0 MPa, mass flux range from 25 to 200 kg/(m 2 s) and inlet subcooling from 5 to 30 K. The experimental results of transition boiling heat transfer obtained in the centre of the test section were correlated in terms of a heat flux/surface superheat relationship that was normalized by the maximum heat flux (local CHF) and its associated wall superheat, respectively, to anchor the transition boiling curve to its low temperature limit. The upper surface temperature limit of the transition boiling regime was determined by inspection of measured axial distributions of surface heat flux and corresponding wall temperature. The critical heat flux (CHF) and its corresponding wall superheat has been measured, too. These temperature-controlled results were compared also with power-controlled experiments. The data are presented in terms of a table and accurate empirical correlations following Katto's generalized correlation scheme. Taking into account previous CHF data at L/D ≤ 100 and same range of flow conditions the length effect was found to further depend on pressure and mass flux. The data for the critical wall superheat show a distinct dependence upon pressure, mass flux and inlet quality that has not been observed before with comparable clarity

  5. Numerical Investigation of Turbulent Natural Convection Heat Transfer in an Internally-Heated Melt Pool and Metallic Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourgaliev, R.R.; Dinh, A.T.; Dinh, T.N.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents results of numerical investigation of turbulent natural convection in an internally-heated oxidic pool, and in a metallic layer heated from below and cooled from top and sidewalls. Emphasis is placed upon applicability of the existing heat transfer correlations (obtained from simulant-material experiments) in assessments of a prototypic severe reactor accident. The objectives of this study are (i) to improve the current understanding of the physics of unstably stratified flows, and (ii) to reduce uncertainties associated with modeling and assessment of natural convection heat transfer in the above configuration. Prediction capabilities of different turbulence modeling approaches are first examined and discussed, based on extensive results of numerical investigations performed by present authors. Findings from numerical modeling of turbulent natural convection flow and heat transfer in melt pools and metallic layers are then described. (authors)

  6. The urban heat island effect, its causes, and mitigation, with reference to the thermal properties of asphalt concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajerani, Abbas; Bakaric, Jason; Jeffrey-Bailey, Tristan

    2017-07-15

    The Urban Heat Island (UHI) is a phenomenon that affects many millions of people worldwide. The higher temperatures experienced in urban areas compared to the surrounding countryside has enormous consequences for the health and wellbeing of people living in cities. The increased use of manmade materials and increased anthropogenic heat production are the main causes of the UHI. This has led to the understanding that increased urbanisation is the primary cause of the urban heat island. The UHI effect also leads to increased energy needs that further contribute to the heating of our urban landscape, and the associated environmental and public health consequences. Pavements and roofs dominate the urban surface exposed to solar irradiation. This review article outlines the contribution that pavements make to the UHI effect and analyses localized and citywide mitigation strategies against the UHI. Asphalt Concrete (AC) is one of the most common pavement surfacing materials and is a significant contributor to the UHI. Densely graded AC has low albedo and high volumetric heat capacity, which results in surface temperatures reaching upwards of 60 °C on hot summer days. Cooling the surface of a pavement by utilizing cool pavements has been a consistent theme in recent literature. Cool pavements can be reflective or evaporative. However, the urban geometry and local atmospheric conditions should dictate whether or not these mitigation strategies should be used. Otherwise both of these pavements can actually increase the UHI effect. Increasing the prevalence of green spaces through the installation of street trees, city parks and rooftop gardens has consistently demonstrated a reduction in the UHI effect. Green spaces also increase the cooling effect derived from water and wind sources. This literature review demonstrates that UHI mitigation techniques are best used in combination with each other. As a result of the study, it was concluded that the current mitigation

  7. Experimental investigations on heat content of supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate by a simple heat loss method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Weiqiang; Dannemand, Mark; Johansen, Jakob Berg

    2016-01-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate is a phase change material that can be used for long term heat storage in solar heating systems because of its relatively high heat of fusion, a melting temperature of 58 °C and its ability to supercool stable. In practical applications sodium acetate trihydrate tend to ......, 0.3–0.5 % (wt.%) Xanthan Gum or 1–2% (wt.%) of some solid or liquid polymers as additives had significantly higher heat contents compared to samples of sodium acetate trihydrate suffering from phase separation....

  8. Cool city as a sustainable example of heat island management case study of the coolest city in the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeman Mohammed Rehan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization negatively impacts the urban environment mainly by the production of waste heat from refrigeration systems, although industrial processes and motorized vehicular traffic have also been recognized as additional causes of the urban heat island (UHI effect. The UHI negatively impacts the residents, with spillover effects for environmental aspects. In urbanized areas, it is a critical factor for air quality management and public health. The UHI and strategies to implement its mitigation are becoming increasingly important for governmental agencies and researchers. The problem is how to deal with UHI effects? Accordingly, the main aim of this paper is to determine the UHI mitigation strategies and their effectiveness in terms of cooling and temperature reduction in cities at the level of urban design. This goal is achieved through exploring the concept of the cool city, as it is the key factor, from the theoretical, analytical, and practical viewpoints, to diminishing the urban heat release. Then, the paper analyzes how the concept of the coolest city in the world (Stuttgart, Germany is developed and explores a practical approach toward cool cities. Finally, it suggests a set of recommendations to develop the urban environment in Greater Cairo by applying the cool city concept.

  9. Heat loss investigation from spherical cavity receiver of solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shewale, V. C. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, NDMVPS KBT College of Engineering, Nashik (India); Dongarwar, P. R. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, College of Military Engineering, Pune (India); Gawande, R. P. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, B.D.C.O.E. Wardha, Nagpur University, NagpurI (India)

    2016-11-15

    The heat losses are mainly affects on the performance of cavity receiver of solar concentrator. In this paper, the experimental and numerical study is carried out for different heat losses from spherical cavity receiver of 0.385 m cavity diameter and 0.154 m opening diameter. The total and convection losses are studied experimentally to no wind and wind conditions for the temperature range of 150 °C to 300 °C at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° inclination angle of cavity receiver. The experimental set up mainly consists of copper tube material cavity receiver wrapped with nichrome heating coil to heat the cavity and insulated with glasswool insulation. The numerical analysis was carried out with Fluent Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, to study connective heat losses for no wind condition only. The numerical results are compared with experimental results and found good agreement with maximum deviation of 12 %. The effect of inclination angle of cavity receiver on total losses and convection losses shows that as the inclination angle increases from 0o to 90o, both losses decreased due to decreased in convective zone into the cavity receiver. The effect of operating temperature of cavity shows that as the temperature of cavity receiver increases, the total and convective losses goes on increasing. The effect of external wind at 2 m/s and 4 m/s in two directions (side-on wind and head-on wind) is also studied experimentally for total and convective heat losses. The result shows that the heat losses are higher for head-on wind condition compared to side-on wind and no wind condition at all inclination angle of cavity receiver. The present results are also compared to the convective losses obtained from the correlations of Stine and Mcdonald and M. Prakash. The convective loss from these correlations shows nearest prediction to both experimental and numerical results.

  10. Heat loss investigation from spherical cavity receiver of solar concentrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shewale, V. C.; Dongarwar, P. R.; Gawande, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    The heat losses are mainly affects on the performance of cavity receiver of solar concentrator. In this paper, the experimental and numerical study is carried out for different heat losses from spherical cavity receiver of 0.385 m cavity diameter and 0.154 m opening diameter. The total and convection losses are studied experimentally to no wind and wind conditions for the temperature range of 150 °C to 300 °C at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° inclination angle of cavity receiver. The experimental set up mainly consists of copper tube material cavity receiver wrapped with nichrome heating coil to heat the cavity and insulated with glasswool insulation. The numerical analysis was carried out with Fluent Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, to study connective heat losses for no wind condition only. The numerical results are compared with experimental results and found good agreement with maximum deviation of 12 %. The effect of inclination angle of cavity receiver on total losses and convection losses shows that as the inclination angle increases from 0o to 90o, both losses decreased due to decreased in convective zone into the cavity receiver. The effect of operating temperature of cavity shows that as the temperature of cavity receiver increases, the total and convective losses goes on increasing. The effect of external wind at 2 m/s and 4 m/s in two directions (side-on wind and head-on wind) is also studied experimentally for total and convective heat losses. The result shows that the heat losses are higher for head-on wind condition compared to side-on wind and no wind condition at all inclination angle of cavity receiver. The present results are also compared to the convective losses obtained from the correlations of Stine and Mcdonald and M. Prakash. The convective loss from these correlations shows nearest prediction to both experimental and numerical results

  11. ARM MJO Investigation Experiment on Gan Island (AMIE-Gan) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, CL; Del Genio, A; Deng, M; Fu, X; Gustafson, W; Houze, R; Jakob, C; Jensen, M; Johnson, R; Liu, X; Luke, E; May, P; McFarlane, S; Minnis, P; Schumacher, C; Vogelmann, A; Wang, Y; Webster, P; Xie, S; Zhang, C

    2011-04-11

    The overarching campaign, which includes the ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2) deployment in conjunction with the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) and the Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2011) campaigns, is designed to test several current hypotheses regarding the mechanisms responsible for Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) initiation and propagation in the Indian Ocean area. The synergy between the proposed AMF2 deployment with DYNAMO/CINDY2011, and the corresponding funded experiment on Manus, combine for an overarching ARM MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) with two components: AMF2 on Gan Island in the Indian Ocean (AMIE-Gan), where the MJO initiates and starts its eastward propagation; and the ARM Manus site (AMIE-Manus), which is in the general area where the MJO usually starts to weaken in climate models. AMIE-Gan will provide measurements of particular interest to Atmospheric System Research (ASR) researchers relevant to improving the representation of MJO initiation in climate models. The framework of DYNAMO/CINDY2011 includes two proposed island-based sites and two ship-based locations forming a square pattern with sonde profiles and scanning precipitation and cloud radars at both island and ship sites. These data will be used to produce a Variational Analysis data set coinciding with the one produced for AMIE-Manus. The synergy between AMIE-Manus and AMIE-Gan will allow studies of the initiation, propagation, and evolution of the convective cloud population within the framework of the MJO. As with AMIE-Manus, AMIE-Gan/DYNAMO also includes a significant modeling component geared toward improving the representation of MJO initiation and propagation in climate and forecast models. This campaign involves the deployment of the second, marine-capable, AMF; all of the included measurement systems; and especially the scanning and vertically pointing radars. The campaign will include sonde

  12. Numerical Investigation for Strengthening Heat Transfer Mechanism of the Tube-Row Heat Exchanger in a Compact Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Chen, Zijian; Liu, Hongwu; Yue, Hao; Chen, Dongbo; Qin, Delei

    2018-06-01

    According to the basic principle of heat transfer enhancement, a 1-kW compact thermoelectric generator (TEG) is proposed that is suitable for use at high temperatures and high flow speeds. The associated heat exchanger has a tube-row structure with a guide-plate to control the thermal current. The heat exchanger has a volume of 7 L, and the TEG has a mass of 8 kg (excluding the thermoelectric modules (TEMs)). In this paper, the heat transfer process of the tube-row exchanger is modeled and analyzed numerically; and the influences of its structure on the heat transfer and temperature status of the TEMs are investigated. The results show that use of the thin - wall pipes and increase of surface roughness inside the pipes are effective ways to improve the heat transfer efficiency, obtain the rated surface temperature, and make the TEG compact and lightweight. Furthermore, under the same conditions, the calculated results are compared with the data of a fin heat exchanger. The comparison results show that the volume and mass of the tube-row heat exchanger are 19% and 33% lower than those of the fin type unit, and that the pressure drop is reduced by 16%. In addition, the average temperature in the tube-row heat exchanger is increased by 15°C and the average temperature difference is increased by 19°C; the tube-row TEG has a more compact volume and better temperature characteristics.

  13. Numerical Investigation for Strengthening Heat Transfer Mechanism of the Tube-Row Heat Exchanger in a Compact Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Chen, Zijian; Liu, Hongwu; Yue, Hao; Chen, Dongbo; Qin, Delei

    2018-04-01

    According to the basic principle of heat transfer enhancement, a 1-kW compact thermoelectric generator (TEG) is proposed that is suitable for use at high temperatures and high flow speeds. The associated heat exchanger has a tube-row structure with a guide-plate to control the thermal current. The heat exchanger has a volume of 7 L, and the TEG has a mass of 8 kg (excluding the thermoelectric modules (TEMs)). In this paper, the heat transfer process of the tube-row exchanger is modeled and analyzed numerically; and the influences of its structure on the heat transfer and temperature status of the TEMs are investigated. The results show that use of the thin - wall pipes and increase of surface roughness inside the pipes are effective ways to improve the heat transfer efficiency, obtain the rated surface temperature, and make the TEG compact and lightweight. Furthermore, under the same conditions, the calculated results are compared with the data of a fin heat exchanger. The comparison results show that the volume and mass of the tube-row heat exchanger are 19% and 33% lower than those of the fin type unit, and that the pressure drop is reduced by 16%. In addition, the average temperature in the tube-row heat exchanger is increased by 15°C and the average temperature difference is increased by 19°C; the tube-row TEG has a more compact volume and better temperature characteristics.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER IN A SPIRALLY COILED CORRUGATED TUBE WITH RADIANT HEATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Đorđević

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Archimedean spiral coil made of a transversely corrugated tube was exposed to radiant heating in order to represent a heat absorber of the parabolic dish solar concentrator. The main advantage of the considered innovative design solution is a coupling effect of the two passive methods for heat transfer enhancement - coiling of the flow channel and changes in surface roughness. The curvature ratio of the spiral coil varies from 0.029 to 0.234, while water and a mixture of propylene glycol and water are used as heat transfer fluids. The unique focus of this study is on specific boundary conditions since the heat flux upon the tube external surfaces varies not only in the circumferential direction, but in the axial direction as well. Instrumentation of the laboratory model of the heat absorber mounted in the radiation field includes measurement of inlet fluid flow rate, pressure drop, inlet and outlet fluid temperature and 35 type K thermocouples welded to the coil surface. A thermal analysis of the experimentally obtained data implies taking into consideration the externally applied radiation field, convective and radiative heat losses, conduction through the tube wall and convection to the internal fluid. The experimental results have shown significant enhancement of the heat transfer rate compared to spirally coiled smooth tubes, up to 240% in the turbulent flow regime.

  15. Experimental investigation of pool boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux on a downward facing surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocmanac, M.; Luxat, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    A separate effects experimental study of heat transfer and Critical Heat Flux (CHF) on a downward facing plate in subcooled water pool boiling is described. Two geometries of downwards facing surfaces are studied. The first is termed the 'confined' study in which bubble motion is restricted to the heated surface. The second is termed the 'unconfined' study where individual bubbles are free to move along the heated surface and vent in any direction. The method used in the confined study is novel and involves the placement of a lip surrounding the heated surface. The CHF as a function of angle of inclination of the surface is presented and is in good agreement with other experimental data from somewhat different test geometries. (author)

  16. Investigation of the possibility of using residual heat reactor energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Yurin, V. E.; Bessonov, V. N.

    2017-11-01

    The largest contribution to the probable frequency of core damage is blackout events. The main component of the heat capacity at each reactor within a few minutes following a blackout is the heat resulting from the braking of beta-particles and the transfer of gamma-ray energy by the fission fragments and their decay products, which is known as the residual heat. The power of the residual heat changes gradually over a long period of time and for a VVER-1000 reactor is about 15-20 MW of thermal power over 72 hours. Current cooldown systems increase the cost of the basic nuclear power plants (NPP) funds without changing the amount of electricity generated. Such systems remain on standby, accelerating the aging of the equipment and accordingly reducing its reliability. The probability of system failure increases with the duration of idle time. Furthermore, the reactor residual heat energy is not used. A proposed system for cooling nuclear power plants involves the use of residual thermal power to supply the station’s own needs in emergency situations accompanied by a complete blackout. The thermal power of residual heat can be converted to electrical energy through an additional low power steam turbine. In normal mode, the additional steam turbine generates electricity, which makes it possible to ensure spare NPP and a return on the investment in the reservation system. In this work, experimental data obtained from a Balakovo NPP was analyzed to determine the admissibility of cooldown of the reactors through the 2nd circuit over a long time period, while maintaining high-level parameters for the steam generated by the steam generators.

  17. Numerical Investigation of a Heated, Sheared Planetary Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yu-Chieng

    1996-01-01

    A planetary boundary layer (PBL) developed on 11 July, 1987 during the First International Satellites Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) is investigated numerically by a two dimensional and a three dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) model. Most of the simulated mean and statistical properties are utilized to compare or verify against the observational results extracted from single Doppler lidar scans conducted by Gal-Chen et al. (1992) on the same day. Through the methods of field measurements and numerical simulations, it is found that this PBL, in contrast to the well-known convective boundary layer (CBL), is driven by not only buoyancy but also wind shear. Large eddies produced by the surface heating, as well as internal gravity waves excited by the convection, are both present in the boundary layer. The most unique feature is that in the stable layer, the momentum flux ({overlinerm u^' w^'}), transported by the gravity waves, is counter-gradient. The occurrence of this phenomenon is interpreted by Gal-Chen et al. (1992) using the theory of critical layer singularity, and is confirmed by the numerical simulations in this study. Qualitative agreements are achieved between the model-generated and lidar-derived results. However, quantitative comparisons are less satisfactory. The most serious discrepancy is that in the stable layer the magnitudes of the observed momentum flux ({overlinerm u^ ' w^'}) and vertical velocity variance ({overlinerm w^'^2}) are much larger than their simulated counterparts. Nevertheless, through the technique of numerical simulation, evidence is collected to show inconsistencies among the observations. Thus, the lidar measurements of {overline rm u^' w^'} and {overlinerm w^ '^2} seem to be doubtful. A Four Dimensional Data Assimilation (FDDA) experiment is performed in order to connect the evolution of the model integration with the observations. The results indicate that the dynamical relaxation

  18. Multiparametric statistical investigation of seismicity occurred at El Hierro (Canary Islands) from 2011 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesca, Luciano; Lovallo, Michele; Lopez, Carmen; Marti Molist, Joan

    2016-03-01

    A detailed statistical investigation of the seismicity occurred at El Hierro volcano (Canary Islands) from 2011 to 2014 has been performed by analysing the time variation of four parameters: the Gutenberg-Richter b-value, the local coefficient of variation, the scaling exponent of the magnitude distribution and the main periodicity of the earthquake sequence calculated by using the Schuster's test. These four parameters are good descriptors of the time and magnitude distributions of the seismic sequence, and their variation indicate dynamical changes in the volcanic system. These variations can be attributed to the causes and types of seismicity, thus allowing to distinguish between different host-rock fracturing processes caused by intrusions of magma at different depths and overpressures. The statistical patterns observed among the studied unrest episodes and between them and the eruptive episode of 2011-2012 indicate that the response of the host rock to the deformation imposed by magma intrusion did not differ significantly from one episode to the other, thus suggesting that no significant local stress changes induced by magma intrusion occurred when comparing between all them. Therefore, despite the studied unrest episodes were caused by intrusions of magma at different depths and locations below El Hierro island, the mechanical response of the lithosphere was similar in all cases. This suggests that the reason why the first unrest culminated in an eruption while the other did not, may be related to the role of the regional/local tectonics acting at that moment, rather than to the forceful of magma intrusion.

  19. Investigation of Heat Pump Operation Strategies with Thermal Storage in Heating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangsik Jung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A heat pump with thermal storage system is a system that operates a heat pump during nighttime using inexpensive electricity; during this time, the generated thermal energy is stored in a thermal storage tank. The stored thermal energy is used by the heat pump during daytime. Based on a model of a dual latent thermal storage tank and a heat pump, this study conducts control simulations using both conventional and advanced methods for heating in a building. Conventional methods include the thermal storage priority method and the heat pump priority method, while advanced approaches include the region control method and the dynamic programming method. The heating load required for an office building is identified using TRNSYS (Transient system simulation, used for simulations of various control methods. The thermal storage priority method shows a low coefficient of performance (COP, while the heat pump priority method leads to high electricity costs due to the low use of thermal storage. In contrast, electricity costs are lower for the region control method, which operates using the optimal part load ratio of the heat pump, and for dynamic programming, which operates the system by following the minimum cost path. According to simulation results for the winter season, the electricity costs using the dynamic programming method are 17% and 9% lower than those of the heat pump priority and thermal storage priority methods, respectively. The region control method shows results similar to the dynamic programming method with respect to electricity costs. In conclusion, advanced control methods are proven to have advantages over conventional methods in terms of power consumption and electricity costs.

  20. The urban heat island in the city of Poznań as derived from Landsat 5 TM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkowska, Agnieszka; Kolendowicz, Leszek; Półrolniczak, Marek; Hauke, Jan; Czernecki, Bartosz

    2017-05-01

    To study urban heat island (UHI), Landsat 5 TM data and in situ measurements of air temperature from nine points in Poznań (Poland) for the period June 2008-May 2013 were used. Based on data from measurement points located in different types of land use, the surface urban heat island (SUHI) maps were created. All available and quality-controlled Landsat 5 TM images from 15 unique days were used to obtain the characteristics of land surface temperature (LST) and UHI intensity. In addition, spatial analysis of UHI was conducted on the basis of Corine Land Cover 2006 dataset. In situ measurements at a height of 2 m above ground level show that the UHI is a common occurrence in Poznań with a mean annual intensity of 1.0 °C. The UHI intensity is greater during the warm half of the year. Moreover, results based on the remote sensing data and the Corine Land Cover 2006 indicate that the highest value of the mean LST anomalies (3.4 °C) is attained by the continuous urban fabric, while the lowest value occurs within the broad-leaved forests (-3.1 °C). To re-count from LST to the air temperature at a height of 2 m above ground level ( T agl), linear and non-linear regression models were created. For both models, coefficients of determination equal about 0.80, with slightly higher value for the non-linear approach, which was applied to estimate the T agl spatial variability over the city of Poznań.

  1. Evaluation of Air Pollution Tolerance Index of Plants and Ornamental Shrubs in Enugu City: Implications for Urban Heat Island Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study compared the air pollution tolerance indices (APTI of five plant species and five ornamental shrubs in Enugu Urban Center. Laboratory analysis was performed on the four physiological and biological parameters including leaf relative water content (RWC, ascorbic acid (AA content, total leaf chlorophyll (TCH and leaf extract pH. These parameters were used to develop an air pollution tolerance index. Factor analysis and descriptive statistics were utilized in the analysis to examine the interactions between these parameters. Vegetation monitoring in terms of its APTI acts as a \\'Bioindicator\\' of air pollution. The study also showed the possibility of utilizing APTI as a tool for selecting plants or ornamental shrubs for urban heat Island mitigation in Enugu City. The result of APTI showed order of tolerance for plants as Anacarduim occidentale (23.20, Pinus spp (22.35, Catalpa burgei (22.57, Magifera indica (23.37, and Psidum guajava (24.15.The result of APTI showed increasing order of sensitivity for ornamental shrubs from ixora red (14.32, yellow ficus(12.63, masquerade pine(12.26, Tuja pine(11.000,to Yellow bush(10.60. The APTI of all the plants examined were higher than those of ornamental shrubs. Thus suggesting that plants in general were more tolerant to air pollution than ornamental shrubs. The ornamental shrubs with lower APTI values (sensitive were recommended as bioindicator of poor urban air quality while plants with high APTI values (tolerant are planted around areas anticipated to have high air pollution load. The result of this current study is therefore handy for future planning and as well provides tolerant species for streetscape and urban heat island mitigation.

  2. An investigation of the influence of heating modes on ignition and pyrolysis of woody wildland fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.L. Yashwanth; B. Shotorban; S. Mahalingam; D.R. Weise

    2015-01-01

    The ignition of woody wildland fuel modeled as a one-dimensional slab subject to various modes of heating was investigated using a general pyrolysis code, Gpyro. The heating mode was varied by applying different convective and/or radiative, time-dependent heat flux boundary conditions on one end of the slab while keeping the other end insulated. Dry wood properties...

  3. Investigation of heat of fusion storage for solar low energy buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Furbo, Simon

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical investigation by means of TRNSYS simulations of a partly heat loss free phase change material (PCM) storage solution for solar heating systems. The partly heat loss free storage is obtained by controlled used of super cooling in a mixture of sodium acetate...

  4. Investigation on thermal environment improvement by waste heat recovery in the underground station in Qingdao metro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianwei; Liu, Jiaquan; Wang, Fengyin; Wang, Cuiping

    2018-03-01

    The thermal environment parameters, like the temperature and air velocity, are measured to investigate the heat comfort status of metro staff working area in winter in Qingdao. The temperature is affected obviously by the piston wind from the train and waiting hall in the lower Hall, and the temperature is not satisfied with the least heat comfort temperature of 16 °C. At the same time, the heat produced by the electrical and control equipments is brought by the cooling air to atmosphere for the equipment safety. Utilizing the water-circulating heat pump, it is feasible to transfer the emission heat to the staff working area to improve the thermal environment. Analyzed the feasibility from the technique and economy when using the heat pump, the water-circulating heat pump could be the best way to realize the waste heat recovery and to help the heat comfort of staff working area in winter in the underground metro station in north China.

  5. Numerical investigation of heat transfer in Plastic Leaded Chip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier (PLCC) package has been emerged a promising option to tackle the thermal management issue of micro-electronic devices. In the present study, three dimensional numerical analysis of heat and fluid flow through PLCC packages oriented in-line and mounted horizontally on a printed circuit ...

  6. Investigation on the pinch point position in heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lisheng; Shi, Weixiu

    2016-06-01

    The pinch point is important for analyzing heat transfer in thermodynamic cycles. With the aim to reveal the importance of determining the accurate pinch point, the research on the pinch point position is carried out by theoretical method. The results show that the pinch point position depends on the parameters of the heat transfer fluids and the major fluid properties. In most cases, the pinch point locates at the bubble point for the evaporator and the dew point for the condenser. However, the pinch point shifts to the supercooled liquid state in the near critical conditions for the evaporator. Similarly, it shifts to the superheated vapor state with the condensing temperature approaching the critical temperature for the condenser. It even can shift to the working fluid entrance of the evaporator or the supercritical heater when the heat source fluid temperature is very high compared with the absorbing heat temperature. A wrong position for the pinch point may generate serious mistake. In brief, the pinch point should be founded by the iterative method in all conditions rather than taking for granted.

  7. Molecular investigations on grain filling rate under terminal heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ezedom Theresa

    2013-07-10

    Jul 10, 2013 ... under terminal heat stress in bread wheat. (Triticum aestivum L.) Girish Chandra Pandey1, Jagadish ... ficantly in all the bread and durum wheat genotypes, because of significant interaction of each ..... wheat varieties and registered genetic stocks (Triticum L.). Technical. Bulletin No.13, Directorate of Wheat ...

  8. Investigation of Induction Heating in Asphalt Mortar: Numerical Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolidis, P.; Liu, X.; Scarpas, Athanasios; van de Ven, M.F.C.; van Bochove, G

    2016-01-01

    The research reported in this paper focuses on utilization of advanced finite-element analyses (COMSOL) for the design and assessment of the induction heating capacity of asphalt mortar by adding electrically conductive additives (e.g., steel fibers), and to understand the factors that influence the

  9. The Urban Tree as a Tool to Mitigate the Urban Heat Island in Mexico City: A Simple Phenomenological Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinas, Mónica; Barradas, Víctor L

    2016-01-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) is mainly a nocturnal phenomenon, but it also appears during the day in Mexico City. The UHI may affect human thermal comfort, which can influence human productivity and morbidity in the spring/summer period. A simple phenomenological model based on the energy balance was developed to generate theoretical support of UHI mitigation in Mexico City focused on the latent heat flux change by increasing tree coverage to reduce sensible heat flux and air temperature. Half-hourly data of the urban energy balance components were generated in a typical residential/commercial neighborhood of Mexico City and then parameterized using easily measured variables (air temperature, humidity, pressure, and visibility). Canopy conductance was estimated every hour in four tree species, and transpiration was estimated using sap flow technique and parameterized by the envelope function method. Averaged values of net radiation, energy storage, and sensible and latent heat flux were around 449, 224, 153, and 72 W m, respectively. Daily tree transpiration ranged from 3.64 to 4.35 Ld. To reduce air temperature by 1°C in the studied area, 63 large would be required per hectare, whereas to reduce the air temperature by 2°C only 24 large trees would be required. This study suggests increasing tree canopy cover in the city cannot mitigate UHI adequately but requires choosing the most appropriate tree species to solve this problem. It is imperative to include these types of studies in tree selection and urban development planning to adequately mitigate UHI. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Heat flow and radioactivity studies in the Ross Island-dry valley area, Antarctica and their tectonic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    In conjunction with the Dry Valley Drilling Project, the University of Wyoming conducted heat flow and basement radioactivity studies in the Ross Island-dry valley area of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. This part of Antarctica is characterized by late Cenozoic alkaline basaltic volcanism and uplift. Six heat flow (q) values for the area range from 1.4 to 2.0 HFU, with a mean value of 1.7 HFU. Radioactive heat production (A) values for basement rocks from the dry valleys range from 2.2 to 4.1 HGU, with a mean value of 3.0 HGU. The combined q-A data imply that this area is a zone of high reduced heat flow, similar to the Basin and Range province in the western United States and other zones of late Cenozoic tectonof Antarctica is probably in the range of 1.2 to 1.6 HFU, which is about 50 to 100% higher than the reduced flux which characterizes stable continental areas. The results of the transient conductive models presented herein imply that the high flux in this part of Antarctica cannot be explained by the residual thermal effects of a major episode of lithospheric thinning associated with the generation of the Ferrar Dolerites. The correlation between steady conductive thermal models and the late Cenozoic, silica-undersaturated, alkaline basalts of the region is similarly obscure. For example, purely conductive steady-state temperature-depth models predict partial melting at depths of only 45 to 50 km in the mantle, whereas geochemical data for the volcanic units are consistent with the basalts being generated at depths of at least 60 to 80 km

  11. Experimental investigation of MHD heat transfer in a vertical round tube affected by transverse magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, I.A., E-mail: corpuskula@gmail.com; Sviridov, E.V.; Sviridov, V.G.; Razuvanov, N.G.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Local and averaged heat transfer coefficient are measured. • Free convection influence on MHD-flow is investigated. • The region with the free convection effect of MHD-heat transfer is found. • Temperature low-frequency fluctuations of abnormally high amplitude are detected. • Analysis of the MHD-heat transfer experimental data is performed. - Abstract: The article is devoted to the results of experimental investigation of heat transfer for a downward mercury flow in a vertical round tube in the presence of a transverse magnetic with non-uniform heat flux along the tube circumference.

  12. Investigating the real situation of Greek solar water heating market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldellis, J.K.; Kavadias, K.A.; Spyropoulos, G.

    2005-01-01

    Solar thermal applications have been acknowledged among the leading alternative solutions endeavouring to face the uncontrollable oil price variations, the gradual depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the chain environmental consequences caused by its excessive usage. Almost 30 years after the initial emergence of the commercial domestic solar water heating system (DSWHS) in the European market, the corresponding technology is qualified as quite mature. On top of this, the European Commission expects that 100,000,000 m 2 of solar collectors are to be installed in Europe by the year 2010 to facilitate durable and environment-friendly heat. In this context, the Greek DSWHSs market is highly developed worldwide, having a great experience in this major energy market segment. The present study is devoted to an extensive evaluation of the local DSWHSs market, including a discerning analysis of its time variation, taking seriously into account the corresponding annual replacement rate. Accordingly, the crucial techno-economic reasons, limiting the DSWHSs penetration in the local heat production market, are summarized and elaborated. Subsequently, the national policy measures - aiming to support the DSWHSs in the course of time - are cited, in comparison with those applied in other European countries. Next, the financial attractiveness of a DSWHS for Greek citizens is examined in the local socio-economic environment. The present work is integrated by reciting the prospects and mustering certain proposals that, if applied, could stimulate the local market. As a general comment, the outlook for penetration of new DSWHSs in the local market is rather grim, as the current techno-economic situation of solar heat cannot compete with oil and natural gas heat production, unless the remarkable social and environmental benefits of solar energy are seriously considered. Hence, the Greek State lacks stimulus to further DSWHSs installations, being strongly in support of the imported

  13. Experimental and numerical investigation of heat transfer from a narrow annulus to supercritical pressure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Han; Bi, Qincheng; Yang, Zhendong; Wang, Linchuan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Heat transfer of supercritical water in a narrow annulus is investigated. • Effects of system parameters and flow direction on heat transfer are studied. • Deteriorated heat transfer is analyzed both experimentally and numerically. - Abstract: Heat transfer characteristics of supercritical pressure water in a narrow annulus with vertically upward and downward flows were investigated experimentally and numerically. The outer diameter of the inner heated rod is 8 mm with an effective heated length of 620 mm. Experimental parameters covered the pressure of 23–28 MPa, mass flux of 400–1000 kg/m 2 s and heat flux on the outer surface of the heated rod from 200 to 1000 kW/m 2 . The general heat transfer behaviors were discussed with respect to various mass fluxes and pressures. According to the experimental data, it was found that the effect of flow direction on heat transfer depends on the heat-flux to mass-flux ratio (q/G). Heat transfer is much improved in the downward flow compared to that of upward flow at high q/G ratios. At the pressure of 25 MPa, low-mass-flux deteriorated heat transfer occurred in the upward flow but not in the downward flow. At the same test parameters, however, heat transfer deterioration was observed at both of the two flow directions when the pressure was lowered to 23 MPa. The experimental results indicate that buoyancy plays an important role for this type of deterioration, but is not the only mechanism that leads to the heat transfer deterioration. Three turbulence models were assessed against the annulus test data, it was found that the SST k-ω model gives a satisfying prediction of heat transfer deterioration especially for the case of downward flow. The mechanisms for the low-mass-flow heat transfer deterioration were investigated from the viewpoints of buoyancy and property variations of the supercritical water

  14. Numerical investigation of boiling heat transfer on hydrocarbon mixture refrigerant in vertical rectangular minichannel

    OpenAIRE

    Huixing Li; Yu Liu

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the characteristics of boiling heat transfer for hydrocarbon mixture refrigerant in plate-fin heat exchanger which is used in the petrochemical industry field, a model was established on boiling heat transfer in vertical rectangular channel. The simulated results were compared with the experimental data from literature. The results show that the deviation between the simulated results and experimental data is within ±15%. Meanwhile, the characteristic of boiling heat t...

  15. Structural investigations of silicon nanostructures grown by self-organized island formation for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roczen, Maurizio; Malguth, Enno; Barthel, Thomas; Gref, Orman; Toefflinger, Jan A.; Schoepke, Andreas; Schmidt, Manfred; Ruske, Florian; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd [Institute for Silicon Photovoltaics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schade, Martin; Leipner, Hartmut S. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Materialwissenschaften, Halle (Germany); Callsen, Gordon; Hoffmann, Axel [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Berlin (Germany); Phillips, Matthew R. [University of Technology Sydney, Department of Physics and Advanced Materials, NSW (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    The self-organized growth of crystalline silicon nanodots and their structural characteristics are investigated. For the nanodot synthesis, thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers with different thicknesses have been deposited onto the ultrathin (2 nm) oxidized (111) surface of Si wafers by electron beam evaporation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The solid phase crystallization of the initial layer is induced by a subsequent in situ annealing step at 700 C, which leads to the dewetting of the initial a-Si layer. This process results in the self-organized formation of highly crystalline Si nanodot islands. Scanning electron microscopy confirms that size, shape, and planar distribution of the nanodots depend on the thickness of the initial a-Si layer. Cross-sectional investigations reveal a single-crystalline structure of the nanodots. This characteristic is observed as long as the thickness of the initial a-Si layer remains under a certain threshold triggering coalescence. The underlying ultra-thin oxide is not structurally affected by the dewetting process. Furthermore, a method for the fabrication of close-packed stacks of nanodots is presented, in which each nanodot is covered by a 2 nm thick SiO{sub 2} shell. The chemical composition of these ensembles exhibits an abrupt Si/SiO{sub 2} interface with a low amount of suboxides. A minority charge carrier lifetime of 18 {mu}s inside of the nanodots is determined. (orig.)

  16. An outbreak investigation of congenital rubella syndrome in Solomon Islands, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara N Durski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During May 2012, a rubella outbreak was declared in Solomon Islands. A suspected case of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS was reported from one hospital 11 months later in 2013. This report describes the subsequent CRS investigation, findings and measures implemented. Methods: Prospective CRS surveillance was conducted at the newborn nursery, paediatric and post-natal wards, and the paediatric cardiology and ophthalmology clinics of the study hospital from April to July 2013. Retrospective case finding by reviewing medical records was also undertaken to identify additional cases born between January and March 2013 for the same wards and clinics. Cases were identified using established World Health Organization case definitions for CRS. Results: A total of 13 CRS cases were identified, including two laboratory-confirmed, four clinically confirmed and seven suspected cases. Five CRS cases were retrospectively identified, including four suspected and one clinically confirmed case. There was no geospatial clustering of residences. The mothers of the cases were aged between 20 and 36 years. Three of the six mothers available for interview recalled an acute illness with rash during the first trimester of pregnancy. Discussion: Additional CRS cases not captured in this investigation are likely. Caring for CRS cases is a challenge in resource-poor settings. Rubella vaccination is safe and effective and can prevent the serious consequences of CRS. Well-planned and funded vaccination activities can prevent future CRS cases.

  17. Investigation of pellet acceleration by an arc heated gas gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, S.A.; Baekmark, L.; Jensen, V.O.; Michelsen, P.; Weisberg, K.V.

    1988-10-01

    This report describes work on pellet acceleration by means of an arc heated gas gun. Preliminary results were described in Riso-M-2536 and in Riso-M-2650. This final report describes the work carried out from 1987.03.31 to 1988.09.30. An arc heated hydrogen gas source, for pneumatic acceleration of deuterium pellets to velocities above 2 km/s, was developed. Experiments were performed with an arc chamber to which different methods of hydrogen supply were possible, and to which the input of electrical power could be programmed. Results in terms of pressure transients and acceleration curves are presented. Maximum pellet velocities approaching 2 km/s were obtained. This limit is discussed in relation to the presented data. Finally this report contains a summary and a conclusion for the entire project. (author) 34 ills., 3 refs

  18. Investigation of transient conduction–radiation heat transfer in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammad Mehdi Keshtkar

    2018-04-17

    Apr 17, 2018 ... For absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering medium, the radiative heat transfer in any discrete direction s_m with direction index m is given as. dIm dsm. ¼ s_m. :rImрr; s_m. ЮјАbIm ю Sm. р16Ю .... thermore, V is the volume of the cell defined as dx В dy and. Im p and Sm p are the intensities and ...

  19. Investigating correlation of lighting activity and precipitation in an Eastern Mediterranean island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanidou, Vasiliki; Koutroulis, Aristeidis; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    This study examines conditions under which lightning activity and precipitation events can be correlated in an Eastern Mediterranean island climate. As a first step, the activity within a predefined area of 50km radius around the gauge station is examined, given the temporal evolution of rain accumulation at an hourly time step. Then the lightning activity is grouped in time-space clusters and for each lightning-cluster precipitation recordings of 10 minutes time step from nearby gauges are searched in an area of variable radius ranging from 10 to 100km. The number of clusters is decided according to the g-means algorithm in which the number of clusters is increasing until the data of all clusters follow the Gaussian distribution. For different durations, number of lightning events and radius the proportion of the corresponding precipitation events for the given radius around the lightning-clusters is investigated. The methods are tested in the case study of the island of Crete. Precipitation data from 22 gauging stations over Crete and lightning data from the Global Lightning Network (GLN) are examined for the investigation of possible associations in a period of almost two years (09/2012-07/2014). For the first approach, for half of the stations rain accumulations over 10mm/h (90th percentile of rain) are recorded up to a day after lightning activity occurrence. According to the second approach, lightning-clusters of smaller duration (up to 5 hours) and more lightning flashes (more than 100) are highly associated with rain events. The optimal radius from the center of the lightning-cluster, according to the proportion of rain events, is found to be 30km. The results establish a better understanding of the relations between lightning and precipitation and could provide valuable information to the now-casting of flash flood events triggered by severe thunderstorms. The research reported in this study effort was fully supported by the "ARISTEIA II" Action

  20. Numerical Study of Condensation Heat Exchanger Design in a Subcooled Pool: Correlation Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Joon; Ju, Yun Jae; Kang, Han Ok; Lee, Tae Ho; Park, Cheon Tae

    2012-01-01

    Generally the condensation heat exchanger has higher heat transfer coefficient compared to the single phase heat exchanger, so has been widely applied to the cooling systems of energy plant. Recently vertical or horizontal type condensation heat exchangers are being studied for the application to secondary passive cooling system of nuclear plants. Lee and Lee investigated the existing condensation correlation to the experiment for heat exchanger in saturated pool. They concluded Traviss' correlation showed most satisfactory results for the heat transfer coefficient and mass flow rate in a saturated water pool. In this study, a thermal sizing program of vertical condensation heat exchanger to design, TSCON(Thermal Sizing of CONdenser) was validated with the existing experimental data of condensation heat exchanger in a subcooled pool for pure steam condensation

  1. Acquisition and Processing of High Resolution Hyperspectral Imageries for the 3d Mapping of Urban Heat Islands and Microparticles of Montreal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongeau, R.; Baudouin, Y.; Cavayas, F.

    2017-10-01

    Ville de Montreal wanted to develop a system to identify heat islands and microparticles at the urban scale and to study their formation. UQAM and UdeM universities have joined their expertise under the framework "Observatoire Spatial Urbain" to create a representative geospatial database of thermal and atmospheric parameters collected during the summer months. They innovated in the development of a methodology for processing high resolution hyperspectral images (1-2 m). In partnership with Ville de Montreal, they integrated 3D geospatial data (topography, transportation and meteorology) in the process. The 3D mapping of intraurban heat islands as well as air micro-particles makes it possible, initially, to identify the problematic situations for future civil protection interventions during extreme heat. Moreover, it will be used as a reference for the Ville de Montreal to establish a strategy for public domain tree planting and in the analysis of urban development projects.

  2. Experimental investigation of direct contact three phase boiling heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, W.D.

    1981-01-01

    The system which was studied in the present work consisted of one liquid undergoing vaporization by contact with a hotter immiscible liquid. The liquids and vapor were contacted in a counterflow spray column with only differential increases in vapor quality. Experiments yielded vertical temperature profiles, flow rates of the phases, liquid holdups, pressure drops, and a characterization of flow patterns. A micro-computer was utilized for measuring temperatures in the column at the rate of 1500 to 1600 times per second at several depths. Analysis of the experimental data indicate that the maximum temperature difference between the phases is 0.5F 0 , and that a temperature crossover occurs at the lower end of the column. The heat transfer fluid undergoes flash vaporization at its inlet at the top of the column, and much of its sensible heat is tranferred to the dispersed phase near the top of the column. Temperature profiles along the length of the boiler are nearly flat, and very little heat transfer occurs in the lower part of the boiler. A chemical method was developed for measuring effective interfacial area in a direct contact boiler. The theoretical basis of the method is discussed, and physico-chemical data necessary for application of the technique are reported. Water solubility of methyl salicylate was measured as a function of temperature, and the second order reaction rate coefficient for saponification of methyl salicylate by sodium hydroxide was determined from sodium hydroxide concentration versus time data and a computer model of a well-mixed semibatch reactor. The activation energy for the reaction was found to be 9.58 kilocalories per gram mole

  3. INVESTIGATION OF HEAT CONDUCTION AND SPECIFIC ELECTRIC IMPEDANCE OF POROUS MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Golubtsova

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article there was investigated the influence of porosity and temperature change on heat condition and electrical resistance of porous iron (PZh4M nickel and steel 14X17H2. There are received the adequate equations of regression, establishing connection between heat conduction and electrical resistance of the investigated materials with their porosity and temperature.

  4. Urban Heat Island Over Delhi Punches Holes in Widespread Fog in the Indo-Gangetic Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Ritesh; Singh, Manoj K.

    2018-01-01

    Persistent and widespread fog affects several densely populated and agriculturally fertile basins around the world. Dense and polluted fog is especially known to impact transportation, air quality, and public health. Here we report a striking observation of holes in fog over urban areas in satellite imagery. The extent of fog holes appear highly correlated with city populations in fog-prevalent regions of Asia, Europe, and the United States. We find the highest frequency and largest extent of fog holes over Delhi along with suppressed fog fraction, amidst increased fog occurrence over the Indo-Gangetic Plains, based on 17 years of satellite data (2000-2016). This apparent urban heat impact is characterized in sharp urban-rural gradients in surface temperatures and fog thickness. Urban heating seems to have already amplified the long-term fog decline in Europe and the United States and should be assessed over regions undergoing urban expansion including India, where no previous linkages are reported between urban heating and fog.

  5. Theoretical and experimental investigation of wickless heat pipes flat plate solar collector with cross flow heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, H.M.S.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, a wickless heat pipes flat plate solar collector with a cross flow heat exchanger was investigated theoretically and experimentally under the meteorological conditions of Cairo, Egypt. The author's earlier simulation program of wickless heat pipes flat plate solar water heaters was modified to be valid for the present type of wickless heat pipes solar collector by including the solution of the dimensionless governing equations of the present analysis. For verifying the modified simulation program, a wickless heat pipes flat plate solar collector with a cross flow heat exchanger was designed, constructed, and tested at different meteorological conditions and operating parameters. These parameters include different cooling water mass flow rates and different inlet cooling water temperatures. The comparison between the experimental results and their corresponding simulated ones showed considerable agreement. Under different climatic conditions, the experimental and theoretical results showed that the optimal mass flow rate is very close to the ASHRAE standard mass flow rate for testing conventional flat plate solar collectors. Also, the experimental and theoretical results indicated that the number of wickless heat pipes has a significant effect on the collector efficiency

  6. Investigation of environmental contamination in lichens of Goekceada (Imbroz) Island in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahraman, A.; Kaynak, G.; Gurler, O.; Yalcin, S.; Ozturk, S.; Gundogdu, O.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the present study is to determine the type of environmental contamination in lichens in Goekceada Island in the Northern Aegean Sea in Turkey. We used two different lichen species Cladonia foliacea and Ramalina pollinaria. In the first part of the investigation, the beta activities of lichens have been measured by using a TENNELEC LB 1000-PW detector. The range of beta activity values was between 607 ± 30 and 308 ± 12 Bq/kg for C. foliacea lichens collected from around Tuz Lake and values for R. pollinaria lichens were found to be 740 ± 25 and 541 ± 17 Bq/kg. The second part of the study was concerned with the gamma spectra of the lichen samples measured by using HpGe detector. 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 40 K, 232 Th, 226 Ra radionuclides were found in C. foliacea collected from around Tepekoey and in R. pollinaria from around Tuz Lake. When these two types of lichens were compared, it was found that R. pollinaria contain more radionuclides. In order to compare and determine which of these lichens act as a better bioaccumulator, K, Mn, Zn, Rb, Sr, Ba and Pb metal content were determined by using Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. It was found that C. foliacea collected more Mn and Sr when compared to R. pollinaria.

  7. Investigation of environmental contamination in lichens of Goekceada (Imbroz) Island in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahraman, A.; Kaynak, G. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Uludag University, Gorukle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Gurler, O. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Uludag University, Gorukle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey)], E-mail: ogurler@uludag.edu.tr; Yalcin, S. [Kastamonu University, Education Faculty, 37200 Kastamonu (Turkey); Ozturk, S. [Biology Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Uludag University, Gorukle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Gundogdu, O. [CNRP, Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); University of Kocaeli, Umuttepe Campus, 41100, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2009-02-15

    The main objective of the present study is to determine the type of environmental contamination in lichens in Goekceada Island in the Northern Aegean Sea in Turkey. We used two different lichen species Cladonia foliacea and Ramalina pollinaria. In the first part of the investigation, the beta activities of lichens have been measured by using a TENNELEC LB 1000-PW detector. The range of beta activity values was between 607 {+-} 30 and 308 {+-} 12 Bq/kg for C. foliacea lichens collected from around Tuz Lake and values for R. pollinaria lichens were found to be 740 {+-} 25 and 541 {+-} 17 Bq/kg. The second part of the study was concerned with the gamma spectra of the lichen samples measured by using HpGe detector. {sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra radionuclides were found in C. foliacea collected from around Tepekoey and in R. pollinaria from around Tuz Lake. When these two types of lichens were compared, it was found that R. pollinaria contain more radionuclides. In order to compare and determine which of these lichens act as a better bioaccumulator, K, Mn, Zn, Rb, Sr, Ba and Pb metal content were determined by using Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. It was found that C. foliacea collected more Mn and Sr when compared to R. pollinaria.

  8. CFD investigation of flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in isoflux spirally fluted tubes

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad; Azamatov, Abdulaziz Irgashevich; El-Amin, Mohamed; Sun, Shuyu; Huang, Huancong

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the problem of flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in spirally fluted tubes is investigated numerically using the CFD code Fluent. The tube investigated in this work is characterized by the existence of helical ridging which

  9. Correlation analysis of the urban heat island effect and the spatial and temporal distribution of atmospheric particulates using TM images in Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L.Y.; Xie, X.D.; Li, S.

    2013-01-01

    This study combines the methods of observation statistics and remote sensing retrieval, using remote sensing information including the urban heat island (UHI) intensity index, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), the normalized difference water index (NDWI), and the difference vegetation index (DVI) to analyze the correlation between the urban heat island effect and the spatial and temporal concentration distributions of atmospheric particulates in Beijing. The analysis establishes (1) a direct correlation between UHI and DVI; (2) an indirect correlation among UHI, NDWI and DVI; and (3) an indirect correlation among UHI, NDVI, and DVI. The results proved the existence of three correlation types with regional and seasonal effects and revealed an interesting correlation between UHI and DVI, that is, if UHI is below 0.1, then DVI increases with the increase in UHI, and vice versa. Also, DVI changes more with UHI in the two middle zones of Beijing. -- Highlights: •We analyze the correlation from the spatial and temporal views. •We present correlation analyses among UHI, NDWI, NDVI, and DVI from three perspectives. •Three correlations are proven to exist with regional and seasonal effects. •If UHI is below 0.1, then DVI increases with the increase in UHI, and vice versa. •The DVI changes more with UHI in the two middle zones of Beijing. -- Generally, if UHI is below 0.1 in the weak heat island or green island range, then DVI increases with the increase in UHI, and vice versa

  10. Investigation of enhanced condensation heat transfer outside vertical titanium circularly-grooved tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhaorigetu; Huang Weitang; Lv Xiangbo; Liu Feng

    2005-01-01

    The investigation of enhanced condensation heat transfer had been conducted on the outside vertical Titanium circularly-grooved tube. The experimental result indicates that the Titanium circularly-grooved tube is fairly efficient in enhancing the heat transfer. Within the experimental scope, the total heat transfer coefficient of the optimum circularly-grooved tube is 1.12 to 1.36 times of that of the Titanium smooth tube. Through regression analysis on the experimental data, the experimental correlations for the inside heat transfer coefficient, the condensation heat transfer coefficient on film condensation and the friction coefficient were achieved. (authors)

  11. Investigation of heat transfer of tube line of staggered tube bank in two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubcionis, Mindaugas

    2015-06-01

    This article presents the results of experimental investigation of heat transfer process, carried out using the model of heat exchanger. Two-phase statically stable foam flow was used as a heat transfer fluid. Heat exchanger model consisted of staggered tube bank. Experimental results are presented with the focus on influence of tube position in the line of the bank, volumetric void component and velocity of gas component of the foam. The phenomena of liquid draining in cellular foam flow and its influence on heat transfer rate has also been discussed. The experimental results have been generalized by relationship between Nusselt, Reynolds and Prandtl numbers.

  12. Seabird, fish, marine mammal and oceanography coordinated investigations (SMMOCI) in the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, July 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — We conducted a survey of seabirds, fishes, marine mammals and oceanographic conditions near the Pribilof Islands, Alaska (Fig. 1) from the M/V Tiˆglaˆx during 20-26...

  13. Application of Time-Domain Electromagnetic Method in Investigating Saltwater Intrusion of Santiago Island (Cape Verde)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rui; Farzamian, Mohammad; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Represas, Patrícia; Mota Gomes, A.; Lobo de Pina, A. F.; Almeida, Eugénio P.

    2017-11-01

    Santiago Island, the biggest and most populated island of the Cape Verde Republic, is characterised by limited surface waters and strong dependence on groundwater sources as the primary source of natural water supply for extensive agricultural activity and human use. However, as a consequence of the scarce precipitation and high evaporation as well as the intense overexploitation of the groundwater resources, the freshwater management is also in a delicate balance with saltwater at coastal areas. The time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) method is used to locate the extent of saltwater intrusion in four important agricultural regions in Santiago Island; São Domingos, Santa Cruz, São Miguel, and Tarrafal. The application of this method in Santiago Island proves it to be a successful tool in imaging the fresh/saltwater interface location. Depths to the saline zones and extensions of saline water are mapped along eight TDEM profiles.

  14. Investigation of pellet acceleration by an arc heated gas gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, P.; Andersen, S.A.; Bundgaard, J.; Baekmark, L.; Hansen, B.H.; Jensen, V.O.; Kossek, H.; Michelsen, P.K.; Nordskov, A.; Sass, B.; Soerensen, H.; Weisberg, K.V.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes work on pellet acceleration by means of an arc heated gas gun. The work is a continuation of the work described in RISO-M-2536. The aim of the work is to obtain velocities well above 2 km/s for 3.2 mm diameter deuterium pellets. By means of a cryogenic arc chamber in which the hydrogen propellant is pre-condensed, extruded deutetrium pellets are accelerated up to a maximum velocity of 1.93 km/s. When increasing the energy input to the arc in order to increase the pellet velocity further the heat input to the extrusion/punching pellet loading mechanism was found to be critical: preparation of pellets became difficult and cooling times between shots became inconveniently long. In order to circumvent this problems the concept of a room temperature hydrogen propellant pellet fed arc chamber was proposed. Preliminary results from acceleration of polyurethane pellets with this arc chamber are described as well as the work of developing of feed pellet guns for this chamber. Finally the report describes design consideration for a high pressure propellant pellet fed arc chamber together with preliminary results obtained with a proto-type arc chamber. (author)

  15. Experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in volumetrically heated spherical segments. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asfia, F.; Dhir, V.

    1998-03-01

    One strategy for preventing the failure of lower head of a nuclear reactor vessel is to flood the concrete cavity with subcooled water in accidents in which relocation of core material into the vessel lower head occurs. After the core material relocates into the vessel, a crust of solid material forms on the inner wall of the vessel, however, most of the pool remains molten and natural convection exists in the pool. At present, uncertainty exists with respect to natural convection heat transfer coefficients between the pool of molten core material and the reactor vessel wall. In the present work, experiments were conducted to examine natural convection heat transfer in internally heated partially filled spherical pools with external cooling. In the experiments, Freon-113 contained in a Pyrex bell jar was used as a test liquid. The pool was bounded with a spherical segment at the bottom, and was heated with magnetrons taken from a conventional microwave oven. The vessel was cooled from the outside with natural convection of water or with nucleate boiling of liquid nitrogen

  16. Radial electric field and transport near the rational surface and the magnetic island in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.; Tamura, N.

    2002-10-01

    The structure of the radial electric field and heat transport at the magnetic island in the Large Helical Device is investigated by measuring the radial profile of poloidal flow with charge exchange spectroscopy. The convective poloidal flow inside the island is observed when the n/m=1/1 external perturbation field becomes large enough to increase the magnetic island width above a critical value (15-20% of minor radius) in LHD. This convective poloidal flow results in a non-flat space potential inside the magnetic island. The sign of the curvature of the space potential depends on the radial electric field at the boundary of the magnetic island. The heat transport inside the magnetic island is studied with a cold pulse propagation technique. The experimental results show the existence of the radial electric field shear at the boundary of the magnetic island and a reduction of heat transport inside the magnetic island. (author)

  17. Numerical Study of Condensation Heat Exchanger Design in a Cooling jacket: Correlation Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myoung Jun; Lee, Hee Joon [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Han Ok; Lee, Tae Ho; Park, Cheon Tae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, condensing heat transfer correlation of TSCON is evaluated with the existing experimental data set to design condensation heat exchanger without noncondensable gas effect (pure steam condensation) in a cooling jacket. From the investigation of the existing condensation heat transfer correlation to the existing experimental data, the improved Shah's correlation showed most satisfactory result for the condensation heat transfer coefficient with experimental data of Khun in a cooling jacket, whereas the Shah's correlation with experimental data of Lee. Lee et al. reported the improved Shah correlation gave us the best predictor for the condensation heat transfer data of Kim and Henderson in a subcooled and saturated water pool. They suggested the improved Shah correlation should be adopted as condensation heat transfer module in TSCON(Thermal Sizing of CONdenser) to design condensation heat exchanger in secondary passive cooling system of nuclear plant.

  18. Numerical Study of Condensation Heat Exchanger Design in a Cooling jacket: Correlation Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myoung Jun; Lee, Hee Joon; Kang, Han Ok; Lee, Tae Ho; Park, Cheon Tae

    2013-01-01

    In this study, condensing heat transfer correlation of TSCON is evaluated with the existing experimental data set to design condensation heat exchanger without noncondensable gas effect (pure steam condensation) in a cooling jacket. From the investigation of the existing condensation heat transfer correlation to the existing experimental data, the improved Shah's correlation showed most satisfactory result for the condensation heat transfer coefficient with experimental data of Khun in a cooling jacket, whereas the Shah's correlation with experimental data of Lee. Lee et al. reported the improved Shah correlation gave us the best predictor for the condensation heat transfer data of Kim and Henderson in a subcooled and saturated water pool. They suggested the improved Shah correlation should be adopted as condensation heat transfer module in TSCON(Thermal Sizing of CONdenser) to design condensation heat exchanger in secondary passive cooling system of nuclear plant

  19. Experimental and theoretic investigations of thermal behavior of a seasonal water pit heat storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Huang, Junpeng; Chatzidiakos, Angelos

    Seasonal heat storages are considered essential for district heating systems because they offer flexibility for the system to integrate different fluctuating renewable energy sources. Water pit thermal storages (PTES) have been successfully implemented in solar district heating plants in Denmark....... Thermal behavior of a 75,000 m3 water pit heat storage in Marstal solar heating plant was investigated experimentally and numerically. Temperatures at different levels of the water pit storage and temperatures at different depths of the ground around the storage were monitored and analyzed. A simulation...... model of the water pit storage is built to investigate development of temperatures in and around the storage. The calculated temperatures are compared to the monitored temperatures with an aim to validate the simulation model. Thermal stratification in the water pit heat storage and its interaction...

  20. Experimental investigation on heating performance of heat pump for electric vehicles at −20 °C ambient temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Fei; Xue, Qingfeng; Albarracin Velez, Giovanny Marcelo; Zhang, Guiying; Zou, Huiming; Tian, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An ASHP system with refrigerant injection for EVs is designed, for cold regions. • The heat performances of the system are tested at −20 °C ambient temperature. • The system cycle process with refrigerant injection are analyzed on lgP-H diagrams. • The effects of refrigerant injection, dryness, and in-car inlet state are discussed. • The new system can improve heating and own better application prospect. - Abstract: Since the performance of conventional air source heat pump (ASHP) for electric vehicles (EVs) is apt to decline sharply in low ambient temperature, it will consume more electricity of the cell, and affect driving mileage in cold regions. Aiming at developing high efficiency heating system for EVs in cold regions, an ASHP system applying refrigerant injection for EVs is designed, as well as the test bench is built to investigate its performance. According to the operation condition of EVs, heating performances are tested on different in-car inlet air temperature and various fresh air ratios under −20 °C ambient temperature. The system cycle process with refrigerant injection, as well as the influences of refrigerant injection and dryness are also analyzed and discussed. The results show that the heating capacity of the ASHP with refrigerant injection can be increased up to 31%, and in comparison with the conventional heat pump system its heating performance is better when in-car inlet temperature is above −10 °C. Therefore, ASHP with refrigerant injection has great potentiality to be applied for the EVs in cold regions

  1. Numerical investigation of fluid flow and heat transfer under high heat flux using rectangular micro-channels

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.

    2012-02-01

    A 3D-conjugate numerical investigation was conducted to predict heat transfer characteristics in a rectangular cross-sectional micro-channel employing simultaneously developing single-phase flows. The numerical code was validated by comparison with previous experimental and numerical results for the same micro-channel dimensions and classical correlations based on conventional sized channels. High heat fluxes up to 130W/cm 2 were applied to investigate micro-channel thermal characteristics. The entire computational domain was discretized using a 120×160×100 grid for the micro-channel with an aspect ratio of (α=4.56) and examined for Reynolds numbers in the laminar range (Re 500-2000) using FLUENT. De-ionized water served as the cooling fluid while the micro-channel substrate used was made of copper. Validation results were found to be in good agreement with previous experimental and numerical data [1] with an average deviation of less than 4.2%. As the applied heat flux increased, an increase in heat transfer coefficient values was observed. Also, the Reynolds number required for transition from single-phase fluid to two-phase was found to increase. A correlation is proposed for the results of average Nusselt numbers for the heat transfer characteristics in micro-channels with simultaneously developing, single-phase flows. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Oxygen, hydrogen, and helium isotopes for investigating groundwater systems of the Cape Verde Islands, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, V.M.; Solomon, K.D.; Gingerich, S.B.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotopes (??18O, ??2H), tritium (3H), and helium isotopes (3He, 4He) were used for evaluating groundwater recharge sources, flow paths, and residence times of three watersheds in the Cape Verde Islands (West Africa). Stable isotopes indicate the predominance of high-elevation precipitation that undergoes little evaporation prior to groundwater recharge. In contrast to other active oceanic hotspots, environmental tracers show that deep geothermal circulation does not strongly affect groundwater. Low tritium concentrations at seven groundwater sites indicate groundwater residence times of more than 50 years. Higher tritium values at other sites suggest some recent recharge. High 4He and 3He/4He ratios precluded 3H/3He dating at six sites. These high 3He/4He ratios (R/Ra values of up to 8.3) are consistent with reported mantle derived helium of oceanic island basalts in Cape Verde and provided end-member constraints for improved dating at seven other locations. Tritium and 3H/3He dating shows that S??o Nicolau Island's Ribeira Faj?? Basin has groundwater residence times of more than 50 years, whereas Fogo Island's Mosteiros Basin and Santo Ant??o Island's Ribeira Paul Basin contain a mixture of young and old groundwater. Young ages at selected sites within these two basins indicate local recharge and potential groundwater susceptibility to surface contamination and/or salt-water intrusion. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  3. Experimental investigation on passive heat transfer by long closed two-phase thermosiphons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grass, Claudia; Kulenovic, Rudi; Starflinger, Joerg [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE)

    2017-07-15

    The removal of decay heat from spent fuel pools is presently realized by active cooling systems. In case of a station black out, a passive heat removal based on closed two-phase thermosiphons can contribute to the power plant safety. In this paper, the basic laboratory setup for closed two-phase thermosiphons and first experimental results are presented. Depending on the driving temperature difference and the heat input, steady-state and pulsating operation of the thermosiphons are investigated.

  4. How efficient are heat pumps? Investigations in practical operation; Wie effizient sind Waermepumpen? Messungen im Praxisbetrieb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miara, Marek [Fraunhofer ISE, Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Heat pump systems win ever larger market shares within the range of the heating and hot water preparation in buildings. But, how great is their efficiency in the practical operation? What are the factors which affect the efficiency? In order to evaluate the ecological, energetic and economic criteria better, Fraunhofer ISE (Freiburg, Federal Republic of Germany) has investigated nearly two hundred heat pump systems scientifically. The contribution under consideration summarizes the most current results and the most important realizations.

  5. Investigation on copper alloy and titanium heat exchanger tubes behaviour in sea water service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casarini, G.; Bianchi, M.; Winkler, L.; Caspani, M.

    1982-01-01

    Because of the contradictory behaviour in service of some copper alloys used in heat exchangers cooled by sea water (Mediterranean Sea - North Africa), a comparative study on the behaviour of some tubular test samples was performed by means of accelerated test run ''in situ'' using two little heat exchangers supplied by Foster Wheeler Italiana. The aim of the investigation was to obtain quick and reliable information on optimizing the choise of the most suitable material for the construction of new heat exchangers

  6. Analysis of human factors on urban heat island and simulation of urban thermal environment in Lanzhou city, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jinghu

    2015-01-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) effect is a global phenomenon caused by urbanization. Because of the number and complexity of factors contributing to the urban thermal environment, traditional statistical methods are insufficient for acquiring data and analyzing the impact of human activities on the thermal environment, especially for identifying which factors are dominant. The UHI elements were extracted using thermal infrared remote sensing data to retrieve the land surface temperatures of Lanzhou city, and then adopting an object-oriented fractal net evolution approach to create an image segmentation of the land surface temperature (LST). The effects of urban expansion on the urban thermal environment were quantitatively analyzed. A comprehensive evaluation system of the urban thermal environment was constructed, the spatial pattern of the urban thermal environment in Lanzhou was assessed, and principal influencing factors were identified using spatial principal component analysis (SPCA) and multisource spatial data. We found that in the last 20 years, the UHI effect in Lanzhou city has been strengthened, as the UHI ratio index has increased from 0.385 in 1993 to 0.579 in 2001 and to 0.653 in 2011. The UHI expansion had a spatiotemporal consistency with the urban expansion. The four major factors that affect the spatial pattern of the urban thermal environment in Lanzhou can be ranked in the following order: landscape configuration, anthropogenic heat release, urban construction, and gradient from man-made to natural land cover. These four together accounted for 91.27% of the variance. A linear model was thus successfully constructed, implying that SPCA is helpful in identifying major contributors to UHI. Regression analysis indicated that the instantaneous LST and the simulated thermal environment have a good linear relationship, the correlation coefficient between the two reached 0.8011, highly significant at a confidence level of 0.001.

  7. Evaluating Mitigation Effects of Urban Heat Islands in a Historical Small Center with the ENVI-Met® Climate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Ambrosini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Urban morphology and increasing building density play a key role in the overall use of energy and promotion of environmental sustainability. The urban environment causes a local increase of temperature, a phenomenon known as Urban Heat Island (UHI. The purpose of this work is the study of the possible formation of an UHI and the evaluation of its magnitude, in the context of a small city, carried out with the ENVI-met® software. For this purpose, a simulation was needed, and this simulation is preparatory for a monitoring campaign on site, which will be held in the immediate future. ENVI-met® simulates the temporal evolution of several thermodynamics parameters on a micro-scale range, creating a 3D, non-hydrostatic model of the interactions between building-atmosphere-vegetation. The weather conditions applied simulate a typical Italian summer heat wave. Three different case-studies have been analyzed: Base Case, Cool Case and Green Case. Analysis of the actual state in the Base Case shows how even in an area with average building density, such as the old town center of a small city, fully developed UHI may rise with strong thermal gradients between built areas and open zones with plenty of vegetation. These gradients arise in a really tiny space (few hundreds of meters, showing that the influence of urban geometry can be decisive in the characterization of local microclimate. Simulations, carried out considering the application of green or cool roofs, showed small relevant effects as they become evident only in large areas heavily built up (metropolis subject to more intense climate conditions.

  8. Validation of a Fast-Response Urban Micrometeorological Model to Assess the Performance of Urban Heat Island Mitigation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, D.; Girard, P.; Overby, M.; Pardyjak, E.; Stoll, R., II; Willemsen, P.; Bailey, B.; Parlange, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Urban heat islands (UHI) are a real threat in many cities worldwide and mitigation measures have become a central component of urban planning strategies. Even within a city, causes of UHI vary from one neighborhood to another, mostly due the spatial variability in surface thermal properties, building geometry, anthropogenic heat flux releases and vegetation cover. As a result, the performance of UHI mitigation measures also varies in space. Hence, there is a need to develop a tool to quantify the efficiency of UHI mitigation measures at the neighborhood scale. The objective of this ongoing study is to validate the fast-response micrometeorological model QUIC EnvSim (QES). This model can provide all information required for UHI studies with a fine spatial resolution (up to 0.5m) and short computation time. QES combines QUIC, a CFD-based wind solver and dispersion model, and EnvSim, composed of a radiation model, a land-surface model and a turbulent transport model. Here, high-resolution (1 m) simulations are run over a subset of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) campus including complex buildings, various surfaces properties and vegetation. For nearly five months in 2006-07, a dense network of meteorological observations (92 weather stations over 0.1 km2) was deployed over the campus and these unique data are used here as a validation dataset. We present validation results for different test cases (e.g., sunny vs cloudy days, different incoming wind speeds and directions) and explore the effect of a few UHI mitigation strategies on the spatial distribution of near-surface air temperatures. Preliminary results suggest that QES may be a valuable tool in decision-making regarding adaptation of urban planning to UHI.

  9. Numerical Investigation of Jet Impingement Heat Transfer on a Flat plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asem Nabadavis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The numerical investigation emphasizes on studying the heat transfer characteristics when a high velocity air jet impinges upon a flat plate having constant heat flux. Numerical analysis has been conducted by solving conservation equations of momentum, mass and energy with two equations based k- ε turbulence model to determine the wall temperature and Nu of the plate considering the flow to be incompressible. It was found from the investigation that the heat transfer rate increases with the increase of Reynolds number of the jet (Rej. It was also found that there is an optimum value for jet distance to nozzle diameter ratio (H/d for maximum heat transfer when all the other parameters were kept fixed. Similar results as above were found when two jets of air were used instead of one jet keeping the mass flow rate constant. For a two jets case it was also found that heat transfer rate over the surface increases when the jets are inclined outward compared to vertical and inward jets and also there exists an optimum angle of jet for maximum heat transfer. Further investigation was carried out for different jetto-jet separation distance for a twin jet impingement model where it was noted that heat transfer is more distributed in case of larger values of L and the rate of heat transfer increases as the separation between the jet increases till a certain point after which the rate of heat transfer decreases.

  10. HISTORICAL GIS DATA AND CHANGES IN URBAN MORPHOLOGICAL PARAMETERS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF URBAN HEAT ISLANDS IN HONG KONG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Peng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid urban development between the 1960 and 2010 decades have changed the urban landscape and pattern in the Kowloon Peninsula of Hong Kong. This paper aims to study the changes of urban morphological parameters between the 1985 and 2010 and explore their influences on the urban heat island (UHI effect. This study applied a mono-window algorithm to retrieve the land surface temperature (LST using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM images from 1987 to 2009. In order to estimate the effects of local urban morphological parameters to LST, the global surface temperature anomaly was analysed. Historical 3D building model was developed based on aerial photogrammetry technique using aerial photographs from 1964 to 2010, in which the urban digital surface models (DSMs including elevations of infrastructures and buildings have been generated. Then, urban morphological parameters (i.e. frontal area index (FAI, sky view factor (SVF, vegetation fractional cover (VFC, global solar radiation (GSR, Normalized Difference Built-Up Index (NDBI, wind speed were derived. Finally, a linear regression method in Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis (WEKA was used to build prediction model for revealing LST spatial patterns. Results show that the final apparent surface temperature have uncertainties less than 1 degree Celsius. The comparison between the simulated and actual spatial pattern of LST in 2009 showed that the correlation coefficient is 0.65, mean absolute error (MAE is 1.24 degree Celsius, and root mean square error (RMSE is 1.51 degree Celsius of 22,429 pixels.

  11. An Urban Heat Island Study of the Colombo Metropolitan Area, Sri Lanka, Based on Landsat Data (1997–2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Ranagalage

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the major impacts associated with unplanned rapid urban growth is the decrease of urban vegetation, which is often replaced with impervious surfaces such as buildings, parking lots, roads, and pavements. Consequently, as the percentage of impervious surfaces continues to increase at the expense of vegetation cover, surface urban heat island (SUHI forms and becomes more intense. The Colombo Metropolitan Area (CMA, Sri Lanka, is one of the rapidly urbanizing metropolitan regions in South Asia. In this study, we examined the spatiotemporal variations of land surface temperature (LST in the CMA in the context of the SUHI phenomenon using Landsat data. More specifically, we examined the relationship of LST with the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI and the normalized difference built-up index (NDBI at three time points (1997, 2007 and 2017. In addition, we also identified environmentally critical areas based on LST and NDVI. We found significant correlations of LST with NDVI (negative and NDBI (positive (p < 0.001 across all three time points. Most of the environmentally critical areas are located in the central business district (CBD, near the harbor, across the coastal belt, and along the main transportation network. We recommend that those identified environmentally critical areas be considered in the future urban planning and landscape development of the city. Green spaces can help improve the environmental sustainability of the CMA.

  12. The Urban Heat Island phenomenon modelling and analysis as an adaptation of Maghreb cities to climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouali Kaoutar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of the urban microclimate, in particular the phenomenon of the Urban Heat Island (UHI, is becoming increasingly essential for city planning and urban design. The phenomenon analysis is henceforth possible thanks to the increase in computational power, the link between simulation tools and urban databases, which allow to represent explicitly the characteristics of the urban microclimate and to better understand its effects, through the analysis and evaluation of the different impacts of the urban climatic or anthropogenic contributors (urban morphology, land use, building sites, albedo, …. However, the choice of the scaleof the study depends on a balance between the precision of the modeling, the capacities of calculation and the availability and reliability of the data.The UHI phenomenon has been the subject of several research studies in the European countries since the 2000s. Thispaper focuses mainly on the description of the phenomenon, the different methodsused to evaluate and modeled its impacts, using some approaches for mitigating these ones.The contribution aims to highlight the phenomenon of the UHI based on a bibliographic study of the latest research on this topic in Maghreb cities.The state of art focuses on the progress made during the last 15 years taking into account the UHI in the different strategies for adapting cities to climate change and for improving their resilience.

  13. Spatio-temporal Assessment of Land Use/ Land Cover Dynamics and Urban Heat Island of Jaipur City using Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalan, S.; Sharma, K.

    2014-11-01

    Urban Heat Island (UHI) refers to the phenomena of higher surface temperature occurring in urban areas as compared to the surrounding countryside attributable to urbanization. Spatio-temporal changes in UHI can be quantified through Land Surface Temperature (LST) derived from satellite imageries. Spatial variations in LST occur due to complexity of land surface - combination of impervious surface materials, vegetation, exposed soils as well as water surfaces. Jaipur city has observed rapid urbanization over the last decade. Due to rising population pressure the city has expanded considerably in areal extent and has also observed substantial land use/land cover (LULC) changes. The paper aims to determine changes in the LST and UHI phenomena for Jaipur city over the period from 2000 to 2011 and analyzes the spatial distribution and temporal variation of LST in context of changes in LULC. Landsat 7 ETM+ (2000) and Landsat 5 TM (2011) images of summer season have been used. Results reveal that Jaipur city has witnessed considerable growth in built up area at the cost of greener patches over the last decade, which has had clear impact on variation in LST. There has been an average rise of 2.99 °C in overall summer temperature. New suburbs of the city record 2° to 4 °C increase in LST. LST change is inversely related to change in vegetation cover and positively related to extent of built up area. The study concludes that UHI of Jaipur city has intensified and extended over new areas.

  14. Do we need full mesoscale models to simulate the urban heat island? A study over the city of Barcelona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Díez, Markel; Ballester, Joan; De Ridder, Koen; Hooyberghs, Hans; Lauwaet, Dirk; Rodó, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    As most of the population lives in urban environments, the simulation of the urban climate has become an important part of the global climate change impact assessment. However, due to the high resolution required, these simulations demand a large amount of computational resources. Here we present a comparison between a simplified fast urban climate model (UrbClim) and a widely used full mesoscale model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, over the city of Barcelona. In order to check the advantages and disadvantages of each approach, both simulations were compared with station data and with land surface temperature observations retrieved by satellites, focusing on the urban heat island. The effect of changing the UrbClim boundary conditions was studied too, by using low resolution global reanalysis data (70 km) and a higher resolution forecast model (15 km). Finally, a strict comparison of the computational resources consumed by both models was carried out. Results show that, generally, the performance of the simple model is comparable to or better than the mesoscale model. The exception are the winds and the day-to-day correlation in the reanalysis driven run, but these problems disappear when taking the boundary conditions from a higher resolution global model. UrbClim was found to run 133 times faster than WRF, using 4x times higher resolution and, thus, it is an efficient solution for running long climate change simulations over large city ensembles.

  15. Influence of diversified relief on the urban heat island in the city of Kraków, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokwa, Anita; Hajto, Monika J.; Walawender, Jakub P.; Szymanowski, Mariusz

    2015-10-01

    In cities located in concave landforms, urban heat island (UHI) is an element of a complicated thermal structure and occurs due to the common impact of urban built-up areas and orography-induced processes like katabatic flows or air temperature inversions. Kraków, Poland (760,000 inhabitants) is located in a large valley of the river Vistula. In the years 2009-2013, air temperature was measured with the 5-min sampling resolution at 21 urban and rural points, located in various landforms. Cluster analysis was used to process data for the night-time. Sodar and synoptic data analysis provided results included in the definition of the four types of night-time thermal structure representing the highest and the lowest spatial air temperature variability and two transitional types. In all the types, there are three permanent elements which show the formation of the inversion layer, the cold air reservoir and the UHI peak zone. As the impact of land use and relief on air temperature cannot be separated, a concept of relief-modified UHI (RMUHI) was proposed as an alternative to the traditional UHI approach. It consists of two steps: (1) recognition of the areal thermal structure taking into consideration the city centre as a reference point and (2) calculation of RMUHI intensity separately for each vertical zone.

  16. The spatial variability of air temperature and nocturnal urban heat island intensity in the city of Brno, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrovolný Petr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to quantify the effects of a number of factors on the nocturnal air temperature field in a medium-sized central European city located in complex terrain. The main data sources consist of mobile air temperature measurements and a geographical database. Temperature measurements were taken along several profiles through the city centre and were made under a clear sky with no advection. Altogether nine sets of detailed measurements, in all seasons, were assembled. Altitude, quantity of vegetation, density of buildings and the structure of the transportation (road system were considered as explanatory variables. The result is that the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI and the density of buildings were the most important factors, each of them explaining a substantial part (more than 50% of overall air temperature variability. Mobile measurements with NDVI values as a covariate were used for interpolation of air temperature for the entire study area. The spatial variability of nocturnal air temperature and UHI intensity in Brno is the main output presented. Air temperatures interpolated from mobile measurements and NDVI values indicate that the mean urban heat island (UHI intensity in the early night in summer is at its highest (approximately 5 °C in the city centre and decreases towards the suburban areas.

  17. Assessing population movement impacts on urban heat island of Beijing during the Chinese New Year holiday: effects of meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lingyun; Zhang, Jingyong

    2018-02-01

    Chinese New Year (CNY), or Spring Festival, is the most important of all festivals in China. We use daily observations to show that Beijing's urban heat island (UHI) effects largely depend on precipitation, cloud cover, and water vapor but are insensitive to wind speed, during the CNY holiday season. Non-precipitating, clear, and low humidity conditions favor strong UHI effects. The CNY holiday, with some 3 billion journeys made, provides a living laboratory to explore the role of population movements in the UHI phenomenon. Averaged over the period 2004-2013, with the Olympic year of 2008 excluded, Beijing's UHI effects during the CNY week decline by 0.48 °C relative to the background period (4 weeks including 2 to 3 weeks before, and 2 to 3 weeks after, the CNY week). With combined effects of precipitation, large cloud cover, and high water vapor excluded, the UHI effects during the CNY week averaged over the study period decline by 0.76 °C relative to the background period, significant at the 99% confidence level by Student's t test. These results indicate that the impacts of population movements can be more easily detected when excluding unfavorable meteorological conditions to the UHI. Population movements occur not only during the CNY holiday, but also during all the time across the globe. We suggest that better understanding the role of population movements will offer new insight into anthropogenic climate modifications.

  18. IDENTIFYING LOCAL SCALE CLIMATE ZONES OF URBAN HEAT ISLAND FROM HJ-1B SATELLITE DATA USING SELF-ORGANIZING MAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Z. Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing acceleration of urbanization, the degeneration of the environment and the Urban Heat Island (UHI has attracted more and more attention. Quantitative delineation of UHI has become crucial for a better understanding of the interregional interaction between urbanization processes and the urban environment system. First of all, our study used medium resolution Chinese satellite data-HJ-1B as the Earth Observation data source to derive parameters, including the percentage of Impervious Surface Areas, Land Surface Temperature, Land Surface Albedo, Normalized Differential Vegetation Index, and object edge detector indicators (Mean of Inner Border, Mean of Outer border in the city of Guangzhou, China. Secondly, in order to establish a model to delineate the local climate zones of UHI, we used the Principal Component Analysis to explore the correlations between all these parameters, and estimate their contributions to the principal components of UHI zones. Finally, depending on the results of the PCA, we chose the most suitable parameters to classify the urban climate zones based on a Self-Organization Map (SOM. The results show that all six parameters are closely correlated with each other and have a high percentage of cumulative (95% in the first two principal components. Therefore, the SOM algorithm automatically categorized the city of Guangzhou into five classes of UHI zones using these six spectral, structural and climate parameters as inputs. UHI zones have distinguishable physical characteristics, and could potentially help to provide the basis and decision support for further sustainable urban planning.

  19. Quantifying the influence of land-use and surface characteristics on spatial variability in the urban heat island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Melissa A.; Sailor, David J.

    2009-03-01

    The urban thermal environment varies not only from its rural surroundings but also within the urban area due to intra-urban differences in land-use and surface characteristics. Understanding the causes of this intra-urban variability is a first step in improving urban planning and development. Toward this end, a method for quantifying causes of spatial variability in the urban heat island has been developed. This paper presents the method as applied to a specific test case of Portland, Oregon. Vehicle temperature traverses were used to determine spatial differences in summertime ~2 m air temperature across the metropolitan area in the afternoon. A tree-structured regression model was used to quantify the land-use and surface characteristics that have the greatest influence on daytime UHI intensity. The most important urban characteristic separating warmer from cooler regions of the Portland metropolitan area was canopy cover. Roadway area density was also an important determinant of local UHI magnitudes. Specifically, the air above major arterial roads was found to be warmer on weekdays than weekends, possibly due to increased anthropogenic activity from the vehicle sector on weekdays. In general, warmer regions of the city were associated with industrial and commercial land-use. The downtown core, whilst warmer than the rural surroundings, was not the warmest part of the Portland metropolitan area. This is thought to be due in large part to local shading effects in the urban canyons.

  20. Numerical investigations of opposing mixed convection heat transfer in vertical flat channel 2. Vortex flow in case of symmetrical heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirvydas, A.; Poskas, R.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results on numerical investigation of the local opposing mixed convection heat transfer in a vertical flat channel with symmetrical heating at low Reynolds numbers. Numerical two-dimensional simulation was performed for the same channel and for the same conditions as in the experiment using the FLUENT 6.1 code. The unsteady flow investigations were performed in airflow for the experimental conditions at the Reynolds number 2130 and Grashof number 6.2* 10 8 . Quasi-steady flow investigations were performed for two Reynolds numbers (2130 and 4310) and the Grashof number up to 3.1*10 9 in order to simulate the buoyancy effect on the flow structure. In both steady and quasi-steady modelling cases the results demonstrated that under the high buoyancy effect the chequerwise local circular flow took place near the heated walls. This made velocity profiles asymmetrical and caused pulsations of the wall temperature. Wall temperature had a pulsatory character, however, the resulting averaged values correlated rather well with experimental data for steady and quasi-steady cases for Re in = 2130. For Re in = 4310, the resulting averaged values for x/d e ≤25 correlated rather well with experimental data. When x/d e > 25, the difference between the experimental and the calculated wall temperature was increasing, increasing, possibly due to a steady flow and heat transfer modelling. (author)

  1. Investigating the effects of heat exchanger on flame transfer function in a simplified boiler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosseini, N.; Kornilov, V.N.; Teerling, O. J.; Lopez Arteaga, I.; de Goey, Ph.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present work is to investigate the effects the heat exchanger can have on the acoustic response of the flames(flame transfer function) in a boiler. In compact condensing boilers the distance between the burner and heat exchanger is small enough to cause intense interactions. That is

  2. Numerical investigation of heat transfer enhancement by carbon nano fibers deposited on a flat plate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelevic, Nikola; van der Meer, Theo

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of flow and heat transfer have been performed for flow over a plate surface covered with carbon nano fibers (CNFs). The CNFs influence on fluid flow and heat transfer has been investigated. Firstly, a stochastic model for CNFs deposition has been explained. Secondly, the

  3. sozialwissenInvestigating public places and impacts of heat stress in the city of Aachen, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maras, Isabell

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the role of structure and social aspects regarding heat stress of people in urban areas requires an interdisciplinary scientific approach that connects methods from both natural sciences and social sciences. In this study, we combine three approaches to provide an interdisciplinary analysis of the structure and social components of heat stress in the city of Aachen, Germany. First, we assess the overall spatial structure of the urban heat island using spatially distributed measurements from mobile air temperature recordings on public transport units combined with spatially distributed geo-statistical data. The results indicate that the time of day matters: During the afternoon, areas with a relative low building density, like the industrial area northeast of the inner city, are the warmest, while surfaces in high-building-density areas like the inner city heat up faster during the evening. Second, we combine these measurements with place-based survey data collected in 2010 from residents aged 50 to 92 regarding their individual housing conditions, medical history and social integration to examine the match among heat-based stress of older residents, social conditions and elevated temperatures in their residential quarter. We identify disadvantaged areas for specific already-disadvantaged demographic groups in the city, pointing to a cumulation of inequalities, including heat stress among the most vulnerable. Third, we compare data of biometeorological measurements on urban public squares during the afternoon with results of the micrometeorological model ENVI-met to examine the spatial variability of the inner-city heat load. We complement the modelling results with on-site interviews to evaluate people’s heat perception at the same public places. A simulation shows that additional vegetation would increase thermal comfort at these public places, whereby the heat load assessed using the predicted mean vote (PMV value would

  4. Experimental investigation and feasibility analysis on a capillary radiant heating system based on solar and air source heat pump dual heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, M.; Gu, Z.L.; Kang, W.B.; Liu, X.; Zhang, L.Y.; Jin, L.W.; Zhang, Q.L.

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: (a) Vertical temperature gradient in Case 3, (b) PMV and PPD of the test room in Case 3, (c) operating time of SPCTS and ASHP systems in Case 3 and (d) the proportion of SPCTS operating time. - Highlights: • A capillary heating system based on solar and air source heat pump was developed. • Influence of supply water temperature on solar energy saving rate was investigated. • Heating performance and thermal comfort of capillary heating system were analyzed. • Low temperature heating with capillary is suitable for solar heating system. - Abstract: Due to sustainable development, solar energy has drawn much attention and been widely applied in buildings. However, the application of solar energy is limited because of its instability, intermittency and low energy density in winter. In order to use low density and instable solar energy source for heating and improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy, a solar phase change thermal storage (SPCTS) heating system using a radiant-capillary-terminal (RCT) to effectively match the low temperature hot water, a phase change thermal storage (PCTS) to store and continuously utilize the solar energy, and an air source heat pump (ASHP) as an alternate energy, was proposed and set up in this research. Series of experiments were conducted to obtain the relation between the solar radiation utilization rate and the heating supply temperatures, and to evaluate the performance of the RCT module and the indoor thermal environment of the system for its practical application in a residential building in the north-western City of Xi’an, China. The results show that energy saving of the solar heating system can be significantly improved by reducing the supplied water temperature, and the supplied water temperature of the RCT would be no more than 35 °C. The capillary radiation heating can adopt a lower water temperature and create a good thermal comfort environment as well. These results may lead to the

  5. Application of green blue roof to mitigate heat island phenomena and resilient to climate change in urban areas: A case study from Seoul, Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Shafique Muhammad; Kim Reeho

    2017-01-01

    Green blue roof has the potential to reduce the surface temperature of the building in the urban areas. Green blue roof is a new innovative low impact development (LID) practice that has exhibited an option to mitigate the heat island phenomena in urban area. This is the modified form of green roof that has ability to store rainwater in vegetation, soil layer and increases the evapotranspiration rate which decreases the temperature of an area. For this purpose, green blue roof is installed at...

  6. Integrating local urban climate modelling and mobile sensor data for personal exposure assessments in the context of urban heat island effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueberham, Maximilian; Hertel, Daniel; Schlink, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Deeper knowledge about urban climate conditions is getting more important in the context of climate change, urban population growth, urban compaction and continued surface sealing. Especially the urban heat island effect (UHI) is one of the most significant human induced alterations of Earth's surface climate. According to this the appearance frequency of heat waves in cities will increase with deep impacts on personal thermal comfort, human health and local residential quality of citizens. UHI can be very heterogenic within a city and research needs to focus more on the neighborhood scale perspective to get further insights about the heat burden of individuals. However, up to now, few is known about local thermal environmental variances and personal exposure loads. To monitor these processes and the impact on individuals, improved monitoring approaches are crucial, complementing data recorded at conventional fixed stations. Therefore we emphasize the importance of micro-meteorological modelling and mobile measurements to shed new light on the nexus of urban human-climate interactions. Contributing to this research we jointly present the approaches of our two PhD-projects. Firstly we illustrate on the basis of an example site, how local thermal conditions in an urban district can be simulated and predicted by a micro-meteorological model. Secondly we highlight the potentials of personal exposure measurements based on an evaluation of mobile micro-sensing devices (MSDs) and analyze and explain differences between model predictions and mobile records. For the examination of local thermal conditions we calculated ENVI-met simulations within the "Bayerischer Bahnhof" quarter in Leipzig (Saxony, Germany; 51°20', 12°22'). To accomplish the maximum temperature contrasts within the diverse built-up structures we chose a hot summer day (25 Aug 2016) under autochthonous weather conditions. From these simulations we analyzed a UHI effect between the model core (urban area

  7. Numerical investigation of passive heat removal system via steam generator in VVER 1200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh Anh Tuan; Duong Thanh Tung; Tran Chi Thanh; Nguyen Van Thai

    2015-01-01

    Passive heat removal system (PHRS) via Steam Generator is an important part in VVER design. In case of Design Basic Accidents such as blackout, failure of feed water supply to steam generator or coolant leakage with failure of emergency core cooling at high pressure. PHRS is designed to remove the residual heat from reactor core through steam generator to heat exchanger which is placed outside reactor vessel. In order to evaluate the passive system, a numerical investigation using a CFD code is performed. However, PHRS has complex geometry for using CFD simulation. Thus, RELAP5 is applied to provide the wall heat flux of tube in the heat exchanger tank. The natural convection in the heat exchanger tank is investigated in this report. Numerical results show temperature and velocity distribution in the heat exchanger tank are calculated with different wall heat flux corresponding to various transient conditions. The calculated results contribute to the capacity analysis of passive heat removal system and giving valuable information for safe operation of VVER 1200. (author)

  8. Numerical investigation of boiling heat transfer on hydrocarbon mixture refrigerant in vertical rectangular minichannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixing Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the characteristics of boiling heat transfer for hydrocarbon mixture refrigerant in plate-fin heat exchanger which is used in the petrochemical industry field, a model was established on boiling heat transfer in vertical rectangular channel. The simulated results were compared with the experimental data from literature. The results show that the deviation between the simulated results and experimental data is within ±15%. Meanwhile, the characteristic of boiling heat transfer was investigated in vertical rectangular minichannel of plate-fin heat exchanger. The results show that the boiling heat transfer coefficient increases with the increase in quality and mass flux and is slightly impacted by the heat flux. This is because that the main boiling mechanism is forced convective boiling while the contribution of nucleate boiling is slight. The correlation of Liu and Winterton is in good agreement with the simulation results. The deviation between correlation calculations and simulation results is mostly less than ±15%. These results will provide some constructive instructions for the understanding of saturated boiling mechanism in a vertical rectangular minichannel and the prediction of heat transfer performance in plate-fin heat exchanger.

  9. An investigation of heat recovery of submarine diesel engines for combined cooling, heating and power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daghigh, Roonak; Shafieian, Abdellah

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The power output of the cycle is about 53 kW in the mass flow rate of 0.6 kg/s. • The output cooling water temperature of evaporator is 3.64 °C. • The absorption chiller has a coefficient of performance equal to 0.94. - Abstract: High temperature and mass flow rate of the exhaust gases of submarine diesel engines provide an appropriate potential for their thermal recovery. The current study introduces a combined cooling, heating and power system for thermal recovery of submarine diesel engines. The cooling system is composed of a mixed effect absorption chiller with two high and low pressure generators. The exhaust of the diesel engine is used in the high pressure generator, and the low pressure generator was divided into two parts. The required heat for the first and second compartments is supplied by the cooling water of the engine and condensation of the vapor generated in the high pressure generator, respectively. The power generation system is a Rankine cycle with an organic working fluid, which is considered a normal thermal system to supply hot water. The whole system is encoded based on mass stability, condensation and energy equations. The obtained findings showed that the maximum heat recovery for the power cycle occurs in exhaust gas mass ratio of 0.23–0.29 and working fluid mass flow rate of 0.45–0.57 kg/s. Further, for each specific mass ratio of exhaust gas, only a certain range of working fluid mass flow rate is used. In the refrigerant mass flow rate of 0.6 kg/s and exhaust gas mass ratio of 0.27, the power output of the cycle is 53 kW, which can also be achieved by simultaneous increase of refrigerant mass flow rate and exhaust gas mass ratio in a certain range of higher powers. In the next section, the overall distribution diagram of output water temperature of the thermal system is obtained according to the exhaust gas mass ratio in various mass flow rates, which can increase the potential of designing and controlling the

  10. Experimental and numerical investigation of dimplelike protrusions employed in recent heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preibisch, S; Dietzel, D; Buschmann, M H; Friebe, C

    2011-01-01

    This study is motivated by the observation that recent investigations of dimpled surfaces employed for enhancing heat transfer rarely go beyond general parameters like pressure losses and heat transfer performance. Here, we explore a real world dimpled cross-flow heat exchanger. In particular, we are interested in the global parameters, but also in the local flow situation around a single dimplelike protrusion. Detailed PIV-experiments and simulations of the local flow around single protrusions and groups of them reveal the flow structures essential for heat transfer. These local results are brought in conjunction with the general performance of the heat exchanger. Based on local results, simulations of the complete heat exchanger are carried out which are found to be in reasonable agreement with the global parameters found experimentally.

  11. Investigating Island Evolution: A Galapagos-Based Lesson Using the 5E Instructional Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFina, Anthony V.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces an inquiry-based lesson plan on evolution and the Galapagos Islands. Uses the 5E instructional model which includes phases of engagement, exploration, explanation, elaboration, and evaluation. Includes information on species for exploration and elaboration purposes, and a general rubric for student evaluation. (YDS)

  12. Performance investigation on a multi-unit heat pump for simultaneous temperature and humidity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Hongming; Shao, Shuangquan; Tian, Changqing

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A multi-unit heat pump is proposed for simultaneous temperature and humidity control. • Condensation heat is non, partly or fully recovered for temperature regulation. • Highly integrated heat pump for residential cooling, dehumidification and heating. • High energy saving potential for all-year-round operation in wet and warm regions. - Abstract: A multi-unit heat pump is presented for simultaneous humidity and temperature control to improve the energy efficiency and the thermal comfort. Two parallel connected condensers are employed in the system, locating at the back of the indoor evaporator and the outdoor unit, respectively. The heat pump can operate in four modes, including heating, cooling and dehumidification without and/or with partial or total condensing heat recovery. The experimental investigation shows that the temperature control capacity is from 3.5 kW for cooling to 3.8 kW for heating with the cooling and heating efficiency higher than 3.5 kW kW −1 , and the dehumidification rate is about 2.0 kg h −1 with the efficiency about 2.0 kg h −1 kW −1 . The supply air temperature and humidity can be simultaneously regulated with high accuracy and high efficiency by adjusting the indoor and/or outdoor air volumes. It provides an integrated and effective solution for simultaneous indoor air temperature and humidity control for all-year-round operation in residential buildings

  13. Performance investigation of a cogeneration plant with the efficient and compact heat recovery system

    KAUST Repository

    Myat, Aung; Thu, Kyaw; Kim, Young-Deuk; Choon, Ng Kim

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the performance investigation of a cogeneration plant equipped with an efficient waste heat recovery system. The proposed cogeneration system produces four types of useful energy namely: (i) electricity, (ii) steam, (iii) cooling

  14. Performance investigation on a 4-bed adsorption desalination cycle with internal heat recovery scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Thu, Kyaw; Yanagi, Hideharu; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Ng, Kim Choon

    2016-01-01

    Multi-bed adsorption cycle with the internal heat recovery between the condenser and the evaporator is investigated for desalination application. A numerical model is developed for a 4-bed adsorption cycle implemented with the master

  15. A study of urban heat island and its association with particulate matter during winter months over Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Puneeta; Kumar, Dinesh; Prakash, Amit; Masih, Jamson; Singh, Manoj; Kumar, Surendra; Jain, Vinod Kumar; Kumar, Krishan

    2012-01-01

    Day and night time thermal mapping of Delhi has been done with MODIS satellite data for the months of November and December for years 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010. The study reveals the formation of day time “cool island” over central parts of Delhi which are found to be cooler by a maximum of 4–6 °C than the surrounding rural areas. During the night time, however, the central parts of Delhi are found to be warmer by a maximum of 4–7 °C or even more than the surrounding rural areas thus confirming the formation of nocturnal urban heat island over Delhi. Measurements of solar spectral irradiance over Delhi reveal significantly lower values as compared to a rural site located south-west of Delhi, during the low wind conditions in the months of November and December. Analysis of average monthly temporal data of surface wind speed and particulate matter concentration over Delhi reveals a strong anti-correlation between wind speed and particulate matter concentration. High values of particulate matter during low wind conditions seem to favor the so called “cool island” over Delhi. Analysis of radiosonde data of 975 hPa and 850 hPa temperatures over Delhi during November and December from 1973 to 2010 reveals a warming trend at the 850 hPa level and an overall declining trend of ∆T between 975 hPa temperatures and 850 hPa temperatures, thus indicating a weakening of vertical thermal gradients over Delhi during these months. The study suggests that urban areas behave more like moderators of diurnal temperature variation in low wind conditions. - Highlights: ► Daytime cool island forms over central parts of Delhi in November and December. ► Central parts of Delhi are cooler by a maximum of 4–6 °C during daytime and warmer by a maximum of 4–7 °C during night. ► Significant negative correlations exist between daytime surface temperatures and AOD levels. ► Land use parameters have significant correlations with surface temperatures. ► The day time

  16. Investigations of Heat Recovery in Different Refrigeration System Solutions in Supermarkets. Effsys2 project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawalha, Same; Chen, Yang

    2010-07-01

    Supermarkets are intensive energy consumers with constantly increasing number of installations. About 50 % of the energy consumption in the supermarket is absorbed by the refrigeration system to cover the cooling demands. Simultaneously, heating is needed in the supermarket where the rejected heat from the refrigeration system is usually higher than the needs. It is an interesting possibility to utilize the rejected heat from the refrigeration system to cover the heating needs in supermarkets. The objective of this project is to investigate the heat recovery performance of the new refrigeration system solutions in supermarket applications. The focus is on environmentally friendly systems with natural working fluids, mainly CO{sub 2} trans-critical systems. The project analyzes the temperature levels and capacities of rejected heat from different system solutions and investigates its matching with the heating needs in supermarkets. Using simulation tools this project also aims at defining the system solution/s which has good energy efficiency for simultaneous cooling and heat recovery.

  17. Numerical investigation of vapor–liquid heat and mass transfer in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin, Chengyun; Rao, Zhonghao; You, Xinyu; Song, Zhengchang; Han, Dongtai

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The heat and mass transfer behaviors in porous media was investigated. • A modified separate flow model (MSFM) was developed. • The influence of heat flux direction on heat and fluid flow behaviors is great. • The saturation profile is weakly discontinuous on the phase interface. • A countercurrent flow exists in two-phase region. - Abstract: A modified separate flow model (MSFM) is developed to numerically investigate the heat and mass transfer behaviors in porous media in this paper. In the MSFM, the effects of capillarity, liquid phase change, nonisothermal two-phase region and the local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE) are considered. The vapor and liquid velocities are both converted into intermediate variables in the simulations and conveniently convergent solutions are obtained because a special upwind scheme for the convection or boiling heat transfer source and variable convergence factors are simultaneously employed. Two typical numerical examples with a one-dimension model of porous media are studied that the high heat fluxes are vertical and parallel to the fluid flow direction, respectively. And the results indicated that the influence of heat flux direction on heat and fluid flow behaviors in porous media is great. The nonisothermal phenomenon in the two-phase region is obvious for the former while the LTNE phenomenon is remarkable in the two-phase region for the latter. The results also showed several similar behaviors that the saturation profile is weakly discontinuous on the phase interface and a countercurrent flow exists in two-phase region

  18. Numerical investigation of Al2O3/water nanofluid laminar convective heat transfer through triangular ducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinali Heris Saeed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, laminar flow-forced convective heat transfer of Al2O3/water nanofluid in a triangular duct under constant wall temperature condition is investigated numerically. In this investigation, the effects of parameters, such as nanoparticles diameter, concentration, and Reynolds number on the enhancement of nanofluids heat transfer is studied. Besides, the comparison between nanofluid and pure fluid heat transfer is achieved in this article. Sometimes, because of pressure drop limitations, the need for non-circular ducts arises in many heat transfer applications. The low heat transfer rate of non-circular ducts is one the limitations of these systems, and utilization of nanofluid instead of pure fluid because of its potential to increase heat transfer of system can compensate this problem. In this article, for considering the presence of nanoparticl: es, the dispersion model is used. Numerical results represent an enhancement of heat transfer of fluid associated with changing to the suspension of nanometer-sized particles in the triangular duct. The results of the present model indicate that the nanofluid Nusselt number increases with increasing concentration of nanoparticles and decreasing diameter. Also, the enhancement of the fluid heat transfer becomes better at high Re in laminar flow with the addition of nanoparticles.

  19. Investigation of heating and cooling in a stand-alone high temperature PEM fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Caizhi; Yu, Tao; Yi, Jun; Liu, Zhitao; Raj, Kamal Abdul Rasheedj; Xia, Lingchao; Tu, Zhengkai; Chan, Siew Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Heating-up and cooling-down processes of HT-PEMFC are the mainly interested topics. • Dynamic behaviours, power and energy demand of the heating and cooling was studied. • Hybrid system based on LiFeYPO_4 battery for heating and cooling is built and tested. • The concept of combining different heating sources together is recommended. - Abstract: One key issue pertaining to the cold-start of High temperature PEM fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) is the requirement of high amount of thermal energy for heating up the stack to a temperature of 120 °C or above before it can generate electricity. Furthermore, cooling down the stack to a certain temperature (e.g. 50 °C) is necessary before stopping. In this study, the dynamic behaviours, power and energy demand of a 6 kW liquid cooled HT-PEMFC stack during heating-up, operation and cooling-down were investigated experimentally. The dynamic behaviours of fuel cell under heating-up and cooling-down processes are the mainly interested topics. Then a hybridisation of HT-PEMFC with Li-ion battery to demonstrate the synergistic effect on dynamic behaviour was conducted and validated for its feasibility. At last, the concept of combining different heating sources together is analysed to reduce the heating time of the HT-PEMFC as well.

  20. The urban heat island in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in the last 30 years using remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Leonardo de Faria; Lucena, Andrews José de; Rotunno Filho, Otto Corrêa; França, José Ricardo de Almeida

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this work is to study urban heat island (UHI) in Metropolitan Area of Rio de Janeiro (MARJ) based on the analysis of land-surface temperature (LST) and land-use patterns retrieved from Landsat-5/Thematic Mapper (TM), Landsat-7/Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and Landsat-8/Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal Infrared Sensors (TIRS) data covering a 32-year period between 1984 and 2015. LST temporal evolution is assessed by comparing the average LST composites for 1984-1999 and 2000-2015 where the parametric Student t-test was conducted at 5% significance level to map the pixels where LST for the more recent period is statistically significantly greater than the previous one. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon rank sum test has also confirmed at the same 5% significance level that the more recent period (2000-2015) has higher LST values. UHI intensity between ;urban; and ;rural/urban low density; (;vegetation;) areas for 1984-1999 and 2000-2015 was established and confirmed by both parametric and non-parametric tests at 1% significance level as 3.3 °C (5.1 °C) and 4.4 °C (7.1 °C), respectively. LST has statistically significantly (p-value analysis was also performed to identify the urban pixels within MARJ where UHI is more intense by subtracting the LST of these pixels from the LST mean value of ;vegetation; land-use class.

  1. Assessment of the intensity and spatial variability of urban heat islands over the Indian cities for Regional Climate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, S.; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.

    2016-12-01

    The Urban heat island (UHI) in general developed over cities, due to the drastic changes in land use and land cover (LULC), has profound impact on the atmospheric circulation patterns due to the changes in the energy transport mechanism which in turn affect the regional climate. In this study, an attempt has been made to quantify the intensity of UHI, and to identify the pockets of UHI over cities during last decade over fast developing cosmopolitan Indian cities such as New Delhi, Mumbai and Kolkata. For this purpose, Landsat TM and ETM+ images during winter period, in about 5 year intervals from 2002 to 2013, has been selected to retrieve the brightness temperatures and land use/cover, from which Land Surface Temperature (LST) has been estimated using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Normalized Difference Build-up Index (NDBI) and Normalized Difference Bareness Index (NDBaI) are estimated to extract build-up areas and bare land from the satellite images to identify the UHI pockets over the study area. For this purpose image processing and GIS tools were employed. Results reveal a significant increase in the intensity of UHI and increase in its area of influence over all the three cities. An increase of 2 to 2.5 oC of UHI intensity over the study regions has been noticed. The range of increase in UHI intensity is found to be more over New Delhi compared to Mumbai and Kolkata which is more or less same. The number of hotspot pockets of UHI has also been increased as seen from the spatial distribution of LST, NDVI and NDBI. This result signifies the impact of rapid urbanization and infrastructural developments has a direct consequence in modulating the regional climate over the Indian cities.

  2. The Effect of Urban Heat Island on Climate Warming in the Yangtze River Delta Urban Agglomeration in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunfang Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Yangtze River Delta (YRD has experienced rapid urbanization and dramatic economic development since 1978 and the Yangtze River Delta urban agglomeration (YRDUA has been one of the three largest urban agglomerations in China. We present evidence of a significant urban heat island (UHI effect on climate warming based on an analysis of the impacts of the urbanization rate, urban population, and land use changes on the warming rate of the daily average, minimal (nighttime and maximal (daytime air temperature in the YRDUA using 41 meteorological stations observation data. The effect of the UHI on climate warming shows a large spatial variability. The average warming rates of average air temperature of huge cities, megalopolises, large cities, medium-sized cities, and small cities are 0.483, 0.314 ± 0.030, 0.282 ± 0.042, 0.225 ± 0.044 and 0.179 ± 0.046 °C/decade during the period of 1957–2013, respectively. The average warming rates of huge cities and megalopolises are significantly higher than those of medium-sized cities and small cities, indicating that the UHI has a significant effect on climate warming (t-test, p < 0.05. Significantly positive correlations are found between the urbanization rate, population, built-up area and warming rate of average air temperature (p < 0.001. The average warming rate of average air temperature attributable to urbanization is 0.124 ± 0.074 °C/decade in the YRDUA. Urbanization has a measurable effect on the observed climate warming in the YRD aggravating the global climate warming.

  3. Correlation or Causality between Land Cover Patterns and the Urban Heat Island Effect? Evidence from Brisbane, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Deilami

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have identified associations between the surface urban heat island (SUHI effect (i.e., SUHI, hereinafter is referred to as UHI and urban growth, particularly changes in land cover patterns. This research questions their causal links to answer a key policy question: If cities restrict urban expansion and encourage people to live within existing urban areas, will that help in controlling UHI? The question has been answered by estimating four models using data from Brisbane, Australia: Model 1—cross-sectional ordinary least square (OLS regression—to examine the association between the UHI effect and land cover patterns in 2013; Model 2—cross-sectional geographically weighted regression (GWR—to examine whether the outputs generated from Model 1 possess significant spatial variations; Model 3—longitudinal OLS—to examine whether changes in land cover patterns led to changes in UHI effects between 2004 and 2013; and Model 4—longitudinal GWR—to examine whether the outputs generated from Model 3 vary significantly over space. All estimations were controlled for potential confounding effects (e.g., population, employment and dwelling densities. Results from the cross-sectional OLS and GWR models were consistent with previous findings and showed that porosity is negatively associated with the UHI effect in 2013. In contrast, population density has a positive association. Results from the longitudinal OLS and GWR models confirm their causal linkages and showed that an increase in porosity level reduced the UHI effect, whereas an increase in population density increased the UHI effect. The findings suggest that even a containment of population growth within existing urban areas will lead to the UHI effect. However, this can be significantly minimized through proper land use planning, by creating a balance between urban and non-urban uses of existing urban areas.

  4. Analysis and modelling of surface Urban Heat Island in 20 Canadian cities under climate and land-cover change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Abhishek; Eichenbaum, Markus Kalev; Simonovic, Slobodan P

    2018-01-15

    Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI) is an urban climate phenomenon that is expected to respond to future climate and land-use land-cover change. It is important to further our understanding of physical mechanisms that govern SUHI phenomenon to enhance our ability to model future SUHI characteristics under changing geophysical conditions. In this study, SUHI phenomenon is quantified and modelled at 20 cities distributed across Canada. By analyzing MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensed surface temperature at the cities over 2002-2012, it is found that 16 out of 20 selected cities have experienced a positive SUHI phenomenon while 4 cities located in the prairies region and high elevation locations have experienced a negative SUHI phenomenon in the past. A statistically significant relationship between observed SUHI magnitude and city elevation is also recorded over the observational period. A Physical Scaling downscaling model is then validated and used to downscale future surface temperature projections from 3 GCMs and 2 extreme Representative Concentration Pathways in the urban and rural areas of the cities. Future changes in SUHI magnitudes between historical (2006-2015) and future timelines: 2030s (2026-2035), 2050s (2046-2055), and 2090s (2091-2100) are estimated. Analysis of future projected changes indicate that 15 (13) out of 20 cities can be expected to experience increases in SUHI magnitudes in future under RCP 2.6 (RCP 8.5). A statistically significant relationship between projected future SUHI change and current size of the cities is also obtained. The study highlights the role of city properties (i.e. its size, elevation, and surrounding land-cover) towards shaping their current and future SUHI characteristics. The results from this analysis will help decision-makers to manage Canadian cities more efficiently under rapidly changing geophysical and demographical conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of Urban Heat Island under the Hanoi Master Plan 2030 on Cooling Loads in Residential Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Hoang Hai Nam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the influence of urban heat island (UHI under the Hanoi Master Plan 2030 on the energy consumption for space cooling in residential buildings. The weather conditions under the current and future status (master plan condition simulated in the previous study (Trihamdani et al., 2014 were used and cooling loads in all the residential buildings in Hanoi over the hottest month were estimated under the simulated current and future conditions by using the building simulation program, TRNSYS (v17. Three most typical housing types in the city were selected for the simulation. The cooling loads of respective housing types were obtained in each of the districts in Hanoi. The results show that the total cooling loads over June 2010 is approximately 683 Terajoule (TJ under the current status, but it is predicted to increase to 903 TJ under the master plan condition. The increment is largely due to the increase in number of households (203 TJ or 92%, but partially due to the increase in urban temperature, i.e. UHI effect (17 TJ or 8%. The increments in new built-up areas were found to be larger than those in existing built-up areas. The cooling load in apartment is approximately half of that in detached house, which is approximately half of that in row house. Moreover, it was seen that although sensible cooling loads increased with the increase in outdoor temperature, the latent cooling loads decreased due to the decrease in absolute humidity and the increase in air temperature.

  6. Full Scale Investigation of the Dynamic Heat Storage of Concrete Decks with PCM and Enhanced Heat Transfer Surface Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the full-scale experimental investigation of the dynamic heat storage potential of the prefabricated hollow core deck elements with and without phase change material (PCM) and with and without increased bottom surface area of the decks. In the presented investigation five types...... of hollow core decks with different surfaces on the bottom are investigated: reference deck made of standard concrete and flat surface, deck with special mortar grooved tiles, deck with flat mortar tiles, deck with grooved mortar and phase change material tiles, deck with flat mortar and phase change...... material tiles. The experimental investigation presented in the paper is performed in the specially designed modified hot box apparatus that allows maintaining periodic steady-state tests with the full-scale concrete deck elements. The presented research investigates if the extended surface area and PCM...

  7. Hydrogeochemical investigation to understand nitrate movement in groundwater of volcanic island, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, E. H.; Park, J.; Chung, E.; Kang, B. R.; Park, W. B.; Woo, N. C.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater is the sole-source of water supply in the volcanic island, Jeju-do, Korea. Since early 1990s, the nitrate contamination of groundwater has increased especially in the western part of the island. High level of nitrate in water can cause not only health risk to human body but also environmental side effect such as eutrophication and algal bloom in the coastal area. Several studies have done to estimate nitrate contamination in groundwater of local areas, but none of them dealt with nitrate movement with flow paths. So, this study aimed to determine the source and migration of nitrate in groundwater in the Gosan area, located in the western part of Jeju island through seasonal monitoring of hydrogeochemistry and stable isotope analyses from pumping and monitoring wells. Water samples including rainfall and groundwater are measured for major ions (Ca, Na, K, Mg, SO4, HCO3, NO3, Cl, etc.) and stable isotopes (i.e., δ2H, δ18O, δ18O-NO3, δ15N-NO3). From the monitoring data, we could evaluate hydrochemical change during nitrate contamination, and also could identify that groundwater in Gosan area is recharged mainly by regional flow from the high-altitude region. In future study, we will conduct additional seasonal monitoring from the multi-depth monitoring wells and will use statistical analysis to understand pollution sources and paths specifically.

  8. Empirical Platform Data Analysis to Investigate how Heat Pumps Operate in Real-Life Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmo, Carolina; Elmegaard, Brian; Nielsen, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    Heat pumps have been widely acknowledged, by academia and industry, as highly efficient thermal energy technologies, for space heating and domestic hot water production. However, there is a lack of information about real performance in residential single family houses with active participation...... of end-users. In this paper, an analysis based on data from 242 heat pump installations in Denmark gathered over a period up to 4 years (2010 until today) is performed. COP, operating temperatures and socio-demographic data are used as basis for comparing theoretical and actual performance. Six different...... heat pump configurations are considered depending on source (ground or air) and sink (radiators, floor heating and/or combined systems). This unique study intends to point out the benefits and limitations of such technologies in terms of energy efficiency and comfort delivery, as well as investigating...

  9. An investigation on the role of thermal fins in the design of micro heat exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omidvarnia, Farzaneh; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Sarhadi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The different dominant physical phenomena in design for micro and macro scale products result in different design considerati ons for both categories. In the cu rrent study, a few design concepts are proposed as micro heat exchangers. In addition, the influential parameters on design of a micro...... heat exchanger in comparison with the effective factors in designing its macro counterpart ar e investigated. Numerical si mulations in the finite element software COMSOL are used to evaluate the thermal performance of both micro and macro heat exchangers. The result of the analysis reveals the fact...... that the presence of some features such as “fins ” in micro heat exchanger is n ot as significant as it is in macro scale. The results of this study can be employed as guidelines in design of similar micro heat exchangers....

  10. Experimental investigation on water quality standard of Yangtze River water source heat pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zenghu; Tong, Mingwei; Kun, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Due to the surface water in the upper reaches of Yangtze River in China containing large amounts of silt and algae, high content of microorganisms and suspended solids, the water in Yangtze River cannot be used for cooling a heat pump directly. In this paper, the possibility of using Yangtze River, which goes through Chongqing, a city in southwest China, as a heat source-sink was investigated. Water temperature and quality of the Yangtze River in the Chongqing area were analyzed and the performance of water source heat pump units in different sediment concentrations, turbidity and algae material conditions were tested experimentally, and the water quality standards, in particular surface water conditions, in the Yangtze River region that adapt to energy-efficient heat pumps were also proposed. The experimental results show that the coefficient of performance heat pump falls by 3.73% to the greatest extent, and the fouling resistance of cooling water in the heat exchanger increases up to 25.6% in different water conditions. When the sediment concentration and the turbidity in the river water are no more than 100 g/m3 and 50 NTU respectively, the performance of the heat pump is better, which can be used as a suitable river water quality standard for river water source heat pumps.

  11. Computational investigation of fluid flow and heat transfer of an economizer by porous medium approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, C. Rajesh; Kumar, P.; Rajamohan, G.

    2017-07-01

    Computation of fluid flow and heat transfer in an economizer is simulated by a porous medium approach, with plain tubes having a horizontal in-line arrangement and cross flow arrangement in a coal-fired thermal power plant. The economizer is a thermal mechanical device that captures waste heat from the thermal exhaust flue gasses through heat transfer surfaces to preheat boiler feed water. In order to evaluate the fluid flow and heat transfer on tubes, a numerical analysis on heat transfer performance is carried out on an 110 t/h MCR (Maximum continuous rating) boiler unit. In this study, thermal performance is investigated using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation using ANSYS FLUENT. The fouling factor ε and the overall heat transfer coefficient ψ are employed to evaluate the fluid flow and heat transfer. The model demands significant computational details for geometric modeling, grid generation, and numerical calculations to evaluate the thermal performance of an economizer. The simulation results show that the overall heat transfer coefficient 37.76 W/(m2K) and economizer coil side pressure drop of 0.2 (kg/cm2) are found to be conformity within the tolerable limits when compared with existing industrial economizer data.

  12. Investigation on the phase transformation of Bi-2223/Ag superconducting tapes during heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, K.-T.; Qu, T.-M.; Xie, P.; Han, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • In situ resistance measurement was carried out on Bi-2223/Ag superconducting tapes. • The oxygen partial pressure of the outlet gas in the heating process was monitored continuously. • The samples quenched in the heating process were studied by XRD and T c measurements. • The heating process contains three procedures: oxygen diffusion, Pb-rich phase evolution and liquid phase formation. -- Abstract: The phase transformation of Bi-2223/Ag superconducting tapes during heating was investigated. The resistance of the ceramic core as a function of the heating temperature was measured in situ. The pO 2 of the outlet gas in the heating process was also monitored continuously. By comparing the heating process with the X-ray diffraction and T c measurements taken from samples quenched at different temperatures, we have identified that the heating process could be divided into the following regions: (1) the oxygen diffusion (OD) region, which is mainly influenced by OD; (2) the Pb-rich phase evolution (PbE) region, in which the formation and decomposition of the Pb-rich phases occur; (3) the liquid phase formation (LF) region, in which resistance increased rapidly with increasing temperature

  13. Experimental investigation into heating and airflow in trombe walls and solar chimneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, A.; Burek, S.

    2006-01-01

    Trombe Walls and solar chimneys are examples of passive solar air heating systems. However, the airflow and thermal efficiency characteristics of this type of system are not well understood, and partly for this reason, they are not commonly utilised. This paper reports on an experimental investigation into buoyancy-driven convection in a test rig designed to simulate the operation of a passive solar collector. The test rig comprised a vertical open-ended channel, approximately 1a square, heated from one side. The channel depth could be varied from 20mm to 110mm, and heating inputs varied from 200W to 1000W. Temperatures and airflow rates were measured and recorded, to characterise both steady-state and transient performance. The principal findings are: 1. Time constants (for heating)ranged typically between 30 and 70 minutes. 2. Flow regimes were mainly laminar (Reynolds number varing from ∼500 to ∼4000, depending on heat input and channel depth. 3. The thermal efficiency (as a solar collector and the heat transfer coefficient were functions of heat input, and were not depended on the channel depth. 4. The mass flow rate through the channel increased bath as the heat input increased and as the channel depth increased. The paper presents these findings and discusses their implications in more detail.(Author)

  14. The Urban Heat Island Effect and the Role of Vegetation to Address the Negative Impacts of Local Climate Changes in a Small Brazilian City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elis Dener Lima Alves

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the influence of urban-geographical variables on determining heat islands and proposes a model to estimate and spatialize the maximum intensity of urban heat islands (UHI. Simulations of the UHI based on the increase of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, using multiple linear regression, in Iporá (Brazil are also presented. The results showed that the UHI intensity of this small city tended to be lower than that of bigger cities. Urban geometry and vegetation (UI and NDVI were the variables that contributed the most to explain the variability of the maximum UHI intensity. It was observed that areas located in valleys had lower thermal values, suggesting a cool island effect. With the increase in NDVI in the central area of a maximum UHI, there was a significant decrease in its intensity and size (a 45% area reduction. It is noteworthy that it was possible to spatialize the UHI to the whole urban area by using multiple linear regression, providing an analysis of the urban set from urban-geographical variables and thus performing prognostic simulations that can be adapted to other small tropical cities.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Mechanical Properties of PVC Polymer under Different Heating and Cooling Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkawt Rostam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to a widely increasing usage of polymers in various industrial applications, there should be a continuous need in doing research investigations for better understanding of their properties. These applications require the usage of the polymer in different working environments subjecting the material to various temperature ranges. In this paper, an experimental investigation of mechanical properties of polyvinyl chloride (PVC polymer under heating and cooling conditions is presented. For this purpose standard samples are prepared and tested in laboratory using universal material testing apparatus. The samples are tested under different conditions including the room temperature environment, cooling in a refrigerator, and heating at different heating temperatures. It is observed that the strength of the tested samples decreases with the increasing of heating temperature and accordingly the material becomes softer. Meanwhile the cooling environments give a clear increasing to the strength of the material.

  16. Experimental investigation of heat transfer to supercritical pressure carbon dioxide in a horizontal pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adebiyi, G.A.; Hall, W.B.

    1976-01-01

    Results obtained in an experimental investigation of heat transfer to supercritical and subcritical pressure CO 2 flowing through a uniformly heated 22.14 mm I.D. horizontal pipe are presented. The experimental work covers a flow inlet Reynolds number range of about 2 x 10 4 to 2 x 10 5 . Marked peripheral temperature variations are obtained which represent the influence of buoyancy. Comparison with buoyancy free data shows that heat transfer at the bottom of the pipe in enhanced and at the top is reduced by buoyancy. Criteria proposed by Jackson and Petukhov indicate that buoyancy effects would be expected under the conditions of all the experiments. (autho)

  17. Investigation of Heat Transfer in Mini Channels using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgild, Morten Ryge; Poulsen, Jonas Lundsted; Rath, Emil Zacho

    2012-01-01

    In this paper an experimental investigation of the heat transfer in mini channels with a hydraulic diameter of 889 m is conducted. The method used is planar laser induceduorescence (PLIF), which uses the principle of laser excitation of rhodamine B in water. The goal of this study is to validate...... the applicability of PLIF to determine the convective heat transfer coecient in mini channels against conventional correlations of the convective heat transfer coecient. The applicability of the conventional theory in micro and mini channels has been discussed by several researchers, but to the authors knowledge...

  18. An investigation into the prevalence of thyroid disease on Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T; Trott, K R; Fujimori, K; Simon, S L; Ohtomo, H; Nakashima, N; Takaya, K; Kimura, N; Satomi, S; Schoemaker, M J

    1997-07-01

    The prevalence of thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer was studied in the indigenous population residing on Ebeye Island, Kwajalein Atoll, in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. This island, centrally located in the nation, is home to about 25% of the nation's population, many who have migrated there from other atolls. The objective of the study was to obtain thyroid disease rate statistics on as much of the population as possible that was alive during the years of nuclear testing and to test the hypothesis that described a linearly decreasing prevalence of palpable nodules with increasing distance from the Bikini test site. 1,322 Marshallese born before 1965 were given a thyroid examination using neck palpation, fine needle aspiration biopsy, and high resolution ultrasound imaging. Approximately 40% of the total population living on this island who are at risk from exposure to radioactive fallout during the years 1946-1958 were screened. Of that group, 815 were alive at the time of the BRAVO test on 1 March 1954. Two hundred sixty-six people with thyroid nodules were found (32.6%): 132 were palpable nodules (16.2%), and 134 were nodules that could be diagnosed with ultrasound only (15.7%). Prevalence of palpable nodules was particularly high in men and women older than 60 y, in men who were 6 to 15 y of age at the time of the BRAVO test, and in women 1 to 10 y of age at the time of the BRAVO test. In 22 people, the clinical diagnosis was most likely cancer though histopathological evidence was only available from 11 operated cases. Of the 11 operated cases, 10 were cancer. Cancer prevalence was particularly high in those women born between 1944 and 1953 (7/220 = 3.2%), i.e., who were children during the early years of nuclear testing. The Ebeye data showed a marginally significant correlation between palpable nodule prevalence among women and distance to Bikini (r = -0.44, p = 0.06). This report summarizes the clinical findings of the thyroid examinations, the age

  19. Numerical investigation of heat transfer in parallel channels with water at supercritical pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Shitsi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal phenomena such as heat transfer enhancement, heat transfer deterioration, and flow instability observed at supercritical pressures as a result of fluid property variations have the potential to affect the safety of design and operation of Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor SCWR, and also challenge the capabilities of both heat transfer correlations and Computational Fluid Dynamics CFD physical models. These phenomena observed at supercritical pressures need to be thoroughly investigated.An experimental study was carried out by Xi to investigate flow instability in parallel channels at supercritical pressures under different mass flow rates, pressures, and axial power shapes. Experimental data on flow instability at inlet of the heated channels were obtained but no heat transfer data along the axial length was obtained. This numerical study used 3D numerical tool STAR-CCM+ to investigate heat transfer at supercritical pressures along the axial lengths of the parallel channels with water ahead of experimental data. Homogeneous axial power shape HAPS was adopted and the heating powers adopted in this work were below the experimental threshold heating powers obtained for HAPS by Xi. The results show that the Fluid Centre-line Temperature FCLT increased linearly below and above the PCT region, but flattened at the PCT region for all the system parameters considered. The inlet temperature, heating power, pressure, gravity and mass flow rate have effects on WT (wall temperature values in the NHT (normal heat transfer, EHT (enhanced heat transfer, DHT (deteriorated heat transfer and recovery from DHT regions. While variation of all other system parameters in the EHT and PCT regions showed no significant difference in the WT and FCLT values respectively, the WT and FCLT values respectively increased with pressure in these regions. For most of the system parameters considered, the FCLT and WT values obtained in the two channels were nearly the

  20. Numerical investigation of heat transfer in parallel channels with water at supercritical pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitsi, Edward; Kofi Debrah, Seth; Yao Agbodemegbe, Vincent; Ampomah-Amoako, Emmanuel

    2017-11-01

    Thermal phenomena such as heat transfer enhancement, heat transfer deterioration, and flow instability observed at supercritical pressures as a result of fluid property variations have the potential to affect the safety of design and operation of Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor SCWR, and also challenge the capabilities of both heat transfer correlations and Computational Fluid Dynamics CFD physical models. These phenomena observed at supercritical pressures need to be thoroughly investigated. An experimental study was carried out by Xi to investigate flow instability in parallel channels at supercritical pressures under different mass flow rates, pressures, and axial power shapes. Experimental data on flow instability at inlet of the heated channels were obtained but no heat transfer data along the axial length was obtained. This numerical study used 3D numerical tool STAR-CCM+ to investigate heat transfer at supercritical pressures along the axial lengths of the parallel channels with water ahead of experimental data. Homogeneous axial power shape HAPS was adopted and the heating powers adopted in this work were below the experimental threshold heating powers obtained for HAPS by Xi. The results show that the Fluid Centre-line Temperature FCLT increased linearly below and above the PCT region, but flattened at the PCT region for all the system parameters considered. The inlet temperature, heating power, pressure, gravity and mass flow rate have effects on WT (wall temperature) values in the NHT (normal heat transfer), EHT (enhanced heat transfer), DHT (deteriorated heat transfer) and recovery from DHT regions. While variation of all other system parameters in the EHT and PCT regions showed no significant difference in the WT and FCLT values respectively, the WT and FCLT values respectively increased with pressure in these regions. For most of the system parameters considered, the FCLT and WT values obtained in the two channels were nearly the same. The

  1. Numerical Investigation on the Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Supercritical Liquefied Natural Gas in an Airfoil Fin Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongchao Zhao; Kai Zhao; Dandan Jia; Pengpeng Jiang; Rendong Shen

    2017-01-01

    As a new kind of highly compact and efficient micro-channel heat exchanger, the printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) is a promising candidate satisfying the heat exchange requirements of liquefied natural gas (LNG) vaporization at low and high pressure. The effects of airfoil fin arrangement on heat transfer and flow resistance were numerically investigated using supercritical liquefied natural gas (LNG) as working fluid. The thermal properties of supercritical LNG were tested by utilizing t...

  2. Urban Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Rickman, Doug L.; Estes, Maury G.

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated that by the year 2025, 80% of the world's population will live in cities. This conversion of the natural landscape vegetation into man-made urban structures such as roads and buildings drastically alter the regional surface energy budgets, hydrology, precipitation patterns, and meteorology. Research studies from many cities have documented these effects range from decreases in air quality, increased energy consumption and alteration of regional climate to direct effects on human health.

  3. Urban heat island 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühler, Oliver; Jensen, Marina Bergen; Tøttrup, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Målinger af overfladetemperaturer viser, at der er betydelige temperaturforskelle mellem de forskellige bydele i København. De områder, der bliver allervarmest, er dem med den mindste andel af grønt. Det konkluderes i en rapport fra Skov & Landskab....

  4. Numerical investigation of heat transfer characteristic of fixed planar elastic tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Derong; Ge, Peiqi; Bi, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Both tube-side and shell-side of planar elastic tube bundles were investigated. • Heat transfer and fluid flow were studied from the local analysis perspective. • Secondary flow varies depending on the fluid flow state and the geometry of tube. • Curvature plays a role on the external flow field. • The heat transfer of the two intermediate tube bundles is augmented. - Abstract: Planar elastic tube bundles are a novel approach to enhance heat transfer by using flow-induced vibration. This paper studied the heat transfer characteristic and fluid flow in both tube-side and shell-side using numerical simulation. Two temperature difference formulas were used to calculate convective heat transfer coefficient and the results were verified by theoretical analysis and experimental correlations. The effect of Reynolds number on overall convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in tube-side and shell-side were studied. The comparison of the secondary flow in planar elastic tube bundles and conical spiral tube bundles were conducted. The external flow field and local convective heat transfer around the periphery of fixed planar elastic tube bundles subjected to the cross fluid flow were also analyzed. The results show that the energy consumption efficiency should be taken into account in the forced heat transfer process conducted by adjusting the fluid flow. The secondary flow varies depending on the fluid flow state and the geometry of tube. Hence, it is deduced that the heat transfer enhancement is obtained because the thermal boundary layer in the deformed planar elastic tube bundles caused by flow-induced vibration is damaged by the disordered secondary flow. In addition, the convective heat transfer capability of outside the two intermediate tube bundles is enhanced because of the effect of irregular and complex fluid flow affected by the role of curved tubes on both sides

  5. Self-heating of dried industrial wastewater sludge: lab-scale investigation of supporting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Zassa, M; Biasin, A; Zerlottin, M; Refosco, D; Canu, P

    2013-06-01

    We studied the reactivity of dried sludge produced by treatment of wastewater, mainly from tanneries. The solids transformations have been first characterized with thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) proving that exothermic transformation takes place at fairly low temperature, before the total organic combustion that occurs in air above 400°C. The onset of low temperature reactions depends on the heating rate and it can be below 100°C at very small heating rate. Then, we reproducibly determined the conditions to trigger dried sludge self-heating at the laboratory scale, on samples in the 0.2-0.3 kg size. Thermal insulation, some aeration and addition of water are key factors. Mastering the self-heating at this scale allows more detailed investigations as well as manipulation of conditions, to understand its nature, course and remediation. Here we report proves and discussions on the role of air, water, particle size, porosity and biological activity, as well as proving that also dried sludge from similar sources lead to self-heating. Tests demonstrate that air and water are simultaneously required for significant self-heating to occur. They act in diverging directions, both triggering the onset of the reactions and damping the temperature rise, by supporting heat loss. The higher the O2 concentration, the higher the solids heating rate. More added water prolongs the exothermic phase. Further additions of water can reactivate the material. Water emphasizes the exothermic processes, but it is not sufficient to start it in an air-free atmosphere. The initial solid moisture concentration (between 8% and 15%) affects the onset of self-heating as intuitive. The sludge particles size strongly determines the strength and extent of the heat release, indicating that surface reactions are taking place. In pelletized particles, limitations to water and air permeability mitigates the reaction course. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An investigation into the Swan Island Honduras collecting event of Tiaporus fuliginosus Cope (Reptilia: Teiidae) and its systematic status

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCranie, James R.; Gotte, Steve W.

    2015-01-01

    Confusion exists in the literature concerning the collecting event of the teiid lizard Tiaporus fuliginosus. We investigated the literature and documents stored at the Smithsonian Institution Archives involving the collector of those specimens in an effort to resolve that confusion. We conclude that the type series was collected on the Swan Islands of Honduras by Charles H. Townsend during 1887. We also provide a redescription of that nominal form and show that it is a valid species that should be called Ameiva fuliginosa. We also examined the type series of A. panchlora from Old Providence, Colombia and confirm that its 1950 placement as a junior synonym of A. fuliginosa is correct.

  7. Title Investigation of the influence of various factors on the power of heat exchange by radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korolyov Alexander V.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The issue of lack of knowledge of radiation heat transfer process has been repeatedly raised in various studies. Despite the fact that works on study of heat transfer by radiation covers a wide range of different industries, it should be noted the lack of materials on study of heat exchange processes by radiation in a core of a nuclear reactor. In this work, the fuel assemblies of the VVER-1000 reactor were used as the bodies under study. Aim: The aim of the research is to investigate the heat exchange process between heat transfer assemblies and to study of the effect of changing the distance between the fuel assemblies on their power taking into account the inter-radiating of assemblies. Materials and Methods: A general description of the process of heat transfer by radiation. A calculation study of the effect of geometric parameters on heat transfer in the close lattice of the reactor core is performed. The influence of heat transfer by radiation on the temperature change of the fuel assemblies surface of the VVER-1000 reactor at change in the cassette gap is studied. The change in the power of the fuel assemblies relative to the initial power with a change in the cassette gap was studied. Experimental measurements of the temperature at different distances from the radiation source were made with an obstacle in the path of radiation propagation in the form of glass and water of different levels. The heat radiation and convective heat transfer are calculated based on the obtained experimental data. The calculation of thermal radiation power and convective heat transfer based on the obtained experimental data is performed. Results: The calculation results show that in models that determine the temperature of the fuel assemblies in the core of the VVER-1000 reactor, the radiation heat transfer must be taken into account. In this case, the amount of transferred energy is the greater, the smaller the distance between objects. This is observed

  8. Investigating mental fitness and school connectedness in Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnaghan, Donna; Morrison, William; Laurence, Courtney; Bell, Brandi

    2014-07-01

    As youth struggle with anxiety and depression, promoting positive mental fitness is a primary concern. Canadian school-based mental health programs that focus on positive psychology and positive mental health initiatives emphasize safe and supportive environments, student engagement, resilience, and self-determination. This study examined predictors of mental fitness and its 3 components (autonomy, competence, and relatedness). School Health Action Planning and Evaluation System-Prince Edward Island (SHAPES-PEI) and the New Brunswick Student Wellness Survey (NB SWS) are data collection and feedback systems that survey youth about 4 health behaviors. Grade 7-12 students in Prince Edward Island (N = 3318) and New Brunswick (N = 7314) completed a mental fitness questionnaire in 2008-2009 (PEI) and 2006-2007 (NB). Four linear regression models were conducted to examine student characteristics associated with mental fitness, autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Positive associations were found between school connectedness (p fitness, as well as autonomy, competence, and relatedness. There were also significant relationships between affect, pro-social and antisocial behaviors, tried smoking, and mental fitness. A better understanding of adolescent health and its predictors is needed. By identifying core parameters for mental fitness, we can inform how to address students' needs through appropriate programs and policies supporting healthy school environments. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  9. The slow demise of Easter Island: insights from a modelling investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar eBrandt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The history of Easter Island and its supposed social-ecological collapse is often taken as a grim warning for the modern world. However, while the loss of a once lush palm forest is largely uncontested, causes and timing of the collapse remain controversial, because many paleoeological and archaeological data are afflicted with considerable uncertainties. According to a scenario named ecocide, the overharvesting of palm trees triggered a dramatic population decline, whereas a contrasting view termed genocide deems diseases and enslavement introduced by Europeans as the main reasons for the collapse. We propose here a third possibility, a slow demise, in which aspects of both ecocide and genocide concur to produce a long and slow decline of the society. We use a dynamic model to illustrate the consequences of the three alternatives with respect to the fate of the paleoecological system of the island.While none of the three model scenarios can be safely ruled out given the uncertainties of the available data, the slow demise appears to be the most plausible model scenario, in particular when considering the temporal pattern of deforestation as inferred from radiocarbon dates of charcoal remains.

  10. Investigation of a heat storage for a solar heating system for combined space heating and domestic hot water supply for homeowner´s association "Bakken"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejen, Niels Kristian

    1998-01-01

    A heat storage for a solar heating system for combined space heating and domestic hot water supply was tested in a laboratory test facility.The heat storage consist of a mantle tank with water for the heating system and of a hot water tank, which by means of thermosyphoning is heated by the water...

  11. Heat island effect on the quality of life in the city; Hitte-eilandeffect zet leefbaarheid in de stad verder onder druk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Harmelen, T.; Klok, L.; Doepp, S.; Dolevo, R.; Janssen, S. [Business Unit Milieu en Leefomgeving, TNO Bouw en Ondergrond, Delft (Netherlands)

    2008-12-15

    The global rise in temperature as a result of climate change becomes increasingly perceptible. The health effects of these changes, combined with air quality, are extra high in urban areas. It seems worth while to examine the consequences of increasing heat in urban areas in the Netherlands. In order to deal with the consequences in a responsible manner and to prepare for an even warmer future, answers will have to be found for the following two questions: (1) How large is the heat island effect in Dutch cities an what can we expect in the future?; and (2) What are the consequences of the heat island effect that we will have to take into account? [mk]. [Dutch] De mondiale temperatuurstijging ten gevolge van klimaatverandering is ook in Nederland steeds duidelijker waarneembaar. De gezondheidseffecten van deze veranderingen in combinatie met luchtkwaliteit zijn in het stedelijk gebied extra groot. Het lijkt daarom de moeite waard om onderzoek te doen naar de gevolgen van toenemende hitte in stedelijke gebieden in Nederland. Om op verantwoorde wijze met de gevolgen om te gaan en om voorbereid te zijn op een nog warmere toekomst zullen antwoorden moeten worden gevonden op twee wagen: (1) Hoe groot is het hitte-eilandeffect in de Nederlandse stad nu en wat kunnen we verwachten in de toekomst?; en (2) Met welke gevolgen van het hitte-eilandeffect moeten we rekening houden?.

  12. Monitoring surface urban heat island formation in a tropical mountain city using Landsat data (1987-2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estoque, Ronald C.; Murayama, Yuji

    2017-11-01

    Since it was first described about two centuries ago and due to its adverse impacts on urban ecological environment and the overall livability of cities, the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon has been, and still is, an important research topic across various fields of study. However, UHI studies on cities in mountain regions are still lacking. This study aims to contribute to this endeavor by monitoring and examining the formation of surface UHI (SUHI) in a tropical mountain city of Southeast Asia -Baguio City, the summer capital of the Philippines- using Landsat data (1987-2015). Based on mean surface temperature difference between impervious surface (IS) and green space (GS1), SUHI intensity (SUHII) in the study area increased from 2.7 °C in 1987 to 3.4 °C in 2015. Between an urban zone (>86% impervious) and a rural zone (<10% impervious) along the urban-rural gradient, it increased from 4.0 °C in 1987 to 8.2 °C in 2015. These results are consistent with the rapid urbanization of the area over the same period, which resulted in a rapid expansion of impervious surfaces and substantial loss of green spaces. Together with landscape composition variables (e.g. fraction of IS), topographic variables (e.g. hillshade) can help explain a significant amount of spatial variations in surface temperature in the area (R2 = 0.56-0.85) (p < 0.001). The relative importance of the 'fraction of IS' variable also increased, indicating that its unique explanatory and predictive power concerning the spatial variations of surface temperature increases as the city size becomes bigger and SUHI gets more intense. Overall, these results indicate that the cool temperature of the study area being situated in a mountain region did not hinder the formation of SUHI. Thus, the formation and effects of UHIs, including possible mitigation and adaptation measures, should be considered in landscape planning for the sustainable urban development of the area.

  13. Investigation on heat transfer characteristics and flow performance of Methane at supercritical pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Hong Wei; Oumer, A. N.; Basrawi, F.; Mamat, Rizalman; Abdullah, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the heat transfer and flow characteristic of cryogenic methane in regenerative cooling system at supercritical pressures. The thermo-physical properties of supercritical methane were obtained from the National institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) webbook. The numerical model was developed based on the assumptions of steady, turbulent and Newtonian flow. For mesh independence test and model validation, the simulation results were compared with published experimental results. The effect of four different performance parameter ranges namely inlet pressure (5 to 8 MPa), inlet temperature (120 to 150 K), heat flux (2 to 5 MW/m2) and mass flux (7000 to 15000 kg/m2s) on heat transfer and flow performances were investigated. It was found that the simulation results showed good agreement with experimental data with maximum deviation of 10 % which indicates the validity of the developed model. At low inlet temperature, the change of specific heat capacity at near-wall region along the tube length was not significant while the pressure drop registered was high. However, significant variation was observed for the case of higher inlet temperature. It was also observed that the heat transfer performance and pressure drop penalty increased when the mass flux was increased. Regarding the effect of inlet pressure, the heat transfer performance and pressure drop results decreased when the inlet pressure is increased.

  14. An investigation on the application of ohmic heating of cold water shrimp and brine mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Juhl; Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Brøkner Kavli, Sissel Therese

    2016-01-01

    Cooking is an important unit-operation in the production of cooked and peeled shrimps. The present study explores the feasibility of using ohmic heating for cooking of shrimps. The focus is on investigating the effects of different process parameters on heating time and quality of ohmic cooked...... shrimps (Pandalus Borelias). The shrimps were heated to a core temperature of 72 °C in a brine solution using a small batch ohmic heater. Three experiments were performed: 1) a comparative analyses of the temperature development between different sizes of shrimps and thickness (head and tail region...... of the shrimp) over varying salt concentrations (10 kg m−3 to 20 kg m−3) and electric field strengths (1150 V m−1 to 1725 V m−1) with the heating time as the response; 2) a 2 level factorial experiment for screening the impact of processing conditions using electric field strengths of 1250 V m−1 and 1580 V m−1...

  15. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Natural Convevtion on Heat Transfer in Mineral Wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrbøl, Susanne; Svendsen, Svend; Elmroth, Arne

    2002-01-01

    from 0.1 to 0.5 m. The contribution of natural convection to the total heat transfer has been experimentally examined for 'perfectly' installed fibrous materials of different air-flow permeability and thermal conductivity. To support the interpretation of the measurements, the experimental work has......In Denmark and a number of other countries convection in fibrous materials is considered non-existent when calculating heat transmission as well as when designing building structures. The current investigation serves to examine whether considering natural convection non-existent in fibrous...... been supplemented with numerical calculations. The measurements and the concurrent computations both show a clear convection-induced redistribution of the heat flow in the material. When measured from the hot side in the apparatus this occurs in the form of an increased heat flow, primarily through...

  16. Numerical investigation of two- and three-dimensional heat transfer in expander cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Robert L.; Cheung, Fan-Bill

    1993-01-01

    The concept of using tube canting for enhancing the hot-side convective heat transfer in a cross-stream tubular rocket combustion chamber is evaluated using a CFD technique in this study. The heat transfer at the combustor wall is determined from the flow field generated by a modified version of the PARC Navier-Stokes Code, using the actual dimensions, fluid properties, and design parameters of a split-expander demonstrator cycle engine. The effects of artificial dissipation on convergence and solution accuracy are investigated. Heat transfer results predicted by the code are presented. The use of CFD in heat transfer calculations is critically examined to demonstrate the care needed in the use of artificial dissipation for good convergence and accurate solutions.

  17. A final report to investigate the state-of-the-art of district heating metering systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    This study investigates the existing heat meters and metering schemes utilized to measure the amount of energy extracted from a district heating hot water supply by a heat exchanger in domestic applications. Various types of commercially available heat meters are tabulated, including a recently developed Dutch device which output an analogue signal proportional to the energy extracted. Discussions outline methods of potentially cost effective multimetering concepts for use in new housing and apartment applications, as well as single family dwelling units. Data retrieval systems, with potential metering/monitoring schemes are discussed, including a proposed network for remote sensing, central integrating and tabulating function applicable to multi-dwelling unit installations. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Effects of Urbanization and Seasonal Cycle on the Surface Urban Heat Island Patterns in the Coastal Growing Cities: A Case Study of Casablanca, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Bahi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island (UHI phenomenon is a harmful environmental problem in urban areas affecting both climatic and ecological processes. This paper aims to highlight and monitor the spatial distribution of Surface UHI (SUHI in the Casablanca region, Morocco, using remote sensing data. To achieve this goal, a time series of Landsat TM/ETM+/OLI-TIRS images was acquired from 1984 to 2016 and analyzed. In addition, nocturnal MODIS images acquired from 2005 to 2015 were used to evaluate the nighttime SUHI. In order to better analyze intense heat produced by urban core, SUHI intensity (SUHII was computed by quantifying the difference of land surface temperature (LST between urban and rural areas. The urban core SUHII appears more significant in winter seasons than during summer, while the pattern of SUHII becomes moderate during intermediate seasons. During winter, the average daytime SUHII gradually increased in the residential area of Casablanca and in some small peri-urban cities by more than 1 °C from 1984 to 2015. The industrial areas of the Casablanca region were affected by a significant rise in SUHII exceeding 15 °C in certain industrial localities. In contrast, daytime SUHII shows a reciprocal effect during summer with emergence of a heat island in rural areas and development of cool islands in urban and peri-urban areas. During nighttime, the SUHII remains positive in urban areas year-round with higher values in winter as compared to summer. The results point out that the seasonal cycle of daytime SUHII as observed in the Casablanca region is different from other mid-latitude cities, where the highest values are often observed in summer during the day.

  19. Experimental investigation of pulsating heat pipe performance with regard to fuel cell cooling application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, Jason; Wang Xia

    2013-01-01

    A pulsating heat pipe (PHP) is a closed loop, passive heat transfer device. Its operation depends on the phase change of a working fluid within the loop. Design and performance testing of a pulsating heat pipe was conducted under conditions to simulate heat dissipation requirements of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack. Integration of pulsating heat pipes within bipolar plates of the stack would eliminate the need for ancillary cooling equipment, thus also reducing parasitic losses and increasing energy output. The PHP under investigation, having dimensions of 46.80 cm long and 14.70 cm wide, was constructed from 0.3175 cm copper tube. Heat pipes effectiveness was found to be dependent upon several factors such as energy input, types of working fluid and its filling ratio. Power inputs to the evaporator side of the pulsating heat pipe varied from 80 to 180 W. Working fluids tested included acetone, methanol, and deionized water. Filling ratios between 30 and 70 percent of the total working volume were also examined. Methanol outperformed other fluids tested; with a 45 percent fluid fill ratio and a 120 W power input, the apparatus took the shortest time to reach steady state and had one of the smallest steady state temperature differences. The various conditions studied were chosen to assess the heat pipe's potential as cooling media for PEM fuel cells. - Highlights: ► Methanol as a working fluid outperformed both acetone and water in a pulsating heat pipe. ► Performance for the PHP peaked with methanol and a fill ratio of 45 percent fluid to total volume. ► A smaller resistance was associated with a higher power input to the system.

  20. Investigations of the marine flora and fauna of the Fiji Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feussner, Klaus-Dieter; Ragini, Kavita; Kumar, Rohitesh; Soapi, Katy M; Aalbersberg, William G; Harper, Mary Kay; Carte, Brad; Ireland, Chris M

    2012-12-01

    Over the past 30 years, approximately 140 papers have been published on marine natural products chemistry and related research from the Fiji Islands. These came about from studies starting in the early 1980s by the research groups of Crews at the University of California Santa Cruz, Ireland at the University of Utah, Gerwick from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the University of California at San Diego and the more recent groups of Hay at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) and Jaspars from the University of Aberdeen. This review covers both known and novel marine-derived natural products and their biological activities. The marine organisms reviewed include invertebrates, plants and microorganisms, highlighting the vast structural diversity of compounds isolated from these organisms. Increasingly during this period, natural products chemists at the University of the South Pacific have been partners in this research, leading in 2006 to the development of a Centre for Drug Discovery and Conservation (CDDC).

  1. Investigations of the marine flora and fauna of the Islands of Palau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Faulkner, D; Newman, David J; Cragg, Gordon M

    2004-02-01

    The Islands of Palau have proven to be an excellent source of bioactive marine natural products primarily as a result of the systematic studies from the late 1970s by the research groups of Scheuer at the University of Hawaii, Faulkner at the Scripps Oceanographic Institution/University of California at San Diego, and Paul at the University of Guam. Their efforts were materially aided by the excellent facilities provided by the Government of Palau and for the last 10 years, those of the NCI's shallow water collection contractor, the Coral Reef Research Foundation. This review covers the structures and biological activities where noted, of the multitudinous marine-derived natural products isolated from the marine flora and fauna of this nation and demonstrates the enormous variety of novel structures elaborated by these organisms.

  2. Investigation of hydrogen-burn damage in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.; Beason, D.G.; Eidem, G.R.

    1982-06-01

    About 10 hours after the March 28, 1979 Loss-of-Coolant Accident began at Three Mile Island Unit 2, a hydrogen deflagration of undetermined extent occurred inside the reactor building. Examinations of photographic evidence, available from the first fifteen entries into the reactor building, yielded preliminary data on the possible extent and range of hydrogen burn damage. These data, although sparse, contributed to development of a possible damage path and to an estimate of the extent of damage to susceptible reactor building items. Further information gathered from analysis of additional photographs and samples can provide the means for estimating hydrogen source and production rate data crucial to developing a complete understanding of the TMI-2 hydrogen deflagration. 34 figures

  3. A Remote Sensing-based Characterization of the Urban Heat Island and its Implications for Modeled Estimates of Urban Biogenic Carbon Fluxes in Boston, MA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Friedl, M. A.; Hutyra, L.; Hardiman, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Urban land use occupies a small but critical proportion of global land area for the carbon cycle, and in the coming decades, urban land area is expected to nearly double. Conversion of natural land cover to urban land cover imposes myriad ecological effects, including increased land surface and air temperatures via the urban heat island effect. In this study, we characterize the seasonal and spatial characteristics of the urban heat island over Boston, MA and estimate its consequences on biogenic carbon fluxes with a remote sensing-based model. Using a 12-year time series of emissivity- and atmospherically-corrected land surface temperatures from Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery, we find a high degree of spatial heterogeneity and consistent seasonal patterns in the thermal properties of Boston, controlled mainly by variations in vegetative cover. Field measurements of surface air temperature across an urbanization gradient show season- and vegetation-dependent patterns consistent with those observed in the Landsat data. With a fused data set that combines surface air temperature, MODIS, and Landsat observations, we modify and run the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) to explore 1) how elevated temperatures affect diurnal and seasonal patterns of hourly urban biogenic carbon fluxes in Massachusetts in 2013 and 2014 and 2) to what extent these fluxes follow spatial patterns found in the urban heat island. Model modifications simulate the ecological effects of urbanization, including empirical adjustments to reanalysis-driven air temperatures (up to 5 K) and ecosystem respiration reduced by impervious surface area. Model results reveal spatio-temporal patterns consistent with strong land use and vegetation cover controls on biogenic carbon fluxes, with non-trivial biogenic annual net ecosystem exchange occurring in urban and suburban areas (up to -2.5 MgC/ha/yr). We specifically consider the feedbacks between Boston's urban heat island and landscape

  4. An assessment of urban heat island effect adopting urban parameterizations in COSMO-CLM simulations over big cities in Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesarchio, Myriam; Rianna, Guido; Mercogliano, Paola; Castellari, Sergio; Schiano, Pasquale

    2015-04-01

    In Europe, about 80% of people live in urban areas, which most of them can be particularly vulnerable to climate impacts (e.g. high air temperatures along with heat waves, flooding due to intense precipitation events, water scarcity and droughts). In fact, the density of people and assets within relatively small geographic areas, such as an urban settlements, mean more risk exposure than in rural areas. Therefore, reliable numerical climate models are needed for elaborating climate risk assessment at urban scale. These models must take into account the effects of the complex three-dimensional structure of urban settlements, combined with the mixture of surface types with contrasting radiative, thermal and moisture characteristics. In this respect, previous studies (e.g. Trusilova et al., 2013) have already assessed the importance to consider urban properties in very high resolution regional climate modeling to better reproduce the features of urban climate, especially in terms of urban heat island effect. In this work, two different configurations of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM at the horizontal resolution of 0.02° (about 2.2km), one including urban parameterization scheme and another without including them, have been applied in order to perform two different climate simulations covering the entire northern Italy. In particular, the present study is focused on large urban settlements such as Milan and Turin. Due to high computational cost required to run very high resolution simulations, the results of the two simulations have been compared over a period of ten years, from 1980 to 1989. Preliminary results indicate that the modification of climate conditions, due to the presence of urban areas, is present mainly in the areas covered by big cities and surrounding them, or rather the presence of urban areas induces modification mainly in their local climate. Other evidences are that the simulation including urban parameterization scheme shows, in general

  5. Fluid flow and heat transfer investigation of pebble bed reactors using mesh-adaptive LES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Lathouwers, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The very high temperature reactor is one of the designs currently being considered for nuclear power generation. One its variants is the pebble bed reactor in which the coolant passes through complex geometries (pores) at high Reynolds numbers. A computational fluid dynamics model with anisotropic mesh adaptivity is used to investigate coolant flow and heat transfer in such reactors. A novel method for implicitly incorporating solid boundaries based on multi-fluid flow modelling is adopted. The resulting model is able to resolve and simulate flow and heat transfer in randomly packed beds, regardless of the actual geometry, starting off with arbitrarily coarse meshes. The model is initially evaluated using an orderly stacked square channel of channel-height-to-particle diameter ratio of unity for a range of Reynolds numbers. The model is then applied to the face-centred cubical geometry. coolant flow and heat transfer patterns are investigated

  6. Experimental investigation on the thermal performance of a closed oscillating heat pipe in thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zhonghao; Wang, Qingchao; Zhao, Jiateng; Huang, Congliang

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the thermal performance of the closed oscillating heat pipe (OHP) as a passive heat transfer device in thermal management system, the gravitation force, surface tension, cooling section position and inclination angle were discussed with applied heating power ranging from 5 to 65 W. The deionized water was chosen as the working fluid and liquid-filling ratio was 50 ± 5%. The operation of the OHP mainly depends on the phase change of the working fluid. The working fluid within the OHP was constantly evaporated and cooled. The results show that the movement of the working fluid was similar to the forced damped mechanical vibration, it has to overcome the capillary resistance force and the stable oscillation should be that the OHP could successful startup. The oscillation frequency slowed and oscillation amplitude decreased when the inclination angle of the OHP increased. However, the thermal resistance increased. With the increment of the heating power, the average temperature of the evaporation and condensation section would be close. If the heating power was further increased, dry-out phenomenon within the OHP would appeared. With the decrement of the L, the start-up heating power also decreased and stable oscillation would be formed.

  7. Paraffin Nanocomposites for Heat Management of Lithium-Ion Batteries: A Computational Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. N. Shirazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-ion (Li-ion batteries are currently considered as vital components for advances in mobile technologies such as those in communications and transport. Nonetheless, Li-ion batteries suffer from temperature rises which sometimes lead to operational damages or may even cause fire. An appropriate solution to control the temperature changes during the operation of Li-ion batteries is to embed batteries inside a paraffin matrix to absorb and dissipate heat. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the possibility of making paraffin nanocomposites for better heat management of a Li-ion battery pack. To fulfill this aim, heat generation during a battery charging/discharging cycles was simulated using Newman’s well established electrochemical pseudo-2D model. We couple this model to a 3D heat transfer model to predict the temperature evolution during the battery operation. In the later model, we considered different paraffin nanocomposites structures made by the addition of graphene, carbon nanotubes, and fullerene by assuming the same thermal conductivity for all fillers. This way, our results mainly correlate with the geometry of the fillers. Our results assess the degree of enhancement in heat dissipation of Li-ion batteries through the use of paraffin nanocomposites. Our results may be used as a guide for experimental set-ups to improve the heat management of Li-ion batteries.

  8. Thermodynamic investigation of waste heat driven desalination unit based on humidification dehumidification (HDH) processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, W.F.; Xu, L.N.; Han, D.; Gao, L.; Yue, C.; Pu, W.H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • HDH desalination system powered by waste heat is proposed. • Performance of the desalination unit and the relevant heat recovery effect is calculated. • Sensitive analysis of the performance for the HDH desalination system is investigated. • Mathematical model based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics is established. - Abstract: Humidification dehumidification (HDH) technology is an effective pattern to separate freshwater from seawater or brackish water. In this paper, a closed-air open-water (CAOW) desalination unit coupled with plate heat exchangers (PHEs) is applied to recover the waste heat from the gas exhaust. Sensitivity analysis for the HDH desalination unit as well as the PHEs from the key parameters including the top and initial temperature of the seawater, operation pressure, and the terminal temperature difference (TTD) of the PHEs are accomplished, and the corresponding performance of the whole HDH desalination system is calculated and presented. The simulation results show that the balance condition of the dehumidifier is allowed by the basic thermodynamic laws, followed by a peak value of gained-output-ratio (GOR) and a bottom value of total specific entropy generation. It is concluded that excellent results including the system performance, heat recovery effect and investment of the PHEs can be simultaneously obtained with a low top temperature, while the obtained desalination performance and the heat recovery effect from other measures are always conflicting. Different from other parameters of the desalination unit, the terminal temperature difference of the PHEs has little influences on the final value of GOR.

  9. Investigation on the crystallography of the transformation products of reverted austenite in intercritically reheated coarse grained heat affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Yang; Shang, Chengjia; Chen, Liang; Subramanian, Sundaresa

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Area of reverted austenite is traced out by crystallographic information. ► Bainite and martensite regions were confirmed within it. ► The martensite region is considered as the blocky MA particles. ► Martensite region has high deformation to initiate fracture. ► More uniform transformation of the reverted austenite is good for toughness. -- Abstract: In present study the intercritically reheated coarse grained heat affected zone (ICCGHAZ) showing the worst impact toughness in the heat affected zone of multi-pass welding was simulated by Gleeble-1500, and its microstructure was investigated in detail by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD). With the crystallographic information from EBSD scanning the area of a single reverted austenite grain which formed during the thermal cycles of second pass simulation was traced out. Within it two regions with different characteristic both in morphology and crystallography were found out, showing an un-uniform transformation of the reverted austenite. The region I is a bainitic region containing larger bainitic ferrite grains, while the region II is made up of several clusters containing tiny grains. Based on the crystallographic information each cluster was determined as martensite island thereby should be considered as blocky Martensite/Austenite constituent (M/A), which is hard phase and harmful for toughness. Analysis on the level of deformation shows that the region II is much higher deformed than the region I, indicating there is high stress concentration within the region II. The possible influence of the region I and the region II on fracture is discussed under the early proposed M/A’s fracture-initiating mechanisms. It suggests that the main cause of the toughness reduction is the un-uniform transformation of the reverted austenite, and the toughness performance of the ICCGHAZ could be improved if the transformation of the reverted

  10. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Heat Flow in Permanent Magnet Brushless DC Hub Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasil, Muhammed; Plesner, Daniel; Walther, Jens Honore

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the heat dissipation in the hub motor of an electric two-wheeler using lumped parameter (LP), finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models. The motor uses external rotor permanent magnet brushless DC topology and nearly all of its losses are generated...

  11. Characterization of sugar alcohols as seasonal heat storage media - experimental and theoretical investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; van Wissen, R.M.J.; Nedea, S.V.; Rindt, C.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Sugar alcohols are under investigation as phase change materials for long term heat storage applications. The thermal performance in such systems is strongly dominated by the nucleation and crystal growth kinetics, which is further linked to the crystal-melt interfacial free energy (surface

  12. Experimental investigation of convection heat transfer of CO2 at supercritical pressures in a vertical circular tube at high Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhihui; Jiang Peixue

    2008-01-01

    Convection heat transfer during the upward flow of CO 2 at supercritical pressures in a vertical circular tube (d in = 2 mm) at high Reynolds numbers was investigated experimentally, and the effects of heat fluxes, mass fluxes, inlet temperatures, pressures, buoyancy and thermal acceleration on the convection heat transfer was analyzed. The results show that the tube wall temperature occurs abnormally distribution for high heat-fluxes with upward flow. The degree of deteriorated heat transfer increases with increasing heat flux. Increasing of the mass flux delays the occurrence of the deterioration of heat transfer and weakens the deterioration of heat transfer down-stream section. The inlet temperature strongly influences the heat transfer. The deterioration degree of heat transfer decreases with increasing pressure. (authors)

  13. Investigating the interactions of decentralized and centralized wastewater heat recovery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzenfrei, Robert; Hillebrand, Sebastian; Rauch, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    In the urban water cycle there are different sources for extracting energy. In addition to potential and chemical energy in the wastewater, thermal energy can also be recovered. Heat can be recovered from the wastewater with heat exchangers that are located decentralized and/or centralized at several locations throughout the system. It can be recovered directly at the source (e.g. in the showers and bathrooms), at building block level (e.g. warm water tanks collecting all grey water), in sewers or at the wastewater treatment plant. However, an uncoordinated installation of systems on such different levels can lead to competing technologies. To investigate these interactions, a modelling environment is set up, tested and calibrated based on continuous sewer temperature and flow measurements. With that approach different heat recovery scenarios on a household level (decentralized) and of in-sewer heat recovery (centralized) are investigated. A maximum performance drop of 40% for a centralized energy recovery system was estimated when all bathrooms are equipped with decentralized recovery systems. Therefore, the proposed modelling approach is suitable for testing different future conditions and to identify robust strategies for heat recovery systems from wastewater.

  14. Investigation of impurity confinement in lower hybrid wave heated plasma on EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Wu, Z. W.; Zhang, L.; Gao, W.; Ye, Y.; Chen, K. Y.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, W.; Yang, X. D.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhang, P. F.; Huang, J.; Wu, C. R.; Morita, S.; Oishi, T.; Zhang, J. Z.; Duan, Y. M.; Zang, Q.; Ding, S. Y.; Liu, H. Q.; Chen, J. L.; Hu, L. Q.; Xu, G. S.; Guo, H. Y.; the EAST Team

    2018-01-01

    The transient perturbation method with metallic impurities such as iron (Fe, Z  =  26) and copper (Cu, Z  =  29) induced in plasma-material interaction (PMI) procedure is used to investigate the impurity confinement characters in lower hybrid wave (LHW) heated EAST sawtooth-free plasma. The dependence of metallic impurities confinement time on plasma parameters (e.g. plasma current, toroidal magnetic field, electron density and heating power) are investigated in ohmic and LHW heated plasma. It is shown that LHW heating plays an important role in the reduction of the impurity confinement time in L-mode discharges on EAST. The impurity confinement time scaling is given as 42IP0.32Bt0.2\\overline{n}e0.43Ptotal-0.4~ on EAST, which is close to the observed scaling on Tore Supra and JET. Furthermore, the LHW heated high-enhanced-recycling (HER) H-mode discharges with ~25 kHz edge coherent modes (ECM), which have lower impurity confinement time and higher energy confinement time, provide promising candidates for high performance and steady state operation on EAST.

  15. Performance investigation on a 4-bed adsorption desalination cycle with internal heat recovery scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Thu, Kyaw

    2016-10-08

    Multi-bed adsorption cycle with the internal heat recovery between the condenser and the evaporator is investigated for desalination application. A numerical model is developed for a 4-bed adsorption cycle implemented with the master-and-slave configuration and the aforementioned internal heat recovery scheme. The present model captures the reversed adsorption/desorption phenomena frequently associated with the unmatched switching periods. Mesoporous silica gel and water vapor emanated from the evaporation of the seawater are employed as the adsorbent and adsorbate pair. The experimental data and investigation for such configurations are reported for the first time at heat source temperatures from 50 °C to 70 °C. The numerical model is validated rigorously and the parametric study is conducted for the performance of the cycle at assorted operation conditions such as hot and cooling water inlet temperatures and the cycle times. The specific daily water production (SDWP) of the present cycle is found to be about 10 m/day per tonne of silica gel for the heat source temperature at 70 °C. Performance comparison is conducted for various types of adsorption desalination cycles. It is observed that the AD cycle with the current configuration provides superior performance whilst is operational at unprecedentedly low heat source temperature as low as 50 °C.

  16. Investigation of heat transfer and fluid flow in activating TIG welding by numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xinxin; Huang, Jiankang; Huang, Yong; Fan, Ding; Guo, Yanning

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The heat input to the anode and subsequent thermal efficiency is almost equal for TIG and A-TIG welding. • Dominant effect heat convection and reversion of molten metal flow in weld pool causes significant increase in weld penetration. - Abstract: Heat transfer and fluid flow of arc plasma and weld pool in tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding of SUS 304 stainless steel are investigated comparatively though a 3D unified model. The model differs from the previous ones in that it considers the arc length more realistic for welding production. Tungsten electrode, anode (work piece) and arc plasma are all included. The effects of buoyance, plasma drag force, Lorentz force and Marangoni force on the weld pool flow are taken into account. By solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy as well as Maxwell equations, the distributions of temperature and velocity of arc plasma and weld pool are obtained for TIG and A-TIG welding. The heat flux, current density and shear stress at the weld pool are presented. Dimensionless numbers are employed to compare the relative importance of the driven forces and that of convection and conduction in heat transfer of the weld pool. It is demonstrated that there is no significant difference in the heat flux at the weld pool, and total heat input to the anode and thermal efficiency is almost equal for TIG and A-TIG welding. The current density and the heat flux at the weld pool are more concentrated in more realistic welding condition. As a result, both of the temperature of the weld pool for TIG welding and A-TIG welding increases, while the latter is more significant. Marangoni force ranges from zero to 100 Pa and dominant the weld pool flow. Compared with the conventional TIG welding, the reversion of the Marangoni force results in inward flow and thus causes inward heat convection in weld pool of A-TIG welding. Heat convection was the main mechanism of

  17. Experimental Investigation on the Specific Heat of Carbonized Phenolic Resin-Based Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Te; Ye, Hong; Zhang, Lisong; Cai, Qilin

    2017-10-01

    As typical phenolic resin-based ablative materials, the high silica/phenolic and carbon/phenolic composites are widely used in aerospace field. The specific heat of the carbonized ablators after ablation is an important thermophysical parameter in the process of heat transfer, but it is rarely reported. In this investigation, the carbonized samples of the high silica/phenolic and carbon/phenolic were obtained through carbonization experiments, and the specific heat of the carbonized samples was determined by a 3D DSC from 150 °C to 970 °C. Structural and compositional characterizations were performed to determine the mass fractions of the fiber and the carbonized product of phenolic which are the two constituents of the carbonized samples, while the specific heat of each constituent was also measured by 3D DSC. The masses of the carbonized samples were reduced when heated to a high temperature in the specific heat measurements, due to the thermal degradation of the carbonized product of phenolic resin in the carbonized samples. The raw experimental specific heat of the two carbonized samples and the carbonized product of phenolic resin was modified according to the quality changes of the carbonized samples presented by TGA results. Based on the mass fraction and the specific heat of each constituent, a weighted average method was adopted to obtain the calculated results of the carbonized samples. Due to the unconsolidated property of the fiber samples which impacts the reliability of the DSC measurement, there is a certain deviation between the experimental and calculated results of the carbonized samples. Considering the similarity of composition and structure, the data of quartz glass and graphite were used to substitute the specific heat of the high silica fiber and carbon fiber, respectively, resulting in better agreements with the experimental ones. Furthermore, the accurate specific heat of the high silica fiber and carbon fiber bundles was obtained by

  18. Parametric investigation on transient boiling heat transfer of metal rod cooled rapidly in water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chi Young [Department of Fire Protection Engineering, Pukyong National University, 45, Yongso-ro, Nam-gu, Busan 48513 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunwoo, E-mail: swkim@alaska.edu [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Alaska Fairbanks, P. O. Box 755905, Fairbanks, AK 99775-5905 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Effects of liquid subcooling, surface coating, material property, and surface oxidation are examined. • Liquid subcooling affects remarkably the quenching phenomena. • Cr-coated surfaces for ATF might extend the quenching duration. • Solids with low heat capacity shorten the quenching duration. • Surface oxidation can affect strongly the film boiling heat transfer and MFB point. - Abstract: In this work, the effects of liquid subcooling, surface coating, material property, and surface oxidation on transient pool boiling heat transfer were investigated experimentally using the vertical metal rod and quenching method. The change in rod temperature was measured with time during quenching, and the visualization of boiling around the test specimen was performed using the high-speed video camera. As the test materials, the zircaloy (Zry), stainless steel (SS), niobium (Nb), and copper (Cu) were tested. In addition, the chromium-coated niobium (Cr-Nb) and chromium-coated stainless steel (Cr-SS) were prepared for accident tolerant fuel (ATF) application. Low liquid subcooling and Cr-coating shifted the quenching curve to the right, which indicates a prolongation of quenching duration. On the other hand, the material with small heat capacity and surface oxidation caused the quenching curve to move to the left. To examine the influence of the material property and surface oxidation on the film boiling heat transfer performance and minimum film boiling (MFB) point in more detail, the wall temperature and heat flux were calculated from the present transient temperature profile using the inverse heat transfer analysis, and then the curves of wall temperature and heat flux in the film boiling regime were obtained. In the present experimental conditions, the effect of material property on the film boiling heat transfer performance and MFB point seemed to be minor. On the other hand, based on the experimental results of the Cu test specimen, the surface

  19. Thermodynamic investigation and optimization of laminar forced convection in a rotating helical tube heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Zhongyuan; Dong, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Variation of total entropy generation is investigated parametrically. • Pareto solution sets for heat transfer and flow friction components are obtained. • Dominant irreversibility component and impact of key variables are discussed. - Abstract: Based on the second law of thermodynamics, an entropy generation investigation is carried out under given dimensionless parameters, i.e. heat exchanger duty, heat flux, with respect to heat transfer and frictional pressure drop in a rotating helical tube heat exchanger with laminar convective flow. The entropy generation from heat transfer across a finite temperature difference – Ψ h decreases with increasing Dean number which represents the impact of centrifugal force induced secondary flow in enhancing heat transfer. Another aspect of increasing Dean number is that intensified momentum transfer in the radial direction also raises the entropy generation from frictional pressure drop – Ψ f , the superposed effect of which yields a decreasing–increasing trend of the total entropy generation-Ψ, a local minimum located in between. The rotation of the helical tube in streamwise (co-rotation) or counter streamwise (counter-rotation) direction leads to a decrease in Ψ h and a increase in Ψ f which complicates the situation that whether or where the minimum of total entropy generation exists is dependent on whether Ψ is dominated by Ψ h or Ψ f or somewhere in between. No difference is discerned between pairs of cases with constant wall temperature and uniform wall heat flux but the same set of variables and parameters. A multi-objective optimization targeting Ψ h and Ψ f simultaneously is implemented using the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA II). Five solution sets are selected and compared with the conventional optimization in regard of Ψ distinguishing the Ψ h -dominated region from the Ψ f -dominated region, the dimensionless variable η 1 is found to be the most suitable

  20. Convective heat transfer enhancement by diamond shaped micro-protruded patterns for heat sinks: Thermal fluid dynamic investigation and novel optimization methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventola, Luigi; Dialameh, Masoud; Fasano, Matteo; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel methodology for optimal design of patterned heat sink surfaces is proposed. • Heat transfer enhancement by patterned surfaces is measured experimentally. • Role of fluid dynamics and geometrical scales on heat transfer is clarified. - Abstract: In the present work, micro-protruded patterns on flush mounted heat sinks for convective heat transfer enhancement are investigated and a novel methodology for thermal optimization is proposed. Patterned heat sinks are experimentally characterized in fully turbulent regime, and the role played by geometrical parameters and fluid dynamic scales is discussed. A methodology specifically suited for micro-protruded pattern optimization is designed, leading to 73% enhancement in thermal performance respect to commercially available heat sinks, at fixed costs. This work is expected to introduce a new methodological approach for a more systematic and efficient development of solutions for electronics cooling.

  1. DNS and Embedded DNS as Tools for Investigating Unsteady Heat Transfer Phenomena in Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    vonTerzi, Dominic; Bauer, H.-J.

    2010-01-01

    DNS is a powerful tool with high potential for investigating unsteady heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena, in particular for cases involving transition to turbulence and/or large coherent structures. - DNS of idealized configurations related to turbomachinery components is already possible. - For more realistic configurations and the inclusion of more effects, reduction of computational cost is key issue (e.g., hybrid methods). - Approach pursued here: Embedded DNS ( segregated coupling of DNS with LES and/or RANS). - Embedded DNS is an enabling technology for many studies. - Pre-transitional heat transfer and trailing-edge cutback film-cooling are good candidates for (embedded) DNS studies.

  2. Investigation of Abnormal Heat Transfer and Flow in a VHTR Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaji, Masahiro [City College of New York, NY (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City College of New York, NY (United States); Artoun, Narbeh [City College of New York, NY (United States); Banerjee, Sanjoy [City College of New York, NY (United States); Sohal, Manohar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schultz, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McEligot, Donald M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-12-21

    The main objective of this project was to identify and characterize the conditions under which abnormal heat transfer phenomena would occur in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. High pressure/high temperature experiments have been conducted to obtain data that could be used for validation of VHTR design and safety analysis codes. The focus of these experiments was on the generation of benchmark data for design and off-design heat transfer for forced, mixed and natural circulation in a VHTR core. In particular, a flow laminarization phenomenon was intensely investigated since it could give rise to hot spots in the VHTR core.

  3. Investigation of the influence of heat transfer on screen printed textile conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazani, I.; De Mey, G.; Hertleer, C.; Guxho, G.; Van Langenhove, L.

    2017-10-01

    Two different textile substrates were screen printed with silver-based inks in order to be electrically conductive. In every textile four conductors were printed with different widths in order to investigate the influence of heat transfer on each conductor. This was done, by using the thermo graphic camera and through the evaluation of each conductor’s profile. It was found that the conductors printed on the white textile had higher values of heat transfer compared to the other conductors printed on the dark textiles.

  4. Investigation of Abnormal Heat Transfer and Flow in a VHTR Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaji, Masahiro; Valentin, Francisco I.; Artoun, Narbeh; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Sohal, Manohar; Schultz, Richard; McEligot, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this project was to identify and characterize the conditions under which abnormal heat transfer phenomena would occur in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. High pressure/high temperature experiments have been conducted to obtain data that could be used for validation of VHTR design and safety analysis codes. The focus of these experiments was on the generation of benchmark data for design and off-design heat transfer for forced, mixed and natural circulation in a VHTR core. In particular, a flow laminarization phenomenon was intensely investigated since it could give rise to hot spots in the VHTR core.

  5. Mapping urban heat islands of arctic cities using combined data on field measurements and satellite images based on the example of the city of Apatity (Murmansk Oblast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, P. I.; Grishchenko, M. Y.; Varentsov, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the results of a study of the urban heat island (UHI) in the city of Apatity during winter that were obtained according to the data of field meteorological measurements and satellite images. Calculations of the surface layer temperature have been made based on the surface temperature data obtained from satellite images. The experimental data on air temperature were obtained as a result of expeditionary meteorological observations, and the experimental data on surface temperature were obtained based on the data of the space hyperspectral Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) system, channels 31 and 32 (10.78-11.28 and 11.77-12.27 micrometers, respectively). As a result of the analysis of temperature fields, an intensive heat island (up to 3.2°C) has been identified that was estimated based on the underlying surface temperature, and its mean intensity over the observation period significantly exceeds the representative data for European cities in winter. It has also been established that the air temperature calculated according to the MODIS data is systematically higher under winter conditions than the air temperature from direct measurement data.

  6. Study of the Relationships between the Spatial Extent of Surface Urban Heat Islands and Urban Characteristic Factors Based on Landsat ETM+ Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinqu Zhang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ten cities with different population and urban sizes located in the Pearl River Delta, Guangdong Province, P.R. China were selected to study the relationships between the spatial extent of surface urban heat islands (SUHI and five urban characteristic factors such as urban size, development area, water proportion, mean NDVI (Normalized Vegetation Index and population density, etc. The spatial extent of SUHI was quantified by using the hot island area (HIA. All the cities are almost at the same latitude, showing similar climate and solar radiation, the influence of which could thus be eliminated during our computation and comparative study. The land surface temperatures (LST were retrieved from the data of Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ band 6 using a mono-window algorithm. A variance-segmenting method was proposed to compute HIA for each city from the retrieved LST. Factors like urban size, development area and water proportion were extracted directly from the classification images of the same ETM+ data and the population density factor is from the official census. Correlation and regression analyses were performed to study the relationships between the HIA and the related factors, and the results show that HIA is highly correlated to urban size (r=0.95, population density (r=0.97 and development area (r=0.83 in this area. It was also proved that a weak negative correlation existed between HIA and both mean NDVI and water proportion for each city. Linear functions between HIA and its related factors were established, respectively. The HIA can reflect the spatial extent and magnitude of the surface urban heat island effect, and can be used as reference in the urban planning.

  7. 环境风对直接空冷岛换热的影响%The Effects of Environment Wind on Heat Transfer of Direct Air Cooled Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁振宇; 陈巍; 田永兴; 李学智

    2011-01-01

    以国内蒙达电厂600MW直接空冷机组为例,针对当前直接空冷机组运行中的突出问题--环境风的不利影响,利用CFD数值模拟软件Fluent,对空冷岛外部流场进行数值模拟.发现炉后来风、热风回流、倒灌是造成空冷岛换热效率下降的主要因素,分析了炉后来风、热风回流、倒灌等对空冷岛外部流场和换热性能的影响机理,并得到环境风速与热风回流和倒灌的关系.%Taking Mengda 600MW direct air-cooled units ii our country into consideration,in view of serious hurdles of air-cooled units available-the unfavorable influences of Ambient Wind,we tentatively proceeds to making numerical simulation research on external flow field of direct air-cooled island by using CFD software Fluent. Found that the wind generating from the boiler house afterwards,hot air re-circulation and air inverse flow are the main factors of decline in the efficiency of air-cooled island heat. This paper proposed the mechanism of ambient wind impacts,and the analysis on such effects of the wind generating from the boiler house afterwards,hot air re-circulation and air inverse flow on external flow field and heat exchange efficiency of air-cooled island was thus been within reach, found out hot air re-circulation and air inverse flow relationship between the wind speed.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Forced Convection Heat Transfer in Heat Sink with Rectangular Plates at Varying Inclinations on Vertical Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Harshal Bhauso; Dingare, Sunil Vishnu

    2018-03-01

    Heat exchange upgrade is a vital territory of research area. Utilization of reasonable systems can bring about noteworthy specialized points of interest coming about reserve funds of cost. Rectangular plates are viewed as best balance arrangement utilized for heat exchange improvement. This gives an enlargement strategy to heat exchange with beginning of limit layer and vortex development. To assess and look at the rate of heat exchange enhancement by rectangular plate fins with differing inclinations (0°-30°-60°), shifting Re and heat supply under forced convection are the principle destinations of this study. The study is done by fluctuating introductions of fins with various inclinations, input heat supply and Re under forced convection. The coefficient of heat transfer increments observed with the expansion in air speed for all the examined designs. The coefficient of the heat transfer is discovered higher at the edge of introduction of fins at 30° for inline arrangement and 0° for staggered arrangement. Looking at both the arrangements, it is discovered that the heat transfer coefficient in 0° fin staggered arrangement is about 17% higher than 30° inline arrangement and 76% higher than the vertical plate fin. For plate fin heat sink, boundary layer formation and growth results in decrease of the coefficient of heat transfer in forced convection. This issue is overcome by accommodating some rectangular fins on the plate fin. It brings about increment of heat transfer coefficient of the RPFHS under the states of trial factors. As indicated by past research, it is discovered that examination of the plate fin heat sink with various sorts of fins for horizontal orientation is done yet but this investigation expects to discover the upgrade of transfer coefficient of plate fin heat sink for its vertical position with rectangular plates at different inclinations under the shifting scopes of heat input supply, fin arrangements and Reynolds number (Re).

  9. Peer review of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Vessel Investigation Project metallurgical examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohl, R.W.; Gaydos, R.G.; Vander Voort, G.F.; Diercks, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Fifteen samples recovered from the lower head of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 nuclear reactor pressure vessel were subjected to detailed metallurgical examinations by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), with supporting work carried out by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and several of the European participants. These examinations determined that a portion of the lower head, a so-called elliptical ``hot spot`` measuring {approx}0.8 {times} 1 m, reached temperatures as high as 1100{degrees}C during the accident and cooled from these temperatures at {approx}10--100{degrees}C/min. The remainder of the lower head was found to have remained below the ferrite-toaustenite transformation temperature of 727{degrees}C during the accident. Because of the significance of these results and their importance to the overall analysis of the TMI accident, a panel of three outside peer reviewers, Dr. Robert W. Bohl, Mr. Richard G. Gaydos, and Mr. George F. Vander Voort, was formed to conduct an independent review of the metallurgical analyses. After a thorough review of the previous analyses and examination of photo-micrographs and actual lower head specimens, the panel determined that the conclusions resulting from the INEL study were fundamentally correct. In particular, the panel reaffirmed that four lower head samples attained temperatures as high as 1100{degrees}C, and perhaps as high as 1150--1200{degrees}C in one case, during the accident. They concluded that these samples subsequently cooled at a rate of {approx}50--125{degrees}C/min in the temperature range of 600--400{degrees}C, in good agreement with the original analysis. The reviewers also agreed that the remainder of the lower head samples had not exceeded the ferrite-to-austenite transformation temperature during the accident and suggested several refinements and alternative procedures that could have been employed in the original analysis.

  10. Peer review of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Vessel Investigation Project metallurgical examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, R.W.; Gaydos, R.G.; Vander Voort, G.F.; Diercks, D.R.

    1994-07-01

    Fifteen samples recovered from the lower head of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 nuclear reactor pressure vessel were subjected to detailed metallurgical examinations by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), with supporting work carried out by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and several of the European participants. These examinations determined that a portion of the lower head, a so-called elliptical ''hot spot'' measuring ∼0.8 x 1 m, reached temperatures as high as 1100 degrees C during the accident and cooled from these temperatures at ∼10--100 degrees C/min. The remainder of the lower head was found to have remained below the ferrite-toaustenite transformation temperature of 727 degrees C during the accident. Because of the significance of these results and their importance to the overall analysis of the TMI accident, a panel of three outside peer reviewers, Dr. Robert W. Bohl, Mr. Richard G. Gaydos, and Mr. George F. Vander Voort, was formed to conduct an independent review of the metallurgical analyses. After a thorough review of the previous analyses and examination of photo-micrographs and actual lower head specimens, the panel determined that the conclusions resulting from the INEL study were fundamentally correct. In particular, the panel reaffirmed that four lower head samples attained temperatures as high as 1100 degrees C, and perhaps as high as 1150--1200 degrees C in one case, during the accident. They concluded that these samples subsequently cooled at a rate of ∼50--125 degrees C/min in the temperature range of 600--400 degrees C, in good agreement with the original analysis. The reviewers also agreed that the remainder of the lower head samples had not exceeded the ferrite-to-austenite transformation temperature during the accident and suggested several refinements and alternative procedures that could have been employed in the original analysis

  11. Experimental Investigation of Convective Heat Transfer during Night Cooling with Different Ventilation Systems and Surface Emissivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2013-01-01

    models for convection. In a full-scale test room, the heat transfer was investigated during 12 h of discharge by night-time ventilation. A total of 34 experiments have been performed, with different ventilation types (mixing and displacement), air change rates, temperature differences between the inlet...... air and the room, and floor emissivities. This extensive experimental study enabled a detailed analysis of the convective and radiative flow at the different surfaces of the room. The experimentally derived convective heat transfer coefficients (CHTC) have been compared to existing correlations....... For mixing ventilation, existing correlations did not predict accurately the convective heat transfer at the ceiling due to differences in the experimental conditions. But the use of local parameters of the air flow showed interesting results to obtain more adaptive CHTC correlations. For displacement...

  12. Heat transfer analysis to investigate the core catcher plate assembly in SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Swapnil; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Velusamy, K.; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    Severe accident scenario in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) is the major concern for public acceptance. After severe accident, the molten core continuously generates substantial decay heat. However, an in-vessel core catcher plate is provided to remove the decay heat passively. The numerical investigation of pool hydraulics phenomena in sodium pool of typical Indian SFR has been carried out. The debris may form a heap with different angle over the core catcher plate due to molten fuel density and interaction force. Therefore, the debris bed with different heap angle has been analyzed for steady and transient state conditions. The governing equation of fluid flow and heat transfer are solved by finite volume method based solver with the k-ε turbulent model. The time period Δ for which temperature is exceeding above safety limit with different debris heap angle have been established. (author)

  13. Experimental and computational investigations of heat and mass transfer of intensifier grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzar, Leonid; Oleksyuk, Dmitry; Semchenkov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses experimental and numerical investigations on intensification of thermal and mass exchange which were performed by National Research Centre ''Kurchatov Institute'' over the past years. Recently, many designs of heat mass transfer intensifier grids have been proposed. NRC ''Kurchatov Institute'' has accomplished a large scope of experimental investigations to study efficiency of intensifier grids of various types. The outcomes of experimental investigations can be used in verification of computational models and codes. On the basis of experimental data, we derived correlations to calculate coolant mixing and critical heat flux mixing in rod bundles equipped with intensifier grids. The acquired correlations were integrated in subchannel code SC-INT.

  14. A Heat Transfer Investigation of Liquid and Two-Phase Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNoord, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    A heat transfer investigation was conducted for liquid and two-phase methane. The tests were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center Heated Tube Facility (HTF) using resistively heated tube sections to simulate conditions encountered in regeneratively cooled rocket engines. This testing is part of NASA s Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) project. Nontoxic propellants, such as liquid oxygen/liquid methane (LO2/LCH4), offer potential benefits in both performance and safety over equivalently sized hypergolic propulsion systems in spacecraft applications. Regeneratively cooled thrust chambers are one solution for high performance, robust LO2/LCH4 engines, but cooling data on methane is limited. Several test runs were conducted using three different diameter Inconel 600 tubes, with nominal inner diameters of 0.0225-, 0.054-, and 0.075-in. The mass flow rate was varied from 0.005 to 0.07 lbm/sec. As the current focus of the PCAD project is on pressure fed engines for LO2/LCH4, the average test section outlet pressures were targeted to be 200 psia or 500 psia. The heat flux was incrementally increased for each test condition while the test section wall temperatures were monitored. A maximum average heat flux of 6.2 Btu/in.2 sec was achieved and, at times, the temperatures of the test sections reached in excess of 1800 R. The primary objective of the tests was to produce heat transfer correlations for methane in the liquid and two-phase regime. For two-phase flow testing, the critical heat flux values were determined where the fluid transitions from nucleate boiling to film boiling. A secondary goal of the testing was to measure system pressure drops in the two-phase regime.

  15. Investigations on a new internally-heated tubular packed-bed methanol–steam reformer

    KAUST Repository

    Nehe, Prashant

    2015-05-01

    Small-scale reformers for hydrogen production through steam reforming of methanol can provide an alternative solution to the demand of continuous supply of hydrogen gas for the operation of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs). A packed-bed type reformer is one of the potential designs for such purpose. An externally heated reformer has issues of adverse lower temperature in the core of the reformer and significant heat loss to the environment thus impacting its performance. Experimental and numerical studies on a new concept of internally heated tubular packed-bed methanol-steam reformer have been reported in this paper with improved performance in terms of higher methanol conversion and reduced heat losses to surroundings. CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 is used as the catalyst for the methanol-steam reforming reaction and a rod-type electric heater at the center of the reactor is used for supplying necessary heat for endothermic steam reforming reaction. The vaporizer and the reformer unit with a constant volume catalyst bed are integrated in the annular section of a tubular reformer unit. The performance of the reformer was investigated at various operating conditions like feed rate of water-methanol mixture, mass of the catalyst and reforming temperature. The experimental and numerical results show that the methanol conversion and CO concentration increase with internal heating for a wide range of operating conditions. The developed reformer unit generates 50-80W (based on lower heating value) of hydrogen gas for applications in PEMFCs. For optimized design and operating conditions, the reformer unit produced 298sccm reformed gas containing 70% H2, 27% CO2 and 3% CO at 200-240°C which can produce a power output of 25-32W assuming 60% fuel cell efficiency and 80% of hydrogen utilization in a PEMFC. © 2015 Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC.

  16. CFD investigation of flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in isoflux spirally fluted tubes

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the problem of flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in spirally fluted tubes is investigated numerically using the CFD code Fluent. The tube investigated in this work is characterized by the existence of helical ridging which is usually obtained by embossing a smooth tube. A tube of diameter of 15 mm, 1.5 mm groove depth and a single helix with pitch of 64 mm is chosen for simulation. This geometry has been chosen for simulation because it has been investigated experimentally for pure fluids and would, therefore, provide a verification framework with our CFD model. The result of our CFD investigation compares very well with the experimental work conducted on this tube geometry. Interesting patterns are highlighted and investigated including the existence of flow swirl as a result of the existence of the spirally enhanced ridges. This swirl flow enhances heat transfer characteristics of this system as reported in the literatures. This study also shows that further enhancement is achieved if small amount of nanoparticles are introduced to the fluid. These nanoparticles (metallic-based nanoparticles) when introduced to the fluid enhances its heat transfer characteristics.

  17. Korean district heating. Part 2: Investigation of the consumption pattern in a substation at Korea District Heating Corporation at the turn of the year 1994/95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, Mats; Olsson, Nils

    1996-05-01

    This thesis, which is the second part of two, analyses the consumption pattern and the conditions for district heating in the Republic of Korea at the turn of the year 1994-95. It is based on a study made in Seoul at Korea District Heating Corporation which is the largest district heating utility in Korea. District heating was introduced in the 80s because of the environmental advantages. In 1994 KDHC provided 340 000 households with district heating. KDHC receives most of its thermal energy from combined heat and power plants which use natural gas as fuel. One substation was chosen for the investigation and temperature, flow, and pressure were measured. A typical Korean substation has heat exchangers connected in parallel in only one step and the apartment complexes use floor heating for internal heating. The space heating load shows a linear relation to the outdoor temperature. The hot tap-water consumption shows a highly varying pattern with peak loads in the morning and evening. There were also an oscillating pattern for some of the temperatures and flows caused by poor regulation. DH suits very well to Korea with its climate and the overpopulated cities. KDHC:s expansion will help to make Korea one of the leading countries in modern district heating. 10 refs, 36 figs, 11 tabs

  18. Analytical Investigation of the Heat-Transfer Limits of a Novel Solar Loop-Heat Pipe Employing a Mini-Channel Evaporator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierno M. O. Diallo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical investigation of heat-transfer limits of a novel solar loop-heat pipe developed for space heating and domestic hot water use. In the loop-heat pipe, the condensate liquid returns to the evaporator via small specially designed holes, using a mini-channel evaporator. The study considered the commonly known heat-transfer limits of loop-heat pipes, namely, the viscous, sonic, entrainment, boiling and heat-transfer limits due to the two-phase pressure drop in the loop. The analysis considered the main factors that affect the limits in the mini-channel evaporator: the operating temperature, mini-channel aspect ratio, evaporator length, evaporator inclination angle, evaporator-to-condenser height difference and the dimension of the holes. It was found that the entrainment is the main governing limit of the system operation. With the specified loop design and operational conditions, the solar loop-heat pipe can achieve a heat-transport capacity of 725 W. The analytical model presented in this study can be used to optimise the heat-transfer capacity of the novel solar loop-heat pipe.

  19. Investigation of printed circuit heat exchanger for VHTRs - HTR2008-58097

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mylavarapu, S. K.; Sun, X.; Figley, J.; Needler, N. J.; Christensen, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs) require high temperature (900-950 deg. C), high integrity, and high efficiency heat exchangers during normal and off-normal conditions. A class of compact heat exchangers, namely, the Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHEs), made of high temperature materials, found to have the above characteristics, are being increasingly pursued for heavy duty applications. A high-temperature helium experimental test facility, primarily aimed at investigating the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of the PCHEs, was designed and is being built at the Ohio State Univ.. The test facility was designed for a maximum operating temperature and pressure of 900 deg. C and 3 MPa, respectively. Owing to the high operating conditions, a detailed investigation various high temperature materials was carried out to aid in design of the test facility and the heat exchangers. The study showed that alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for high temperature heat exchangers. Two PCHEs, each having 10 hot 10 cold plates with 12 channels in each plate, are currently being fabricated from alloy 617 plates and will be tested once test facility is constructed. To supplement the experiments, computational fluid dynamics modeling of a simplified PCHE model is being performed and the results for three flow rate cases of 15, 40, and 90 kg/h and a system pressure of 3 MPa are discussed. In summary, this paper focuses on the study of the high-temperature materials, the design of the helium test facility, the design and fabrication of the PCHEs, and the computational modeling of a simplified PCHE model. (authors)

  20. Investigation of waste heat recovery of binary geothermal plants using single component refrigerants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unverdi, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the availability of waste heat in a power generating capacity of 47.4 MW in Germencik Geothermal Power Plant has been investigated via binary geothermal power plant. Refrigerant fluids of 7 different single components such as R-134a, R-152a, R-227ea, R-236fa, R-600, R-143m and R-161 have been selected. The binary cycle has been modeled using the waste heat equaling to mass flow rate of 100 kg/s geothermal fluid. While the inlet temperature of the geothermal fluid into the counter flow heat exchanger has been accepted as 110°C, the outlet temperature has been accepted as 70°C. The inlet conditions have been determined for the refrigerants to be used in the binary cycle. Finally, the mass flow rate of refrigerant fluid and of cooling water and pump power consumption and power generated in the turbine have been calculated for each inlet condition of the refrigerant. Additionally, in the binary cycle, energy and exergy efficiencies have been calculated for 7 refrigerants in the availability of waste heat. In the binary geothermal cycle, it has been found out that the highest exergy destruction for all refrigerants occurs in the heat exchanger. And the highest and lowest first and second law efficiencies has been obtained for R-600 and R-161 refrigerants, respectively.

  1. Numerical investigation of premixed combustion in a porous burner with integrated heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzaneh, Meisam; Shafiey, Mohammad; Shams, Mehrzad [K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, Reza [K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    In this paper, we perform a numerical analysis of a two-dimensional axisymmetric problem arising in premixed combustion in a porous burner with integrated heat exchanger. The physical domain consists of two zones, porous and heat exchanger zones. Two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, gas and solid energy equations, and chemical species transport equations are solved and heat release is described by a multistep kinetics mechanism. The solid matrix is modeled as a gray medium, and the finite volume method is used to solve the radiative transfer equation to calculate the local radiation source/sink in the solid phase energy equation. Special attention is given to model heat transfer between the hot gas and the heat exchanger tube. Thus, the corresponding terms are added to the energy equations of the flow and the solid matrix. Gas and solid temperature profiles and species mole fractions on the burner centerline, predicted 2D temperature fields, species concentrations and streamlines are presented. Calculated results for temperature profiles are compared to experimental data. It is shown that there is good agreement between the numerical solutions and the experimental data and it is concluded that the developed numerical program is an excellent tool to investigate combustion in porous burner. (orig.)

  2. Numerical investigation on thermal-hydraulic performance of new printed circuit heat exchanger model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Eok; Kim, Moo Hwan; Cha, Jae Eun; Kim, Seong O.

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical analysis was performed to investigate heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of supercritical CO 2 flow in new Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger (PCHE) model using commercial CFD code, Fluent 6.3. First, numerical analysis for conventional zigzag channel PCHE model was performed and compared with previous experimental data. Maximum deviation of in-outlet temperature difference and pressure drop from experimental data is about 10%. A new PCHE model has been designed to optimize thermal-hydraulic performance of PCHE. The new PCHE model has several airfoil shape fins (NACA 0020 model), which are designed to streamlined shape. Simulation results showed that in the airfoil shape fin PCHE, total heat transfer rate per unit volume was almost same with zigzag channel PCHE and the pressure drop was reduced to one-twentieth of that in zigzag channel PCHE. In airfoil shape fin PCHE model, the enhancement of heat transfer area and the uniform flow configuration contributed to obtain the same heat transfer performance with zigzag channel PCHE model. And the reduction of pressure drop in airfoil shape fin PCHE model was caused by suppressing generation of separated flow owing to streamlined shape of airfoil fins

  3. Investigations on installation of the heat exchange system in geothermal wells; Chinetsu koseinai netsukokan system donyu ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The heat exchange system in geothermal wells is a system that replaces the air source heat pump and uses underground beds or groundwater as a heat source to heat rooms by collecting underground heat in winter, and cool rooms in summer by operating a heat media circuit in reverse direction through the action of a reverse flow valve to discharge heat underground. This paper describes feasibility investigations on the system including its technical trend for introducing the system technology. Technological and economic discussions were given by classifying the intra-well heat exchange device in its installation direction (horizontal loop type and vertical installation type), underground heat exchange media (antifreeze solution/water cyclic system and direct expansion system), and underground heat transfer (heat conduction system and heat convection system). As a result of discussing each system, it was concluded that the following two systems are promising: A = vertical installation, antifreeze solution/water cyclic and heat conduction system, and B = vertical installation, antifreeze solution/water cyclic and heat convection system. Since the system B was found to have better efficiency and economy among both systems, it is necessary to verify an intra-well heat exchange system and operation methods that suit the system B effectively. 21 refs., 8 tabs.

  4. Experimental process investigation of a latent heat energy storage system with a staggered heat exchanger with different phase change materials for solar thermal energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolakoglou, Nikolas P.; Koukou, Maria K.; Vrachopoulos, Michalis Gr.; Tachos, Nikolaos; Lymberis, Kostas; Stathopoulos, Vassilis

    2017-11-01

    This work investigates melting and solidification processes of four different Phase Change Materials (PCM) used as latent heat thermal storage system. The experimental rig was consisted of an insulated tank, filled with the under investigation PCM, a staggered heat exchanger to supply or extract heat from the PCM cavity and a water pump to circulate Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF). Both charging (melting) and discharging (solidification) processes were conducted for two different HTF flow rates. The main scope of this work was to develop a first approach and to investigate the behaviour of PCM under various load conditions (different HTF flow rates). Results show that different HTF flow rates affect melting and solidification time periods; in both processes time was reduced while HTF flow rate was increased but in differentways due to the transition from conduction to convection heat transfer mechanisms.

  5. Experimental process investigation of a latent heat energy storage system with a staggered heat exchanger with different phase change materials for solar thermal energy storage applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsolakoglou Nikolas P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates melting and solidification processes of four different Phase Change Materials (PCM used as latent heat thermal storage system. The experimental rig was consisted of an insulated tank, filled with the under investigation PCM, a staggered heat exchanger to supply or extract heat from the PCM cavity and a water pump to circulate Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF. Both charging (melting and discharging (solidification processes were conducted for two different HTF flow rates. The main scope of this work was to develop a first approach and to investigate the behaviour of PCM under various load conditions (different HTF flow rates. Results show that different HTF flow rates affect melting and solidification time periods; in both processes time was reduced while HTF flow rate was increased but in differentways due to the transition from conduction to convection heat transfer mechanisms.

  6. Experimental Investigation of the Combined Effects of Heat Exchanger Geometries on Nucleate Pool Boiling Heat Transfer in a Scaled IRWST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Myeong Gie; Chun, Moon Hyun

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to determine the combined effects of major parameters of heat exchanger tubes on the nucleate pool boiling heat transfer in the scaled in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST), a total of 1,966 data for q v ersus ΔT has been obtained using various combinations of tube diameters, surface roughness, and tube orientations. The experimental results show that (1) increased surface roughness enhances heat transfer for both horizontal and vertical tubes, (2) the two heat transfer mechanisms, i.e.,enhanced heat transfer for both horizontal and vertical tubes, (2) the two heat transfer mechanisms, i.e., enhanced heat transfer due to liquid agitation by bubbles generated and reduced heat transfer by the formation of large vapor slugs and bubble coalescence are different in two regions of low heat fluxes (q ≤ 50kW/m 2 ) and high heat fluxes (q > 50kW/m 2 ) depending on the orientation of tubes and the degree of surface roughness, and (3) the heat transfer rate decreases as the tube diameter is increased for both horizontal and vertical tubes, but the effect of tube diameter on the nucleate pool boiling heat transfer for vertical tubes is greater than that for horizontal tubes. Two empirical heat transfer correlations for q , one for horizontal tubes and the other for vertical tubes, are obtained in terms of surface roughness (ε) and tube diameter (D). In addition, a simple empirical correlation for nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficient (h b ) is obtained as a function of heat flux (q ) only. 9 figs., 4 tabs., 15 refs. (Author)

  7. Design and construction of a heat stage for investigations of samples by atomic force microscopy above ambient temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækmark, Thomas Rosleff; Bjørnholm, Thomas; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1997-01-01

    The construction from simple and cheap commercially available parts of a miniature heat stage for the direct heating of samples studied with a commercially available optical-lever-detection atomic force microscope is reported. We demonstrate that by using this heat stage, atomic resolution can...... be obtained on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite at 52 °C. The heat stage is of potential use for the investigation of biological material at physiological temperatures. ©1997 American Institute of Physics....

  8. Resistivity-Chemistry Integrated Approaches for Investigating Groundwater Salinity of Water Supply and Agricultural Activity at Island Coastal Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharuddin, M. F. T.; Masirin, M. I. M.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Azman, M. A. A.; Madun, A.

    2018-04-01

    Groundwater suitability for water supply and agriculture in an island coastal area may easily be influenced by seawater intrusion. The aim of this study was to investigate seawater intrusion to the suitability of the groundwater for water supply and oil palm cultivation on Carey Island in Malaysia. This is the first study that used integrated method of geo-electrical resistivity and hydrogeochemical methods to investigate seawater intrusion to the suitability of groundwater for water supply and oil palm cultivation at two different surface elevation and land cover. The relationship between earth resistivity, total dissolved solids and earth conductivity was derived with water type classifications and crop suitability classification according to salinity, used to identify water types and also oil palm tolerance to salinity. Results from the contour resistivity and conductivity maps showed that the area facing severe coastal erosion (east area) exhibited unsuitable groundwater condition for water supply and oil palm at the unconfined aquifer thickness of 7.8 m and 14.1 m, respectively. Comparing to the area that are still intact with mangrove (west area), at the same depth, groundwater condition exhibits suitable usage for both socioeconomic activities. Different characteristics of surface elevation and land cover are paramount factors influencing saltwater distribution at the west and east area. By the end of the twenty-first century there will no longer be suitable water for supply and oil palm plantation based on the local sea-level rise prediction and Ghyben–Herzberg assumption (sharp interface), focusing on the severe erosion area of the study site.

  9. Experimental investigation of gas heating and dissociation in a microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure