WorldWideScience

Sample records for heat generating plants

  1. French nuclear power plants for heat generation

    Girard, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The considerable importance that France attributes to nuclear energy is well known even though as a result of the economic crisis and the energy savings it is possible to observe a certain downward trend in the rate at which new power plants are being started up. In July 1983, a symbolic turning-point was reached - at more than 10 thousand million kW.h nuclear power accounted, for the first time, for more than 50% of the total amount of electricity generated, or approx. 80% of the total electricity output of thermal origin. On the other hand, the direct contribution - excluding the use of electricity - of nuclear energy to the heat market in France remains virtually nil. The first part of this paper discusses the prospects and realities of the application, at low and intermediate temperatures, of nuclear heat in France, while the second part describes the French nuclear projects best suited to the heat market (excluding high temperatures). (author)

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Acquisition Strategy

    Mizia, Ronald Eugene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-04-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C to 950°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor, and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. The purpose of this report is to address the acquisition strategy for the NGNP Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX).This component will be operated in flowing, impure helium on the primary and secondary side at temperatures up to 950°C. There are major high temperature design, materials availability, and fabrication issues that need to be addressed. The prospective materials are Alloys 617, 230, 800H and X, with Alloy 617 being the leading candidate for the use at 950°C. The material delivery schedule for these materials does not pose a problem for a 2018 start up as the vendors can quote reasonable delivery times at the moment. The product forms and amount needed must be finalized as soon as possible. An

  3. Nuclear heat generating plants - technical concepts and market potentials. Chapter 8

    Thoene, E.

    1988-01-01

    To determine the advantages and disadvantages of different heat generating systems, a comparison is made between nuclear heat generating plants and competing heat generating systems. Nuclear heat generating plant concepts in practice have to compete with a wide range of existing and new fossil heat generating technologies of the most different capacities, ranging from combined heat and power generation to individual heating in one-family houses. Heat generation costs are calculated by means of a dynamic annuity method from an economic point of view. The development of real prices of fossil energy sources is based on two scenarios characterized as follows: scenario I - insignificant price increase by the year 2000, then stagnant; scenario II - moderate price increase by the year 2010, then stagnant. As a result of that systems comparison it can be stated that the considered nuclear heat generating plants may be an interesting competitive heat generation option, provided the assumptions on which the study is based can be implemented. This applies especially to investment costs. At the same time those plants contribute to a diversification of energy source options on the heat market. Their use leads to a reduction of fossil fuel imports, increasing at the same time short- and long-term supply guarantees. If nuclear heat generating plants substitute fossil heat generating plants, or render the construction of new ones superfluous, they contribute to avoiding chemical air pollutants. (orig./UA) [de

  4. Large-Scale Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Generation at Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3

    Bergroth, N.

    2010-01-01

    Fortum has applied for a Decision in Principle concerning the construction of a new nuclear power plant unit (Loviisa 3) ranging from 2800-4600 MWth at its site located at the southern coast of Finland. An attractive alternative investigated is a co-generation plant designed for large-scale district heat generation for the Helsinki metropolitan area that is located approximately 75 km west of the site. The starting point is that the district heat generation capacity of 3 unit would be around 1 000 MWth.The possibility of generating district heat for the metropolitan area by Loviisa's two existing nuclear power plant units was investigated back in the 1980s, but it proved unpractical at the time. With the growing concern of the climate change and the subsequent requirements on heat and power generation, the idea is much more attractive today, when recognising its potential to decrease Finland's carbon dioxide emissions significantly. Currently the district heat generation in metropolitan area is based on coal and natural gas, producing some five to seven million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions annually. Large-scale combined heat and power (CHP) generation at the 3 unit could cut this figure by up to four million tonnes. This would decrease carbon dioxide emissions by as much as six percent. In addition, large-scale CHP generation would increase the overall efficiency of the new unit significantly and hence, reduce the environmental impact on the local marine environment by cutting heat discharges into the Gulf of Nuclear energy has been used for district heating in several countries both in dedicated nuclear heating plants and in CHP generation plants. However, the heat generation capacity is usually rather limited, maximum being around 250 MWth per unit. Set against this, the 3 CHP concept is much more ambitious, not only because of the much larger heat generation output envisaged, but also because the district heating water would have to be transported over a

  5. Certification of materials for steam generator condensor and regeneration heat exchanger for nuclear plant

    Stevanovicj, M.V.; Jovashevicj, V.J.; Jovashevicj, V.D.J.; Spasicj, Zh.Lj.

    1977-01-01

    In the construction of a nuclear power plant almost all known materials are used. The choice depends on working conditions. In this work standard specifications of contemporary materials that take part in larger quantities in the following components of the secondary circuit of PWR-type nuclear power plant are proposed: steam generator with moisture separator, condensor and regenerative heat eXchanger

  6. District heating system of Belgrade supplied from the co-generation plant 'Obrenovac' (Yugoslavia)

    Tomic, P.; Dobric, Z.; Studovic, M.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents most relevant technical and economic features of the Project called 'System for supplying Belgrade with heat' (SDGB) from the thermal power plant 'Obrenovac', based on domestic coal and reconstruction of condensing power plant for combined generation of electricity and heat for the needs of municipal energy consumption. The system is designed for transport thermal energy, with capacity of 730 MJ/s from the Thermal Power Plant 'Nikola Tesla' / A to the existing heat plant 'Novi Beograd' based on the natural gas. The paper also gives the comparison of most important technical and economic features of 'SDGB' Project with the similar Project of District Heating System for supplying Prague with the thermal energy from Thermal Power Plant Melnik. (Author)

  7. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  8. Design option of heat exchanger for the next generation nuclear plant - HTR2008-58175

    Oh, C. H.; Kim, E. S.

    2008-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very High temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) concept, will provide the first demonstration of a closed-loop Brayton cycle at a commercial scale, producing a few hundred megawatts of power in the form of electricity and hydrogen. The power conversion unit (PCU) for the NGNP will take advantage of the significantly higher reactor outlet temperatures of the VHTRs to provide higher efficiencies than can be achieved with the current generation of light water reactors. Besides demonstrating a system design that can be used directly for subsequent commercial deployment, the NGNP will demonstrate key technology elements that can be used in subsequent advanced power conversion systems for other Generation IV reactors. In anticipation of the design, development and procurement of an advanced power conversion system for the NGNP, the system integration of the NGNP and hydrogen plant was initiated to identify the important design and technology options that must be considered in evaluating the performance of the proposed NGNP. As part of the system integration of the VHTRs and the hydrogen production plant, the intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the process heat from VHTRs to the hydrogen plant. Therefore, the design and configuration of the intermediate heat exchanger is very important. This paper will include analysis of one stage versus two stage heat exchanger design configurations and simple stress analyses of a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE), helical coil heat exchanger, and shell/tube heat exchanger. (authors)

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of heat recovery steam generator in combined cycle power plant

    Ravi Kumar Naradasu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined cycle power plants play an important role in the present energy sector. The main challenge in designing a combined cycle power plant is proper utilization of gas turbine exhaust heat in the steam cycle in order to achieve optimum steam turbine output. Most of the combined cycle developers focused on the gas turbine output and neglected the role of the heat recovery steam generator which strongly affects the overall performance of the combined cycle power plant. The present paper is aimed at optimal utilization of the flue gas recovery heat with different heat recovery steam generator configurations of single pressure and dual pressure. The combined cycle efficiency with different heat recovery steam generator configurations have been analyzed parametrically by using first law and second law of thermodynamics. It is observed that in the dual cycle high pressure steam turbine pressure must be high and low pressure steam turbine pressure must be low for better heat recovery from heat recovery steam generator.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for

  11. Steam generators and waste heat boilers for process and plant engineers

    Ganapathy, V

    2014-01-01

    Incorporates Worked-Out Real-World ProblemsSteam Generators and Waste Heat Boilers: For Process and Plant Engineers focuses on the thermal design and performance aspects of steam generators, HRSGs and fire tube, water tube waste heat boilers including air heaters, and condensing economizers. Over 120 real-life problems are fully worked out which will help plant engineers in evaluating new boilers or making modifications to existing boiler components without assistance from boiler suppliers. The book examines recent trends and developments in boiler design and technology and presents novel idea

  12. Nuclear heat generating plants - technical concepts and market potentials. Chapter 11

    Hasenkopf, O.; Erhard, W.D.; Nonnenmacher, A.; Hanselmann, M.

    1988-01-01

    Within the framework of a case study under the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology project 'Nuclear heat generating plants - technological concepts and market potentials', the possible applications of such plants were studied giving the district heat supply network of the Technische Werke der Stadt Stuttgart AG (Technical Works of the City of Stuttgart, Inc.) as an example. The use of district heating systems concentrated specifically on areas identified for economical supply because of their topographical position, existing heat density, distance from power plants, and a reasonable delimination from the available gas network. Based on the results of optimization calculations made by the Stuttgart Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Conversion, the required investment capital can be estimated as a function of the amount of fuel savings under the Stuttgart case study. (orig./UA) [de

  13. Technology data for electricity and heat generating plants

    NONE

    2005-03-01

    The Danish Energy Authority and the two Danish electricity transmission and system operators, Elkraft System and Eltra, initiated updating of current technology catalogues in 2003. The first updated catalogue was published in March 2004. This report presents the results of the second phase of updating. The primary objective has been to establish a uniform, commonly accepted and up-to-date basis for energy planning activities, such as future outlooks, evaluations of security of supply and environmental impacts, climate change evaluations, and technical and economic analyses. The catalogue may furthermore be used as reference for evaluations of the development perspectives for the numerous technologies available for energy generation in relation to the programming of funding schemes for research, development and demonstration of emerging technologies. It has finally been the intention to offer the catalogue for the international audience, as a contribution to similar initiates aiming at forming a public and concerted knowledge base for international analyses and negotiations. A guiding principle for developing the catalogue has been to primarily rely on well-documented and public information, secondarily on invited expert advice. Since many experts are reluctant in estimating future quantitative performance data, the data tables are not complete, in the sense that most data tables show several blank spaces. This approach has been chosen in order to achieve data, which to some extent are equivalently reliable, rather than to risk a largely incoherent data set including unfounded guesses. (au)

  14. Thermoeconomic Analysis of Hybrid Power Plant Concepts for Geothermal Combined Heat and Power Generation

    Florian Heberle

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a thermo-economic analysis for a low-temperature Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC in a combined heat and power generation (CHP case. For the hybrid power plant, thermal energy input is provided by a geothermal resource coupled with the exhaust gases of a biogas engine. A comparison to alternative geothermal CHP concepts is performed by considering variable parameters like ORC working fluid, supply temperature of the heating network or geothermal water temperature. Second law efficiency as well as economic parameters show that hybrid power plants are more efficient compared to conventional CHP concepts or separate use of the energy sources.

  15. The thermoelectric generators use for waste heat utilization from cement plant

    Sztekler Karol

    2017-01-01

    Production often entails the formation of by-product which is waste heat. One of the equipment processing heat into electricity is a thermoelectric generator. Its operation is based on the principle of thermoelectric phenomenon, which is known as a Seebeck phenomenon. The simplicity of thermoelectric phenomena allows its use in various industries, in which the main waste product is in the form of heat with the temperature of several hundred degrees. The study analyses the possibility of the thermoelectric systems use for the waste heat utilization resulting in the cement production at the cement plant. The location and design of the thermoelectric system that could be implemented in cement plant is chosen. The analysis has been prepared in the IPSEpro software.

  16. Concept of a HTR modular plant for generation of process heat in a chemical plant

    1991-07-01

    This final report summarizes the results of a preliminary study on behalf of Buna AG and Leunawerke AG. With regard to the individual situations the study investigated the conditions for modular HTR-2 reactors to cover on-site process heat and electric power demands. HTR-2 reactor erection and operation were analyzed for their economic efficiency compared with fossil-fuel power plants. Considering the prospective product lines, the technical and economic conditions were developed in close cooperation with Buna AG and Leunawerke AG. The study focused on the technical integration of modular HTR reactors into plants with regard to safety concepts, on planning, acceptance and erection concepts which largely exclude uncalculable scheduling and financial risks, and on comparative economic analyses with regard to fossil-fuel power plants. (orig.) [de

  17. Equipment for secondary water distribution in heat exchanger, especially saturated steam generator for nuclear power plants and heat plants

    Riman, J; Manek, O; Rybnicek, J

    1979-09-15

    A special structure consisting of a system of channels and a distribution plate with ports in-built above the tube-plate of a vertical-type steam generator prevents secondary water vaporization in the space above the tube-plate and thus also salt and sludge sedimentation which causes increased corrosion of heat transfer tubes. The size of the distribution plate ports is variable in the radial direction. The distribution plate is divided by means of the system of channels into at least two parts. The middle section of each part is of the through-flow type.

  18. Design of reactor protection systems for HTR plants generating electric power and process heat problems and solutions

    Craemer, B.; Dahm, H.; Spillekothen, H.G.

    1982-06-01

    The design basis of the reactor protection system (RPS) for HTR plants generating process heat and electric power is briefly described and some particularities of process heat plants are indicated. Some particularly important or exacting technical measuring positions for the RPS of a process heat HTR with 500 MWsub(th) power (PNP 500) are described and current R + D work explained. It is demonstrated that a particularly simple RPS can be realized in an HTR with modular design. (author)

  19. Reactor type choice and characteristics for a small nuclear heat and electricity co-generation plant

    Liu Kukui; Li Manchang; Tang Chuanbao

    1997-01-01

    In China heat supply consumes more than 70 percent of the primary energy resource, which makes for heavy traffic and transportation and produces a lot of polluting materials such as NO x , SO x and CO 2 because of use of the fossil fuel. The utilization of nuclear power into the heat and electricity co-generation plant contributes to the global environmental protection. The basic concept of the nuclear system is an integral type reactor with three circuits. The primary circuit equipment is enclosed in and linked up directly with reactor vessel. The third circuit produces steam for heat and electricity supply. This paper presents basic requirements, reactor type choice, design characteristics, economy for a nuclear co-generation plant and its future application. The choice of the main parameters and the main technological process is the key problem of the nuclear plant design. To make this paper clearer, take for example a double-reactor plant of 450 x 2MW thermal power. There are two sorts of main technological processes. One is a water-water-steam process. Another is water-steam-steam process. Compared the two sorts, the design which adopted the water-water-steam technological process has much more advantage. The system is simplified, the operation reliability is increased, the primary pressure reduces a lot, the temperature difference between the secondary and the third circuits becomes larger, so the size and capacity of the main components will be smaller, the scale and the cost of the building will be cut down. In this design, the secondary circuit pressure is the highest among that of the three circuits. So the primary circuit radioactivity can not leak into the third circuit in case of accidents. (author)

  20. Themoeconomic optimization of triple pressure heat recovery steam generator operating parameters for combined cycle plants

    Mohammd Mohammed S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a method for optimization of operating parameters of a triple pressure heat recovery steam generator. Two types of optimization: (a thermodynamic and (b thermoeconomic were preformed. The purpose of the thermodynamic optimization is to maximize the efficiency of the plant. The selected objective for this purpose is minimization of the exergy destruction in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG. The purpose of the thermoeconomic optimization is to decrease the production cost of electricity. Here, the total annual cost of HRSG, defined as a sum of annual values of the capital costs and the cost of the exergy destruction, is selected as the objective function. The optimal values of the most influencing variables are obtained by minimizing the objective function while satisfying a group of constraints. The optimization algorithm is developed and tested on a case of CCGT plant with complex configuration. Six operating parameters were subject of optimization: pressures and pinch point temperatures of every three (high, intermediate and low pressure steam stream in the HRSG. The influence of these variables on the objective function and production cost are investigated in detail. The differences between results of thermodynamic and the thermoeconomic optimization are discussed.

  1. Nuclear Co-Generating Plants for Powering and Heating to Cleaning the Warsaw's Environment

    Baurski, J.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the Polish Government made a decision to introduce nuclear power to Poland. Two nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be constructed nearly at the same time - the first unit should start operation in 2020, and by 2030 there should be about 6000 MWe added to the national electrical grid. The Commissioner of the Government was nominated to introduce the Polish Nuclear Power Program (PNPP). One of the four vertically integrated - the biggest energy company (PGE - the Polish Energy Group with headquarters in Warsaw) was appointed to prepare investments. These activities are planned in four stages: I. up to 31.12.2010 - The PNPP will be prepared and the program must then be accepted by the Government. II. 2011 - 2013 - Sites will be determined, and the contract for construction of the first NPP will be closed. III. 2014 - 2015 - Technical specifications will be prepared and accepted according the law. IV. 2016 - 2020 - The first NPP in Poland will be constructed. At present, the Government is receiving proposals from some regions of Poland asking that they be chosen for the NPP. One of the obvious locations for the NPP is a 40-kilometer vicinity of Warsaw (1.8 mln inhabitants). The need for both electric power and heat is increasing because of the rapidly growing town. It gives the extremely valuable chance for a very high thermodynamic efficiency of 80% in co-generation instead of 33% (max 36% for EPR-1600) for NPP generated electric power only. The Warsaw heating system has a capacity of 3950 MWt and is the biggest among EU countries. It is the third biggest in the world. Two NPPs, each of 2 x 1000 MWe could be built on the Vistula River up and down the town. In 2005, UE calculated losses caused by gas emissions at 24 mld eur, and the span of human lives was six months shorter in western countries and 8 months shorter in Poland. Warsaw's atmosphere is very polluted also because there are four heat and power generating plants: three coal and one oil -fired. In these

  2. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    Mani, S.; Sokhansanj, S.; Tagore, S.; Turhollow, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam 3 ). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  3. Heat and electricity generating methods

    Buter, J.

    1977-01-01

    A short synopsis on the actual methods of heating of lodgings and of industrial heat generation is given. Electricity can be generated in steam cycles heated by burning of fossil fuels or by nuclear energy. A valuable contribution to the electricity economy is produced in the hydroelectric power plants. Besides these classical methods, also the different procedures of direct electricity generation are treated: thermoelectric, thermionic, magnetohydrodynamic power sources, solar and fuel cells. (orig.) [de

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2804)

    J. K. Wright

    2008-04-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for

  5. Plant concept of heat utilization of high temperature gas-cooled reactors. Co-generation and coal-gasification

    Tonogouchi, M.; Maeda, S.; Ide, A.

    1996-01-01

    In Japan, JAERI is now constructing the High temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) and the new era is coming for the development and utilization of HTR. Recognizing that the heat utilization of HTR would mitigate problems of environment and resources and contribute the effective use and steady supply of the energy, FAPIG organized a working group named 'HTR-HUC' to study the heat utilization of HTR in the field other than electric power generation. We chose three kinds of plants to study, 1) a co-generation plant in which the existing power units supplying steam and electricity can be replaced by a nuclear plant, 2) Coal gasification plant which can accelerate the clean use of coal and contribute stable supply of the energy and preservation of the environment in the world and 3) Hydrogen production plant which can help to break off the use of the new energy carrier HYDROGEN and will release people from the dependence of fossil energy. In this paper the former two plants, Co-generation chemical plant and Coal-gasification plant are focussed on. The main features, process flow and safety assessment of these plants are discussed. (J.P.N.)

  6. Economic impact of latent heat thermal energy storage systems within direct steam generating solar thermal power plants with parabolic troughs

    Seitz, M.; Johnson, M.; Hübner, S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Integration of a latent heat thermal energy storage system into a solar direct steam generation power cycle. • Parametric study of solar field and storage size for determination of the optimal layout. • Evaluation of storage impact on the economic performance of the solar thermal power plant. • Economic comparison of new direct steam generation plant layout with state-of-the-art oil plant layout. - Abstract: One possible way to further reduce levelized costs of electricity of concentrated solar thermal energy is to directly use water/steam as the primary heat transfer fluid within a concentrated collector field. This so-called direct steam generation offers the opportunity of higher operating temperatures and better exergy efficiency. A technical challenge of the direct steam generation technology compared to oil-driven power cycles is a competitive storage technology for heat transfer fluids with a phase change. Latent heat thermal energy storages are suitable for storing heat at a constant temperature and can be used for direct steam generation power plants. The calculation of the economic impact of an economically optimized thermal energy storage system, based on a latent heat thermal energy storage system with phase change material, is the main focus of the presented work. To reach that goal, a thermal energy storage system for a direct steam generation power plant with parabolic troughs in the solar field was thermally designed to determine the boundary conditions. This paper discusses the economic impact of the designed thermal energy storage system based on the levelized costs of electricity results, provided via a wide parametric study. A state-of-the-art power cycle with a primary and a secondary heat transfer fluid and a two-tank thermal energy storage is used as a benchmark technology for electricity generation with solar thermal energy. The benchmark and direct steam generation systems are compared to each other, based respectively

  7. Intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator designs for the HYLIFE-II fusion power plant using molten salts

    Lee, Y.T.; Hoffman, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The HYLIFE-II fusion power plant employs the molten salt, Flibe, for the liquid jets which form the self-healing 'first wall' of the reactor. The molten salt, sodium fluoroborate then transports the heat from the IHX's to the steam generators. The design and optimization of the IHX's and the steam generators for use with molten salts has been done as part of the HYLIFE-II conceptual design study. The results of this study are described, and reference designs of these large heat exchangers are selected to minimize the cost of electricity while satisfying other important constraints

  8. Optimised heat recovery steam generators for integrated solar combined cycle plants

    Peterseim, Jürgen H.; Huschka, Karsten

    2017-06-01

    The cost of concentrating solar power (CSP) plants is decreasing but, due to the cost differences and the currently limited value of energy storage, implementation of new facilities is still slow compared to photovoltaic systems. One recognized option to lower cost instantly is the hybridization of CSP with other energy sources, such as natural gas or biomass. Various references exist for the combination of CSP with natural gas in combined cycle plants, also known as Integrated Solar Combined Cycle (ISCC) plants. One problem with current ISCC concepts is the so called ISCC crisis, which occurs when CSP is not contributing and cycle efficiency falls below efficiency levels of solely natural gas only fired combined cycle plants. This paper analyses current ISCC concepts and compares them with two optimised designs. The comparison is based on a Kuraymat type ISCC plant and shows that cycle optimization enables a net capacity increase of 1.4% and additional daily generation of up to 7.9%. The specific investment of the optimised Integrated Solar Combined Cycle plant results in a 0.4% cost increase, which is below the additional net capacity and daily generation increase.

  9. Monitoring the risk of loss of heat sink during plant shutdowns at Bruce Generating Station 'A'

    Krishnan, K.S.; Mancuso, F.; Vecchiarelli, D.

    1996-01-01

    A relatively simple loss of shutdown heat sink fault tree model has been developed and used during unit outages at Bruce Nuclear Generation Station 'A' to assess, from a risk and reliability perspective, alternative heat sink strategies and to aid in decisions on allowable outage configurations. The model is adjusted to reflect the various unit configurations planned during a specific outage, and identifies events and event combinations leading to loss of fuel cooling. The calculated failure frequencies are compared to the limits consistent with corporate and international public safety goals. The importance measures generated by the interrogation of the fault tree model for each outage configuration are also used to reschedule configurations with high fuel damage frequency later into the outage and to control the configurations with relatively high probability of fuel damage to short intervals at the most appropriate time into the outage. (author)

  10. Geothermal Power Generation Plant

    Boyd, Tonya [Oregon Inst. of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR (United States). Geo-Heat Center

    2013-12-01

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196°F resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  11. Modeling a Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger with RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to design a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and carry out Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation using RELAP5-3D. Helium was chosen as the coolant in the primary and secondary sides of the heat exchanger. The design of PCHE is critical for the LOCA simulations. For purposes of simplicity, a straight channel configuration was assumed. A parallel intermediate heat exchanger configuration was assumed for the RELAP5 model design. The RELAP5 modeling also required the semicircular channels in the heat exchanger to be mapped to rectangular channels. The initial RELAP5 run outputs steady state conditions which were then compared to the heat exchanger performance theory to ensure accurate design is being simulated. An exponential loss of pressure transient was simulated. This LOCA describes a loss of coolant pressure in the primary side over a 20 second time period. The results for the simulation indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the loss of pressure occurs, heat transfers from the secondary loop to the primary loop.

  12. Monitoring of the energy performance of a district heating CHP plant based on biomass boiler and ORC generator

    Prando, Dario; Renzi, Massimiliano; Gasparella, Andrea; Baratieri, Marco

    2015-01-01

    More than seventy district heating (DH) plants based on biomass are operating in South Tyrol (Italy) and most of them supply heat to residential districts. Almost 20% of them are cogenerative systems, thus enabling primary energy savings with respect to the separate production of heat and power. However, the actual performance of these systems in real operation can considerably differ from the nominal one. The main objectives of this work are the assessment of the energy performance of a biomass boiler coupled with an Organic Rankine Cycle (i.e. ORC) generator under real operating conditions and the identification of its potential improvements. The fluxes of energy and mass of the plant have been measured onsite. This experimental evaluation has been supplemented with a thermodynamic model of the ORC generator, calibrated with the experimental data, which is capable to predict the system performance under different management strategies of the system. The results have highlighted that a decrease of the DH network temperature of 10 °C can improve the electric efficiency of the ORC generator of one percentage point. Moreover, a DH temperature reduction could decrease the main losses of the boiler, namely the exhaust latent thermal loss and the exhaust sensible thermal loss, which account for 9% and 16% of the boiler input power, respectively. The analysis of the plant has pointed out that the ORC pump, the flue gases extractor, the thermal oil pump and the condensation section fan are the main responsible of the electric self-consumption. Finally, the negative effect of the subsidisation on the performance of the plant has been discussed. - Highlights: • Energy performance of a biomass boiler coupled to an ORC turbine in real operation. • Potential improvements of a CHP plant connected to a DH network. • Performance prediction by means of a calibrated ORC thermodynamic model. • Influence of the DH temperature on the electric efficiency. • Impact of the

  13. Optimal sizing of a multi-source energy plant for power heat and cooling generation

    Barbieri, E.S.; Dai, Y.J.; Morini, M.; Pinelli, M.; Spina, P.R.; Sun, P.; Wang, R.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-source systems for the fulfilment of electric, thermal and cooling demand of a building can be based on different technologies (e.g. solar photovoltaic, solar heating, cogeneration, heat pump, absorption chiller) which use renewable, partially renewable and fossil energy sources. Therefore, one of the main issues of these kinds of multi-source systems is to find the appropriate size of each technology. Moreover, building energy demands depend on the climate in which the building is located and on the characteristics of the building envelope, which also influence the optimal sizing. This paper presents an analysis of the effect of different climatic scenarios on the multi-source energy plant sizing. For this purpose a model has been developed and has been implemented in the Matlab ® environment. The model takes into consideration the load profiles for electricity, heating and cooling for a whole year. The performance of the energy systems are modelled through a systemic approach. The optimal sizing of the different technologies composing the multi-source energy plant is investigated by using a genetic algorithm, with the goal of minimizing the primary energy consumption only, since the cost of technologies and, in particular, the actual tariff and incentive scenarios depend on the specific country. Moreover economic considerations may lead to inadequate solutions in terms of primary energy consumption. As a case study, the Sino-Italian Green Energy Laboratory of the Shanghai Jiao Tong University has been hypothetically located in five cities in different climatic zones. The load profiles are calculated by means of a TRNSYS ® model. Results show that the optimal load allocation and component sizing are strictly related to climatic data (e.g. external air temperature and solar radiation)

  14. Development of Natural Gas Fired Combined Cycle Plant for Tri-Generation of Power, Cooling and Clean Water Using Waste Heat Recovery: Techno-Economic Analysis

    Mohan, Gowtham; Dahal, Sujata; Kumar, Uday; Martin, Andrew; Kayal, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Tri-generation is one of the most efficient ways for maximizing the utilization of available energy. Utilization of waste heat (flue gases) liberated by the Al-Hamra gas turbine power plant is analyzed in this research work for simultaneous production of: (a) electricity by combining steam rankine cycle using heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); (b) clean water by air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) plant; and (c) cooling by single stage vapor absorption chiller (VAC). The flue gases liber...

  15. Theoretical Design of a Thermosyphon for Efficient Process Heat Removal from Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) for Production of Hydrogen

    Piyush Sabharwall; Fred Gunnerson; Akira Tokuhiro; Vivek Utgiker; Kevan Weaver; Steven Sherman

    2007-01-01

    The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase Thermosyphon heat transfer performance with various alkali metals. Thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. Heat transport occurs via evaporation and condensation, and the heat transport fluid is re-circulated by gravitational force. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. For process heat, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) are required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant in the most efficient way possible. The production of power at higher efficiency using Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production requires both heat at higher temperatures (up to 1000 C) and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. The purpose for selecting a compact heat exchanger is to maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. The IHX design requirements are governed by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet of the NGNP (900 C, based on the current capabilities of NGNP), and the temperatures in the hydrogen production plant. Spiral Heat Exchangers (SHE's) have superior heat transfer characteristics, and are less susceptible to fouling. Further, heat losses to surroundings are minimized because of its compact configuration. SHEs have never been examined for phase-change heat transfer applications. The research presented provides useful information for thermosyphon design and Spiral Heat Exchanger

  16. Solar thermal power plants for heat and electricity generation; Presentacion de plantas termosolares para generacion de calor y energia electrica

    Estrada Cajigal, V [Solartronic S. A. de C. V., Cuernavaca (Mexico); Manzini, F; Sanchez, A [Laboratorio de Energia Solar (IIM-UNAM), Temixco (Mexico)

    1993-12-31

    Solar thermal technology is presented for concentration into a point for the production of heat and energy in small and large scale, emphasis is made on the capacity for the combination with current technologies using fossil fuels for electricity generation and process steam, increasing the global efficiency of the power plants and notably reducing the pollutants emission to the air during the insolation hours. It is successfully compared with other solar-thermal technologies. [Espanol] Se presenta la tecnologia termosolar de concentracion puntual para produccion de calor y de energia en pequena y gran escala, se enfatiza su capacidad de combinacion con las tecnologias actuales que utilizan combustibles fosiles para produccion de electricidad y vapor de proceso, aumentando la eficiencia global de las plantas y reduciendo notablemente sus emisiones contaminantes a la atmosfera durante las horas de insolacion. Se le compara exitosamente con otras tecnologias termosolares.

  17. Solar thermal power plants for heat and electricity generation; Presentacion de plantas termosolares para generacion de calor y energia electrica

    Estrada Cajigal, V. [Solartronic S. A. de C. V., Cuernavaca (Mexico); Manzini, F.; Sanchez, A. [Laboratorio de Energia Solar (IIM-UNAM), Temixco (Mexico)

    1992-12-31

    Solar thermal technology is presented for concentration into a point for the production of heat and energy in small and large scale, emphasis is made on the capacity for the combination with current technologies using fossil fuels for electricity generation and process steam, increasing the global efficiency of the power plants and notably reducing the pollutants emission to the air during the insolation hours. It is successfully compared with other solar-thermal technologies. [Espanol] Se presenta la tecnologia termosolar de concentracion puntual para produccion de calor y de energia en pequena y gran escala, se enfatiza su capacidad de combinacion con las tecnologias actuales que utilizan combustibles fosiles para produccion de electricidad y vapor de proceso, aumentando la eficiencia global de las plantas y reduciendo notablemente sus emisiones contaminantes a la atmosfera durante las horas de insolacion. Se le compara exitosamente con otras tecnologias termosolares.

  18. Heating plant privatization stagnates

    Janoska, J.; Benka, M.; Sobinkovic, B.; Haluza, I.

    2005-01-01

    The state has been talking about privatization of 6 municipal heating plants since 2001. The tenders were to start last year. But nothing has happened and the future is uncertain. The city councils would prefer to receive, if not 100%, then at least a majority stake in the heating plants free of charge. But the Cabinet has decided to sell 51% to investors. The privatization agency - the National Property Fund (FNM) is preparing a proposal to increase the stake offered for sale to 67%. According to information provided by the FNM the sale will begin after Cabinet approval. The Fund intends to apply the same model to the sale of all the heating plants. Last year, a major German company Verbundnetz Gas declared its interest in purchasing large municipal heating plants in Slovakia. But it has been waiting for a response ever since. The French company - Dalkia, which has 10-years' experience of doing business in Slovakia, is interested in all the heating plants to be offered for sale. The Austrian company - Stefe is not new to the business either, it is interested mainly in the regions where it has already established itself - Central and Eastern Slovakia. Strategic investors expect financial groups to show interest too. The Penta Group has not hid its ambitions - it has already privatised a company which represents the key to the future development of heat management in Bratislava - Paroplynovy cyklus. Whereas Penta is not new to the heat production business another financial group - Slavia Capital is still surveying the sector. Should it not succeed, it plans several projects that would allow it to take a stake in the sector

  19. On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers, Volumes 1, 2

    Upadhyaya, Belle R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hines, J. Wesley [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Lu, Baofu [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2005-06-03

    The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001 September 2004. Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance.Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. Development of advanced signal processing methods using

  20. Monitoring wood heating plants

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The overall aim of the project is to support the increased use of biomass heating plant in the UK by improving the quality and quantity of information available to suppliers and users. This aim will be achieved by: providing a qualitative assessment of the operational performance of a representative range of biomass heating installations including summaries of technical information; providing good case studies for a range of installations addressing the varied market demands; collating performance data of existing installations so as to improve the performance and/or reduce capital and operating costs of existing and future installations; and providing basic operator training and recommending methods optimising/improving plant performance. (author)

  1. On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Wesley Hines, J.

    2004-01-01

    The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001-September 2004. (1) Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. (2) Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. (3) Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. (4) Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. (5) Development of advanced signal

  2. On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers.

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

    2004-09-27

    The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001-September 2004. (1) Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. (2) Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. (3) Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. (4) Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. (5) Development of advanced signal

  3. Development of Natural Gas Fired Combined Cycle Plant for Tri-Generation of Power, Cooling and Clean Water Using Waste Heat Recovery: Techno-Economic Analysis

    Gowtham Mohan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tri-generation is one of the most efficient ways for maximizing the utilization of available energy. Utilization of waste heat (flue gases liberated by the Al-Hamra gas turbine power plant is analyzed in this research work for simultaneous production of: (a electricity by combining steam rankine cycle using heat recovery steam generator (HRSG; (b clean water by air gap membrane distillation (AGMD plant; and (c cooling by single stage vapor absorption chiller (VAC. The flue gases liberated from the gas turbine power cycle is the prime source of energy for the tri-generation system. The heat recovered from condenser of steam cycle and excess heat available at the flue gases are utilized to drive cooling and desalination cycles which are optimized based on the cooling energy demands of the villas. Economic and environmental benefits of the tri-generation system in terms of cost savings and reduction in carbon emissions were analyzed. Energy efficiency of about 82%–85% is achieved by the tri-generation system compared to 50%–52% for combined cycles. Normalized carbon dioxide emission per MW·h is reduced by 51.5% by implementation of waste heat recovery tri-generation system. The tri-generation system has a payback period of 1.38 years with cumulative net present value of $66 million over the project life time.

  4. Biofuelled heating plants

    Gulliksson, Hans; Wennerstaal, L.; Zethraeus, B.; Johansson, Bert-Aake

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to serve as a basis to enable establishment and operation of small and medium-sized bio-fuel plants, district heating plants and local district heating plants. Furthermore, the purpose of this report is to serve as a guideline and basis when realizing projects, from the first concept to established plant. Taking into account all the phases, from selection of heating system, fuel type, selection of technical solutions, authorization request or application to operate a plant, planning, construction and buying, inspection, performance test, take-over and control system of the plant. Another purpose of the report is to make sure that best available technology is used and to contribute to continuous development of the technology. The report deals mainly with bio-fuelled plants in the effect range 0.3 to10 MW. The term 'plant' refers to combined power and heating plants as well as 'simpler' district heating plants. The last-mentioned is also often referred to as 'local heating plant'. In this context, the term bio fuel refers to a wide range of fuel types. The term bio fuel includes processed fractions like powders, pellets, and briquettes along with unprocessed fractions, such as by-products from the forest industry; chips and bark. Bio fuels also include straw, energy crops and cereal waste products, but these have not been expressly studied in this report. The report is structured with appendixes regarding the various phases of the projects, with the purpose of serving as a helping handbook, or manual for new establishment, helping out with technical and administrative advice and environmental requirements. Plants of this size are already expanding considerably, and the need for guiding principles for design/technology and environmental requirements is great. These guiding principles should comply with the environmental legislation requirements, and must contain advice and recommendations for bio fuel plants in this effect range, also in

  5. Design and System Analysis of Quad-Generation Plant Based on Biomass Gasification Integrated with District Heating

    Rudra, Souman

    alternative by upgrading existing district heating plant. It provides a generic modeling framework to design flexible energy system in near future. These frameworks address the three main issues arising in the planning and designing of energy system: a) socio impact at both planning and proses design level; b...... in this study. The overall aim of this work is to provide a complete assessment of the technical potential of biomass gasification for local heat and power supply in Denmark and replace of natural gas for the production. This study also finds and defines the future areas of research in the gasification......, it possible to lay a foundation for future gasification based power sector to produce flexible output such as electricity, heat, chemicals or bio-fuels by improving energy system of existing DHP(district heating plant) integrating gasification technology. The present study investigate energy system...

  6. An innovative ORC power plant layout for heat and power generation from medium- to low-temperature geothermal resources

    Fiaschi, Daniele; Lifshitz, Adi; Manfrida, Giampaolo; Tempesti, Duccio

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Explotation of medium temperature geothermal resource with ORC–CHP is investigated. • A new CHP configuration to provide higher temperature to thermal user is proposed. • Several organic fluids and wide range of heat demand are studied. • The system produces higher power (almost 55%) in comparison to typical layouts. • Optimal working fluids vary with the characteristics of the heat demand. - Abstract: Medium temperature (up to 170 °C), water dominated geothermal resources are the most widespread in the world. The binary geothermal-ORC power plants are the most suitable energy conversion systems for this kind of resource. Specifically, combined heat and power (CHP) systems have the potential to improve the efficiency in exploiting the geothermal resources by cascading the geothermal fluid heat carrier to successively lower temperature users, thus increasing first and second law efficiency of the entire power plant. However, geothermal CHPs usually extract heat from the geofluid either in parallel or in series to the ORC, and usually provide only low temperature heat, which is seldom suitable for industrial use. In this paper, a new CHP configuration, called Cross Parallel CHP, has been proposed and analyzed. It aims to provide higher temperature heat suitable for industrial use, allowing the exploitation of geothermal resources even in areas where district heating is not needed. The proposed CHP allows the reduction of the irreversibilities in the heat exchangers and the loss to the environment related to the re-injection of geofluid, thus producing higher electric power output while satisfying, at the same time, the heat demand of the thermal utility for a wide range of temperatures and mass flow rates (80–140 °C; 3–13 kg/s). Several organic fluids are investigated and the related optimizing working conditions are found by a built in procedure making use of genetic algorithms. The results show that the optimal working fluids and

  7. Co-generation and innovative heat storage systems in small-medium CSP plants for distributed energy production

    Giaconia, Alberto; Montagnino, Fabio; Paredes, Filippo; Donato, Filippo; Caputo, Giampaolo; Mazzei, Domenico

    2017-06-01

    CSP technologies can be applied for distributed energy production, on small-medium plants (on the 1 MW scale), to satisfy the needs of local communities, buildings and districts. In this perspective, reliable, low-cost, and flexible small/medium multi-generative CSP plants should be developed. Four pilot plants have been built in four Mediterranean countries (Cyprus, Egypt, Jordan, and Italy) to demonstrate the approach. In this paper, the plant built in Italy is presented, with specific innovations applied in the linear Fresnel collector design and the Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system, based on a single the use of molten salts but specifically tailored for small scale plants.

  8. Micro thrust and heat generator

    Garcia, E.J.

    1998-11-17

    A micro thrust and heat generator have a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA). 30 figs.

  9. Technical and economical analyses of combined heat and power generation from distillers grains and corn stover in ethanol plants

    Wang, Lijun; Hanna, Milford A.; Weller, Curtis L.; Jones, David D.

    2009-01-01

    The technical and economical feasibilities of a novel integrated biomass gasification and fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) system were analyzed for supplying heat and power in an ethanol plant from distillers grains (DG) and corn stover. In a current dry-grind plant with an annual production capacity of 189 million liters (50 million gallons) of ethanol, the energy cost for ethanol production using natural gas at a price of 6.47 US$/GJ for processing heat and commercial grid at a price of 0.062 US$/kWh for electrical power supply was 0.094 US$/liter. If the integrated CHP system using wet DG with 64.7% moisture on a wet basis at 105 US$/dry tonne and corn stover with 20% moisture at 30 US$/dry tonne as feedstock was used to supply heat and power in the ethanol plant, the energy costs for ethanol production would be 0.101 US$/liter and 0.070 US$/liter, which are 107% and 75% of the current energy cost for ethanol production, respectively. To meet the demand of processing heat and power in the ethanol plant, the integrated CHP system required 22.1 dry tonnes of corn stover with 20% moisture or 14.5 dry tonnes of DG with 64.7% moisture on a wet basis per hour, compared with the available 18.8 dry tonnes of DG per hour in the ethanol plant. High-value chemicals such as policosanols, phytosterols and free fatty acids can be extracted out of the raw DG to reduce the cost of DG as a feedstock of the integrated CHP system. The energy cost for ethanol production using the integrated CHP system with corn stover and DG as the feedstock for supplying heat and power can be reduced further by increasing ethanol production scale, decreasing the moisture content of biomass feedstock, and decreasing thermal energy to electricity output ratio of the CHP system. In terms of the energy efficiency of the integrated CHP system and the energy cost for ethanol production, the moisture content of the feedstock going into the integrated CHP should be lower than 70% on a wet basis

  10. Participation of nuclear power plants in variable operation regimes under conditions of combined electric power and heat generation

    Rydzi, S.

    1988-01-01

    The incorporation of nuclear power units in the control of the output of an electric power system is affected by technical and economic factors as well as by the manner of heat take-off from the nuclear power unit for heating purposes. The effect was therefore studied of the technological solution of converting the heat output of WWER-440 units to operating parameters of turbines in nonrated regimes of operation. Some results of the study are graphically represented. An analysis was also made of limitations preventing WWER-440 units from supplying heat with regard to their incorporation in the electric power transmission system. The results show that using nuclear power units for district heating will in the future strictly determine the seasonal shut-down of nuclear units for fuel exchange and overhauls. This could interfere with the considered concept of the 1.5 year duty time of WWER-440 reactors. With regard to the economy of operation of the nuclear power system and reduced demands on weekend unloading it will be necessary to incorporate in the power system pumped-storage power plants with one-week pumped-storage systems. (Z.M.). 5 figs., 2 tabs., 6 refs

  11. Next Generation Microchannel Heat Exchangers

    Ohadi, Michael; Dessiatoun, Serguei; Cetegen, Edvin

    2013-01-01

    In Next Generation Microchannel Heat Exchangers, the authors’ focus on the new generation highly efficient heat exchangers and presentation of novel data and technical expertise not available in the open literature.  Next generation micro channels offer record high heat transfer coefficients with pressure drops much less than conventional micro channel heat exchangers. These inherent features promise fast penetration into many mew markets, including high heat flux cooling of electronics, waste heat recovery and energy efficiency enhancement applications, alternative energy systems, as well as applications in mass exchangers and chemical reactor systems. The combination of up to the minute research findings and technical know-how make this book very timely as the search for high performance heat and mass exchangers that can cut costs in materials consumption intensifies.

  12. Technical and economic analysis of electricity generation from forest, fossil, and wood-waste fuels in a Finnish heating plant

    Palander, Teijo

    2011-01-01

    The Finnish energy industry is subject to policy decisions regarding renewable energy production and energy efficiency. Conventional electricity generation has environmental side-effects that may cause global warming. Renewable fuels are superior because they offer near-zero net emissions. In this study, I investigated a heating mill's ability to generate electricity from forest fuels in southern Finland on a 1-year strategic decision-making horizon. I solved the electricity generation problem using optimization of the energy products and fuel mixtures based on energy efficiency and forest technology. The decision environment was complicated by the sequence-dependent procurement chains for forest fuels. The optimal product and fuel mixtures were selected by minimizing procurement costs, maximizing production revenues, and minimizing energy losses. The combinatorial complexity of the problem required the use of adaptive techniques to solve a multiple-objective linear programming system with industrial relevance. I discuss the properties of the decision-support system and methodology and illustrate pricing of electricity generation based on real industrial data. The electricity-generation, -purchase, and -sales decisions are made based on a comprehensive technical and economic analysis that accounts for procurement of local forest fuels in a holistic supply chain model. -- Highlights: → I use adaptive techniques to solve a multiple-objective linear programming system with industrial relevance. → I investigated a heating mill's ability to generate electricity from forest fuels. → The electricity-generation, -purchase, and -sales decisions are made based on a comprehensive technical and economic analysis. → The optimal product and fuel mixtures were selected by minimizing procurement costs, maximizing production revenues, and minimizing energy losses.

  13. Third generation nuclear plants

    Barré, Bertrand

    2012-05-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, a new generation of Light Water Reactors has been designed and is being built. Third generation nuclear plants are equipped with dedicated systems to insure that if the worst accident were to occur, i.e. total core meltdown, no matter how low the probability of such occurrence, radioactive releases in the environment would be minimal. This article describes the EPR, representative of this "Generation III" and a few of its competitors on the world market.

  14. Heat generated by knee prostheses.

    Pritchett, James W

    2006-01-01

    Temperature sensors were placed in 50 knees in 25 patients who had one or both joints replaced. Temperature recordings were made before walking, after walking, and after cycling. The heat generated in healthy, arthritic, and replaced knees was measured. The knee replacements were done using eight different prostheses. A rotating hinge knee prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 7 degrees C in 20 minutes and 9 degrees C in 40 minutes. An unconstrained ceramic femoral prosthesis articulating with a polyethylene tibial prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 4 degrees C compared with a healthy resting knee. The other designs using a cobalt-chrome alloy and high-density polyethylene had temperature increases of 5 degrees-7 degrees C with exercise. Frictional heat generated in a prosthetic knee is not immediately dissipated and may result in wear, creep, and other degenerative processes in the high-density polyethylene. Extended periods of elevated temperature in joints may inhibit cell growth and perhaps contribute to adverse performance via bone resorption or component loosening. Prosthetic knees generate more heat with activity than healthy or arthritic knees. More-constrained knee prostheses generate more heat than less-constrained prostheses. A knee with a ceramic femoral component generates less heat than a knee with the same design using a cobalt-chromium alloy.

  15. Heat operated cryogenic electrical generator

    Fletcher, J.C.; Wang, T.C.; Saffren, M.M.; Elleman, D.D.

    1975-01-01

    An electrical generator useful for providing electrical power in deep space, is disclosed. The subject electrical generator utilizes the unusual hydrodynamic property exhibited by liquid helium as it is converted to and from a superfluid state to cause opposite directions of rotary motion for a rotor cell thereof. The physical motion of said rotor cell is employed to move a magnetic field provided by a charged superconductive coil mounted on the exterior of said cell. An electrical conductor is placed in surrounding proximity to said cell to interact with the moving magnetic field provided by the superconductive coil and thereby generate electrical energy. A heat control arrangement is provided for the purpose of causing the liquid helium to be partially converted to and from a superfluid state by being cooled and heated, respectively. (U.S.)

  16. Cogeneration steam turbine plant for district heating of Berovo (Macedonia)

    Armenski, Slave; Dimitrov, Konstantin

    2000-01-01

    A plant for combined heat and electric power production, for central heating of the town Berovo (Macedonia) is proposed. The common reason to use a co-generation unit is the energy efficiency and a significant reduction of environmental pollution. A coal dust fraction from B rik' - Berovo coal mine is the main energy resource for cogeneration steam turbine plant. The heat consumption of town Berovo is analyzed and determined. Based on the energy consumption of a whole power plant, e. i. the plant for combined and simultaneous production of power is proposed. All necessary facilities of cogeneration plant is examined and determined. For proposed cogeneration steam turbine power plant for combined heat and electric production it is determined: heat and electric capacity of the plant, annually heat and electrical quantity production and annually coal consumption, the total investment of the plant, the price of both heat and electric energy as well as the pay back period. (Authors)

  17. SECURE nuclear district heating plant

    Nilsson; Hannus, M.

    1978-01-01

    The role foreseen for the SECURE (Safe Environmentally Clean Urban REactor) nuclear district heating plant is to provide the baseload heating needs of primarily the larger and medium size urban centers that are outside the range of waste heat supply from conventional nuclear power stations. The rationale of the SECURE concept is that the simplicity in design and the inherent safety advantages due to the use of low temperatures and pressures should make such reactors economically feasible in much smaller unit sizes than nuclear power reactors and should make their urban location possible. It is felt that the present design should be safe enough to make urban underground location possible without restriction according to any criteria based on actual risk evaluation. From the environmental point of view, this is a municipal heat supply plant with negligible pollution. Waste heat is negligible, gaseous radioactivity release is negligible, and there is no liquid radwaste release. Economic comparisons show that the SECURE plant is competitive with current fossil-fueled alternatives. Expected future increase in energy raw material prices will lead to additional energy cost advantages to the SECURE plant

  18. Power generation from residual industrial heat

    Nguyen, T.Q.; Slawnwhite, J.D.; Boulama, K.Goni

    2010-01-01

    Industrial plants continuously reject large amounts of thermal energy through warm liquid or gaseous effluents during normal operation. These energy losses contribute to an inflation of production costs and also threaten the environment. This paper investigates methods of recovering the residual low grade thermal energy and converting it into higher quality mechanical energy using the thermodynamic Rankine cycle principle. For the temperature range of the available thermal energy, water was shown to be a poor working fluid for the conversion system, thus several potential working fluids, including ammonia, synthetic refrigerants, and organic compounds have been considered as alternatives. A comparative analysis led to the identification of different performance evaluation criteria. For example, the water-based Rankine cycle and, to a lesser extent, the ammonia-based Rankine cycle proved to be interesting when the power generation potential per unit working fluid mass flow rate was considered. On the other hand, Rankine-like cycles using dry hydrocarbon working fluids proved much more interesting in terms of energy conversion efficiency, as well as in terms of the net mechanical power generation potential for a given heat source. All performance indicators were low at low temperatures, and improved as the primary heat source was available at higher temperatures. This paper also discusses the influence of various external and internal operating parameters, such as heat source and heat sink temperatures, turbine and pump isentropic efficiencies and the addition of an internal heat exchanger on the overall performance of the energy recovery and conversion system.

  19. Heating unit of Berovo by co-generation (Macedonia)

    Armenski, Slave; Dimitrov, Konstantin; Tashevski, Done

    1999-01-01

    A plant for combined heat and electric power production, for central heating of the town Berovo (Macedonia) is proposed. The common reason to use a co-generation unit is the energy efficiency and a significant reduction of environmental pollution. The heat consumption of town Berovo is analyzed and determined. Based on the energy consumption of a whole power plant, e. i. the plant for combined and simultaneous production of power is proposed. The quantity of annually heat and electrical production and annually coal consumption are estimated. (Author)

  20. Improvements to thermal plants for generating energy

    Pacault, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    Said invention relates to a procedure for superheating steam intended for steam cycled thermal plants of energy production, and particularly nuclear power plants. Said procedure combines two different working modes. According to the first working mode, the live steam is taken from the steam generator, mechanically compressed and the heat is partly transferred to the working fluid. According to the second working mode the heat is taken from an auxiliary fluid heated by an independent thermal source, distinct from the principal thermal source of the plant and this heat is partly transferred to the working fluid. A combination of both working modes enables the superheating of the working fluid to be obtained before it inflows the turbine and/or between two stages of said turbine [fr

  1. Heat recovery from nuclear power plants

    Safa, H.

    2012-01-01

    The thermodynamic efficiency of a standard Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is around 33%. Therefore, about two third of the heat generated by the nuclear fuel is literally wasted in the environment. Given the fact that the steam coming out from the high pressure turbine is superheated, it could be advantageously used for non electrical applications, particularly for district heating. Considering the technological improvements achieved these last years in heat piping insulation, it is now perfectly feasible to envisage heat transport over quite long distances, exceeding 200 km, with affordable losses. Therefore, it could be energetically wise to revise the modifications required on present reactors to perform heat extraction without impeding the NPP operation. In this paper, the case of a French reactor is studied showing that a large fraction of the wasted nuclear heat can be actually recovered and transported to be injected in the heat distribution network of a large city. Some technical and economical aspects of nuclear district heating application are also discussed. (author)

  2. Heating plant overcomes coal crisis

    Sobinkovic, B.

    2006-01-01

    At the last moment Kosice managed to overcome the threat of a more than 30-percent heating price increase. The biggest local heat producer, Teplaren Kosice, is running out of coal supplies. The only alternative would be gas, which is far more expensive. The reason for this situation was a dispute of the heating plant with one of its suppliers, Kimex. Some days ago, the dispute was settled and the heating plant is now expecting the first wagon loads of coal to arrive. These are eagerly awaited, as its supplies will not last for more than a month. It all started with a public tender for a coal supplier. Teplaren Kosice (TEKO) announced the tender for the delivery of 120,000 tons of coal in June. Kimex, one of the traditional and biggest suppliers, was disqualified in the course of the tender. The winners of the tender were Slovenergo, Bratislava and S-Plus Trade, Vranov nad Toplou. TEKO signed contracts with them but a district court in Kosice prohibited the company from purchasing coal from these contractors. Kimex filed a complaint claiming that it was disqualified unlawfully. Based on this the court issued a preliminary ruling prohibiting the purchase of coal from the winners of the tender. The heating plant had to wait for the final verdict. The problem was then solved by the company's new Board of Directors, who were appointed in mid October who managed to sign new contracts with the two winners and Kimex. The new contracts cover the purchase of 150-thousand tons of coal, which is 30,000 more than in the original tender specification. Each company will supply one third. (authors)

  3. On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Hines, J. Wesley

    2004-01-01

    Integrity monitoring and flaw diagnostics of flat beams and tubular structures was investigated in this research task using guided acoustic signals. A piezo-sensor suite was deployed to activate and collect Lamb wave signals that propagate along metallic specimens. The dispersion curves of Lamb waves along plate and tubular structures are generated through numerical analysis. Several advanced techniques were explored to extract representative features from acoustic time series. Among them, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is a recently developed technique for the analysis of non-linear and transient signals. A moving window method was introduced to generate the local peak characters from acoustic time series, and a zooming window technique was developed to localize the structural flaws. The time-frequency analysis and pattern recognition techniques were combined for classifying structural defects in brass tubes. Several types of flaws in brass tubes were tested, both in the air and in water. The techniques also proved to be effective under background/process noise. A detailed theoretical analysis of Lamb wave propagation was performed and simulations were carried out using the finite element software system ABAQUS. This analytical study confirmed the behavior of the acoustic signals acquired from the experimental studies. The report presents the background the analysis of acoustic signals acquired from piezo-electric transducers for structural defect monitoring. A comparison of the use of time-frequency techniques, including the Hilbert-Huang transform, is presented. The report presents the theoretical study of Lamb wave propagation in flat beams and tubular structures, and the need for mode separation in order to effectively perform defect diagnosis. The results of an extensive experimental study of detection, location, and isolation of structural defects in flat aluminum beams and brass tubes are presented. The results of this research show the feasibility of on

  4. On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

    2004-09-27

    Integrity monitoring and flaw diagnostics of flat beams and tubular structures was investigated in this research task using guided acoustic signals. A piezo-sensor suite was deployed to activate and collect Lamb wave signals that propagate along metallic specimens. The dispersion curves of Lamb waves along plate and tubular structures are generated through numerical analysis. Several advanced techniques were explored to extract representative features from acoustic time series. Among them, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is a recently developed technique for the analysis of non-linear and transient signals. A moving window method was introduced to generate the local peak characters from acoustic time series, and a zooming window technique was developed to localize the structural flaws. The time-frequency analysis and pattern recognition techniques were combined for classifying structural defects in brass tubes. Several types of flaws in brass tubes were tested, both in the air and in water. The techniques also proved to be effective under background/process noise. A detailed theoretical analysis of Lamb wave propagation was performed and simulations were carried out using the finite element software system ABAQUS. This analytical study confirmed the behavior of the acoustic signals acquired from the experimental studies. The report presents the background the analysis of acoustic signals acquired from piezo-electric transducers for structural defect monitoring. A comparison of the use of time-frequency techniques, including the Hilbert-Huang transform, is presented. The report presents the theoretical study of Lamb wave propagation in flat beams and tubular structures, and the need for mode separation in order to effectively perform defect diagnosis. The results of an extensive experimental study of detection, location, and isolation of structural defects in flat aluminum beams and brass tubes are presented. The results of this research show the feasibility of on

  5. Research of waste heat energy efficiency for absorption heat pump recycling thermal power plant circulating water

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Liansheng; E, Zhijun; Wang, Kun; Wang, Ziyue; Li, Guohao; Qu, Bin

    2018-02-01

    The waste heat energy efficiency for absorption heat pump recycling thermal power plant circulating water has been analyzed. After the operation of heat pump, the influences on power generation and heat generation of unit were taken into account. In the light of the characteristics of heat pump in different operation stages, the energy efficiency of heat pump was evaluated comprehensively on both sides of benefits belonging to electricity and benefits belonging to heat, which adopted the method of contrast test. Thus, the reference of energy efficiency for same type projects was provided.

  6. Optimization of heat supply systems employing nuclear power plants

    Urbanek, J.

    1988-01-01

    Decision making on the further development of heat supply systems requires optimization of the parameters. In particular, meeting the demands of peak load ranges is of importance. The heat supply coefficient α and the annual utilization of peak load equipment τ FS have been chosen as the characteristic quantities to describe them. The heat price at the consumer, C V , offers as the optimization criterion. The transport distance, temperature spread of the heating water, and different curves of annual variation of heat consumption on heat supply coefficient and heat price at the consumer. A comparison between heat supply by nuclear power plants and nuclear heating stations verifies the advantage of combined heat and power generation even with longer heat transport distances as compared with local heat supply by nuclear district heating stations based on the criterion of minimum employment of peak load boilers. (author)

  7. District heating and combined heat and power generation from biomass

    Veski, Rein

    1999-01-01

    An Altener programme seminar District Heating and Combined Heat and Power Generation from Biomass. Minitraining seminar and study tours and also Business forum, Exhibition and Short company presentations were held in Tallinn on March 21-23, 1999. The Seminar was organised by the VTT Energy, the Estonian Bioenergy Association and the Estonian Heat and Power Association in co-operation with the AFB-net. The Agricultural and Forestry Biomass Network (AFB-net) is part of the ALTENER programme. The Network aims at promoting and stimulating the implementation and commercial utilisation of energy from biomass and waste, through the initiation of business opportunities. This includes national and international co-operation and the exchange of the personnel. The Seminar was attended by consulting companies, scientists, municipal authorities and representatives of co-ordinating bodies engaged in renewable energy management as well as DH and CHP plant managers, equipment manufacturers and local energy planners from Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Sweden, Denmark, Belgium, Slovenia and Slovak Republic. At the Seminar minitraining issues were dealt with: the current situation and future trends in biomass DH in the Baltic Sea countries, and biomass DH and CHP in Eastern and Central Europe, planning and construction of biomass-based DH plants, biomass fuel procurement and handling technology, combustion technology, DH networks, financing of biomass projects and evaluating of projects, and case projects in Eastern and Central European countries. The following were presented: boilers with a capacity of 100 kW or more, stoker burners, wood and straw handling equipment, wood fuel harvesters, choppers, pelletisers, district heating pipelines and networks. (author)

  8. Investigation of the mixed beta-photon radiation field in plant areas of the heat steam generator of the Obrigheim nuclear power station

    Burgkhardt, B.; Piesch, E.

    1988-10-01

    The investigations of the beta-photon radiation field in parts of the plant in the primary circuit were performed by irradiation experiments in different distances of exhausted disks of the heat steam generator using LiF-TLDs. The depth dose distribution for a detector free of mass is found on the basis of the measurement results by using a standardized extrapolation procedure. The measurement results show that the depth dose distribution is more or less independent of the detector-to-source distance if the absorption in air and the detector is taken into account. Thus low energy beta-photon fields can be analyzed, in general, using the results found in one distance of about 5 cm from the source. For the purpose of radiation protection at working places transmission factors for protective clothes and detectors of different thicknesses were determined. The estimation of the dose equivalents H'(0.07) and H'(10) and the dose equivalents in the lens of the eye and the testes shows that the low energy beta radiation component contributes only to the partial dose equivalent H'(0.07) and will be absorbed by a protective layer of 100 mg.cm -2 . (orig.) [de

  9. Pestel study: system comparison of the generation of electric current and heating energy in coupled and uncoupled plants; Pestel Studie: Systemvergleich der Strom- und Heizenergieerzeugung in gekoppelten und ungekoppelten Anlagen

    Moeller, K.P.

    1995-12-31

    A system comparison of the generation of electric current and heating energy in coupled and uncoupled plants was carried out in the years 1983/84 at the Eduard Pestel Institute for system research in Hannover. A report is given on the main focus of the investigation which was the comparison of cogeneration power plant for cogeneration with the current generation in modern condensation power plants and the corresponding generation of heating energy in modern gas boilers. The primary energy consumption for generating electric current was compared by means of four examples to the consumption for heating energy generation. The costs of this generation in terms of national economy and industrial management were also compared to each other by means of four examples. (orig.) [Deutsch] Am Eduard Pestel Institut fuer Systemforschung e.V. in Hannover wurde in den Jahren 1983/1984 ein Systemvergleich zwischen der Strom- und Heizenergieerzeugung in gekoppelten und ungekoppelten Anlagen durchgefuehrt. Schwerpunkt der Untersuchung, ueber den heute berichtet werden soll, war der Vergleich von - Blockheizkraftwerken zur gekoppelten Erzeugung mit - einer Stromerzeugung in modernene Kondensationskraftwerken und der entsprechenden Heizwaermeerzeugung in modernen Gaskesseln. Dabei wurden anhand von vier konkreten Fallbeispielen jeweils - die Primaerenergieverbraeuche fuer die Strom- und Heizwaermeerzeugung sowie - die volkswirtschaftlichen und betriebswirtschaftlichen Kosten dieser Erzeugung miteinander verglichen. (orig.)

  10. Natural convection in heat-generating fluids

    Bol'shov, Leonid A; Kondratenko, Petr S; Strizhov, Valerii F

    2001-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of convective heat transfer from a heat-generating fluid confined to a closed volume are reviewed. Theoretical results are inferred from analytical estimates based on the relevant conservation laws and the current understanding of the convective heat-transfer processes. Four basic and one asymptotic regime of heat transfer are identified depending on the heat generation rate. Limiting heat-transfer distribution patterns are found for the lower boundary. Heat transfer in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry is analyzed. Quasi-steady-state heat transfer from a cooling-down fluid without internal heat sources is studied separately. Experimental results and theoretical predictions are compared. (reviews of topical problems)

  11. District heating grid of the Daqing Nuclear Heating Plant

    Changwen, Ma [Institute of Nuclear Energy and Technology, Tsingua Univ., Beijing (China)

    1997-09-01

    The Daqing Nuclear Heating Plant is the first commercial heating plant to be built in China. The plant is planned to be used as the main heat resource of one residential quarter of Daqing city. The main parameters of the heating plant are summarized in the paper. The load curve shows that the capacity of the NHP is about 69% of total capacity of the grid. The 12 existing boilers can be used as reserve and peak load heat resources. Two patterns of load following have have been considered and tested on the 5MW Test Heating Reactor. Experiment shows load of heat grid is changed slowly, so automatic load following is not necessary. (author). 9 figs, 1 tab.

  12. Next generation CANDU plants

    Hedges, K.R.; Yu, S.K.W.

    1998-01-01

    Future CANDU designs will continue to meet the emerging design and performance requirements expected by the operating utilities. The next generation CANDU products will integrate new technologies into both the product features as well as into the engineering and construction work processes associated with delivering the products. The timely incorporation of advanced design features is the approach adopted for the development of the next generation of CANDU. AECL's current products consist of 700MW Class CANDU 6 and 900 MW Class CANDU 9. Evolutionary improvements are continuing with our CANDU products to enhance their adaptability to meet customers ever increasing need for higher output. Our key product drivers are for improved safety, environmental protection and improved cost effectiveness. Towards these goals we have made excellent progress in Research and Development and our investments are continuing in areas such as fuel channels and passive safety. Our long term focus is utilizing the fuel cycle flexibility of CANDU reactors as part of the long term energy mix

  13. Heat Generation by Irradiated Complex Composite Nanostructures

    Ma, Haiyan; Tian, Pengfei; Pello, Josselin

    2014-01-01

    Heating of irradiated metallic e-beam generated nanostructures was quantified through direct measurements paralleled by novel model-based numerical calculations. By comparing discs, triangles, and stars we showed how particle shape and composition determines the heating. Importantly, our results...... revealed that substantial heat is generated in the titanium adhesive layer between gold and glass. Even when the Ti layer is as thin as 2 nm it absorbs as much as a 30 nm Au layer and hence should not be ignored....

  14. Power generation by nuclear power plants

    Bacher, P.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear power plays an important role in the world, European (33%) and French (75%) power generation. This article aims at presenting in a synthetic way the main reactor types with their respective advantages with respect to the objectives foreseen (power generation, resources valorization, waste management). It makes a fast review of 50 years of nuclear development, thanks to which the nuclear industry has become one of the safest and less environmentally harmful industry which allows to produce low cost electricity: 1 - simplified description of a nuclear power generation plant: nuclear reactor, heat transfer system, power generation system, interface with the power distribution grid; 2 - first historical developments of nuclear power; 3 - industrial development and experience feedback (1965-1995): water reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu), RBMK, fast neutron reactors, high temperature demonstration reactors, costs of industrial reactors; 4 - service life of nuclear power plants and replacement: technical, regulatory and economical lifetime, problems linked with the replacement; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  15. Heat recovery from a cement plant with a Marnoch Heat Engine

    Saneipoor, P.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of a new Marnoch Heat Engine (MHE) that recovers waste heat from within a typical cement plant. Two MHE units with compressed air as the working fluid are installed to recover the waste heat. The first unit on the main stack has four pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers. The second heat recovery unit is installed on a clinker quenching system. This unit operates with three pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers. The recovered heat is converted to electricity through the MHE system and used internally within the cement plant. A predictive model and results are presented and discussed. The results show the promising performance of the MHE's capabilities for efficient generation of electricity from waste heat sources in a cement plant. The new heat recovery system increases the efficiency of the cement plant and lowers the CO 2 emissions from the clinker production process. Moreover, it reduces the amount of waste heat to the environment and lowers the temperature of the exhaust gases. - Highlights: → This paper examines the thermodynamic performance of a new Marnoch Heat Engine (MHE) that recovers waste heat to produce electricity and improve the operating efficiency of a typical cement plant. → The first unit of the MHE on the main stack has four pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers and the second heat recovery unit is installed on a clinker quenching system. → Both predicted and experimental results demonstrate the promising performance of the MHE's capabilities for efficient generation of electricity from waste heat sources in a cement plant.

  16. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine

  17. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

    1984-05-29

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  18. Heat savings in energy systems with substantial distributed generation

    Østergaard, PA

    2003-01-01

    In Denmark, the integration of wind power is affected by a large amount of cogeneration of heat and power. With ancillary services supplied by large-scale condensation and combined heat and power (CHP) plants, a certain degree of large-scale generation is required regardless of momentary wind input......, if a certain production is required regardless of whether over-all electricity generation is sufficient. This article analyses this and although heat savings do have a negative impact on the amount of wind power the system may integrate a given moment in certain cases, associated fuel savings are notable...

  19. The Marstal Central Solar Heating Plant

    Heller, Alfred; Jochen, Dahm

    1999-01-01

    The central solar heating plant in Marstal is running since 1996 and has been monitored since. The resulting data from the plant is analysed and the plant performance evaluated. A TRNSYS-model (computersimulation) id prepared and validated based on the measured data from the plant. Acceptable good...

  20. 4th Generation District Heating (4GDH)

    Lund, Henrik; Werner, Sven; Wiltshire, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This paper defines the concept of 4th Generation District Heating (4GDH) including the relations to District Cooling and the concepts of smart energy and smart thermal grids. The motive is to identify the future challenges of reaching a future renewable non-fossil heat supply as part...... of the implementation of overall sustainable energy systems. The basic assumption is that district heating and cooling has an important role to play in future sustainable energy systems – including 100 percent renewable energy systems – but the present generation of district heating and cooling technologies will have...

  1. District heating by the Bohunice nuclear power plant

    Metke, E.; Skvarka, P.

    1984-01-01

    Technical and economical aspects of district heating by the electricity generating nuclear plants in Czechoslovakia are discussed. As a first stage of the project, 240 MW thermal power will be supplied using bleeding lines steam from the B-2 nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice to heat up water at a central station to 130 grad C. The maximal thermal power that can be produced for district heating by WWER type reactors with regular condensation turbines is estimated to be: 465 MW for a WWER-440 reactor with two 220 MWe turbines and 950 MW for a WWER-1000 reactor with a Skoda made 1000 MWe turbine using a three-stage scheme to heat up water from 60 grad C to 150 grad C. The use of satelite heating turbines connected to the steam collector is expected to improve the efficiency. District heating needs will de taken into account for siting of the new power plants

  2. Optimum heat storage design for heat integrated multipurpose batch plants

    Stamp, J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available procedure is presented tha journal homepage: www All rights reserved. ajozi T, Optimum heat storage grated multipurpose batch plants , South Africa y usage in multipurpose batch plants has been in published literature most present methods, time... � 2pL?u?kins ? 1 h3A3?u?cu?U (36) The internal area for heat loss by convection from the heat transfer medium is given by Constraint (37) and the area for convective heat transfer losses to the environment is given in Constraint (38). A1?u? ? 2...

  3. Low-temperature nuclear heat applications: Nuclear power plants for district heating

    1987-08-01

    The IAEA reflected the needs of its Member States for the exchange of information in the field of nuclear heat application already in the late 1970s. In the early 1980s, some Member States showed their interest in the use of heat from electricity producing nuclear power plants and in the development of nuclear heating plants. Accordingly, a technical committee meeting with a workshop was organized in 1983 to review the status of nuclear heat application which confirmed both the progress made in this field and the renewed interest of Member States in an active exchange of information about this subject. In 1985 an Advisory Group summarized the Potential of Low-Temperature Nuclear Heat Application; the relevant Technical Document reviewing the situation in the IAEA's Member States was issued in 1986 (IAEA-TECDOC-397). Programme plans were made for 1986-88 and the IAEA was asked to promote the exchange of information, with specific emphasis on the design criteria, operating experience, safety requirements and specifications for heat-only reactors, co-generation plants and power plants adapted for heat application. Because of a growing interest of the IAEA's Member States about nuclear heat employment in the district heating domaine, an Advisory Group meeting was organized by the IAEA on ''Low-Temperature Nuclear Heat Application: Nuclear Power Plants for District Heating'' in Prague, Czechoslovakia in June 1986. The information gained up to 1986 and discussed during this meeting is embodied in the present Technical Document. 22 figs, 11 tabs

  4. Heat supply from nuclear power plants

    Stach, V [Ustav Jaderneho Vyzkumu CSKAE, Rez (Czechoslovakia)

    1978-05-01

    The current state of world power production and consumption is assessed. Prognoses made for the years 1980 to 2000 show that nuclear energy should replace the major part of fossil fuels not only in the production of power but also in the production of heat. In this respect high-temperature reactors are highly prospective. The question is discussed of the technical and economic parameters of dual-purpose heat and power plants. It is, however, necessary to solve problems arising from the safe siting of nuclear heat and power plants and their environmental impacts. The economic benefits of combined power and heat production by such nuclear plants is evident.

  5. A new method for distribution of consumed heat in a fuel and costs in power and heating plants

    Kadrnozka, J [Technical Univ., Brno (Czech Republic)

    1993-09-01

    There is described a new method for distribution of consumed heat in a fuel and costs in the power and heating plants, which is based on the relatively the same proportion of advantages followed from combine generation of electricity and heat on electricity and heat. The method is physically substantiated, it is very universal and it is applied for new types of power and heating plants and for distribution of investment costs and other costs. (orig./GL)

  6. German central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage

    Bauer, D.; Marx, R.; Nussbicker-Lux, J.; Ochs, F.; Heidemann, W. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Mueller-Steinhagen, H. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute of Technical Thermodynamics (ITT), German Aerospace Centre (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Central solar heating plants contribute to the reduction of CO{sub 2}-emissions and global warming. The combination of central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage enables high solar fractions of 50% and more. Several pilot central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage (CSHPSS) built in Germany since 1996 have proven the appropriate operation of these systems and confirmed the high solar fractions. Four different types of seasonal thermal energy stores have been developed, tested and monitored under realistic operation conditions: Hot-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Friedrichshafen), gravel-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Steinfurt-Borghorst), borehole thermal energy store (in Neckarsulm) and aquifer thermal energy store (in Rostock). In this paper, measured heat balances of several German CSHPSS are presented. The different types of thermal energy stores and the affiliated central solar heating plants and district heating systems are described. Their operational characteristics are compared using measured data gained from an extensive monitoring program. Thus long-term operational experiences such as the influence of net return temperatures are shown. (author)

  7. Heat exchanger. [Nuclear power plants

    Molina, C; Brisseaux, A

    1976-01-19

    This invention concerns a heat exchanger between a fluid flowing through a tube and a gas. Such an exchanger can be used, inter alia, for removing calories that cannot be used for generating electricity in a thermal or nuclear power station. This exchanger can withstand any pressure surges in the system and even the use of a high vapour pressure coolant such as ammonia, since the fluid flows in a round tube with low pressure drops (both with respect to the fluid to be cooled and the cooling air). It is rigid enough to stand up to being moved and handled as well as to gusts of wind. It is formed of units that can be handled without difficulty and that are easily dismantable and interchangeable, even in service, and it is easily maintained. The exchange area is high for a minimum frontal area and this enables the size of the supporting frame to be reduced and makes it easy to hide it behind a screen of trees should this prove necessary. Finally, it is composed of a small number of standard units thus reducing the industrial production cost. These units are rectangular plates, each one being a flat tubular coil fitted between two flat parallel sheet metal plates having on their outer sides flat top raised bosses. These units are assembled together by the tops of the bosses so as to form an exchanger bank, each bank comprising two collectors to which the bank coils are tightly connected.

  8. Distributed heat generation in a district heating system

    Lennermo, Gunnar; Lauenberg, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    District heating (OH) systems need to be improved  regarding integration  of decentralised  heat generation. Micro production, prosumers and smart grids are terms becoming more and more common  in  connection  to  the  power  grid.  Concerning district  heating,  the  development  is slower, although improving. Today there are a number of such decentralised units for heat generation,  mainly  solar,  that have been partly evaluated.  Previous  studies  have shown  that there is a need to deve...

  9. Heat transfer enhancement in heat exchangers by longitudinal vortex generators

    Guntermann, T.; Fiebig, M.; Mitra, N.K.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper heat transfer enhancement and flow losses are computed for the interaction of a laminar channel flow with a pair of counterrotating longitudinal vortices generated by a pair of delta-winglets punched out of the channel wall. The geometry simulates an element of a fin-plate or fin-tube heat exchanger. The structure of the vortex flow and temperature distribution, the local heat transfer coefficients and the local flow losses are discussed for a sample case. For a Reynolds number of Re d = 1000 and a vortex generator angle of attack of β = 25 degrees heat transfer is enhanced locally by more than 300% and in the mean by 50%. These values increase further with Re and β

  10. Investigating heat and temperature regime of the combustion chamber furnace screen of the TP 100A steam generator in the Varna thermal power plant

    Mikhlevski, A; Buchinski, B; Dashkiev, Yu; Radzievski, V; Petkov, Kh [Kievski Politekhnicheski Institut (USSR)

    1988-01-01

    In the course of 10 year operation of six TP 100A steam generators 72 emergency operation interruptions occurred due to the piercing of screen pipes in the combustion chamber. According to investigations carried out by the NPO, CKT, VTI, KPI and Soyuzenergo institutes, the damage occurred mainly because of the destructive influence of external gas corrosion processes, overheating and fatigue of metallic pipes, as well as unstable heat and temperature regime in the combustion chamber. Large-scale measurements of the main thermodynamic parameters of the combustion chamber of the TP-100A steam generator were carried out in order to increase service life of screen pipes. It was found that the temperature of screen pipes increases 2.5 C/month because of deposition of sediments. Regular cleaning of screen pipes in intervals of 18 months is recommended as a very efficient means of prolonging their service life. 1 ref.

  11. Cogeneration using a nuclear reactor to generate process heat

    Alonso, Gustavo; Ramirez, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    Some of the new nuclear reactor technologies (Generation III+) are claiming the production of process heat as an additional value to electricity generation. These technologies are still under development and none of them has shown how this can be possible and what will be the penalty in electricity generation to have this additional product. The current study assess the likeliness of generate process heat from a Pebble Bed Modular Reactor to be used for a refinery showing different plant balance and alternatives to produce and use that process heat. An actual practical example is presented to demonstrate the cogeneration viability using the fact that the PBMR is a modular small reactor and also the challenges that this option has. (author)

  12. Sustainability assessment of renewable power and heat generation technologies

    Dombi, Mihály; Kuti, István; Balogh, Péter

    2014-01-01

    Rationalisation of consumption, more efficient energy usage and a new energy structure are needed to be achieved in order to shift the structure of energy system towards sustainability. The required energy system is among others characterised by intensive utilisation of renewable energy sources (RES). RES technologies have their own advantages and disadvantages. Nevertheless, for the strategic planning there is a great demand for the comparison of RES technologies. Furthermore, there are additional functions of RES utilisation expected beyond climate change mitigation, e.g. increment of employment, economic growth and rural development. The aim of the study was to reveal the most beneficial RES technologies with special respect to sustainability. Ten technologies of power generation and seven technologies of heat supply were examined in a multi-criteria sustainability assessment frame of seven attributes which were evaluated based on a choice experiment (CE) survey. According to experts the most important characteristics of RES utilisation technologies are land demand and social impacts i.e. increase in employment and local income generation. Concentrated solar power (CSP), hydropower and geothermal power plants are favourable technologies for power generation, while geothermal district heating, pellet-based non-grid heating and solar thermal heating can offer significant advantages in case of heat supply. - highlights: • We used choice experiment to estimate the weights of criteria for the sustainability assessment of RES technologies. • The most important attributes of RES technologies according to experts are land demand and social impacts. • Concentrated solar power (CSP), hydropower and geothermal power plants are advantageous technologies for power generation. • Geothermal district heating, pellet-based non-grid heating and solar thermal heating are favourable in case of heat supply

  13. Geological disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    1986-03-01

    A number of options for the disposal of vitrified heat-generating radioactive waste are being studied to ensure that safe methods are available when the time comes for disposal operations to commence. This study has considered the feasibility of three designs for containers which would isolate the waste from the environment for a minimum period of 500 to 1000 years. The study was sub-divided into the following major sections: manufacturing feasibility; stress analysis; integrity in accidents; cost benefit review. The candidate container designs were taken from the results of a previous study by Ove Arup and Partners (1985) and were developed as the study progressed. Their major features can be summarised as follows: (A) a thin-walled corrosion-resistant metal shell filled with lead or cement grout. (B) an unfilled thick-walled carbon steel shell. (C) an unfilled carbon steel shell planted externally with corrosion-resistant metal. Reference repository conditions in clay, granite and salt, reference disposal operations and metals corrosion data have been taken from various European Community radioactive waste management research and engineering projects. The study concludes that design Types A and B are feasible in manufacturing terms but design Type C is not. It is recommended that model containers should be produced to demonstrate the proposed methods of manufacture and that they should be tested to validate the analytical techniques used. (author)

  14. Heat flow and heat generation in greenstone belts

    Drury, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Heat flow has been measured in Precambrian shields in both greenstone belts and crystalline terrains. Values are generally low, reflecting the great age and tectonic stability of the shields; they range typically between 30 and 50 mW/sq m, although extreme values of 18 and 79 mW/sq m have been reported. For large areas of the Earth's surface that are assumed to have been subjected to a common thermotectonic event, plots of heat flow against heat generation appear to be linear, although there may be considerable scatter in the data. The relationship is expressed as: Q = Q sub o + D A sub o in which Q is the observed heat flow, A sub o is the measured heat generation at the surface, Q sub o is the reduced heat flow from the lower crust and mantle, and D, which has the dimension of length, represents a scale depth for the distribution of radiogenic elements. Most authors have not used data from greenstone belts in attempting to define the relationship within shields, considering them unrepresentative and preferring to use data from relatively homogeneous crystalline rocks. A discussion follows.

  15. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    1986-03-01

    The objective of this study was to predict tensile stress levels in thin-walled titanium alloy and thick-walled carbon steel containers designed for the ocean disposal of heat-generating radioactive wastes. Results showed that tensile stresses would be produced in both designs by the expansion of the lead filter, for a temperature rise of 200 0 C. Tensile stress could be reduced if the waste heat output at disposal was reduced. Initial stresses for the titanium-alloy containers could be relieved by heat treatment. (UK)

  16. Flexible use of electricity in heat-only district heating plants

    Erik Trømborg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available European energy systems are in a period of significant transition, with the increasing shares of variable renewable energy (VRE and less flexible fossil-based generation units as predominant factors. The supply-side changes are expected to cause large short-term electricity price volatility. More frequent periods of low electricity prices may mean that electric use in flexible heating systems will become more profitable, and such flexible heating systems may, in turn, improve the integration of increasing shares of VRE. The objective of this study is to analyze the likely future of Nordic electricity price levels and variations and how the expected prices might affect the use of electricity and thermal storage in heat-only district heating plants. We apply the North European energy market model Balmorel to provide scenarios for future hourly electricity prices in years with normal, high, and low inflow levels to the hydro power system. The simulation tool energyPRO is subsequently applied to quantify how these electricity price scenarios affect the hourly use of thermal storage and individual boilers in heat-only district heating plants located in Norway. The two studied example plants use wood chips or heat pump as base load representing common technologies for district heating in Norway. The Balmorel results show that annual differences in inflow is still a decisive factor for Norwegian and Nordic electricity prices in year 2030 and that short-term (daily price variability is expected to increase. In the plant-level simulations, we find that tank storage, which is currently installed in only a few district heating plants in Norway, is a profitable flexibility option that will significantly reduce the use of fossil peak load in both biomass and heat-pump-based systems. Installation of an electric boiler in addition to tank storage is profitable in the heat pump system due to the limited capacity of the heat pump. Electricity will hence, to a

  17. Next Generation Nuclear Plant System Requirements Manual

    Not Listed

    2008-01-01

    System Requirements Manual for the NGNP Project. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (H.R. 6; EPAct), which was signed into law by President George W. Bush in August 2005, required the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to establish a project to be known as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. According to the EPAct, the NGNP Project shall consist of the research, development, design, construction, and operation of a prototype plant (to be referred to herein as the NGNP) that (1) includes a nuclear reactor based on the research and development (R and D) activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems initiative, and (2) shall be used to generate electricity, to produce hydrogen, or to both generate electricity and produce hydrogen. The NGNP Project supports both the national need to develop safe, clean, economical nuclear energy and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), which has the goal of establishing greenhouse-gas-free technologies for the production of hydrogen. The DOE has selected the helium-cooled High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) as the reactor concept to be used for the NGNP because it is the only near-term Generation IV concept that has the capability to provide process heat at high-enough temperatures for highly efficient production of hydrogen. The EPAct also names the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the DOE's lead national laboratory for nuclear energy research, as the site for the prototype NGNP

  18. After-heat removing device in nuclear power plant

    Mizuno, K [Nippon Atomic Industry Group Co. Ltd., Tokyo

    1977-01-14

    Purpose: To prevent water hammer in a BWR type reactor or the like by moving water in pipe lines having stagnant portions in an after-heat removing device. Constitution: To a reactor container, is provided a recycling pump which constitutes a closed loop type recycling system in a nuclear power plant together with a pressure vessel and pipe lines. A pump and a heat exchanger are provided outside of the reactor container and they are connected to up- and down-streams of the recycling pump to form an after-heat removing device in the plant. Upon shutdown of the nuclear power plant, since water in the stagnant portion flows to the intake port of the recycling pump and water from the reactor is spontaneously supplemented thereafter to the stagnant portion, neither pressurized water nor heated steam is generated and thus water hammer is prevented.

  19. Optimization of operation for combined heat and power plants - CHP plants - with heat accumulators using a MILP formulation

    Grue, Jeppe; Bach, Inger [Aalborg Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Energy Technology]. E-mails: jeg@iet.auc.dk; ib@iet.auc.dk

    2000-07-01

    The power generation system in Denmark is extensively based on small combined heat and power plants (CHP plants), producing both electricity and district heating. This project deals with smaller plants spread throughout the country. Often a heat accumulator is used to enable electricity production, even when the heat demand is low. This system forms a very complex problem, both for sizing, designing and operation of CHP plants. The objective of the work is the development of a tool for optimisation of the operation of CHP plants, and to even considering the design of the plant. The problem is formulated as a MILP-problem. An actual case is being tested, involving CHP producing units to cover the demand. The results from this project show that it is of major importance to consider the operation of the plant in detail already in the design phase. It is of major importance to consider the optimisation of the plant operation, even at the design stage, as it may cause the contribution margin to rise significantly, if the plant is designed on the basis of a de-tailed knowledge of the expected operation. (author)

  20. Current generation by minority-species heating

    Fisch, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    It is proposed that electric currents be generated from the preferential heating of ions travelling in one direction but with no net momentum injected into the system. This can be accomplished with, for example, travelling waves in a two-ion-species plasma. The current can be generated efficiently enough for the scheme to be of interest in maintaining steady-state toroidal currents in a reactor. (author)

  1. Current generation by minority species heating

    Fisch, N.J.

    1980-07-01

    It is proposed that electric currents be generated from the preferential heating of ions traveling in one direction but with no net momentum injected into the system. This can be accomplished with, for example, traveling waves in a two-ion-species plasma. The current can be generated efficiently enough for the scheme to be of interest in maintaining steady-state toroidal currents in a reactor

  2. Design and optimization of geothermal power generation, heating, and cooling

    Kanoglu, Mehmet

    Most of the world's geothermal power plants have been built in 1970s and 1980s following 1973 oil crisis. Urgency to generate electricity from alternative energy sources and the fact that geothermal energy was essentially free adversely affected careful designs of plants which would maximize their performance for a given geothermal resource. There are, however, tremendous potentials to improve performance of many existing geothermal power plants by retrofitting, optimizing the operating conditions, re-selecting the most appropriate binary fluid in binary plants, and considering cogeneration such as a district heating and/or cooling system or a system to preheat water entering boilers in industrial facilities. In this dissertation, some representative geothermal resources and existing geothermal power plants in Nevada are investigated to show these potentials. Economic analysis of a typical geothermal resource shows that geothermal heating and cooling may generate up to 3 times as much revenue as power generation alone. A district heating/cooling system is designed for its incorporation into an existing 27 MW air-cooled binary geothermal power plant. The system as designed has the capability to meet the entire heating needs of an industrial park as well as 40% of its cooling needs, generating potential revenues of $14,040,000 per year. A study of the power plant shows that evaporative cooling can increase the power output by up to 29% in summer by decreasing the condenser temperature. The power output of the plant can be increased by 2.8 percent by optimizing the maximum pressure in the cycle. Also, replacing the existing working fluid isobutane by butane, R-114, isopentane, and pentane can increase the power output by up to 2.5 percent. Investigation of some well-known geothermal power generation technologies as alternatives to an existing 12.8 MW single-flash geothermal power plant shows that double-flash, binary, and combined flash/binary designs can increase the

  3. Utilization of Aluminum Waste with Hydrogen and Heat Generation

    Buryakovskaya, O. A.; Meshkov, E. A.; Vlaskin, M. S.; Shkolnokov, E. I.; Zhuk, A. Z.

    2017-10-01

    A concept of energy generation via hydrogen and heat production from aluminum containing wastes is proposed. The hydrogen obtained by oxidation reaction between aluminum waste and aqueous solutions can be supplied to fuel cells and/or infrared heaters for electricity or heat generation in the region of waste recycling. The heat released during the reaction also can be effectively used. The proposed method of aluminum waste recycling may represent a promising and cost-effective solution in cases when waste transportation to recycling plants involves significant financial losses (e.g. remote areas). Experiments with mechanically dispersed aluminum cans demonstrated that the reaction rate in alkaline solution is high enough for practical use of the oxidation process. In theexperiments aluminum oxidation proceeds without any additional aluminum activation.

  4. Heat savings in energy systems with substantial distributed generation

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2004-01-01

    The integration of flutuating wind power is an important issue for the future development of sustainable energy systems. In Denmark, the integration is affected by a large amount of cogeneration of heat and power. This gives possibilities as well as sets restraints. The paper shows that with anci...... that with ancillary services supplied by large-scale condensation and CHP-plants, a certain degree of large-scale generation is required regardless of momentary wind input....

  5. Simultaneous power generation and heat recovery using a heat pipe assisted thermoelectric generator system

    Remeli, Muhammad Fairuz; Tan, Lippong; Date, Abhijit; Singh, Baljit; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new passive power cogeneration system using industrial waste heat was introduced. • Heat pipes and thermoelectrics were used for recovering waste heat and electricity. • Theoretical model predicted the 2 kW test rig could recover 1.345 kW thermal power. • 10.39 W electrical power was produced equivalent to 0.77% conversion efficiency. - Abstract: This research explores a new method of recovering waste heat and electricity using a combination of heat pipes and thermoelectric generators (HP-TEG). The HP-TEG system consists of Bismuth Telluride (Bi 2 Te 3 ) based thermoelectric generators (TEGs), which are sandwiched between two finned heat pipes to achieve a temperature gradient across the TEG for thermoelectricity generation. A theoretical model was developed to predict the waste heat recovery and electricity conversion performances of the HP-TEG system under different parametric conditions. The modelling results show that the HP-TEG system has the capability of recovering 1.345 kW of waste heat and generating 10.39 W of electrical power using 8 installed TEGs. An experimental test bench for the HP-TEG system is under development and will be discussed in this paper

  6. Power generation using sugar cane bagasse: A heat recovery analysis

    Seguro, Jean Vittorio

    The sugar industry is facing the need to improve its performance by increasing efficiency and developing profitable by-products. An important possibility is the production of electrical power for sale. Co-generation has been practiced in the sugar industry for a long time in a very inefficient way with the main purpose of getting rid of the bagasse. The goal of this research was to develop a software tool that could be used to improve the way that bagasse is used to generate power. Special focus was given to the heat recovery components of the co-generation plant (economizer, air pre-heater and bagasse dryer) to determine if one, or a combination, of them led to a more efficient co-generation cycle. An extensive review of the state of the art of power generation in the sugar industry was conducted and is summarized in this dissertation. Based on this models were developed. After testing the models and comparing the results with the data collected from the literature, a software application that integrated all these models was developed to simulate the complete co-generation plant. Seven different cycles, three different pressures, and sixty-eight distributions of the flue gas through the heat recovery components can be simulated. The software includes an economic analysis tool that can help the designer determine the economic feasibility of different options. Results from running the simulation are presented that demonstrate its effectiveness in evaluating and comparing the different heat recovery components and power generation cycles. These results indicate that the economizer is the most beneficial option for heat recovery and that the use of waste heat in a bagasse dryer is the least desirable option. Quantitative comparisons of several possible cycle options with the widely-used traditional back-pressure turbine cycle are given. These indicate that a double extraction condensing cycle is best for co-generation purposes. Power generation gains between 40 and

  7. Economy of straw-fired heating plants

    1991-10-01

    The aim was to produce a detailed survey of the economical aspects of the operation of individual Danish straw-fired heating plants and to compare the results. It is hoped the operators of these plants will thus be encouraged to work together when atttempting to solve problems in this respect and that the gathered information could be used by consultants. The collected data from the survey is presented in the form of tables and graphs. (AB)

  8. Fuel cell - An alternative for power and heat generating

    Zubcu, Victor; Ursescu, Gabriel; Zubcu, Dorina Silvia; Miler, Mihai Cristian

    2004-01-01

    One of the most promising energy generating technologies is the fuel cell (FC) because of its high efficiency and low emissions. There are even zero chemical emissions FC and cogeneration plants based on FC generate low heat emissions too. FC was invented 160 years ago but it was usually used only since 1960 in space missions. A FC farm tractor was tested 40 years ago. FC was again taken into account by power engineering since 1990 and it is now considered a credible alternative to power and heat generating. The thermal power engineers (and not only they) have two problems of cardinal importance for mankind to solve: - Energy saving (by increasing of energy generating efficiency) and - Environmental protection (by reducing chemical and heat emissions). The possibilities to use FC to generate power and heat are practically endless: on the earth, in the air and outer space, by and under water, in numberless areas of human activities. FC are now powering buses, cars, trains, boats, plains, scooters, highway road signs etc. There are already miniature FC for portable electronics. Homes, schools, hospitals, institutes, banks, police stations, etc are using FC to generate power and heat for their facilities. The methane gas produced by wastewater treatment plants and landfills is converted into electricity by using FC. Being less expensive than nuclear and solar source of energy, FC is now generally used in the space missions (in addition FC generates water). In this work an analysis of the possibilities to use FC especially for combined power and heat generating is presented. FC is favourite as energy source in space missions because it is less expensive than nuclear or solar sources. All major automobile companies have FC powered automobiles in testing stage. Mini FC for phone, laptop, and electronics are already on market. FC will be use to pagers, video recorders, small portable tools, miniature robots, special devices as hearing aid various devices, smoke detectors

  9. EIR solar heating plant OASE

    Wiedemann, K.H.

    1982-03-01

    For a corrosion surveillance program of the EIR solar heating unit, OASE, the coolant of the flat collector circuit is controlled and material samples mounted in a circuit by-pass are tested periodically. The results of the first year of surveillance have been evaluated and interpreted. Furthermore water-ethyleneglycol mixtures without and with corrosion inhibiting additives have been tested. Only the ethyleneglycol and inhibitor contents may be controlled by means of pH and electrical conductivity tests. The metal content in the coolant as a corrosion indicator is not recorded by pH or electrical conductivity readings - they must be determined by chemical analysis. Samples of different materials used in the coolant circuit, mounted in a test by-pass of the circuit and taken out every year for testing give information on the corrosion behaviour of these materials under service conditions. Corrosion can be prevented or reduced by adding inhibitors to the coolant. The optimum inhibitor composition for the concerned material combinations and for the coolant must be determined in laboratory tests. The inhibitor composition used in the flat collector circuit proved not to be the optimum: corrosion on the aluminium of the rollbond absorber plate was not prevented. (Auth.)

  10. Heat exchanger, particularly liquid sodium heated steam generator

    Robin, Marcel; Tillequin, Jean.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a liquid sodium heated steam generator the characteristic of which is an annular distribution chamber fed by two independent and diametrically opposed manifolds on a common horizontal axis, issuing respectively into two adjacent compartments made in the chambers on both sides of a vertical transversal partition containing the axis of the casing and extending perpendicularly to the manifolds, each compartment being itself divided into a number of adjacent sectors marked by folded metal sheets fixed to the distributor and shaped so as to present in pairs and with the chamber opposite the manifold issuing into a compartment two independent ducts for distributing the sodium flow [fr

  11. The optimization of longitudinal convective fins with internal heat generation

    Razelos, P.

    1979-01-01

    The solution of the optimization problem for longitudinal convective fins of constant thickness, triangular or parabolic profile, and uniform internal heat generation, is presented. The cases considered are those of a given heat generation density, total heat generation and heat generation per unit width of the fin, when either the heat dissipation or the width of the fin is prescribed. The results are set forth in a nondimensional form, which are presented graphically. The effect of the fin's thermal conductivity upon the optimum dimensions is discussed, and limiting values for the heat generation and the heat dissipation, which may be imposed on the fin for a feasible optimization, are also obtained. (Auth.)

  12. Heat exchanger design for desalination plants

    1979-03-01

    The Office of Saline Water (OSW) accomplished a very large amount of significant work related to the design and performance of large heat exchanger bundles and enhanced heat transfer surfaces. This work was undertaken to provide basic technical and economic data for the design of distillation plants for the desalination of seawater, and should be of value to other industrial applications as well. The OSW work covers almost every aspect of heat exchanger design, and ranges academic research to data gathering on commercial desalting plants. Exchanger design configurations include multistage flash plant condensers, vertical tube falling film and upflow evaporators, and horizontal tube spray film evaporators. Unfortunately, the data is scattered through a large number of reports of which many are concerned primarily with factors other than heat transfer, and the quality of reporting and the quality of the data are far from consistent. This report catalogues and organizes the heat exchanger data developed by the OSW. Some analysis as to the validity of the data is made and ranges of performance that can be expected are given. Emphasis is placed on the vertical tube, falling film evaporators. A thorough analysis of the large literature file that was surveyed was not possible. No analysis was made of the quality of original data, but apparent data discrepancies are pointed out where such discrepancies happen to be found

  13. ULF Generation by Modulated Ionospheric Heating

    Chang, C.; Labenski, J.; Wallace, T.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Modulated ionospheric heating experiments designed to generate ULF waves using the HAARP heater have been conducted since 2007. Artificial ULF waves in the Pc1 frequency range were observed from space and by ground induction magnetometers located in the vicinity of the heater as well as at long distances. Two distinct generation mechanisms of artificial ULF waves were identified. The first was electroject modulation under geomagnetically disturbed conditions. The second was pressure modulation in the E and F regions of the ionosphere under quiet conditions. Ground detections of ULF waves near the heater included both Shear Alfven waves and Magnetosonic waves generated by electrojet and/or pressure modulations. Distant ULF detections involved Magnetosonic wave propagation in the Alfvenic duct with pressure modulation as the most likely source. Summary of our observations and theoretical interpretations will be presented at the meeting. We would like to acknowledge the support provided by the staff at the HAARP facility during our ULF experiments.

  14. Thermo hydrodynamical analyses of steam generator of nuclear power plant

    Petelin, S.; Gregoric, M.

    1984-01-01

    SMUP computer code for stationary model of a U-tube steam generator of a PWR nuclear power plant was developed. feed water flow can enter through main and auxiliary path. The computer code is based on the one dimensional mathematical model. Among the results that give an insight into physical processes along the tubes of steam generator are distribution of temperatures, water qualities, heat transfer rates. Parametric analysis permits conclusion on advantage of each design solution regarding heat transfer effects and safety of steam generator. (author)

  15. Safety and licensing of nuclear heating plants

    Snell, V.G.; Hilborn, J.W.; Lynch, G.F.; McAuley, S.J.

    1989-09-01

    World attention continues to focus on nuclear district heating, a low-cost energy from a non-polluting fuel. It offers long-term security for countries currently dependent on fossil fuels, and can reduce the burden of fossil fuel transportation on railways and roads. Current initiatives encompass large, centralized heating plants and small plants supplying individual institutions. The former are variants of their power reactor cousins but with enhanced safety features. The latter face the safety and licensing challenges of urban siting and remotely monitored operation, through use of intrinsic safety features such as passive decay heat removal, low stored energy and limited reactivity speed and depth in the control systems. Small heating reactor designs are compared, and the features of the SLOWPOKE Energy System, in the forefront of these designs, are summarized. The challenge of public perception must be met by clearly presenting the characteristics of small heating reactors in terms of scale and transparent safety in design and operation, and by explaining the local benefits

  16. Quantity, Quality, and Availability of Waste Heat from United States Thermal Power Generation.

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2015-07-21

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJ(th) of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040.

  17. Power generation from low-temperature heat source

    Lakew, Amlaku Abie

    2012-07-01

    transcritical power cycle is operating at lower pump efficiency, the effect of a decrease in pump efficiency is equivalent to a decrease in turbine efficiency. The thermodynamic analysis is coupled with a 1D mean line turbine design. Both axial and radial turbines are considered. The Ainely and Mathieson loss model is used in the 1D axial turbine designs. It is observed that the blade height is generally small; the reason being high operating pressure and low flow rate. A novel approach to enhance the performance of low-temperature CO{sub 2} transcritical power cycles is investigated. From the thermodynamic analysis, it is observed that the pump work is significant and reduction of pump work will be translated to a gain in net power output. The mechanical driven pump is suggested to be replaced by a thermally driven pump. The working principle of thermally driven pump is by exploiting the phenomena in which the pressure of a closed vessel filled full with saturated liquid will rise when heated. A cascade of vessels is used to make the pressurizing process continuous. The time taken to pressurize is an important parameter for the performance of thermally driven pump. Pressurizing time depends on isochoric specific heat capacity of the working fluid, heat transfer coefficient, inlet conditions of heat source, tube diameter, and initial mass of the working fluid. When the pressurizing time is longer, more vessels are required to make the process continuous. It is shown that it possible to increase power output using a thermal driven pump, but additional equipments are required. An example of a possible application is a low-temperature CO{sub 2} power cycle integrated with a post-combustion carbon dioxide capture plant. The heat rejected by low temperature streams in the capture plant is used as a heat sources for power generation. It is found that utilization of heat of the capture plant improves the performance of the overall process. It shows that low-temperature transcritical

  18. High-Temperature Reactor For Power Generation and District Heating

    Herzberger, Karlheinz

    1987-01-01

    The multinational BBC Brown Brave Group, which has its head-quarters in Baden/Switzerland, was founded in 1891. Its German company is Brown, Brave and CIEs AGM, Mannheim. The field of operation covers wide areas of electrical engineering: These includes mainly the manufacture of installations and equipment for the generation, conversion, distribution and utilization of electric power, with special emphasis on the capital goods sector. BBC erects turnkey power plants and manufactures electrical equipment for industrial plants and urban transport and main line trains. Also of major importance are standard electrical products such as motors, switches, cables, semiconductor devices as well as measuring and control equipment. In the field of nuclear power BBC is engaged in particular in the development and construction of high-temperature reactors for the generation of electric power and process heat. The following presentation gives a short view on the milestones of the HTR development achieved in 1987

  19. Analysis of Heat Generation Mechanism in Ultrasound Infrared Thermography

    Choi, Man Yong; Lee, Seung Seok; Park, Jeong Hak; Kang, Ki Soo; Kim, Won Tae

    2009-01-01

    Heat generation mechanism of ultrasound infrared thermography is still not well understood, yet and there are two reliable assumptions of heat generation, friction and thermo-mechanical effect. This paper investigates the principal cause of heat generation at fatigue crack with experimental and numerical approach. Our results show most of heat generation is contributed by friction between crack interface and thermo-mechanical effect is a negligible quantity

  20. Flexibility of Large-Scale Solar Heating Plant with Heat Pump and Thermal Energy Storage

    Luc, Katarzyna Marta; Heller, Alfred; Rode, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    to decrease biomass use in a district heating system. The paper focuses on the renewable energy-based district heating system in Marstal, Denmark, with heat produced in central solar heating plant, wood pellet boiler, heat pump and bio-oil boiler. The plant has been the object of research and developments...

  1. Performances of nuclear power plants for combined production of electricity and hot water for district heating

    Bronzen, S.

    The possibilities for using nuclear power plants for combined production of heat and power seem to be very good in the future. With the chosen 600 MWsub (e) BWR plant a heat output up to 1200 MW can be arranged. An alternative, consisting of steam extractions from the low-pressure turbine, offers a flexible solution for heat and power generation. With this alternative the combined plant can use components from normal condensing nuclear power plants. The flexible extraction design also offers a real possibility for using the combined plant in electric peak generation. However, urban siting requires long distance heat transmission and the pipe design for this transmission is a major problem when planning and optimizing the whole nuclear combined heat and power plant. (author)

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

    2008-12-01

    As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

  3. Combined generation of electric and heating energy in future development of Yugoslav energy sector until 2000

    Djajic, Nenad; Zivanovic, Vladimir

    2000-01-01

    Development of the district heating system in the FR Yugoslavia, beside the combined generation of electric and heating energy presents a necessity for energy, economic and ecological reasons. Although the structure of energy reserves is rather unfavourable considering that the lignite is being predominantly used, available reserves of energy raw material are able to ensure the long-term development of Yugoslav energy sector, and to offer real possibilities for considerable substitution of foreign good quality fuels, especially in district heating systems. Their further development will depend, among other things: on the implementation of new technological solutions for the exploitation of local energy resources; need of reconstruction, revitalisation and transformation of old condensing thermal power plants into the cogeneration plants; installation of remote controlled transmission of heating energy as well as on development of heating plants and smaller co-generation plants based on local energy resources. (Authors)

  4. Analysis of existing structure and emissions of wood combustion plants for the production of heat and electricity in Bavaria

    Joa, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the detailed analysis of the existing structure of all Bavarian wood burning plants for the generation of heat and electricity as well as the determination of the resulting emission emissions in 2013. The number of wood burning plants in the single-chamber fireplaces, wood central heating and wood-fired heating plants which are in operation in the year 2013 were determined, and how many plants are existing in the various areas like pellet stoves, traditional ovens, wood-burning fireplace, pellet central heating systems, wood chips central heating systems, fire-wood central heating systems, wood combined heat and power plant (electricity and heat) and wood power plants (heat). In addition, the regional distribution of the wood burning plants in the Bavarian governmental districts is investigated as well as the type and amount of energy produced by them (heat, electricity). [de

  5. Economic aspects of electricity and industrial heat generating reactors

    Gaussens, J.; Moulle, N.; Dutheil, F.

    1964-01-01

    The economic advantage of electricity-generating nuclear stations decreases when their size decreases. However, when a counter-pressure turbine is joined on to a reactor and the residual heat can be properly used, it can be shown that fairly low capacity nuclear equipment may compete with conventional equipment under certain realistic enough conditions. The aim of this paper is to define these special conditions under which nuclear energy can be profitable. They are connected with the location and the general economic environment of the station, the pattern of the electricity and heat demands it must meet, the level of fuel and specific capital costs, nuclear and conventional. These conditions entail certain technical and economic specifications for the reactors used in this way otherwise they are unlikely to be competitive. In addition, these results are referred to the potential steam and electricity market, which leads us to examine certain uses for the heat generated by double purpose power stations; for example, to supply combined industrial plants, various types of town heating and for removal of salt from sea water. (authors) [fr

  6. A Modified Entropy Generation Number for Heat Exchangers

    1996-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the difference between the entropy generation number method proposed by Bejian and the method of entropy generation per unit amount of heat transferred in analyzing the ther-modynamic performance of heat exchangers,points out the reason for leading to the above difference.A modified entropy generation number for evaluating the irreversibility of heat exchangers is proposed which is in consistent with the entropy generation per unit amount of heat transferred in entropy generation analysis.The entropy generated by friction is also investigated.Results show that when the entropy generated by friction in heat exchangers in taken into account,there is a minimum total entropy generation number while the NTU and the ratio of heat capacity rates vary.The existence of this minimum is the prerequisite of heat exchanger optimization.

  7. Entropy generation minimization: A practical approach for performance evaluation of temperature cascaded co-generation plants

    Myat, Aung; Thu, Kyaw; Kim, Youngdeuk; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Ng, K. C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a practical tool that employs entropy generation minimization (EGM) approach for an in-depth performance evaluation of a co-generation plant with a temperature-cascaded concept. Co-generation plant produces useful effect production sequentially, i.e., (i) electricity from the micro-turbines, (ii) low pressure steam at 250 °C or about 8-10 bars, (iii) cooling capacity of 4 refrigeration tones (Rtons) and (iv) dehumidification of outdoor air for air conditioned space. The main objective is to configure the most efficient configuration of producing power and heat. We employed entropy generation minimization (EGM) which reflects to minimize the dissipative losses and maximize the cycle efficiency of the individual thermally activated systems. The minimization of dissipative losses or EGM is performed in two steps namely, (i) adjusting heat source temperatures for the heat-fired cycles and (ii) the use of Genetic Algorithm (GA), to seek out the sensitivity of heat transfer areas, flow rates of working fluids, inlet temperatures of heat sources and coolant, etc., over the anticipated range of operation to achieve maximum efficiency. With EGM equipped with GA, we verified that the local minimization of entropy generation individually at each of the heat-activated processes would lead to the maximum efficiency of the system. © 2012.

  8. Entropy generation minimization: A practical approach for performance evaluation of temperature cascaded co-generation plants

    Myat, Aung

    2012-10-01

    We present a practical tool that employs entropy generation minimization (EGM) approach for an in-depth performance evaluation of a co-generation plant with a temperature-cascaded concept. Co-generation plant produces useful effect production sequentially, i.e., (i) electricity from the micro-turbines, (ii) low pressure steam at 250 °C or about 8-10 bars, (iii) cooling capacity of 4 refrigeration tones (Rtons) and (iv) dehumidification of outdoor air for air conditioned space. The main objective is to configure the most efficient configuration of producing power and heat. We employed entropy generation minimization (EGM) which reflects to minimize the dissipative losses and maximize the cycle efficiency of the individual thermally activated systems. The minimization of dissipative losses or EGM is performed in two steps namely, (i) adjusting heat source temperatures for the heat-fired cycles and (ii) the use of Genetic Algorithm (GA), to seek out the sensitivity of heat transfer areas, flow rates of working fluids, inlet temperatures of heat sources and coolant, etc., over the anticipated range of operation to achieve maximum efficiency. With EGM equipped with GA, we verified that the local minimization of entropy generation individually at each of the heat-activated processes would lead to the maximum efficiency of the system. © 2012.

  9. Method and means for heating buildings in a district heating system with waste heat from a thermal power plant

    Margen, P.H.E.

    1975-01-01

    The waste heat from a thermal power plant is transported through a municipal heating network to a plurality of buildings to be heated. The quantity of heat thus supplied to the buildings is higher than that required for the heating of the buildings. The excess heat is released from the buildings to the atmosphere in the form of hot air

  10. Nuclear power generation and global heating

    Taboada, Horacio

    1999-01-01

    The Professionals Association and Nuclear Activity of National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) are following with great interest the worldwide discussions on global heating and the role that nuclear power is going to play. The Association has an active presence, as part of the WONUC (recognized by the United Nations as a Non-Governmental Organization) in the COP4, which was held in Buenos Aires in November 1998. The environmental problems are closely related to human development, the way of power production, the techniques for industrial production and exploitation fields. CO 2 is the most important gas with hothouse effects, responsible of progressive climatic changes, as floods, desertification, increase of average global temperature, thermal expansion in seas and even polar casks melting and ice falls. The consequences that global heating will have on the life and economy of human society cannot be sufficiently emphasized, great economical impact, destruction of ecosystems, loss of great coast areas and complete disappearance of islands owing to water level rise. The increase of power retained in the atmosphere generates more violent hurricanes and storms. In this work, the topics presented in the former AATN Meeting is analyzed in detail and different technological options and perspectives to mitigate CO 2 emission, as well as economical-financial aspects, are explored. (author)

  11. Ocean disposal of heat generating waste

    1985-06-01

    A number of options for the disposal of vitrified heat generating waste are being studied to ensure that safe methods are available when the time comes for disposal operations to commence. This study has considered the engineering and operational aspects of the Penetrator Option for ocean disposal to enable technical comparisons with other options to be made. In the Penetrator Option concept, waste would be loaded into carefully designed containers which would be launched at a suitable deep ocean site where they would fall freely through the water and would embed themselves completely within the seabed sediments. Radiological protection would be provided by a multi-barrier system including the vitrified waste form, the penetrator containment, the covering sediment and the ocean. Calculations and demonstration have shown that penetrators could easily achieve embedment depths in excess of 30m and preliminary radiological assessments indicate that 30m of intact sediment would be an effective barrier for radionuclide isolation. The study concludes that a 75mm thickness of low carbon steel appears to be sufficient to provide a containment life of 500 to 1000 years during which time the waste heat output would have decayed to an insignificant level. Disposal costs have been assessed. (author)

  12. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    1985-12-01

    The feasibility of safe ocean disposal options for heat-generating radioactive waste relies on the existence of suitable disposal sites. This review considers the status of the development of site selection criteria and the results of the study area investigations carried out under various national and international research programmes. In particular, the usefulness of the results obtained is related to the data needed for environmental and emplacement modelling. Preliminary investigations have identified fifteen potential deep ocean study areas in the North Atlantic. From these Great Meteor East (GME), Southern Nares Abyssal Plan (SNAP) and Kings Trough Flank (KTF) were selected for further investigation. The review includes appraisals of regional geology, geophysical studies, sedimentology, geotechnical studies, geochemical studies and oceanography. (author)

  13. Economical photovoltaic power generation with heat recovery

    Ascher, G.

    1977-01-01

    Three designs for conversion of solar radiation to electricity and thermal energy are analyzed. The objective of these converters is to increase the electric and thermal output for each photovoltaic array so as to lower the cell cost relative to the amount of energy delivered. An analysis of the economical aspects of conversion by photovoltaic cells with heat recovery is carried out in terms of hypothetical examples. Thus, it is shown that the original cost of say $40,000 per generated kilowat can be reduced to $572.00 per kilowatt by increasing the original electric output of 1 kW to 10 kW in electricity and 60 kW in thermal energy. The newly derived specific cost is only 1.4 percent of the original one. It is expected that a cost reduction of roughly 2% of the present specific cost per kilowatt will greatly stimulate public acceptance of photovoltaic terrestrial conversion to electricity.

  14. Heat transfer enhancement for fin-tube heat exchanger using vortex generators

    Yoo, Seong Yeon; Park, Dong Seong; Chung, Min Ho; Lee, Sang Yun

    2002-01-01

    Vortex generators are fabricated on the fin surface of a fin-tube heat exchanger to augment the convective heat transfer. In addition to horseshoe vortices formed naturally around the tube of the fin-tube heat exchanger, longitudinal vortices are artificially created on the fin surface by vortex generators. The purpose of this study is to investigate the local heat transfer phenomena in the fin-tube heat exchangers with and without vortex generators, and to evaluate the effect of vortices on the heat transfer enhancement. Naphthalene sublimation technique is employed to measure local mass transfer coefficients, then analogy equation between heat and mass transfer is used to calculate heat transfer coefficients. Experiments are performed for the model of fin-circular tube heat exchangers with and without vortex generators, and of fin-flat tube heat exchangers with and without vortex generators. Average heat transfer coefficients of fin-flat tube heat exchanger without vortex generator are much lower than those of fin-circular tube heat exchanger. On the other hand, fin-flat tube heat exchanger with vortex generators has much higher heat transfer value than conventional fin-circular tube heat exchanger. At the same time, pressure losses for four types of heat exchanger is measured and compared

  15. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    1985-11-01

    The detailed radiological assessment of any proposed operations for the disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste in deep ocean sediments would require data describing expected embedment depths and spacing of the waste. In this study a theoretical model which predicts penetrator trajectories from launch through to rest in the sediment has been produced and has been used to generate data for environmental models. The trajectory model has been used to study the effects of small imperfections and launch parameters on the motion of a reference penetrator through water and sediment. The model predicts that the horizontal displacements of the penetrators' final resting places in the sediment from their launch positions at the ocean surface could be limited to less than 15m by twisting their tail fins uniformly by just one degree to induce spinning. The reference penetrator is predicted to achieve satisfactory embedment depth for all the cases considered including allowance for the effect of curved penetration paths in the seabed. However, the ability of the model to represent highly non-linear sediment penetration paths is demonstrated. Distribution histograms of seabed impact points relative to specific release points are presented. The area of seabed required is calculated. (author)

  16. Heat wave generates questions about Ontario's generation capacity

    Horne, D.

    2005-01-01

    Concerns regarding Ontario's power generation capacity were raised following a major blackout which occurred in August 2003. Power demand reached 26,170 MW during the weeks leading to the blackout, forcing the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) to ask residents to reduce electricity use during the day. The grid operator had also issued a forecast that Toronto could face rolling blackouts during times of heavy power demand. Ontario power consumption records were set in June and July of 2003 due to a heat wave, with hourly demand exceeding 25,000 MW on 53 occasions. Ontario was forced to import up to 3,400 MW (13 per cent of its power needs) from neighbouring provinces and the United States. During that period, the price of power had risen sharply to over 30 cents a kilowatt hour, although household consumers were still charged in the 5 to 10 cent range per kilowatt hour. However, it was noted that taxpayers will eventually bear the cost of importing power. The IESO noted that importing electricity is cheaper than the generation available in Ontario and that it is more economical to import, based on the market clearing price of all generators. In 2004, the IESO purchased 6 per cent of their electricity from the United States. That figure is expected to increase for 2005. Ontario generators produced 26.9 million MWh more in the summer of 2005 than during the same period in 2004 to meet electricity demand levels. It was noted that although importing power presently meets peak demand, the IESO agrees there is a need for new generation within Ontario. In addition to restarting Ontario's Pickering and Bruce nuclear facilities, more than 3,300 MW of new gas-fired generation is under construction or approved, and more than 9,000 MW are in various stages of approval. This paper discussed the effect of high energy costs on industry and Ontario's ability to meet future electricity demand in comparison to neighbouring jurisdictions. Issues regarding grid maintenance

  17. Woodfuel procurement strategies of district heating plants

    Roos, A.; Bohlin, F.; Hektor, B.; Hillring, B.

    2003-01-01

    Woodfuel use in the Swedish district heating sector increased significantly from 1985 to 1999. This study analysed strategies and considerations concerning woodfuel procurement in district heating plants. Priorities and concerns in the industry involved an increased woodfuel share, ambitions to create an environmental image, cost minimisation, awareness about the role of energy policies for fuel choice, improvement of woodfuel quality and the ambition to maintain a competitive woodfuel market with several suppliers. Factor analysis yielded five dimensions in the woodfuel procurement strategies among the district heating companies: (1) increased woodfuel use; (2) import; (3) spot market woodfuel purchases; (4) focus on refined woodfuels; and (5) using price only when deciding whether to use woodfuels or other fuels. Five clusters were defined along the three strategy dimensions (1)-(3). The clusters differed concerning size, experiences from the introduction of woodfuels, perceptions about woodfuels and strategies employed to date. This paper describes different strategies that the district heating companies apply on the woodfuel market. The conclusion is that policies should consider this diversity in procurement strategies, mitigate their negative side-effects and assist to make them cost-effective. (author)

  18. Thermal performance of solar district heating plants in Denmark

    Furbo, Simon; Perers, Bengt; Bava, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The market for solar heating plants connected to district heating systems is expanding rapidly in Denmark. It is expected that by the end of 2014 the 10 largest solar heating plants in Europe will be located in Denmark. Measurements from 23 Danish solar heating plants, all based on flat plate solar...... collectors mounted on the ground, shows measured yearly thermal performances of the solar heating plants placed in the interval from 313 kWh/m² collector to 493 kWh/m² collector with averages for all plants of 411 kWh/m² collector for 2012 and 450 kWh/m² collector for 2013. Theoretical calculations show...... of the cost/performance ratio for solar collector fields, both with flat plate collectors and with concentrating tracking solar collectors. It is recommended to continue monitoring and analysis of all large solar heating plants to document the reliability of the solar heating plants. It is also recommended...

  19. Increasing the flexibility of operational scheduling for a large-scale CHP plant used for generating district heat and electricity in order to meet the varying market demands; Steigerung der Einsatzflexibilitaet einer grossen KWK-Anlage zur Fernwaerme- und Stromerzeugung gemaess aktueller Marktanforderungen

    Meierer, Matthias; Krupp, Roland; Stork, Rolf [Grosskraftwerk Mannheim AG, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The substantial changes in the structure of German power supply plants pose high demands on the flexibility of the operational scheduling of conventional thermal power plants. Grosskraftwerk Mannheim AG is a power plant company that is operating a plant for combined power and district heat generation. The paper describes some measures which have been taken to improve the plant's operational flexibility. In addition, the associated technical systems and their functions, as well as the state of ongoing projects are outlined. Special focus is placed on topics related to issues such as ''district-heat storage unit of the new unit 9, flexibility of operational scheduling, and efficient CHP plant operation''.

  20. Small-Scale Combined Heat and Power Plants Using Biofuels

    Salomon-Popa, Marianne [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Technology

    2002-11-01

    In this time period where energy supply and climate change are of special concern, biomass-based fuels have attracted much interest due to their plentiful supply and favorable environmental characteristics (if properly managed). The effective capture and continued sustainability of this renewable resource requires a new generation of biomass power plants with high fuel energy conversion. At the same time, deregulation of the electricity market offers new opportunities for small-scale power plants in a decentralized scheme. These two important factors have opened up possibilities for small-scale combined heat and power (CHP) plants based on biofuels. The objective of this pre-study is to assess the possibilities and technical limitations for increased efficiency and energy utilization of biofuels in small size plants (approximately 10 MWe or lower). Various energy conversion technologies are considered and proven concepts for large-scale fossil fuel plants are an especially important area. An analysis has been made to identify the problems, technical limitations and different possibilities as recognized in the literature. Beyond published results, a qualitative survey was conducted to gain first-hand, current knowledge from experts in the field. At best, the survey results together with the results of personal interviews and a workshop on the role of small-scale plants in distributed generation will serve a guideline for future project directions and ideas. Conventional and novel technologies are included in the survey such as Stirling engines, combustion engines, gas turbines, steam turbines, steam motors, fuel cells and other novel technologies/cycles for biofuels. State-of-the-art heat and power plants will be identified to clarify of the advantages and disadvantages as well as possible obstacles for their implementation.

  1. Steam generators for nuclear power plants

    Tillequin, Jean

    1975-01-01

    The role and the general characteristics of steam generators in nuclear power plants are indicated, and particular types are described according to the coolant nature (carbon dioxide, helium, light water, heavy water, sodium) [fr

  2. Refurbishment of hydropower generation plants

    Kofler, W.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents the factors taken into consideration and the methods used for the management of refurbishment work in the hydropower installations of the TUWAG - a Tyrolean hydropower company in Austria. The technical and financial advantages to be gained from refurbishment are discussed and the requirements placed on the structuring of refurbishment projects are described. Various factors such as plant operation and maintenance, increased returns through better efficiency and cost reduction through lower wear and tear and reduced risk of failure are discussed. Annexes to the article cover monitoring and measurement techniques, the simulation of mechanical and hydraulic conditions, profitability calculations and turbine management

  3. Toward 4th generation district heating

    Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend; Dalla Rosa, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    In many countries, district heating (DH) has a key role in the national strategic energy planning. However, tighter legislation on new and future buildings requires much less heating demand which subsequently causes relative high network heat loss. This will make current DH system uneconomical co...

  4. Fiscal 1999 report on basic research for promotion of joint implementation programs. Heat and power plant reconstruction project for Yuzhmash Company co-generating plant, Donepropetrovsk City, the Ukraine; 1999 nendo Donepropetrovsk shi Yuzhmansh sha Heat and Power Plant Reconstruction Project chosa hokokusho

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This project complies with the COP3 (Third Session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) protocol. To be newly installed are three gas turbine power generators (rating: 26MW, main fuel: natural gas), three waste heat recovery boilers (additionally fired boilers, 2-pressure natural circulation type), and one 40MW water circulation type mixed pressure steam turbine power generator (including a bleeder for co-generation). Greenhouse gases will be reduced by 242,424 tons/year in terms of CO2. The project will cost 9-billion yen in total, with improvement on cost performance expected to be 37,000 yen/ton/year in terms of CO2 and 1,500 yen/ton/25 years. Profitability is assessed using EIRR (economic internal rate of return) when the exchange rate is set at 4.91 UHA/US dollar (as of February 2000). Provided that the emission trading rate in US dollar/ton in CO2 is 0.0, 5.00, 14.0, or 60.00, the economic rate of return will be 7.363, 8.112, 9.399, or 15.155%, respectively. To realize an internal rate of return of 15% which the project wants to achieve, the emission trading rate needs to be 60 US dollars/ton in CO2 or higher. (NEDO)

  5. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    1984-12-01

    A study of container designs for heat generating radioactive waste disposal in the deep ocean sediments is presented. The purpose of the container would be to isolate the waste from the environment for a period of 500 to 1000 years. The container designs proposed are based on the use of either corrosion allowance or corrosion resistant metals. Appropriate overpack wall thicknesses are suggested for each design using the results of corrosion studies and experiments but these are necessarily preliminary and data relevant to corrosion in deep ocean sediments remain sparse. It is concluded that the most promising design concept involves a thin titanium alloy overpack in which all internal void spaces are filled with lead or cement grout. In situ temperatures for the sediment adjacent to the emplaced 50 year cooled waste containers are calculated to reach about 260 deg C. The behaviour of the sediments at such a high temperature is not well understood and the possibility of 100 years interim storage is recommended for consideration to allow further cooling. Further corrosion data and sediment thermal studies would be required to fully confirm the engineering feasibility of these designs. (author)

  6. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    1984-07-01

    This report is based on an emplacement techniques review prepared for the Department of the Environment in February 1983, which appeared as Chapter III of the Nuclear Energy Agency, Seabed Working Group's Status Report. The original document (DOE/RW/83.032) has been amended to take account of the results of field trials carried out in March 1983 and to better reflect current UK Government policy on ocean disposal of HGW. In particular Figure 7 has been redrawn using more realistic drag factors for the calculation of the terminal velocity in water. This report reviews the work conducted by the SWG member countries into the different techniques of emplacing heat generating radioactive waste into the deep ocean sediments. It covers the waste handling from the port facilities to final emplacement in the seabed and verification of the integrity of the canister isolation system. The two techniques which are currently being considered in detail are drilled emplacement and the free fall penetrator. The feasibility study work in progress for both techniques as well as the mathematical and physical modelling work for embedment depth and hole closure behind the penetrator are reviewed. (author)

  7. Geological disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    1985-02-01

    A study has been made of the requirements and design features for containers to isolate vitrified heat generating radioactive waste from the environment for a period of 500 to 1000 years. The requirements for handling, storing and transporting containers have been identified following a study of disposal operations, and the pressures and temperatures which may possibly be experienced in clay, granite and salt formations have been estimated. A range of possible container designs have been proposed to satisfy the requirements of each of the disposal environments. Alternative design concepts in corrosion resistant or corrosion allowance material have been suggested. Potentially suitable container shell materials have been selected following a review of corrosion studies and although metals have not been specified in detail, titanium alloys and low carbon steels are thought to be appropriate for corrosion resistant and corrosion allowance designs respectively. Performance requirements for container filler materials have been identified and candidate materials assessed. A preliminary container stress analysis has shown the importance of thermal modelling and that if lead is used as a filler it dominates the stress response of the container. Possible methods of manufacturing disposal containers have been assessed and found to be generally feasible. (author)

  8. Emissions of soot particles from heat generators

    Lyubov, V. K.; Popov, A. N.; Popova, E. I.

    2017-11-01

    «Soot carbon» or «Soot» - incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition particulate carbon product of hydrocarbons consisting of particles of various shapes and sizes. Soot particles are harmful substances Class 2 and like a dust dispersed by wind for thousands of kilometers. Soot have more powerful negative factor than carbon dioxide. Therefore, more strict requirements on ecological and economical performance for energy facilities at Arctic areas have to be developed to protect fragile Arctic ecosystems and global climate change from degradation and destruction. Quantity of soot particles in the flue gases of energy facilities is a criterion of effectiveness for organization of the burning process. Some of heat generators do not provide the required energy and environmental efficiency which results in irrational use of energy resources and acute pollution of environment. The paper summarizes the results of experimental study of solid particles emission from wide range of capacity boilers burning different organic fuels (natural gas, fuel oil, coal and biofuels). Special attention is paid to environmental and energy performance of the biofuels combustion. Emissions of soot particles PM2.5 are listed. Structure, composition and dimensions of entrained particles with the use of electronic scanning microscope Zeiss SIGMA VP were also studied. The results reveal an impact of several factors on soot particles emission.

  9. Ziar nad Hronom will be heated by an underground heat plant

    Stiegel, J.

    1999-01-01

    The World Bank and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development are concerned in co-participation in funding a project for utilising geothermal ground water in heating premises in Ziar nad Hronom. The project implementations costs will be running at U.S.$18 million, of which the two bank institutions would provide for a non-specified part in the form of credit. In heating residential houses, production and commercial infrastructure of Ziar nad Hronom, 72 thousand tonnes of coal are consumed annually to generate 810 TJ heat. By implementing the new project there will be over 100 TJ savings, with a new more efficient distribution hot water network and 39 reconstructed heat exchange station making for effective consumption of heat. The current heat plant will only serve as an auxiliary source under extremely chilly weather conditions with an expected coal consumption of at most 9 thousand tonnes. In addition to cost implications, the geothermal water heating will make a significant contribution through environmental impact. Ecologists calculated that by shutting down the solid fuel burning heat plant the air burden will be reduced by 59 thousand tonnes of carbon dioxide, 290 tonnes of sulfur dioxide, 48 tonnes of nitrogen oxide, 230 tonnes of dust and nearly 12 tonnes of ash. The implementer of the project scheduled to complete in 2001 is a subsidiary of the joint-stock company Zavod SNP - Geothermal, Ltd, Ziar nad Hronom. Aimed at geothermal water sampling in the depth of some 2,500 meters, a trial drill at Ziarska kotlina - site Varticka will last roughly till April 9 1999. The drilling set of Nafta Gbely erected on December 21, 1998 is technically capable of reaching the depth 2,800 meter, just in case that the geothermal water level is lower than the expected 2,500 m. In all In all Nafta Gbely staffs will carry out two production and two reinjection drills. (author)

  10. Thermal performance analysis of a solar heating plant

    Fan, Jianhua; Huang, Junpeng; Andersen, Ola Lie

    was developed to calculate thermal performances of the plant. In the Trnsys model, three solar collector fields with a total solar collector area of 33,300 m2, a seasonal water pit heat storage of 75,000 m3, a simplified CO2 HP, a simplified ORC unit and a simplified wood chip boiler were included. The energy......Detailed measurements were carried out on a large scale solar heating plant located in southern Denmark in order to evaluate thermal performances of the plant. Based on the measurements, energy flows of the plant were evaluated. A modified Trnsys model of the Marstal solar heating plant...... consumption of the district heating net was modeled by volume flow rate and given forward and return temperatures of the district heating net. Weather data from a weather station at the site of the plant were used in the calculations. The Trnsys calculated yearly thermal performance of the solar heating plant...

  11. Improvements in steam cycle electric power generating plants

    Bienvenu, Claude.

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to a steam cycle electric energy generating plants of the type comprising a fossil or nuclear fuel boiler for generating steam and a turbo alternator group, the turbine of which is fed by the boiler steam. The improvement is characterized in that use is made of a second energy generating group in which a fluid (e.g. ammoniac) undergoes a condensation cycle the heat source of said cycle being obtained through a direct or indirect heat exchange with a portion of the boiler generated steam whereby it is possible without overloading the turbo-alternator group, to accomodate any increase of the boiler power resulting from the use of another fuel while maintaining a maximum energy output. This can be applied to electric power stations [fr

  12. Heat generation during plunge stage in friction stir welding

    Veljić Darko M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the heat generation in the Al alloy Al2024-T3 plate under different rotating speeds and plunge speeds during the plunge stage of friction stir welding (FSW. A three-dimensional finite element model (FEM is developed in the commercial code ABAQUS/Explicit using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation, the Johnson-Cook material law and Coulomb’s Law of friction. The heat generation in FSW can be divided into two parts: frictional heat generated by the tool and heat generated by material deformation near the pin and the tool shoulder region. Numerical results obtained in this work indicate a more prominent influence from the friction-generated heat. The slip rate of the tool relative to the workpiece material is related to this portion of heat. The material velocity, on the other hand, is related to the heat generated by plastic deformation. Increasing the plunging speed of the tool decreases the friction-generated heat and increases the amount of deformation-generated heat, while increasing the tool rotating speed has the opposite influence on both heat portions. Numerical results are compared with the experimental ones, in order to validate the numerical model, and a good agreement is obtained.

  13. Entropy and heat generation of lithium cells/batteries

    Wang Songrui

    2016-01-01

    The methods and techniques commonly used in investigating the change of entropy and heat generation in Li cells/batteries are introduced, as are the measurements, calculations and purposes. The changes of entropy and heat generation are concomitant with the use of Li cells/batteries. In order to improve the management and the application of Li cells/batteries, especially for large scale power batteries, the quantitative investigations of the change of entropy and heat generating are necessary. (topical review)

  14. Steam generator design considerations for modular HTGR plant

    McDonald, C.F.; DeFur, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    Studies are in progress to develop a standard High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant design that is amenable to serial production and is licensable. Based on the results of trade studies performed in the DOE-funded HTGR program, activities are being focused to emphasize a modular concept based on a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Utilization of a multiplicity of the standard module affords flexibility in power rating for utility electricity generation. The selected modular HTGR concept has the reactor core and heat transport systems housed in separate steel vessels. This paper highlights the steam generator design considerations for the reference plant, and includes a discussion of the major features of the heat exchanger concept and the technology base existing in the U.S

  15. Effects of the distribution density of a biomass combined heat and power plant network on heat utilisation efficiency in village-town systems.

    Zhang, Yifei; Kang, Jian

    2017-11-01

    The building of biomass combined heat and power (CHP) plants is an effective means of developing biomass energy because they can satisfy demands for winter heating and electricity consumption. The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of the distribution density of a biomass CHP plant network on heat utilisation efficiency in a village-town system. The distribution density is determined based on the heat transmission threshold, and the heat utilisation efficiency is determined based on the heat demand distribution, heat output efficiency, and heat transmission loss. The objective of this study was to ascertain the optimal value for the heat transmission threshold using a multi-scheme comparison based on an analysis of these factors. To this end, a model of a biomass CHP plant network was built using geographic information system tools to simulate and generate three planning schemes with different heat transmission thresholds (6, 8, and 10 km) according to the heat demand distribution. The heat utilisation efficiencies of these planning schemes were then compared by calculating the gross power, heat output efficiency, and heat transmission loss of the biomass CHP plant for each scenario. This multi-scheme comparison yielded the following results: when the heat transmission threshold was low, the distribution density of the biomass CHP plant network was high and the biomass CHP plants tended to be relatively small. In contrast, when the heat transmission threshold was high, the distribution density of the network was low and the biomass CHP plants tended to be relatively large. When the heat transmission threshold was 8 km, the distribution density of the biomass CHP plant network was optimised for efficient heat utilisation. To promote the development of renewable energy sources, a planning scheme for a biomass CHP plant network that maximises heat utilisation efficiency can be obtained using the optimal heat transmission threshold and the nonlinearity

  16. Power generation enhancement in a salinity-gradient solar pond power plant using thermoelectric generator

    Ziapour, Behrooz M.; Saadat, Mohammad; Palideh, Vahid; Afzal, Sadegh

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermoelectric generator was used and simulated within a salinity-gradient solar pond power plant. • Results showed that the thermoelectric generator can be able to enhance the power plant efficiency. • Results showed that the presented models can be able to produce generation even in the cold months. • The optimum size of area of solar pond based on its effect on efficiency is 50,000 m 2 . - Abstract: Salinity-gradient solar pond (SGSP) has been a reliable supply of heat source for power generation when it has been integrated with low temperature thermodynamics cycles like organic Rankine cycle (ORC). Also, thermoelectric generator (TEG) plays a critical role in the production of electricity from renewable energy sources. This paper investigates the potential of thermoelectric generator as a power generation system using heat from SGSP. In this work, thermoelectric generator was used instead of condenser of ORC with the purpose of improving the performance of system. Two new models of SGSP have been presented as: (1) SGSP using TEG in condenser of ORC without heat exchanger and (2) SGSP using TEG in condenser of ORC with heat exchanger. These proposed systems was evaluated through computer simulations. The ambient conditions were collected from beach of Urmia lake in IRAN. Simulation results indicated that, for identical conditions, the model 1 has higher performance than other model 2. For models 1 and 2 in T LCZ = 90 °C, the overall thermal efficiency of the solar pond power plant, were obtained 0.21% and 0.2% more than ORC without TEG, respectively.

  17. Analysis of Decay Heat Removal by Natural Convection in LMR with a Combined Steam Generator

    Kim, Eui Kwang; Eoh, Jae Hyuk; Han, Ji Woong; Lee, Tae Ho

    2011-01-01

    Liquid metal reactors (LMRs) conventionally employ an intermediate heat transport system (IHTS) to protect the nuclear core during a sodium-water reaction (SWR) event. However these SWR-related components increase plant construction costs. In order to eliminate the need for an IHTS, a combined steam generator, which is an integrated heat exchanger of a steam generator and intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), was proposed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The objective of this work is to analyze the natural circulation heat removal capability of the rector system using a combined steam generator. As a means of decay heat removal, a normal heat transport path is composed of a primary sodium system, intermediate lead-bismuth circuit combined with SG and steam/water system. This paper presents the results of the possible temperature and natural circulation flows in all circuits during a steady state for a given reactor power level varied as a function of time

  18. Layout of an internally heated gas generator for the steam gasification of coal

    Feistel, P.P.; Duerrfeld, R.; Heck, K.H. van; Juentgen, H.

    1975-01-01

    Industrial-scale steam gasification of coal using heat from high temperature reactors requires research and development on allothermal gas generators. Bergbau-Forschung GmbH, Essen, does theoretical and experimental work in this field. The experiments deal with reaction kinetics, heat transfer and material tests. Their significance for the layout of a full-scale gas generator is shown. Including material specifications, the feasibility of a gasifier, characterized by a fluid bed volume of 318 m 3 and a heat transferring area of 4000 m 2 , results. The data, now available, are used to determine the gasification throughput from the heat balance, i.e. the equality of heat consumed and heat transferred. Throughputs of about 50 t/hr of coal are possible for a single gas generator, the helium outlet temperature of the HTR being 950 0 C/ Bergbau-Forschung has commissioned a medium-scale pilot plant (200 kg/hr). (Auth.)

  19. Safety provision during heating of coal downcast shafts with gas heat generators using degassed methane

    В. Р. Алабьев

    2017-06-01

    Together with heat generators of mixed type the article also describes a working principle of heat generator of indirect action type, which to the fullest extent possible meets requirements of Russian Federation legislation and regulation for application of this heat generators in coal mines conditions. The article has a principal working scheme of heat unit layout using this type of generator. It is shown that after development of corresponding normative documents regulating processes of design, construction and operation of heating units using heaters of indirect action, their application in Russian coal mines will be possible without breaking Safety standards and rules.

  20. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste

    Leigh, Christi D.; Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United

  1. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.

    Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from

  2. Soviet steam generator technology: fossil fuel and nuclear power plants

    Rosengaus, J.

    1987-01-01

    In the Soviet Union, particular operational requirements, coupled with a centralized planning system adopted in the 1920s, have led to a current technology which differs in significant ways from its counterparts elsewhere in the would and particularly in the United States. However, the monograph has a broader value in that it traces the development of steam generators in response to the industrial requirements of a major nation dealing with the global energy situation. Specifically, it shows how Soviet steam generator technology evolved as a result of changing industrial requirements, fuel availability, and national fuel utilization policy. The monograph begins with a brief technical introduction focusing on steam-turbine power plants, and includes a discussion of the Soviet Union's regional power supply (GRES) networks and heat and power plant (TETs) systems. TETs may be described as large central co-generating stations which, in addition to electricity, provide heat in the form of steam and hot water. Plants of this type are a common feature of the USSR today. The adoption of these cogeneration units as a matter of national policy has had a central influence on Soviet steam generator technology which can be traced throughout the monograph. The six chapters contain: a short history of steam generators in the USSR; steam generator design and manufacture in the USSR; boiler and furnace assemblies for fossil fuel-fired power stations; auxiliary components; steam generators in nuclear power plants; and the current status of the Soviet steam generator industry. Chapters have been abstracted separately. A glossary is included containing abbreviations and acronyms of USSR organizations. 26 references

  3. District heating and cooling system for communities through power plant retrofit and distribution network. Final report, Phase I

    1979-06-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting thermal power plants in Minnesota to accommodate both heat and power generation for district heating was examined and is discussed. Three communities were identified as viable sites for co-generation district heating. (LCL)

  4. Analyses of pebble-bed reactors for the generation of heat for heating purposes

    Muehlensiep, J.; Fricke, U.; Inhester, K.H.; Kugeler, K.; Phlippen, P.W.; Schmidtlein, P.; Swatoch, R.; Wagner, U.

    1986-10-01

    Marginal conditions are described for the use of a nuclear power reactor for long-distance heat supply in densely populated areas. For the design of the high-temperature heat generating reactor, plant components and possible arrangements are analyzed with consideration to safety and costs. System sizes are reasonably chosen on the basis of analyzed parameters, the paramount design goal being to adequately retain the fission products in the coated particles of the fuel elements, in anticipation of probable accidents. With the help of the data record obtained, a system is designed with a cuboid-shaped core as its characteristic feature; the advantage of the core consists in the fact that it quickly discharges the after-heat outwards even in case of a hypothetical accident. Due to the core shape, it is possible to install heat-exchanging components near the core, and to place the safety rods where they can be very effective in reflector borings. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Technical and economical analysis of concepts for using the heat of biogas plants in rural areas

    Kaths, Friederike Annette

    2012-08-01

    Since the implementation of the EEG in Germany the biogas production becomes an independent branch of industry in the agriculture. At this time more than 90 percent of the biogas plants work with co-generation plant for heat and power with a thermal engine efficiencies of more than 50 percent. Because of the location in the rural area heat costumers with a continuous demand of heat over the whole year are rare. This research had a closer look how to use the heat of biogas production efficiently and also generating profit. The aim of the study was to use heat over the whole year, a profitable heat concept without counting the KWK-bonus and an added value on the farm. During the study the following concepts were analyzed: asparagus production using soil heating, drying equipment for different products, the production of fish in aquaculture, the poultry production and the heated production of tomatoes. The results showed different concepts using heat of biogas plants as efficient for farmers. However with only one concept the aims - to use the heat over the whole year, generating a profitable heat concept without counting the KWK-bonus, add an value on the farm - mostly can not be achieved. The combination of different heat concepts is necessary. In this analysis the poultry production in combination with the dryer can be considered as the most efficient concept. Bearing in mind the benefit which can be generated with a heat concept as well as the higher income and the higher technical efficiency of biogas plants operators should implement an individual concept for their heat.

  6. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    Phillips, B.A.; Zawacki, T.S.

    1998-07-21

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use, as the heat transfer medium, the working fluid of the absorption system taken from the generator at a location where the working fluid has a rich liquor concentration. 5 figs.

  7. Genetic and epigenetic control of plant heat responses

    Junzhong eLiu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved sophisticated genetic and epigenetic regulatory systems to respond quickly to unfavorable environmental conditions such as heat, cold, drought, and pathogen infections. In particular, heat greatly affects plant growth and development, immunity and circadian rhythm, and poses a serious threat to the global food supply. According to temperatures exposing, heat can be usually classified as warm ambient temperature (about 22-27℃, high temperature (27-30℃ and extremely high temperature (37-42℃, also known as heat stress for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The genetic mechanisms of plant responses to heat have been well studied, mainly focusing on elevated ambient temperature-mediated morphological acclimation and acceleration of flowering, modulation of plant immunity and circadian clock by high temperatures, and thermotolerance to heat stress. Recently, great progress has been achieved on epigenetic regulation of heat responses, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, histone chaperones, small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs and other undefined epigenetic mechanisms. These epigenetic modifications regulate the expression of heat-responsive genes and function to prevent heat-related damage. This review focuses on recent progresses regarding the genetic and epigenetic control of heat responses in plants, and pays more attention to the role of the major epigenetic mechanisms in plant heat responses. Further research perspectives are also discussed.

  8. Computer functions in overall plant control of candu generating stations

    Chou, Q.B.; Stokes, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    System Planning Specifications form the basic requirements for the performance of the plant including its response to abnormal situations. The rules for the computer control programs are devised from these, taking into account limitations imposed by the reactor, heat transport and turbine-generator systems. The paper outlines these specifications and the limitations imposed by the major items of plant equipment. It describes the functions of each of the main programs, their interactions and the control modes used in the existing Ontario Hydro's nuclear station or proposed for future stations. Some simulation results showing the performance of the overall unit control system and plans for future studies are discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Heat Recovery From Tail Gas Incineration To Generate Power

    Tawfik, Tarek

    2010-09-15

    Many industrial processes result in tail gas wastes that must be flared or incinerated to abide with environmental guidelines. Tail gas incineration occurs in several chemical processes resulting in high-temperature exhaust gas that simply go to the stack, thus wasting all that valuable heat! This paper discusses useful heat recovery and electric power generation utilizing available heat in exhaust gas from tail gas incinerators. This heat will be recovered in a waste-heat recovery boiler that will produce superheated steam to expand in a steam turbine to generate power. A detailed cost estimate is presented.

  10. Laminar fluid flow and heat transfer in a fin-tube heat exchanger with vortex generators

    Yanagihara, J.I.; Rodriques, R. Jr. [Polytechnic School of Univ. of Sao Paolo, Sao Paolo (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Development of heat transfer enhancement techniques for fin-tube heat exchangers has great importance in industry. In recent years, heat transfer augmentation by vortex generators has been considered for use in plate fin-tube heat exchangers. The present work describes a numerical investigation about the influence of delta winglet pairs of vortex generators on the flow structure and heat transfer of a plate fin-tube channel. The Navier-Stokes and Energy equations are solved by the finite volume method using a boundary-fitted coordinate system. The influence of vortex generators parameters such as position, angle of attack and aspect ratio were investigated. Local and global influences of vortex generators in heat transfer and flow losses were analyzed by comparison with a model using smooth fin. The results indicate great advantages of this type of geometry for application in plate fin-tube heat exchangers, in terms of large heat transfer enhancement and small pressure loss penalty. (author)

  11. Laminar fluid flow and heat transfer in a fin-tube heat exchanger with vortex generators

    Yanagihara, J I; Rodriques, R Jr [Polytechnic School of Univ. of Sao Paolo, Sao Paolo (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Development of heat transfer enhancement techniques for fin-tube heat exchangers has great importance in industry. In recent years, heat transfer augmentation by vortex generators has been considered for use in plate fin-tube heat exchangers. The present work describes a numerical investigation about the influence of delta winglet pairs of vortex generators on the flow structure and heat transfer of a plate fin-tube channel. The Navier-Stokes and Energy equations are solved by the finite volume method using a boundary-fitted coordinate system. The influence of vortex generators parameters such as position, angle of attack and aspect ratio were investigated. Local and global influences of vortex generators in heat transfer and flow losses were analyzed by comparison with a model using smooth fin. The results indicate great advantages of this type of geometry for application in plate fin-tube heat exchangers, in terms of large heat transfer enhancement and small pressure loss penalty. (author)

  12. The PBMR electric power generation plant

    Perez S, G.; Santacruz I, I.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2003-01-01

    This work has as purpose to diffuse in a general way the technology of the one modulate reactor of pebble bed. Because our country is in developing ways, the electric power demand goes in increase with that which it is presented the great challenge of satisfying this necessity, not only being in charge of the one fact per se, but also involving the environmental aspect and of security. Both factors are covered by the PBMR technology, which we approach in their basic aspects with the purpose that the public opinion knows it and was familiarized with this type of reactors that well could represent a solution for our growing electricity demand. We will treat this reactor visualizing it like part of a generation plant defining in first place to the itself reactor. We will see because that the system PBMR consists of 2 main sections: the reactor and the unit of energy conversion, highlighting that the principle of the PBMR reactor operation is based on the thermodynamic Brayton cycle cooled by helium and that, in turn, it transmits the energy in form of heat toward a gas turbine. In what concerns to the fuel, it peculiar design due to its spherical geometry is described, aspect that make to this reactor different from the traditional ones that use fuel rods. In fact in the fuel spheres of the PBMR it is where it resides great part of it inherent security since each particle of fuel, consistent in uranium dioxide, is lined one with coal and silicon carbide those which form an impenetrable barrier containing to the fuel and those radioactive products that result of the nuclear reactions. Such particles are encapsulated in graphite to form the sphere or 'pebble', of here born the name of this innovative technology. (Author)

  13. Thermodynamic Analysis of a Ship Power Plant Operating with Waste Heat Recovery through Combined Heat and Power Production

    Mirko Grljušić

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to study a cogeneration plant for combined heat & power (CHP production that utilises the low-temperature waste energy in the power plant of a Suezmax-size oil tanker for all heating and electricity requirements during navigation. After considering various configurations, a standard propulsion engine operating at maximum efficiency and a CHP Plant with R245fa fluid using a supercritical organic Rankine cycle (ORC is selected. All the ship heat requirements can be covered by energy of organic fluid after expansion in the turbine, except feeder-booster heating. Hence, an additional quantity of working fluid may be heated using an after Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG directed to the feeder-booster module. An analysis of the obtained results shows that the steam turbine plant does not yield significant fuel savings. However, a CHP plant with R245fa fluid using supercritical ORC meets all of the demands for electrical energy and heat while burning only a small amount of additional fuel in HRSG at the main engine off-design operation.

  14. An evaluation of analytical heat transfer area with various boiling heat transfer correlations in steam generator thermal sizing

    Jung, B. R.; Park, H. S.; Chung, D. M.; Baik, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The computer program SAFE has been used to size and analyze the performance of a steam generator which has two types of heat transfer regions in Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants (KSNP) and Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) design. The SAFE code calculates the analytical boiling heat transfer area using the modified form of the saturated nucleate pool boiling correlation suggested by Rohsenow. The predicted heat transfer area in the boiling region is multiplied by a constant to obtain a final analytical heat transfer area. The inclusion of the multiplier in the analytical calculation has some disadvantage of loss of complete correlation by the governing heat transfer equation. Several comparative analyses have been performed quantitatively to evaluate the possibility of removing the multiplier in the analytical calculation in the SAFE code. The evaluation shows that the boiling correlation and multiplier used in predicting the boiling region heat transfer area can be replaced with other correlations predicting nearly the same heat transfer area. The removal of multiplier included in the analytical calculation will facilitate a direct use of a set of concerned analytical sizing values that can be exactly correlated by the governing heat transfer equation. In addition this will provide more reasonable basis for the steam generator thermal sizing calculation and enhance the code usability without loss of any validity of the current sizing procedure. (author)

  15. Coal-Fired Power Plant Heat Rate Reductions

    View a report that identifies systems and equipment in coal-fired power plants where efficiency improvements can be realized, and provides estimates of the resulting net plant heat rate reductions and costs for implementation.

  16. Sorption heat engines: simple inanimate negative entropy generators

    Muller, Anthonie W. J.; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    The name 'sorption heat engines' is proposed for simple negative entropy generators that are driven by thermal cycling and work on alternating adsorption and desorption. These generators are in general not explicitly recognized as heat engines. Their mechanism is applicable to the fields of engineering, physics, chemistry, geology, and biology, in particular the origin of life. Four kinds of sorption heat engines are distinguished depending on the occurrence of changes in the adsorbent or ads...

  17. Impact of Next Generation District Heating Systems on Distribution Network Heat Losses: A Case Study Approach

    Li, Yu; Rezgui, Yacine

    2018-01-01

    District heating (DH) is a promising energy pathway to alleviate environmental negative impacts induced by fossil fuels. Improving the performance of DH systems is one of the major challenges facing its wide adoption. This paper discusses the heat losses of the next generation DH based on the constructed Simulink model. Results show that lower distribution temperature and advanced insulation technology greatly reduce network heat losses. Also, the network heat loss can be further minimized by a reduction of heat demand in buildings.

  18. Main characteristics and design features of steam generators for VG-400 plant

    Golovko, V.F.; Grebennik, V.N.; Gol'tsev, A.O.; Ivanov, S.M.; Sergeev, A.I.; Pospelov, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The description of a steam generator for the VG-400 plant performed in two variants depending on a heat-exchange surface arrangement (one-bundle coil and module-cassette construction) is given. (author)

  19. Thermal resistance of a convectively cooled plate with applied heat flux and variable internal heat generation

    Venkataraman, N.S.; Cardoso, H.P.; Oliveira Filho, O.B. de

    1981-01-01

    The conductive heat transfer in a rectangular plate with nonuniform internal heat generation, with one end convectively cooled and a part of the opposite end subjected to external heat flux is considered. The remaining part of this end as well as the other two sides are thermally insulated. The governing differential equation is solved by a finite difference scheme. The variation of the thermal resistance with Biot modulus, the plate geometry, the internal heat generation parameter and the type of profile of internal heat generation is discussed. (author) [pt

  20. Heat-Pipe-Associated Localized Thermoelectric Power Generation System

    Kim, Pan-Jo; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Jang, Ju-Chan; Lee, Wook-Hyun; Lee, Ki-Woo

    2014-06-01

    The present study focused on how to improve the maximum power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system and move heat to any suitable space using a TEG associated with a loop thermosyphon (loop-type heat pipe). An experimental study was carried out to investigate the power output, the temperature difference of the thermoelectric module (TEM), and the heat transfer performance associated with the characteristic of the researched heat pipe. Currently, internal combustion engines lose more than 35% of their fuel energy as recyclable heat in the exhaust gas, but it is not easy to recycle waste heat using TEGs because of the limited space in vehicles. There are various advantages to use of TEGs over other power sources, such as the absence of moving parts, a long lifetime, and a compact system configuration. The present study presents a novel TEG concept to transfer heat from the heat source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any location. This simple and novel design for a TEG can be applied to future hybrid cars. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate power of around 1.8 V with T TEM = 58°C. The heat transfer performance of a loop-type heat pipe with various working fluids was investigated, with water at high heat flux (90 W) and 0.05% TiO2 nanofluid at low heat flux (30 W to 70 W) showing the best performance in terms of power generation. The heat pipe can transfer the heat to any location where the TEM is installed.

  1. Steam generator assessment for sustainable power plant operation

    Drexler, Andreas; Fandrich, Joerg; Ramminger, Ute; Montaner-Garcia, Violeta

    2012-09-01

    Water and steam serve in the water-steam cycle as the energy transport and work media. These fluids shall not affect, through corrosion processes on the construction materials and their consequences, undisturbed plant operation. The main objectives of the steam water cycle chemistry consequently are: - The metal release rates of the structural materials shall be minimal - The probability of selective / localized forms of corrosion shall be minimal. - The deposition of corrosion products on heat transfer surfaces shall be minimized. - The formation of aggressive media, particularly local aggressive environments under deposits, shall be avoided. These objectives are especially important for the steam generators (SGs) because their condition is a key factor for plant performance, high plant availability, life time extension and is important to NPP safety. The major opponent to that is corrosion and fouling of the heating tubes. Effective ways of counteracting all degradation problems and thus of improving the SG performance are to keep SGs in clean conditions or if necessary to plan cleaning measures such as mechanical tube sheet lancing or chemical cleaning. Based on more than 40 years of experience in steam-water cycle water chemistry treatment AREVA developed an overall methodology assessing the steam generator cleanliness condition by evaluating all available operational and inspection data together. In order to gain a complete picture all relevant water chemistry data (e.g. corrosion product mass balances, impurity ingress), inspection data (e.g. visual inspections and tube sheet lancing results) and thermal performance data (e.g. heat transfer calculations) are evaluated, structured and indexed using the AREVA Fouling Index Tool Box. This Fouling Index Tool Box is more than a database or statistical approach for assessment of plant chemistry data. Furthermore the AREVA's approach combines manufacturer's experience with plant data and operates with an

  2. Heat and mass transfer and hydrodynamics in two-phase flows in nuclear power plants

    Styrikovich, M.A.; Polonskii, V.S.; Tsiklauri, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    This book examines nuclear power plant equipment from the point of view of heat and mass transfer and the behavior of impurities contained in water and in steam, with reference to real water regimes of nuclear power plants. The transfer processes of equipment are considered. Heat and mass transfer are analyzed in the pre-crisis regions of steam-generating passages with non-permeable surfaces, and in capillary-porous structures. Attention is given to forced convection boiling crises and top post-DNB heat transfer. Data on two-phase hydrodynamics in straight and curved channels are correlated and safety aspects of nuclear power plants are discussed

  3. Design and analysis of heat recovery system in bioprocess plant

    Anastasovski, Aleksandar; Rašković, Predrag; Guzović, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Heat integration of a bioprocess plant is studied. • Bioprocess plant produces yeast and ethyl-alcohol. • The design of a heat recovery system is performed by batch pinch analysis. • Direct and indirect heat integration approaches are used in process design. • The heat recovery system without a heat storage opportunity is more profitable. - Abstract: The paper deals with the heat integration of a bioprocess plant which produces yeast and ethyl-alcohol. The referent plant is considered to be a multiproduct batch plant which operates in a semi-continuous mode. The design of a heat recovery system is performed by batch pinch analysis and by the use of the Time slice model. The results obtained by direct and indirect heat integration approaches are presented in the form of cost-optimal heat exchanger networks and evaluated by different thermodynamic and economic indicators. They signify that the heat recovery system without a heat storage opportunity can be considered to be a more profitable solution for the energy efficiency increase in a plant

  4. Major plant retrofits at Monticello nuclear generating plant

    Larsen, D.E.; Hogg, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    For the past several years, Northern States Power (NSP) has been making major plant retrofits to Monticello Nuclear generating Station in order to improve plant availability and upgrade the plant components for the potential extension of the operating license (life extension). This paper discusses in detail three major retrofits that have been completed or in the process of completion; recirculation loop piping replacement, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) water level-instrumentation modification, core spray piping replacement, the authors will address the scope of work, design and installation concerns, and life extension considerations during the design and procurement process for these three projects

  5. Combined heat, cold and power generation with cold water storage plants. State of the art and development; Kraft-Waerme-Kaelte-Kopplung mit Kaltwasserspeichern. Stand und Entwicklung der Technologie

    Urbaneck, Thorsten; Platzer, Bernd [Technische Univ. Chemnitz (Germany). Professur Technische Thermodynamik; Uhlig, Ulf; Goeschel, Thomas [Eins Energie in Sachsen GmbH und Co. KG, Chemnitz (Germany). Betrieb Rohrnetze

    2013-02-18

    District cooling systems with combined heat, cold and power generation may be an alternative for the refrigeration supply with medium-sized decentralized compression refrigerating machines or for the wide-spread application of split devices. The implementation of discontinuously available renewable energy sources can be much better transposed by means of such systems.

  6. Heat transfer enhancement in cross-flow heat exchanger using vortex generator

    Yoo, S. Y.; Kwon, H. K.; Kim, B. C.; Park, D. S.; Lee, S. S.

    2003-01-01

    Fouling is very serious problem in heat exchanger because it rapidly deteriorates the performance of heat exchanger. Cross-flow heat exchanger with vortex generators is developed, which enhance heat transfer and reduce fouling. In the present heat exchanger, shell and baffle are removed from the conventional shell-and-tube heat exchanger. The naphthalene sublimation technique is employed to measure the local heat transfer coefficients. The experiments are performed for single circular tube, staggered array tube bank and in-line array tube bank with and without vortex generators. Local and average Nusselt numbers of single tube and tube bank with vortex generator are investigated and compared to those of without vortex generator

  7. Atmospheric effects of heat release at large power plants

    Kikuchi, Yukio

    1979-01-01

    In power plants, the thermal efficiency of generating electricity is generally 1/3, the rest 2/3 being carried away by cooling water. To release the heat, there are three alternative methods; i.e. cooling water released into sea, cooling water released into a cooling pond, and cooling of such water with a cooling tower. In the third method, cooling towers are stacks of 10m -- 80m bore, and warm cooling water flowing on the side wall is cooled with atmospheric air. The resultant heated air is discharged as plume from their top. Upon condensation, it becomes visible and then leads to the formation of clouds. In this manner, the weather around the sites of power plants is affected, such as reduction of insolation reaching ground and increase in precipitation. The following matters are described: cooling towers; phenomena and prediction methods of visible plume, cloud formation, increase of precipitation and deposition of drifting waterdrops; and effects of the group of power plants. (J.P.N.)

  8. Heat generation by a wind turbine

    Corten, G.P. [ECN Wind, Petten (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    It will be shown that an actuator disk operating in wind turbine mode extracts more energy from the fluid than can be transferred into useful energy. At the Lanchester-Betz limit the decrease of the kinetic energy in the wind is converted by 2 /3 into useful power and by 1 /3 into heat. Behind the wind turbine the outer flow and the flow that has passed the actuator disk will mix. In this process momentum is conserved but part of the kinetic energy will dissipate in heat via viscous shear. 7 refs.

  9. Compact heat exchanger for power plants

    Kinnunen, L.

    2001-01-01

    Vahterus Oy, located at Kalanti, has manufactured heat exchangers since the beginning of 1990s. About 90% of the equipment produced are exported. In the PSHE (Plate and Shell) solution of the Vahterus heat exchanger the heat is transferred by round plated welded to form a compact package, which is assembled into a cylindrical steel casing. The heat exchanger contains no gaskets or soldered joints, which eliminates the leak risks. Traditional heat exchanges are usually operated at higher temperatures and pressures, but the heat transfer capacities of them are lower. Plate heat exchangers, on the other hand, are efficient, but the application range of them is narrow. Additionally, the rubber gasket of the heat exchange plates, sealing the joints of the heat exchanging plates, does not stand high pressures or temperatures, or corroding fluids. The new welded plate heat exchanger combine the pressure and temperature resistance of tube heat exchangers and the high heat exchange capacity of plate heat exchangers. The new corrosion resisting heat exchanger can be applied for especially hard conditions. The operating temperature range of the PSHE heat exchanger is - 200 - 900 deg C. The pressure resistance is as high as 100 bar. The space requirement of PSHE is only one tenth of the space requirement of traditional tube heat exchangers. Adjusting the number of heat exchanging plates can change the capacity of the heat exchanger. Power range of the heat exchanger can be as high as 80 MW. Due to the corrosion preventive construction and the small dimension the PSHE heat exchanger can be applied for refrigerators using ammonia as refrigerant. These kinds of new Vahterus heat exchangers are in use in 60 countries in more than 2000 refrigerators

  10. First-Generation Transgenic Plants and Statistics

    Nap, Jan-Peter; Keizer, Paul; Jansen, Ritsert

    1993-01-01

    The statistical analyses of populations of first-generation transgenic plants are commonly based on mean and variance and generally require a test of normality. Since in many cases the assumptions of normality are not met, analyses can result in erroneous conclusions. Transformation of data to

  11. Comparison of LCA results of low temperature heat plant using electric heat pump, absorption heat pump and gas-fired boiler

    Nitkiewicz, Anna; Sekret, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Usage of geothermal heat pump can bring environmental benefits. • The lowest environmental impact for whole life cycle is obtained for absorption heat pump. • The value of heat pump COP has a significant influence on environmental impact. • In case of coal based power generation the damage to human health is significant. - Abstract: This study compares the life cycle impacts of three heating plant systems which differ in their source of energy and the type of system. The following heating systems are considered: electric water-water heat pump, absorption water-water heat pump and natural gas fired boiler. The heat source for heat pump systems is low temperature geothermal source with temperature below 20 °C and spontaneous outflow 24 m 3 /h. It is assumed that the heat pumps and boiler are working in monovalent system. The analysis was carried out for heat networks temperature characteristic at 50/40 °C which is changing with outdoor temperature during heating season. The environmental life cycle impact is evaluated within life cycle assessment methodological framework. The method used for life cycle assessment is eco-indicator ‘99. The functional unit is defined as heating plant system with given amount of heat to be delivered to meet local heat demand in assumed average season. The data describing heating plant system is derived from literature and energy analysis of these systems. The data describing the preceding life cycle phases: extraction of raw materials and fuels, production of heating devices and their transportation is taken from Ecoinvent 2.0 life cycle inventory database. The results were analyzed on three levels of indicators: single score indicator, damage category indicators and impact category indicator. The indicators were calculated for characterization, normalization and weighting phases as well. SimaPro 7.3.2 is the software used to model the systems’ life cycle. The study shows that heating plants using a low

  12. Heat diffusion and magnetic field generation

    Holstein, P.A.

    1983-10-01

    In the report of CECAM workshop in 1982 some results of heat diffusion, when the spontaneous B-field is calculated, have been given. Separately, a similar code (magneto-calo-dynamic or MCD code) has been built and it was interesting to compare them. Comparisom has been made during the workshop of October 1983

  13. How is Electricity Generated from Nuclear Power Plant

    Lajnef, D.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power is a proven, safe and clean source of power generation. A nuclear power plant is a thermal power station in which the heat source is a nuclear reactor. As is typical in all conventional thermal power stations the heat is used to generate steam which drives a steam turbine: the energy released from continuous fission of the atoms of the fuel is harnessed as heat in either a gas or water, and is used to produce steam. Nuclear Reactors are classified by several methods. It can be classified by type of nuclear reaction, by the moderator material, by coolant or by generation. There are several components common to most types of reactors: fuel, moderator, control rods, coolant, and containment. Nuclear reactor technology has been under continuous development since the first commercial exploitation of civil nuclear power in the 1950s. We can mention seven key reactor attributes that illuminate the essential differences between the various generations of reactors: cost effectiveness, safety, security and non-proliferation, fuel cycle, grid appropriateness and Economics. Today there are about 437 nuclear power reactors that are used to generate electricity in about 30 countries around the world. (author)

  14. Economic feasibility of heat supply from nuclear power plants in the United States

    Roe, K.K.; Oliker, I.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear energy is regarded as competitive for urban district heating applications. Hot water heat transoport systems of up to 50 miles are feasible for heat loads over 1500 MWt, and heat load density of over 130 MWt/mi 2 is most suitable for nuclear applications. An incremental approach and a nuclear plant design provision for future heat extraction are recommended. Nuclear district heating technology status is discussed, particularly turbine design. Results of a study for retrofitting a major existing nuclear power plant to cogeneration operation are presented. The study indicates that for transmission distances up to 20 miles it is economical to generate and transport between 600 and 1200 MWt of district heat (author)

  15. DENINT power plant cost benefit analysis code: Analysis of methane fuelled power plant/district heating system

    Cincotti, V.; D'Andrea, A.

    1989-07-01

    The DENINT power plant cost benefit analysis code takes into consideration, not only power production costs at the generator terminals, but also, in the case of cogeneration, the costs of the fuel supply and heat and power distribution systems which depend greatly on the location of the plant. The code is able to allow comparisons of alternatives with varying annual operation hours, fuel cost increases, and different types of fossil fuels and production systems. For illustrative purposes, this paper examines two methane fired cogeneration plant/district heating alternatives

  16. Application and design of an economizer for waste heat recovery in a cogeneration plant

    Martić Igor I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy increase cost has required its more effective use. However, many industrial heating processes generate waste energy. Use of waste-heat recovery systems decreases energy consumption. This paper presents case study of waste heat recovering of the exhaust flue gas in a 1415 kWe cogeneration plant. This waste heat can be recovered by installing an economizer to heat the condensed and fresh water in thermal degasification unit and reduce steam use for maintaining the temperature of 105˚C for oxygen removal. Design methodology of economizer is presented.

  17. Glas generator for the steam gasification of coal with nuclear generated heat

    Buchner, G.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heat from a High Temperature Reactor (HTR) for the steam gasification of coal saves coal, which otherwise is burnt to generate the necessary reaction heat. The gas generator for this process, a horizontal pressure vessel, contains a fluidized bed of coal and steam. An ''immersion-heater'' type of heat exchanger introduces the nuclear generated heat to the process. Some special design problems of this gasifier are presented. Reference is made to the present state of development of the steam gasification process with heat from high temperature reactors. (author)

  18. Trends in safety objectives for nuclear district heating plants

    Brogli, R [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Safety objectives for dedicated nuclear heating plants are strongly influenced on the one hand by what is accepted for electricity nuclear stations, and on the other hand by the requirement that for economical reasons heating reactors have to be located close to population centers. The paper discusses the related trends and comes to the conclusion that on account of the specific technical characteristics of nuclear heating plants adequate safety can be provided even for highly populated sites. (author). 8 refs.

  19. Utilization of straw in district heating and CHP plants

    Nikolaisen, L.

    1993-01-01

    In Denmark 64 straw-fired district heating plants and 6 decentral CHP plants have been built since 1980 which are completely or partly straw-fired. The annual straw consumption in the district heating plants is 275,000 tons and in the decentral plants about 200,000 tons. The size of the district heating plants amounts to 0.5 MW - 10 MW and that of the CHP plants to 7 MW - 67 MW heat flow rate. Either whole bales or cut/scarified straw is used for firing. Hesston bales of about 450 kg control the market. The Centre of Biomass Technology is an activity supported 100 % by the Danish Energy Agency with the purpose of increasing the use of straw and wood in the energy supply (orig.)

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of waste heat power generation system

    Guo, Jiangfeng; Xu, Mingtian; Cheng, Lin

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, a waste heat power generation system is analyzed based on the criteria with and without considering the heat/exergy loss to the environment. For the criteria without considering the heat/exergy loss to the environment, the first- and second-law efficiencies display different tendencies with the variations of some system parameters. When the heat/exergy loss to the environment is taken into consideration, the first and second law efficiencies display the same tendency. Thus, choosing the appropriate expressions for the performance criteria is crucial for the optimization design of the waste heat power generation system. It is found that there are two approaches to improving the system performance: one is to improve the heat/exergy input; the other is to enhance the heat-work conversion ability of the system. The former would deteriorate the environment if the heat-work conversion ability of the system remains unchanged; the latter could reduce the environmental impact but it's restricted by the heat/exergy input. Therefore, the optimal operation condition should be achieved at the trade-off between the heat/exergy input and the heat-work conversion ability of the system.

  1. Suitability of a combined steam gas power plant in connection with a plant for production of gaseous fuel with a low heating value for the generation of electric power in the middle range of the load characteristic

    Alich, J.A. Jr.; Dickenson, R.L.; Korens, N.

    1975-01-01

    The report deals with the summary of the basic considerations concerning the gasification of oil and coal to produce electrical power. The application requirements in the middle region of the load diagram are discussed. A survey on the suitability of corresponding gasification equipment as well as methods for such a production of energy are described. The profitableness of an electroenergy-producing medium in the combined cycle with a gas having low heating value for the operation in this load diagram region is compared with other methods. (orig./LH) [de

  2. RESEARCH OF HYDRODYNAMICS OF HEAT GENERATORS FOR MECHANICAL SYSTEMS AUTONOMOUS HEATING

    E. M. Derbasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A design of mechanical heat source, allows direct conversion of mechanical energy of the wind flow into thermal energy due to friction forces in a highly viscous fluid. Obtained theoretical dependence for calculating the heat generated by converting mechanical energy into heat. For laminar flow of a highly viscous, fluid in the gap between the stationary and rotating disk heat source. Based on experimental studies to determine the average thickness of the boundary layer between the rotating and fixed disks. The dependences to identify key structural dimensions of mechanical heat sources for heating systems. 

  3. CHP in Switzerland from 1990 to 1998. Thermal power generation including combined heat and power

    Kaufmann, U.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a study on thermal power generation in Switzerland show that combined heat and power (CHP) systems have grown rapidly. Statistics are presented on the development of CHP-based power and also on thermal power stations without waste heat usage. Figures are given for gas and steam turbine installations, combined gas and steam turbine stations and motor-driven CHP units. Power production is categorised, separating small and large (over 1 Megawatt electrical) power generation facilities. On-site, distributed power generation at consumers' premises and the geographical distribution of plant is described

  4. Heat generation and heating limits for the IRUS LLRW disposal facility

    Donders, R.E.; Caron, F.

    1995-10-01

    Heat generation from radioactive decay and chemical degradation must be considered when implementing low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal. This is particularly important when considering the management of spent radioisotope sources. Heating considerations and temperature calculations for the proposed IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure) near-surface disposal facility are presented. Heat transfer calculations were performed using a finite element code with realistic but somewhat conservative heat transfer parameters and environmental boundary conditions. The softening-temperature of the bitumen waste-form (38 deg C) was found to be the factor that limits the heat generation rate in the facility. This limits the IRUS heat rate, assuming a uniform source term, to 0.34 W/m 3 . If a reduced general heat-limit is considered, then some higher-heat packages can be accepted with restrictions placed on their location within the facility. For most LLRW, heat generation from radioactive decay and degradation are a small fraction of the IRUS heating limits. However, heating restrictions will impact on the disposal of higher-activity radioactive sources. High activity 60 Co sources will require decay-storage periods of about 70 years, and some 137 Cs will need to bed disposed of in facilities designed for higher-heat waste. (author). 21 refs., 8 tabs., 2 figs

  5. Research report for fiscal 1998. Basic research for promoting joint implementation, etc. (fuel change plan for No. 1 and No. 9 Irkutsk Heat and Power Co-Generation Plants, Irkutsk, Russia); 1998 nendo chosa hokokusho. Roshia renpo Irkuktsk shu dai 1 go oyobi dai 9 go Irkutsk netsu heikyu hatsudensho nenryo tenkan keikaku

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    A research is conducted to find out if efficiency will increase and greenhouse gas will decrease when fuel is changed from coal to gas at the above-named plants, and the economics of the plan is reviewed. The No. 1 plant comprises 18 coal-fired boilers with a total design capacity of 2985 tons/hour, and 8 steam turbine generators rated at 185MW, constructed in the 1940s. The No. 9 plant was constructed in the 1960s and 1970s. Four different modifications programs are drafted to study the fuel change plan. As the result, it is found that the addition of natural gas burning facilities to the existing heat and power co-generation plants and the modification of the existing boiler-related facilities will be low in earning rate and reliability, though excellent in budget size and cost efficiency; and that to dismantle the existing plants and to newly construct heat and power plants operating on gas turbines will bring about a higher earning rate, fuel cost reduction effect, and reliability, though such will cost more. (NEDO)

  6. Vapor generator steam drum spray heat

    Fasnacht, F.A. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A typical embodiment of the invention provides a combination feedwater and cooldown water spray head that is centrally disposed in the lower portion of a nuclear power plant steam drum. This structure not only discharges the feedwater in the hottest part of the steam drum, but also increases the time required for the feedwater to reach the steam drum shell, thereby further increasing the feedwater temperature before it contacts the shell surface, thus reducing thermal shock to the steam drum structure

  7. Creeping Viscous Flow around a Heat-Generating Solid Sphere

    Krenk, Steen

    1981-01-01

    The velocity field for creeping viscous flow around a solid sphere due to a spherically symmetric thermal field is determined and a simple thermal generalization of Stokes' formula is obtained. The velocity field due to an instantaneous heat source at the center of the sphere is obtained in closed...... form and an application to the storage of heat-generating nuclear waste is discussed....

  8. Potentials for heat accumulators in thermal power plants; Potenziale fuer Waermespeicher in Heiz(kraft)werken

    Dengel, Andreas [STEAG New Energies GmbH, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    STEAG New Energies GmbH (Saarbruecken, Federal Republic of Germany) is contractor and operator of a variety of decentralized plants for heat production and power generation. The customers consist of communities, cooperation associations, business enterprises as well as industrial enterprises. Beside merely heat generators, so-called heat and power cogeneration plants often are used. The power generation is of minor importance due to the heat-controlled energy supply of the customers. Biomass power plants being operated in line with the Renewable Energy Law are an exemption. The demand for regulating energy increased clearly due to the enhanced volatile feeding of regenerative produced electric power. If the operation of heat and power cogeneration plants becomes more independent from the actual energy demand by using energy storages, then the energy transducer can be implemented in the lucrative market of regulation energy supply. Thus, the potential of such storages at the sites within a company shall be determined. Additionally, the development and testing of a latent heat accumulator for a thermal power plant of the company supplying process vapour with a temperature of 300 Celsius to a foil manufacturing facility is envisaged.

  9. Cost of electricity from small scale co-generation of electricity and heat

    Kjellstroem, Bjoern

    2012-07-15

    There is an increasing interest in Sweden for using also small heat loads for cogeneration of electricity and heat. Increased use of small CHP-plants with heat supply capacities from a few 100 kW(h) up to 10 MW(h) cannot change the structure of the electricity supply system significantly, but could give an important contribution of 2 - 6 TWh(e) annually. The objective of this study was to clarify under what conditions electricity can be generated in small wood fired CHP-plants in Sweden at costs that can compete with those for plants using fossil fuels or nuclear energy. The capacity range studied was 2 - 10 MW(h). The results should facilitate decisions about the meaningfulness of considering CHP as an option when new heat supply systems for small communities or sawmills are planned. At the price for green certificates in Sweden, 250 - 300 SEK/MWh(e), generation costs in small wood fired CHP-plants should be below about 775 SEK/MWh(e) to compete with new nuclear power plants and below about 925 SEK/MWh(e) to compete with generation using fossil fuels.

  10. Optimization of the Heat Exchangers of a Thermoelectric Generation System

    Martínez, A.; Vián, J. G.; Astrain, D.; Rodríguez, A.; Berrio, I.

    2010-09-01

    The thermal resistances of the heat exchangers have a strong influence on the electric power produced by a thermoelectric generator. In this work, the heat exchangers of a thermoelectric generator have been optimized in order to maximize the electric power generated. This thermoelectric generator harnesses heat from the exhaust gas of a domestic gas boiler. Statistical design of experiments was used to assess the influence of five factors on both the electric power generated and the pressure drop in the chimney: height of the generator, number of modules per meter of generator height, length of the fins of the hot-side heat exchanger (HSHE), length of the gap between fins of the HSHE, and base thickness of the HSHE. The electric power has been calculated using a computational model, whereas Fluent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to obtain the thermal resistances of the heat exchangers and the pressure drop. Finally, the thermoelectric generator has been optimized, taking into account the restrictions on the pressure drop.

  11. Prototype plant for nuclear process heat (PNP) - operation of the pilot plant for hydrogasification of coal

    Bruengel, N.; Dehms, G.; Fiedler, P.; Gerigk, H.P.; Ruddeck, W.; Schrader, L.; Schumacher, H.J.

    1988-04-01

    The Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG developed the process of hydrogasification of coal in a fluidized bed for generation of SNG. On basis of test results obtained in a semi-technical pilot plant of a through-put of 250 kg/h dried coal a large pilot plant was erected processing 10 t/h dried brown coal. This plant was on stream for about 14700 h, of which about 7800 h were with gasifier operation; during this time about 38000 t of dried brown coal of the Rhenish district were processed containing 4 to 25% of ash. At pressures of 60 to 120 bar and temperatures of 800 to 935 0 C carbon conversion rates up to 81 percent and methane amounts of 5000 m 3 (STP)/h were reached. The decisive parameter for methane generation was the hydrogen/coal-ratio. Even at high moisture contents, usually diminishing the methane yield from the coal essentially, by high hydrogen/coal-ratios high methane yields could be obtained. The gasifier itself caused no troubles during the total time operation. Difficulties with the original design of the residual char cooler could be overcome by change-over from water injection to liquid carbon dioxide. The design of the heat recovery system proved well. Alltogether so the size increasement of the gasifier from the semi-technical to the large pilot plant as well as the harmonization of gas generation and gas refining was proved. (orig.) With 20 refs., 20 tabs., 81 figs [de

  12. Heat priming induces trans-generational tolerance to high temperature stress in wheat

    Xiao eWang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat plants are very sensitive to high temperature stress during grain filling. Effects of heat priming applied to the first generation on tolerance of the successive generation to post-anthesis high temperature stress were investigated. Compared with the progeny of non-heat primed plants (NH, the progeny of heat-primed plants (PH possessed higher grain yield, leaf photosynthesis and activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower cell membrane damage under high temperature stress. In the transcriptome profile, 1430 probes showed obvious difference in expression between PH and NH. These genes were related to signal transduction, transcription, energy, defense, and protein destination and storage, respectively. The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1 which was involved in histone demethylation related to epigenetic modification was up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. The proteome analysis indicated that the proteins involved in photosynthesis, energy production and protein destination and storage were up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. In short, thermos-tolerance was induced through heritable epigenetic alternation and signaling transduction, both processes further triggered prompt modifications of defense related responses in anti-oxidation, transcription, energy production, and protein destination and storage in the progeny of the primed plants under high temperature stress. It was concluded that trans-generation thermo-tolerance was induced by heat priming in the first generation, and this might be an effective measure to cope with severe high-temperature stresses during key growth stages in wheat production.

  13. Combined cycle power plant with integrated low temperature heat (LOTHECO)

    Kakaras, E.; Doukelis, A.; Leithner, R.; Aronis, N.

    2004-01-01

    The major driver to enhance the efficiency of the simple gas turbine cycle has been the increase in process conditions through advancements in materials and cooling methods. Thermodynamic cycle developments or cycle integration are among the possible ways to further enhance performance. The current paper presents the possibilities and advantages from the LOTHECO natural gas-fired combined cycle concept. In the LOTHECO cycle, low-temperature waste heat or solar heat is used for the evaporation of injected water droplets in the compressed air entering the gas turbine's combustion chamber. Following a description of this innovative cycle, its advantages are demonstrated by comparison between different gas turbine power generation systems for small and large-scale applications, including thermodynamic and economic analysis. A commercial gas turbine (ALSTOM GT10C) has been selected and computed with the heat mass balance program ENBIPRO. The results from the energy analysis are presented and the features of each concept are discussed. In addition, the exergy analysis provides information on the irreversibilities of each process and suggested improvements. Finally, the economic analysis reveals that the combined cycle plant with a heavy-duty gas turbine is the most efficient and economic way to produce electricity at base load. However, on a smaller scale, innovative designs, such as the LOTHECO concept, are required to reach the same level of performance at feasible costs

  14. Gas Generation of Heated PBX 9502

    Holmes, Matthew David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parker, Gary Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-07

    Uniaxially pressed samples of PBX 9502 were heated until self-ignition (cookoff) in order to collect pressure and temperature data relevant for model development. Samples were sealed inside a small gas-tight vessel, but were mechanically unconfined. Long-duration static pressure rise, as well as dynamic pressure rise during the cookoff event, were recorded. Time-lapse photography of the sample was used to measure the thermal expansion of the sample as a function of time and temperature. High-speed videography qualitatively characterized the mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms at the time of cookoff. These results provide valuable input to modeling efforts, in order to improve the ability to predict pressure output during cookoff as well as the effect of pressure on time-toignition.

  15. Heat generation: prices have only a minor influence

    Stadelmann, M.

    2006-01-01

    This article takes a look at long-term trends in the heat generation market. Here, heat-pumps, gas heaters and wood-fired systems, together with their combination with solar collectors, are gaining ground, whereas heating oil is loosing its share of the market. The various influences on the market and, in particular, price increases for oil are discussed. The influence of revised energy legislation is discussed, which calls for 20% of the standardised energy requirements of housing to be met by renewables or increased thermal insulation. Increased sales in the solar sector are discussed, as are future trends in the heating market

  16. Natural convection in porous media with heat generation

    Hardee, H.C. Jr.; Nilson, R.H.

    1976-12-01

    Heat transfer characteristics of a fluid saturated porous media are investigated for the case of uniform internal heat generation with cooling from above. Analytical models of conduction and single phase cellular convection show good agreement with previous Rayleigh number correlations and with experimental data obtained by Joule heating of salt water in a sand bed. An approximate dryout criterion is also derived for two phase boiling heat transfer in a fixed bed which is neither channeled nor fluidized. Correlation of dryout data using this criterion is encouraging, especially considering the analytical rather than correlational basis of the criterion

  17. Nuclear reactor plant for production process heat

    Weber, M.

    1979-01-01

    The high temperature reactor is suitable as a heat source for carrying out endothermal chemical processes. A heat exchanger is required for separating the reactor coolant gases and the process medium. The heat of the reactor is transferred at a temperature lower than the process temperature to a secondary gas and is compressed to give the required temperature. The compression energy is obtained from the same reactor. (RW) [de

  18. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2005-01-01

    Electricity produced by distributed energy resources (DER) located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumer requirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid. Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associated with transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricity delivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities to purchase energy when attractive. On-site, single-cycle thermal power generation is typic...

  19. Steam generator concept of a small HTR for reheating and for removal of the residual heat

    Singh, J; Barnert, H; Hohn, H; Mondry, M [Institut fuer Reaktorenentwicklung, Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    1988-07-01

    The steam generator of a small HTR is arranged above the core in an in line design of the primary loop, thereby helium flows upwards. Water flows downwards in the steam generator to realize cross flow. To achieve stable evaporation conditions during part load operation it is desired to realize upward evaporation in the steam generator. Moreover if the steam generator is also used as a heat sink for removal of residual heat, this desire of upwards evaporation becomes more imperative. It is possible to realize the design of steam generator with upwards evaporation by arranging a hot gas duct in its central region, so that hot helium can flow upwards through it. Therefore helium enters the steam generator from the top and flows downwards and water upwards. In the presented design, a heat exchanger is arranged in the central region of the steam generator instead of a hot gas duct. Hot helium of 750 deg. C flows upwards in this heat exchanger and thereby cools down to the temperature of about 700 deg. C before it enters the bundle of the steam generator at the top. Through an intermediate loop this heat is transferred outside the primary loop, where in an extra heat exchanger live steam is reheated to improve the thermal efficiency of the plant. This intermediate loop works on the basis of forced convection and transfer about 25 MW for reheating. During the shutdown operation of the reactor, this heat exchanger in the central region of the steam generator serves as a heat sink for removal of the residual heat through natural convection in the primary loop. At the same time it is further possible, that intermediate loop also works on the basis of natural convection, because during shutdown operation only a very small amount of heat has to be removed and moreover the outside heat exchanger can be arranged much higher above the central heat exchanger to get favourable conditions for the natural convection. Some of the highlights of the central heat exchanger are: coaxial

  20. Device for district heating with utilization of waste heat from power plants

    Korek, J.

    1976-01-01

    In order to utilize the waste heat developing in power plants - especially in nuclear power plants - the author suggests to lead the waste heat of the coolers for oil (which the bearings are lubricated with), hydrogen (which serves for the stator rotor-cooling), and the stator cooling water to the circulating district heating water and to arrange these heat exchangers one behind another or parallel to each other in the water circuit of the district heating system. The oil cooler of the engine transformer is also connected with the circulation of the district heating water. The runback water of the district heating network could thus be heated from approx. 40 0 C up to 65 0 C. (UA) [de

  1. Passive flow heat exchanger simulation for power generation from solar pond using thermoelectric generators

    Baharin, Nuraida'Aadilia; Arzami, Amir Afiq; Singh, Baljit; Remeli, Muhammad Fairuz; Tan, Lippong; Oberoi, Amandeep

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a thermoelectric generator heat exchanger system was designed and simulated for electricity generation from solar pond. A thermoelectric generator heat exchanger was studied by using Computational Fluid Dynamics to simulate flow and heat transfer. A thermoelectric generator heat exchanger designed for passive in-pond flow used in solar pond for electrical power generation. A simple analysis simulation was developed to obtain the amount of electricity generated at different conditions for hot temperatures of a solar pond at different flow rates. Results indicated that the system is capable of producing electricity. This study and design provides an alternative way to generate electricity from solar pond in tropical countries like Malaysia for possible renewable energy applications.

  2. Modular steam generator for use in nuclear power plants

    Cella, A.

    1979-01-01

    An improved steam generator for a PWR is described. A turbine generator is driven by the steam output of the steam generator to provide electrical power. The improvement provides vertically assemblable modules which are removably mounted together in sealing relationship. The modules comprising a base module, a tube bundle module removably mountable on the base module in sealing relationship, and an uppermost dryer module removably mountable on the tube bundle module in sealing relationship. Ready access to and removal of the tube bundle module in situ from the nuclear power plant steam generator is facilitated. The dryer module contains moisture separator for drying the generated steam. The base module, upon which the associated weight of the vertically assembled dryer module and tube bundle module are supported, contains the inlet and outlet for the heat exchange fluid. The tube bundle module contains the tube bundle through which the heat exchange fluid flows as well as an inlet for feedwater. The tube sheet serves as a closure flange for the tube bundle module, with the associated weight of the vertically assembled dryer module and tube bundle module on the tube sheet closure flange effectuating the sealing relationship between the base module and the tube bundle module for facilitating closure

  3. Smart energy systems and 4th generation district heating

    Lund, Henrik; Duic, Neven; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2016-01-01

    scientific understanding on how we can design and implement a suitable and least-cost transformation into a sustainable energy future. The concept of Smart Energy Systems emphasizes the importance of being coherent and cross-sectoral when the best solutions are to be found and how this also calls......This editorial gives an introduction to the important relationship between Smart Energy Systems and 4th Generation District Heating and presents a number of selected papers from the 1st International Conference on the topic. All of the papers elaborate on or otherwise contribute to the theoretical...... for the active inclusion of the heating and cooling sectors. The concept of 4th Generation District Heating emphasizes that district heating and cooling are both important elements but also technologies that have to be developed further into a 4th generation version to be able to fulfil their roles in future...

  4. District heating and co-generation in Slovenia

    Hrovatin, Franc; Pecaric, Marko; Perovic, Olgica

    2000-01-01

    Recent development of district heating systems, gasification and co-generation processes in local communities in Slovenia as well as current status, potentials, possibilities and plans for further development in this sphere are presented. The current status presents energy production, distribution and use in district heating systems and in local gas distribution networks. An analysis of the energy and power generated and distributed in district power systems, made with regard to the size of the system, fuel used, type of consumers and the way of production, is given. Growth in different areas of local power systems in the period of last years is included. Potentials in the sphere of electrical energy and heat co-generation were assessed. Some possibilities and experience in heat energy storage are given and trends and plans for further development are introduced. (Authors)

  5. National need for utilizing nuclear energy for process heat generation

    Gambill, W.R.; Kasten, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are potential sources for generating process heat, and their applications for such use economically competitive. They help satisfy national needs by helping conserve and extend oil and natural gas resources, thus reducing energy imports and easing future international energy concerns. Several reactor types can be utilized for generating nuclear process heat; those considered here are light water reactors (LWRs), heavy water reactors (HWRs), gas-cooled reactors (GCRs), and liquid metal reactors (LMRs). LWRs and HWRs can generate process heat up to 280 0 C, LMRs up to 540 0 C, and GCRs up to 950 0 C. Based on the studies considered here, the estimated process heat markets and the associated energy markets which would be supplied by the various reactor types are summarized

  6. Operating of Small Wind Power Plants with Induction Generators

    Jakub Nevrala; Stanislav Misak

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes different systems of small wind power plants with induction generators used in the Czech Republic. Problems of wind power plants running with induction generators are solved within partial target of the research project MSM 6198910007. For small wind power plants is used induction motor as a generator. Parameters of the name plate of motor must be resolved for generator running on measuring base. These generators are running as a separately working generators or generator...

  7. Gas power plants heat the public mind

    Chauveau, L.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides most part of the electricity produced in France but fossil thermal plants remain necessary to face peaking demand. The French government has planned to replace all the fossil plants by combined cycle gas plants that release far less CO 2 than classic coal or oil plants. 31 new gas plants have been authorized and among them 2 are operating, 10 are being built and 8 are at the project stage. In some projects like in the little town of Verberie (Oise department) these projects are facing a strong local opposition. The objection of the opponents is two-fold: -) the plant will have a strong negative impact on the wild life particularly the population of boars and stags and -) this huge program of 31 gas plants contradict the government that committed itself to reduce the consumption of fossil energies and to favor renewable energies through its Grenelle environmental policy. (A.C.)

  8. Steam generation device with heat exchange between a liquid metal coolant and the feedwater

    Malaval, C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is particularly applicable to a liquid metal fast breeder reactor plant, the liquid metal being sodium. The steam generation device is described in detail, it allows to get an upper liquid metal level without turbulence and an easier passage for the shock wave towards the steam generator up to the liquid metal level without being laterally reflected back to the intermediate heat exchangers [fr

  9. Utilization of waste heat from nuclear power plants in agriculture

    Horacek, P.

    1981-01-01

    The development of nuclear power will result in the relative and absolute increase in the amount of waste heat which can be used in agriculture for heating greenhouses, open spaces, for fish breeding in heated water, for growing edible mushrooms, growing algae, for frost protection of orchards, air conditioning of buildings for breeding livestock and poultry, and for other purposes. In addition of the positive effect of waste heat, the danger increases of disease, weeds and pests. Pilot plant installations should be build in Czechoslovakia for testing the development of waste heat utilization. (Ha)

  10. The Sydvaerme project: District heating from the Barsebeck nuclear power plant

    Josefsson, L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents a summary report of a study on district heating from Barsebeck Nuclear Power Plant in Sweden, prepared cooperatively by the cities of Malmoe, Lund, Helsingborg, Landskrona and the electric power company Sydkraft. A future number 3 generating set at the Barsebeck nuclear power station could be designed for combined production of heat and electric power. The generating set could be completed after 1983, and could then supply about 65% of total district heating requirements. The first stage of the investigation includes a proposal for a technically feasible solution, sufficiently detailed to permit both technical and economic evaluation of the project. (author)

  11. Thermal circuit and supercritical steam generator of the BGR-300 nuclear power plant

    Afanas'ev, B.P.; Godik, I.B.; Komarov, N.F.; Kurochnkin, Yu.P.

    1979-01-01

    Secondary coolant circuit and a steam generator for supercritical steam parameters of the BGR-300 reactor plant are described. The BGR-300 plant with a 300 MW(e) high-temperature gas-cooled fast reactor is developed as a pilot commercial plant. It is shown that the use of a supercritical pressure steam increases the thermal efficiency of the plant and descreases thermal releases to the environment, permits to use home-made commercial turbine plants of large unit power. The proposed supercritical pressure steam generator has considerable advantages from the viewpoint of heat transfer and hydrodynamical processes

  12. Heat Transfer and Entropy Generation Analysis of an Intermediate Heat Exchanger in ADS

    Wang, Yongwei; Huai, Xiulan

    2018-04-01

    The intermediate heat exchanger for enhancement heat transfer is the important equipment in the usage of nuclear energy. In the present work, heat transfer and entropy generation of an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) in the accelerator driven subcritical system (ADS) are investigated experimentally. The variation of entropy generation number with performance parameters of the IHX is analyzed, and effects of inlet conditions of the IHX on entropy generation number and heat transfer are discussed. Compared with the results at two working conditions of the constant mass flow rates of liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and helium gas, the total pumping power all tends to reduce with the decreasing entropy generation number, but the variations of the effectiveness, number of transfer units and thermal capacity rate ratio are inconsistent, and need to analyze respectively. With the increasing inlet mass flow rate or LBE inlet temperature, the entropy generation number increases and the heat transfer is enhanced, while the opposite trend occurs with the increasing helium gas inlet temperature. The further study is necessary for obtaining the optimized operation parameters of the IHX to minimize entropy generation and enhance heat transfer.

  13. Heat shock proteins of higher plants

    Key, J.L.; Lin, C.Y.; Chen, Y.M.

    1981-01-01

    The pattern of protein synthesis changes rapidly and dramatically when the growth temperture of soybean seedling tissue is increased from 28 0 C (normal) to about 40 0 C (heat shock). The synthesis of normal proteins is greatly decreased and a new set of proteins, heat shock proteins, is induced. The heat shock proteins of soybean consist of 10 new bands on one-dimensional NaDodSO 4 gels; a more complex pattern is observed on two-dimensional gels. when the tissue is returned to 28 0 C after 4 hr at 40 0 C, there is progressive decline in the synthesis of heat shock proteins and reappearance of a normal pattern of synthesis by 3 or 4 hr. In vitro translation of poly(A) + RNAs isolated from tissued grown at 28 and 40 0 C shows that the heat shock proteins are translated from a ndw set of mRNAs induced at 40 0 C; furthermore, the abundant class mRNAs for many of the normal proteins persist even though they are translated weakly (or not at all) in vivo at 40 or 42.5 0 C. The heat shock response in soybean appears similar to the much-studied heat shock phenomenon in Drosophila

  14. Study of entropy generation in a slab with non-uniform internal heat generation

    El Haj Assad Mamdouh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of entropy generation in a rectangular slab with a nonuniform internal heat generation is presented. Dimensionless local and total entropy generation during steady state heat conduction through the slab are obtained. Two different boundary conditions have been considered in the analysis, the first with asymmetric convection and the second with constant slab surface temperature. Temperature distribution within the slab is obtained analytically. The study investigates the effect of some relevant dimensionless heat transfer parameters on entropy generation. The results show that there exists a minimum local entropy generation but there does not exist a minimum total entropy generation for certain combinations of the heat transfer parameters. The results of calculations are presented graphically.

  15. Heat generated by dental implant drills during osteotomy-a review: heat generated by dental implant drills.

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2014-06-01

    Osseointegration is the more stable situation and results in a high success rate of dental implants. Heat generation during rotary cutting is one of the important factors influencing the development of osseointegration. To assess the various factors related to implant drills responsible for heat generation during osteotomy. To identify suitable literature, an electronic search was performed using Medline and Pubmed database. Articles published in between 1960 to February 2013 were searched. The search is focused on heat generated by dental implant drills during osteotomy. Various factors related to implant drill such effect of number of blades; drill design, drill fatigue, drill speed and force applied during osteotomies which were responsible for heat generation were reviewed. Titles and abstracts were screened, and literature that fulfilled the inclusion criteria was selected for a full-text reading. The initial literature search resulted in 299 articles out of which only 70 articles fulfils the inclusion criteria and were included in this systematic review. Many factors related to implant drill responsible for heat generation were found. Successful preparation of an implant cavity with minimal damage to the surrounding bone depends on the avoidance of excessive temperature generation during surgical drilling. The relationship between heat generated and implant drilling osteotomy is multifactorial in nature and its complexity has not been fully studied. Lack of scientific knowledge regarding this issue still exists. Further studies should be conducted to determine the various factors which generate less heat while osteotomy such as ideal ratio of force and speed in vivo, exact time to replace a drill, ideal drill design, irrigation system, drill-bone contact area.

  16. Firing with wood chips in heating and cogeneration plants

    Kofman, P.D.

    1992-01-01

    The document was produced for use as detailed teaching material aimed at spreading information on the use of wood chips as fuel for heating and cogeneration plants. It includes information and articles on wood fuels generally, combustion values, chopping machines, suppliers, occupational health hazards connected with the handling of wood chips, measuring amounts, the selection of types, prices, ash, environmental aspects and information on the establishment of a wood-chip fired district heating plant. (AB)

  17. Gas-steam turbine plant for cogenerative process at 'Toplifikacija' - Skopje (Joint-Stock Co. for district heating - Macedonia)

    Cvetkovski, Andrijan

    2003-01-01

    The gas-steam power plant for combined heat and electric power production at A.D. 'Toplifikacija' Skopje - TO 'Zapad' is analyzed and determined. The analyzed plant is consisted of gas turbine, heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) and condensate steam turbine with controlled steam extraction. It operates on natural gas as a main fuel source. The heating of the water for the district heating is dine in the heat exchanger, with // heat of controlled extraction from condensate turbine. The advantages of the both binary plant and centralized co generative production compared with the individual are analyzed. The natural gas consumption of for both specific heating and electrical capacity in join production as well as fuel savings compared to the separate production of the same quantity of energy is also analyzed. (Original)

  18. Entropy generation of nanofluid flow in a microchannel heat sink

    Manay, Eyuphan; Akyürek, Eda Feyza; Sahin, Bayram

    2018-06-01

    Present study aims to investigate the effects of the presence of nano sized TiO2 particles in the base fluid on entropy generation rate in a microchannel heat sink. Pure water was chosen as base fluid, and TiO2 particles were suspended into the pure water in five different particle volume fractions of 0.25%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5% and 2.0%. Under laminar, steady state flow and constant heat flux boundary conditions, thermal, frictional, total entropy generation rates and entropy generation number ratios of nanofluids were experimentally analyzed in microchannel flow for different channel heights of 200 μm, 300 μm, 400 μm and 500 μm. It was observed that frictional and total entropy generation rates increased as thermal entropy generation rate were decreasing with an increase in particle volume fraction. In microchannel flows, thermal entropy generation could be neglected due to its too low rate smaller than 1.10e-07 in total entropy generation. Higher channel heights caused higher thermal entropy generation rates, and increasing channel height yielded an increase from 30% to 52% in thermal entropy generation. When channel height decreased, an increase of 66%-98% in frictional entropy generation was obtained. Adding TiO2 nanoparticles into the base fluid caused thermal entropy generation to decrease about 1.8%-32.4%, frictional entropy generation to increase about 3.3%-21.6%.

  19. Heat Pipe-Assisted Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology for Waste Heat Recovery

    Jang, Ju-Chan; Chi, Ri-Guang; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Lee, Wook-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Currently, large amounts of thermal energy dissipated from automobiles are emitted through hot exhaust pipes. This has resulted in the need for a new efficient recycling method to recover energy from waste hot exhaust gas. The present experimental study investigated how to improve the power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system assisted by a wickless loop heat pipe (loop thermosyphon) under the limited space of the exhaust gas pipeline. The present study shows a novel loop-type heat pipe-assisted TEG concept to be applied to hybrid vehicles. The operating temperature of a TEG's hot side surface should be as high as possible to maximize the Seebeck effect. The present study shows a novel TEG concept of transferring heat from the source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any local place with a loop-type heat pipe. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate an electromotive force power of around 1.3 V in the case of 170°C hot exhaust gas. Two thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for a conductive block model and four Bi2Te3 TEMs with a heat pipe-assisted model were installed in the condenser section. Heat flows to the condenser section from the evaporator section connected to the exhaust pipe. This novel TEG system with a heat pipe can be placed in any location on an automobile.

  20. Waste heat recovery options in a large gas-turbine combined power plant

    Upathumchard, Ularee

    This study focuses on power plant heat loss and how to utilize the waste heat in energy recovery systems in order to increase the overall power plant efficiency. The case study of this research is a 700-MW natural gas combined cycle power plant, located in a suburban area of Thailand. An analysis of the heat loss of the combustion process, power generation process, lubrication system, and cooling system has been conducted to evaluate waste heat recovery options. The design of the waste heat recovery options depends to the amount of heat loss from each system and its temperature. Feasible waste heat sources are combustion turbine (CT) room ventilation air and lubrication oil return from the power plant. The following options are being considered in this research: absorption chillers for cooling with working fluids Ammonia-Water and Water-Lithium Bromide (in comparison) and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) with working fluids R134a and R245fa. The absorption cycles are modeled in three different stages; single-effect, double-effect and half-effect. ORC models used are simple ORC as a baseline, ORC with internal regenerator, ORC two-phase flash expansion ORC and ORC with multiple heat sources. Thermodynamic models are generated and each system is simulated using Engineering Equation Solver (EES) to define the most suitable waste heat recovery options for the power plant. The result will be synthesized and evaluated with respect to exergy utilization efficiency referred as the Second Law effectiveness and net output capacity. Results of the models give recommendation to install a baseline ORC of R134a and a double-effect water-lithium bromide absorption chiller, driven by ventilation air from combustion turbine compartment. The two technologies yield reasonable economic payback periods of 4.6 years and 0.7 years, respectively. The fact that this selected power plant is in its early stage of operation allows both models to economically and effectively perform waste heat

  1. Total generating costs: coal and nuclear plants

    1979-02-01

    The study was confined to single and multi-unit coal- and nuclear-fueled electric-generating stations. The stations are composed of 1200-MWe PWRs; 1200-MWe BWRs; 800-and 1200-MWe High-Sulfur Coal units, and 800- and 1200-MWe Low-Sulfur Coal units. The total generating cost estimates were developed for commercial operation dates of 1985 and 1990; for 5 and 8% escalation rates, for 10 and 12% discount rates; and, for capacity factors of 50, 60, 70, and 80%. The report describes the methodology for obtaining annualized capital costs, levelized coal and nuclear fuel costs, levelized operation and maintenance costs, and the resulting total generating costs for each type of station. The costs are applicable to a hypothetical Middletwon site in the Northeastern United States. Plant descriptions with general design parameters are included. The report also reprints for convenience, summaries of capital cost by account type developed in the previous commercial electric-power cost studies. Appropriate references are given for additional detailed information. Sufficient detail is given to allow the reader to develop total generating costs for other cases or conditions

  2. Heat recovery optimization in a steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) plant

    Ashrafi, Omid; Navarri, Philippe; Hughes, Robin; Lu, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Pinch Analysis was used to improve the energy performance of a typical steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process. The objective of this work was to reduce the amount of natural gas used for steam generation in the plant and the associated greenhouse gas emissions. The INTEGRATION software was used to analyze how heat is being used in the existing design and identify inefficient heat exchanges causing excessive use of energy. Several modifications to improve the base case heat exchanger network (HEN) were identified. The proposed retrofit projects reduced the process heating demands by improving the existing heat recovery system and by recovering waste heat and decreased natural gas consumption in the steam production unit by approximately 40 MW, representing approximately 8% of total consumption. As a result, the amount of glycol used to transfer energy across the facility was also reduced, as well as the electricity consumption related to glycol pumping. It was shown that the proposed heat recovery projects reduced natural gas costs by C$3.8 million/y and greenhouse gas emissions by 61,700 t/y of CO_2. - Highlights: • A heat integration study using Pinch analysis was performed in a SAGD process. • Several modifications are suggested to improve the existing heat recovery system. • Heat recovery projects increased boiler feed water and combustion air temperatures. • The proposed modifications reduced natural gas use for steam generation. • Heat recovery significantly reduced operating costs and greenhouse gas emissions.

  3. Flow visualization in heat-generating porous media

    Lee, D.O.; Nilson, R.H.

    1977-11-01

    The work reported is in support of the Sandia Post-Accident Heat Removal Program, in which simulated LMFBR beds will be subjected to in-pile heating in the ACPR (Annular Core Pulsed Reactor). Flow visualization experiments were performed to gain some insight into the flow patterns and temperature distributions in a fluid-saturated heat-generating porous medium. Although much of the information presented is of a qualitative nature, it is useful in the recognition of the controlling transport process and in the formulation of analytic and numerical models

  4. Effective thermal conductivity of a heat generating rod bundle dissipating heat by natural convection and radiation

    Senve, Vinay; Narasimham, G.S.V.L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Transport processes in isothermal hexagonal sheath with 19 heat generating rods is studied. → Correlation is given to predict the maximum temperature considering all transport processes. → Effective thermal conductivity of rod bundle can be obtained using max temperature. → Data on the critical Rayleigh numbers for p/d ratios of 1.1-2.0 is presented. → Radiative heat transfer contributes to heat dissipation of 38-65% of total heat. - Abstract: A numerical study of conjugate natural convection and surface radiation in a horizontal hexagonal sheath housing 19 solid heat generating rods with cladding and argon as the fill gas, is performed. The natural convection in the sheath is driven by the volumetric heat generation in the solid rods. The problem is solved using the FLUENT CFD code. A correlation is obtained to predict the maximum temperature in the rod bundle for different pitch-to-diameter ratios and heat generating rates. The effective thermal conductivity is related to the heat generation rate, maximum temperature and the sheath temperature. Results are presented for the dimensionless maximum temperature, Rayleigh number and the contribution of radiation with changing emissivity, total wattage and the pitch-to-diameter ratio. In the simulation of a larger system that contains a rod bundle, the effective thermal conductivity facilitates simplified modelling of the rod bundle by treating it as a solid of effective thermal conductivity. The parametric studies revealed that the contribution of radiation can be 38-65% of the total heat generation, for the parameter ranges chosen. Data for critical Rayleigh number above which natural convection comes into effect is also presented.

  5. Central Heating Plant Coal Use Handbook. Volume 1: Technical Reference.

    1996-11-01

    CHUTES LIFT TRUCKS MONORAILS , TRAMWAYS J p WEIGHING, 0 MEASURING SCALES COAL METERS HOPPERS SAMPLERS 9 FIRING EQUIPMENT (Source: Power, February...Defense (DOD) installations employ coal- fired central energy plants, the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) was... fired central heat plant operations cost by improving coal quality specifications. The Handbook is tailored for military installation industrial

  6. Cooling and heating facility for nuclear power plant

    Kakuta, Atsuro

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a cooling and heating facility for a nuclear power plant. Namely, a cooling water supply system supplies cooling water prepared by a refrigerator for cooling the inside of the plant. A warm water supply system supplies warm water having its temperature elevated by using an exhausted heat from a reactor water cleanup system. The facility comprises a heat pump-type refrigerator disposed in a cold water supply system for producing cold water and warm water, and warm water pipelines for connecting the refrigerator and the warm water supply system. With such a constitution, when the exhaust heat from the reactor water cleanup system can not be used, warm water prepared by the heat pump type refrigerator is supplied to the warm water supply system by way of the warm water pipelines. Accordingly, when the exhaust heat from the reactor water cleanup system can not be used such as upon inspection of the plant, a portion of the refrigerators in a not-operated state can be used for heating. Supply of boiler steams in the plant is no more necessary or extremely reduced. (I.S.)

  7. A methodology for the geometric design of heat recovery steam generators applying genetic algorithms

    Durán, M. Dolores; Valdés, Manuel; Rovira, Antonio; Rincón, E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows how the geometric design of heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) can be achieved. The method calculates the product of the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) by the area of the heat exchange surface (A) as a function of certain thermodynamic design parameters of the HRSG. A genetic algorithm is then applied to determine the best set of geometric parameters which comply with the desired UA product and, at the same time, result in a small heat exchange area and low pressure losses in the HRSG. In order to test this method, the design was applied to the HRSG of an existing plant and the results obtained were compared with the real exchange area of the steam generator. The findings show that the methodology is sound and offers reliable results even for complex HRSG designs. -- Highlights: ► The paper shows a methodology for the geometric design of heat recovery steam generators. ► Calculates product of the overall heat transfer coefficient by heat exchange area as a function of certain HRSG thermodynamic design parameters. ► It is a complement for the thermoeconomic optimization method. ► Genetic algorithms are used for solving the optimization problem

  8. Radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation suitable for disposal

    Brennecke, P.; Schumacher, J.; Warnecke, E.

    1987-01-01

    It is planned to dispose of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation in the Konrad repository. Preliminary waste acceptance requirements are derived taking the results of site-specific safety assessments as a basis. These requirements must be fulfilled by the waste packages on delivery. The waste amounts which are currently stored and those anticipated up to the year 2000 are discussed. The disposability of these waste packages in the Konrad repository was evaluated. This examination reveals that basically almost all radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation can be accepted. (orig.) [de

  9. Desalination demonstration plant using nuclear heat

    Hanra, M.S.; Misra, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Most of the desalination plants which are operating throughout the world utilize the energy from thermal power station which has the main disadvantage of polluting the environment due to combustion of fossil fuel and with the inevitable rise in prices of fossil fuel, nuclear driven desalination plants will become more economical. So it is proposed to set up nuclear desalination demonstration plant at the location of Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), Kalpakkam. The desalination plant will be of a capacity 6300 m 3 /day and based on both Multi Stage Flash (MSF) and Sea Water Reverse Osmosis (SWRO) processes. The MSF plant with performance ratio of 9 will produce water total dissolved solids (TDS-25 ppm) at a rate of 4500 m 3 /day from seawater of 35000 ppm. A part of this water namely 1000 m 3 /day will be used as Demineralised (DM) water after passing it through a mixed bed polishing unit. The remaining 3500 m 3 /day water will be mixed with 1800 m 3 /day water produced from the SWRO plant of TDS of 400 ppm and the same be supplied to industrial/municipal use. The sea water required for MSF and SWRO plants will be drawn from the intake/outfall system of MAPS which will also supply the required electric power pumping. There will be net 4 MW loss of power of MAPS namely 3 MW for MSF and 1 MW for SWRO desalination plants. The salient features of the project as well as the technical details of the both MSF and SWRO processes and its present status are given in this paper. It also contains comparative cost parameters of water produced by both processes. (author)

  10. Calculational tracking of decay heat for FFTF plant

    Cillan, T.F.; Carter, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed calculational monitoring of decay heat for each assembly on the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) plant is obtained by utilizing a decay heat data base and user friendly computer programs to access the data base. Output includes the time-dependent decay heat for an assembly or a specific set of assemblies, and optional information regarding the curies of activated nuclides along the axial length of the assembly. The decay heat data base is updated periodically, usually at the end of each irradiation cycle. 1 ref., 2 figs

  11. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-05-01

    The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported [via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)] to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  12. Nuclear heat source design for an advanced HTGR process heat plant

    McDonald, C.F.; O'Hanlon, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    A high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with a chemical process facility could produce synthetic fuels (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, methanol, hydrogen, etc.) in the long term using low-grade carbon sources (e.g., coal, oil shale, etc.). The ultimate high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant is being studied for nuclear process heat. This paper discusses a process heat plant with a 2240-MW(t) nuclear heat source, a reactor outlet temperature of 950 0 C, and a direct reforming process. The nuclear heat source outputs principally hydrogen-rich synthesis gas that can be used as a feedstock for synthetic fuel production. This paper emphasizes the design of the nuclear heat source and discusses the major components and a deployment strategy to realize an advanced HTGR process heat plant concept

  13. Heat transfer of liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic flow with internal heat generation

    Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Kurita, Kazuhisa; Kodama, Satoshi

    2000-01-01

    Numerical calculations on heat transfer of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow with internal heat generation in a rectangular channel have been performed for the cases of very-large Hartmann numbers, finite wall conductivities and small aspect ratio (i.e. small length ratios of the channel side perpendicular to the applied magnetic field and the side parallel to the field), simulating typical conditions for a fusion-reactor blanket. The Nusselt numbers of the MHD flow in rectangular channels with aspect ratios of 1/10 to 1/40 for Hartmann numbers of ∼5 x 10 5 become ∼10 times higher than those for the corresponding flow under no magnetic field. The Nusselt number becomes higher as the internal heat generation rate increases as far as the heat generation rates in a fusion reactor blanket are considered. (author)

  14. Heat shrink formation of a corrugated thin film thermoelectric generator

    Sun, Tianlei; Peavey, Jennifer L.; David Shelby, M.; Ferguson, Scott; O’Connor, Brendan T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Demonstrate and characterize a thermoelectric generator with a corrugated geometry. • Employ a novel heat shrink fabrication approach compatible with low-cost processing. • Use thermal impedance modeling to explore design potential. • Corrugated design shown to be advantageous for low heat-flux density applications. - Abstract: A thin film thermoelectric (TE) generator with a corrugated architecture is demonstrated formed using a heat-shrink fabrication approach. Fabrication of the corrugated TE structure consists of depositing thin film thermoelectric elements onto a planar non-shrink polyimide substrate that is then sandwiched between two uniaxial stretch-oriented co-polyester (PET) films. The heat shrink PET films are adhered to the polyimide in select locations, such that when the structure is placed in a high temperature environment, the outer films shrink resulting in a corrugated core film and thermoelectric elements spanning between the outer PET films. The module has a cross-plane heat transfer architecture similar to a conventional bulk TE module, but with heat transfer in the plane of the thin film thermoelectric elements, which assists in maintaining a significant temperature difference across the thermoelectric junctions. In this demonstration, Ag and Ni films are used as the thermoelectric elements and a Seebeck coefficient of 14 μV K −1 is measured with a maximum power output of 0.22 nW per couple at a temperature difference of 7.0 K. We then theoretically consider the performance of this device architecture with high performance thermoelectric materials in the heat sink limited regime. The results show that the heat-shrink approach is a simple fabrication method that may be advantageous in large-area, low power density applications. The fabrication method is also compatible with simple geometric modification to achieve various form factors and power densities to customize the TE generator for a range of applications

  15. Method for the utilization of waste heat, especially from nuclear power plants, in connection with processing sewage water and industrial waste water and in connection with the generation of motional energy whilst continuous heat recovery takes place and a device for carrying out this method

    Borst, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    A method is proposed by which the waste heat for nuclear power plants is used for distilling waste water, thus creating drinking water. A pressure vessel with appropriate pipes and control elementes, in which this process is to be carried out, is described. (UWI) [de

  16. Central solar heating plants with seasonal storage

    Chuard, D; Hadorn, J C; Van Gilst, J; Aranovitch, E; Hardacre, A G; Ofverholm, E [eds.

    1982-09-14

    On May 9, 1979, the Federal Department for Buildings released instructions concerning the use of alternative energies. The federal energy policy is to be as much as possible independent on oil imports. The canton Fribourg decided to equip the new maintenance and service center for the national high-road N12, with alternative energy, resources, and to apply new concepts with respect to passive and active solar energy. The project uses active solar energy with an earth-storage and heat pump. A conventional oil-heating system provides energy for peak-loads and can be operated in stand-by. A delay in the construction of the earth storage sub system was requested because it was intended to optimize the system with respect to the solar sub system, and heat pump sub system. The design work was done by SORANE which also is the coordinator for Switzerland in the I.E.A. Task VII. However, the preplanning of the project started in 1978 before the I.E.A. Task VII started. As a consequence, many design parameters were determined before 1980. The optimization of the solar collector, heat-pump etc. sub system was performed by a simulation approach developed by SORANE. The Vaulruz service center has been commissioned during the winter 1981/82.

  17. Development of low grade waste heat thermoelectric power generator

    Suvit Punnachaiya

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to develop a 50 watt thermoelectric power generator using low grade waste heat as a heat source,in order to recover and utilize the excess heat in cooling systems of industrial processes and high activity radioisotope sources. Electricity generation was based on the reverse operation of a thermoelectric cooling (TEC device. The TEC devices weremodified and assembled into a set of thermal cell modules operating at a temperature less than 100°C. The developed powergenerator consisted of 4 modules, each generating 15 watts. Two cascade modules were connected in parallel. Each modulecomprised of 96 TEC devices, which were connected in series. The hot side of each module was mounted on an aluminumheat transfer pipe with dimensions 12.212.250 cm. Heat sinks were installed on the cold side with cooling fans to provideforced air cooling.To test electricity generation in the experiment, water steam was used as a heat source instead of low grade waste heat.The open-circuit direct current (DC of 250 V and the short-circuit current of 1.2 A was achieved with the following operatingconditions: a hot side temperature of 96°C and a temperature difference between the hot and cold sides of 25°C. The DC poweroutput was inverted to an AC power source of 220 V with 50 Hz frequency, which can continuously supply more than 50 wattsof power to a resistive load as long as the heat source was applied to the system. The system achieved an electrical conversionefficiency of about 0.47 percent with the capital cost of 70 US$/W.

  18. Phenotypic effects of salt and heat stress over three generations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Léonie Suter

    Full Text Available Current and predicted environmental change will force many organisms to adapt to novel conditions, especially sessile organisms such as plants. It is therefore important to better understand how plants react to environmental stress and to what extent genotypes differ in such responses. It has been proposed that adaptation to novel conditions could be facilitated by heritable epigenetic changes induced by environmental stress, independent of genetic variation. Here we assessed phenotypic effects of heat and salt stress within and across three generations using four highly inbred Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes (Col, Cvi, Ler and Sha. Salt stress generally decreased fitness, but genotypes were differently affected, suggesting that susceptibility of A. thaliana to salt stress varies among genotypes. Heat stress at an early rosette stage had less detrimental effects but accelerated flowering in three out of four accessions. Additionally, we found three different modes of transgenerational effects on phenotypes, all harboring the potential of being adaptive: heat stress in previous generations induced faster rosette growth in Sha, both under heat and control conditions, resembling a tracking response, while in Cvi, the phenotypic variance of several traits increased, resembling diversified bet-hedging. Salt stress experienced in earlier generations altered plant architecture of Sha under salt but not control conditions, similar to transgenerational phenotypic plasticity. However, transgenerational phenotypic effects depended on the type of stress as well as on genotype, suggesting that such effects may not be a general response leading to adaptation to novel environmental conditions in A. thaliana.

  19. Feasibility study for Tashkent Heat and Power Plant Modernizing Project

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An investigational study was carried out of the project for energy conservation and greenhouse effect gas emission reduction by introducing the newest and most powerful gas turbine cogeneration facilities to the Tashkent cogeneration plant in Uzbekistan. At the Tashkent cogeneration plant, each of the facilities is being superannuated, which leads to lowering of operational reliability and increase in cost of repairs. In the project, studied was the introduction of the newest and most powerful gas turbine cogeneration facilities with heat output of 100 Gcal/h equivalent to that of one can of the existing hot water boiler and with generated output of 80MW. As a result of the study, obtained were the energy conservation amount of 83.9 ktoe/y and the greenhouse effect gas reduction amount of 179.7 kt-CO2/y. The initial investment amount was 10.003 billion yen. Expenses vs. effects were 8.39 toe/y-million yen in energy conservation amount and 18.0 t-CO2/y-million yen in greenhouse effect gas reduction amount. In the study of profitability, the internal earning rate was 9.24% after tax, the return yield of capital was 41.26%, and the period of ROI was 16.9 years. (NEDO)

  20. Nuclear power plant waste heat utilization

    Ryther, J.H.; Huke, R.E.; Archer, J.C.; Price, D.R.; Jewell, W.J.; Hayes, T.D.; Witherby, H.R.

    1977-09-01

    The possibility of using Vermont Yankee condenser effluent for commercial food growth enhancement was examined. It was concluded that for the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Station, commercial success, both for horticulture and aquaculture endeavors, could not be assured without additional research in both areas. This is due primarily to two problems. First, the particularly low heat quality of our condenser discharge, being nominally 72 +- 2/sup 0/F; and second, to the capital intensive support systems. The capital needed for the support systems include costs of pumps, piping and controls to move the heated water to growing facilities and the costs of large, efficient heat exchangers that may be necessary to avoid regulatory difficulties due to the 1958 Delaney Amendment to the U.S. Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act. Recommendations for further work include construction of a permanent aquaculture research laboratory and a test greenhouse complex based on a greenhouse wherein a variety of heating configurations would be installed and tested. One greenhouse would be heated with biogas from an adjacent anaerobic digester thermally boosted during winter months by Vermont Yankee condenser effluent. The aquaculture laboratory would initially be dedicated to the Atlantic salmon restoration program. It appears possible to raise fingerling salmon to smolt size within 7 months using water warmed to about 60/sup 0/F. The growth rate by this technique is increased by a factor of 2 to 3. A system concept has been developed which includes an aqua-laboratory, producing 25,000 salmon smolt annually, a 4-unit greenhouse test horticulture complex and an 18,000 square foot commercial fish-rearing facility producing 100,000 pounds of wet fish (brook trout) per year. The aqualab and horticulture test complex would form the initial phase of construction. The trout-rearing facility would be delayed pending results of laboratory studies confirming its commercial viability.

  1. Nuclear power plant waste heat utilization

    Ryther, J.H.; Huke, R.E.; Archer, J.C.; Price, D.R.; Jewell, W.J.; Hayes, T.D.; Witherby, H.R.

    1977-09-01

    The possibility of using Vermont Yankee condenser effluent for commercial food growth enhancement was examined. It was concluded that for the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Station, commercial success, both for horticulture and aquaculture endeavors, could not be assured without additional research in both areas. This is due primarily to two problems. First, the particularly low heat quality of our condenser discharge, being nominally 72 +- 2 0 F; and second, to the capital intensive support systems. The capital needed for the support systems include costs of pumps, piping and controls to move the heated water to growing facilities and the costs of large, efficient heat exchangers that may be necessary to avoid regulatory difficulties due to the 1958 Delaney Amendment to the U.S. Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act. Recommendations for further work include construction of a permanent aquaculture research laboratory and a test greenhouse complex based on a greenhouse wherein a variety of heating configurations would be installed and tested. One greenhouse would be heated with biogas from an adjacent anaerobic digester thermally boosted during winter months by Vermont Yankee condenser effluent. The aquaculture laboratory would initially be dedicated to the Atlantic salmon restoration program. It appears possible to raise fingerling salmon to smolt size within 7 months using water warmed to about 60 0 F. The growth rate by this technique is increased by a factor of 2 to 3. A system concept has been developed which includes an aqua-laboratory, producing 25,000 salmon smolt annually, a 4-unit greenhouse test horticulture complex and an 18,000 square foot commercial fish-rearing facility producing 100,000 pounds of wet fish (brook trout) per year. The aqualab and horticulture test complex would form the initial phase of construction. The trout-rearing facility would be delayed pending results of laboratory studies confirming its commercial viability

  2. Calculation of Efficiencies of a Ship Power Plant Operating with Waste Heat Recovery through Combined Heat and Power Production

    Mirko Grljušić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the possibility of a combined heat & power (CHP plant, using the waste heat from a Suezmax-size oil tanker’s main engine, to meet all heating and electricity requirements during navigation. After considering various configurations, a standard propulsion engine operating at maximum efficiency, combined with a supercritical Organic Rankine cycle (ORC system, was selected to supply the auxiliary power, using R245fa or R123 as the working fluid. The system analysis showed that such a plant can meet all heat and electrical power requirements at full load, with the need to burn only a small amount of supplementary fuel in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG when the main engine operates at part load. Therefore, it is possible to increase the overall thermal efficiency of the ship’s power plant by more than 5% when the main engine operates at 65% or more of its specified maximum continuous rating (SMCR.

  3. Heat savings and heat generation technologies: Modelling of residential investment behaviour with local health costs

    Zvingilaite, Erika; Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The trade-off between investing in energy savings and investing in individual heating technologies with high investment and low variable costs in single family houses is modelled for a number of building and consumer categories in Denmark. For each group the private economic cost of providing heating comfort is minimised. The private solution may deviate from the socio-economical optimal solution and we suggest changes to policy to incentivise the individuals to make choices more in line with the socio-economic optimal mix of energy savings and technologies. The households can combine their primary heating source with secondary heating e.g. a woodstove. This choice results in increased indoor air pollution with fine particles causing health effects. We integrate health cost due to use of woodstoves into household optimisation of heating expenditures. The results show that due to a combination of low costs of primary fuel and low environmental performance of woodstoves today, included health costs lead to decreased use of secondary heating. Overall the interdependence of heat generation technology- and heat saving-choice is significant. The total optimal level of heat savings for private consumers decrease by 66% when all have the option to shift to the technology with lowest variable costs. - Highlights: • Heat saving investment and heat technology choice are interdependent. • Health damage costs should be included in private heating choice optimisation. • Flexibility in heating technology choice reduce the optimal level of saving investments. • Models of private and socioeconomic optimal heating produce different technology mix. • Rebound effects are moderate but varies greatly among consumer categories

  4. Heat integration of an Olefins Plant: Pinch Analysis and mathematical optimization working together

    M. Beninca

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work explores a two-step, complexity reducing methodology, to analyze heat integration opportunities of an existing Olefins Plant, identify and quantify reduction of energy consumption, and propose changes of the existing heat exchanger network to achieve these goals. Besides the analysis of plant design conditions, multiple operational scenarios were considered to propose modifications for handling real plant operation (flexibility. On the strength of plant complexity and large dimension, work methodology was split into two parts: initially, the whole plant was evaluated with traditional Pinch Analysis tools. Several opportunities were identified and modifications proposed. Modifications were segregated to represent small and independent portions of the original process. One of them was selected to be re-analyzed, considering two scenarios. Reduction of problem dimension allowed mathematical methodologies (formulation with decomposition, applying LP, MILP and NLP optimization methods to synthesize flexible networks to be applied, generating a feasible modification capable of fulfilling the proposed operational scenarios.

  5. Steam generator for use in nuclear power plants

    Cella, A.

    1980-01-01

    An improved steam generator is described for use in a nuclear power plant of the pressurized water type in which a turbine generator is driven by the steam output of the steam generator to provide electrical power therefrom. The improvement comprises providing a vertically movable grid structure vertically extending within the interior of the lower housing portion of the steam generator through which individual tubes comprising a vertically extending tube bundle extend. The tube bundle has a tube sheet at one end thereof supporting the tube bundle for the tubes extending through the tube sheet in flow through communication with a heat exchange fluid inlet. The grid structure defines grid apertures therein through which the individual tubes extend with each of the grid apertures being in surrounding relationship with a portion of an associated one of the tubes. The grid structure is movable for a predetermined vertical extent, such as by hydraulic means, such as a piston, along the tubes for vertically displacing the means defining the grid apertures by a sufficient amount for removing the previously surrounded portion of each of the tubes from the associated grid apertures whereby an enhanced reading of the condition of the tubes at the previously surrounded portion is enabled. The steam generator may comprise vertically assemblable modules which are removably mounted together in sealing relationship, with the modules comprising a base module, a tube bundle module removably mountable on the base module in sealing relationship therewith and an uppermost drier module removably mountable on the tube bundle module in sealing relationship therewith whereby ready access to removal of the tube bundle module in situ from the nuclear power plant steam generator is facilitated

  6. Solar hot-water generation and heating - Kombi-Kompakt+

    Haller, M.; Vogelsanger, P.

    2005-01-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes new testing facilities at the Institute for Solar Technology in Rapperswil, Switzerland, that allow the testing of solar systems the whole year through. The systems tested feature the combined generation of heat for hot water storage vessels and heat for space heating. The test method used, the Concise Cycle Test (CCT) is described. The results of tests made on a large number of systems demonstrate that it is especially important to have a test system that allows the solar market to be protected from unsatisfactory systems. Good co-operation with manufactures is noted. As the test method includes tests with secondary energy sources such as oil or gas, certain problems in this area were discovered and corrected. Further tests are to be made with systems using biomass as a secondary source of heat

  7. Preliminary project concerning the straw-fueled combined power-heat plant to be constructed at Glamsbjerg

    Gabriel, S.; Koch, T.

    1994-06-01

    Power and heat generation based on biomass gasification is of great importance due to its beneficial environmental effects and good economy. This report concerns a preliminary project on feasibility and problems of implementing a dual-purpose power plant, supplying both power and district heating to several schools, swimming pools and other public facilities at Glamsbjerg (Funen). The plant is to be based on thermal gasification (pyrolysis) of straw and use of the gas in a diesel engine. The diesels operate the power generator, and their waste heat should be utilized in the local district heating network. In order to establish a stable and flexible straw supply to the plant an evaluation of resources in the area has been carried out. Apart from straw-derived fuel the plant is planned to use natural gas for start and maintenance of the process. The prices of the combined plant and of the fuel processing are estimated in the report. (EG)

  8. Generation of heat on fuel rod in cosine pattern by using induction heating

    Keettikkal, Felix; Sajeesh, Divya; Rao, Poornima; Hande, Shashank; Dakave, Ganesh; Kute, Tushar; Mahajan, Akshay; Kulkarni, R.D.

    2017-01-01

    Fuel rods are used in a nuclear reactor for fission process. When these rods are cooled by water during the heat transfer, the temperature stress causes undesirable defects in the fuel rod. Studying these defects occurring in the fuel rod in the nuclear cluster during nuclear reaction is a difficult task because fission reaction makes it difficult to analyse the changes in the rod. Hence there is a need to use a replica of the rod with similar thermal stress to study and analyse the rod for the defects. Normally the heat generated on the fuel rod follows a cosine pattern which is an inherent characteristic inside a nuclear reactor. In view of this, in this paper induction heating method is used on a rod to create an exact replica of the cosine pattern of heat by varying the pitch of the coil. First, a MATLAB simulation is done using simulink. Then a prototype of the model has been developed comprising of carbon steel pipe, with length and outside diameter of 1 meter and 48.2 mm, respectively. Instead of using water as coolant, rod is simulated in air. Therefore, the heat generated is lost by normal convection and radiation. Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development or in some kind of experiment using nuclear reactor. Induction heating becomes an alternative to classical heating technologies because of its advantages such as efficiency, quickness, safety, clean heating and accurate power control. (author)

  9. Vogtle Electric Generating Plant ETE Analysis Review

    Diediker, Nona H.; Jones, Joe A.

    2006-12-09

    Under contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL)-Albuquerque reviewed the evacuation time estimate (ETE) analysis dated April 2006 prepared by IEM for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP). The ETE analysis was reviewed for consistency with federal regulations using the NRC guidelines in Review Standard (RS)-002, Supplement 2 and Appendix 4 to NUREG-0654, and NUREG/CR-4831. Additional sources of information referenced in the analysis and used in the review included NUREG/CR-6863 and NUREG/CR-6864. The PNNL report includes general comments, data needs or clarifications, and requests for additional information (RAI) resulting from review of the ETE analysis.

  10. Wind power plant for electricity generation

    Landsiedel, E

    1978-11-09

    The invention concerns a wind power plant which rotates on a vertical axis and is suitable for the generation of electricity. This wind power machine with a vertical axis can be mounted at any height, so that it can catch the wind on the vertical axis of rotation. Further, it does not have to be turned into the direction of the wind and fixed. The purpose of the invention is to obtain equal load on the structure due to the vertical axis. The purpose of the invention is fulfilled by having the wind vanes fixed above one another from the bottom to the top in 6 different directions. The particular advantage of the invention lies in the fact that the auxiliary blades can bring the other blades to the operating position in good time, due to their particular method of fixing.

  11. Meeting residential space heating demand with wind-generated electricity

    Hughes, Larry

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, many electricity suppliers are faced with the challenge of trying to integrate intermittent renewables, notably wind, into their energy mix to meet the needs of those services that require a continuous supply of electricity. Solutions to intermittency include the use of rapid-response backup generation and chemical or mechanical storage of electricity. Meanwhile, in many jurisdictions with lengthy heating seasons, finding secure and preferably environmentally benign supplies of energy for space heating is also becoming a significant challenge because of volatile energy markets. Most, if not all, electricity suppliers treat these twin challenges as separate issues: supply (integrating intermittent renewables) and demand (electric space heating). However, if space heating demand can be met from an intermittent supply of electricity, then both of these issues can be addressed simultaneously. One such approach is to use off-the-shelf electric thermal storage systems. This paper examines the potential of this approach by applying the output from a 5.15 MW wind farm to the residential heating demands of detached households in the Canadian province of Prince Edward Island. The paper shows that for the heating season considered, up to 500 households could have over 95 percent of their space heating demand met from the wind farm in question. The benefits as well as the limitations of the approach are discussed in detail. (author)

  12. Heat extraction from turbines of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants for district heating

    Drahy, J.

    1985-01-01

    Two design are described of SKODA extraction turbines for Czechoslovak nuclear power plants with WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors. 220 MW steam turbines were originally designed as pure condensation turbines with uncontrolled steam extraction. Optimal ways are now being sought for their use for heating hot water for district heating. For district heating of the town of Trnava, the nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice will provide a two-step heating of water from 70 to 120 degC with a heat supply of 60 MW th from one turbine unit. The ratio of obtained heat power to lost electric power is 5.08. Investigations showed the possibility of extracting 85 MW th of heat from uncontrolled steam extraction, this at three-step water heating from 60 to 145 degC, the ratio of gained and lost power being 7.14. Information is presented on the SKODA 220 MW turbine with steam extraction for heat supply purposes and on the 1000 MW turbine with 893 MW th heat extraction. The specifications of both types are given. (Pu)

  13. Heat transfer efficient thermal energy storage for steam generation

    Adinberg, R.; Zvegilsky, D.; Epstein, M.

    2010-01-01

    A novel reflux heat transfer storage (RHTS) concept for producing high-temperature superheated steam in the temperature range 350-400 deg. C was developed and tested. The thermal storage medium is a metallic substance, Zinc-Tin alloy, which serves as the phase change material (PCM). A high-temperature heat transfer fluid (HTF) is added to the storage medium in order to enhance heat exchange within the storage system, which comprises PCM units and the associated heat exchangers serving for charging and discharging the storage. The applied heat transfer mechanism is based on the HTF reflux created by a combined evaporation-condensation process. It was shown that a PCM with a fraction of 70 wt.% Zn in the alloy (Zn70Sn30) is optimal to attain a storage temperature of 370 deg. C, provided the heat source such as solar-produced steam or solar-heated synthetic oil has a temperature of about 400 deg. C (typical for the parabolic troughs technology). This PCM melts gradually between temperatures 200 and 370 deg. C preserving the latent heat of fusion, mainly of the Zn-component, that later, at the stage of heat discharge, will be available for producing steam. The thermal storage concept was experimentally studied using a lab scale apparatus that enabled investigating of storage materials (the PCM-HTF system) simultaneously with carrying out thermal performance measurements and observing heat transfer effects occurring in the system. The tests produced satisfactory results in terms of thermal stability and compatibility of the utilized storage materials, alloy Zn70Sn30 and the eutectic mixture of biphenyl and diphenyl oxide, up to a working temperature of 400 deg. C. Optional schemes for integrating the developed thermal storage into a solar thermal electric plant are discussed and evaluated considering a pilot scale solar plant with thermal power output of 12 MW. The storage should enable uninterrupted operation of solar thermal electric systems during additional hours

  14. Inquiry on the valorisation of heat produced by methanization with co-generation in France. Energy and territory: Valorisation of heat produced by methanization

    Bazin, Florian; David, Laura; Heuraux, Thalie; Jeziorny, Thibaud; Massazza, Michael; Mosse, Noemie; Nguyen Dai, Kim Yen; Pruvost, Paul; Regimbart, Amelie; Rogee, Pierre-Emmanuel; Roy, Samuel; Segret, Emilien

    2014-01-01

    A leaflet first proposes graphs which illustrate the valorisation of heat produced by methanization with co-generation in France: material and methods, farm characterisation, plant sources, valorisation modes. The second document proposes detailed and discussed presentations of the various involved processes. Contributions address methanization as a whole, valorisation of heat produced by co-generation through heating of agricultural and domestic buildings or through digestate dehydration, digestate hygienisation, and other types of valorisation such as fodder drying, cereal drying, wood drying, compost drying, fabrication of rape seed, greenhouse crops, cultures of micro algae, and mushroom farming

  15. The effect of heat generation in inclined slats on the natural convective heat transfer from an isothermal heated vertical plate

    Oosthuizen, P.H.; Sun, L.; Naylor, D.

    2003-01-01

    Natural convective heat transfer from a wide heated vertical isothermal plate with adiabatic surfaces above and below the heated surface has been considered. There are a series of equally spaced vertical thin, flat surfaces (termed 'slats') near the heated surface, these surfaces being, in general, inclined to the heated surface. There is, in general, a uniform heat generation in the slats. The slats are pivoted about their centre-point and thus as their angle is changed, the distance of the tip of the slat from the plate changes. The situation considered is an approximate model of a window with a vertical blind, the particular case where the window is hotter than the room air being considered. The heat generation in the slats in this situation is the result of solar radiation passing through the window and falling on and being absorbed by the slats of the blind. The flow has been assumed to be laminar and steady. Fluid properties have been assumed constant except for the density change with temperature that gives rise to the buoyancy forces. The governing equations have been written in dimensionless form and the resulting dimensionless equations have been solved using a commercial finite-element package. The solution has the following parameters: (1) the Rayleigh number (2) the Prandtl number (3) the dimensionless heat generation rate in the slats per unit frontal area (4) the dimensionless distance of the slat center point (the pivot point) from the surface (5) the dimensionless slat size (6) the dimensionless slat spacing (7) the angle of inclination of the slats. Because of the application that motivated the study, results have only been obtained for a Prandtl number of 0.7. The effect of the other dimensionless variables on the mean dimensionless heat transfer rate from the heated vertical surface has been examined. (author)

  16. Large Combined Heat and Power Plants for Sustainable Energy System

    Lund, Rasmus Søgaard; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    . CHP (combined heat and power) plants in Denmark will change their role from base load production to balancing the fluctuation in renewable energy supply, such as wind power and at the same time they have to change to renewable energy sources. Some solutions are already being planned by utilities...... in Denmark; conversion of pulverised fuel plants from coal to wood pellets and a circulating fluidised bed (CFB) plant for wood chips. From scientific research projects another solution is suggested as the most feasible; the combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) plant. In this study a four scenarios...

  17. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant hydrogen generation

    King, R.B.; King, A.D. Jr.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.

    1996-02-01

    The most promising method for the disposal of highly radioactive nuclear wastes is a vitrification process in which the wastes are incorporated into borosilicate glass logs, the logs are sealed into welded stainless steel canisters, and the canisters are buried in suitably protected burial sites for disposal. The purpose of the research supported by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) project of the Department of Energy through Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and summarized in this report was to gain a basic understanding of the hydrogen generation process and to predict the rate and amount of hydrogen generation during the treatment of HWVP feed simulants with formic acid. The objectives of the study were to determine the key feed components and process variables which enhance or inhibit the.production of hydrogen. Information on the kinetics and stoichiometry of relevant formic acid reactions were sought to provide a basis for viable mechanistic proposals. The chemical reactions were characterized through the production and consumption of the key gaseous products such as H 2 . CO 2 , N 2 0, NO, and NH 3 . For this mason this research program relied heavily on analyses of the gases produced and consumed during reactions of the HWVP feed simulants with formic acid under various conditions. Such analyses, used gas chromatographic equipment and expertise at the University of Georgia for the separation and determination of H 2 , CO, CO 2 , N 2 , N 2 O and NO

  18. Uncertainties in the daily operation of a district heating plant

    Sorknæs, Peter

    Studies have found that district heating (DH) systems should play an important role in future sustainable energy systems, but that DH has to adapt to lower heat demands. This means adapting to reduced operation hours for units essential for DHs integration in other parts of the energy system......, such as CHP. It will therefore likely be increasingly important to increase the value per operation hour. The value can be increased by offering balancing for the electricity system. This in turn increases the uncertainties in the daily operation planning of the DH system. In this paper the Danish DH plant...... Ringkøbing District Heating is used as a case to investigate what costs market uncertainties can incur on a DH plant. It is found that the market uncertainties in a 4 months simulated period increased Ringkøbing District Heatings costs by less than 1%. Several factors are however not included in this paper....

  19. Environmental Assessment of a Central Heating Plant.

    1983-02-01

    be critical for wildlife productivity. Nutrient content differs by plant species and vegetative part. Many interactions in the biotic community are...deposits which begin in the Cliffs Ridge area and run west to Negaunee. Concentrations of uranium which have higher readings than background can be found...manganese, aluminium , zinc and selen- ium (Ref. 10). kny effect on the ground-water quality would likely in- volve an increase in one or more of these

  20. Self-disposal option for heat-generating waste - 59182

    Ojovan, Michael I.; Poluektov, Pavel P.; Kascheev, Vladimir A.

    2012-01-01

    Self-descending heat generating capsules can be used for disposal of dangerous radioactive wastes in extremely deep layers of the Earth preventing any release of radionuclides into the biosphere. Self-disposal option for heat-generating radioactive waste such as spent fuel, high level reprocessing waste or spent sealed radioactive sources, known also as rock melting concept, was considered in the 70's as a viable alternative disposal option by both Department of Energy in the USA and Atomic Industry Ministry in the USSR. Self-disposal is currently reconsidered as a potential alternative route to existing options for solving the nuclear waste problem and is associated with the renaissance of nuclear industry. Self- disposal option utilises the heat generated by decaying radionuclides of radioactive waste inside a heavy and durable capsule to melt the rock on its way down. As the heat from radionuclides within the capsule partly melts the enclosing rock, the relatively low viscosity and density of the silicate melt allow the capsule to be displaced upwards past the heavier capsule as it sinks. Eventually the melt cools and solidifies (e.g. vitrifies or crystallizes), sealing the route along which the capsule passed. Descending or self-disposal continues until enough heat is generated by radionuclides to provide partial melting of surrounding rock. Estimates show that extreme depths of several tens and up to hundred km can be reached by capsules which could never be achieved by other techniques. Self- disposal does not require complex and expensive disposal facilities and provides a minimal footprint used only at operational stage. It has also an extremely high non- proliferation character and degree of safety. Utilisation of heat generated by relatively short-lived radionuclides diminishes the environmental uncertainties of self-disposal and increases the safety of this concept. Self-sinking heat-generating capsules could be launched from the bottom of the sea as

  1. Entropy Generation of Desalination Powered by Variable Temperature Waste Heat

    David M. Warsinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Powering desalination by waste heat is often proposed to mitigate energy consumption and environmental impact; however, thorough technology comparisons are lacking in the literature. This work numerically models the efficiency of six representative desalination technologies powered by waste heat at 50, 70, 90, and 120 °C, where applicable. Entropy generation and Second Law efficiency analysis are applied for the systems and their components. The technologies considered are thermal desalination by multistage flash (MSF, multiple effect distillation (MED, multistage vacuum membrane distillation (MSVMD, humidification-dehumidification (HDH, and organic Rankine cycles (ORCs paired with mechanical technologies of reverse osmosis (RO and mechanical vapor compression (MVC. The most efficient technology was RO, followed by MED. Performances among MSF, MSVMD, and MVC were similar but the relative performance varied with waste heat temperature or system size. Entropy generation in thermal technologies increases at lower waste heat temperatures largely in the feed or brine portions of the various heat exchangers used. This occurs largely because lower temperatures reduce recovery, increasing the relative flow rates of feed and brine. However, HDH (without extractions had the reverse trend, only being competitive at lower temperatures. For the mechanical technologies, the energy efficiency only varies with temperature because of the significant losses from the ORC.

  2. Modeling a Thermoelectric Generator Applied to Diesel Automotive Heat Recovery

    Espinosa, N.; Lazard, M.; Aixala, L.; Scherrer, H.

    2010-09-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are outstanding devices for automotive waste heat recovery. Their packaging, lack of moving parts, and direct heat to electrical conversion are the main benefits. Usually, TEGs are modeled with a constant hot-source temperature. However, energy in exhaust gases is limited, thus leading to a temperature decrease as heat is recovered. Therefore thermoelectric properties change along the TEG, affecting performance. A thermoelectric generator composed of Mg2Si/Zn4Sb3 for high temperatures followed by Bi2Te3 for low temperatures has been modeled using engineering equation solver (EES) software. The model uses the finite-difference method with a strip-fins convective heat transfer coefficient. It has been validated on a commercial module with well-known properties. The thermoelectric connection and the number of thermoelements have been addressed as well as the optimum proportion of high-temperature material for a given thermoelectric heat exchanger. TEG output power has been estimated for a typical commercial vehicle at 90°C coolant temperature.

  3. Use of waste heat from nuclear power plants

    Olszewski, M.

    1978-01-01

    The paper details the Department of Energy (DOE) program concerning utilization of power plant reject heat conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A brief description of the historical development of the program is given and results of recent studies are outlined to indicate the scope of present efforts. A description of a DOE-sponsored project assessing uses for reject heat from the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Station is also given

  4. 75 MW heat extraction from Beznau nuclear power plant (Switzerland)

    Handl, K.H.

    1998-01-01

    The district heat extraction system installed and commissioned at the Beznau Nuclear Power Plant 1983 and 1984 is working successfully since the beginning. Together with a six kilometres extension in 1994, the system now consists of a 35 kilometres main network and 85 kilometres of local distribution pipelines. The eight founding communities as well as three networks joined later have been connected. Today around 2160 consumers of the Refuna district heating, small and large private buildings, industrial and agricultural enterprises are supplied with heat from the Beznau plant (1997: 141'000 MWh). The regional district heat supply system has become an integrated part of the regional infrastructure for around 20'000 inhabitants of the lower Aare valley. Nearly 15 years of operational experience are confirming the success of the strict approval conditions for the housing connections. Remarkably deep return flow temperatures in the district heating network were leading to considerable reserves in the transport capacity of the main pipeline system. The impacts of the heat extraction from the Beznau nuclear power plant, in particular its contribution to the protection of the environment by substituting fossil fuels and preventing CO2-production, have been positive. (author)

  5. Selection of criterions of fuels incineration on heat power plants

    Bubnov, V.P.; Minchenko, E.M.; Zelenukho, E.V.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel and energy complex takes first place in industry field of cities and defines in many respects environmental situation of cities. The products of combustion of fuel bring the greatest contribution in environmental contamination. This factor is ignored during calculation of technical and economics indexes. Ecological impact of heat power plants on the environment is determined separately from assessment of ecological damage. Determination of optimal conditions of functioning of heat power plants incineration with respect to technical, economics and ecological indexes with use of multicriterion mathematics model is proposed. (authors)

  6. District heating plants in Europe: Recent experience and innovations

    De Comelli, G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper contains a critical review of recent experience and innovative features encountered in some European district heating plants. The increased application of cogeneration is pointed out, with reference to traditional, as well as, more recent technology which makes use of combined gas-steam cycles. An example of a combined gas-steam cycle is schematically described. The relevance of fluidized bed combustion and interconnection of heat distribution grids, and their consequences to the environmentally-safe and economical employment of the plants, are evidenced

  7. Off-design performance analysis of organic Rankine cycle using real operation data from a heat source plant

    Kim, In Seop; Kim, Tong Seop; Lee, Jong Jun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • ORC systems driven by waste or residual heat from a combined cycle cogeneration plant were analyzed. • An off-design analysis model was developed and validated with commercial ORC data. • A procedure to predict the actual variation of ORC performance using the off-design model was set up. • The importance of using long-term operation data of the heat source plant was demonstrated. - Abstract: There has been increasing demand for cogeneration power plants, which provides high energy utilization. Research on upgrading power plant performance is also being actively pursued. The organic Rankine cycle (ORC) can operate with mid- and low-temperature heat sources and is suitable for enhancing performance of existing power plants. In this study, an off-design analysis model for the ORC was developed, which is driven by waste heat or residual heat from a combined cycle cogeneration plant. The applied heat sources are the exhaust gas from the heat recovery steam generator (Case 1) and waste heat from a heat storage unit (Case 2). Optimal design points of the ORC were selected based on the design heat source condition of each case. Then, the available ORC power output for each case was predicted using actual long-term plant operation data and a validated off-design analysis model. The ORC capacity of Case 2 was almost two times larger than that of Case 1. The predicted average electricity generation of both cases was less than the design output. The results of this paper reveal the importance of both the prediction of electricity generation using actual plant operation data and the need for optimal ORC system sizing.

  8. Steam generator design for solar towers using solar salt as heat transfer fluid

    González-Gómez, Pedro Ángel; Petrakopoulou, Fontina; Briongos, Javier Villa; Santana, Domingo

    2017-06-01

    Since the operation of a concentrating solar power plant depends on the intermittent character of solar energy, the steam generator is subject to daily start-ups, stops and load variations. Faster start-up and load changes increase the plant flexibility and the daily energy production. However, it involves high thermal stresses on thick-walled components. Continuous operational conditions may eventually lead to a material failure. For these reasons, it is important to evaluate the transient behavior of the proposed designs in order to assure the reliability. The aim of this work is to analyze different steam generator designs for solar power tower plants using molten salt as heat transfer fluid. A conceptual steam generator design is proposed and associated heat transfer areas and steam drum size are calculated. Then, dynamic models for the main parts of the steam generator are developed to represent its transient performance. A temperature change rate that ensures safe hot start-up conditions is studied for the molten salt. The thermal stress evolution on the steam drum is calculated as key component of the steam generator.

  9. 60-MW/sub t/ methanation plant design for HTGR process heat

    Davis, C.R.; Arcilla, N.T.; Hui, M.M.; Hutchins, B.A.

    1982-07-01

    This report describes a 60 MW(t) Methanation Plant for generating steam for industrial applications. The plant consists of four 15 MW(t) methanation trains. Each train is connected to a pipeline and receives synthesis gas (syngas) from a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Reforming (HTGR-R) plant. Conversion of the syngas to methane and water releases exothermic heat which is used to generate steam. Syngas is received at the Methanation Plant at a temperature of 80 0 F and 900 psia. One adiabatic catalytic reactor and one isothermal catalytic reactor, in each methanation train, converts the syngas to 92.2% (dry bases) methane. Methane and condensate are returned at temperatures of 100 to 125 0 F and at pressures of 860 to 870 psia to the HTGR-R plant for the reproduction of syngas

  10. Dissipation of the reactor heat at the Savannah River Plant

    Neill, J.S.; Babcock, D.F.

    1971-10-01

    The effluent cooling water from the heat exchangers of the Savannah River nuclear reactors is cooled by natural processes as it flows through the stream beds, canals, ponds, and swamps on the plant site. The Langhaar equation, which gives the rate of heat removal from the water surface as a function of the surface temperature, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed, is applied satisfactorily to calculate the cooling that occurs at all temperature levels and for all modes of water flow. The application of this equation requires an accounting of effects such as solar heating, shading, mixing, staging, stratification, underflow, rainfall, the imposed heat load, and the rate of change in heat content of the body of water

  11. On usage of heat-condensation type nuclear heat-and-power plants with the TK type turbines

    Boldyrev, V.M.; Smirnov, I.A.; Fedyaev, A.V.; Khrilev, L.S.

    1978-01-01

    The problems of the efficiency of nuclear heat-and-plants (NHPP) in the heat-andpower energetics of the USSR are discussed. Most attention is centered on an NHPP of heat-condensation type equipped with constant steam flow turbines of the TK-450/500-60 and K-500-60 types and WWER-1000 reactors. According to the specially developed procedure, the problem of selecting the profile of a TK-type turbine, NHPP composition and applications are subjected to the technico-economic analysis. The distance to the urban area from a central heat-and-power plant utilizing organic and atomic fuel is adopted to be the same and equal to 5, 10 and 15 km, and the thermal load is variable between 500 and 7000 Gcal/hour (the share of hot water supply load in the total thermal load being 0.2). The heat supply system is open-circuited, the hot/return water temperatures being 150/70 deg C. The optimum calculated heat production factor for the NHPP does not exceed 0.7, and the optimum heat production values from controlled turbine outputs are within 500-600 Gcal/hour. The mininum thermal load, for which the NHPP with TK turbines is more effective than an organic fuel heat-and-power station, is about 1000-1500 Gcal/hour if cooling towers are used in the technical water supply system, and if it is possible to construct a water reservoir-cooler for the NHPP, this range is reduced to a thermal load level, at which the combined system becomes more effective than the separate power generation systems, i.e. to 500-600 Gcal/hour

  12. Composite electric generator equipped with steam generator for heating reactor coolant

    Watabe, Masaharu; Soman, Yoshindo; Kawanishi, Kohei; Ota, Masato.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns a composite electric generator having coolants, as a heating source, of a PWR type reactor or a thermonuclear reactor. An electric generator driving gas turbine is disposed, and a superheater using a high temperature exhaust gas of the gas turbine as a heating source is disposed, and main steams are superheated by the superheater to elevate the temperature at the inlet of the turbine. This can increase the electric generation capacity as well as increase the electric generation efficiency. In addition, since the humidity in the vicinity of the exit of the steam turbine is reduced, occurrence of loss and erosion can be suppressed. When cooling water of the thermonuclear reactor is used, the electric power generated by the electric generator driven by the gas turbine can be used upon start of the thermonuclear reactor, and it is not necessary to dispose a large scaled special power source in the vicinity, which is efficient. (N.H.)

  13. RELAP5 analysis of reflux condensation behavior in heat transfer tube bundle of a steam generator

    Minami, Noritoshi; Chikusa, Toshiaki; Nagae, Takashi; Murase, Michio

    2007-01-01

    In case of loss of the residual heat removal system and other alternative cooling methods under mid-loop operation during shutdown of the pressurized water reactor plant, reflux condensation in the steam generator (SG) may be an effective heat removal mechanism. In reflux condensation experiments 7.2c with injection of nitrogen gas using the BETHSY facility in France, which is a scale model of a pressurized water reactor plant, 34 heat transfer tubes were divided into two kinds of flow patterns, which were steam forward flow and nitrogen reverse flow. In this study, we simulated the BETHSY experiments using the transient analysis code RELAP5. Modifying calculation equations for interfacial friction force and wall friction force between the inlet plenum and heat transfer tubes, nitrogen reverse flow was successfully simulated. In calculations with alteration of the flow area ratio to two flow channels for the heat transfer tube bundle, the number of active tubes with the maximum nitrogen recirculation flow rate agreed rather well with the observed number of active tubes. In calculations with three flow channels for the heat transfer tube bundle, the average number of active tubes in several calculations with different flow area ratios of the three flow channels predicted the number of active tubes well. (author)

  14. Nant-De-Chatillon: electric power generation by ORC (organic Rankine cycle) using waste heat from the Chatillon biogas plant; Nant-de-Chatillon: Production d'electricite par ORC a partir des rejets de chaleur du site de methanisation de Chatillon. Resume

    Kane, M.; Gay, B.

    2005-07-01

    This report prepared for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes the practical realisation and testing of a heat recovery system based on a one-stage organic Rankine cycle with R134a as the working fluid. The waste heat has a temperature of 95 {sup o}C and originates from a gas engine that powers a small co-generation plant fuelled with biogas produced on-site. Two similar cycles have been built, ORC1 with one and ORC2 with two turbines. Only ORC1 has been tested so far. The maximum efficiency measured in these tests was 6.64% (theoretical Carnot-efficiency: 17 %) and the electric power output was 5.0 kW. The problems encountered during commissioning are described and recommendations for further improvements are given.

  15. Entropy Generation of Shell and Double Concentric Tubes Heat Exchanger

    basma abbas abdulmajeed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Entropy generation was studied for new type of heat exchanger (shell and double concentric tubes heat exchanger. Parameters of hot oil flow rate, temperature of inlet hot oil and pressure drop were investigated with the concept of entropy generation. The results showed that the value of entropy generation increased with increasing the flow rate of hot oil and when cold water flow rate was doubled from 20 to 40 l/min, these values were larger. On the other hand, entropy generation increased with increasing the hot oil inlet temperature at a certain flow rate of hot oil. Furthermore, at a certain hot oil inlet temperature, the entropy generation increased with the pressure drop at different hot oil inlet flow rates. Finally, in order to keep up with modern technology, infrared thermography camera was used in order to measure the temperatures. The entropy generation was determined with lower values when infrared thermography camera was used to measure the temperatures, compared with the values obtained by using thermocouples.

  16. Design of the vitrification plant for HLLW generated from the Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    Vematsu, K.

    1986-01-01

    Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) is now designing a vitrification plant. This plant is for the solidification of high-level liquid waste (HLLW) which is generated from the Tokai Reprocessing Plant, and for the demonstration of the vitrification technology. The detailed design of the plant which started in 1982 was completed in 1984. At present the design improvement is being made for the reduction of construction cost and for the licensing which is going to be applied in 1986. The construction will be started in autumn 1987. The plant has a large shielded cell with low flow ventilation, and employs rack-mounted module system and high performance two-armed servomanipulator system to accomplish the fully remote operations and maintenance. The vitrification of HLLW is based on the liquid-fed Joule-heated ceramic melter process. The processing capacity is equivalent to the reprocessing of 0.7 ton of heavy metals per day. The glass production rate is about 9 kg/h, and about 300 kg of glass is poured periodically from the bottom of the melter into a canister. Produced glass is stored under the forced air cooling condition

  17. Stress analysis of HTR-10 steam generator heat exchanging tubes

    Dong Jianling; Zhang Xiaohang; Yin Dejian; Fu Jiyang

    2001-01-01

    Steam Generator (SG) heat exchanging tubes of 10 MW High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR-10) are protective screens between the primary loop of helium with radioactivity and the secondary loop of feeding water and steam without radioactivity. Water and steam will enter into the primary loop when rupture of the heat exchanging tubes occurs, which lead to increase of the primary loop pressure and discharge of radioactive materials. Therefore it is important to guarantee the integrity of the tubes. The tube structure is spiral tube with small bending radius, which make it impossible to test with volumetric in-service detection. For such kind of spiral tube, using LBB concept to guarantee the integrity of the tubes is an important option. The author conducts stress analysis and calculation of HTR-10 SG heat exchanging tubes using the FEM code of piping stress analysis, PIPESTRESS. The maximum stress and the dangerous positions are obtained

  18. Heat supply of the town of Trnava from EBO nuclear plant

    Kovarik, Z.

    4 variants of central heat supply from the V-2 Bohunice nuclear power plant were considered. Three included the supply of hot water while the fourth envisaged the supply of steam. The variants of hot water supply differed in the proportion of heat supply during load peak, the range being from 75% to 88% to 100%. The system suggested considers hot water with a maximum overpressure of 2.5 MPa and temperature of 150/70 degC, with possible temporary decrease to 130/70 degC. The estimated power of heat exchange stations is 240 MW at a temperature gradient of 150/70 degC and 180 MW at a temperature gradient 130/70 degC. The location, design and control of the heat supply system and the specifications of heat generation facilities are given. (J.P.)

  19. 7 CFR 1726.125 - Generating plant facilities.

    2010-01-01

    ... desulfurization system, particulate removal system, electric wiring and control systems, mechanical equipment installation (including turbine installation and plant piping), power plant building (foundation and... installations. Engineering services, turbine/generator, civil works and powerhouse construction, electrical...

  20. Assessment of productivity at four generating plants

    Saarlas, M.; Nelson, M.

    1976-01-01

    The 1975 FEA study of power plant reliability was undertaken as a first step in improving the productivity of large (larger than 400 MW) generating units by attempting to trace outages to their root causes so that meaningful corrective action can be taken at the root of the problem. Trident Engineering Associates studied the operation, maintenance, management, and manning of two fossil-fueled and two nuclear-fueled units, one each of above average and one below average reliability (high availability and low forced outage rate). It was expected that the differences between a highly reliable unit and a less reliable unit would lead to recommendations which would be useful for improving productivity of units throughout the country. The findings are of two basic types: (1) general concepts covering problem areas, fundamental reasons and immediate symptoms behind the problems, methods used to eliminate or alleviate the problems, and proposed solutions; (2) details which provide statistics that establish the relative lost productivity by fundamental causes. Eight root causes (fundamental reasons for failures or outages) were established into which most failures and outages could be assigned. Twenty nine cause factors (causes of failure) were established which assisted in assigning the failures and outages to a root cause

  1. Corrosion aspects in steam generators of nuclear power plants

    Visoni, E.; Santos Pinto, M. dos

    1988-01-01

    Steam generators of pressurized water reactors (PWR), transfer heat from a primary coolant system to a secondary coolant system. Primary coolant water is heated in the core and passes through the steam generator that transfer heat to the secondary coolant water. However, the steam generator is dead for ionic impurities, corrosion products and fabrication/maintenence residues. These impurities concentrate between crevice and cracks. Many types of degradation mechanisms affect the tubes. The tubes are dented, craked, ovalized, wasted, etc. This paper describes the main corrosion problems in steam generators and includes the corrective actions to considered to reduce or eliminate these corrosion problems. (author) [pt

  2. Heat-pipe assisted thermoelectric generators for exhaust gas applications

    Gonçalves, L. M.; Martins, Jorge; Antunes, Joaquim; Rocha, Romeu; Brito, F. P.

    2012-01-01

    Millions of hybrid cars are already running on our roads with the purpose of reducing fossil fuel dependence. One of their main advantages is the recovery of wasted energy, namely by brake recovery. However, there are other sources of wasted energy in a car powered by an internal combustion engine, such as the heat lost through the cooling system, lubrication system (oil coolers) and in the exhaust system. These energies can be recuperated by the use of thermoelectric generators (TEG) based o...

  3. Valve arrangement for a nuclear plant residual heat removal system

    Fidler, G.L.; Hill, R.A.; Carrera, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved valve arrangement for a two-train Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) of a nuclear reactor plant which ensures operational integrity of the system under single failure circumstances including loss of one of two electrical power sources

  4. EFFICIENCY AND LIFETIME OF SOLAR COLLECTORS FOR SOLAR HEATING PLANTS

    The 12.5 m² flat plate solar collector HT, today marketed by Arcon Solvarme A/S, has been used in solar heating plants in Scandinavia since 1983. The collector is designed to operate in a temperature interval between 40°C and 90°C. The efficiency of the collector has been strongly improved since...... it was introduced on the market. The paper will present the increase of the efficiency of the collector due to technical improvements since 1983. Further, measurements from the spring of 2009 of the efficiency of two HT collectors, which have been in operation in the solar heating plant Ottrupgaard, Skørping......, Denmark since 1994 with a constant high flow rate and in the solar heating plant Marstal, Denmark since 1996 with a variable flow rate, will be presented. The efficiencies will be compared to the efficiencies of the collectors when they were first installed in the solar heating plants. The measurements...

  5. EFFICIENCY AND LIFETIME OF SOLAR COLLECTORS FOR SOLAR HEATING PLANTS

    Fan, Jianhua; Chen, Ziqian; Furbo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The 12.5 m² flat plate solar collector HT, today marketed by Arcon Solvarme A/S, has been used in solar heating plants in Scandinavia since 1983. The collector is designed to operate in a temperature interval between 40°C and 90°C. The efficiency of the collector has been strongly improved since...... it was introduced on the market. The paper will present the increase of the efficiency of the collector due to technical improvements since 1983. Further, measurements from the spring of 2009 of the efficiency of two HT collectors, which have been in operation in the solar heating plant Ottrupgaard, Skørping......, Denmark since 1994 with a constant high flow rate and in the solar heating plant Marstal, Denmark since 1996 with a variable flow rate, will be presented. The efficiencies will be compared to the efficiencies of the collectors when they were first installed in the solar heating plants. The measurements...

  6. Nuclear power and heating plant control rooms. I

    Malaniuk, B.

    1983-01-01

    The questions are discussed of memory capacity, vigilance, speed of data processing, decision-making quality and other demands placed on operators of nuclear power and heating plants. On the example of the accident at the Three Mile Island-2 nuclear power plant, the instants are shown when failure of the human factor owing to a stress situation resulted in the accident not being coped with in time. It is therefore necessary to place high demands on the choice of operators and to devote equal attention to the human factor as to the safety of the technical equipment of the power plant. (J.B.)

  7. Cost-benefit analysis for combined heat and power plant

    Sazdovski, Ace; Fushtikj, Vangel

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents a methodology and practical application of Cost-Benefit Analysis for Combined Heat and Power Plant (Cogeneration facility). Methodology include up-to-date and real data for cogeneration plant in accordance with the trends ill development of the CHP technology. As a case study a CHP plant that could be built-up in Republic of Macedonia is analyzed. The main economic parameters for project evaluation, such as NPV and IRR are calculated for a number of possible scenarios. The analyze present the economic outputs that could be used as a decision for CHP project acceptance for investment. (Author)

  8. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  9. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  10. Mechanical design of a sodium heated steam generator

    Chetal, S.C.

    1975-01-01

    FBTR steam generator is a once through type unit consisting of four 12.5 MW thermal modules generating a total of 74 tons per hour of steam at 125 bar and 480 0 C. This paper outlines the mechanical design of such type of steam generator with emphasis on special design problems associated with this type of sodium to water steam heat exchanger, namely, thermal cycling of transition zone where nucleate boiling changes over to film boiling, application of pressure vessel design criteria for transient pressures, thermal stress evaluation resulting from differential expansion between shell and tube in this typical configuration, sodium headers support design, thermal sleeve, design, thermal shock analysis in thick tubes, thermal stress resulting from stratification and stability of expansion bends against vibration. Some of the possible design changes for the future large size steam generator are outlined. (author)

  11. Modeling of heat transfer in a horizontal heat-generating layer by an effective diffusivity approach

    Cheung, F.B.; Shiah, S.W.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of effective diffusivity is employed to model various processes of heat transfer in a volumetrically heated fluid layer subjected to different initial and boundary conditions. The approach, which involves the solution of only heat diffusion equations, is found to give rather accurate predictions of the transient response of an initially stagnant fluid layer to a step input of power as well as the developing and decaying nature of the flow following a step change in the internal Rayleigh number from one state of steady convection to another. The approach is also found to be applicable to various flow regions of a heat-generating fluid layer, and is not limited to the case in which the entire layer is in turbulent motion. The simplicity and accuracy of the method are clearly illustrated in the analysis. Validity of the effective diffusivity approach is demonstrated by comparing the predicted results with corresponding experimental data

  12. Prototype plant for nuclear process heat (PNP)

    Duerrfeld, R.; Kraut-Giesen, G.

    1982-01-01

    1. Goals: Verification of owner's interests during experimental and engineering phase of nuclear coal gasification. 2. Method: 2.1 Witnessing and evaluating of experimental results from running test facilities. 2.2 Influencing experimental program. 2.3 Participation in important meetings of PNP-project. 3. Results: From present point of view the realization of nuclear coal gasification with a nuclear high temperature reactor (HTR) in accordance with the present technical status as well as meeting the existing safety regulations seems to be feasable. R+D-work will be needed for affirmation of design. The gasification of hard coal basing on the allothermal principal has proved to be possible. The examination of the gasifier on a pilot scale is not yet done. The design work for the pilot plant should be started immediately, particularly keeping in mind the decision for erection of PNP in 1990. The calculation of production costs in comparison to autothermal gasification processes is promising better economics, if uncertainties of investment calculation are deemed to be neglectable. (orig.) [de

  13. Large combined heat and power plants in sustainable energy systems

    Lund, Rasmus Søgaard; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    2015-01-01

    . It is concluded that the CCGT CHP plant is the most feasible both from a technical analysis and a market economic analysis with electricity exchange. It is found that the current economic framework for large CHP plants in Denmark generates a mismatch between socio economy and business economy as well...

  14. Consequent downsizing. Combined heat, cold and power generation; Konsequentes Downsizing. Kraft-Waerme-Kaelte-Kopplung

    Schmid, Wolfgang

    2010-11-15

    The combined heat, cold and power generation particularly is worthwhile if electricity, warmth and cold are used during the year. During the reconstruction of a furniture store in a financial centre of the Volksbank and Raiffeisenbank Schweinfurt country (Federal Republic of Germany) the planner succeeded in an optimal coordination of the highly thermal insulated building envelope, the cogeneration plant for the own power generation, the absorption refrigerator as well as a free cooling equipment by means of a thermal building simulation and variational calculus.

  15. An artificial intelligence (AI) NOx/heat rate optimization system for Ontario Hydro`s fossil generating stations

    Luk, J.; Frank, A.; Bodach, P. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada); Warriner, G. [Radian International, Tucker, GA (United States); Noblett, J. [Radian International, Austin, TX (United States); Slatsky, M. [Southern Company, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI)-based software packages which can optimize power plant operations that improves heat rate and also reduces nitrogen oxide emissions are now commonly available for commercial use. This paper discusses the implementation of the AI-based NOx and Heat Rate Optimization System at Ontario Hydro`s generation stations, emphasizing the current AI Optimization Project at Units 5 and 6 of the Lakeview Generating Station. These demonstration programs are showing promising results in NOx reduction and plant performance improvement. The availability of the plant Digital Control System (DCS) in implementing AI optimization in a closed-loop system was shown to be an important criterion for success. Implementation of AI technology at other Ontario Hydro fossil generating units as part of the overall NOx emission reduction system is envisaged to coincide with the retrofit of the original plant control system with the latest DCS systems. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Optimal placement of combined heat and power scheme (cogeneration): application to an ethylbenzene plant

    Zainuddin Abd Manan; Lim Fang Yee

    2001-01-01

    Combined heat and power (CHP) scheme, also known as cogeneration is widely accepted as a highly efficient energy saving measure, particularly in medium to large scale chemical process plants. To date, CHP application is well established in the developed countries. The advantage of a CHP scheme for a chemical plant is two-fold: (i) drastically cut down on the electricity bill from on-site power generation (ii) to save the fuel bills through recovery of the quality waste heat from power generation for process heating. In order to be effective, a CHP scheme must be placed at the right temperature level in the context of the overall process. Failure to do so might render a CHP venture worthless. This paper discusses the procedure for an effective implementation of a CHP scheme. An ethylbenzene process is used as a case study. A key visualization tool known as the grand composite curves is used to provide an overall picture of the process heat source and heat sink profiles. The grand composite curve, which is generated based on the first principles of Pinch Analysis enables the CHP scheme to be optimally placed within the overall process scenario. (Author)

  17. North Plant co-generation project for South Davis County Sewer Improvement District

    Rogers, L.S. [Aqua Environmental Services, Inc., Bountiful, UT (United States)

    1993-12-31

    In the summer of 1988, the South Davis County Sewer Improvement District (SDCSID) learned of a grant/loan program being administered by the Utah State Department of Energy(DOE) for projects that demonstrate new and innovative ways of conserving energy or utilizing renewable energy sources. The SDCSID applied for and received from the DOE both a grant and a no-interest loan to finance half of the cost of a co-generation project at the North Wastewater Treatment Plant. This co-generation project utilizes methane gas, a by-product of the anaerobic digestion process, to generate both electricity and heat that is used at the plant. The SDCSID calculated that at the current anaerobic gas production rate, a 140 KW engine generator could be run almost 24 hours a day. Approximately 75% of the current electrical needs at the North Plant are supplied by the 140 KW engine generator. Also, all of the heat necessary to raise the temperature of the incoming sludge to 95{degrees}F, and to heat four large buildings is supplied from the heat recovery system of the engine. The system utilizes an induction type generator to supply electricity, which is somewhat simpler to design and less expensive to install than a synchronous type system. An induction system utilizes the Electrical Utility`s incoming power to excite the generator to correct the phase so that is can be used by the loads in the plant. In addition, the SDCSID installed a second identical engine generator as a back-up and to peak shave. Plant effluent is used to cool the engines instead of air-cooling through radiators.

  18. Chinese nuclear heating test reactor and demonstration plant

    Wang Dazhong; Ma Changwen; Dong Duo; Lin Jiagui

    1992-01-01

    In this report the importance of nuclear district heating is discussed. From the viewpoint of environmental protection, uses of energy resources and transport, the development of nuclear heating in China is necessary. The development program of district nuclear heating in China is given in the report. At the time being, commissioning of the 5 MW Test Heating Reactor is going on. A 200 MWt Demonstration Plant will be built. In this report, the main characteristics of these reactors are given. It shows this type of reactor has a high inherent safety. Further the report points out that for this type of reactor the stability is very important. Some experimental results of the driving facility are included in the report. (orig.)

  19. Nonlinear radiative heat flux and heat source/sink on entropy generation minimization rate

    Hayat, T.; Khan, M. Waleed Ahmed; Khan, M. Ijaz; Alsaedi, A.

    2018-06-01

    Entropy generation minimization in nonlinear radiative mixed convective flow towards a variable thicked surface is addressed. Entropy generation for momentum and temperature is carried out. The source for this flow analysis is stretching velocity of sheet. Transformations are used to reduce system of partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Total entropy generation rate is determined. Series solutions for the zeroth and mth order deformation systems are computed. Domain of convergence for obtained solutions is identified. Velocity, temperature and concentration fields are plotted and interpreted. Entropy equation is studied through nonlinear mixed convection and radiative heat flux. Velocity and temperature gradients are discussed through graphs. Meaningful results are concluded in the final remarks.

  20. Possibilities of the metallurgical base in the manufacture of tubes for nuclear power plant steam generators

    Prnka, T.; Walder, V.; Dolenek, J.

    Current possibilities are briefly summarized of metallurgy in the manufacture of high-quality tubes for nuclear power plant steam generators, mainly for fast reactor power plants. Discussed are steel making possibilities, semi-finished product and tube forming with special regard to 2.25Cr1MoNiNb steel problems, heat treatment, finishing, and testing. Necessary equipment and technology for the production of steam generator tubes are less common in the existing practice and are demanding on investment; their introduction, however, is inevitable for securing quality production of steam generator tubes. (Kr)

  1. Effect of excess air on second-generation PFB combustion plant performance and economics

    Robertson, A.; Garland, R.; Newby, R.; Rehmat, A.; Rubow, L.; Bonk, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a 1.4-MPa (14-atm) coal-fired second-generation pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) combustion plant and identifies the performance and economic changes that result as the excess air and thus gas turbine-to-steam turbine power ratio, is changed. The performance of these plants, another second- generation PFB combustion plant, and a conventional pulverized-coal (PC)-fired plant with wet limestone flue gas desulfurization is compared. Depending upon the conditions selected, the PFB combustion plant can achieve a 45 percent efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the coal used as fuel) and a cost of electricity at least 20 percent lower than that of the conventional PC-fired plant

  2. Feasibility of a single-purpose reactor plant for district heating in Finland

    Tarjanne, R.; Vuori, S.; Eerikaeinen, L.; Saukkoriipi, L.

    A feasibility study of a single-purpose reactor for district heating is presented. The reactor chosen is of an ordinary pressurized water reactor type with a thermal output of 100 to 200 MW. Primary circuit steam generators employed in ordinary PWR's are replaced by water-water heat exchangers. For safety reasons an intermediate circuit separates the primary from the network water. The conditions of the district heating systems in Finland were taken into account, which led to the choice of an average temperature of 160 0 C for the reactor coolant and a pressure of 13.5 bar. This, coupled with minimal control requirements helped design a considerably simple reactor plant. On condition, the reactor satisfies the basic heat demand in a district heating system, the effective annual full-power operation time of the heating reactor is from 5000 h to 7000 h. Economic comparisons indicated that the heating reactor may be competitive if the operation period is of this order. As the reactor has to be sited near the heat consumption area for reasons of economy, the safety aspects are of major importance and may in themselves preclude the realization of the heating idea. (author)

  3. Current status and development of heat exchangers for boiling water reactor nuclear power plant

    Uchiyama, Yoshio; Nishioka, Shuji; Ito, Shizuo

    1975-01-01

    More efficient and reliable operation is required for BWR heat exchangers because of nuclear plant safety and other reasons. Heat exchangers are classified into two categories of systems, the system for normal operation and the system for emergency operation. The present state and future improvement of heat exchangers are described in view of heat transfer performance, material selection, structural design, vibration, and so on. When noncondensing gas exists in vapour, heat transfer performance deteriorates, so that the heat transfer characteristics should be corrected by the adaption of venting the non condensing gas from the system. Heat transfer tubes should have high corrosion resistance to working fluid as well as high thermal conductivity, strength and economy. From that point of view, 30% cupro-nickel tubes will be replaced with 10% cupro-nickel tubes or titanium tubes though some technical development is necessary. These heat exchangers are now designed according to the MITI criteria for the technology concerning nuclear and thermal power generation, ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Sec. III and some other criteria. Most of heat transfer tube failures are caused from the tube vibration induced by working fluid flow, so that the vibration test and analysis were performed on U-tube elements. Some correction was obtained for design and fabrication techniques. (Iwase, T.)

  4. Socio-economic effects and benefits of biofuels in power and heat generation

    Turkki, J.

    1999-10-01

    This report studies the socioeconomic effects and benefits of domestic fuels - peat and wood and agricultural energy plants also - in power and heat generation. For evaluation of the employment and income effects, it compares the costs of domestic as well as imported fuels as regards to production, transportation and power stations by looking especially at the direct labour input and inputs in terms of intermediate products and investment. Their indirect employment effects and allocation to domestic factor income and imports are introduced by means of an input-output model. The net changes in the disposable incomes of local households, firms and municipalities, the government and other are derived from factor incomes by means of income redistribution. If in heat generation 15 MW oil heating plant is replaced by a peat heating plant, the annual local employment increases by 8 man years. If the fuel used is wood, employment increases by 9 man-years. The disposable income of the local economy rises annually about FIM 0,8 million with the peat alternative and FIM 0,9 million with the wood alternative. Although with the domestic fuel alternatives the income tax revenue grows and the unemployment security payments decrease, the loss of the high fuel taxes collected on oil means however, that the government is netloser by FIM 0,8-1,4 million annually. The total annual import bill decreases both with peat and wood by FIM 2,5 million respectively. Calculated by a small-sized 3/9 MW cogeneration station, which in heat generation replaces oil heating plants and in power generation replaces coal condensation power, the annual local employment effect is 11 man-years with peat and 12 with food fuel. The local economy gain an annual net income of FIM 0,8-0,9 million. The net increase of the government is FIM 0,1 million annually. With the wood alternative the government is a net looser by FIM 0,2 million. The annual import bill decreases by FIM 2,3-2,5 million. (orig.)

  5. Generating high temperature tolerant transgenic plants: Achievements and challenges.

    Grover, Anil; Mittal, Dheeraj; Negi, Manisha; Lavania, Dhruv

    2013-05-01

    Production of plants tolerant to high temperature stress is of immense significance in the light of global warming and climate change. Plant cells respond to high temperature stress by re-programming their genetic machinery for survival and reproduction. High temperature tolerance in transgenic plants has largely been achieved either by over-expressing heat shock protein genes or by altering levels of heat shock factors that regulate expression of heat shock and non-heat shock genes. Apart from heat shock factors, over-expression of other trans-acting factors like DREB2A, bZIP28 and WRKY proteins has proven useful in imparting high temperature tolerance. Besides these, elevating the genetic levels of proteins involved in osmotic adjustment, reactive oxygen species removal, saturation of membrane-associated lipids, photosynthetic reactions, production of polyamines and protein biosynthesis process have yielded positive results in equipping transgenic plants with high temperature tolerance. Cyclic nucleotide gated calcium channel proteins that regulate calcium influxes across the cell membrane have recently been shown to be the key players in induction of high temperature tolerance. The involvement of calmodulins and kinases in activation of heat shock factors has been implicated as an important event in governing high temperature tolerance. Unfilled gaps limiting the production of high temperature tolerant transgenic plants for field level cultivation are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Generation IV nuclear energy systems: road map and concepts. 2. Generation II Measurement Systems for Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants

    Miller, Don W.

    2001-01-01

    , humidity, smoke, and high temperature). Reference 4 describes the use of a Fabry-Perot fiber-optic temperature sensor that was selected for performance evaluation and for potential application in nuclear power plants because of its unique interferometric mechanism and data processing technique and its commercial availability. In the past several years, the use of acoustic methods, either transmission timing or correlation methods, have been developed to the point that they are being introduced as a back-fit in operating plants. The advantage these methods offer is increased accuracy, which translates into increased reactor power. A new method for local measurement of reactor power is being developed at Ohio State. This power sensor concept is based on maintaining a constant temperature in a small mass of actual reactor fuel or fuel analogue by adding heat through resistive dissipation of input electrical energy. Sensors of this type can provide a direct measurement of the nuclear energy deposition rather than neutron flux. Holcomb at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is proposing to develop a combined optical-based neutron flux/temperature sensor for in-core measurements in high-temperature gas reactors. The current status of I and C systems in nuclear power plants was reviewed, and it was concluded that the fundamental measuring systems had not changed substantially since the early nuclear plants. New methods and advanced measuring systems were discussed. Advanced systems of the type discussed should be considered in the design of next-generation I and C systems. However, they should be considered along with the sensors and systems currently being used, which have served their functions very well for the past 40 yr. (authors)

  7. Chemical Plant Accidents in a Nuclear Hydrogen Generation Scheme

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Revankar, Shripad T.

    2011-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear reactor (HTR) could be used to drive a steam reformation plant, a coal gasification facility, an electrolysis plant, or a thermochemical hydrogen production cycle. Most thermochemical cycles are purely thermodynamic, and thus achieve high thermodynamic efficiency. HTRs produce large amounts of heat at high temperature (1100 K). Helium-cooled HTRs have many passive, or inherent, safety characteristics. This inherent safety is due to the high design basis limit of the maximum fuel temperature. Due to the severity of a potential release, containment of fission products is the single most important safety issue in any nuclear reactor facility. A HTR coupled to a chemical plant presents a complex system, due primarily to the interactive nature of both plants. Since the chemical plant acts as the heat sink for the nuclear reactor, it important to understand the interaction and feedback between the two systems. Process heat plants and HTRs are generally very different. Some of the major differences include: time constants of plants, safety standards, failure probability, and transient response. While both the chemical plant and the HTR are at advanced stages of testing individually, no serious effort has been made to understand the operation of the integrated system, especially during accident events that are initiated in the chemical plant. There is a significant lack of knowledge base regarding scaling and system integration for large scale process heat plants coupled to HTRs. Consideration of feedback between the two plants during time-dependent scenarios is absent from literature. Additionally, no conceptual studies of the accidents that could occur in either plant and impact the entire coupled system are present in literature

  8. Amplification of heat extremes by plant CO2 physiological forcing.

    Skinner, Christopher B; Poulsen, Christopher J; Mankin, Justin S

    2018-03-15

    Plants influence extreme heat events by regulating land-atmosphere water and energy exchanges. The contribution of plants to changes in future heat extremes will depend on the responses of vegetation growth and physiology to the direct and indirect effects of elevated CO 2 . Here we use a suite of earth system models to disentangle the radiative versus vegetation effects of elevated CO 2 on heat wave characteristics. Vegetation responses to a quadrupling of CO 2 increase summer heat wave occurrence by 20 days or more-30-50% of the radiative response alone-across tropical and mid-to-high latitude forests. These increases are caused by CO 2 physiological forcing, which diminishes transpiration and its associated cooling effect, and reduces clouds and precipitation. In contrast to recent suggestions, our results indicate CO 2 -driven vegetation changes enhance future heat wave frequency and intensity in most vegetated regions despite transpiration-driven soil moisture savings and increases in aboveground biomass from CO 2 fertilization.

  9. Second generation plant health clinics in Uganda

    Danielsen, Solveig; Matsiko, Frank; Mutebi, Emmanuel

    coverage, Regularity/timeliness and Quality of plant healthcare. Field work was carried out over 15 months between July 2010 and September 2011 in 13 districts in the eastern, central and western parts of Uganda. A total of 205 plant clinic sessions were held in the period. The plant clinics received 2...... from the clinics to diagnostic laboratories. Although the plant clinics have become part of Ministry policy and districts showed increasing interest and commitment, there are some structural barriers that made it difficult for the districts to institutionalise the clinics and for the Ministry to play...... their leading role. A mismatch between institutional mandates/authority and allocated resources limited the scope of the actions both at district and national level. The plant clinics risk ‘falling between the two chairs’ of extension and pest and disease control. Finding a solid institutional base...

  10. An experimental study of the enhanced heating capacity of an electric heat pump (EHP) using the heat recovered from a gas engine generator

    Kim, Cheol Min; Chang, Se Dong [HAC R and D Laboratory, LG Electronics, 327-23 Gasan-Dong, Geumcheon-gu, Seoul 153-802 (Korea); Lee, Jaekeun; Hwang, Yujin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, San 30, Changjeon-Dong, Keumjeong-Ku, Busan 609-735 (Korea)

    2009-11-15

    This paper is concerned with the effect of recovered heat on the heating capacity of an Electric Heat Pump (EHP), which is supplied with electric power and recovered heat from a gas engine generator system. Two methods of supplying recovery heat are examined: (i) to the refrigerant with the discharge line heat exchanger (HEX), and (ii) to the refrigerant of the evaporator with the sub-evaporator. Heating capacity, input power and coefficient of performance (COP) were investigated and compared for each heat recovery method. Conclusively, we found that the second method was most reasonable to recover wasted heat and increased system COP by 215%. (author)

  11. Device for starting a steam generator by heating sodium in a reactor

    Nakano, Hisao.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To enhance cooperation between ventilation and steam conditions of turbine and ventilation condition relative to a superheater at the time of starting a plant using a fast breeder, and to enhance safety with respect to failure of heat transmission tubes at the time of start. Structure: In a device in which steam generated in an evaporator is fed to a high pressure turbine through a super-heater and an outlet steam of high pressure turbine is reheated by means of a re-heater and fed into a turbine on the side of low pressure to drive the turbine for power generation, opening and closing valves are mounted on outlet and inlet pipes, respectively, of the heat transmission pipe in the super heater, said outlet and inlet pipes being connected by a bypass pipe. Upstream side of the opening and closing valve on the inlet pipe and the downstream side of the opening and closing valve on the outlet pipe and connected by a bypass pipe in the re-heater and said bypass pipe in the re-heater is provided with a steam heat exchanger to be heated by steam in the outlet of the superheater, and a steam line in an auxiliary boiler is connected to the side of re-heater from the opening and closing valve on the heat transmission pipe in the re-heater. (Hanada, M.)

  12. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    Sircombe N.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  13. Thermal Behavior and Heat Generation Modeling of Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    Stroe, Daniel-Ioan; Knap, Vaclav; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Lithium Sulfur batteries are receiving a lot of research interest because of their intrinsic characteristics, such as very high energy density and increased safety, which make them a suitable solution for zero-emission vehicles and space application. This paper analyses the influence of the tempe......Lithium Sulfur batteries are receiving a lot of research interest because of their intrinsic characteristics, such as very high energy density and increased safety, which make them a suitable solution for zero-emission vehicles and space application. This paper analyses the influence...... of the temperature on the performance parameters of a 3.4 Ah Lithium-Sulfur battery cell. Furthermore, the values of the internal resistance and entropic heat coefficient, which are necessary for the parametrization of a heat generation model, are determined experimentally....

  14. Heating and generation of suprathermal particles at collisionless shocks

    Thomsen, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    Collisionless plasma shocks are different from ordinary collisional fluid shocks in several important respects. They do not in general heat the electrons and ions equally, nor do they produce Maxwellian velocity distributions downstream. Furthermore, they commonly generate suprathermal particles which propagate into the upstream region, giving advance warning of the presence of the shock and providing a ''seed'' population for further acceleration to high energies. Recent space observations and theory have revealed a great deal about the heating mechanisms which occur in collisionless shocks and about the origin of the various suprathermal particle populations which are found in association with them. An overview of the present understanding of these subjects is presented herein. 83 refs., 8 figs

  15. A thermoelectric generator using loop heat pipe and design match for maximum-power generation

    Huang, Bin-Juine

    2015-09-05

    The present study focuses on the thermoelectric generator (TEG) using loop heat pipe (LHP) and design match for maximum-power generation. The TEG uses loop heat pipe, a passive cooling device, to dissipate heat without consuming power and free of noise. The experiments for a TEG with 4W rated power show that the LHP performs very well with overall thermal resistance 0.35 K W-1, from the cold side of TEG module to the ambient. The LHP is able to dissipate heat up to 110W and is maintenance free. The TEG design match for maximum-power generation, called “near maximum-power point operation (nMPPO)”, is studied to eliminate the MPPT (maximum-power point tracking controller). nMPPO is simply a system design which properly matches the output voltage of TEG with the battery. It is experimentally shown that TEG using design match for maximum-power generation (nMPPO) performs better than TEG with MPPT.

  16. Numerical investigation of conjugate heat transfer and flow performance of a fin and tube heat exchanger with vortex generators

    Singh, Shobhana; Sørensen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Vortex generator is considered as an effective device for augmentation of the thermal-hydraulic performance of a heat exchanger. The aim of present study is to examine the influence of vortex generators on a double fin and tube heat exchanger performance. Vortex generator of rectangular winglet...

  17. Characterization plan for the Hanford Generating Plant (HGP)

    Marske, S.G.

    1996-09-01

    This characterization plan describes the sample collection and sample analysis activities to characterize the Hanford Generating Plant and associated solid waste management units (SWMUs). The analytical data will be used to identify the radiological contamination in the Hanford Generating Plant as well as the presence of radiological and hazardous materials in the SWMUs to support further estimates of decontamination interpretation for demolition

  18. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    Using alternate energy sources abundant in the U.S.A. to help curb foreign oil imports is vitally important from both national security and economic standpoints. Perhaps the most forwardlooking opportunity to realize national energy goals involves the integrated use of two energy sources that have an established technology base in the U.S.A., namely nuclear energy and coal. The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc.) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported (via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)) to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  19. Increase of efficiency of plant materials heat treatment in tubular reactors

    A. V. Golubkovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In agriculture products of pyrolysis of plant materials in the form of waste of the main production can be applied as a source of heat and electric power. Besides, their use prevents ecological pollution of the soil and the atmosphere. Pyrolysis plants can be used for work with tubular reactors anywhere. Due to them farmers can dry grain, using waste heat of diesel generators, heatgenerators, boiler plants and receiving thus gaseous products, liquid and firm fractions. A technology based on cyclic and continuous plant mass movement by a piston in a pipe from a loading site to a place of unloading of a firm phase consistently through cameras of drying, pyrolysis, condensation of gaseous products. Exhaust furnace gases with a temperature up to 600 degrees Celsius are given countercurrent material movement from a power equipment. The gaseous, liquid and firm products from the pyrolysis camera are used for heat and electric power generation. Calculation of parameters of subdrying and pyrolysis cameras is necessary for effective and steady operation of the tubular reactor. The authors determined the speed of raw materials movement, and also duration of drying and pyrolysis in working chambers. An analysis of a simplified mathematical model of process was confirmed with results of experiments. Models of heat treatment of wet plant materials in tubular reactors are worked out on a basis of equality of speeds of material movement in the reactor and distribution of a temperature front in material on radius. The authors defined estimated characteristic for determination of tubular reactor productivity and size of heat, required for drying and pyrolysis.

  20. Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    Mathur, Anoop [Terrafore Inc.

    2013-08-14

    A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during

  1. Pulse Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor: Heat transfer loop and balance-of-plant considerations

    McDowell, M.W.; Blink, J.A.; Curlander, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop and balance-of-plant design for the Pulse Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor has been investigated and the results are presented. The Pulse Star reaction vessel, a perforated steel bell jar about11 m in diameter, is immersed in Li 17 Pb 83 coolant, which flows through the perforations and forms a 1.5-m-thick plenum of droplets around a 8-m-diameter inner chamber. The bell jar and associated pumps, piping, and steam generators are contained within a 17-m-diameter pool of Li 17 Pb 83 coolant to minimize structural requirements and occupied space, resulting in reduced cost. Four parallel heat transfer loops, each with a flow rate of 5.5 m 3 /s, are necessary to transfer 3300 MWt of power. Liquid metal is pumped to the top of the pool, where it flows downward through eight vertical steam generators. Double-walled tubes are used in the steam generators to assure tritium containment without intermediate heat transfer loops. Each pump is a mixed flow type and has a required NPSH of 3.4 m, a speed of 278 rpm, and an impeller diameter of 1.2 m. The steam generator design was optimized by finding the most cost-effective combination of heat exchanger area and pumping power. The design minimizes the total cost (heat exchanger area plus pumping) for the plant lifetime. The power required for the pumps is 36 MWe. Each resulting steam generator is 12 m high and 1.6 m in diameter, with 2360 tubes. The steam generators and pumps fit easily in the pool between the reactor chamber and the pool wall

  2. Evaluation of Hybrid Power Plants using Biomass, Photovoltaics and Steam Electrolysis for Hydrogen and Power Generation

    Petrakopoulou, F.; Sanz, J.

    2014-12-01

    Steam electrolysis is a promising process of large-scale centralized hydrogen production, while it is also considered an excellent option for the efficient use of renewable solar and geothermal energy resources. This work studies the operation of an intermediate temperature steam electrolyzer (ITSE) and its incorporation into hybrid power plants that include biomass combustion and photovoltaic panels (PV). The plants generate both electricity and hydrogen. The reference -biomass- power plant and four variations of a hybrid biomass-PV incorporating the reference biomass plant and the ITSE are simulated and evaluated using exergetic analysis. The variations of the hybrid power plants are associated with (1) the air recirculation from the electrolyzer to the biomass power plant, (2) the elimination of the sweep gas of the electrolyzer, (3) the replacement of two electric heaters with gas/gas heat exchangers, and (4) the replacement two heat exchangers of the reference electrolyzer unit with one heat exchanger that uses steam from the biomass power plant. In all cases, 60% of the electricity required in the electrolyzer is covered by the biomass plant and 40% by the photovoltaic panels. When comparing the hybrid plants with the reference biomass power plant that has identical operation and structure as that incorporated in the hybrid plants, we observe an efficiency decrease that varies depending on the scenario. The efficiency decrease stems mainly from the low effectiveness of the photovoltaic panels (14.4%). When comparing the hybrid scenarios, we see that the elimination of the sweep gas decreases the power consumption due to the elimination of the compressor used to cover the pressure losses of the filter, the heat exchangers and the electrolyzer. Nevertheless, if the sweep gas is used to preheat the air entering the boiler of the biomass power plant, the efficiency of the plant increases. When replacing the electric heaters with gas-gas heat exchangers, the

  3. Optimizing Waste Heat Utilization in Vehicle Bio-Methane Plants

    Feng Zhen

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Current vehicle bio-methane plants have drawbacks associated with high energy consumption and low recovery levels of waste heat produced during the gasification process. In this paper, we have optimized the performance of heat exchange networks using pinch analysis and through the introduction of heat pump integration technology. Optimal results for the heat exchange network of a bio-gas system producing 10,000 cubic meters have been calculated using a pinch point temperature of 50 °C, a minimum heating utility load of 234.02 kW and a minimum cooling utility load of 201.25 kW. These optimal parameters are predicted to result in energy savings of 116.08 kW (19.75%, whilst the introduction of new heat pump integration technology would afford further energy savings of 95.55 kW (16.25%. The combined energy saving value of 211.63 kW corresponds to a total energy saving of 36%, with economic analysis revealing that these reforms would give annual savings of 103,300 USD. The installation costs required to introduce these process modifications are predicted to require an initial investment of 423,200 USD, which would take 4.1 years to reach payout time based on predicted annual energy savings.

  4. A dynamic analysis of interfuel substitution for Swedish heating plants

    Braennlund, R.; Lundgren, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper estimates a dynamic model of interfuel substitution for Swedish heating plants. We use the cost share linear logit model developed by Considine and Mount. All estimated own-price elasticities are negative and all cross-price elasticities are positive. The estimated dynamic adjustment rate parameter is small, however increasing with the size of the plant and time, indicating fast adjustments in the fuel mix when changing relative fuel prices. The estimated model is used to illustrate the effects of two different policy changes

  5. Theoretical study on a multivariate feedback control of a sodium-heated steam generator

    Takahashi, R.; Maruyama, Y.; Oikawa, T.

    1984-01-01

    This paper applies the connection of a multivariate feedback controller with a state estimator to a 1-MW sodium-heated steam generator for LMFBR theoretically, to obtain a control strategy which emphasizes, from the view point of safety and availability of the FBR plant, that a superheat of 30 0 C should be required for the evaporator steam. This involves a trial to study the feasibility for the estimation of such an inaccessible variable as the dry-out location of tubes and utilize the state estimate to design a feedback controller of steam generators. The Kalman filter tested was found to generate reasonable estimates of the transient process variables of the steam generator and can provide a major advantage of regulating steam condition of the system even in the presence of contamination by a rather high level of measurement noise in the view point of economic uses of micro- and/or minicomputers. (orig.)

  6. Investigation of waste heat recovery of binary geothermal plants using single component refrigerants

    Unverdi, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the availability of waste heat in a power generating capacity of 47.4 MW in Germencik Geothermal Power Plant has been investigated via binary geothermal power plant. Refrigerant fluids of 7 different single components such as R-134a, R-152a, R-227ea, R-236fa, R-600, R-143m and R-161 have been selected. The binary cycle has been modeled using the waste heat equaling to mass flow rate of 100 kg/s geothermal fluid. While the inlet temperature of the geothermal fluid into the counter flow heat exchanger has been accepted as 110°C, the outlet temperature has been accepted as 70°C. The inlet conditions have been determined for the refrigerants to be used in the binary cycle. Finally, the mass flow rate of refrigerant fluid and of cooling water and pump power consumption and power generated in the turbine have been calculated for each inlet condition of the refrigerant. Additionally, in the binary cycle, energy and exergy efficiencies have been calculated for 7 refrigerants in the availability of waste heat. In the binary geothermal cycle, it has been found out that the highest exergy destruction for all refrigerants occurs in the heat exchanger. And the highest and lowest first and second law efficiencies has been obtained for R-600 and R-161 refrigerants, respectively.

  7. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    Fic Adam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle, which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle. The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  8. A heat transfer study for vertical straight-tube steam generators heated by liquid metal

    Valette, M.

    1984-04-01

    A single-tube mockup of a vertical straight-tube steam generator heated by sodium-potassium alloy NaK was submitted to thermal and hydraulic testing in conditions representative of fast breeder reactor operation. The mockup consisted of a 10mm I.D. ferritic steel heat exchange tube centered inside a cylindrical stainless steel shell. The complete assembly was 20.9 meters long. Water flowed upward inside the exchange tube, and NaK flowed downward in the annular gap between the tube and the shell. The steam outlet pressure ranged from 90 to 195 bars, while the liquid metal temperature at the mockup inlet was between 480 and 580 0 C. The water flowrate in the tube ranged from 153 to 2460 kg.m -2 .s -1 . During the tests the fluid inlet and outlet temperatures, flowrate and pressures were measured, as was the NaK temperature profile over the full length of the device. The test results were subsequently compared with heat exchange and pressure drop values calculated using the standard formulas for straight-tube heat exchangers. The heat exchange coefficients predicted by these correlations in the boiling zone were found to be largely overestimated, while the calculated pressure drop values proved satisfactory. A set of modified correlations is proposed to account for the observed phenomena, and for use in designing commercial units, provided the sodium flow in the tube bundle is adequately distributed

  9. Generator technology for HTGR power plants

    Lomba, D.; Thiot, D.

    1997-01-01

    Approximately 15% of the worlds installed capacity in electric energy production is from generators developed and manufactured by GEC Alsthom. GEC Alsthom is now working on the application of generators for HTGR power conversion systems. The main generator characteristics induced by the different HTGR power conversion technology include helium immersion, high helium pressure, brushless excitation system, magnetic bearings, vertical lineshaft, high reliability and long periods between maintenance. (author)

  10. Performance investigation of a cogeneration plant with the efficient and compact heat recovery system

    Myat, Aung

    2011-10-03

    This paper presents the performance investigation of a cogeneration plant equipped with an efficient waste heat recovery system. The proposed cogeneration system produces four types of useful energy namely: (i) electricity, (ii) steam, (iii) cooling and (iv) dehumidification. The proposed plant comprises a Capstone C30 micro-turbine which generates 24 kW of electricity, a compact and efficient waste heat recovery system and a host of waste heat activated devices namely (i) a steam generator, (ii) an absorption chiller, (iii) an adsorption chiller and (iv) a multi-bed desiccant dehumidifier. The numerical analysis for the host of waste heat recovery system and thermally activated devices using FORTRAN power station linked to powerful IMSL library is performed to investigate the performance of the overall system. A set of experiments, both part load and full load, of micro-turbine is conducted to examine the electricity generation and the exhaust gas temperature. It is observed that energy utilization factor (EUF) could achieve as high as 70% while Fuel Energy Saving Ratio (FESR) is found to be 28%.

  11. Straw fired district heating plants in Denmark. Facts and figures

    1996-05-01

    A series of analyses and comparisons of technical, operational and financial and environmental conditions relating to straw-fired district heating and cogeneration plants in Denmark during the period of May 1993 to June 1995. The report provides an insight into the potentials of straw as a source of energy, particularly in the case of countries where the cultivation of cereals represents a major part of the agricultural economy. (AB)

  12. Heat exchangers for automotive gas turbine power plants

    Penny, R.N.

    1974-01-01

    Automotive gas turbine power plants are now in the final stages of development for quantity manufacture. A crucial factor in this development is the regenerative heat exchanger. The relative merits of the rotary regenerative and static recuperative heat exchanger are compared. Thermal efficiency and initial cost are two vital issues involved in the design of small gas turbines for the commercial establishment of gas turbine vehicles. The selection of a material for the rotaty regenerator is essentially related to resolving the two vital issues of future small gas turbines and is, therefore, analysed. The account of the pioneering work involved in engineering the glass ceramic and other non-metal regenerators includes a complete failure analysis based on running experience with over 200 ceramic regenerators. The problems of sealing, supporting and manufacturing the ceramic regenerator are discussed and future practical designs are outlined. Heat exchange theory applied to small gas turbines is also reviewed

  13. Satellite combined heat and power plants and their legal autonomy

    Loibl, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Since the landmark decision by the German Court of Justice concerning the term ''plant'' in the context of biogas plants it should be clear beyond doubt that satellite combined heat and power plants (CHPs) are legally autonomous plants pursuant to Para. 3 No. 1 of the Renewable Energy Law (EEG). What has yet to be finally resolved are the conditions under which satellite CHPs are to be regarded as autonomous. This will be a question of distance on the one hand and of operation autonomy on the other. In the individual case both these factors will have to be assessed from the perspective of an average objective, informed citizen. To the extent that its heat and electricity are being utilised in a meaningful manner, the plant's autonomy will be beyond doubt, at least in operational terms. Regarding the remuneration to be paid for satellite CHPs the only case requiring special consideration is when a CHP falls under the EEG of 2012. In this case Para. 1 Section 1 Sentence 2 EEG provides that the remuneration for the CHP in question is to be calculated as if there was a single overall plant. To the extent that none of the CHPs fall under the EEG of 2012, the ruling remains that there is a separate entitlement to remuneration for each satellite CHP. This also holds in cases where satellite CHPs that were commissioned after 1 January 2012 are relocated. When a satellite CHP is replaced by a new one, the rate and duration of remuneration remain unchanged. However, when a new satellite CHP is added to an existing satellite CHP via a gas collector line it is to be treated according to the decisions of the Federal Court of Justice concerning biogas plant extensions: It falls under the law that applies to the existing CHP and has an entitlement to a new minimum remuneration period, albeit subject to the degression rate provided by the EEG version in question.

  14. Thermal mechanical analysis of applications with internal heat generation

    Govindarajan, Srisharan Garg

    The radioactive tracer Technetium-99m is widely used in medical imaging and is derived from its parent isotope Molybedenum-99 (Mo-99) by radioactive decay. The majority of Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) produced internationally is extracted from high enriched uranium (HEU) dispersion targets that have been irradiated. To alleviate proliferation risks associated with HEU-based targets, the use of non-HEU sources is being mandated. However, the conversion of HEU to LEU based dispersion targets affects the Mo-99 available for chemical extraction. A possible approach to increase the uranium density, to recover the loss in Mo-99 production-per-target, is to use an LEU metal foil placed within an aluminum cladding to form a composite structure. The target is expected to contain the fission products and to dissipate the generated heat to the reactor coolant. In the event of interfacial separation, an increase in the thermal resistance could lead to an unacceptable rise in the LEU temperature and stresses in the target. The target can be deemed structurally safe as long as the thermally induced stresses are within the yield strength of the cladding and welds. As with the thermal and structural safety of the annular target, the thermally induced deflection of the BORALRTM-based control blades, used by the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURRRTM ), during reactor operation has been analyzed. The boron, which is the neutron absorber in BORAL, and aluminum mixture (BORAL meat) and the aluminum cladding are bonded together through powder metallurgy to establish an adherent bonded plate. As the BORAL absorbs both neutron particles and gamma rays, there is volumetric heat generation and a corresponding rise in temperature. Since the BORAL meat and aluminum cladding materials have different thermal expansion coefficients, the blade may have a tendency to deform as the blade temperature changes and the materials expand at different rates. In addition to the composite nature of the

  15. Analysis of a furnace for heat generation using polydisperse biomass

    Magalhaes, Edney Alves; Silva, Juarez de Sousa e; Silva, Jadir Nogueira da; Oliveira Filho, Delly [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (DEA/UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola; Donzeles, Sergio Mauricio Lopes [Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuaria de Minas Gerais (EPAMIG), Vicosa, MG (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    In many agro-industrial activities, the processing of raw material generates a substantial amount of fine materials. Examples include the production of soluble coffee, processing of rice, and wood processing, among others. In many regions, these by-products keep piling up on the courtyard of companies or become an environmental problem for land dumps. However, detailed tests of these byproducts indicate that they are excellent sources of energy. With this in mind, a furnace was developed to generate clean and hot air, using the alimentation system for pneumatic transport. Wood sawdust was used as fuel for analysis. The obtained results were considered satisfactory, proven by the small heat losses, primarily by the non-burned carbon monoxide (less than 0.2%) and the cooling of the furnace (less than 2.5%) whereas the losses by the exhaust gases were a little more than 23%. The thermal efficiency of the furnace was considered high when compared to others with an indirect heating system, obtaining an average value of 73%. The developed furnace, beyond being efficient, allows the use of the waste from the wood industry, which is important in the reduction of environmental impacts and minimizing production costs associated with the acquisition of conventional energy. (author)

  16. Generation and Sustainment of Plasma Rotation by ICRF Heating

    Perkins, F. W.

    2000-10-01

    When tokamak plasmas are heated by the fundamental minority ion-cyclotron process, they are observed to rotate toroidally, even though this heating process introduces negligable angular momentum. This work proposes and evaluates a physics mechanism which resolves this apparent conflict. The argument has two elements. First, it is assumed that angular momentum transport is governed by a diffusion equation with a v_tor = 0 boundary condition at the plasma surface and a torque-density source. When the source consists of separated regions of positive and negative torque density, a finite central rotation velocity results, even though the volume integrated torque density - the angular momentum input - vanishes. Secondly, ions energized by the ICRF process can generate separated regions of positive and negative torque density. Heating increases their banana widths which leads to radial energetic-particle transport that must be balanced by neutralizing radial currents and a j_rB_pR torque density in the bulk plasma. Additional, comparable torque density results from collisional transfer of mechanical angular momentum from energetic particles to the bulk plasma and particle loss through banana particles impacting the wall. Monte-Carlo calculations utilizing the ORBIT code evaluate all sources of torque density and rigorously assure that no net angular momentum is introduced. Two models of ICRF heating, diffusive and instantaneous, give similar results. When the resonance location is on the LFS, the calculated rotation has the magnitude, profile, and co-current sense of Alcator C-Mod observations. For HFS resonance locations, the model predicts counter-current rotation. Scans of rotational profiles vs. resonance location, initial energy, particle loss, pitch, and qm will be presented as will the location of the velocity shear layer its scaling to a reactor.

  17. Operating of Small Wind Power Plants with Induction Generators

    Jakub Nevrala

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes different systems of small wind power plants with induction generators used in the Czech Republic. Problems of wind power plants running with induction generators are solved within partial target of the research project MSM 6198910007. For small wind power plants is used induction motor as a generator. Parameters of the name plate of motor must be resolved for generator running on measuring base. These generators are running as a separately working generators or generators connected to the power grid. Methods of control these systems as a separately working, directly connecting to power grid, control by frequency converter and wiring by synchronous cascade are confronted on the measuring base too.

  18. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R and D) Program is responsible for performing R and D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R and D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    Demick, L.E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  2. Studying effect of heating plant parameters on performances of a geothermal-fuelled series cogeneration plant based on Organic Rankine Cycle

    Habka, Muhsen; Ajib, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We analyzed performances of a series ORC–CHP plant versus the heating plant parameters. • ORC–CHP power is destructed when raising the heat demand or the return temperature. • Only the high supply temperatures of the heating plant affect negatively the performances. • Reducing the return temperature optimizes both the energetic and exergetic criteria. • Increasing the heat demand improves the exergetic efficiency of the total CHP system. - Abstract: The present work aims to analyze the performance characteristics of the series Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system based on Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) under influence of the heating plant parameters without considering the chemistry of the geothermal water considered as heat source. For evaluation, energetic and exergetic criteria along with the heat transfer capacities have been determined, and also the working fluid R134a has been used. The results showed that increasing the heat demand or the return temperature and only the high supply temperatures lead to destruct the net power generated by the ORC–CHP system. While, influence of the last parameters on the total exergy efficiency and losses is different; whereas raising the heat demands optimizes these exergetic indicators, variation of the supply temperature leads to an optimum for these performances. Since increasing the return temperature has purely negative impacts on all exergetic and energetic criteria, the latter can be improved by reducing this temperature with attention to the heat transfer capacities. Thus, reduction of the return temperature about 5 °C lowers the exhausted stream losses by app. 25% and enhances the power generation by app. 52% and the total exergy efficiency by 9%

  3. Performance of ammonia–water based cycles for power generation from low enthalpy heat sources

    Mergner, Hanna; Weimer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cost efficient power generation from low temperature heat sources requires an optimal usage of the available heat. In addition to the ORC (Organic Rankine Cycles), cycles with ammonia and water as working fluid show promising results regarding efficiency. Due to their non-isothermal phase change, mixtures can adapt well to a liquid heat source temperature profile and reduce the exergetic losses. In this analysis thermodynamic calculations on the layouts of two existing ammonia–water cycles are compared: a geothermal power plant based on a Siemens’ patent and a modified lab plant based on a patent invented by Kalina (KCS-34). The difference between the two cycles is the position of the internal heat recovery. Cycle simulations were carried out at defined boundary conditions in order to identify optimal operation parameters. For the selected heat source of 393.15 K (hot water) the ammonia mass fraction between 80% and 90% results in the best performance in both configurations. In general, the layout of Siemens achieves a slightly better efficiency compared to the KCS-34. Compared to an ORC using R245fa as working fluid, the exergetic efficiency can be increased by the ammonia/water based cycles by approximately 25%. - Highlights: • Two NH 3 /H 2 O based cycles based on existing plants are analyzed and compared. • A simple KCS-34 focuses on a high enthalpy difference at the turbine. • The Kalina cycle of a Siemens patent KC SG1 runs on a high vapor mass flow. • The layout of the KC SG1 shows slightly better results compared to the KCS-34. • NH 3 /H 2 O cycles show an efficiency increase compared to a regular ORC with R245fa

  4. YAG laser cladding to heat exchanger flange in actual plant

    Toshio, Kojima

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a sequel to ''Development of YAG Laser Cladding Technology to Heat Exchanger Flange'' presented in ICONE-8. A YAG Laser cladding technology is a permanent repairing and preventive maintenance method for heat exchanger's flange (channel side) seating surface which is degraded by the corrosion in long term operation. The material of this flange is carbon steel, and that of cladding wire is type 316 stainless steel so as to have high corrosion resistance. In former paper above, the soundness of cladding layers were presented to be verified. This channel side flange is bolted with tube sheet (shell side) through metal gasket. As the tube sheet side is already cladded a corrosion resistant material, it needs to apply the repairing and preventive maintenance method to only channel side. In 2000 this technology had been performed to the actual heat exchanger (Residual Heat Removal Heat Exchanger; RHR Hx) flange in domestic nuclear power plant. This paper described the outline, special equipment, and our total evaluation for this actual laser cladding work. And also several technical subjects which we should solve and/or improve for the next project was presented. (author)

  5. Development of second-generation PFB combustion plants

    Robertson, A.; Domeracki, W.; Horazak, D. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Contract DE-AC21-86MC21023 to develop a new type of coal-fueled plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant--called an Advanced or Second-generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (APFBC) plant--offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 45 percent (HHV), with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized-coal-fired plants with scrubbers. This paper summarizes the pilot-plant R&D work being conducted to develop this new type of plant and discusses a proposed design that should reduce demonstration-plant risks and costs.

  6. A small capacity co generative gas-turbine plant in factory AD 'Komuna' - Skopje (Macedonia)

    Dimitrov, Konstantin; Armenski, Slave; Tashevski, Done

    2000-01-01

    The factory AD 'Komuna' -Skopje (Macedonia), has two steam block boilers, type ST 800 for steam production for process and space heating. The factory satisfies the electricity needs from the national grid. By the use of natural gas like fuel it is possible to produce electrical energy in its own co generative gas turbine plant. In this article, a co generative plant with small-scale gas turbine for electricity production is analyzed . The gas from gas turbine have been introduce in the steam block boiler. Also, a natural gas consumption, the electricity production, total investment and payback period of investment are determined. (Authors)

  7. Special considerations on operating a fuel cell power plant using natural gas with marginal heating value

    Moses, L. Ng; Chien-Liang Lin [Industrial Technology Research Institute, Taiwan (China); Ya-Tang Cheng [Power Research Institute, Taiwan (China)

    1996-12-31

    In realizing new power generation technologies in Taiwan, a phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant (model PC2513, ONSI Corporation) has been installed in the premises of the Power Research Institute of the Taiwan Power Company in Taipei County of Taiwan. The pipeline gas supplying to the site of this power plant has a high percentage of carbon dioxide and thus a slightly lower heating value than that specified by the manufacturer. Because of the lowering of heating value of input gas, the highest Output power from the power plant is understandably less than the rated power of 200 kW designed. Further, the transient response of the power plant as interrupted from the Grid is also affected. Since this gas is also the pipeline gas supplying to the heavily populated Taipei Municipal area, it is conceivable that the success of the operations of fuel cells using this fuel is of vital importance to the promotion of the use of this power generation technology in Taiwan. Hence, experiments were set up to assess the feasibility of this fuel cell power plant using the existing pipeline gas in this part of Taiwan where fuel cells would most likely find useful.

  8. Numerical and experimental investigation of melting with internal heat generation within cylindrical enclosures

    Amber Shrivastava; Brian Williams; Ali S. Siahpush; Bruce Savage; John Crepeau

    2014-06-01

    There have been significant efforts by the heat transfer community to investigate the melting phenomenon of materials. These efforts have included the analytical development of equations to represent melting, numerical development of computer codes to assist in modeling the phenomena, and collection of experimental data. The understanding of the melting phenomenon has application in several areas of interest, for example, the melting of a Phase Change Material (PCM) used as a thermal storage medium as well as the melting of the fuel bundle in a nuclear power plant during an accident scenario. The objective of this research is two-fold. First a numerical investigation, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), of melting with internal heat generation for a vertical cylindrical geometry is presented. Second, to the best of authors knowledge, there are very limited number of engineering experimental results available for the case of melting with Internal Heat Generation (IHG). An experiment was performed to produce such data using resistive, or Joule, heating as the IHG mechanism. The numerical results are compared against the experimental results and showed favorable correlation. Uncertainties in the numerical and experimental analysis are discussed. Based on the numerical and experimental analysis, recommendations are made for future work.

  9. Heat integration of fractionating systems in para-xylene plants based on column optimization

    Chen, Ting; Zhang, Bingjian; Chen, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the optimization of xylene fractionation and disproportionation units in a para-xylene plant is performed through a new method for systematic design based on GCC (grand composite curve) and CGCC (column grand composite curve). The distillation columns are retrofitted by CGCC firstly. Heat Integration between the columns and the background xylene separation process are then explored by GCC. We found that potential retrofits for columns suggested by CGCC provide better possibilities for further Heat Integration. The effectiveness of the retrofits is finally evaluated by means of thermodynamics and economic analysis. The results show that energy consumption of the retrofitted fractionating columns decreases by 7.13 MW. With the improved thermodynamic efficiencies, all columns operate with less energy requirements. Coupled with Heat Integration, the energy input of the para-xylene plant is reduced by 30.90 MW, and the energy outputs are increased by 17 MW and 58 MW for generation of the 3.5 MPa and 2.5 MPa steams. The energy requirement after the Heat Integration is reduced by 12% compared to the original unit. The retrofits required a fixed capital cost of 6268.91 × 10 3  $ and saved about 24790.74 × 10 3  $/year worth of steam. The payback time is approximately 0.26 year for the retrofits. - Highlights: • A new method for systematic design is proposed to improve energy saving of the PX plant in retrofit scenarios. • An optimization approach is developed to identify maximum heat recovery in distillation columns. • An efficient Heat Integration procedure of the PX plant is addressed based on the optimal retrofitted distillation columns. • The energy consumption is reduced by 12% after improvement to an industrial case

  10. THE EFFECTS OF SWIRL GENERATOR HAVING WINGS WITH HOLES ON HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP IN TUBE HEAT EXCHANGER

    Zeki ARGUNHAN

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of turbulance creators on heat transfer and pressure drop used in concentric heat exchanger experimentaly. Heat exchanger has an inlet tube with 60 mm in diameter. The angle of swirl generators wings is 55º with each wing which has single, double, three and four holes. Swirl generators is designed to easily set to heat exchanger entrance. Air is passing through inner tube of heat exhanger as hot fluid and water is passing outer of inner tube as cool fluid.

  11. Residual heat use generated by a 12 kW fuel cell in an electric vehicle heating system

    Colmenar-Santos, Antonio; Alberdi-Jiménez, Lucía; Nasarre-Cortés, Lorenzo; Mora-Larramona, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    A diesel or gasoline vehicle heating is produced by the heat of the engine coolant liquid. Nevertheless, electric vehicles, due to the fact that electric motor transform directly electricity into mechanical energy through electromagnetic interactions, do not generate this heat so other method of providing it has to be developed. This study introduces the system developed in a fuel cell electric vehicle (lithium-ion battery – fuel cell) with residual heat use. The fuel cell electric vehicle is driven by a 12 kW PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell. This fuel cell has an operating temperature around 50 °C. The residual heat generated was originally wasted by interaction with the environment. The new developed heating system designed integrates the heat generated by the fuel cell into the heating system of the vehicle, reducing the global energy consumption and improving the global efficiency as well. - Highlights: • Modification of heating system was done by introducing the residual heat from fuel cell. • Maximum heat achieved by the heating radiator of 9.27 kW. • Reduction of the heat dissipation by the fuel cell cooling system 1.5 kW. • Total efficiency improvement of 20% with an autonomy increase of 21 km

  12. Modes of heat removal from a heat-generating debris bed

    Squarer, D.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Piecznski, A.T.

    1984-01-01

    In the worst hypothetical accident in a light water reactor, when all protection systems fail, the core could be converted into a deep particulate bed either in-vessel or ex-vessel. The containment of such an accident depends on the coolability of a heat-generating debris bed. Some recent experimental and analytical studies that are concerned with heat removal from such a particulate bed are reviewed. Studies have indicated that bed dryout flux and, therefore, the heat removal rate from the particulate bed increases with the particle diameter (i.e., the permeability) for pool boiling conditions and can exceed the critical heat flux of a flat plate. Bed dryout in a large particle bed (i.e., a few millimetres) was found to be closely related to the ''flooding'' limit of the bed. Dryout under forced flow conditions was found to be affected by both forced and natural convection for mass flow rate smaller than m /SUB cr/ , whereas above this mass flow rate, bed dryout is proportional to the mass flow rate. Recent analyses were found to be in agreement with experimental data; however, additional research is needed to assess factors not accounted for in previous studies (e.g., effect of pressure, multidimensionality, stratification, etc.). Based on the expected pressure and particle sizes in a postulated severe accident sequence, a debris bed should be coolable, given a sufficient water supply

  13. Perspectives on deciphering mechanisms underlying plant heat stress response and thermotolerance

    Kamila Lucia Bokszczanin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is a major threat for agriculture and food safety and in many cases the negative effects are already apparent. The current challenge of basic and applied plant science is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of heat stress response and thermotolerance in detail and use this information to identify genotypes that will withstand unfavorable environmental conditions. Nowadays X-omics approaches complement the findings of previous targeted studies and highlight the complexity of heat stress response mechanisms giving information for so far unrecognized genes, proteins and metabolites as potential key players of thermotolerance. Even more, roles of epigenetic mechanisms and the involvement of small RNAs in thermotolerance are currently emerging and thus open new directions of yet unexplored areas of plant heat stress response. In parallel it is emerging that although the whole plant is vulnerable to heat, specific organs are particularly sensitive to elevated temperatures. This has redirected research from the vegetative to generative tissues. The sexual reproduction phase is considered as the most sensitive to heat and specifically pollen exhibits the highest sensitivity and frequently an elevation of the temperature just a few degrees above the optimum during pollen development can have detrimental effects for crop production. Compared to our knowledge on heat stress response of vegetative tissues, the information on pollen is still scarce. Nowadays, several techniques for high-throughput X-omics approaches provide major tools to explore the principles of pollen heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms in specific genotypes. The collection of such information will provide an excellent support for improvement of breeding programs to facilitate the development of tolerant cultivars. The review aims at describing the current knowledge of thermotolerance mechanisms and the technical advances which will foster new insights into

  14. Detailed partial load investigation of a thermal energy storage concept for solar thermal power plants with direct steam generation

    Seitz, M.; Hübner, S.; Johnson, M.

    2016-05-01

    Direct steam generation enables the implementation of a higher steam temperature for parabolic trough concentrated solar power plants. This leads to much better cycle efficiencies and lower electricity generating costs. For a flexible and more economic operation of such a power plant, it is necessary to develop thermal energy storage systems for the extension of the production time of the power plant. In the case of steam as the heat transfer fluid, it is important to use a storage material that uses latent heat for the storage process. This leads to a minimum of exergy losses during the storage process. In the case of a concentrating solar power plant, superheated steam is needed during the discharging process. This steam cannot be superheated by the latent heat storage system. Therefore, a sensible molten salt storage system is used for this task. In contrast to the state-of-the-art thermal energy storages within the concentrating solar power area of application, a storage system for a direct steam generation plant consists of a latent and a sensible storage part. Thus far, no partial load behaviors of sensible and latent heat storage systems have been analyzed in detail. In this work, an optimized fin structure was developed in order to minimize the costs of the latent heat storage. A complete system simulation of the power plant process, including the solar field, power block and sensible and latent heat energy storage calculates the interaction between the solar field, the power block and the thermal energy storage system.

  15. Heat Balance Study on Integrated Cycles for Hydrogen and Electricity Generation in VHTR

    Lee, Sang Il; Yoo, Yeon Jae [Hyundai Engineering Company Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyunyoung; Park, Soyoung; Kang, Yeon Kwan [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A gas cooled reactor has the advantage of being able to create a higher temperature coolant than a water cooled reactor. We can take advantage of supplying electricity as well as process heat. Recently, taking the export opportunity of a commercial nuclear power plants in UAE, Middle East area where politically stable and resource-rich seems promising for further nuclear business. Even if construction cost is more expensive than water cooled reactors, a high temperature gas cooled reactor is an attractive option from the viewpoint of safety. It can reduce the domestic use of fossil fuels and secure power and water, which is the most important part of people's daily life. All- Electrical Mode (AEM) operates only for the purpose of electricity generation. Rated Cogeneration Mode (RCM) uses approximately 60% of the total flow as process heat. We use a part flow exiting the high pressure turbine of end portion to the process heat, and the flow channel to a heat exchanger and a deaerator is changed at this time. Turbine Bypass Mode (TBM) will be used to supply the process heat by blocking all flow to the turbines.

  16. Heat Balance Study on Integrated Cycles for Hydrogen and Electricity Generation in VHTR

    Lee, Sang Il; Yoo, Yeon Jae; Heo, Gyunyoung; Park, Soyoung; Kang, Yeon Kwan

    2015-01-01

    A gas cooled reactor has the advantage of being able to create a higher temperature coolant than a water cooled reactor. We can take advantage of supplying electricity as well as process heat. Recently, taking the export opportunity of a commercial nuclear power plants in UAE, Middle East area where politically stable and resource-rich seems promising for further nuclear business. Even if construction cost is more expensive than water cooled reactors, a high temperature gas cooled reactor is an attractive option from the viewpoint of safety. It can reduce the domestic use of fossil fuels and secure power and water, which is the most important part of people's daily life. All- Electrical Mode (AEM) operates only for the purpose of electricity generation. Rated Cogeneration Mode (RCM) uses approximately 60% of the total flow as process heat. We use a part flow exiting the high pressure turbine of end portion to the process heat, and the flow channel to a heat exchanger and a deaerator is changed at this time. Turbine Bypass Mode (TBM) will be used to supply the process heat by blocking all flow to the turbines

  17. Load averaging system for co-generation plant; Jikayo hatsuden setsubi ni okeru fuka heijunka system

    Ueno, Y. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-07-30

    MAZDA Motor Corp. planed the construction of a 20.5MW co-generation plant in 1991 for responding to an increase in power demand due to expansion of the Hofu factory. On introduction of this co-generation plant, it was decided that the basic system would adopt the following. (1) A circulating fluidized bed boiler which can be operated by burning multiple kinds of fuels with minimum environmental pollution. (2) A heat accumulation system which can be operated through reception of a constant power from electric power company despite a sudden and wide range change in power demand. (3) A circulating-water exchange heat recovery system which recovers exhaust heat of the turbine plant as the hot water to be utilized for heating and air-conditioning of the factory mainly in winter. Power demand in MAZDA`s Hofu factory changes 15% per minute within a maximum range from 20MW to 8MW. This change is difficult to be followed even by an oil burning boiler excellent in load follow-up. The circulating Fluidized bed boiler employed this time is lower in the follow-up performance than the oil boiler. For the newly schemed plant, however, load averaging system named a heat accumulation system capable of responding fully to the above change has been developed. This co-generation plant satisfied the official inspection before commercial operation according the Ministerial Ordinance in 1993. Since then, with regard to the rapid load following, which was one of the initial targets, operation is now performed steadily. This paper introduces an outline of the system and operation conditions. 10 refs.

  18. Integrated biomass gasification combined cycle distributed generation plant with reciprocating gas engine and ORC

    Kalina, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    The paper theoretically investigates the performance of a distributed generation plant made up of gasifier, Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) machine as a bottoming unit. The system can be used for maximization of electricity production from biomass in the case where there is no heat demand for cogeneration plant. To analyze the performance of the gasifier a model based on the thermodynamic equilibrium approach is used. Performance of the gas engine is estimated on the basis of the analysis of its theoretical thermodynamic cycle. Three different setups of the plant are being examined. In the first one the ORC module is driven only by the heat recovered from engine exhaust gas and cooling water. Waste heat from a gasifier is used for gasification air preheating. In the second configuration a thermal oil circuit is applied. The oil transfers heat from engine and raw gas cooler into the ORC. In the third configuration it is proposed to apply a double cascade arrangement of the ORC unit with a two-stage low temperature evaporation of working fluid. This novel approach allows utilization of the total waste heat from the low temperature engine cooling circuit. Two gas engines of different characteristics are taken into account. The results obtained were compared in terms of electric energy generation efficiency of the system. The lowest obtained value of the efficiency was 23.6% while the highest one was 28.3%. These are very favorable values in comparison with other existing small and medium scale biomass-fuelled power generation plants. - Highlights: →The study presents performance analysis of a biomass-fuelled local power plant. →Downdraft wood gasifier, gas engine and ORC module are modelled theoretically. →Method for estimation of the producer gas fired engine performance is proposed. →Two gas engines of different characteristics are taken into account. →Different arrangements of the bottoming ORC cycle ere examined.

  19. First Experience from the World Largest fully commercial Solar Heating Plant

    Heller, Alfred; Furbo, Simon

    1997-01-01

    The first experience from the largest solar heating plant in the world is given. The plant is situated in Marstal and is has a total area of 8000 square m.......The first experience from the largest solar heating plant in the world is given. The plant is situated in Marstal and is has a total area of 8000 square m....

  20. Cascade: a review of heat transport and plant design issues

    Murray, K.A.; McDowell, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop for Cascade, a centrifugal-action solid-breeder reaction chamber, has been investigated and results are presented. The Cascade concept, a double-cone-shaped reaction chamber, rotates along its horizontal axis. Solid Li 2 O or other lithium-ceramic granules are injected tangentially through each end of the chamber. The granules cascade axially from the smaller radii at the ends to the larger radius at the center, where they are ejected into a stationary granule catcher. Heat and tritium are then removed from the granules and the granules are reinjected into the chamber. A 50% dense Li 2 O granule throughput of 2.8 m 3 /s is transferred from the reaction chamber to the steam generators via continuous bucket elevators. The granules then fall by gravity through 4 vertical steam generators. The entire transport system is maintained at the same vacuum conditions present inside the reaction chamber

  1. Ways to achieve optimum utilization of waste gas heat in cement kiln plants with cyclone preheaters

    Steinbiss, E

    1986-02-01

    Kiln exit gases and the exhaust gases from clinker coolers often cannot be fully utilized in drying plants. In such cases a part of the heat content of the gases should be utilized for water heating. In addition, it is possible to utilize the waste gas heat in conventional steam boilers, with which, depending on design, it is possible to generate electricity at a rate of between 10-30 kWh/t (net output). A new and promising method of utilization of waste gas heat is provided by precalcining systems with bypass, in which up to 100% of the kiln exit gases can be economically bypassed and be utilized in a steam boiler, without requiring any cooling. A development project, already started, gives information on the operational behaviour of such a plant and on the maximum energy recoverable. Alternatively, the bypass gases may, after partial cooling with air or preheater exit gas, be dedusted and then utilized in a grinding/drying plant. Furthermore, they can be used in the cement grinding process for the drying of wet granulated blastfurnace slag or other materials. For this it is not necessary to dedust the bypass gases.

  2. Exergy analysis and evolutionary optimization of boiler blowdown heat recovery in steam power plants

    Vandani, Amin Mohammadi Khoshkar; Bidi, Mokhtar; Ahmadi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Heat recovery of boiler blow downed water using a flash tank is modeled. • Exergy destruction of each component is calculated. • Exergy efficiency of the whole system is optimized using GA and PSO algorithms. • Utilizing the flash tank increases the net power and efficiency of the system. - Abstract: In this study, energy and exergy analyses of boiler blowdown heat recovery are performed. To evaluate the effect of heat recovery on the system performance, a steam power plant in Iran is selected and the results of implementation of heat recovery system on the power plant are investigated. Also two different optimization algorithms including GA and PSO are established to increase the plant efficiency. The decision variables are extraction pressure from steam turbine and temperature and pressure of boiler outlet stream. The results indicate that using blowdown recovery technique, the net generated power increases 0.72%. Also energy and exergy efficiency of the system increase by 0.23 and 0.22, respectively. The optimization results show that temperature and pressure of boiler outlet stream have a higher effect on the exergy efficiency of the system in respect to the other decision variables. Using optimization methods, exergy efficiency of the system reaches to 30.66% which shows a 1.86% augmentation with regard to the situation when a flash tank is implemented.

  3. Design precautions for coupling interfaces between nuclear heating reactor and heating grid or desalination plant

    Zheng Wenxiang

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear heating reactor (NHR) has been developed by INET since the early eighties. To achieve its economic viability and safety goal, the NHR is designed with a number of advanced and innovative features, including integrated arrangement, natural circulation, self-pressurized performance, dynamically hydraulic control rod drive and passive safety systems. As a new promising energy system, the NHR can serve for district heating, air conditioning, sea-water desalination and other industrial processes. For all of these applications, it is vital that the design and performance of the coupling interfaces shall insure protection of user ends against radioactive contamination. Therefore, an intermediate circuit is provided in the NHR as a physical barrier, and the operating pressure in the intermediate circuit is higher than that in the primary system. In addition, the radioactivity in the intermediate circuit is monitored continuously, and there are also other protection measures in the design for isolating the intermediate circuit and the heating grid or desalination plant under some emergency conditions. The excellent performance of the above design precautions for the coupling interfaces has been demonstrated by operational practice from the NHR-5, a 5 MW(thermal) experimental NHR, which was put into operation in 1989. This paper presents the main design features of the NHR as well as the special provisions taken in the design for coupling the NHR to the heating grid or desalination plant and some operating experience from the NHR-5. (author)

  4. Turbines, generators and associated plant incorporating modern power system practice

    Littler, DJ

    1992-01-01

    The introduction of new 500 MW and 660 MW turbine generator plant in nuclear, coal- and oil-fired power stations has been partly responsible for the increase in generating capacity of the CEGB over the last 30 years. This volume provides a detailed account of experience gained in the development, design, manufacture, operation and testing of large turbine-generators in the last 20 years. With the advance in analytical and computational techniques, the application of this experience to future design and operation of large turbine-generator plant will be of great value to engineers in the indust

  5. CONTAIN calculations of direct containment heating in the Surry plant

    Williams, D.C.; Louie, D.L.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The draft NUREG-1150 risk analysis performed for the Surry plant identified direct containment heating (DCH) as a potentially dominant contributor to the total public risk associated with this plant. At that time, however, detailed mechanistic calculations of DCH loads were unavailable. Subsequently, a series of analyses of DCH scenarios using the CONTAIN-DCH code was performed in order to put the treatment of DCH on a firmer basis in the final draft of NUREG-1150. The present paper describes some of the results obtained for the Surry plant. A developmental model for DCH has been incorporated into CONTAIN code. This model includes mechanistic treatments of reasonably well-understood phenomena (e.g., heat and mass transfer), together with a parametric treatment of poorly understood phenomena for which mechanistic models are unavailable (e.g., debris de-entrainment from the gas stream due to debris-structure interactions). The DCH model was described in an earlier report, but the present version incorporates a number of advances, including treatment of the chemical equilibria involved in the iron-steam reaction

  6. Solar heat collector-generator for cooling purposes

    Abdullah, K.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of an experimental LiBr-H2O solar collector powered absorption cooling system is described. A numerical model was developed of the energy, mass, and momentum balances across the heat-exchange loop to obtain the refrigerant vapor generation rate. The mechanism works by the thermosiphon principle, which eliminates mechanical devices from the loop. All leaks were fixed before measurements began with a test apparatus comprising a pyrex tube 1.87 m long with a 2.7 i.d. The refrigerant flow rate was monitored, along with temperature changes in the fluid and across the tube. Bubble initiation was observed from the free surface extending downward in the tube. Reynolds numbers varied from 6-43 in the liquid phase and 81-204 in the vapor phase. A formulation was made for the low-velocity two-phase flow and good agreement was demonstrated with the simulation.

  7. Management of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation

    Alter, U.

    1990-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany only one company is responsible for the management of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generations. This is the Company for Nuclear Service (GNS mbH). It was the intention of the competent authorities of the FRG to intensify state control during conditioning, intermediate storage and transport of low- and medium level radioactive waste. A guideline provides that the responsibility of the waste producers and of those concerned with conditioning, storage and transport of radioactive waste is assigned in the individual case and that the qualitative and quantitative registration of all waste streams will be ensured. An overview of the radioactive waste management within the last two years in the FRG is presented. (orig./DG)

  8. On the Analysis and Fault-Diagnosis Tools for Small-Scale Heat and Power Plants

    Arriagada, Jaime

    2003-12-01

    The deregulation of the electricity market drives utilities and independent power producers to operate heat and power plants as profit centers. In order to keep the economic margins on the credit side, the preferred measures have been to improve the electrical efficiency through changes in the hardware and boost the overall efficiency through e.g. combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The better understanding of global environmental issues is also pushing the development toward more advanced power plant technology that at the introduction stage may represent a risky option for the plant owner. Recently, there is a growing interest in improving the plant operation instead, and therefore the focus has been put on aspects related to the RAM (reliability-availability-maintenance) of the plants. Small- and mid-scale CHP plants, especially natural gas- and biomass-fueled, have been identified to be important to satisfy the needs of the energy market and help to mitigate the environmental factors in the short- and middle-term. One of the major challenges that these types of plants will face is attaining good RAM at the same time that they cannot support big O and M costs and a lot of personnel. Therefore the implementation of cheap and reliable IT-based tools that help to achieve this goal is essential. Most power plants today are equipped with modern distributed control systems that through a considerable number of sensors deliver large amounts of data to the control room. This paves the way to the introduction of intelligent tools - derived from the artificial intelligence technology - such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) and genetic algorithms (GA). ANNs have a learning ability that makes them useful for the construction of powerful non-physical models based on data from the process, while GA has shown to be a robust optimization method based on the principle of the 'survival-of-the-fittest'. Principally ANNs, but also to a lesser extent GA, have

  9. Prospects of heat supply from Temelin nuclear power plant

    Kuba, V.

    1987-01-01

    The possibilities are discussed of using the Temelin nuclear power plant for heat supply to a number of localities in the South Bohemian Region, to a distance of up to 34 km. Direct supply of steam and of 150/70 degC or 180/65 degC hot water is envisaged. An alternative solution has also been proposed allowing to supply steam and hot water simultaneously from 180 degC hot water with quantitative regulation. The hot water is made to expand at a pressure of 0.3 to 0.5 MPa and the low-pressure steam is compressed to a pressure of 0.9 to 1.3 MPa. This steam will be supplied to the existing heating system. The possibility was also studied of supplying Prague with heat and 180/65 degC hot water of a thermal output of up to 1,700 MW using a two-pipe heat supply line of 105 to 125 km in length. (B.S.). 2 figs

  10. Dual-cycle power plant with internal and external heating of a gas turbine circuit

    Strach, L.

    1976-01-01

    The present proposal, after a preceding invention by the same inventor, aims at making possible the increased use of gas turbines in nuclear and coal-fired power plants. This is to be achieved by bringing the temperature of the combustion easily from a maximum of 900 0 C, as may be supplied, e.g., by the cooling media of nuclear reactors, up to the 1,700 to 2,000 0 C required as inlet temperature for gas turbines, with the aid of a fossil-fired recuperator. In fossil and nuclear power plants, gas turbines will more and more substitute steam turbines which affect the environment because of their high waste-heat losses. In coal power plants, only that part of the coal will be gasified whose resulting gas causes internal combustion within the furnace, while the remaining part of the coal is used for external combustion in a tabular heater. In a nuclear power plant, undisturbed maximum generation of electric power is to be achieved, even at reactor outages and shutdown periods for refuelling and maintenance, by almost inertia-free increase of the fossil fuel supply to the furnace (provided an extension of the latter for the capacity of heating the combustion air from room temperature till 1,700 to 2,000 0 C). The hazard of ruptures in the primary heat exchanging system is very low, because it is operated with a relative pressure of nearly zero between reactor coolant and gas turbine circuit. (RW) [de

  11. Study of waste-heat recovery and utilization at the Farmington Municipal Power Plant. Final report, December 1, 1980-June 30, 1981

    Leigh, G.G.; Edgel, W.R.; Feldman, K.T. Jr.; Moss, E.J.

    1982-03-01

    An examination was made of the technical and economc feasibility of utilizing waste heat from the Farmington Municipal Power Plant. First, the production cycles of the natural-gas-fired plant were assessed to determine the quantity and quality of recoverable waste heat created by the plant during its operation. Possibilities for utilizing waste heat from the exhaust gases and the cooling water were then reviewed. Hot water systems that can be used to retrieve heat from hot flue gases were investigated; the heated water can then be used for space heating of nearby buildings. The potential use of waste heat to operate a refrigeration plant was also analyzed. The use of discharged cooling water for hydroelectric generation was studied, as well as its application for commercial agricultural and aquaculture enterprises.

  12. Korea's choice of a new generation of nuclear plants

    Redding, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The ABWR and SBWR design, both under development at GE, provide the best platform for developing the next generation advanced plants. The ABWR, which is rapidly setting the standard for new nuclear reactor plants, is clearly the best choice to meet the present energy needs of Korea. And through a GE/Korea partnership to develop the plant of the next century, Korea will establish itself as a leader in innovative reactor technology

  13. Targeted enrichment strategies for next-generation plant biology

    Richard Cronn; Brian J. Knaus; Aaron Liston; Peter J. Maughan; Matthew Parks; John V. Syring; Joshua. Udall

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic advances offered by modem DNA sequencers continue to redefine the limits of what can be accomplished in comparative plant biology. Even with recent achievements, however, plant genomes present obstacles that can make it difficult to execute large-scale population and phylogenetic studies on next-generation sequencing platforms. Factors like large genome...

  14. Geothermal project will predetermine future of the Kosice heating plant

    Hirman, K.

    2003-01-01

    Geoterm, a.s. manager O. Halas describes economic and technical parameters of geothermal energy source by village Durkov near Kosice. It is planned to exploitate geothermal energy source for Kosicka heating plant (TEKO). Three basic variants of technical connecting to geothermal source are developed. Temperature at TEKO entrance should reach 125 degrees, annual heating energy supply will reach 2100 TJ and source output will reach 100 MWt, while admissible deviation at all indicators reaches 10%. The first geothermal energy should by supplied to TEKO in 2007. The investments overlapping 3 billions Slovak crowns are necessary to realize whole project. According to O. Halas a credit from World Bank guaranteed by state is crucial

  15. Generation IV nuclear plant design strategies

    Altin, V.

    2007-01-01

    In this presentation Generation IV nuclear reactor design criteria are examined under the light of known nuclear properties of fissile and fertile nuclei. Their conflicting nature is elucidated along with the resulting inevitability of a multitude of designs. The designs selected as candidates for further development are evaluated with respect to their potential to serve the different design criteria, thereby revealing their more difficult aspects of realization and the strong research challenges lying ahead

  16. Savannah River Plant Low-Level Waste Heat Utilization Project preliminary analysis. Volume I. Executive summary

    1978-11-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of capturing energy ejected in hot water at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) is presented. The cooling water, drawn from the river or a pond at the rate of 500,000 gallons per minute, is typically heated 80 0 F to about 150 0 F and is then allowed to cool in the atmosphere. The energy added to the water is equivalent to 20 million barrels of oil a year. This study reports that the reject heat can be used directly in an organic Rankine cycle system to evaporate fluids which drive electric generators. The output of one reactor can produce 45,000 kilowatts of electricity. Since the fuel is waste heat, an estimated 45% savings over conventional electric costs is possible over a thirty year period

  17. Savannah River Plant Low-Level Waste Heat Utilization Project preliminary analysis. Volume II. Options for capturing the waste heat

    1978-11-01

    Options for utilizing the heated SRP effluent are investigated. The temperature and availability characteristics of the heated effluent are analyzed. Technical options for energy recovery are discussed. A number of thermodynamic cycles that could generate electrical power using the energy in the heated SRP effluent are described. Conceptual designs for SRP application of two attractive options are presented. Other direct uses for the heated effluent, as heat sources for agriculture and aquaculture options are discussed

  18. Recycling of concrete generated from Nuclear Power Plant dismantling

    Ogawa, Hideo; Nawa, Toyoharu; Ishikura, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Reactor decommissioning required various technologies such as dismantling of facilities, decontamination, radioactivity measurement and recycling of dismantling wastes. This article discussed recycling of demolished concrete wastes. Dismantling of reactor building of large one unit of nuclear power plants would generate about 500 K tons of concrete wastes, about 98% of which was non-radioactive and could be used as base course material or backfill material after crushed to specified particle size. Since later part of 1990s, high quality recycled aggregate with specified limit of bone-dry density, water absorptivity and amount of fine aggregate had been developed from demolished concrete with 'Heat and rubbing method', 'Eccentric rotor method' and 'Screw grinding method' so as to separate cements attached to aggregate. Recycled aggregates were made from concrete debris with 'Jaw crusher' to particle size less than 40 mm and then particle size control or grinded by various grinding machines. Recycled fine aggregates made from crushing would have fragile site with cracks, air voids and bubbles. The author proposed quality improvement method to selectively separate fragile defects from recycled aggregates using weak grinding force, leaving attached pastes much and preventing fine particle generation as byproducts. This article outlined experiments to improve quality of recycled fine aggregates and their experimental results confirmed improvement of flow ability and compressive strength of mortal using recycled fine aggregates using 'Particle size selector' and 'Ball mill' so as to remove their fragile parts less than 2%. Mortal made from recycled fine aggregate could also prevent permeation of chloride ion. Recycled aggregate could be used for concrete instead of natural aggregate. (T. Tanaka)

  19. Modernization and efficiency of heat treatment and heating up plants; Modernisierung und Effizienz von Thermoprozessanlagen

    Wendt, Peter [LOI Thermprocess GmbH, Essen (Germany); Kuehn, Friedhelm [Ingenieurbuero fuer Waermebehandlung, Industrieoefen und Energieberatung, Muelheim (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    A goal of this contribution is to show, using examples of the thermal heat treatment industry and the thermal processing units used there (Beltype plants, routary hearth, walking hearth, walking beam, pusher type furnaces and gas carburizing plants as well as case hardening plants), which increases in efficiency within and outside of the actual thermal treatment process and the necessary thermal processing units for the order are available today. From the possibilities of the reduction of energy employment resulting from that, a high potential for the discharge of the environment can be derived. The economic effect concerning energy employment and saving possibilities will also be considered. Concluding, examples of case-hardening show which variants of a change of process present themselves partially in the future, in order to achieve substantial production increases and thus energy cost reductions. (orig.)

  20. Review of European regulatory and tariff experience with the sale of heat and electricity from combined heat and power plants

    Dyrelund, A.

    1991-12-01

    The Prince Edward Island Energy Corporation, Edmonton Power, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada and the Canadian Electrical Association commissioned a study to understand how electrical power and district heat from combined heat and power (CHP) plants is priced in Europe. Four northern European countries were investigated, Denmark, Germany, Sweden and Finland. These countries produce 45.8 TWh of power from combined heat and power plants, 7.1% of their annual consumption. In the case of Denmark, CHP accounts for 37.5% of its total power production. The energy situation in each country is reviewed using published statistics, and in particular the rapidly changing situation with regard to environmental and fuel taxes is examined. In order to obtain practical insights with regard to tariffs used by the various utilities, a series of generic examples were examined, supported by specific case studies. Technologies reviewed included: CHP from coal-fuelled extraction plant, CHP from coal-fuelled back pressure plant, waste heat from a municipal waste plant, and gas turbine with waste heat recovery. The benefits and risks associated with different tariff designs are discussed in detail including tariff formulae. This should enable interested parties to develop appropriate tariffs for combined heat and power plants in the context of current electrical utility policies. As a complement to the tariffs for combined heat and power plants, the design of district heating tariffs is also addressed. The typical concepts used in different countries are presented and discussed. 23 tabs

  1. Interactive economic analysis of small-scale heating plant

    Landen, R.A.; Sanders, D.L.; Douglas, B.H.

    1998-11-01

    This report contains the work that has been undertaken by LRZ Limited in pursuance of this agreement. The potential for small-scale biomass heating systems is identified, and surrounding issues relating to acceptance are discussed. Such systems are described, and the origins of capital and running costs examined. A full review of the calculation methods for boiler plant size and fuel consumption is made, and subsequently expounded in four varying case studies. The results of this work are discussed, and the final development of the computer models is reviewed, incorporating further refinements to the method. Finally, data not contained in the text is incorporated in comprehensive appendices. (author)

  2. The agricultural use of heat discharge by nuclear power plants

    Grauby, A.; Delmas, J.; Foulquier, L.; Guillermin, R.

    1977-01-01

    At a time in which energy savings are of prime importance, it is interesting to be able to offer a technique enabling the use of the heated waters leaving the cooling circuits of electric power plants. Satisfactory and positive results have been obtained by the Environmental Research Service, in the area of open field farming as well as in pisciculture. The use of a network of buried pipes conveying the hot water leads to greater crop yields, off-season scheduling of early and late varieties to benefit from favorable market prices, together with the possibility of adapting priority industrial crops such as soya to our climates [fr

  3. Structural steels for power generating equipment and heat and chemical heat treatments

    Astaf'ev, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    Development of structural steels for power generating equipment and for reactor engineering, in particular, is elucidated. Noted is utilization of the 15Kh2NMFA steels for the WWER-1000 reactor vessels, the 10GN2MFA steels for steam generators, pressurizers, vessels of the automatic emergency shut down and safety system; the 00Kh12N3DL steel for cast pump vessels and main locking bars. The recommendations on heat treatment of big forgings, for instance, ensuring the necessary complex of mechanical properties are given. Diffusion chromizing with subsequent nitriding of austenitic steels which increase durability of the components in BN reactors more than 4 times, is practised on a large scale

  4. Heat transfer characteristics of porous sludge deposits and their impact on the performance of commercial steam generators

    Kreider, M.A.; White, G.A.; Varrin, R.D.; Ouzts, P.J.

    1998-12-01

    Steam generator (SG) fouling, in the form of corrosion deposits on the secondary sides of SG tubes, has been known to occur in almost all commercial US nuclear PWR (pressurized water reactor) plants. The level of fouling, as measured by the quantity of corrosion products that form, varies widely from plant to plant. In addition, the effect of SG fouling, as measured by a decrease in effective heat-transfer coefficient, has also varied substantially among commercial US plants. While some have observed large decreases in heat transfer, others have noted little change in performance despite the presence of significant quantities of secondary corrosion layers on their SG tubes. This observation has led to considerable confusion about what role secondary deposits play in causing heat-transfer degradation in SGs. As will become clear later in this report, secondary deposits can have a wide range of effects on heat transfer, from highly resistive to slightly enhancing (reflected by negative fouling). These different behaviors are the result of differences in deposit thickness, composition, and morphology. The main focus of this report is an investigation of the effects of secondary deposits on SG thermal performance. This investigation includes compilation of detailed information on the properties of tube scale at five commercial US nuclear plants and corresponding information characterizing SG thermal performance at these plants

  5. Farm effluent plant produces gas for domestic heat and power

    1963-01-01

    A plant for treating farm waste waters, developed by Wright Rain Ltd. and based on a prototype plant invented by J. Fry which has been in continuous use for 5 years on a pig farm at Rietvlei, Johannesburg, is described. Manure is pumped into one end of the digestion tank about one-third of the way up the tank, and anaerobic decomposition occurs at a controlled temperature (optimum 35/sup 0/C); the gas rises to the top and is collected in gas holders to be utilized for domestic heat and power, while an outlet near the bottom of the tank allows decomposed matter to be drawn off for spreading. Results with pig manure suggest that a digestion tank should be planned for a 60-day cycle. Cow and pig manure can be digested without difficulty, but it would be necessary to add water to chicken manure for successful digestion.

  6. A dynamic analysis of interfuel substitution for Swedish heating plants

    Braennlund, Runar; Lundgren, Tommy

    2004-01-01

    This paper estimates a dynamic model of interfuel substitution for Swedish heating plants. We use the cost share linear logit model developed by Considine and Mount [Considine, T.J., Mount, T.D., 1984. The use of linear logit models for dynamic input demand systems. Review of Economics and Statistics 66, 434-443]. All estimated own-price elasticities are negative and all cross-price elasticities are positive. The estimated dynamic adjustment rate parameter is small, however, increasing with the size of the plant and time, indicating fast adjustments in the fuel mix when changing relative fuel prices. The estimated model is used to illustrate the effects of two different policy changes

  7. Test and evaluation of Alco/BLH prototype sodium-heated steam generator. Final report

    Kaplan, C.J.; Auge, L.J.; Cho, S.M.; Hanna, R.W.; Prevost, J.R.; Steger, N.A.; Wagner, R.K.

    1971-01-31

    A 30-Mwt prototype sodium-to-sodium intermediate heat exchanger and a 30-Mwt prototype sodium-heated steam generator were tested in combined operation in its Sodium Components Test Installation. This report contains the results of test and evaluation of the steam generator. During plant performance tests, performance degradation was observed, which resulted in the initiation of a diagnostic test series. This test series revealed that under certain operating conditions, the thermohydraulic characteristic of the steam generator changed either suddenly or gradually, resulting in overall performance degradation. A structural failure, requiring retirement of the unit, occurred before the diagnostic test series and analytical support effort were completed. This report describes the thermohydraulic and structural performance, including the structural failures, and related evaluation analyses of the Alco/BLH prototype steam generator performed prior to termination of the test and evaluation program. In addition, the report presents a post-test examination plan to obtain data that could possibly explain the cause of performance anomalies and structural failures experienced during testing.

  8. Microbiome selection could spur next-generation plant breeding strategies

    Murali Gopal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants, though sessile, have developed a unique strategy to counter biotic and abiotic stresses by symbiotically co-evolving with microorganisms and tapping into their genome for this purpose. Soil is the bank of microbial diversity from which a plant selectively sources its microbiome to suit its needs. Besides soil, seeds, which carry the genetic blueprint of plants during trans-generational propagation, are home to diverse microbiota that acts as the principal source of microbial inoculum in crop cultivation. Overall, a plant is ensconced both on the outside and inside with a diverse assemblage of microbiota. Together, the plant genome and the genes of the microbiota that the plant harbours in different plant tissues i.e the ‘plant microbiome’, form the holobiome which is now considered as unit of selection: ‘the holobiont’. The ‘plant microbiome’ not only helps plants to remain fit but also offers critical genetic variability, hitherto, not employed in the breeding strategy by plant breeders, who traditionally have exploited the genetic variability of the host for developing high yielding or disease tolerant or drought resistant varieties. This fresh knowledge of the microbiome, particularly of the rhizosphere, offering genetic variability to plants, opens up new horizons for breeding that could usher in cultivation of next-generation crops depending less on inorganic inputs, resistant to insect pest and diseases and resilient to climatic perturbations. We surmise, from ever increasing evidences, that plants and their microbial symbionts need to be co-propagated as life-long partners in future strategies for plant breeding.

  9. Development project HTR-electricity-generating plant, concept design of an advanced high-temperature reactor steam cycle plant with spherical fuel elements (HTR-K)

    1978-07-01

    The report gives a survey of the principal work which was necessary to define the design criteria, to determine the main design data, and to design the principal reactor components for a large steam cycle plant. It is the objective of the development project to establish a concept design of an edvanced steam cycle plant with a pebble bed reactor to permit a comparison with the direct-cycle-plant and to reach a decision on the concept of a future high-temperature nuclear power plant. It is tried to establish a largerly uniform basic concept of the nuclear heat-generating systems for the electricity-generating and the process heat plant. (orig.) [de

  10. Summary of results from sodium-heated steam generator test program

    McDonald, J S

    1975-07-01

    A 28 MWt sodium-heated steam generator test unit developed and fabricated by Atomics International was operated in the Sodium Component Test Installation. The SCTI is located at the Liquid Metal Engineering Center which is operated for the Atomic Energy Commission by Atomics International, Reviewed in this paper are the results of the test operations and the findings of the post-test examination of the module. Testing was performed to assure the mechanical integrity of the unit over a wide range of simulated plant operating conditions and to develop a variety of performance data. Specific tests conducted included preheat, vibration, startup-shutdown, pressurization, steady state and parametric performance mapping, endurance, simulated leak injection, low- flow stability and simulated plant transients. (author)

  11. MicroRNA160 Modulates Plant Development and Heat Shock Protein Gene Expression to Mediate Heat Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    Jeng-Shane Lin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is causing a negative impact on plant growth and adversely impacts on crop yield. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are critical in regulating the expression of genes involved in plant development as well as defense responses. The effects of miRNAs on heat-stressed Arabidopsis warrants further investigation. Heat stress increased the expression of miR160 and its precursors but considerably reduced that of its targets, ARF10, ARF16, and ARF17. To study the roles of miR160 during heat stress, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing miR160 precursor a (160OE and artificial miR160 (MIM160, which mimics an inhibitor of miR160, were created. T-DNA insertion mutants of miR160 targets were also used to examine their tolerances to heat stress. Results presented that overexpressing miR160 improved seed germination and seedling survival under heat stress. The lengths of hypocotyl elongation and rachis were also longer in 160OE than the wild-type (WT plants under heat stress. Interestingly, MIM160 plants showed worse adaption to heat. In addition, arf10, arf16, and arf17 mutants presented similar phenotypes to 160OE under heat stress to advance abilities of thermotolerance. Moreover, transcriptome and qRT-PCR analyses revealed that HSP17.6A, HSP17.6II, HSP21, and HSP70B expression levels were regulated by heat in 160OE, MIM160, arf10, arf16, and arf17 plants. Hence, miR160 altered the expression of the heat shock proteins and plant development to allow plants to survive heat stress.

  12. Ocean thermal gradient as a generator of electricity. OTEC power plant

    Enrique, Luna-Gomez Victor; Angel, Alatorre-Mendieta Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) is a power plant that uses the thermal gradient of the sea water between the surface and a depth of about 700 meters. It works by supplying the heat to a steam machine, for evaporation, with sea water from the surface and cold, to condense the steam, with deep sea water. The energy generated by the power plant OTEC can be transferred to the electric power grid, another use is to desalinate seawater. During the twentieth century in some countries experimental power plants to produce electricity or obtaining drinking water they were installed. On the Mexico's coast itself this thermal gradient, as it is located in tropical seas it occurs, so it has possibilities of installing OTEC power plant type. In this paper one type OTEC power plant operation is represented in most of its components.

  13. Analysis of the internal heat losses in a thermoelectric generator

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn; Eriksen, Dan

    2014-01-01

    and radiative heat losses, including surface to surface radiation. For radiative heat losses it is shown that for the temperatures considered here, surface to ambient radiation is a good approximation of the heat loss. For conductive heat transfer the module efficiency is shown to be comparable to the case...... of radiative losses. Finally, heat losses due to internal natural convection in the module is shown to be negligible for the millimetre sized modules considered here. The combined case of radiative and conductive heat transfer resulted in the lowest efficiency. The optimized load resistance is found...... to decrease for increased heat loss. The leg dimensions are varied for all heat losses cases and it is shown that the ideal way to construct a TEG module with minimal heat losses and maximum efficiency is to either use a good insulating material between the legs or evacuate the module completely, and use...

  14. A Critical Heat Generation for Safe Nuclear Fuels after a LOCA

    Jae-Yong Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study applies a thermo-elasto-plastic-creep finite element procedure to the analysis of an accidental behavior of nuclear fuel as well as normal behavior. The result will be used as basic data for the robust design of nuclear power plant and fuels. We extended the range of mechanical strain from small or medium to large adopting the Hencky logarithmic strain measure in addition to the Green-Lagrange strain and Almansi strain measures, for the possible large strain situation in accidental environments. We found that there is a critical heat generation after LOCA without ECCS (event category 5, under which the cladding of fuel sustains the internal pressure and temperature for the time being for the rescue of the power plant. With the heat generation above the critical value caused by malfunctioning of the control rods, the stiffness of cladding becomes zero due to the softening by high temperature. The weak position of cladding along the length continuously bulges radially to burst and to discharge radioactive substances. This kind of cases should be avoid by any means.

  15. Microbiome Selection Could Spur Next-Generation Plant Breeding Strategies.

    Gopal, Murali; Gupta, Alka

    2016-01-01

    " No plant is an island too …" Plants, though sessile, have developed a unique strategy to counter biotic and abiotic stresses by symbiotically co-evolving with microorganisms and tapping into their genome for this purpose. Soil is the bank of microbial diversity from which a plant selectively sources its microbiome to suit its needs. Besides soil, seeds, which carry the genetic blueprint of plants during trans-generational propagation, are home to diverse microbiota that acts as the principal source of microbial inoculum in crop cultivation. Overall, a plant is ensconced both on the outside and inside with a diverse assemblage of microbiota. Together, the plant genome and the genes of the microbiota that the plant harbors in different plant tissues, i.e., the 'plant microbiome,' form the holobiome which is now considered as unit of selection: 'the holobiont.' The 'plant microbiome' not only helps plants to remain fit but also offers critical genetic variability, hitherto, not employed in the breeding strategy by plant breeders, who traditionally have exploited the genetic variability of the host for developing high yielding or disease tolerant or drought resistant varieties. This fresh knowledge of the microbiome, particularly of the rhizosphere, offering genetic variability to plants, opens up new horizons for breeding that could usher in cultivation of next-generation crops depending less on inorganic inputs, resistant to insect pest and diseases and resilient to climatic perturbations. We surmise, from ever increasing evidences, that plants and their microbial symbionts need to be co-propagated as life-long partners in future strategies for plant breeding. In this perspective, we propose bottom-up approach to co-propagate the co-evolved, the plant along with the target microbiome, through - (i) reciprocal soil transplantation method, or (ii) artificial ecosystem selection method of synthetic microbiome inocula, or (iii) by exploration of microRNA transfer

  16. Automatic ID heat load generation in ANSYS code

    Wang, Zhibi.

    1992-01-01

    Detailed power density profiles are critical in the execution of a thermal analysis using a finite element (FE) code such as ANSYS. Unfortunately, as yet there is no easy way to directly input the precise power profiles into ANSYS. A straight-forward way to do this is to hand-calculate the power of each node or element and then type the data into the code. Every time a change is made to the FE model, the data must be recalculated and reentered. One way to solve this problem is to generate a set of discrete data, using another code such as PHOTON2, and curve-fit the data. Using curve-fitted formulae has several disadvantages. It is time consuming because of the need to run a second code for generation of the data, curve-fitting, and doing the data check, etc. Additionally, because there is no generality for different beamlines or different parameters, the above work must be repeated for each case. And, errors in the power profiles due to curve-fitting result in errors in the analysis. To solve the problem once and for all and with the capability to apply to any insertion device (ID), a program for ED power profile was written in ANSYS Parametric Design Language (APDL). This program is implemented as an ANSYS command with input parameters of peak magnetic field, deflection parameter, length of ID, and distance from the source. Once the command is issued, all the heat load will be automatically generated by the code

  17. Strain measurements of nuclear power plant steam generator antiseismic supports

    Kulichevsky, R.

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear power plants steam generators have different types of structural supports. One of these types are the antiseismic supports, which are intended to be under stress only if a seismic event takes place. Nevertheless, the antiseismic supports lugs, that are welded to the steam generator vessel, are subjected to thermal fatigue because of the temperature cycles related with the shut down and start up operations performed during the life of the nuclear power plant. In order to evaluate the stresses that the lugs are subjected to, several strain gages were welded on two supports lugs, positioned at two heights of one of the Embalse nuclear power plant steam generators. In this paper, the instrumentation used and the strain measurements obtained during two start up operations are presented. The influence of the plant start up operation parameters on the lugs strain evolution is also analyzed. (author) [es

  18. Investment in new power generation under uncertainty: Benefits of CHP vs. condensing plants in a copula-based analysis

    Westner, Günther; Madlener, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we apply a spread-based real options approach to analyze the decision-making problem of an investor who has the choice between an irreversible investment in a condensing power plant without heat utilization and a plant with combined heat-and-power (CHP) generation. Our investigation focuses on large-scale fossil-fueled generation technologies and is based on a stochastic model that uses copula functions to provide the input parameters of the real options model. We define the aggregated annual spread as assessment criteria for our investigation since it contains all relevant volatile input parameters that have an impact on the evaluation of investment decisions. We show that the specific characteristics of CHP plants, such as additional revenues from heat sales, promotion schemes, specific operational features, and a beneficial allocation of CO 2 allowances, have a significant impact on the option value and therefore on the optimal timing for investment. For the two fossil-fueled CHP technologies investigated (combined-cycle gas turbine and steam turbine), we conclude from our analysis that a high share of CHP generation reduces the risk exposure for the investor. The maximal possible CHP generation depends significantly on the local heat demand in the surroundings of the power plant. Considering this, the size of the heat sink available could gain more relevance in the future selection process of sites for new large-scale fossil power plants.

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    P. E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    None

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented

  1. Heat shock and plant leachates regulate seed germination of the endangered carnivorous plant Drosophyllum lusitanicum

    S. Gómez-González

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In fire-prone ecosystems, many plant species have specialized mechanisms of seed dormancy that ensure a successful recruitment after fire. A well-documented mechanism is the germination stimulated by fire-related cues, such as heat shock and smoke. However, less is known about the role of inhibitory germination signals (e.g. allelopathy in regulating post-fire recruitment. Plant leachates derived from the unburned vegetation can enforce dormancy by means of allelopathic compounds, acting as a signal of unfavourable (highly competitive niche for germination in pyrophyte species. Here, we assessed the separate effects of heat shock and plant leachates on seed germination of Drosophyllum lusitanicum, an endangered carnivorous plant endemic to Mediterranean fire-prone heathlands. We performed a germination experiment in which seeds were subjected to three treatments: (1 5 min at 100 °C, (2 watering with plant leachate, and (3 control. Germination rate and seed viability was determined after 63 days. Heat shock stimulated seed germination in D. lusitanicum while plant leachates had inhibitory germination effects without reducing seed viability. Thus, both positive and negative signals could be involved in its successful post-fire recruitment. Fire would break seed dormancy and stimulate seed germination of D. lusitanicum through high temperatures, but also by eliminating allelochemical compounds from the soil. These results help to understand the population dynamics patterns found for D. lusitanicum in natural populations, and highlight the role of fire in the ecology and conservation of this endangered species. Seed dormancy imposed by plant-derived leachates as an adaptive mechanism should be considered more in fire ecology theory.

  2. Energy and exergy analysis of the Kalina cycle for use in concentrated solar power plants with direct steam generation

    Knudsen, Thomas; Clausen, Lasse Røngaard; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    In concentrated solar power plants using direct steam generation, the usage of a thermal storage unit based only on sensible heat may lead to large exergetic losses during charging and discharging, due to a poor matching of the temperature profiles. By the use of the Kalina cycle, in which...... evaporation and condensation takes place over a temperature range, the efficiency of the heat exchange processes can be improved, possibly resulting also in improved overall performance of the system. This paper is aimed at evaluating the prospect of using the Kalina cycle for concentrated solar power plants...... with direct steam generation. The following two scenarios were addressed using energy and exergy analysis: generating power using heat from only the receiver and using only stored heat. For each of these scenarios comparisons were made for mixture concentrations ranging from 0.1 mole fraction of ammonia to 0...

  3. Integration of solar process heat into an existing thermal desalination plant in Qatar

    Dieckmann, S.; Krishnamoorthy, G.; Aboumadi, M.; Pandian, Y.; Dersch, J.; Krüger, D.; Al-Rasheed, A. S.; Krüger, J.; Ottenburger, U.

    2016-05-01

    The water supply of many countries in the Middle East relies mainly on water desalination. In Qatar, the water network is completely fed with water from desalination plants. One of these power and desalination plants is located in Ras Abu Fontas, 20 km south of the capital Doha. The heat required for thermal desalination is provided by steam which is generated in waste heat recovery boilers (HRB) connected to gas turbines. Additionally, gas fired boilers or auxiliary firing in the HRBs are used in order to decouple the water generation from the electricity generation. In Ras Abu Fontas some auxiliary boilers run 24/7 because the HRB capacity does not match the demand of the desalination units. This paper contains the techno-economic analysis of two large-scale commercial solar field options, which could reduce the fuel consumption significantly. Both options employ parabolic trough technology with a nominal saturated steam output of 350 t/h at 15 bar (198°C, 240 MW). The first option uses direct steam generation without storage while the second relies on common thermal oil in combination with a molten salt thermal storage with 6 hours full-load capacity. The economic benefit of the integration of solar power depends mainly on the cost of the fossil alternative, and thus the price (respectively opportunity costs) of natural gas. At a natural gas price of 8 US-/MMBtu the internal rate of return on equity (IRR) is expected at about 5%.

  4. Photovoltaic and Hydrogen Plant Integrated with a Gas Heat Pump for Greenhouse Heating: A Mathematical Study

    Alexandros Sotirios Anifantis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the traditional energy sources used for greenhouse heating are fossil fuels such as LPG, diesel and natural gas. The global energy demand will continue to grow and alternative technologies need to be developed in order to improve the sustainability of crop production in protected environments. Innovative solutions are represented by renewable energy plants such as photovoltaic, wind and geothermal integrated systems, however, these technologies need to be connected to the power grid in order to store the energy produced. On agricultural land, power grids are not widespread and stand-alone renewable energy systems should be investigated especially for greenhouse applications. The aim of this research is to analyze, by means of a mathematical model, the energy efficiency of a photovoltaic (8.2 kW, hydrogen (2.5 kW and ground source gas heat pump (2.2 kW integrated in a stand-alone system used for heating an experimental greenhouse tunnel (48 m2 during the winter season. A yearlong energy performance analysis was conducted for three different types of greenhouse cover materials, a single layer polyethylene film, an air inflated-double layer polyethylene film, and a double acrylic or polycarbonate. The results of one year showed that the integrated system had a total energy efficiency of 14.6%. Starting from the electric energy supplied by the photovoltaic array, the total efficiency of the hydrogen and ground source gas heat pump system was 112% if the coefficient of the performance of the heat pump is equal to 5. The heating system increased the greenhouse air temperatures by 3–9 °C with respect to the external air temperatures, depending on the greenhouse cover material used.

  5. Increase net plant output through selective operation of the heat-rejection system

    Ostrowski, E.T.; Queenan, P.T.

    1987-01-01

    Depending on unit load and ambient meteorological conditions, a net increase of 800 to 5500 kW in plant output is possible for many generating units through optimized operation of the major motor-driven equipment in the heat-rejection system - the circulating water pumps and mechanical-draft cooling tower fans. This can be realised when the resulting decrease in auxiliary-power demand is greater than the decrease in gross electric generation caused by operating fewer pumps and/or fans. No capital expenditures are incurred and only operating procedures are involved so that the performance gains are achieved at no cost. The paper considers the application of this technique to nuclear power plants, pump optimization and the superimposition of fan and cooling tower performance curves

  6. Economic analysis of a small-sized combined heat and power plant using forest biomass in the Republic of Korea

    Yeongwan Seo; Han-Sup Han; Edward M. (Ted) Bilek; Jungkee Choi; Dusong Cha; Jungsoo Lee

    2017-01-01

    Economic analysis was conducted on the feasibility of operating a small-sized (500kW/hour) gasification power plant producing heat and electricity in a rural town surrounded by forests in the Republic of Korea. Cost factors that were considered over the plant’s 20-year life included wood procurement, a wood grab loader, a chipper, a chip dryer, a gasifier, a generator...

  7. Pilot plant for hydrogasification of coal with nuclear heat

    Falkenhain, G.; Velling, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the framework of a research and development programme sponsored by the Ministry of Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany, two process variants for hydrogasification of coal by means of nuclear heat have been developed by the Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG, Cologne. For testing these process variants a semi-technical pilot plant for gasification of coal under pressure in a fluidized bed was constructed. The pilot plant, in which the gasification of lignite and hard coal is planned, is designed for a throughput of 100kg carbon per hour corresponding to 400kg raw lignite per hour or 150kg hard coal per hour. The plant should provide data on the influence of the most essential process parameters (pressure, temperature, residence time of gas and coal, type and pre-treatment of feed coal) on the performance of gasification and raw gas composition. Different plant components will also be tested. Since the pilot plant will permit testing of both process variants of hydrogasification, it was designed in such a way that it is possible to vary a great number of process parameters. Thus, for instance, the pressure can be chosen in a range up to 100 bar and pure hydrogen or mixtures of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and steam can be applied as gasification agents. The gasifier is an internally insulated fluidized bed reactor with an inner diameter of 200mm and a height of about 8m, to which an internally insulated cyclone for separation of the entrained fines is attached. The raw gas is then cooled down by direct water scrubbing. (author)

  8. Pulse*Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor: heat transfer loop and balance of plant considerations

    McDowell, M.W.; Murray, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop and balance of plant design for the Pulse*Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor has been investigated and results are presented. The Pulse*Star reaction vessel, a perforated steel bell jar approximately 11 m in diameter, is immersed in Li 17 Pb 83 coolant which flows through the perforations and forms a 1.5 m thick plenum of droplets around an 8 m diameter inner chamber. The reactor and associated pumps, piping, and steam generators are contained within a 17 m diameter pool of Li 17 Pb 83 coolant to minimize structural requirements and occupied space, resulting in reduced cost. Four parallel heat transfer loops with flow rates of 5.5 m 3 /s each are necessary to transfer 3300 MWt of power. The steam generator design was optimized by finding the most cost-effective combination of heat exchanger area and pumping power. Power balance calculations based on an improved electrical conversion efficiency revealed a net electrical output of 1260 MWe to the bus bar and a resulting net efficiency of 39%. Suggested balance-of-plant layouts are also presented

  9. 78 FR 55117 - Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants; Draft Regulatory Guide

    2013-09-09

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0203] Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants; Draft... (DG), DG-1275, ``Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This regulatory guide (RG) describes methods and procedures acceptable to the NRC staff that nuclear power plant facility licensees and...

  10. Characterization of elevated temperature properties of heat exchanger and steam generator alloys

    Wright, J.K.; Carroll, L.J.; Cabet, C.; Lillo, T.M.; Benz, J.K.; Simpson, J.A.; Lloyd, W.R.; Chapman, J.A.; Wright, R.N.

    2012-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is considering Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 for steam generator and intermediate heat exchangers. It is envisioned that a steam generator would operate with reactor outlet temperatures from 750 to 800 °C, while an intermediate heat exchanger for primary to secondary helium would operate up to an outlet temperature of 950 °C. Although both alloys are of interest due in part to their technical maturity, a number of specific properties require further characterization for design of nuclear components. Strain rate sensitivity of both alloys has been characterized and is found to be significant above 600 °C. Both alloys also exhibit dynamic strain aging, characterized by serrated flow, over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. High temperature tensile testing of Alloy 617 and Alloy 800H has been conducted over a range of temperatures. Dynamic strain aging is a concern for these materials since it is observed to result in reduced ductility for many solid solution alloys. Creep, fatigue, and creep–fatigue properties of Alloy 617 have been measured as well, with the goal of determining the influence of the temperature, strain rate and atmosphere on the creep–fatigue life of Alloy 617. Elevated temperature properties and implications for codification of the alloys will be described.

  11. Characterization of Elevated Temperature Properties of Heat Exchanger and Steam Generator Alloys

    Wright, J.K.; Carroll, L.J.; Benz, J.K.; Simpson, J.A.; Wright, R.N.; Lloyd, W.R.; Chapman, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is considering Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 for steam generator and intermediate heat exchangers. It is envisioned that a steam generator would operate with reactor outlet temperatures from 750 to 800 C, while an intermediate heat exchanger for primary to secondary helium would operate up to an outlet temperature of 950 C. Although both alloys are of interest due in part to their technical maturity, a number of specific properties require further characterization for design of nuclear components. Strain rate sensitivity of both alloys has been characterized and is found to be significant above 600 C. Both alloys also exhibit dynamic strain aging, characterized by serrated flow, over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. In general dynamic strain aging is observed to begin at higher temperatures and serrated flow persists to higher temperatures in Alloy 617 compared to Alloy 800H. Dynamic strain aging is a concern for these materials since it is observed to result in reduced ductility for many solid solution alloys. The role of dynamic strain aging in the creep-fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 at temperatures of 800 C and above has also been examined in detail. Serrated flow is found to persist in cyclic stress-strain curves up to nearly the cycle to failure in some temperature and strain regimes. Results of those experiments and implications for creep-fatigue testing protocols will be described.

  12. Design and modelling of an innovative three-stage thermal storage system for direct steam generation CSP plants

    Garcia, Pierre; Vuillerme, Valéry; Olcese, Marco; El Mourchid, Nadim

    2016-05-01

    Thermal Energy Storage systems (TES) for a Direct Steam Generation (DSG) solar plant feature preferably three stages in series including a latent heat storage module so that steam can be recovered with a limited temperature loss. The storage system designed within the Alsolen Sup project is characterized by an innovative combination of sensible and latent modules. A dynamic model of this three-stage storage has been developed and applied to size the storage system of the Alsolen Sup® plant demonstrator at CEA Cadarache. Results of this simulation show that this promising concept is an efficient way to store heat in DSG solar plants.

  13. Comparison of the heat generation of light curing units.

    Bagis, Bora; Bagis, Yildirim; Ertas, Ertan; Ustaomer, Seda

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the heat generation of three different types of light curing units. Temperature increases were recorded from a distance of 1 mm from a thermocouple to the tip of three different types of light curing units including one quartz-tungsten halogen (QTH), one plasma arc (PAC), and one light emitting diode (LED) unit. An experimental model was designed to fix the 1 mm distance between the tip of the light curing units and the thermocouple wire. Temperature changes were recorded in 10 second intervals up to 40 seconds. (10, 20, 30, and 40 seconds). Temperature measurements were repeated three times for every light curing unit after a one hour standby period. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Bonferroni Test. The highest temperature rises (54.4+/-1.65 degrees C) occurred during activation of a PAC light curing unit for every test period (pdamage to the pulp.

  14. Voltage Control in Wind Power Plants with Doubly Fed Generators

    Garcia, Jorge Martinez

    In this work, the process of designing a wind power plant composed of; doubly fed induction generators, a static compensator unit, mechanically switched capacitors and on-load tap changer, for voltage control is shown. The selected control structure is based on a decentralized system, since...... supplied by the doubly fed induction generator wind turbines is overcome by installing a reactive power compensator, i.e. a static compensator unit, which is coordinated with the plant control by a specific dispatcher. This dispatcher is set according to the result of the wind power plant load flow....... To release the operation of the converters during steady-state disturbances, mechanically switched capacitors are installed in the wind power plant, which due to their characteristics, they are appropriate for permanent disturbances compensation. The mechanically switched capacitors are controlled to allow...

  15. Prototype plant for nuclear process heat (PNP), reference phase

    Fladerer, R.; Schrader, L.

    1982-07-01

    The coal gasification processes using nuclear process heat being developed within the framwork of the PNP project, have the advantages of saving feed coal, improving efficiency, reducing emissions, and stabilizing energy costs. One major gasification process is the hydrogasification of coal for producing SNG or gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; this process can also be applied in a conventional route. The first steps to develop this process were planning, construction and operation of a semi-technical pilot plant for hydrogasification of coal in a fluidized bed having an input of 100 kg C/h. Before the completion of the development phase (reference phase) describing here, several components were tested on part of which no operational experience had so far been gained; these were the newly developed devices, e.g. the inclined tube for feeding coal into the fluidized bed, and the raw gas/hydrogenation gas heat exchanger for utilizing the waste heat of the raw gas leaving the gasifier. Concept optimizing of the thoroughly tested equipment parts led to an improved operational behaviour. Between 1976 and 1980, the semi-technical pilot plant was operated for about 19,400 hours under test conditions, more than 7,400 hours of which it has worked under gasification conditions. During this time approx. 1,100 metric tons of dry brown coal and more than 13 metric tons of hard coal were gasified. The longest coherent operational phase under gasification conditions was 748 hours in which 85.4 metric tons of dry brown coal were gasified. Carbon gasification rates up to 82% and methane contents in the dry raw gas (free of N 2 ) up to 48 vol.% were obtained. A detailed evaluation of the test results provided information of the results obtained previously. For the completion of the test - primarily of long-term tests - the operation of the semi-technical pilot plant for hydrogasification of coal is to be continued up to September 1982. (orig.) [de

  16. Waste generation comparison: Coal-fired versus nuclear power plants

    LaGuardia, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste generation and disposal attract a great deal of attention whenever the nuclear industry is scrutinized by concerned parties, be it the media, the public, or political interests. It is therefore important to the nuclear industry that this issue be put into perspective relative to other current forms of energy production. Most of the country's fossil-fueled power comes from coal-fired plants, with oil and gas as other fuel sources. Most of the generated waste also comes from coal plants. This paper, therefore, compares waste quantities generated by a typical (1150-MW(electric)) pressurized water reactor (PWR) to that of a comparably sized coal-fired power plant

  17. The performance of a Solar Aided Power Generation plant with diverse “configuration-operation” combinations

    Qin, Jiyun; Hu, Eric; Nathan, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Four configurations of solar preheaters have been proposed. • Three typical operation strategies of solar preheaters have been identified. • 12 “configuration-operation” combinations has been proposed. • There are superior combinations to achieve the highest solar thermal performance. - Abstract: Solar Aided Power Generation is an efficient way to integrate solar thermal energy into a fossil fuel fired power plant for solar power generation purposes. In this particular power plant, the solar heat is used to displace the extraction steam to preheat the feedwater to the boiler. The heat exchanger, which facilitates the heat exchange between the solar heat carried by the heat transfer fluid and the feedwater, is termed a solar preheater. Four possible configurations of the solar preheater, namely Parallel 1, Parallel 2, Series 1 and Series 2, are proposed in this paper. In this type of plant, the extraction steam flow rates must be adjusted according to the solar input. The ways to control the extraction steam flow rates are termed solar preheater operation strategies. Three typical strategies: the Constant Temperature control, Variable Temperature control with high to low temperature feedwater heater displacement and Variable Temperature control with low to high temperature feedwater heater displacement have been identified. Each configuration can be operated with one of the three strategies, resulting in twelve “configuration-operation” combinations/scenarios (shown in Table 1). Previous assessments and modelling of such a plant have only been based on a single combination. In this paper, a Solar Aided Power Generation plant, modified from a typical 300 MW power plant, is used to understand the plant’s performance for all twelve of the available combinations. The results show that the instantaneous and annual technical performances of such a plant are dependent on the combinations used. The scenario 10 (Table 1) is superior to the

  18. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Surry Nuclear Power Plant

    Blanchat, T.K.; Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Containment Technology Test Facility (CTTF) and the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are used to perform scaled experiments for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) that simulate High Pressure Melt Ejection (HPME) accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) phenomena on the containment load. High-temperature, chemically reactive melt is ejected by high-pressure steam into a scale model of a reactor cavity. Debris is entrained by the steam blowdown into a containment model where specific phenomena, such as the effect of subcompartment structures, prototypic atmospheres, and hydrogen generation and combustion, can be studied

  19. Manning designs for nuclear district-heating plant (NDHP) with RUTA-type reactor

    Gerasimova, V.S.; Mikhan, V.I.; Romenkov, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    RUTA-type reactor is a water cooled water-moderated pool-type reactor with an atmospheric pressure air medium. The reactor has been designed for heating and hot water supply. Nuclear district heating plant (NDHP) with RUTA-type reactor facility has been designed with a three circuit layout. Primary circuit components are arranged integrally in the reactor vessel. Natural coolant circulation mode is used in the primary circuit. A peculiarity of RUTA-based NDHP as engineered system is a smooth nature of its running slow variation of the parameters at transients. Necessary automation with application of computer equipment will be provided for control and monitoring of heat production process at NDHP. Under developing RUTA-based NDHP it is foreseen that operating staff performs control and monitoring of heat generation process and heat output to consumers as well as current maintenance of NDHP components. All other works associated with NDHP operation should be fulfilled by extraneous personnel. In so doing the participation of operating staff is also possible. (author)

  20. Correct safety requirements during the life cycle of heating plants; Korrekta saekerhetskrav under vaermeanlaeggningars livscykel

    Tegehall, Jan; Hedberg, Johan [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2006-10-15

    The safety of old steam boilers or hot water generators is in principle based on electromechanical components which are generally easy to understand. The use of safety-PLC is a new and flexible way to design a safe system. A programmable system offers more degrees of freedom and consequently new problems may arise. As a result, new standards which use the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) concept for the level of safety have been elaborated. The goal is to define a way of working to handle requirements on safety in control systems of heat and power plants. SIL-requirements are relatively new within the domain and there is a need for guidance to be able to follow the requirements. The target of this report is the people who work with safety questions during new construction, reconstruction, or modification of furnace plants. In the work, the Pressure Equipment Directive, 97/23/EC, as well as standards which use the SIL concept have been studied. Additionally, standards for water-tube boilers have been studied. The focus has been on the safety systems (safety functions) which are used in water-tube boilers for heat and power plants; other systems, which are parts of these boilers, have not been considered. Guidance has been given for the aforementioned standards as well as safety requirements specification and risk analysis. An old hot water generator and a relatively new steam boiler have been used as case studies. The design principles and safety functions of the furnaces have been described. During the risk analysis important hazards were identified. A method for performing a risk analysis has been described and the appropriate content of a safety requirements specification has been defined. If a heat or power plant is constructed, modified, or reconstructed, a safety life cycle shall be followed. The purpose of the safety life cycle is to plan, describe, document, perform, check, test, and validate that everything is correctly done. The components of the safety

  1. The Apatity nuclear heating plant project: modern technical and economic issues of nuclear heat application in Russia

    Adamov, E.O.; Romenkov, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Traditionally Russia is a country with advanced structure of centralized heat supply. Many thermal plants and heating networks need technical upgrading to improve their technical and economic efficiency. Fossil fuelled heating capacities have a negative influence on ecology, which can be seen especially in the northern regions of Russia. Furthermore, fossil fuel prices are rising in Russia. The above factors tend to intensify the need for alternative heat sources being capable of solving the problem. Nuclear heat sources may be the alternative. In this paper, the main features of a proposed NHP in the Murmansk region are summarized. (author)

  2. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology

    Ahmed Hadidi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21-24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant virology including, but not limited to, discovery of novel viruses and viroids as well as detection and identification of those pathogens already known, analysis of genome diversity and evolution, and study of pathogen epidemiology. The genome engineering editing method, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas9 system has been successfully used recently to engineer resistance to DNA geminiviruses (family, Geminiviridae by targeting different viral genome sequences in infected Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis plants. The DNA viruses targeted include tomato yellow leaf curl virus and merremia mosaic virus (begomovirus; beet curly top virus and beet severe curly top virus (curtovirus; and bean yellow dwarf virus (mastrevirus. The technique has also been used against the RNA viruses zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus and turnip mosaic virus (potyvirus and cucumber vein yellowing virus (ipomovirus, family, Potyviridae by targeting the translation initiation genes eIF4E in cucumber or Arabidopsis plants. From these recent advances of major importance, it is expected that NGS and CRISPR-Cas technologies will play a significant role in the very near future in advancing the field of plant virology and connecting it with other related fields of biology.Keywords: Next-generation sequencing, NGS, plant virology, plant viruses, viroids, resistance to plant viruses by CRISPR-Cas9

  3. Increased efficiency of targeted mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 in plants using heat stress.

    LeBlanc, Chantal; Zhang, Fei; Mendez, Josefina; Lozano, Yamile; Chatpar, Krishna; Irish, Vivian F; Jacob, Yannick

    2018-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has greatly improved our ability to engineer targeted mutations in eukaryotic genomes. While CRISPR/Cas9 appears to work universally, the efficiency of targeted mutagenesis and the adverse generation of off-target mutations vary greatly between different organisms. In this study, we report that Arabidopsis plants subjected to heat stress at 37°C show much higher frequencies of CRISPR-induced mutations compared to plants grown continuously at the standard temperature (22°C). Using quantitative assays relying on green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter genes, we found that targeted mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 in Arabidopsis is increased by approximately 5-fold in somatic tissues and up to 100-fold in the germline upon heat treatment. This effect of temperature on the mutation rate is not limited to Arabidopsis, as we observed a similar increase in targeted mutations by CRISPR/Cas9 in Citrus plants exposed to heat stress at 37°C. In vitro assays demonstrate that Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) is more active in creating double-stranded DNA breaks at 37°C than at 22°C, thus indicating a potential contributing mechanism for the in vivo effect of temperature on CRISPR/Cas9. This study reveals the importance of temperature in modulating SpCas9 activity in eukaryotes, and provides a simple method to increase on-target mutagenesis in plants using CRISPR/Cas9. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Use of an integrated containment and ultimate heat sink (UHS) response approach to evaluate nuclear power plant modifications

    Wetzel, M.C.; Vieira, A.T.; Patton, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed containment and Ultimate Heat Sink (UHS) performance evaluations often are required to support major plant modifications, such as power up-rates and steam generator replacements. These UHS and containment pressure and temperature response evaluations are interrelated. Not only is the containment heat load to the UHS a factor in these evaluations, but other heat loads, such as those from the spent fuel pool, may change as a result of the plant modification and impact containment or UHS response. Our experience is that if an integrated containment/UHS response model is developed prior to the feasibility evaluations for such plant modifications, significant savings in engineering hours can be achieved. This paper presents an overview of such a front-end engineering tool that has been developed and used to support engineering evaluations. 3 refs., 2 figs

  5. Vibrations measurement at the Embalse nuclear power plant's electrical generator

    Salomoni, R.C.; Belinco, C.G.; Pastorini, A.J.; Sacchi, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    After the modifications made at the Embalse nuclear power plant's electrical generator to reduce its vibration level produced by electromagnetic phenomena, it was necessary to perform measurements at the new levels, under different areas and power conditions. To this purpose, a work was performed jointly with the 'Vibrations Team' of the ANSALDO Company (the generator constructor) and the Hydrodynamic Assays Division under the coordination and supervision of the plant's electrical maintenance responsible. This paper includes the main results obtained and the instrumentation criteria and analysis performed. (Author)

  6. Simulation of gaseous emissions from electricity generating plant

    Bellhouse, G.M.; Whittington, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    In electricity supply networks, traditional dispatch algorithms are based on features such as economics and plant availability. Annual limits on emissions from fossil-fuelled stations are regarded as a restriction and set a ceiling on generation from particular stations. With the impending introduction of financial penalties on emissions, for example cal bon taxation, algorithms will have to be developed which allow the dispatch engineer to assess the cost in real-time of different generation options involving fossil-fuelled plants. Such an algorithm is described in this paper. (UK)

  7. Flue gas recovery system for natural gas combined heat and power plant with distributed peak-shaving heat pumps

    Zhao, Xiling; Fu, Lin; Wang, Xiaoyin; Sun, Tao; Wang, Jingyi; Zhang, Shigang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A flue gas recovery system with distributed peak-shaving heat pumps is proposed. • The system can improve network transmission and distribution capacity. • The system is advantageous in energy saving, emission reduction and economic benefits. - Abstract: District heating systems use distributed heat pump peak-shaving technology to adjust heat in secondary networks of substations. This technology simultaneously adjusts the heat of the secondary network and reduces the return-water temperature of the primary network by using the heat pump principle. When optimized, low temperature return-water is able to recycle more waste heat, thereby further improving the heating efficiency of the system. This paper introduces a flue gas recovery system for a natural gas combined heat and power plant with distributed peak-shaving heat pumps. A pilot system comprising a set of two 9F gas-steam combined cycle-back pressure heating units was used to analyse the system configuration and key parameters. The proposed system improved the network transmission and distribution capacity, increased heating capacity, and reduced heating energy consumption without compromising heating safety issues. As such, the proposed system is advantageous in terms of energy saving, emission reduction, and economic benefits.

  8. Risks of turbine generators at WWER-440 nuclear power plants

    Virolainen, T.; Marttila, J.; Aulamo, H.

    1998-01-01

    Many serious fires and incidents have occurred in the turbine halls of nuclear power plants, resulting in serious damage and long shutdown outages. Some of these incidents have endangered the safe shutdown of the plants because of the location of lack of vital fire protection safety systems. A detailed analysis is necessary for all those plants that have equipment important for safe shutdown located in the turbine hall or its vicinity without strict fire separation by fire rated barriers. A reduction in the fire frequencies of the turbine hall is an additional way of improving safety. This is possible by improving all aspects of turbine generator operation. (author)

  9. After heat distribution of a mobile nuclear power plant

    Parker, W. G.; Vanbibber, L. E.; Tang, Y. S.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program was developed to analyze the transient afterheat temperature and pressure response of a mobile gas-cooled reactor power plant following impact. The program considers (in addition to the standard modes of heat transfer) fission product decay and transport, metal-water reactions, core and shield melting and displacement, and pressure and containment vessel stress response. Analyses were performed for eight cases (both deformed and undeformed models) to verify operability of the program options. The results indicated that for a 350 psi (241 n/sq cm) initial internal pressure, the containment vessel can survive over 100,000 seconds following impact before creep rupture occurs. Recommendations were developed as to directions for redesign to extend containment vessel life.

  10. Binary co-generative plants with height temperature SOFC fuel cells

    Tashevski, D; Dimitrov, K.; Armenski, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a field of binary co-generative plants with height temperature SOFC fuel cells is presented. Special attention of application of height temperature SOFC fuel cells and binary co-generative units has been given. These units made triple electricity and heat. Principle of combination of fuel cells with binary cycles has been presented. A model and computer programme for calculation of BKPFC, has been created. By using the program, all the important characteristic-results are calculated: power, efficiency, emission, dimension and economic analysis. On base of results, conclusions and recommendations has been given. (Author)

  11. Binary co-generative plants with height temperature SOFC fuel cells

    Tashevski, D; Dimitrov, K.; Armenski, S.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a field of binary co-generative plants with height temperature SOFC fuel cells is presented. Special attention of application of height temperature SOFC fuel cells and binary co-generative units has been given. These units made triple electricity and heat. Principle of combination of fuel cells with binary cycles has been presented. A model and computer programme for calculation of BKPFC, has been created. By using the program, all the important characteristic-results are calculated: power, efficiency, emission, dimension and economic analysis. On base of results, conclusions and recommendations has been given. (Author)

  12. Equipment sizing in a coal-fired municipal heating plant modernisation project with support for renewable energy and cogeneration technologies

    Kalina, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Sizing of biomass fired cogeneration block is performed for existing heating plant. • Mathematical model for cogeneration block optimisation is presented. • Impact of financial support mechanisms on optimal solution is discussed. • Influence of short term variations of prices and support intensity is presented. • Different design parameters are suggested by economic and technical quality indices. - Abstract: The paper presents results of design parameters optimisation of a wood chips fired steam boiler based heat and power block in a sample project of coal fired municipal heating plant modernisation. The project assumes the conversion of the heating plant into a dual fuel heat and power plant. The problem that is presented is selection of cogeneration block structure and thermodynamic parameters taking into account financial support mechanisms for cogeneration and renewable energy technologies. There are examined energy conversion and financial performances of the project. The results show that without the financial support the project is not profitable although it generates savings of primary energy of fossil fuels. If an administrative incentives are applied the optimal technical solution is different than suggested by energy conversion efficiency or fossil fuel savings. Financial calculations were performed for Polish marked conditions in the years 2011 and 2014 showing the impact of relatively short term variations of prices and support intensity on optimal plant design parameters

  13. Minimisation of Generation Variability of a Group of Wind Plants

    Dubravko Sabolić

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Minimisation of variability of energy delivered from a group of wind plants into the power system using portfolio theory approach was studied. One of the assumptions of that theory is Gaussian distribution of the sample, which is not satisfied in case of wind generation. Therefore, optimisation of a “portfolio” of plants with different goal functions was studied. It was supposed that a decision on distribution of a fixed amount of generation capacity to be installed among a set of geographical locations with known wind statistics is to be made with minimised variability of generation as a goal. In that way the statistical cancellation of variability would be used in the best possible manner. This article is a brief report on results of such an investigation. An example of nine locations in Croatia was used. These locations’ wind statistics are known from historic generation data.

  14. Clinch river breeder reactor plant steam generator water quality

    Van Hoesen, D.; Lowe, P.A.

    1975-01-01

    The recent problems experienced by some LWR Steam Generators have drawn attention to the importance of system water quality and water/ steam side corrosion. Several of these reactor plants have encountered steam generator failures due to accelerated tube corrosion caused, in part, by poor water quality and corrosion control. The CRBRP management is aware of these problems, and the implications that they have for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CPBRP) Steam Generator System (SGS). Consequently, programs are being implemented which will: 1) investigate the corrosion mechanisms which may be present in the CRBRP SGS; 2) assure steam generator integrity under design and anticipated off-normal water quality conditions; and 3) assure that the design water quality levels are maintained at all times. However, in order to understand the approach being used to examine this potential problem, it is first necessary to look at the CRBRP SGS and the corrosion mechanisms which may be present

  15. Clinch river breeder reactor plant steam generator water quality

    Van Hoesen, D; Lowe, P A

    1975-07-01

    The recent problems experienced by some LWR Steam Generators have drawn attention to the importance of system water quality and water/ steam side corrosion. Several of these reactor plants have encountered steam generator failures due to accelerated tube corrosion caused, in part, by poor water quality and corrosion control. The CRBRP management is aware of these problems, and the implications that they have for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CPBRP) Steam Generator System (SGS). Consequently, programs are being implemented which will: (1) investigate the corrosion mechanisms which may be present in the CRBRP SGS; (2) assure steam generator integrity under design and anticipated off-normal water quality conditions; and (3) assure that the design water quality levels are maintained at all times. However, in order to understand the approach being used to examine this potential problem, it is first necessary to look at the CRBRP SGS and the corrosion mechanisms which may be present.

  16. Disposal of Steam Generators from Decommissioning of PWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Walberg, Mirko; Viermann, Joerg; Beverungen, Martin; Kemp, Lutz; Lindstroem, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Amongst other materials remarkable amounts of radioactively contaminated or activated scrap are generated from the dismantling of Nuclear Power Plants. These scrap materials include contaminated pipework, fittings, pumps, the reactor pressure vessel and other large components, most of them are heat exchangers. Taking into account all commercial and technical aspects an external processing and subsequent recycling of the material might be an advantageous option for many of these components. The disposal of steam generators makes up an especially challenging task because of their measures, their weight and compared to other heat exchangers high radioactive inventory. Based on its experiences from many years of disposal of smaller components of NPP still in operation or under decommissioning GNS and Studsvik Nuclear developed a concept for disposal of steam generators, also involving experiences made in Sweden. The concept comprises transport preparations and necessary supporting documents, the complete logistics chain, steam generator treatment and the processing of arising residues and materials not suitable for recycling. The first components to be prepared, shipped and treated according to this concept were four steam generators from the decommissioning of the German NPP Stade which were removed from the plant and shipped to the processing facility during the third quarter of 2007. Although the plant had undergone a full system decontamination, due to the remaining contamination in a number of plugged tubes the steam generators had to be qualified as industrial packages, type 2 (IP-2 packages), and according to a special requirement of the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection a license for a shipment under special arrangement had to be applied for. The presentation gives an overview of the calculations and evidences required within the course of the IP-2 qualification, additional requirements of the competent authorities during the licensing procedure as

  17. Thermodynamic performance analysis and algorithm model of multi-pressure heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) based on heat exchangers layout

    Feng, Hongcui; Zhong, Wei; Wu, Yanling; Tong, Shuiguang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A general model of multi-pressure HRSG based on heat exchangers layout is built. • The minimum temperature difference is introduced to replace pinch point analysis. • Effects of layout on dual pressure HRSG thermodynamic performances are analyzed. - Abstract: Changes of heat exchangers layout in heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) will modify the amount of waste heat recovered from flue gas; this brings forward a desire for the optimization of the design of HRSG. In this paper the model of multi-pressure HRSG is built, and an instance of a dual pressure HRSG under three different layouts of Taihu Boiler Co., Ltd. is discussed, with specified values of inlet temperature, mass flow rate, composition of flue gas and water/steam parameters as temperature, pressure etc., steam mass flow rate and heat efficiency of different heat exchangers layout of HRSG are analyzed. This analysis is based on the laws of thermodynamics and incorporated into the energy balance equations for the heat exchangers. In the conclusion, the results of the steam mass flow rate, heat efficiency obtained for three heat exchangers layout of HRSGs are compared. The results show that the optimization of heat exchangers layout of HRSGs has a great significance for waste heat recovery and energy conservation

  18. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibrations in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    Catton, Ivan; Dhir, Vijay K.; Alquaddoomi, O.S.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Adinolfi, Pierangelo

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers. In the nuclear industry, steam generators are often affected by this problem. However, flow-induced vibration is not limited to nuclear power plants, but to any type of heat exchanger used in many industrial applications such as chemical processing, refrigeration and air conditioning. Specifically, shell and tube type heat exchangers experience flow-induced vibration due to the high velocity flow over the tube banks. Flow-induced vibration in these heat exchangers leads to equipment breakdown and hence expensive repair and process shutdown. The goal of this research is to provide accurate measurements that can help modelers to validate their models using the measured experimental parameters and thereby develop better design criteria for avoiding fluid-elastic instability in heat exchangers. The research is divided between two primary experimental efforts, the first conducted using water alone (single phase) and the second using a mixture of air or steam and water as the working fluid (two phase). The outline of this report is as follows: After the introduction to fluid-elastic instability, the experimental apparatus constructed to conduct the experiments is described in Chapter 2 along with the measurement procedures. Chapter 3 presents results obtained on the tube array and the flow loop, as well as techniques used in data processing. The project performance is described and evaluated in Chapter 4 followed by

  19. Retrofitting a Geothermal Plant with Solar and Storage to Increase Power Generation

    Zhu, Guangdong [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McTigue, Joshua Dominic P [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Turchi, Craig S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Castro, Jose [Coso Operating Co.; Mungas, Greg [Hyperlight Energy; Kramer, Nick [Hyperlight Energy; King, John [Hyperlight Energy

    2017-10-04

    Solar hybridization using concentrating solar power (CSP) can be an effective approach to augment the power generation and power cycle efficiency of a geothermal power plant with a declining resource. Thermal storage can further increase the dispatchability of a geothermal/solar hybrid system, which is particularly valued for a national grid with high renewable penetration. In this paper, a hybrid plant design with thermal storage is proposed based on the requirements of the Coso geothermal field in China Lake, California. The objective is to increase the power production by 4 MWe. In this system, a portion of the injection brine is recirculated through a heat exchanger with the solar heat transfer fluid, before being mixed with the production well brine. In the solar heating loop the brine should be heated to at least 155 degrees C to increase the net power. The solar field and storage were sized based on solar data for China Lake. Thermal storage is used to store excess power at the high-solar-irradiation hours and generate additional power during the evenings. The solar field size, the type and capacity of thermal storage and the operating temperatures are critical factors in determining the most economic hybrid system. Further investigations are required to optimize the hybrid system and evaluate its economic feasibility.

  20. Evaluation of piping heat transfer, piping flow regimes, and steam generator heat transfer for the Semiscale Mod-1 isothermal tests

    French, R.T.

    1975-08-01

    Selected experimental data pertinent to piping heat transfer, transient fluid flow regimes, and steam generator heat transfer obtained during the Semiscale Mod-1 isothermal blowdown test series (Test Series 1) are analyzed. The tests in this first test series were designed to provide counterparts to the LOFT nonnuclear experiments. The data from the Semiscale Mod-1 intact and broken loop piping are evaluated to determine the surface heat flux and average heat transfer coefficients effective during the blowdown transient and compared with well known heat transfer correlations used in the RELAP4 computer program. Flow regimes in horizontal pipe sections are calculated and compared with data obtained from horizontal and vertical densitometers and with an existing steady state flow map. Effects of steam generator heat transfer are evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. The Semiscale Mod-1 data and the analysis presented in this report are valuable for evaluating the adequacy and improving the predictive capability of analytical models developed to predict system response to piping heat transfer, piping flow regimes, and steam generator heat transfer during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). 16 references. (auth)

  1. Power plant project success through total productive generation

    Kaivola, R.; Tamminen, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Total Productive Generation concept (TPG) defines the lines of action adopted by IVO Generation Services Ltd (IGS) for the operation and maintenance of power plants. The TPG concept is based on procedures tested in practice. The main idea of TPG is continuous development of quality, which is a joint effort of the entire staff. Its objective is to benefit IGS`s own staff and, in particular, the company`s customers. (orig.)

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Pre-Conceptual Design Report

    Larry Demick; Doug Vandel

    2007-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950 C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications. The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively1 safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to current and advanced light water reactors (LWRs). In the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), the Department of Energy (DOE) was tasked with providing a demonstration of this HTGR technology to economically and reliably produce electricity and hydrogen by the year 2021. As the lead nuclear technology development laboratory of the DOE, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated the work necessary to complete this task. The EPAct also stipulated that the task should be undertaken in partnership with the industrial end users of the technology. To that end, a working group has been assembled consisting of suppliers of the technology, nuclear plant owner/operators, other supportive technology companies, and potential end users. The objective of the working group is to form an Alliance that would provide the private sector perspective and direction for completion of the NGNP in partnership with the DOE. The Alliance will support the selection of the specific operating conditions and configuration for NGNP to ensure it meets private sector expectations, commence

  3. Performance of Generating Plant: Managing the Changes. Part 2: Thermal Generating Plant Unavailability Factors and Availability Statistics

    Curley, G. Michael [North American Electric Reliability Corporation (United States); Mandula, Jiri [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    2008-05-15

    The WEC Committee on the Performance of Generating Plant (PGP) has been collecting and analysing power plant performance statistics worldwide for more than 30 years and has produced regular reports, which include examples of advanced techniques and methods for improving power plant performance through benchmarking. A series of reports from the various working groups was issued in 2008. This reference presents the results of Working Group 2 (WG2). WG2's main task is to facilitate the collection and input on an annual basis of power plant performance data (unit-by-unit and aggregated data) into the WEC PGP database. The statistics will be collected for steam, nuclear, gas turbine and combined cycle, hydro and pump storage plant. WG2 will also oversee the ongoing development of the availability statistics database, including the contents, the required software, security issues and other important information. The report is divided into two sections: Thermal generating, combined cycle/co-generation, combustion turbine, hydro and pumped storage unavailability factors and availability statistics; and nuclear power generating units.

  4. Magnetoresistance effect of heat generation in a single-molecular spin-valve

    Jiang, Feng; Yan, Yonghong; Wang, Shikuan; Yan, Yijing

    2016-01-01

    Based on non-equilibrium Green's functions' theory and small polaron transformation's technology, we study the heat generation by current through a single-molecular spin-valve. Numerical results indicate that the variation of spin polarization degree can change heat generation effectively, the spin-valve effect happens not only in electrical current but also in heat generation when Coulomb repulsion in quantum dot is smaller than phonon frequency and interestingly, when Coulomb repulsion is larger than phonon frequency, the inverse spin-valve effect appears by sweeping gate voltage and is enlarged with bias increasing. The inverse spin-valve effect will induce the unique heat magnetoresistance effect, which can be modulated from heat-resistance to heat-gain by gate voltage easily. - Highlights: • Spin-valve effect of heat generation happens when Coulomb repulsion in quantum dot is less than phonon frequency. • When Coulomb repulsion is larger than phonon frequency, inverse spin-valve effect appears and is enlarged with bias increasing. • The variation of spin polarization degree can change heat generation effectively. • The heat magnetoresistance can be modulated from heat-resistance to heat-gain by gate voltage easily.

  5. STEAM GENERATOR TUBE INTEGRITY ANALYSIS OF A TOTAL LOSS OF ALL HEAT SINKS ACCIDENT FOR WOLSONG NPP UNIT 1

    HEOK-SOON LIM

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A total loss of all heat sinks is considered a severe accident with a low probability of occurrence. Following a total loss of all heat sinks, the degasser/condenser relief valves (DCRV become the sole means available for the depressurization of the primary heat transport system. If a nuclear power plant has a total loss of heat sinks accident, high-temperature steam and differential pressure between the primary heat transport system (PHTS and the steam generator (SG secondary side can cause a SG tube creep rupture. To protect the PHTS during a total loss of all heat sinks accident, a sufficient depressurization capability of the degasser/condenser relief valve and the SG tube integrity is very important. Therefore, an accurate estimation of the discharge through these valves is necessary to assess the impact of the PHTS overprotection and the SG tube integrity of the primary circuit. This paper describes the analysis of DCRV discharge capacity and the SG tube integrity under a total loss of all heat sink using the CATHENA code. It was found that the DCRV's discharge capacity is enough to protect the overpressure in the PHTS, and the SG tube integrity is maintained in a total loss of all heat accident.

  6. Steam Generator Tube Integrity Analysis of A Total Loss of all Heat Sinks Accident for Wolsong NPP Unit 1

    Lim, Heoksoon; Song, Taeyoung; Chi, Moongoo [Korea Htydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seoungrae [Nuclear Engineering Service and Solution, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    A total loss of all heat sinks is considered a severe accident with a low probability of occurrence. Following a total loss of all heat sinks, the degasser/condenser relief valves (DCRV) become the sole means available for the depressurization of the primary heat transport system. If a nuclear power plant has a total loss of heat sinks accident, high-temperature steam and differential pressure between the primary heat transport system (PHTS) and the steam generator (SG) secondary side can cause a SG tube creep rupture. To protect the PHTS during a total loss of all heat sinks accident, a sufficient depressurization capability of the degasser/condenser relief valve and the SG tube integrity is very important. Therefore, an accurate estimation of the discharge through these valves is necessary to assess the impact of the PHTS overprotection and the SG tube integrity of the primary circuit. This paper describes the analysis of DCRV discharge capacity and the SG tube integrity under a total loss of all heat sink using the CATHENA code. It was found that the DCRV's discharge capacity is enough to protect the overpressure in the PHTS, and the SG tube integrity is maintained in a total loss of all heat accident.

  7. Steam Generator Tube Integrity Analysis of A Total Loss of all Heat Sinks Accident for Wolsong NPP Unit 1

    Lim, Heoksoon; Song, Taeyoung; Chi, Moongoo; Kim, Seoungrae

    2014-01-01

    A total loss of all heat sinks is considered a severe accident with a low probability of occurrence. Following a total loss of all heat sinks, the degasser/condenser relief valves (DCRV) become the sole means available for the depressurization of the primary heat transport system. If a nuclear power plant has a total loss of heat sinks accident, high-temperature steam and differential pressure between the primary heat transport system (PHTS) and the steam generator (SG) secondary side can cause a SG tube creep rupture. To protect the PHTS during a total loss of all heat sinks accident, a sufficient depressurization capability of the degasser/condenser relief valve and the SG tube integrity is very important. Therefore, an accurate estimation of the discharge through these valves is necessary to assess the impact of the PHTS overprotection and the SG tube integrity of the primary circuit. This paper describes the analysis of DCRV discharge capacity and the SG tube integrity under a total loss of all heat sink using the CATHENA code. It was found that the DCRV's discharge capacity is enough to protect the overpressure in the PHTS, and the SG tube integrity is maintained in a total loss of all heat accident

  8. From Modules to a Generator: An Integrated Heat Exchanger Concept for Car Applications of a Thermoelectric Generator

    Bosch, Henry

    2016-03-01

    A heat exchanger concept for a thermoelectric generator with integrated planar modules for passenger car applications is introduced. The module housings, made of deep drawn stainless steel sheet metal, are brazed onto the exhaust gas channel to achieve an optimal heat transfer on the hot side of the modules. The cooling side consists of winding fluid channels, which are mounted directly onto the cold side of the modules. Only a thin foil separates the cooling media from the modules for an almost direct heat contact on the cooling side. Thermoelectric generators with up to 20 modules made of PbTe and Bi2Te3, respectively, are manufactured and tested on a hot gas generator to investigate electrical power output and performance of the thermoelectric generator. The proof of concept of the light weight heat exchanger design made of sheet metal with integrated modules is positively accomplished.

  9. Fuel procurement for first generation fusion power plants

    Gore, B.F.; Hendrickson, P.L.

    1976-09-01

    The provision of deuterium, tritium, lithium and beryllium fuel materials for fusion power plants is examined in this document. Possible fusion reactions are discussed for use in first generation power plants. Requirements for fuel materials are considered. A range of expected annual consumption is given for each of the materials for a 1000 megawatts electric (MWe) fusion power plant. Inventory requirements are also given. Requirements for an assumed fusion power plant electrical generating capacity of 10 6 MWe (roughly twice present U.S. generating capacity) are also given. The supply industries are then examined for deuterium, lithium, and beryllium. Methods are discussed for producing the only tritium expected to be purchased by a commercial fusion industry--an initial inventory for the first plant. Present production levels and methods are described for deuterium, lithium and beryllium. The environmental impact associated with production of these materials is then discussed. The toxicity of beryllium is described, and methods are indicated to keep worker exposure to beryllium as low as achievable

  10. Performance of Generating Plant: Managing the Changes. Part 1: International availability data exchange for thermal generating plant

    Stallard, G.S.; Deschaine, R. [Black and Veatch (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The WEC Committee on the Performance of Generating Plant (PGP) has been collecting and analysing power plant performance statistics worldwide for more than 30 years and has produced regular reports, which include examples of advanced techniques and methods for improving power plant performance through benchmarking. A series of reports from the various working groups was issued in 2008. This reference presents the results of Working Group 1 (WG1). WG1's primary focus is to analyse the best ways to measure, evaluate, and apply power plant performance and availability data to promote plant performance improvements worldwide. The paper explores the specific work activities of 2004-2007 to extend traditional analysis and benchmarking frameworks. It is divided into two major topics: Overview of current electric supply industry issues/trends; and, Technical Methods/Tools to evaluate performance in today's ESI.

  11. Performance of Generating Plant: New Metrics for Industry in Transition

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    This report is the result of the work of the Performance of Generating Plant task force of the World Energy Council. The report examines the challenges of measuring and improving performance and considers some of the issues related to this field.

  12. Determination of thermal characteristics of combustion products of fire-tube heat generator with flow turbulator

    Lukjanov Alexander V.; Ostapenko Dmitry V.; Basist Dmitry V.

    2014-01-01

    Boiler construction is one of the major industries of any state. The aim is to determine the effect of the turbulator on the intensity of heat transfer in the convective part of the fire-tube heat generator of domestic production. The improvement of convective heating surfaces is one of the ways to increase the energy efficiency of the fire-tube heat generator. Since model of the process of heat transfer of gas flow in the convective tubes is multifactorial and does not have clear analytical ...

  13. EFFECTS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF CO-GENERATION IN THE DISTRICT HEATING SYSTEM OF THE FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING IN NIŠ

    Mladen M Stojiljković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of co-generation of thermal and electrical energy in district heating systems often results with higher overall energy efficiency of the systems, primary energy savings and environmental benefits. Financial results depend on number of parameters, some of which are very difficult to predict. After introduction of feed-in tariffs for generation of electrical energy in Serbia, better conditions for implementation of co-generation are created, although in district heating systems barriers are still present. In this paper, possibilities and effects of implementation of natural gas fired co-generation engines are examined and presented for the boiler house that is a part of the district heating system owned and operated by the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering in Niš. At the moment, in this boiler house only thermal energy is produced. The boilers are natural gas fired and often operate in low part load regimes. The plant is working only during the heating season. For estimation of effects of implementation of co-generation, referent values are taken from literature or are based on the results of measurements performed on site. Results are presented in the form of primary energy savings and greenhouse gasses emission reduction potentials. Financial aspects are also considered and triangle of costs is shown.

  14. Diagnostic knowledge generation of nuclear power plants using knowledge compilers

    Yoshikawa, Shinji; Endou, Akira; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses a method to generate diagnostic knowledge of nuclear power plants, from commonly accepted physical knowledge and design information about plant configuration. This method is based on qualitative reasoning, which is advantageous to numerical information processing in the sense that system can explain why and how directly applicable knowledge is correctly generated, and that knowledge base is highly reusable and expandable because it is independent on detailed numerical design specifications. However, reasoning ambiguity has been found as the largest problem in applying the technique to nuclear power plants. The proposed approach mainly consists of a knowledge representation scheme, reasoning algorithm, and qualitative model construction method. (author). 4 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  15. Entropy Generation Analysis of Natural Convection in Square Enclosures with Two Isoflux Heat Sources

    S. Z. Nejad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates entropy generation resulting from natural convective heat transfer in square enclosures with local heating of the bottom and symmetrical cooling of the sidewalls. This analysis tends to optimize heat transfer of two pieces of semiconductor in a square electronic package. In this simulation, heaters are modeled as isoflux heat sources and sidewalls of the enclosure are isothermal heat sinks. The top wall and the non-heated portions of the bottom wall are adiabatic. Flow and temperature fields are obtained by numerical simulation of conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy in laminar, steady and two dimensional flows. With constant heat energy into the cavity, effect of Rayleigh number, heater length, heater strength ratios and heater position is evaluated on flow and temperature fields and local entropy generation. The results show that a minimum entropy generation rate is obtained under the same condition in which a minimum peak heater temperature is obtained.

  16. Biomass Supply Planning for Combined Heat and Power Plants using Stochastic Programming

    Guericke, Daniela; Blanco, Ignacio; Morales González, Juan Miguel

    method using stochastic optimization to support the biomass supply planning for combined heat and power plants. Our two-phase approach combines mid-term decisions about biomass supply contracts with the short-term decisions regarding the optimal market participation of the producer to ensure......During the last years, the consumption of biomass to produce power and heat has increased due to the new carbon neutral policies. Nowadays, many district heating systems operate their combined heat and power (CHP) plants using different types of biomass instead of fossil fuel, especially to produce......, and heat demand and electricity prices vary drastically during the planning period. Furthermore, the optimal operation of combined heat and power plants has to consider the existing synergies between the power and heating systems while always fulfilling the heat demand of the system. We propose a solution...

  17. Renovation and rehabilitation of Didi Digomi District Heat Supply Plant (No.48) in Tbilisi

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An investigational study was conducted on the project for energy conservation and reduction in greenhouse effect gas emission at the existing district heating plant in Tbilisi City, Georgia. In the project, the following are conducted for the district heating plants in the Didi-Digomi section and Saburtalo section: renewal/higher efficiency of boiler equipment, adoption of cogeneration using gas turbine, improvement of hot water pipeline and improvement of equipment at heat users. As a result of the study, one plan for cogeneration of 2 units x 6MW class in each section was good in terms of economical efficiency and expenses vs. effects, and the other plan for cogeneration of 17 units (8 units and 9 units) x 6MW class was good in terms of the generated output and regional needs. The amount of energy conservation to be made by the former plan totaled 22,678 toe/y in both sections. The amount of greenhouse effect gas reduction is 70,170 t-CO2/y. The internal earning rate is 1.707% in the Didi-Digomi section and 2.249% in the Saburtalo section. The project profit is lower than the initial investment cost, and therefore, it is necessary to consider the profit from the CO2 emission right. (NEDO)

  18. Thermoelectric cooling of microelectronic circuits and waste heat electrical power generation in a desktop personal computer

    Gould, C.A.; Shammas, N.Y.A.; Grainger, S.; Taylor, I.

    2011-01-01

    Thermoelectric cooling and micro-power generation from waste heat within a standard desktop computer has been demonstrated. A thermoelectric test system has been designed and constructed, with typical test results presented for thermoelectric cooling and micro-power generation when the computer is executing a number of different applications. A thermoelectric module, operating as a heat pump, can lower the operating temperature of the computer's microprocessor and graphics processor to temperatures below ambient conditions. A small amount of electrical power, typically in the micro-watt or milli-watt range, can be generated by a thermoelectric module attached to the outside of the computer's standard heat sink assembly, when a secondary heat sink is attached to the other side of the thermoelectric module. Maximum electrical power can be generated by the thermoelectric module when a water cooled heat sink is used as the secondary heat sink, as this produces the greatest temperature difference between both sides of the module.

  19. Environmental flows and life cycle assessment of associated petroleum gas utilization via combined heat and power plants and heat boilers at oil fields

    Rajović, Vuk; Kiss, Ferenc; Maravić, Nikola; Bera, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Environmental impact of associated petroleum gas flaring is discussed. • A modern trend of introducing cogeneration systems to the oil fields is presented. • Three alternative utilization options evaluated with life cycle assessment method. • Producing electricity and/or heat instead of flaring would reduce impacts. - Abstract: Flaring of associated petroleum gas is a major resource waste and causes considerable emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants. New environmental regulations are forcing oil industry to implement innovative and sustainable technologies in order to compete in growing energy market. A modern trend of introducing energy-effective cogeneration systems to the oil fields by replacing flaring and existing heat generation technologies powered by associated petroleum gas is discussed through material flow analysis and environmental impact assessment. The environmental assessment is based on the consequential life cycle assessment method and mainly primary data compiled directly from measurements on Serbian oil-fields or company-supplied information. The obtained results confirm that the utilization of associated petroleum gas via combined heat and power plants and heat boilers can provide a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and resource depletion by displacing marginal production of heat and electricity. At the base case scenario, which assumes a 100% heat realization rate, the global warming potential of the combined heat and power plant and heat boiler scenarios were estimated at −4.94 and −0.54 kg CO_2_e_q Sm"−"3, whereas the cumulative fossil energy requirements of these scenarios were −48.7 and −2.1 MJ Sm"−"3, respectively. This is a significant reduction compared to the global warming potential (2.25 kg CO_2_e_q Sm"−"3) and cumulative fossil energy requirements (35.36 MJ Sm"−"3) of flaring. Nevertheless, sensitivity analyses have shown that life cycle assessment results are sensitive

  20. Steam gasification of coal, project prototype plant nuclear process heat

    Heek, K.H. van

    1982-05-01

    This report describes the tasks, which Bergbau-Forschung has carried out in the field of steam gasification of coal in cooperation with partners and contractors during the reference phase of the project. On the basis of the status achieved to date it can be stated, that the mode of operation of the gas-generator developed including the direct feeding of caking high volatile coal is technically feasible. Moreover through-put can be improved by 65% at minimum by using catalysts. On the whole industrial application of steam gasification - WKV - using nuclear process heat stays attractive compared with other gasification processes. Not only coal is conserved but also the costs of the gas manufactured are favourable. As confirmed by recent economic calculations these are 20 to 25% lower. (orig.) [de

  1. Hybrid biomass-wind power plant for reliable energy generation

    Perez-Navarro, A.; Alfonso, D.; Alvarez, C.; Ibanez, F.; Sanchez, C.; Segura, I.

    2010-01-01

    Massive implementation of renewable energy resources is a key element to reduce CO 2 emissions associated to electricity generation. Wind resources can provide an important alternative to conventional electricity generation mainly based on fossil fuels. However, wind generators are greatly affected by the restrictive operating rules of electricity markets because, as wind is naturally variable, wind generators may have serious difficulties on submitting accurate generation schedules on a day ahead basis, and on complying with scheduled obligations in real-time operation. In this paper, an innovative system combining a biomass gasification power plant, a gas storage system and stand-by generators to stabilize a generic 40 MW wind park is proposed and evaluated with real data. The wind park power production model is based on real data about power production of a Spanish wind park and a probabilistic approach to quantify fluctuations and so, power compensation needs. The hybrid wind-biomass system is analysed to obtain main hybrid system design parameters. This hybrid system can mitigate wind prediction errors and so provide a predictable source of electricity. An entire year cycle of hourly power compensations needs has been simulated deducing storage capacity, extra power needs of the biomass power plant and stand-by generation capacity to assure power compensation during critical peak hours with acceptable reliability. (author)

  2. Experimental observation of current generation by asymmetrical heating of ions in a tokamak plasma

    Gahl, J.; Ishihara, O.; Wong, K.L.; Kristiansen, M.; Hagler, M.

    1986-01-01

    The first experimental observation of current generation by asymmetrical heating of ions is reported. Ions were asymmetrically heated by a unidirectional fast Alfven wave launched by a slow wave antenna inside a tokamak. Current generation was detected by measuring the asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current with probes at the top and bottom of the toroidal plasma column

  3. Calculation of radiation heat generation on a graphite reflector side of IAN-R1 Reactor

    Duque O, J.; Velez A, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    Calculation methods for radiation heat generation in nuclear reactor, based on the point kernel approach are revisited and applied to the graphite reflector of IAN-R1 reactor. A Fortran computer program was written for the determination of total heat generation in the reflector, taking 1155 point in it

  4. Estimation of shutdown heat generation rates in GHARR-1 due to ...

    Fission products decay power and residual fission power generated after shutdown of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) by reactivity insertion accident were estimated by solution of the decay and residual heat equations. A Matlab program code was developed to simulate the heat generation rates by fission product ...

  5. An analytical model for the heat generation in friction stir welding

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper; Wert, John

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to establish an analytical model for heat generation by friction stir welding (FSW), based on different assumptions of the contact condition between the rotating tool surface and the weld piece. The material flow and heat generation are characterized by the contact...

  6. Thermal power generation during heat cycle near room temperature

    Shibata, Takayuki; Fukuzumi, Yuya; Kobayashi, Wataru; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate that a sodium-ion secondary battery (SIB)-type thermocell consisting of two types of Prussian blue analogue (PBA) with different electrochemical thermoelectric coefficients (S EC ≡ ∂V/∂T V and T are the redox potential and temperature, respectively) produces electrical energy during heat cycles. The device produces an electrical energy of 2.3 meV/PBA per heat cycle between 295 K (= T L) and 323 K (= T H). The ideal thermal efficiency (η = 1.0%), which is evaluated using the heat capacity (C = 4.16 meV/K) of ideal Na2Co[Fe(CN)6], reaches 11% of the Carnot efficiency (ηth = 8.7%). Our SIB-type thermocell is a promising thermoelectric device that harvests waste heat near room temperature.

  7. Passive safety features for next generation CANDU power plants

    Natalizio, A.; Hart, R.S.; Lipsett, J.J.; Soedijono, P.; Dick, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    CANDU offers an evolutionary approach to simpler and safer reactors. The CANDU 3, an advanced CANDU, currently in the detailed design stage, offers significant improvements in the areas of safety, design simplicity, constructibility, operability, maintainability, schedule and cost. These are being accomplished by retaining all of the well known CANDU benefits, and by relying on the use of proven components and technologies. A major safety benefit of CANDU is the moderator system which is separate from the coolant. The presence of a cold moderator reduces the consequences arising from a LOCA or loss of heat sink event. In existing CANDU plants even the severe accident - LOCA with failure of the emergency core cooling system - is a design basis event. Further advances toward a simpler and more passively safe reactor will be made using the same evolutionary approach. Building on the strength of the moderator system to mitigate against severe accidents, a passive moderator cooling system, depending only on the law of gravity to perform its function, will be the next step of development. AECL is currently investigating a number of other features that could be incorporated in future evolutionary CANDU designs to enhance protection against accidents, and to limit off-site consequences to an acceptable level, for even the worst event. The additional features being investigated include passive decay heat removal from the heat transport system, a simpler emergency core cooling system and a containment pressure suppression/venting capability for beyond design basis events. Central to these passive decay heat removal schemes is the availability of a short-term heat sink to provide a decay heat removal capability of at least three days, without any station services. Preliminary results from these investigations confirm the feasibility of these schemes. (author)

  8. Eddy current technology for heat exchanger and steam generator tube inspection

    Obrutsky, L.; Lepine, B.; Lu, J.; Cassidy, R.; Carter, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    A variety of degradation modes can affect the integrity of both heat exchanger (HX) and balance of plant tubing, resulting in expensive repairs, tube plugging or replacement of tube bundles. One key component for ensuring tube integrity is inspection and monitoring for detection and characterization of the degradation. In-service inspection of HX and balance of plant tubing is usually carried out using eddy current (EC) bobbin coils, which are adequate for the detection of volumetric degradations. However, detection and quantification of additional modes of degradation such as pitting, intergranular attack (IGA), axial cracking and circumferential cracking require specialized probes. The need for timely, reliable detection and characterization of these modes of degradation is especially critical in Nuclear Generating Stations. Transmit-receive single-pass array probes, developed by AECL, offer high defect detectability in conjunction with fast and reliable inspection capabilities. They have strong directional properties, permitting probe optimization for circumferential or axial crack detection. Compared to impedance probes, they offer improved performance in the presence of variable lift-off. This EC technology can help resolve critical detection issues at susceptible areas, such as the rolled-joint transitions at the tubesheet, U-bends and tube-support intersections. This paper provides an overview of the operating principles and the capabilities of advanced ET inspection technology available for HX tube inspection. Examples of recent application of this technology in Nuclear Generating Stations (NGSs) are discussed. (author)

  9. Eddy current technology for heat exchanger and steam generator tube inspection

    Obrutsky, L.; Lepine, B.; Lu, J.; Cassidy, R.; Carter, J.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of degradation modes can affect the integrity of both heat exchanger (HX) and balance of plant tubing, resulting in expensive repairs, tube plugging or replacement of tube bundles. One key component for ensuring tube integrity is inspection and monitoring for detection and characterization of the degradation. In-service inspection of HX and balance of plant tubing is usually carried out using eddy current (EC) bobbin coils, which are adequate for the detection of volumetric degradations. However, detection and quantification of additional modes of degradation such as pitting, intergranular attack (IGA), axial cracking and circumferential cracking require specialized probes. The need for timely, reliable detection and characterization of these modes of degradation is especially critical in Nuclear Generating Stations. Transmit-receive single-pass array probes, developed by AECL, offer high defect detectability in conjunction with fast and reliable inspection capabilities. They have strong directional properties, permitting probe optimization for circumferential or axial crack detection. Compared to impedance probes, they offer improved performance in the presence of variable lift-off. This EC technology can help resolve critical detection issues at susceptible areas, such as the rolled-joint transitions at the tubesheet, U-bends and tube-support intersections. This paper provides an overview of the operating principles and the capabilities of advanced ET inspection technology available for HX tube inspection. Examples of recent application of this technology in Nuclear Generating Stations (NGSs) are discussed. (author)

  10. Risk analysis of heat recovery steam generator with semi quantitative risk based inspection API 581

    Prayogo, Galang Sandy; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Ismail, Rifky; Kim, Seon Jin

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is a major problem that most often occurs in the power plant. Heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is an equipment that has a high risk to the power plant. The impact of corrosion damage causing HRSG power plant stops operating. Furthermore, it could be threaten the safety of employees. The Risk Based Inspection (RBI) guidelines by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 58 has been used to risk analysis in the HRSG 1. By using this methodology, the risk that caused by unexpected failure as a function of the probability and consequence of failure can be estimated. This paper presented a case study relating to the risk analysis in the HRSG, starting with a summary of the basic principles and procedures of risk assessment and applying corrosion RBI for process industries. The risk level of each HRSG equipment were analyzed: HP superheater has a medium high risk (4C), HP evaporator has a medium-high risk (4C), and the HP economizer has a medium risk (3C). The results of the risk assessment using semi-quantitative method of standard API 581 based on the existing equipment at medium risk. In the fact, there is no critical problem in the equipment components. Damage mechanisms were prominent throughout the equipment is thinning mechanism. The evaluation of the risk approach was done with the aim of reducing risk by optimizing the risk assessment activities.

  11. Risk analysis of heat recovery steam generator with semi quantitative risk based inspection API 581

    Prayogo, Galang Sandy; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Ismail, Rifky; Kim, Seon Jin

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion is a major problem that most often occurs in the power plant. Heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is an equipment that has a high risk to the power plant. The impact of corrosion damage causing HRSG power plant stops operating. Furthermore, it could be threaten the safety of employees. The Risk Based Inspection (RBI) guidelines by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 58 has been used to risk analysis in the HRSG 1. By using this methodology, the risk that caused by unexpected failure as a function of the probability and consequence of failure can be estimated. This paper presented a case study relating to the risk analysis in the HRSG, starting with a summary of the basic principles and procedures of risk assessment and applying corrosion RBI for process industries. The risk level of each HRSG equipment were analyzed: HP superheater has a medium high risk (4C), HP evaporator has a medium-high risk (4C), and the HP economizer has a medium risk (3C). The results of the risk assessment using semi-quantitative method of standard API 581 based on the existing equipment at medium risk. In the fact, there is no critical problem in the equipment components. Damage mechanisms were prominent throughout the equipment is thinning mechanism. The evaluation of the risk approach was done with the aim of reducing risk by optimizing the risk assessment activities.

  12. Risk analysis of heat recovery steam generator with semi quantitative risk based inspection API 581

    Prayogo, Galang Sandy, E-mail: gasandylang@live.com; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Ismail, Rifky [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Diponegoro University, Semarang (Indonesia); Kim, Seon Jin [Department of Mechanical & Automotive Engineering of Pukyong National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-19

    Corrosion is a major problem that most often occurs in the power plant. Heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is an equipment that has a high risk to the power plant. The impact of corrosion damage causing HRSG power plant stops operating. Furthermore, it could be threaten the safety of employees. The Risk Based Inspection (RBI) guidelines by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 58 has been used to risk analysis in the HRSG 1. By using this methodology, the risk that caused by unexpected failure as a function of the probability and consequence of failure can be estimated. This paper presented a case study relating to the risk analysis in the HRSG, starting with a summary of the basic principles and procedures of risk assessment and applying corrosion RBI for process industries. The risk level of each HRSG equipment were analyzed: HP superheater has a medium high risk (4C), HP evaporator has a medium-high risk (4C), and the HP economizer has a medium risk (3C). The results of the risk assessment using semi-quantitative method of standard API 581 based on the existing equipment at medium risk. In the fact, there is no critical problem in the equipment components. Damage mechanisms were prominent throughout the equipment is thinning mechanism. The evaluation of the risk approach was done with the aim of reducing risk by optimizing the risk assessment activities.

  13. Combined heat and power unit using renewable raw materials. A cogeneration power plant with wood chips and pellets; BHKW auf Basis nachwachsender Rohstoffe. KWK mit Holzhackschnitzeln und Pellets

    Lennartz, Marc Wilhelm

    2013-07-15

    The combined heat and power units of the next generation operate with renewable resources. The plants working with wood chips or pellets now are ready for mass production. So, farmers and foresters, trade and municipalities may pile in the decentralized, energetic self-sufficiency. Two companies have developed procedures with which combined heat and power plants based can be operated on wood chips or pellets.

  14. Optimizing Waste Heat Recovery for Class A Biosolids Production from a Combined Cycle Power Plant

    Soroushian, Fred

    2003-07-01

    The City of Corona serves a rapidly growing area of Southern California, The City operates three wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) that produce reclaimed water for unrestricted reuse. The sludge from the three WWTPs is transported to a central sludge treatment facility located at WWTP No. 1. The sludge treatment facility consists of sludge receiving, thickening, anaerobic digestion, and dewatering. In the year 2000, the City was faced with two crises. First, the California power shortage and escalating cost of power severely impacted the industry and businesses. Second, bans on Class B biosolids land application and the shutdown of a local privatized composting facility where the bulk of the City's biosolids were processed or reused forced the City to transport bulk waste a much greater distance. To cost-effectively respond to these crises, the City decided to start generating and supplying power to its constituents by constructing a nominal 30-megawatt (MW) power plant. The feasibility study proved that locating the power plant at the City's largest WWTP produced significant synergies. The reclaimed water from the WWTP could be used for power plant cooling, the waste heat from the power plant could be recovered and used in Class A biosolids processes, the digester gas could be used for supplementing the fuel needs of the sludge dryer, and the combined facilities operation was more efficient than physically separate facilities. This paper presents the results of this analysis as well as the construction and operational aspects of the project. (author)

  15. Single-phase convection heat transfer characteristics of pebble-bed channels with internal heat generation

    Meng Xianke; Sun Zhongning; Xu Guangzhan

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The core of the water-cooled pebble bed reactor is the porous channels which stacked with spherical fuel elements. The gaps between the adjacent fuel elements are complex because they are stochastic and often shift. We adopt electromagnetic induction heating method to overall heat the pebble bed. By comparing and analyzing the experimental data, we get the rule of power distribution and the rule of heat transfer coefficient with particle diameter, heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid's Re number. Highlights: ► We adopt electromagnetic induction heating method to overall heat the pebble bed to be the internal heat source. ► The ball diameter is smaller, the effect of the heat transfer is better. ► With Re number increasing, heat transfer coefficient is also increasing and eventually tends to stabilize. ► The changing of heat power makes little effect on the heat transfer coefficient of pebble bed channels. - Abstract: The reactor core of a water-cooled pebble bed reactor includes porous channels that are formed by spherical fuel elements. This structure has notably improved heat transfer. Due to the variability and randomness of the interstices in pebble bed channels, heat transfer is complex, and there are few studies regarding this topic. To study the heat transfer characters of pebble bed channels with internal heat sources, oxidized stainless steel spheres with diameters of 3 and 8 mm and carbon steel spheres with 8 mm diameters are used in a stacked pebble bed. Distilled water is used as a refrigerant for the experiments, and the electromagnetic induction heating method is used to heat the pebble bed. By comparing and analyzing the experimental results, we obtain the governing rules for the power distribution and the heat transfer coefficient with respect to particle diameter, heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid Re number. From fitting of the experimental data, we obtain the dimensionless average

  16. Computer code to simulate transients in a steam generator of PWR nuclear power plants

    Silva, J.M. da.

    1979-01-01

    A digital computer code KIBE was developed to simulate the transient behavior of a Steam Generator used in Pressurized Water Reactor Power PLants. The equations of Conservation of mass, energy and momentum were numerically integrated by an implicit method progressively in the several axial sections into which the Steam Generator was divided. Forced convection heat transfer was assumed on the primary side, while on the secondary side all the different modes of heat transfer were permitted and deternined from the various correlations. The stability of the stationary state was verified by its reproducibility during the integration of the conservation equation without any pertubation. Transient behavior resulting from pertubations in the flow and the internal energy (temperature) at the inlet of the primary side were simulated. The results obtained exhibited satisfactory behaviour. (author) [pt

  17. Safety Philosophy in Process Heat Plants Coupled to High Temperature Reactors

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Revankar, Shripad T.

    2011-01-01

    With the future availability of fossil fuel resources in doubt, high temperature nuclear reactors have the potential to be an important technology in the near term. Due to a high coolant outlet temperature, high temperature reactors (HTR) can be used to drive chemical plants that directly utilize process heat. Additionally, the high temperature improves the thermodynamic efficiency of the energy utilization. Many applications of high temperature reactors exist as a thermal driving vector for endothermic chemical process plants. Hydrogen generation using the General Atomics (GA) sulfur iodine (SI) cycle is one promising application of high temperature nuclear heat. The main chemical reactions in the SI cycle are: 1. I 2 +SO 2 + 2H 2 O → 2HI + H 2 SO 4 (Bunsen reaction) 2. H 2 SO 4 → H 2 O + SO 2 + 1/2O 2 (Sulfuric acid decomposition) 3. 2HI → H 2 + I 2 (Hydrogen Iodide decomposition). With the exception of hydrogen and oxygen, all relevant reactants are recycled within the process. However, there are many unresolved safety and operational issues related to implementation of such a coupled plant

  18. Artificial earthquake generation for nuclear power plant design

    King, A.C.Y.; Chen, C.

    1977-01-01

    The time history method has been one of the analytical tools applied in the seismic resistant design of nuclear power plants. The time histories used are required to be consistent with the specified design Spectra. Since the spectra of recorded strong motion earthquake or conventionally generated artificial time history have local peaks and valleys, iteration procedures must be applied to generate the artificial time history with desired spectra. The paper describes a detailed method for generating a time history which is consistent with a specified design spectra. There are several advantages of this method described herein. First of all, frequency content of the time history is well under control. Secondly, if one wishes to generate the three components of an earthquake at one site, the inherent nature of this method will make the correlations among these three components to simulate closely the actual recorded time histories. Thirdly, a single time history can be generated to match a spectra for different damping values. (auth.)

  19. Regional trends in radiogenic heat generation in the Precambrian basement of the Western Canadian Basin

    Jones, F. W.; Majorowicz, J. A.

    Radiogenic heat generation values for 381 basement samples from 229 sites in the western Canadian basin exhibit a lognormal frequency distribution. The mean value = 2.06 (S.D. = 1.22) µWm-3 is larger than the radiogenic heat generation values reported for the shield in the Superior (ca. 1.2 µWm-3, Jessop and Lewis, 1978) and Churchill (ca. 0.7 µWm-3, Drury, 1985) provinces. When equal Log A contour intervals are used to map the basement heat generation, three large zones of relatively high heat generation are found. One coincides with the Peace River Arch basement structure and one with the Athabasca axis (Darnley, 1981). There is no apparent indication of increased heat flow through the Paleozoic formations associated with these two zones. The third zone, in southwestern Saskatchewan, coincides with a high heat flow zone in the Swift Current area. The lack of correlation between heat flow and heat generation in Alberta may be due to the disturbance to the heat flow in the Paleozoic formations by water motion, or may indicate that the heat is from uranium, thorium and potassium isotope enrichment near the basement surface rather than enrichment throughout the entire upper crust.

  20. Numerical simulation of flow field in shellside of heat exchanger in nuclear power plant

    Wang Xinliang; Qiu Jinrong; Gong Zili

    2010-01-01

    Heat exchanger is the important equipment of nuclear power plant. Numerical simulation can give the detail information inside the heat exchange, and has been an effective research method. The geometric structure of shell-and-tube heat exchanger is very complex and it is difficult to simulate the whole flow field presently. According to the structure characteristics of the heat exchanger, a periodic whole-section calculation model was presented. The numerical simulation of flow field in shellside of heat exchange of a nuclear power plant was done by using this model. The results of simulation show that heat transfer in the periodic section of the heat exchange is uniform, the heat transfer is enhanced by using baffles in heat exchange, and frictional resistance is primary from the effect of segmental baffles. (authors)