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Sample records for heart rate bpm

  1. Screening for coronary artery disease in respiratory patients: comparison of single- and dual-source CT in patients with a heart rate above 70 bpm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pansini, Vittorio; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Tacelli, Nunzia; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Flohr, Thomas; Deken, Valerie; Duhamel, Alain

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the assessibility of coronary arteries in respiratory patients with high heart rates. This study was based on the comparative analysis of two paired populations of 54 patients with a heart rate >70 bpm evaluated with dual-source (group 1) and single-source (group 2) CT. The mean heart rate was 89.1 bpm in group 1 and 86.7 bpm in group 2 (P=0.26). The mean number of assessable segments per patient was significantly higher in group 1 compared to group 2 (P≤0.0001). The proportions of patients in whom proximal and mid-coronary segments were assessable (i.e., the anatomical level enabling screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease) were 35.3% for heart rates <110 bpm, 35.6% for heart rates <100 bpm, 40% for heart rates <90 bpm, and 60% for heart rates <80 bpm in group 1 and 11.3, 12.2, 8.8, and 10% for the corresponding thresholds in group 2 (P<0.05). In both groups of patients, coronary artery imaging was obtained from standard CT angiograms of the chest. The improvement in coronary imaging with dual-source CT suggests that high heart rates should no longer be considered as contraindications for ECG-gated CT angiograms of the chest whenever clinically relevant. (orig.)

  2. Behavioral correlates of heart rates of free-living Greater White-fronted Geese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Craig R.; Ward, D.H.; Bollinger, K.S.

    1999-01-01

    We simultaneously monitored the heart rate and behavior of nine free-living Greater White-fronted Geese (Anser albifrons) on their wintering grounds in northern California. Heart rates of wild geese were monitored via abdominally-implanted radio transmitters with electrodes that received electrical impulses of the heart and emitted a radio signal with each ventricular contraction. Post-operative birds appeared to behave normally, readily rejoining flocks and flying up to 15 km daily from night-time roost sites to feed in surrounding agricultural fields. Heart rates varied significantly among individuals and among behaviors, and ranged from less than 100 beats per minute (BPM) during resting, to over 400 BPM during flight. Heart rates varied from 80 to 140 BPM during non-strenuous activities such as walking, feeding, and maintenance activities, to about 180 BPM when birds became alert, and over 400 BPM when birds were startled, even if they did not take flight. Postflight heart rate recovery time averaged postures, as heart rates were context-dependent, and were highest in initial encounters among individuals. Instantaneous measures of physiological parameters, such as heart rate, are often better indicators of the degree of response to external stimuli than visual observations and can be used to improve estimates of energy expenditure based solely on activity data.

  3. Relationship between heart rate and quiescent interval of the cardiac cycle in children using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei [Texas Children' s Hospital, E. B. Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Bogale, Saivivek [Baylor University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Golriz, Farahnaz [Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnamurthy, Rajesh [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Imaging the heart in children comes with the challenge of constant cardiac motion. A prospective electrocardiography-triggered CT scan allows for scanning during a predetermined phase of the cardiac cycle with least motion. This technique requires knowing the optimal quiescent intervals of cardiac cycles in a pediatric population. To evaluate high-temporal-resolution cine MRI of the heart in children to determine the relationship of heart rate to the optimal quiescent interval within the cardiac cycle. We included a total of 225 consecutive patients ages 0-18 years who had high-temporal-resolution cine steady-state free-precession sequence performed as part of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or magnetic resonance angiography study of the heart. We determined the location and duration of the quiescent interval in systole and diastole for heart rates ranging 40-178 beats per minute (bpm). We performed the Wilcoxon signed rank test to compare the duration of quiescent interval in systole and diastole for each heart rate group. The duration of the quiescent interval at heart rates <80 bpm and >90 bpm was significantly longer in diastole and systole, respectively (P<.0001 for all ranges, except for 90-99 bpm [P=.02]). For heart rates 80-89 bpm, diastolic interval was longer than systolic interval, but the difference was not statistically significant (P=.06). We created a chart depicting optimal quiescent intervals across a range of heart rates that could be applied for prospective electrocardiography-triggered CT imaging of the heart. The optimal quiescent interval at heart rates <80 bpm is in diastole and at heart rates ≥90 bpm is in systole. The period of quiescence at heart rates 80-89 bpm is uniformly short in systole and diastole. (orig.)

  4. Heart rate awareness in patients with chronic stable heart failure. A multi-center observational study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, D

    2014-08-23

    We assessed adherence to European Society of Cardiology heart rate guidelines (i.e. heart rates less than 70bpm) in patients with chronic stable heart failure. We also investigated the percent of patients on target doses of rate controlling drugs.

  5. Effects of hot-iron branding on heart rate, breathing rate and behaviour of anaesthetised Steller sea lions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, K A; Mellish, J E; Weary, D M

    2011-10-01

    This study assessed the heart rate, breathing rate and behavioural responses of 12 juvenile Steller sea lions during hot-iron branding under isoflurane anaesthesia. Physiological and behavioural measures were recorded in four periods: baseline (five minutes), sham branding (one minute), branding (approximately 2.7 minutes) and postbranding (five minutes). No difference in heart rate was noted from baseline to sham branding, but heart rate increased from mean (sem) 78.3 (2.4) bpm in the baseline period to 85.6 (2.5) bpm in the branding period. Heart rate remained elevated in the postbranding period, averaging 84.7 (2.5) bpm. Breathing rate averaged 2.5 (1.0) breaths/minute in the baseline and sham branding periods increased to 8.9 (1.0) breaths/minute during branding, but returned to baseline by the postbranding period. Behaviourally, half of the sea lions exhibited trembling and head and shoulder movements during branding.

  6. Correlation of radiation dose and heart rate in dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laspas, Fotios; Tsantioti, Dimitra; Roussakis, Arkadios; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Kehagias, Dimitrios; Andreou, John

    2011-04-01

    Computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) has been widely used since the introduction of 64-slice scanners and dual-source CT technology, but the relatively high radiation dose remains a major concern. To evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure and heart rate (HR), in dual-source CTCA. Data from 218 CTCA examinations, performed with a dual-source 64-slices scanner, were statistically evaluated. Effective radiation dose, expressed in mSv, was calculated as the product of the dose-length product (DLP) times a conversion coefficient for the chest (mSv = DLPx0.017). Heart rate range and mean heart rate, expressed in beats per minute (bpm) of each individual during CTCA, were also provided by the system. Statistical analysis of effective dose and heart rate data was performed by using Pearson correlation coefficient and two-sample t-test. Mean HR and effective dose were found to have a borderline positive relationship. Individuals with a mean HR >65 bpm observed to receive a statistically significant higher effective dose as compared to those with a mean HR ≤65 bpm. Moreover, a strong correlation between effective dose and variability of HR of more than 20 bpm was observed. Dual-source CT scanners are considered to have the capability to provide diagnostic examinations even with high HR and arrhythmias. However, it is desirable to keep the mean heart rate below 65 bpm and heart rate fluctuation less than 20 bpm in order to reduce the radiation exposure.

  7. Measuring heart rate with optical sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barachi, M. (Mitra)

    2014-01-01

    The problem addressed in this report is to verify the possibility of using an optical sensor in the SaxShirt in order to extract the heart rate. There are specifically three questions that we try to address. 1) How is it possible to extract heart rate (BPM) from the optical sensor? 2) Is it

  8. Correlation of radiation dose and heart rate in dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laspas, Fotios; Roussakis, Arkadios; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Kehagias, Dimitrios; Andreou, John; Tsantioti, Dimitra

    2011-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) has been widely used since the introduction of 64-slice scanners and dual-source CT technology, but the relatively high radiation dose remains a major concern. Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure and heart rate (HR), in dual-source CTCA. Material and Methods: Data from 218 CTCA examinations, performed with a dual-source 64-slices scanner, were statistically evaluated. Effective radiation dose, expressed in mSv, was calculated as the product of the dose-length product (DLP) times a conversion coefficient for the chest (mSv = DLPx0.017). Heart rate range and mean heart rate, expressed in beats per minute (bpm) of each individual during CTCA, were also provided by the system. Statistical analysis of effective dose and heart rate data was performed by using Pearson correlation coefficient and two-sample t-test. Results: Mean HR and effective dose were found to have a borderline positive relationship. Individuals with a mean HR >65 bpm observed to receive a statistically significant higher effective dose as compared to those with a mean HR =65 bpm. Moreover, a strong correlation between effective dose and variability of HR of more than 20 bpm was observed. Conclusion: Dual-source CT scanners are considered to have the capability to provide diagnostic examinations even with high HR and arrhythmias. However, it is desirable to keep the mean heart rate below 65 bpm and heart rate fluctuation less than 20 bpm in order to reduce the radiation exposure

  9. Effects of smoking on heart rate at rest and during exercise, and on heart rate recovery, in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, George; Georgakopoulos, Dimitris; Papageorgiou, Effie; Zerva, Efthimia; Michalis, Lampros; Kalfakakou, Vasiliki; Evangelou, Angelos

    2013-01-01

    There is an established link between smoking, abnormal heart rate (HR) values, and impaired cardiovascular health in middle-aged or older populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of smoking on resting HR and on HR responses during and after exercise in young adults. A sample of 298 young adults (159 men), aged 20-29 years old, were selected from a large population of health-science students based on health status, body mass index, physical activity, and smoking habit. All subjects underwent a maximal Bruce treadmill test and their HR was recorded during, at peak, and after termination of exercise. Smokers had significantly higher resting HR values than non-smokers. Both female and male smokers showed a significantly slower HR increase during exercise. Female smokers failed to reach their age-predicted maximum HR by 6.0 bpm and males by 3.6 bpm. The actual maximum HR achieved (HRmax) was significantly lower for both female smokers (191.0 bpm vs.198.0 bpm) and male smokers (193.2 bpm vs.199.3 bpm), compared to non-smokers. Heart rate reserve was also significantly lower in female (114.6 bpm vs. 128.1 bpm) and male smokers (120.4 bpm vs. 133.0 bpm). During recovery, the HR decline was significantly attenuated, but only in female smokers. Females had a higher resting HR and showed a higher HR response during sub-maximal exercise compared to males. Smoking was found to affect young smokers' HR, increasing HR at rest, slowing HR increase during exercise and impairing their ability to reach the age-predicted HRmax. In addition, smoking was associated with an attenuated HR decline during recovery, but only in females.

  10. Ventricular fibrillation occurring after atrioventricular node ablation despite minimal difference between pre- and post-ablation heart rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squara, F; Theodore, G; Scarlatti, D; Ferrari, E

    2017-02-01

    We report the case of an 82-year-old man presenting with ventricular fibrillation (VF) occurring acutely after atrioventricular node (AVN) ablation. This patient had severe valvular cardiomyopathy, chronic atrial fibrillation (AF), and underwent prior to the AVN ablation a biventricular implantable cardiac defibrillator positioning. The VF was successfully cardioverted with one external electrical shock. What makes this presentation original is that the pre-ablation spontaneous heart rate in AF was slow (84 bpm), and that VF occurred after ablation despite a minimal heart rate drop of only 14 bpm. VF is the most feared complication of AVN ablation, but it had previously only been described in case of acute heart rate drop after ablation of at least 30 bpm (and more frequently>50 bpm). This case report highlights the fact that VF may occur after AVN ablation regardless of the heart rate drop, rendering temporary fast ventricular pacing mandatory whatever the pre-ablation heart rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Abnormal heart rate recovery and deficient chronotropic response after submaximal exercise in young Marfan syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Paulo; Carvalho, Antônio C; Perez, Ana Beatriz A; Medeiros, Wladimir M

    2016-10-01

    Marfan syndrome patients present important cardiac structural changes, ventricular dysfunction, and electrocardiographic changes. An abnormal heart rate response during or after exercise is an independent predictor of mortality and autonomic dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to compare heart rate recovery and chronotropic response obtained by cardiac reserve in patients with Marfan syndrome subjected to submaximal exercise. A total of 12 patients on β-blocker therapy and 13 off β-blocker therapy were compared with 12 healthy controls. They were subjected to submaximal exercise with lactate measurements. The heart rate recovery was obtained in the first minute of recovery and corrected for cardiac reserve and peak lactate concentration. Peak heart rate (141±16 versus 155±17 versus 174±8 bpm; p=0.001), heart rate reserve (58.7±9.4 versus 67.6±14.3 versus 82.6±4.8 bpm; p=0.001), heart rate recovery (22±6 versus 22±8 versus 34±9 bpm; p=0.001), and heart rate recovery/lactate (3±1 versus 3±1 versus 5±1 bpm/mmol/L; p=0.003) were different between Marfan groups and controls, respectively. All the patients with Marfan syndrome had heart rate recovery values below the mean observed in the control group. The absolute values of heart rate recovery were strongly correlated with the heart rate reserve (r=0.76; p=0.001). Marfan syndrome patients have reduced heart rate recovery and chronotropic deficit after submaximal exercise, and the chronotropic deficit is a strong determinant of heart rate recovery. These changes are suggestive of autonomic dysfunction.

  12. Heart rate responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is accompanied by structural alterations and dysfunction in central autonomic regulatory regions, which may impair dynamic and static cardiovascular regulation, and contribute to other syndrome pathologies. Characterizing cardiovascular responses to autonomic challenges may provide insights into central nervous system impairments, including contributions by sex, since structural alterations are enhanced in OSA females over males. The objective was to assess heart rate responses in OSA versus healthy control subjects to autonomic challenges, and, separately, characterize female and male patterns. We studied 94 subjects, including 37 newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA patients (6 female, age mean ± std: 52.1 ± 8.1 years; 31 male aged 54.3 ± 8.4 years, and 57 healthy control subjects (20 female, 50.5 ± 8.1 years; 37 male, 45.6 ± 9.2 years. We measured instantaneous heart rate with pulse oximetry during cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. All challenges elicited significant heart rate differences between OSA and control groups during and after challenges (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05. In post-hoc analyses, OSA females showed greater impairments than OSA males, which included: for cold pressor, lower initial increase (OSA vs. control: 9.5 vs. 7.3 bpm in females, 7.6 vs. 3.7 bpm in males, OSA delay to initial peak (2.5 s females/0.9 s males, slower mid-challenge rate-of-increase (OSA vs. control: -0.11 vs. 0.09 bpm/s in females, 0.03 vs. 0.06 bpm/s in males; for hand grip, lower initial peak (OSA vs. control: 2.6 vs. 4.6 bpm in females, 5.3 vs. 6.0 bpm in males; for Valsalva maneuver, lower Valsalva ratio (OSA vs. control: 1.14 vs. 1.30 in females, 1.29 vs. 1.34 in males, and OSA delay during phase II (0.68 s females/1.31 s males. Heart rate responses showed lower amplitude, delayed onset, and slower rate changes in OSA patients over healthy controls, and impairments may be more pronounced in

  13. Multi-slice spiral CT coronary angiography: influence of heart rate and reconstruction window on image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Dingbiao; Hua Yanqing; Wang Mingpeng; Zhang Guozhen; Wu Weilan; Hu Fei; Ge Xiaojun; Ding Qiyong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of heart rate and reconstruction window on image quality of multi-slice spiral CT coronary angiography. Methods: Retrospectively ECG-gated MSCT coronary angiography were performed in 80 healthy cases. Results: Four coronary (RCA, LM, LAD, LCX) segments were analyzed in each patient with regard to image quality. 82.1% (46/56) of the coronary segments were sufficient for analysis in patients with heart rate ≤60 bpm, 63.4% (104/164) with 61-70 bpm, 41.2%(28/68) with 71-80 bpm, and 31.2%(10/32) with>80 bpm, respectively. The left anterior descending artery, left circumflex artery, and the right coronary artery were best visualized when the reconstruction window was 60%-70%, 50%-60%, and 50%-70%, respectively. Conclusion: Image quality of MSCT coronary angiography is highly dependent on heart rate and reconstruction window

  14. Evaluation of computed tomography coronary angiography in patients with a high heart rate using 16-slice spiral computed tomography with 0.37-s gantry rotation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shi-Zheng; Hu, Xiu-Hua; Zhang, Qiao-Wei; Huang, Wen-Xin

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study is to evaluate computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography in patients with a high heart rate using 16-slice spiral CT with 0.37-s gantry rotation time. We compare the image quality of patients whose heart rates were over 70 beats per minute (bpm) with that of patients whose heart rates were 70 bpm or less. Sixty patients with various heart rates underwent retrospectively ECG-gated multislice spiral CT (MSCT) coronary angiography. Two experienced observers who were blind to the heart rates of the patients evaluated all the MSCT coronary angiographic images and calculated the assessable segments. A total of 620 out of 891 (69.6%) segments were satisfactorily visualized. On average, 10.3 coronary artery segments per patient could be evaluated. In 36 patients whose heart rates were below 70 bpm [mean 62.2 bpm±5.32 (standard deviation, SD)], the number of assessable segments was 10.72±2.02 (SD). In the other 24 patients whose heart rates were above 70 bpm [mean 78.6 bpm±8.24 (SD)], the corresponding number was 9.75±1.74 (SD). No statistically significant difference was found in these two subgroups' t test, P>0.05. The new generation of 16-slice spiral CT with 0.37-s rotation time can satisfactorily evaluate the coronary arteries of patients with high heart rates (above 70 bpm, up to 102 bpm). (orig.)

  15. Using Complexity Metrics With R-R Intervals and BPM Heart Rate Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallot, Sebastian; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Lately, growing attention in the health sciences has been paid to the dynamics of heart rate as indicator of impending failures and for prognoses. Likewise, in social and cognitive sciences, heart rate is increasingly employed as a measure of arousal, emotional engagement and as a marker of inter......Lately, growing attention in the health sciences has been paid to the dynamics of heart rate as indicator of impending failures and for prognoses. Likewise, in social and cognitive sciences, heart rate is increasingly employed as a measure of arousal, emotional engagement and as a marker...... of interpersonal coordination. However, there is no consensus about which measurements and analytical tools are most appropriate in mapping the temporal dynamics of heart rate and quite different metrics are reported in the literature. As complexity metrics of heart rate variability depend critically...

  16. Rate control management of atrial fibrillation: may a mathematical model suggest an ideal heart rate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Anselmino

    Full Text Available Despite the routine prescription of rate control therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF, clinical evidence demonstrating a heart rate target is lacking. Aim of the present study was to run a mathematical model simulating AF episodes with a different heart rate (HR to predict hemodynamic parameters for each situation.The lumped model, representing the pumping heart together with systemic and pulmonary circuits, was run to simulate AF with HR of 50, 70, 90, 110 and 130 bpm, respectively.Left ventricular pressure increased by 57%, from 33.92±37.56 mmHg to 53.15±47.56 mmHg, and mean systemic arterial pressure increased by 27%, from 82.66±14.04 mmHg to 105.3±7.6 mmHg, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. Stroke volume (from 77.45±8.50 to 39.09±8.08 mL, ejection fraction (from 61.10±4.40 to 39.32±5.42% and stroke work (SW, from 0.88±0.04 to 0.58±0.09 J decreased by 50, 36 and 34%, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. In addition, oxygen consumption indexes (rate pressure product - RPP, tension time index per minute - TTI/min, and pressure volume area per minute - PVA/min increased from the 50 to the 130 bpm simulation, respectively, by 186% (from 5598±1939 to 15995±3219 mmHg/min, 56% (from 2094±265 to 3257±301 mmHg s/min and 102% (from 57.99±17.90 to 117.4±26.0 J/min. In fact, left ventricular efficiency (SW/PVA decreased from 80.91±2.91% at 50 bpm to 66.43±3.72% at the 130 bpm HR simulation.Awaiting compulsory direct clinical evidences, the present mathematical model suggests that lower HRs during permanent AF relates to improved hemodynamic parameters, cardiac efficiency, and lower oxygen consumption.

  17. Rate control management of atrial fibrillation: may a mathematical model suggest an ideal heart rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmino, Matteo; Scarsoglio, Stefania; Camporeale, Carlo; Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Despite the routine prescription of rate control therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF), clinical evidence demonstrating a heart rate target is lacking. Aim of the present study was to run a mathematical model simulating AF episodes with a different heart rate (HR) to predict hemodynamic parameters for each situation. The lumped model, representing the pumping heart together with systemic and pulmonary circuits, was run to simulate AF with HR of 50, 70, 90, 110 and 130 bpm, respectively. Left ventricular pressure increased by 57%, from 33.92±37.56 mmHg to 53.15±47.56 mmHg, and mean systemic arterial pressure increased by 27%, from 82.66±14.04 mmHg to 105.3±7.6 mmHg, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. Stroke volume (from 77.45±8.50 to 39.09±8.08 mL), ejection fraction (from 61.10±4.40 to 39.32±5.42%) and stroke work (SW, from 0.88±0.04 to 0.58±0.09 J) decreased by 50, 36 and 34%, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. In addition, oxygen consumption indexes (rate pressure product - RPP, tension time index per minute - TTI/min, and pressure volume area per minute - PVA/min) increased from the 50 to the 130 bpm simulation, respectively, by 186% (from 5598±1939 to 15995±3219 mmHg/min), 56% (from 2094±265 to 3257±301 mmHg s/min) and 102% (from 57.99±17.90 to 117.4±26.0 J/min). In fact, left ventricular efficiency (SW/PVA) decreased from 80.91±2.91% at 50 bpm to 66.43±3.72% at the 130 bpm HR simulation. Awaiting compulsory direct clinical evidences, the present mathematical model suggests that lower HRs during permanent AF relates to improved hemodynamic parameters, cardiac efficiency, and lower oxygen consumption.

  18. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Wearable Device for Monitoring Heart Rates in Hospital Inpatients: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Ryan R; Boyd, J Gordon; Maslove, David M

    2016-09-20

    As the sensing capabilities of wearable devices improve, there is increasing interest in their application in medical settings. Capabilities such as heart rate monitoring may be useful in hospitalized patients as a means of enhancing routine monitoring or as part of an early warning system to detect clinical deterioration. To evaluate the accuracy of heart rate monitoring by a personal fitness tracker (PFT) among hospital inpatients. We conducted a prospective observational study of 50 stable patients in the intensive care unit who each completed 24 hours of heart rate monitoring using a wrist-worn PFT. Accuracy of heart rate recordings was compared with gold standard measurements derived from continuous electrocardiographic (cECG) monitoring. The accuracy of heart rates measured by pulse oximetry (Spo2.R) was also measured as a positive control. On a per-patient basis, PFT-derived heart rate values were slightly lower than those derived from cECG monitoring (average bias of -1.14 beats per minute [bpm], with limits of agreement of 24 bpm). By comparison, Spo2.R recordings produced more accurate values (average bias of +0.15 bpm, limits of agreement of 13 bpm, P<.001 as compared with PFT). Personal fitness tracker device performance was significantly better in patients in sinus rhythm than in those who were not (average bias -0.99 bpm vs -5.02 bpm, P=.02). Personal fitness tracker-derived heart rates were slightly lower than those derived from cECG monitoring in real-world testing and not as accurate as Spo2.R-derived heart rates. Performance was worse among patients who were not in sinus rhythm. Further clinical evaluation is indicated to see if PFTs can augment early warning systems in hospitals. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02527408; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02527408 (Archived by WebCite at  http://www.webcitation.org/6kOFez3on).

  19. Monitoring nocturnal heart rate with bed sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, M; Kortelainen, J M; Pärkkä, J; Tenhunen, M; Himanen, S L; Bianchi, A M

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Biosignal Interpretation: Advanced Methods for Studying Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems". The aim of this study is to assess the reliability of the estimated Nocturnal Heart Rate (HR), recorded through a bed sensor, compared with the one obtained from standard electrocardiography (ECG). Twenty-eight sleep deprived patients were recorded for one night each through matrix of piezoelectric sensors, integrated into the mattress, through polysomnography (PSG) simultaneously. The two recording methods have been compared in terms of signal quality and differences in heart beat detection. On average, coverage of 92.7% of the total sleep time was obtained for the bed sensor, testifying the good quality of the recordings. The average beat-to-beat error of the inter-beat intervals was 1.06%. These results suggest a good overall signal quality, however, considering fast heart rates (HR > 100 bpm), performances were worse: in fact, the sensitivity in the heart beat detection was 28.4% while the false positive rate was 3.8% which means that a large amount of fast beats were not detected. The accuracy of the measurements made using the bed sensor has less than 10% of failure rate especially in periods with HR lower than 70 bpm. For fast heart beats the uncertainty increases. This can be explained by the change in morphology of the bed sensor signal in correspondence of a higher HR.

  20. Influence of heart rate on diagnostic accuracy and image quality of 16-slice CT coronary angiography: comparison of multisegment and halfscan reconstruction approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc; Teige, Florian; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Chariteplatz 1, P.O. Box 10098, Berlin (Germany); Laule, Michael [Department of Cardiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    The lower the heart rate the better image quality in multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography. We prospectively assessed the influence of heart rate on per-patient diagnostic accuracy and image quality of MSCT coronary angiography and compared adaptive multisegment and standard halfscan reconstruction. A consecutive cohort of 126 patients scheduled to undergo conventional coronary angiography was examined with 16-slice CT. For all heart rate groups, per-patient diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for multisegment than halfscan reconstruction with values of 95 vs. 79% (p < 0.05, <65 bpm, 38 patients), 85 vs. 66% (p < 0.05, 65-74 bpm, 47 patients), and 78% vs. 41% (p < 0.001, >74 bpm, 41 patients). Differences in diagnostic accuracy between adjacent heart rate groups were only significant for halfscan reconstruction for the comparison between the 65-74 and >74 bpm group (p < 0.05). The vessel lengths free of motion artifacts were significantly longer with multisegment reconstruction in all heart rate groups and for all coronary arteries (p < 0.005). For noninvasive MSCT coronary angiography, both per-patient diagnostic accuracy and image quality decline with increasing heart rate, and multisegment reconstruction at high heart rates yields similar results as standard halfscan reconstruction at low heart rates. (orig.)

  1. Electron-beam CT coronary angiography in the patients with high heart rate arrhythmia or pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Zhi; Zhu Jiemin; Liu Zhe; Liu Junbo; Li Youjie; Qi Ji

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical applicability of coronary angiography for patients with high heart rate, arrhythmia or cardiac pacing using the new-generation of electron-beam CT (e-Speed). Methods: EBCT (GE e-Speed) coronary angiography was performed in 36 eases (male 27, female 9, mean age 58), including the heart rate more than 90 bpm in 20 patients, frequent ectopic beats in 11 cases, implantation of cardiac pacemaker in 4 patients and the unacceptable MSCT image quality due to variability of interscan heart rate (from 82 bpm to 104 bpm) in 1 case. After volume data set was acquired using spiral mode with prospective ECG-gating, the reconstructions of MIP, CPR, VR and Cine were performed. The VR quality was evaluated using a five-point scale. Results: The quality of coronary imaging in all of 36 cases were acceptable. The total visualization rate of coronary artery branches was 80.0%. Left main, left anterior artery and right coronary artery were visualized in all patients and in 94.3% of all cases circumflex artery were visible. Conclusion: EBCT (e-Speed) is applicable in noninvasive coronary angiography for patients with high heart rate, arrhythmia or implanted cardiac pacemaker', and this examination can obtain satisfied diagnosis. (authors)

  2. Syncope During Competitive Events: Interrogating Heart Rate Monitor Watches May Be Useful!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabouillot, Oscar; Bostanci, Kevin; Bouvier, Francois; Dumitrescu, Nicolae; Stéfuriac, Maria; Paule, Philippe; Roche, Nicolas-Charles

    2017-12-01

    This is a case report of a 45-year-old man who reported complete amnesia during the very first kilometer of a 10-km run. He was wearing a heart rate monitor (HRM). The interrogation of his HRM watch showed 200 bpm tachycardia beginning in the first kilometer and increasing up to 220 bpm during the last kilometer. The patient was asked to wear a Holter-monitor (Holter Research Laboratory; Helena, Montana USA) electrocardiogram (ECG) while practicing a training session. This examination allowed for the diagnosis of an adrenergic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) with an impressive auriculo-ventricular conduction over 260 bpm. This case highlights that non-medical devices, such as connected watches, can be helpful to diagnose arrhythmias. Thabouillot O , Bostanci K , Bouvier F , Dumitrescu N , Stéfuriac M , Paule P , Roche NC . Syncope during competitive events: interrogating heart rate monitor watches may be useful! Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(6):691-693.

  3. A Multi-Channel Opto-Electronic Sensor to Accurately Monitor Heart Rate against Motion Artefact during Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alzahrani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the use of a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor (OEPS to effectively monitor critical physiological parameters whilst preventing motion artefact as increasingly demanded by personal healthcare. The aim of this work was to study how to capture the heart rate (HR efficiently through a well-constructed OEPS and a 3-axis accelerometer with wireless communication. A protocol was designed to incorporate sitting, standing, walking, running and cycling. The datasets collected from these activities were processed to elaborate sport physiological effects. t-test, Bland-Altman Agreement (BAA, and correlation to evaluate the performance of the OEPS were used against Polar and Mio-Alpha HR monitors. No differences in the HR were found between OEPS, and either Polar or Mio-Alpha (both p > 0.05; a strong correlation was found between Polar and OEPS (r: 0.96, p < 0.001; the bias of BAA 0.85 bpm, the standard deviation (SD 9.20 bpm, and the limits of agreement (LOA from −17.18 bpm to +18.88 bpm. For the Mio-Alpha and OEPS, a strong correlation was found (r: 0.96, p < 0.001; the bias of BAA 1.63 bpm, SD 8.62 bpm, LOA from −15.27 bpm to +18.58 bpm. These results demonstrate the OEPS to be capable of carrying out real time and remote monitoring of heart rate.

  4. Effectiveness of Using Dual-source CT and the Upshot it creates on Both Heart Rate and Image Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Selçuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early detection of coronary artery disease (CAD is important because of the high morbidity and mortality rates. As invasive coronary angiography (ICA is an invasive procedure, an alternative diagnostic method; coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA, has become more widely used by the improvements in detector technology. Aims: In this study, we aimed to examine the accuracy and image quality of high-pitch 128-slice dual-source CTA taking the ICA as reference technique. We also aimed to compare the accuracy and image quality between different heart rate groups of >70 beates per minute (bpm and ≤70 bpm. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: Among 450 patients who underwent coronary CTA with the FLASH spiral technique, performed with a second generation dual-source computed tomography device with a pitch value of 3.2, 102 patients without stent and/or bypass surgery history and clinically suspected coronary artery disease who underwent ICA within 15 days were enrolled. Image quality was assessed by two independent radiologists using a 4-point scale (1=absence of any artifacts- 4=non-evaluable. A stenosis >50% was considered significant on a per-segment, per-vessel, and per-patient basis and ICA was considered the reference method. Radiation doses were determined using dose length product (DLP values detected by the computed tomography (CT device. In addition, patients were classified into two groups according to their heart rates as ≤70 bpm (73 patients and >70 bpm (29 patients. The relation between the diagnostic accuracy and heart rate groups were evaluated. Results: Overall, 1495 (98% coronary segments were diagnostic in 102 patients (32 male, 70 female, mean heart rate: 65 bpm. There was a significant correlation between image quality and mean heart rate in the right coronary artery (RCA segments. The effective radiation dose was 0.98±0.09 mili Sievert (mSv. On a per-patient basis, sensitivity

  5. Evaluation of three-dimensional navigator-gated whole heart MR coronary angiography: The importance of systolic imaging in subjects with high heart rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yenwen; Tadamura, Eiji; Yamamuro, Masaki; Kanao, Shotaro; Nakayama, Kazuki; Togashi, Kaori

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of heart rate (HR) on magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA) image quality in diastolic and systolic phases. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven healthy volunteers (9 men; 33 ± 9 years, HR 53-110 bpm), were evaluated with the electrocardiography and three-dimensional navigator-gating MRCA in a 1.5-T MR scanner (Avanto, Siemens) in diastolic and systolic phases (steady-state free precession; TR/TE/flip angle = 3.2 ms/1.6 ms/90 o ). The timing of scanning was individually adapted to the cardiac rest periods obtained in the prescanning, by visually identifying when the movement of right coronary artery was minimized during diastole and systole. Images of two phases were side-by-side compared on a four-point scale (from 1 = poor to 4 = excellent visibility; score of 3 or 4 as diagnostic). Results: Of 13 subjects with HR ≤65 bpm (low HR group, mean 59.8 ± 4.9 bpm, range 53-65), the image quality scores were significantly better than that with higher heart rates (73.9 ± 9.0 bpm, range 68-110) in diastolic MRCA. The image quality was significantly improved during systole in high HR group. Overall, 91.3% of low HR group had MRCA image of diagnostic quality acquired at diastole, while 88.3% of high HR group had diagnostic images at systole by segmental analysis (p = NS). Conclusions: MRCA at systole offered superior quality in patients with high heart rates

  6. The antiarrhythmic effect of vagal stimulation after acute coronary occlusion: Role of the heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manati, Waheed; Pineau, Julien; Doñate Puertas, Rosa; Morel, Elodie; Quadiri, Timour; Bui-Xuan, Bernard; Chevalier, Philippe

    2018-01-03

    Strong evidence suggests a causal link between autonomic disturbances and ventricular arrhythmias. However, the mechanisms underlying the antiarrhythmic effect of vagal stimulation are poorly understood. The vagal antiarrhythmic effect might be modulated by a decrease in heart rate. the proximal anterior interventricular artery was occluded in 16 pigs by clamping under general anaesthesia. Group 1: heart rates remained spontaneous (n = 6; 12 occlusions); Group 2: heart rates were fixed at 190 beats per minute (bpm) with atrial electrical stimulation (n = 10; 20 occlusions). Each pig received two occlusions, 30 min apart, one without and one with vagal stimulation (10 Hz, 2 ms, 5-20 mA). The antiarrhythmic effect of vagal activation was defined as the time to the appearance of ventricular fibrillation (VF) after occlusion. In Group 1, vagal stimulation triggered a significant decrease in basal heart rate (132 ± 4 vs. 110 ± 17 bpm, p coronary occlusion (1102 ± 85 vs. 925 ± 41 s, p acute coronary occlusion.

  7. Heart rate never lies: interventional cardiologist and Braude's quote revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Stéphane; Stauffer, Jean-Christophe; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Graf, Denis; Puricel, Serban; Frobert, Aurélien; Muller, Olivier; Togni, Mario; Arroyo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Interventional cardiologists may be immune to stress, allowing them to perform complex percutaneous interventions under pressure. To assess heart rate (HR) variations as a surrogate marker of stress of interventional cardiologists during percutaneous cardiac procedures and in every-day life. This is a single-centre observational study including a total of six male interventional cardiologists performing coronary interventions and pacemaker implantations. Participants were asked to record their HR with the Apple Watch Device during procedures, every-day life and control activities such as outpatient consultations, sport, marital conflicts and sexual intercourse. Average daily HR was 88±17 bpm. During work days, HR increased significantly during procedures (90±17 bpm) compared with days outside the cathlab (87±17 bpm, p=0.02). The average HR was higher during a regular week working (88±16 bpm) compared with weekends off (84±18 bpm, p=0.002). Complex cardiac procedures were associated with higher HR up to 122 bpm. Peak HR were higher during physical exertion. Of note, participants complained of hypersexuality and mania after night shifts. Work and especially percutaneous cardiac procedures increase HR independently of physical exertion suggesting that interventional cardiologists experience mental stress and emotions.

  8. Estimation of organ-absorbed radiation doses during 64-detector CT coronary angiography using different acquisition techniques and heart rates: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro; Kawashima, Hiroko (Dept. of Quantum Medical Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa (Japan)), email: matsuk@mhs.mp.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Noto, Kimiya; Takata, Tadanori; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki (Dept. of Radiological Technology, Kanazawa Univ. Hospital, Kanazawa (Japan)); Shimono, Tetsunori (Dept. of Radiology, Hoshigaoka Koseinenkin Hospital, Hirakata (Japan)); Matsui, Osamu (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa (Japan))

    2011-07-15

    Background: Though appropriate image acquisition parameters allow an effective dose below 1 mSv for CT coronary angiography (CTCA) performed with the latest dual-source CT scanners, a single-source 64-detector CT procedure results in a significant radiation dose due to its technical limitations. Therefore, estimating the radiation doses absorbed by an organ during 64-detector CTCA is important. Purpose: To estimate the radiation doses absorbed by organs located in the chest region during 64-detector CTCA using different acquisition techniques and heart rates. Material and Methods: Absorbed doses for breast, heart, lung, red bone marrow, thymus, and skin were evaluated using an anthropomorphic phantom and radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLDs). Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated helical and ECG-triggered non-helical acquisitions were performed by applying a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute (bpm) and ECG-gated helical acquisitions using ECG modulation (ECGM) of the tube current were performed by applying simulated heart rates of 40, 60, and 90 bpm after placing RPLDs on the anatomic location of each organ. The absorbed dose for each organ was calculated by multiplying the calibrated mean dose values of RPLDs with the mass energy coefficient ratio. Results: For all acquisitions, the highest absorbed dose was observed for the heart. When the helical and non-helical acquisitions were performed by applying a simulated heart rate of 60 bpm, the absorbed doses for heart were 215.5, 202.2, and 66.8 mGy for helical, helical with ECGM, and non-helical acquisitions, respectively. When the helical acquisitions using ECGM were performed by applying simulated heart rates of 40, 60, and 90 bpm, the absorbed doses for heart were 178.6, 139.1, and 159.3 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: ECG-triggered non-helical acquisition is recommended to reduce the radiation dose. Also, controlling the patients' heart rate appropriately during ECG-gated helical acquisition with

  9. The heart rate response to nintendo wii boxing in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Pamela R; Poloni, Joseph; Thornton, Andrew; Lynskey, James V

    2012-06-01

    To determine if 30 minutes of Nintendo Wii Sports boxing provides cardiorespiratory benefits and contributes to the daily exercise recommendations for healthy young adults. Twenty healthy 23- to 27-year-olds participated in two sessions to measure maximum heart rate (HR(max)) via a treadmill test and heart rate (HR) response to 30 minutes of Wii Sports boxing. Heart rate in beats per minute (bpm) was measured continuously, and exercise intensity during each minute of play was stratified as a percentage of HR(max). Mixed designs analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Pearson product moment correlations were used to analyze the data. Mean (SD) HR response to boxing was 143 (15) bpm or 77.5% (10.0%) of HR(max). The mean HR response for experienced participants was significantly lower than inexperienced participants, P = .007. The ANOVA revealed a significant interaction between experience and time spent at various intensities, P = .009. Experienced participants spent more time in light to vigorous intensities, inexperienced participants in moderate to very hard intensities. Fitness was not correlated with mean HR response to boxing, P = .49. Thirty minutes of Nintendo Wii Sports boxing provides a moderate to vigorous aerobic response in healthy young adults and can contribute to daily recommendations for physical activity.

  10. Influence of heart rate on diagnostic accuracy and image quality of 16-slice CT coronary angiography: comparison of multisegment and halfscan reconstruction approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc; Teige, Florian; Hamm, Bernd; Laule, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The lower the heart rate the better image quality in multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography. We prospectively assessed the influence of heart rate on per-patient diagnostic accuracy and image quality of MSCT coronary angiography and compared adaptive multisegment and standard halfscan reconstruction. A consecutive cohort of 126 patients scheduled to undergo conventional coronary angiography was examined with 16-slice CT. For all heart rate groups, per-patient diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for multisegment than halfscan reconstruction with values of 95 vs. 79% (p 74 bpm, 41 patients). Differences in diagnostic accuracy between adjacent heart rate groups were only significant for halfscan reconstruction for the comparison between the 65-74 and >74 bpm group (p < 0.05). The vessel lengths free of motion artifacts were significantly longer with multisegment reconstruction in all heart rate groups and for all coronary arteries (p < 0.005). For noninvasive MSCT coronary angiography, both per-patient diagnostic accuracy and image quality decline with increasing heart rate, and multisegment reconstruction at high heart rates yields similar results as standard halfscan reconstruction at low heart rates. (orig.)

  11. Understanding heart rate alarm adjustment in the intensive care units through an analytical approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Fidler

    Full Text Available Heart rate (HR alarms are prevalent in ICU, and these parameters are configurable. Not much is known about nursing behavior associated with tailoring HR alarm parameters to individual patients to reduce clinical alarm fatigue.To understand the relationship between heart rate (HR alarms and adjustments to reduce unnecessary heart rate alarms.Retrospective, quantitative analysis of an adjudicated database using analytical approaches to understand behaviors surrounding parameter HR alarm adjustments. Patients were sampled from five adult ICUs (77 beds over one month at a quaternary care university medical center. A total of 337 of 461 ICU patients had HR alarms with 53.7% male, mean age 60.3 years, and 39% non-Caucasian. Default HR alarm parameters were 50 and 130 beats per minute (bpm. The occurrence of each alarm, vital signs, and physiologic waveforms was stored in a relational database (SQL server.There were 23,624 HR alarms for analysis, with 65.4% exceeding the upper heart rate limit. Only 51% of patients with HR alarms had parameters adjusted, with a median upper limit change of +5 bpm and -1 bpm lower limit. The median time to first HR parameter adjustment was 17.9 hours, without reduction in alarms occurrence (p = 0.57.HR alarms are prevalent in ICU, and half of HR alarm settings remain at default. There is a long delay between HR alarms and parameters changes, with insufficient changes to decrease HR alarms. Increasing frequency of HR alarms shortens the time to first adjustment. Best practice guidelines for HR alarm limits are needed to reduce alarm fatigue and improve monitoring precision.

  12. Heart rate at admission is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes: Results from 58 European hospitals: The European Hospital Benchmarking by Outcomes in acute coronary syndrome Processes study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Magnus T; Pereira, Marta; Araujo, Carla; Malmivaara, Anti; Ferrieres, Jean; Degano, Irene R; Kirchberger, Inge; Farmakis, Dimitrios; Garel, Pascal; Torre, Marina; Marrugat, Jaume; Azevedo, Ana

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between heart rate at admission and in-hospital mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). Consecutive ACS patients admitted in 2008-2010 across 58 hospitals in six participant countries of the European Hospital Benchmarking by Outcomes in ACS Processes (EURHOBOP) project (Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Portugal and Spain). Cardiogenic shock patients were excluded. Associations between heart rate at admission in categories of 10 beats per min (bpm) and in-hospital mortality were estimated by logistic regression in crude models and adjusting for age, sex, obesity, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, known heart failure, renal failure, previous stroke and ischaemic heart disease. In total 10,374 patients were included. In both STEMI and NSTE-ACS patients, a U-shaped relationship between admission heart rate and in-hospital mortality was found. The lowest risk was observed for heart rates between 70-79 bpm in STEMI and 60-69 bpm in NSTE-ACS; risk of mortality progressively increased with lower or higher heart rates. In multivariable models, the relationship persisted but was significant only for heart rates >80 bpm. A similar relationship was present in both patients with or without diabetes, above or below age 75 years, and irrespective of the presence of atrial fibrillation or use of beta-blockers. Heart rate at admission is significantly associated with in-hospital mortality in patients with both STEMI and NSTE-ACS. ACS patients with admission heart rate above 80 bpm are at highest risk of in-hospital mortality.

  13. A three-lead, programmable, and microcontroller-based electrocardiogram generator with frequency domain characteristics of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ying-Chieh; Wei, Ying-Yu; Chang, Kai-Hsiung; Young, Ming-Shing

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study is to design and develop a programmable electrocardiogram (ECG) generator with frequency domain characteristics of heart rate variability (HRV) which can be used to test the efficiency of ECG algorithms and to calibrate and maintain ECG equipment. We simplified and modified the three coupled ordinary differential equations in McSharry's model to a single differential equation to obtain the ECG signal. This system not only allows the signal amplitude, heart rate, QRS-complex slopes, and P- and T-wave position parameters to be adjusted, but can also be used to adjust the very low frequency, low frequency, and high frequency components of HRV frequency domain characteristics. The system can be tuned to function with HRV or not. When the HRV function is on, the average heart rate can be set to a value ranging from 20 to 122 beats per minute (BPM) with an adjustable variation of 1 BPM. When the HRV function is off, the heart rate can be set to a value ranging from 20 to 139 BPM with an adjustable variation of 1 BPM. The amplitude of the ECG signal can be set from 0.0 to 330 mV at a resolution of 0.005 mV. These parameters can be adjusted either via input through a keyboard or through a graphical user interface (GUI) control panel that was developed using LABVIEW. The GUI control panel depicts a preview of the ECG signal such that the user can adjust the parameters to establish a desired ECG morphology. A complete set of parameters can be stored in the flash memory of the system via a USB 2.0 interface. Our system can generate three different types of synthetic ECG signals for testing the efficiency of an ECG algorithm or calibrating and maintaining ECG equipment. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  14. Revisiting the relationship between exercise heart rate and music tempo preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorghis, Costas I; Jones, Leighton; Priest, David-Lee; Akers, Rose I; Clarke, Adam; Perry, Jennifer M; Reddick, Benjamin T; Bishop, Daniel T; Lim, Harry B T

    2011-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated a hypothesized quartic relationship (meaning three inflection points) between exercise heart rate (HR) and preferred music tempo. Initial theoretical predictions suggested a positive linear relationship (Iwanaga, 1995a, 1995b); however, recent experimental work has shown that as exercise HR increases, step changes and plateaus that punctuate the profile of music tempo preference may occur (Karageorghis, Jones, & Stuart, 2008). Tempi bands consisted of slow (95-100 bpm), medium (115-120 bpm), fast (135-140 bpm), and very fast (155-160 bpm) music. Twenty-eight active undergraduate students cycled at exercise intensities representing 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% of their maximal HR reserve while their music preference was assessed using a 10-point scale. The Exercise Intensity x Music Tempo interaction was significant, F(6.16, 160.05) = 7.08, p music-tempo relationship (p music was not preferred at any exercise intensity, preference for fast tempo increased, relative to medium and very fast tempo music, as exercise intensity increased. The implications for the prescription of music in exercise and physical activity contexts are discussed.

  15. Forehead reflectance photoplethysmography to monitor heart rate: preliminary results from neonatal patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grubb, M R; Carpenter, J; Crowe, J A; Teoh, J; Hayes-Gill, B R; Marlow, N; Ward, C; Mann, C; Sharkey, D

    2014-01-01

    Around 5%–10% of newborn babies require some form of resuscitation at birth and heart rate (HR) is the best guide of efficacy. We report the development and first trial of a device that continuously monitors neonatal HR, with a view to deployment in the delivery room to guide newborn resuscitation. The device uses forehead reflectance photoplethysmography (PPG) with modulated light and lock-in detection. Forehead fixation has numerous advantages including ease of sensor placement, whilst perfusion at the forehead is better maintained in comparison to the extremities. Green light (525 nm) was used, in preference to the more usual red or infrared wavelengths, to optimize the amplitude of the pulsatile signal. Experimental results are presented showing simultaneous PPG and electrocardiogram (ECG) HRs from babies (n = 77), gestational age 26–42 weeks, on a neonatal intensive care unit. In babies ⩾32 weeks gestation, the median reliability was 97.7% at ±10 bpm and the limits of agreement (LOA) between PPG and ECG were +8.39 bpm and −8.39 bpm. In babies <32 weeks gestation, the median reliability was 94.8% at ±10 bpm and the LOA were +11.53 bpm and −12.01 bpm. Clinical evaluation during newborn deliveries is now underway. (paper)

  16. Fetal QRS detection and heart rate estimation: a wavelet-based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Rute; Rocha, Ana Paula; Gonçalves, Hernâni; Bernardes, João

    2014-01-01

    Fetal heart rate monitoring is used for pregnancy surveillance in obstetric units all over the world but in spite of recent advances in analysis methods, there are still inherent technical limitations that bound its contribution to the improvement of perinatal indicators. In this work, a previously published wavelet transform based QRS detector, validated over standard electrocardiogram (ECG) databases, is adapted to fetal QRS detection over abdominal fetal ECG. Maternal ECG waves were first located using the original detector and afterwards a version with parameters adapted for fetal physiology was applied to detect fetal QRS, excluding signal singularities associated with maternal heartbeats. Single lead (SL) based marks were combined in a single annotator with post processing rules (SLR) from which fetal RR and fetal heart rate (FHR) measures can be computed. Data from PhysioNet with reference fetal QRS locations was considered for validation, with SLR outperforming SL including ICA based detections. The error in estimated FHR using SLR was lower than 20 bpm for more than 80% of the processed files. The median error in 1 min based FHR estimation was 0.13 bpm, with a correlation between reference and estimated FHR of 0.48, which increased to 0.73 when considering only records for which estimated FHR > 110 bpm. This allows us to conclude that the proposed methodology is able to provide a clinically useful estimation of the FHR. (paper)

  17. Real-life indications to ivabradine treatment for heart rate optimization in patients with chronic systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondi, Lara; Fragasso, Gabriele; Spoladore, Roberto; Pinto, Giuseppe; Gemma, Marco; Slavich, Massimo; Godino, Cosmo; Salerno, Anna; Montanaro, Claudia; Margonato, Alberto

    2018-05-11

    : Ivabradine is a selective and specific inhibitor of If current. With its pure negative chronotropic action, it is recommended by European Society of Cardiology and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines in symptomatic heart failure patients (NYHA ≥ 2) with ejection fraction 35% or less, sinus rhythm and heart rate (HR) at least 70 bpm, despite maximally titrated β-blocker therapy. Data supporting this indication mainly derive from the SHIFT study, in which ivabradine reduced the combined endpoint of mortality and hospitalization, despite the fact that only 26% of patients enrolled were on optimal β-blocker doses. The aim of the present analysis is to establish the real-life eligibility for ivabradine in a population of patients with systolic heart failure, regularly attending a single heart failure clinic and treated according to guideline-directed medical therapy (GDMT). The clinical cards of 308 patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) through a 68-month period of observation were retrospectively analyzed. GDMT, including β-blocker up-titration to maximal tolerated dose, was implemented during consecutive visits at variable intervals. Demographic, clinical and echocardiographic data were collected at each visit, together with 12-leads ECG and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels. Out of 308 analyzed HFrEF patients, 220 (71%) were on effective β-blocker therapy, up-titrated to effective/maximal tolerated dose (55 ± 28% of maximal dose) (HR 67 ± 10 bpm). Among the remaining 88 patients, 10 (3.2%) were on maximally tolerated β blocker and ivabradine; 21 patients (6.8%), despite being on maximal tolerated β-blocker dose, had still HR ≥70 bpm, ejection fraction 35% or less and were symptomatic NYHA ≥2, being therefore eligible for ivabradine treatment. The remaining 57 (18%) patients were not on β blocker due to either intolerance or major contraindications. Among

  18. Maximal heart rate in soccer players: Measured versus age-predicted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelis T Nikolaidis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although maximal heart rate (HR max is widely used to assess exercise intensity in sport training, and particularly in soccer, there are limited data with regards to the use of age-based prediction equations of HR max in soccer players. The aim of this study was to compare the measured-HR max with two prediction equations (Fox-HR max = 220 – age and Tanaka-HR max = 208 – 0.7 × age in soccer players. Methods: Adolescent (n = 162, 15.8 ± 1.5 years and adult players (n = 158, 23.4 ± 4.6 years, all members of competitive clubs, voluntarily performed a graded exercise field test (Conconi protocol to assess HR max . Results: The measured-HR max (197.6 ± 9.4 bpm in total, 200.2 ± 7.9 bpm in adolescent players, and 195.0 ± 10.0 bpm in adult players was explained by the formula HR max = 212.3 – 0.75 × age (r = −0.41, standard error of the estimate = 8.6. In the total sample, Fox-HR max overestimated measured-HR max [mean difference (95% confidence intervals = 2.8 bpm (1.6; 3.9], while Tanaka-HR max underestimated HR max [–3.3 bpm (–4.5; –2.2]. In adolescents, Fox-HR max overestimated measured-HR max [4.0 bpm (2.5; 5.5] and Tanaka-HR max underestimated HR max [– 3.2 bpm (–4.7; –1.8]. In adults, Tanaka-HR max underestimated HR max [–5.0 bpm (–5.3; –4.7], while there was not any difference between Fox-HR max and measured-HR max [1.6 bpm (–3.4; 0.2]. Conclusions: The results of this study failed to validate two widely used prediction equations in a large sample of soccer players, indicating the need for a sport-specific equation. On the other hand, the new equation that we presented should be investigated further by future studies before being adopted by coaches and fitness trainers.

  19. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant η. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and η. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y η were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus η decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product η HR remained stable. The viscous modulus η increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of η when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms

  20. Accuracy of Heart Rate Watches: Implications for Weight Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Wallen

    Full Text Available Wrist-worn monitors claim to provide accurate measures of heart rate and energy expenditure. People wishing to lose weight use these devices to monitor energy balance, however the accuracy of these devices to measure such parameters has not been established.To determine the accuracy of four wrist-worn devices (Apple Watch, Fitbit Charge HR, Samsung Gear S and Mio Alpha to measure heart rate and energy expenditure at rest and during exercise.Twenty-two healthy volunteers (50% female; aged 24 ± 5.6 years completed ~1-hr protocols involving supine and seated rest, walking and running on a treadmill and cycling on an ergometer. Data from the devices collected during the protocol were compared with reference methods: electrocardiography (heart rate and indirect calorimetry (energy expenditure.None of the devices performed significantly better overall, however heart rate was consistently more accurate than energy expenditure across all four devices. Correlations between the devices and reference methods were moderate to strong for heart rate (0.67-0.95 [0.35 to 0.98] and weak to strong for energy expenditure (0.16-0.86 [-0.25 to 0.95]. All devices underestimated both outcomes compared to reference methods. The percentage error for heart rate was small across the devices (range: 1-9% but greater for energy expenditure (9-43%. Similarly, limits of agreement were considerably narrower for heart rate (ranging from -27.3 to 13.1 bpm than energy expenditure (ranging from -266.7 to 65.7 kcals across devices.These devices accurately measure heart rate. However, estimates of energy expenditure are poor and would have implications for people using these devices for weight loss.

  1. Accuracy of Heart Rate Watches: Implications for Weight Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Matthew P; Gomersall, Sjaan R; Keating, Shelley E; Wisløff, Ulrik; Coombes, Jeff S

    2016-01-01

    Wrist-worn monitors claim to provide accurate measures of heart rate and energy expenditure. People wishing to lose weight use these devices to monitor energy balance, however the accuracy of these devices to measure such parameters has not been established. To determine the accuracy of four wrist-worn devices (Apple Watch, Fitbit Charge HR, Samsung Gear S and Mio Alpha) to measure heart rate and energy expenditure at rest and during exercise. Twenty-two healthy volunteers (50% female; aged 24 ± 5.6 years) completed ~1-hr protocols involving supine and seated rest, walking and running on a treadmill and cycling on an ergometer. Data from the devices collected during the protocol were compared with reference methods: electrocardiography (heart rate) and indirect calorimetry (energy expenditure). None of the devices performed significantly better overall, however heart rate was consistently more accurate than energy expenditure across all four devices. Correlations between the devices and reference methods were moderate to strong for heart rate (0.67-0.95 [0.35 to 0.98]) and weak to strong for energy expenditure (0.16-0.86 [-0.25 to 0.95]). All devices underestimated both outcomes compared to reference methods. The percentage error for heart rate was small across the devices (range: 1-9%) but greater for energy expenditure (9-43%). Similarly, limits of agreement were considerably narrower for heart rate (ranging from -27.3 to 13.1 bpm) than energy expenditure (ranging from -266.7 to 65.7 kcals) across devices. These devices accurately measure heart rate. However, estimates of energy expenditure are poor and would have implications for people using these devices for weight loss.

  2. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Endurance training lowers heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise, but the mechanisms and consequences remain unclear. To determine the role of skeletal muscle for the cardioventilatory response to exercise, 8 healthy young men were studied before and after 5 weeks of 1-legged knee-ex...... was ≈ 15 bpm lower during exercise with the trained leg (P...

  3. Determination of the intensity of a power jump session by means of heart rate monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Grossl

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2008v10n2p129 A Power Jump (PJ session is considered to be a safe and easy class that also involves intermittent exercises that prolong the time to exhaustion. However, there is not enough information about this subject in the literature. The purpose of this study was to determine the intensity of a PJ session by means of heart rate (HR monitoring. Eleven physically active females participated in the study (age: 21.7 ± 1.9 years; body mass: 59.3 ± 4.8 kg; height: 162.6 ± 5.6 cm; percentage body fat: 22.6 ± 3.2 %. Participants were asked to perform an incremental test (IT, in order to obtain values for oxygen uptake (VO2, maximal heart rate (HRmax, heart rate deflection point (HRDP and energy expenditure (EE. The HR of the subjects was monitored during a special type of Power Jump session called “mix nine” on two different occasions. According to the HRDP values, physiological domains could be divided into three exercise intensity classes: moderate, heavy and severe. Descriptive statistics were adopted (mean ± SD. Student’s t test was used to compare HR and EE between PJ1 and PJ2. For comparisons between domains, two-way ANOVA and the Scheffé test were used. The level of significance was set at p<0.05. Mean HRmax obtained during the IT was 195±10bpm. The velocities, HR and %HRmax corresponding to HRDP and 80% of HRDP were 10.1±0.95km.h-1, 178±7bpm and 91.7±4.0%; and 8.1±0.76km.h-1, 143±5bpm and 73.4±3.2%, respectively. Values for HRmean and EE were significantly different when PJ1 (161±11bpm, 386±58.2kcal and PJ2 (156±10bpm, 355.1±53.8kcal were compared. The times spent in each exercise intensity domain were: heavy 51±14.5%; severe 27±19.7% and moderate 23±8.7%. These results show that the subjects spent most of the time in the heavy exercise domain which, in turn, appears to be the most indicated for improving aerobic capacity.

  4. Effects of heart rate on myocardial thallium-201 uptake and clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordrehaug, J.E.; Danielsen, R.; Vik-Mo, H.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of heart rate on the myocardial uptake and clearance of 201 Tl were studied prospectively in seven healthy men, mean age 43 +/- 7 (s.d.) yr. Initial and delayed (3 hr) thallium images were obtained in three views after three bicycle exercise tests: to maximal, 80% and 60% of predicted maximal heart rate. The mean of three views initial myocardial 201 Tl uptake was higher at maximal than at both 80% and 60% of predicted maximal heart rate, being 81% (p less than 0.01) and 60% (p less than 0.01) of maximal activity, respectively. The myocardial activity in the delayed images was identical. There was a linear relationship between heart rate and the initial myocardial activity, r = 0.86 (p less than 0.001). The mean (range) 201 Tl clearance was 58% (51-65), 47% (34-56), and 34% (22-49) (all differences p less than 0.01), respectively. Concordance among the three individual views in estimating clearance was best for the highest exercise level. There was a linear relationship between heart rate and clearance, r = 0.80 (p less than 0.001). Clearance was altered by only 1.67 x 10%/heart bpm (0.024 hr/heart beat). Clearance in the liver, spleen and lungs increased at submaximal exercise levels. Thus, a linear relationship between heart rate and clearance is the result of changes in the initial exercise myocardial 201 Tl activity. Submaximal exercise may reduce reproducibility of clearance estimation, and the change of myocardial clearance with heart rate seems less than previously suggested

  5. Beta blockers and chronic heart failure patients: prognostic impact of a dose targeted beta blocker therapy vs. heart rate targeted strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corletto, Anna; Fröhlich, Hanna; Täger, Tobias; Hochadel, Matthias; Zahn, Ralf; Kilkowski, Caroline; Winkler, Ralph; Senges, Jochen; Katus, Hugo A; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2018-05-17

    Beta blockers improve survival in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (CHF). Whether physicians should aim for target dose, target heart rate (HR), or both is still under debate. We identified 1,669 patients with systolic CHF due to ischemic heart disease or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy from the University Hospital Heidelberg and the Clinic of Ludwigshafen, Germany. All patients were treated with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker and had a history of CHF known for at least 6 months. Target dose was defined as treatment with ≥ 95% of the respective published guideline-recommended dose. Target HR was defined as 51-69 bpm. All-cause mortality during the median follow-up of 42.8 months was analysed with respect to beta blocker dosing and resting HR. 201 (12%) patients met the dose target (group A), 285 (17.1%) met the HR target (group B), 627 (37.6%) met no target (group C), and 556 (33.3%) did not receive beta blockers (Group D). 5-year mortality was 23.7, 22.7, 37.6, and 55.6% for group A, B, C, and D, respectively (p <  0.001). Survival for group A patients with a HR ≥ 70 bpm was 28.8% but 14.8% if HR was 50-70 bpm (p = 0.054). Achieving guidelines recommended beta blocker dose or to HR control has a similar positive impact on survival. When on target dose, supplemental HR control additionally improves survival.

  6. Prospective and retrospective ECG-gating for CT coronary angiography perform similarly accurate at low heart rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolzmann, Paul, E-mail: paul.stolzmann@usz.ch [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Goetti, Robert; Baumueller, Stephan [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Plass, Andre; Falk, Volkmar [Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Scheffel, Hans; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Marincek, Borut [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Leschka, Sebastian [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    Objective: To compare, in patients with suspicion of coronary artery disease (CAD) and low heart rates, image quality, diagnostic performance, and radiation dose values of prospectively and retrospectively electrocardiography (ECG)-gated dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for the diagnosis of significant coronary stenoses. Materials and methods: Two-hundred consecutive patients with heart rates {<=}70 bpm were retrospectively enrolled; 100 patients undergoing prospectively ECG-gated CTCA (group 1) and 100 patients undergoing retrospectively-gated CTCA (group 2). Coronary artery segments were assessed for image quality and significant luminal diameter narrowing. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV), negative predictive values (NPV), and accuracy of both CTCA groups were determined using conventional catheter angiography (CCA) as reference standard. Radiation dose values were calculated. Results: Both groups were comparable regarding gender, body weight, cardiovascular risk profile, severity of CAD, mean heart rate, heart rate variability, and Agatston score (all p > 0.05). There was no significant difference in the rate of non-assessable coronary segments between group 1 (1.6%, 24/1404) and group 2 (1.4%, 19/1385; p = 0.77); non-diagnostic image quality was significantly (p < 0.001) more often attributed to stair step artifacts in group 1. Segment-based sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy were 98%, 98%, 88%, 100%, and 100% among group 1; 96%, 99%, 90%, 100%, and 98% among group 2, respectively. Parameters of diagnostic performance were similar (all p > 0.05). Mean effective radiation dose of prospectively ECG-gated CTCA (2.2 {+-} 0.4 mSv) was significantly (p < 0.0001) smaller than that of retrospectively ECG-gated CTCA (8.1 {+-} 0.6 mSv). Conclusion: Prospectively ECG-gated CTCA yields similar image quality, performs as accurately as retrospectively ECG-gated CTCA in patients having heart rates {<=}70 bpm

  7. Development of a BPM Lock-In Diagnostic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Dickson

    2003-05-12

    A system has been developed for the acquisition and analysis of high rate, time coherent BPM data across the Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This system will allow the acquisition of Beam Position Monitor (BPM) position and intensity information at a rate in excess 7 KHz for approximately 200 BPMs in a time synchronous manner. By inducing minute sinusoidal transverse beam motion in the CEBAF injector, with known phase relative to the synchronized BPM acquisition, it is possible to derive several types of useful information. Analysis of the BPM intensity data, which is proportional to beam current, by beating the signal with an in-phase sinusoidal representation of the transverse kick can localize beam scraping to a particular BPM. Similarly, real-time optics information may be deduced with an analysis of BPM position data. This paper will detail the frequency lock-in technique applied and present status.

  8. The Effect of a Reconstruction Technique and Heart Rate in the Evaluation of Optimal Trigger Delay Using Multiphase Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Jun

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the mean optimal trigger delays and the difference between the absolute delay and the relative delay as a function of heart rate, using multiphase reconstruction. A total of 30 patients consecutively underwent a 64-slice MDCT examination. Optimal trigger delays at four planes (the bifurcation of the left main coronary artery, aortic valve, mitral valve and cardiac apex) were measured using multiphase reconstruction based on the absolute and relative delay. For this reason, patients were divided into three groups according to heart rate (group I, < 65 bpm; group II, 65-74 bpm; group III, ≥ 75 bpm), and the mean optimal trigger delays and the difference between the absolute delay and the relative delay were evaluated at the four planes for each group. The mean optimal trigger delay for the relative delay and absolute delay ranged from 46% to 66% and from 327 to 700 msec, respectively. The differences in the mean optimal trigger delay using the relative and the absolute delay at the four planes were 1% and 4 msec (group I), 3% and 27 msec (group II), and 14% and 46 msec (group III). In group III, the difference of the mean optimal trigger delay based on the relative delay, increased significantly compared to the absolute delay (p = 0.040). For the patients analyzed, the results suggest that as the heart rate increased, the mean optimal trigger delays shifted from the mid-diastolic phase to the end-systolic phase and the differences in the mean optimal trigger delay at the four planes were significantly greater for the relative delay

  9. Heart rate and use of beta-blockers in stable outpatients with coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph Gabriel Steg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heart rate (HR is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD. However, there is little contemporary data regarding HR and the use of HR-lowering medications, particularly beta-blockers, among patients with stable CAD in routine clinical practice. The goal of the present analysis was to describe HR in such patients, overall and in relation to beta-blocker use, and to describe the determinants of HR. METHODS AND FINDINGS: CLARIFY is an international, prospective, observational, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable CAD, defined as prior myocardial infarction or revascularization procedure, evidence of coronary stenosis of >50%, or chest pain associated with proven myocardial ischemia. A total of 33,438 patients from 45 countries in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Middle East, and Asia/Pacific were enrolled between November 2009 and July 2010. Most of the 33,177 patients included in this analysis were men (77.5%. Mean (SD age was 64.2 (10.5 years, HR by pulse was 68.3 (10.6 bpm, and by electrocardiogram was 67.2 (11.4 bpm. Overall, 44.0% had HR ≥ 70 bpm. Beta-blockers were used in 75.1% of patients and another 14.4% had intolerance or contraindications to beta-blocker therapy. Among 24,910 patients on beta-blockers, 41.1% had HR ≥ 70 bpm. HR ≥ 70 bpm was independently associated with higher prevalence and severity of angina, more frequent evidence of myocardial ischemia, and lack of use of HR-lowering agents. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a high rate of use of beta-blockers, stable CAD patients often have resting HR ≥ 70 bpm, which was associated with an overall worse health status, more frequent angina and ischemia. Further HR lowering is possible in many patients with CAD. Whether it will improve symptoms and outcomes is being tested.

  10. Variation in heart rate influences the assessment of transient ischemic dilation in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, William D; Levin, Daniel P; Demeter, Sandor J

    2007-01-01

    Transient arrhythmias can affect transient ischemic dilation (TID) ratios. This study was initiated to evaluate the frequency and effect of normal heart rate change on TID measures in routine clinical practice. Consecutive patients undergoing stress/rest sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy were studied (N = 407). Heart rate at the time of stress and rest imaging were recorded. TID ratios were analyzed in relation to absolute change in heart rate (stress minus rest) for subjects with normal perfusion and systolic function (Group 1, N = 169) and those with abnormalities in perfusion and/or function (Group 2, N = 238). In Group 1, mean TID ratio was inversely correlated with the change in heart rate (r = -0.47, P < 0.0001). For every increase of 10 BPM in heart rate change, the TID ratio decreased by approximately 0.06 (95% confidence interval 0.04–0.07). In Group 2, multiple linear regression demonstrated that the change in heart rate (beta = -0.25, P < 0.0001) and the summed difference score (beta = 0.36, P < 0.0001) were independent predictors of the TID ratio. Normal variation in heart rate between the stress and rest components of myocardial perfusion scans is common and can influence TID ratios in patients with normal and abnormal cardiac scans

  11. Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in current and former smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus T; Marott, Jacob L; Jensen, Gorm B

    2010-01-01

    . Current and former smokers had, irrespective of tobacco consumption, greater relative risk of elevated RHR compared to never smokers. The relative risk of all-cause mortality per 10bpm increase in RHR was (95% CI): 1.06 (1.01-1.10) in never smokers, 1.11 (1.07-1.15) in former smokers, 1.13 (1......BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate is associated with mortality in general populations. Smokers may be at particular risk. The association between resting heart rate (RHR), smoking status and cardiovascular and total mortality was investigated in a general population. METHODS: Prospective.......09-1.16) in moderate smokers, and 1.13 (1.10-1.16) in heavy smokers. There was no gender difference. The risk estimates for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality were essentially similar. In univariate analyses, the difference in survival between a RHR in the highest (>80bpm) vs lowest quartile (...

  12. Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in current and former smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus T; Marott, Jacob L; Jensen, Gorm B

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate is associated with mortality in general populations. Smokers may be at particular risk. The association between resting heart rate (RHR), smoking status and cardiovascular and total mortality was investigated in a general population. METHODS: Prospective....... Current and former smokers had, irrespective of tobacco consumption, greater relative risk of elevated RHR compared to never smokers. The relative risk of all-cause mortality per 10bpm increase in RHR was (95% CI): 1.06 (1.01-1.10) in never smokers, 1.11 (1.07-1.15) in former smokers, 1.13 (1.......09-1.16) in moderate smokers, and 1.13 (1.10-1.16) in heavy smokers. There was no gender difference. The risk estimates for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality were essentially similar. In univariate analyses, the difference in survival between a RHR in the highest (>80bpm) vs lowest quartile (...

  13. Effects of age and physical activity on the autonomic control of heart rate in healthy men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Melo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the aging process and an active life-style on the autonomic control of heart rate (HR were investigated in nine young sedentary (YS, 23 ± 2.4 years, 16 young active (YA, 22 ± 2.1 years, 8 older sedentary (OS, 63 ± 2.4 years and 8 older active (OA, 61 ± 1.1 years healthy men. Electrocardiogram was continuously recorded for 15 min at rest and for 4 min in the deep breathing test, with a breath rate of 5 to 6 cycles/min in the supine position. Resting HR and RR intervals were analyzed by time (RMSSD index and frequency domain methods. The power spectral components are reported in normalized units (nu at low (LF and high (HF frequency, and as the LF/HF ratio. The deep breathing test was analyzed by the respiratory sinus arrhythmia indices: expiration/inspiration ratio (E/I and inspiration-expiration difference (deltaIE. The active groups had lower HR and higher RMSSD index than the sedentary groups (life-style condition: sedentary vs active, P < 0.05. The older groups showed lower HFnu, higher LFnu and higher LF/HF ratio than the young groups (aging effect: young vs older, P < 0.05. The OS group had a lower E/I ratio (1.16 and deltaIE (9.7 bpm than the other groups studied (YS: 1.38, 22.4 bpm; YA: 1.40, 21.3 bpm; OA: 1.38, 18.5 bpm. The interaction between aging and life-style effects had a P < 0.05. These results suggest that aging reduces HR variability. However, regular physical activity positively affects vagal activity on the heart and consequently attenuates the effects of aging in the autonomic control of HR.

  14. Impact of heart rate in atrial fibrillation versus sinus rhythm on mortality in octogenarian patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shijun; Barywani, Salim; Fu, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Association of heart rate (HR) with mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and aged ≥ 80 years are underrepresented in clinical trials. We therefore aimed to investigate the association of HR in atrial fibrillation (AF) versus sinus rhythm (SR) with all-cause mortality in octogenarian patients with ACS. A total of 336 patients with ACS patients and aged ≥ 80 years were enrolled into the current study. The end point of interest was death from any cause. Association of HR in AF versus SR with mortality was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curve following log-rank test and multivariable Cox regression analysis. In total, 63 (87.5%) of patients with AF were dead and 147 (59.8%) of patients with SR were dead during the follow-up period. The best cut-off was 80 bpm, with a sensitivity of 62% and specificity of 66%. HR ≤ 80 bpm in SR but not in AF was associated with better outcome as compared with HR > 80 bpm (Chi-Square = 26.55, Log rank P < 0.001). In SR subgroup, the hazard ratios of HR ≤ 80 bpm were 0.51(95% CI 0.37-0.70, P < 0.001) adjusted for age, 0.46 (95%CI 0.33-0.63, P < 0.001) adjusted for gender, 0.62 (95%CI 0.42- 0.93, P = 0.020) adjusted for multivariables respectively. In AF subgroup, the hazard ratios of HR ≤ 80 bpm were 0.83(95% CI 0.49-1.38, P = 0.464) adjusted for age, 0.96 (95%CI 0.59-1.58, P = 0.882) adjusted for gender, 0.72(95% CI 0.41-1.26, P = 0.249) adjusted for multivariables respectively. The current study demonstrates that heart rate is an independent prognostic predictor for all-cause mortality, and HR ≤ 80 bpm is associated with improved outcome in SR but not in AF in octogenarian patients with ACS.

  15. Blood pressure and heart rate during orthostatic stress and walking with continuous postoperative thoracic epidural bupivacaine/morphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Hjortsø, N C; Blemmer, T

    1993-01-01

    lower heart rate (approximately 10 bpm) 48 h after surgery at rest and during orthostatic stress in the epidural group. There was no significant difference between groups in number of patients with a reduction > 20 mmHg (2.7 kPa) in systolic blood pressure during orthostatic stress (two in each group...... and during mobilisation was superior compared to systemic morphine and NSAID. There were no significant differences between groups in haemodynamic responses (BP and heart rate) during rest, orthostatic stress and after walking assessed before, 24 and 48 h after operation except for a clinically unimportant...... position....

  16. Dual-source CT coronary angiography in patients with premature heart-beats: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yining; Zhang Zhuhua; Kong Lingyan; Song Lan; Mu Wenbin; Wang Yun; Jin Zhengyu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography in a population with premature heart-beats. Methods: Seventy patients with suspected coronary artery disease and premature heart-beats were routinely imaged on a DSCT scanner (Somatom Definition, Siemens AG, Germany). The images were reconstmcted before and after ECG editing. Two readers independently assessed image quality of all coronary segments using a four-point grading scale from excellent (1) to non-assessable (4). The results of the two groups were compared with a paired t-test, and a P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The mean heart rate during examination ranged from 49 to 111 bpm[ mean(70.7±12.4) bpm]. Twenty-eight of 70 patients with relatively small variability of the heart rate [(41.0±18.4) bpm] got diagnostic image quality without ECG editing. In other 42 patients with larger variability of the heart rate [(71.4±28.7) bpm], the mean image quality scores were 2.09±1.27 and 1.50±0.79 before and after ECG editing, there was a significant difference (t= 13.764, P 2 =121.846, P<0.01). Finally, the diagnostic image accounted 98.0% (1014/1035) in all segments of 70 patients. Conclusion: DSCT can provide diagnostic images for patients with premature heart-beats. The image quality in patients with larger variability of the heart rate can be significantly improved through ECG editing. (authors)

  17. Maximum heart rate in brown trout (Salmo trutta fario) is not limited by firing rate of pacemaker cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverinen, Jaakko; Abramochkin, Denis V; Kamkin, Andre; Vornanen, Matti

    2017-02-01

    Temperature-induced changes in cardiac output (Q̇) in fish are largely dependent on thermal modulation of heart rate (f H ), and at high temperatures Q̇ collapses due to heat-dependent depression of f H This study tests the hypothesis that firing rate of sinoatrial pacemaker cells sets the upper thermal limit of f H in vivo. To this end, temperature dependence of action potential (AP) frequency of enzymatically isolated pacemaker cells (pacemaker rate, f PM ), spontaneous beating rate of isolated sinoatrial preparations (f SA ), and in vivo f H of the cold-acclimated (4°C) brown trout (Salmo trutta fario) were compared under acute thermal challenges. With rising temperature, f PM steadily increased because of the acceleration of diastolic depolarization and shortening of AP duration up to the break point temperature (T BP ) of 24.0 ± 0.37°C, at which point the electrical activity abruptly ceased. The maximum f PM at T BP was much higher [193 ± 21.0 beats per minute (bpm)] than the peak f SA (94.3 ± 6.0 bpm at 24.1°C) or peak f H (76.7 ± 2.4 at 15.7 ± 0.82°C) (P brown trout in vivo. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. [The influence of physical exercise on heart rate variability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Jacek; Zyśko, Dorota; Negrusz-Kawecka, Marta; Halawa, Bogumił

    2003-03-01

    Heart rate variability is controlled by the influence of autonomic nervous system, whereas one part of the system modulates the activity of the other. There is evidence of increased sympathetic activity in patients (pts) with essential hypertension. The aim of the study was to assess the persisting influence of increased sympathetic activity 30 min after moderate physical exercise on heart rate variability in patients with arterial hypertension. The study was performed in 19 patients (10 women, mean age 52.7 +/- 9.5 years and 9 men, mean age 37.7 +/- 8.8 years) with stage I (6 pts) and stage II (13 pts) arterial hypertension. All studied pts had sinus rhythm, were free of diabetes, coronary heart disease and congestive heart failure. 24-hour Holter monitoring was performed and for 30 min before the exercise test the pts stayed in supine rest. The exercise tests were performed between 10 and 11 a.m. Immediately after the exercise all pts stayed in supine position for 30 min. The heart rate variability parameters were studied using Holter monitoring system Medilog Optima Jet and were then analysed statistically. The mean energy expenditure during the exercise was 5.8 +/- 1.1 METs and the maximal heart rate was 148.1 +/- 20.3 bpm. All studied HRV parameters were significantly different in the assessed time period compared to the baseline values (p < 0.001). Significant correlation was found between the age of the studied patients and the mean RR interval, what can be considered as a hyperkinetic (hyperadrenergic) circulatory status and shorter RR interval in younger pts. Significant negative correlation between the age and SDNN parameter (r = -0.65, p < 0.001), 30 min after the exercise mirrors the prolonged adrenergic influence in older pts. The present study shows that the influence of moderate physical exercise on heart rate variability in pts with essential hypertension is extended over 30 min period after exercise and is more pronounced in older pts. The studies

  19. Performance of the ELBE BPM Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Evtushenko, P

    2003-01-01

    The ELBE radiation source is based on a superconducting linac. Initially it was designed to be used in CW mode with repetition rates either 13 MHz either 260 MHz. Later it was decided to operate the accelerator with reduced repetition rates for diagnostic reasons and for certain users. Now it is possible to operate at repetition rate 13/n MHz, where n can be 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, and 128. It is required that the BPM system supports any of these operation modes. A core element of the BPM electronics is a logarithmic amplifier AD8313 made by Analog Devices Inc. The logarithmic amplifier is a direct RF to DC converter rated up to 2.5 GHz. Initial design of the BPM electronic was sophisticated only for CW operation with repetition rate more than 10 MHz, since bandwidth of the AD8313 is about of 10 MHz. Additionally a sample and hold amplifier is built in to provide enough time for an ADC to make measurements. The sample and hold amplifier is synchronized with a micropulse frequency. In the paper we present results...

  20. Investigation of influence of 16-slice spiral CT electrocardiogram-controlled dose modulation on exposure dosage and image quality of cardiac CT imaging under simulated fluctuant heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Yan; Chen Jie; Chai Weiming; Hua Jia; Gao Na; Xu Jianrong; Shen Yun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of electrocardiogram (ECG)-controlled dose modulation on exposure dosage and image quality of cardiac CT imaging in a cardiac phantom with simulated fluctuant heart rate. Methods: The basal heart rate of the cardiac pulsating phantom was set as 60 bpm, the experimental situations were divided as 6 groups according to different heart rates. The cardiac imaging was performed on the cardiac phantom when the ECG-controlled dose modulation was firstly turned off. The exposure dosage of each scan sequence was documented. The standard deviation of the CT values of the phantom was measured on the central slice after coronal reformation of the raw data. The quality of 2D and 3D images were scored. Then cardiac imaging was performed when ECG modulation was on and set as four groups according to different modulation parameters. All the data were documented as before. The results from the five groups with and without ECG modulation current were analyzed by F test and comparative rank sum test using the statistical software SPSS 10.0. Results: Statistical analysis showed no significant difference (P>0.05) between the SNR of images (SD value was 27.78 and 26.30) from the groups that full mA output at wide reconstruction phase (69%-99%) when the heart rate was fluctuant(≥7.5 bpm). There was also no significant difference (P>0.05) between the quality of the 2D and 3D images. But there was a significant difference (P 12.5 bpm, the exposure dosage would increase obviously (from 0.6 to 1.7 mSv). Conclusion: For cardiac imaging with 16-slice row CT, the application of ECG modulated current can effectively reduce the exposure dosage without compromising the image quality even if heart rate was fluctuant. (authors)

  1. The impact of heart rate on image quality and reconstruction timing of dual-source CT coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yining; Jin Zhengyu; Kong Lingyan; Zhang Zhuhua; Song Lan; Mu Wenbin; Wang Yun; Zhao Wenmin; Zhang Shuyang; Lin Songbai

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of patient's heart rate (HR) on coronary CT angiography (CTA) image quality (IQ) and reconstruction timing in dual-source CT (DSCT). Methods Ninety-five patients with suspicion of coronary artery disease were examined with a DSCT scanner (Somatom Definition, Siemens) using 32 x 0.6 mm collimation. All patients were divided three groups according to the heart rate (HR): group 1, HR ≤ 70 beats per minute (bpm), n=26; group 2, HR >70 bpm to ≤90 bpm, n=37; group 3, HR > 90 bpm, n=32. No beta-blockers were taken before CT scan. 50- 60 ml of nonionic contrast agent were injected with a rate of 5 ml/s. Images were reconstructed from 10% to 100% of the R-R interval using single-segment reconstruction. Two readers independently assessed IQ of all coronary, segments using a 3-point scale from excellent (1) to non-assessable (3) for coronary segments and the relationship between IQ and the HR. Results: Overall mean IQ score was 1.31 ± 0.55 for all patients with 1.08 ± 0.27 for group 1, 1.32 ± 0.58 for group 2 and 1.47 ± 0.61 for group 3. The IQ was better in the LAD than the RCA and LCX (P<0.01). Only 1.4% (19/1386) of coronary artery segments were considered non-assessable due to the motion artifacts. Optimal image quality of all coronary segments in 74 patients (77.9%) can be achieved with one reconstruction data set. The best IQ was predominately in diastole (88.5%) in group 1, while the best IQ was in systole (84.4%) in group 3. Conclusions: DSCT can achieve the optimal IQ with a wide range of HR using single-segment reconstruction. With the increasing of HR, the timing of data reconstruction for the best IQ shifts from mid-diastole to systole. (authors)

  2. Effect of Nebivolol on MIBG Parameters and Exercise in Heart Failure with Normal Ejection Fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messias, Leandro Rocha, E-mail: lmessias@cardiol.br; Ferreira, Aryanne Guimarães; Miranda, Sandra Marina Ribeiro de; Teixeira, José Antônio Caldas [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Azevedo, Jader Cunha de [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hospital Procardíaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Messias, Ana Carolina Nader Vasconcelos [Hospital Federal dos Servidores do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Maróstica, Elisabeth [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hospital Procardíaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    More than 50% of the patients with heart failure have normal ejection fraction (HFNEF). Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy and cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) are prognostic markers in HFNEF. Nebivolol is a beta-blocker with vasodilating properties. To evaluate the impact of nebivolol therapy on CPET and123I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters in patients with HFNEF. Twenty-five patients underwent 123I-MIBG scintigraphy to determine the washout rate and early and late heart-to-mediastinum ratios. During the CPET, we analyzed the systolic blood pressure (SBP) response, heart rate (HR) during effort and recovery (HRR), and oxygen uptake (VO{sub 2}). After the initial evaluation, we divided our cohort into control and intervention groups. We then started nebivolol and repeated the tests after 3 months. After treatment, the intervention group showed improvement in rest SBP (149 mmHg [143.5-171 mmHg] versus 135 mmHg [125-151 mmHg, p = 0.016]), rest HR (78 bpm [65.5-84 bpm] versus 64.5 bpm [57.5-75.5 bpm, p = 0.028]), peak SBP (235 mmHg [216.5-249 mmHg] versus 198 mmHg [191-220.5 mmHg], p = 0.001), peak HR (124.5 bpm [115-142 bpm] versus 115 bpm [103.7-124 bpm], p= 0.043), HRR on the 1st minute (6.5 bpm [4.75-12.75 bpm] versus 14.5 bpm [6.7-22 bpm], p = 0.025) and HRR on the 2nd minute (15.5 bpm [13-21.75 bpm] versus 23.5 bpm [16-31.7 bpm], p = 0.005), but no change in peak VO{sub 2} and 123I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters. Despite a better control in SBP, HR during rest and exercise, and improvement in HRR, nebivolol failed to show a positive effect on peak VO2 and 123I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters. The lack of effect on adrenergic activity may be the cause of the lack of effect on functional capacity.

  3. Effect of Nebivolol on MIBG Parameters and Exercise in Heart Failure with Normal Ejection Fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messias, Leandro Rocha; Ferreira, Aryanne Guimarães; Miranda, Sandra Marina Ribeiro de; Teixeira, José Antônio Caldas; Azevedo, Jader Cunha de; Messias, Ana Carolina Nader Vasconcelos; Maróstica, Elisabeth; Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco

    2016-01-01

    More than 50% of the patients with heart failure have normal ejection fraction (HFNEF). Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy and cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) are prognostic markers in HFNEF. Nebivolol is a beta-blocker with vasodilating properties. To evaluate the impact of nebivolol therapy on CPET and123I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters in patients with HFNEF. Twenty-five patients underwent 123I-MIBG scintigraphy to determine the washout rate and early and late heart-to-mediastinum ratios. During the CPET, we analyzed the systolic blood pressure (SBP) response, heart rate (HR) during effort and recovery (HRR), and oxygen uptake (VO 2 ). After the initial evaluation, we divided our cohort into control and intervention groups. We then started nebivolol and repeated the tests after 3 months. After treatment, the intervention group showed improvement in rest SBP (149 mmHg [143.5-171 mmHg] versus 135 mmHg [125-151 mmHg, p = 0.016]), rest HR (78 bpm [65.5-84 bpm] versus 64.5 bpm [57.5-75.5 bpm, p = 0.028]), peak SBP (235 mmHg [216.5-249 mmHg] versus 198 mmHg [191-220.5 mmHg], p = 0.001), peak HR (124.5 bpm [115-142 bpm] versus 115 bpm [103.7-124 bpm], p= 0.043), HRR on the 1st minute (6.5 bpm [4.75-12.75 bpm] versus 14.5 bpm [6.7-22 bpm], p = 0.025) and HRR on the 2nd minute (15.5 bpm [13-21.75 bpm] versus 23.5 bpm [16-31.7 bpm], p = 0.005), but no change in peak VO 2 and 123I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters. Despite a better control in SBP, HR during rest and exercise, and improvement in HRR, nebivolol failed to show a positive effect on peak VO2 and 123I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters. The lack of effect on adrenergic activity may be the cause of the lack of effect on functional capacity

  4. Effect of Heart Rate and Coronary Calcification on the Diagnostic Accuracy of the Dual-Source CT Coronary Angiography in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Lingdong; Cui, Lianqun; Cheng, Yuntao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Tang, Yuansheng; Wang, Yong; Xu, Fayun

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of a dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography, with a particular focus on the effect of heart rate and calcifications. One hundred and nine patients with suspected coronary disease were divided into 2 groups according to a mean heart rate ( 400). Next, the effect of heart rate and calcification on the accuracy of coronary artery stenosis detection was analyzed by using an invasive coronary angiography as a reference standard. Coronary segments of less than 1.5 mm in diameter in an American Heart Association (AHA) 15-segment model were independently assessed. The mean heart rate during the scan was 71.8 bpm, whereas the mean Agatston score was 226.5. Of the 1,588 segments examined, 1,533 (97%) were assessable. A total of 17 patients had calcium scores above 400 Agatston U, whereas 50 had heart rates ≥ 70 bpm. Overall the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) for significant stenoses were: 95%, 91%, 65%, and 99% (by segment), respectively and 97%, 90%, 81%, and 91% (by artery), respectively (n = 475). Heart rate showed no significant impact on lesion detection; however, vessel calcification did show a significant impact on accuracy of assessment for coronary segments. The specificity, PPV and accuracy were 96%, 80%, and 96% (by segment), respectively for an Agatston score less than 100% and 99%, 96% and 98% (by artery). For an Agatston score of greater to or equal to 400 the specificity, PPV and accuracy were reduced to 79%, 55%, and 83% (by segment), respectively and to 79%, 69%, and 85% (by artery), respectively. The DSCT provides a high rate of accuracy for the detection of significant coronary artery disease, even in patients with high heart rates and evidence of coronary calcification. However, patients with severe coronary calcification (> 400 U) remain a challenge to diagnose

  5. Increased resting heart rate following radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Brian; Chen, Xu; Pehrson, Steen

    2005-01-01

    the procedure. RESULTS: Following PV isolation, the mean HR significantly increased from 58 +/- 10 bpm at baseline to 67 +/- 12 bpm at one month, 71 +/- 13 bpm at three months, 69 +/- 12 bpm at six months, 69 +/- 13 at nine months, and 70 +/- 13 at 12 months follow-up. The ablation success significantly...... correlated with the increase in HR at one month follow-up. In three patients the mean HR increased > 25 bpm resulting in symptoms necessitating therapy with rate-controlling drugs. CONCLUSION: PV isolation in patients with AF may result in increased HR, which positively correlated with the ablation success...

  6. Bluetooth Heart Rate Monitors For Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, R. E.; West, M. R.; Kalogera, K. L.; Hanson, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required for crewmembers during exercise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data are required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth heart rate monitors (BT_HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health aboard the ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT_HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) were worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT_HRM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the 2 data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. RESULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6% error), followed by CS4 (3.3% error), CS3 (6.4% error), and CS2 (9.2% error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, but unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to obtain the best quality data. CS2 will be

  7. Effect of a novel motion correction algorithm (SSF) on the image quality of coronary CTA with intermediate heart rates: Segment-based and vessel-based analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qianwen, E-mail: qianwen18@126.com; Li, Pengyu, E-mail: lipyu818@gmail.com; Su, Zhuangzhi, E-mail: suzhuangzhi@xwh.ccmu.edu.cn; Yao, Xinyu, E-mail: 314985151@qq.com; Wang, Yan, E-mail: wy19851121@126.com; Wang, Chen, E-mail: fskwangchen@gmail.com; Du, Xiangying, E-mail: duxying_xw@163.com; Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kuncheng.li@gmail.com

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • SSF provided better image quality than single-sector and bi-sector reconstruction among the intermediate heart rates (65–75 bpm). • Evidence for the application of prospective ECG-triggered coronary CTA with SSF onto an expanded heart rate range. • Information about the inconsistent effectiveness of SSF among the segments of coronary artery. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the effect of SnapShot Freeze (SSF) reconstruction at an intermediate heart-rate (HR) range (65–75 bpm) and compare this method with single-sector reconstruction and bi-sector reconstruction on segmental and vessel bases in retrospective coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Materials and methods: Retrospective electrocardiogram-gated CCTA was performed on 37 consecutive patients with HR between 65 and 75 bpm using a 64-row CT scanner. Retrospective single-sector reconstruction, bi-sector reconstruction, and SSF were performed for each patient. Multi-phase single-sector reconstruction was performed to select the optimal phase. SSF and bi-sector images were also reconstructed at the optimal phase. The images were interpreted in an intent-to-diagnose fashion by two experienced readers using a 5-point scale, with 3 points as diagnostically acceptable. Image quality among the three reconstruction groups were compared on per-patient, per-vessel, and per-segment bases. Results: The average HR of the enrolled patients was 69.4 ± 2.7 bpm. A total of 111 vessels and 481 coronary segments were assessed. SSF provided significantly higher interpretability of the coronary segments than bi-sector reconstructions. The qualified and excellent rates of SSF (97.9% and 82.3%) were significantly higher than those of single-sector (92.9% and 66.3%) and bi-sector (90.9% and 64.7%) reconstructions. The image quality score (IQS) using SSF was also significantly higher than those of single-sector and bi-sector reconstructions both on per-patient and per-vessel bases. On per

  8. Energy expenditure and heart rate response to breaking up sedentary time with three different physical activity interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, S E; Jones, M; Gladwell, V F

    2015-05-01

    Prolonged sedentary behaviour is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk and decreased energy expenditure (EE). Workplace interventions breaking up sedentary time have increased EE but the cardiovascular responses are unknown. The practicalities of these interventions, such as required costs and workplace adaptations, are questioned. Calisthenics exercises overcome such limitations, but have not been assessed. The aim of this study was to assess the EE and heart rate (HR) response when breaking up sedentary time with a short bout of standing, walking or calisthenics. Twenty healthy participants (15 male) completed four 30 min conditions: a) 30 min sitting, or breaking up this period with two minutes of b) standing, c) treadmill walking (4 km·h(-1)) or d) a set of calisthenics exercises (including squats and lunges). HR and EE (indirect calorimetry) were assessed throughout. During the activity break, calisthenics caused the highest HR (90 ± 12 bpm) compared to all other conditions (Sit: 70 ± 12 bpm; Stand:72 ± 13 bpm; Walk:84 ± 10 bpm; p workplace sedentary time and improve cardiovascular health and assist in weight management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of low-dose β-blocker on heart rate and heart rate variability in health subjects wth a resting heart rate of less than 65 beats per minute: Effect on the quality of prospective electrocardiography-gated coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chul Hwan; Kim, Tae Hoon [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    We assessed the effect of a low-dose β-blocker on heart rate (HR), HR variability (HRV) and image quality of prospective electrocardiography-gated coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in healthy subjects with low HR. CCTA was performed with a 64-slice CT in 75 subjects with a HR of less than 65 beats per minute (bpm). Subjects were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (G1), 35 with a low dose β-blocker; and Group 2 (G2), 40 without pre-medication. The image quality (IQ) of the CCTA was assessed on a 4-point grading scale (1, poor; 4, excellent). Initial HR (bpm) was not different between the 2 groups. HR during CCTA was lower in G1 than G2 (50.3 ± 5.6 vs. 53.3 ± 4.8, p = 0.016). HRV was not different between the 2 groups. Per-segment analysis showed better IQ at the mid-segment of the right coronary artery (3.0 ± 0.9 vs. 2.5 ± 1.1, p = 0.039) and the first diagonal branch (3.4 ± 0.6 vs. 3.1 ± 0.7, p = 0.024), in the G1 than the G2 group, respectively. The IQ was negatively correlated with HR, but no correlation was found between HRV and IQ. The IQs in the per-vessel analysis were not different between the 2 groups. Low-dose β-blocker reduced HR and improved the IQ of CCTA in a few segments, even at a HR of less than 65 bpm. However the effect was limited.

  10. The effect of low-dose β-blocker on heart rate and heart rate variability in health subjects wth a resting heart rate of less than 65 beats per minute: Effect on the quality of prospective electrocardiography-gated coronary CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chul Hwan; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Min; Hong, Yoo Jin

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effect of a low-dose β-blocker on heart rate (HR), HR variability (HRV) and image quality of prospective electrocardiography-gated coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in healthy subjects with low HR. CCTA was performed with a 64-slice CT in 75 subjects with a HR of less than 65 beats per minute (bpm). Subjects were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (G1), 35 with a low dose β-blocker; and Group 2 (G2), 40 without pre-medication. The image quality (IQ) of the CCTA was assessed on a 4-point grading scale (1, poor; 4, excellent). Initial HR (bpm) was not different between the 2 groups. HR during CCTA was lower in G1 than G2 (50.3 ± 5.6 vs. 53.3 ± 4.8, p = 0.016). HRV was not different between the 2 groups. Per-segment analysis showed better IQ at the mid-segment of the right coronary artery (3.0 ± 0.9 vs. 2.5 ± 1.1, p = 0.039) and the first diagonal branch (3.4 ± 0.6 vs. 3.1 ± 0.7, p = 0.024), in the G1 than the G2 group, respectively. The IQ was negatively correlated with HR, but no correlation was found between HRV and IQ. The IQs in the per-vessel analysis were not different between the 2 groups. Low-dose β-blocker reduced HR and improved the IQ of CCTA in a few segments, even at a HR of less than 65 bpm. However the effect was limited.

  11. BPM, SOA and WOA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Thomsen, Bent; Thomsen, Lone Leth

    This paper surveys the state-of-the art in BPM, SOA and WOA anno 2007. We argue that the vision of inter company BPM based on agile business process creation and dynamic lookup of services based on WSDL and UDDI has not materialised. Instead formalised BPM, based on BPMN and BPEL-WS, has become...

  12. Impact of Carbohydrate-Electrolyte Beverage Ingestion on Heart Rate Response While Climbing Mountain Fuji at ~3000 m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Horiuchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to investigate whether carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage ingestion reduced heart rate (HR in twenty-three healthy young adults while climbing Mount Fuji at a given exercise intensity. Twenty-three healthy adults were randomly divided into two groups: the tap water (11 males [M] and 1 female [F] and the carbohydrate-electrolyte group (10 M and 1 F. HR and activity energy expenditure (AEE were recorded every min. The HRs for the first 30 minutes of climbing were not significantly different between the groups [121 ± 2 beats per min (bpm in the tap water and 116 ± 3 bpm in the carbohydrate-electrolyte]; however, HR significantly increased with climbing in the tap water group (129 ± 2 bpm but showed no significant increase in the carbohydrate-electrolyte group (121 ± 3 bpm. In addition, body weight changes throughout two days ascending and descending on Mount Fuji were inversely related to changes in resting HR. Further, individual variation of body weight changes was suppressed by carbohydrate-electrolyte drink. Collectively, carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage intake may attenuate an increase in HR at a given AEE while mountaineering at ~3000 m compared with tap water intake.

  13. Is 10-second electrocardiogram recording enough for accurately estimating heart rate in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Wei; Wang, Xi-Xing; Hong, Kui; Peng, Qiang; Li, Ju-Xiang; Li, Ping; Chen, Jing; Cheng, Xiao-Shu; Su, Hai

    2016-07-15

    At present, the estimation of rest heart rate (HR) in atrial fibrillation (AF) is obtained by apical auscultation for 1min or on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) by multiplying the number of RR intervals on the 10second recording by six. But the reasonability of 10second ECG recording is controversial. ECG was continuously recorded at rest for 60s to calculate the real rest HR (HR60s). Meanwhile, the first 10s and 30s ECG recordings were used for calculating HR10s (sixfold) and HR30s (twofold). The differences of HR10s or HR30s with the HR60s were compared. The patients were divided into three sub-groups on the HR60s 100bpm. No significant difference among the mean HR10s, HR30s and HR60s was found. A positive correlation existed between HR10s and HR60s or HR30s and HR60s. Bland-Altman plot showed that the 95% reference limits were high as -11.0 to 16.0bpm for HR10s, but for HR30s these values were only -4.5 to 5.2bpm. Among the three subgroups with HR60s 100bpm, the 95% reference limits with HR60s were -8.9 to 10.6, -10.5 to 14.0 and -11.3 to 21.7bpm for HR10s, but these values were -3.9 to 4.3, -4.1 to 4.6 and -5.3 to 6.7bpm for HR30s. As 10s ECG recording could not provide clinically accepted estimation HR, ECG should be recorded at least for 30s in the patients with AF. It is better to record ECG for 60s when the HR is rapid. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Using heart rate to predict energy expenditure in large domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerth, N; Ruoß, C; Dobenecker, B; Reese, S; Starck, J M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish heart rate as a measure of energy expenditure in large active kennel dogs (28 ± 3 kg bw). Therefore, the heart rate (HR)-oxygen consumption (V˙O2) relationship was analysed in Foxhound-Boxer-Ingelheim-Labrador cross-breds (FBI dogs) at rest and graded levels of exercise on a treadmill up to 60-65% of maximal aerobic capacity. To test for effects of training, HR and V˙O2 were measured in female dogs, before and after a training period, and after an adjacent training pause to test for reversibility of potential effects. Least squares regression was applied to describe the relationship between HR and V˙O2. The applied training had no statistically significant effect on the HR-V˙O2 regression. A general regression line from all data collected was prepared to establish a general predictive equation for energy expenditure from HR in FBI dogs. The regression equation established in this study enables fast estimation of energy requirement for running activity. The equation is valid for large dogs weighing around 30 kg that run at ground level up to 15 km/h with a heart rate maximum of 190 bpm irrespective of the training level. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Heart rate index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, C; Pedersen, F H; Svendsen, J H

    1992-01-01

    after the myocardial infarction. A significant correlation (Spearman's correlation coefficient rs, p less than 0.05) was found between LVEF at rest and the following variables assessed at exercise test: 1) the heart rate at rest, 2) rise in heart rate, 3) ratio between maximal heart rate and heart rate...... at rest, 4) rise in systolic blood pressure, 5) rate pressure product at rest, 6) rise in rate pressure product, 7) ratio (rHR) between maximal rate pressure product and rate pressure product at rest, 8) total exercise time. The heart rate was corrected for effects caused by age (heart index (HR...

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT coronary angiography in a population unselected for degree of coronary artery calcification and without heart rate modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.-J.; Hsu, J.-C.; Lai, Y.-J.; Wang, K.-L.; Lee, J.-Y.; Li, A.-H.; Chu, S.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess the ability of coronary angiography performed using dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) to evaluate coronary artery disease (CAD) in a population with unselected heart rates and extensive coronary calcification. Materials and methods: Forty-four patients at intermediate to high risk for CAD underwent both DSCT coronary angiography and invasive coronary angiography (ICA) within 30 days. No beta blockers were administered prior to imaging. Image quality and quantitatively stenosis of all coronary segments with a diameter ≥1.5 mm were accessed. Patients were stratified according to mean heart rate (<70 versus ≥70 bpm) and heart rate variability (<10 versus ≥10 bpm). DSCT detection of coronary stenosis by segment, vessel, and patient characteristics were compared to the reference standard of ICA. Results: Diagnostic accuracy for all patients was high regarding sensitivity (97%), positive predictive value (PPV, 84.2%), and negative predictive value (NPV, 83.3%) but low regarding specificity (45.5%) with a moderate interobserver agreement (Kappa = 0.50). The accuracy for vessel-based diagnosis was high regarding sensitivity (96.6%), specificity (80.8%), PPV (80.3%), and NPV (96.7%). The segment-based diagnostic results revealed a moderate interobserver agreement for image quality and sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for all segments of 66.9, 97.8, 90.8, and 89.9%, respectively. Conclusion: DSCT coronary angiography has high diagnostic accuracy in assessing CAD among patients at intermediate to high risk without using heart rate-modulating premedication. DSCT is not superior to ICA for diagnosis of calcified segments.

  17. Resting heart rate associates with one-year risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-Li; Wang, Cheng-Long; Wang, Pei-Li; Xu, Hao; Du, Jian-Peng; Zhang, Da-Wu; Gao, Zhu-Ye; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Chang-Geng; Chen, Ke-Ji; Shi, Da-Zhuo

    2016-03-01

    The study was to access the association between resting heart rate (RHR) and one-year risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients with ACS after PCI (n = 808) were prospectively followed-up for MACE. RHR was obtained from electrocardiogram. MACE was defined as a composite of cardiac death, nonfatal recurrent myocardial infarction, ischemic-driven revascularization, and ischemic stroke. The association between RHR and one-year risk of MACE was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression model. Compared with patients with RHR >76 bpm, the adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) was 0.51 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.23-1.14; P = 0.100) for patients with RHR 76 bpm were at higher risk of MACE during one-year follow-up compared with patients with RHR 61-76 bpm. An elevated RHR ≥ 61 bpm was associated with increased risk of one-year MACE in ACS patients. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  18. Attenuated Heart Rate Recovery After Exercise Testing and Risk of Incident Hypertension in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae, Sae Young; Bunsawat, Kanokwan; Fadel, Paul J; Fernhall, Bo; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Park, Jeong Bae; Franklin, Barry A

    2016-09-01

    Although attenuated heart rate recovery (HRR) and reduced heart rate (HR) reserve to maximal exercise testing are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, their relation to incident hypertension in healthy normotensive populations is unclear. We examined the hypothesis that both attenuated HRR and reduced HR reserve to exercise testing are associated with incident hypertension in men. A total of 1,855 participants were selected comprising of healthy, initially normotensive men who underwent peak or symptom-limited treadmill testing at baseline. HRR was calculated as the difference between peak HR during exercise testing and the HR at 2 minutes after exercise cessation. HR reserve was calculated as the percentage of HR reserve (peak HR - resting HR)/(220 - age - resting HR) × 100. During an average 4-year follow-up, 179 (9.6%) men developed hypertension. Incident hypertension was associated with HRR quartiles (Q1 (57 bpm) 8.3%; P = 0.05 for trend). The relative risk (RR) of the incident hypertension in the slowest HRR quartile vs. the fastest HRR quartile was 1.78 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14-2.78) after adjustment for confounders. Every 1 bpm increment in HRR was associated with a 2% (RR 0.98, 95% CI: 0.97-0.99) lower risk of incident hypertension after adjusting for potential confounders. In contrast, reduced HR reserve did not predict the risk of incident hypertension. Slow HRR after exercise testing is independently associated with the development of hypertension in healthy normotensive men. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2016. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Bluetooth(Registered Trademark) Heart Rate Monitors for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Roxanne E.; West, Michael R.; Kalogera, Kent L.; Hanson, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required during exercise for crewmembers aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data is required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth® heart rate monitors (BT_HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health on board ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT_HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) was worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT_RHM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the two data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. REULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6%error), followed by CS4 (3.3%error), CS3 (6.4%error), and CS2 (9.2%error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to get the best quality data. CS2 will be used in an

  20. Relationship between Cardiometabolic Parameters and Elevated Resting and Effort Heart Rate in Schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristiane Fernanda da; Burgos, Miria Suzana; Silva, Priscila Tatiana da; Burgos, Leandro Tibiriçá; Welser, Letícia; Sehn, Ana Paula; Horta, Jorge André; Mello, Elza Daniel de; Reuter, Cézane Priscila

    2017-09-01

    Little has been studied on heart rate and its relationship with metabolic disorders. To identify possible association between heart rate (HR) and metabolic disorders in children and adolescents. This cross-sectional study evaluated 2.098 subjects, aged between 7 and 17 years. The variables evaluated were: HR, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), double-product (DP), myocardial oxygen consumption (mVO2), lipids, glucose and uric acid levels, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). The values of HR at rest and effort were divided into quartiles. The association between continuous values of HR and cardiometabolic indicators was tested by linear regression. LDL cholesterol presented a significantly higher mean (p = 0.003) in schoolchildren with resting HR greater or equal to 91 bpm, compared to students with less than 75 bpm. Compared with the quartiles of effort HR, SBP, DBP, glucose and uric acid presented high values when HR was greater or equal than 185 bpm. SBP, glucose and HDL cholesterol demonstrated a significant association with resting HR. Uric acid was observed as a predictor of increased effort HR. Schoolchildren with a higher resting HR have higher mean of LDL cholesterol. For effort HR, there was an increase in blood pressure, glucose and uric acid levels. Uric acid has been shown to be a predictor of elevated effort HR. Pouco se tem estudado sobre frequência cardíaca e suas relações com alterações metabólicas. Verificar se existe associação entre frequência cardíaca e disfunções metabólicas em crianças e adolescentes. Estudo transversal com 2.098 escolares, com idade entre 7 e 17 anos. As variáveis avaliadas foram: frequência cardíaca (FC), pressão arterial sistólica (PAS), diastólica (PAD) e de pulso (PP), duplo-produto (DP), consumo de oxigênio pelo miocárdio (mVO2), perfil lipídico e glicêmico, níveis de ácido úrico, índice de massa corporal (IMC) e circunferência da cintura

  1. Heart rate at discharge and long-term prognosis following percutaneous coronary intervention in stable and acute coronary syndromes--results from the BASKET PROVE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Magnus Thorsten; Kaiser, Christoph; Sandsten, Karl Erik; Alber, Hannes; Wanitschek, Maria; Iversen, Allan; Jensen, Jan Skov; Pedersen, Sune; Soerensen, Rikke; Rickli, Hans; Zurek, Marzena; Fahrni, Gregor; Bertel, Osmund; De Servi, Stefano; Erne, Paul; Pfisterer, Matthias; Galatius, Søren

    2013-10-09

    Elevated heart rate (HR) is associated with mortality in a number of heart diseases. We examined the long-term prognostic significance of HR at discharge in a contemporary population of patients with stable angina (SAP), non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS), and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) revascularized with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients from the BASKET-PROVE trial, an 11-center randomized all-comers trial comparing bare-metal and drug-eluting stenting in large coronary vessels, were included. Discharge HR was determined from a resting ECG. Long-term outcomes (7 days to 2 years) were evaluated for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular death and non-fatal myocardial infarction. A total of 2029 patients with sinus rhythm were included, 722 (35.6%) SAP, 647 (31.9%) NSTE-ACS, and 660 (32.5%) STEMI. Elevated discharge HR was associated significantly with all-cause mortality: when compared to a reference of 90 bpm. For cardiovascular death/myocardial infarction, a discharge HR >90 bpm was associated with a hazard ratio of 6.2 (2.5-15.5, pacute coronary syndromes an elevated discharge HR was independently associated with poor prognosis. Conversely, a HR <60 bpm at discharge was associated with a good long-term prognosis irrespective of indication for PCI. © 2013.

  2. Yoga Nidra relaxation increases heart rate variability and is unaffected by a prior bout of Hatha yoga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markil, Nina; Whitehurst, Michael; Jacobs, Patrick L; Zoeller, Robert F

    2012-10-01

    The measurement of heart rate variability (HRV) is often applied as an index of autonomic nervous system (ANS) balance and, therefore, myocardial stability. Previous studies have suggested that relaxation or mind-body exercise can influence ANS balance positively as measured by HRV but may act via different mechanisms. No studies, to the authors' knowledge, have examined the acute response in HRV to interventions combining relaxation and mind-body exercise. The objective of this study was to compare the acute HRV responses to Yoga Nidra relaxation alone versus Yoga Nidra relaxation preceded by Hatha yoga. This was a randomized counter-balanced trial. The trial was conducted in a university exercise physiology laboratory. Subjects included 20 women and men (29.15±6.98 years of age, with a range of 18-47 years). Participants completed a yoga plus relaxation (YR) session and a relaxation only (R) session. The YR condition produced significant changes from baseline in heart rate (HR; beats per minute [bpm], pheart rate (bpm, p<0.001) as well as indices of HRV: R-R (ms, p<0.001), HF (ms(2), p=0.004), LF (%, p=0.005), HF (%, p=0.008) and LF:HF ratio (%, p=0.008). There were no significant differences between conditions at baseline nor for the changes from baseline for any of the variables. These changes demonstrate a favorable shift in autonomic balance to the parasympathetic branch of the ANS for both conditions, and that Yoga Nidra relaxation produces favorable changes in measures of HRV whether alone or preceded by a bout of Hatha yoga.

  3. BPM News - Folge 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichert, M.U.; Rinderle, S.B.; Weber, Barbara

    Die BPM-Kolumne des EMISA-Forums berichtet über aktuelle Themen, Projekte und Veranstaltungen aus dem BPM-Umfeld. Schwerpunkt der vorliegenden Kolumne bildet das Thema Standardisierung von Prozessbeschreibungssprachen und -notationen im Allgemeinen und BPEL4WS (Business Process Execution Language

  4. Study on motion artifacts in coronary arteries with an anthropomorphic moving heart phantom on an ECG-gated multidetector computed tomography unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Dorgelo, Joost; Tukker, Wim G.J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2005-01-01

    Acquisition time plays a key role in the quality of cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and is directly related to the rotation time of the scanner. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of heart rate and a multisector reconstruction algorithm on the image quality of coronary arteries of an anthropomorphic adjustable moving heart phantom on an ECG-gated MDCT unit. The heart phantom and a coronary artery phantom were used on a MDCT unit with a rotation time of 500 ms. The movement of the heart was determined by analysis of the images taken at different phases. The results indicate that the movement of the coronary arteries on the heart phantom is comparable to that in a clinical setting. The influence of the heart rate on image quality and artifacts was determined by analysis of several heart rates between 40 and 80 bpm where the movement of the heart was synchronized using a retrospective ECG-gated acquisition protocol. The resulting reformatted volume rendering images of the moving heart and the coronary arteries were qualitatively compared as a result of the heart rate. The evaluation was performed on three independent series by two independent radiologists for the image quality of the coronary arteries and the presence of artifacts. The evaluation shows that at heart rates above 50 bpm the influence of motion artifacts in the coronary arteries becomes apparent. In addition the influence of a dedicated multisector reconstruction technique on image quality was determined. The results show that the image quality of the coronary arteries is not only related to the heart rate and that the influence of the multisector reconstruction technique becomes significant above 70 bpm. Therefore, this study proves that from the actual acquisition time per heart cycle one cannot determine an actual acquisition time, but only a mathematical acquisition time. (orig.)

  5. High-pitch coronary CT angiography in dual-source CT during free breathing vs. breath holding in patients with low heart rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.bischoff@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Meinel, Felix G. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Del Prete, Alessandra [Department of Radiology Magrassi-Lanzara, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Reiser, Maximilian F.; Becker, Hans-Christoph [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Background: Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is usually performed during breath holding to reduce motion artifacts caused by respiration. However, some patients are not able to follow the breathing commands adequately due to deafness, hearing impairment, agitation or pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of high-pitch CCTA in free breathing patients when compared to breath holding patients. Methods: In this study we evaluated 40 patients (20 free breathing and 20 breath holding patients) with a heart rate of 60 bpm or below referred for CCTA who were examined on a 2nd generation dual-source CT system. Image quality of each coronary artery segment was rated using a 4-point grading scale (1: non diagnostic–4: excellent). Results: Mean heart rate during image acquisition was 52 ±5 bpm in both groups. There was no significant difference in mean image quality, slightly favoring image acquisition during breath holding (mean image quality score 3.76 ± 0.32 in breath holding patients vs. 3.61 ± 0.45 in free breathing patients; p = 0.411). Due to a smaller amount of injected contrast medium, there was a trend for signal intensity to be slightly lower in free breathing patients, but this was not statistically significant (435 ± 123 HU vs. 473 ± 117 HU; p = 0.648). Conclusion: In patients with a low heart rate who are not able to hold their breath adequately, CCTA can also be acquired during free breathing without substantial loss of image quality when using a high pitch scan mode in 2nd generation dual-source CT.

  6. Optimal Blood Suppression inversion time based on breathing rates and heart rates to improve renal artery visibility in spatial labeling with multiple inversion pulses: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Yi Gang; Li, Fang; Long, Xue Ying; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Jin Kang; Li, Wen Zheng [Dept. of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha (China); Shen, Hao [GE Healthcare, Waukesha (United States)

    2016-02-15

    To determine whether an optimal blood suppression inversion time (BSP TI) can boost arterial visibility and whether the optimal BSP TI is related to breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR) for hypertension subjects in spatial labeling with multiple inversion pulses (SLEEK). This prospective study included 10 volunteers and 93 consecutive hypertension patients who had undergone SLEEK at 1.5T MRI system. Firstly, suitable BSP TIs for displaying clearly renal artery were determined in 10 volunteers. Secondly, non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography with the suitable BSP TIs were performed on those hypertension patients. Then, renal artery was evaluated and an optimal BSP TI to increase arterial visibility was determined for each patient. Patients' BRs and HRs were recorded and their relationships with the optimal BSP TI were analyzed. The optimal BSP TI was negatively correlated with BR (r1 = -0.536, P1 < 0.001; and r2 = -0.535, P2 < 0.001) and HR (r1 = -0.432, P1 = 0.001; and r2 = -0.419, P2 = 0.001) for 2 readers (κ = 0.93). For improving renal arterial visibility, BSP TI = 800 ms could be applied as the optimal BSP TI when the 95% confidence interval were 17-19/min (BR1) and 74-82 bpm (HR1) for reader#1 and 17-19/min (BR2) and 74-83 bpm (HR2) for reader#2; BSP TI = 1100 ms while 14-15/min (BR1, 2) and 71-76 bpm (HR1, 2) for both readers; and BSP TI = 1400 ms when 13-16/min (BR1) and 63-68 bpm (HR1) for reader#1 and 14-15/min (BR2) and 64-70 bpm (HR2) for reader#2. In SLEEK, BSP TI is affected by patients' BRs and HRs. Adopting the optimal BSP TI based on BR and HR can improve the renal arterial visibility and consequently the working efficiency.

  7. Intraventricular filling under increasing left ventricular wall stiffness and heart rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaee, Milad; Lai, Hong Kuan; Schovanec, Joseph; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Nagueh, Sherif

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) is a clinical syndrome that is prevalent in over 50% of heart failure patients. HFNEF patients show increased left ventricle (LV) wall stiffness and clinical diagnosis is difficult using ejection fraction (EF) measurements. We hypothesized that filling vortex circulation strength would decrease with increasing LV stiffness irrespective of heart rate (HR). 2D PIV and hemodynamic measurements were acquired on LV physical models of varying wall stiffness under resting and exercise HRs. The LV models were comparatively tested in an in vitro flow circuit consisting of a two-element Windkessel model driven by a piston pump. The stiffer LV models were tested in comparison with the least stiff baseline model without changing pump amplitude, circuit compliance and resistance. Increasing stiffness at resting HR resulted in diminishing cardiac output without lowering EF below 50% as in HFNEF. Increasing HR to 110 bpm in addition to stiffness resulted in lowering EF to less than 50%. The circulation strength of the intraventricular filling vortex diminished with increasing stiffness and HR. The results suggest that filling vortex circulation strength could be potentially used as a surrogate measure of LV stiffness. This research was supported by the Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (HR14-022).

  8. Promotion of energy efficient automobiles via the tax on passenger cars and motorcycles (BPM). A comparative evaluation of different BPM systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroten, A.; Blom, M.J.; De Jong, F.L.

    2009-05-01

    The environmental effectiveness of eight different BPM systems (BPM: tax on passenger cars and motorcycles) has been examined for three variants: (1) Basic BPM; (2) BPM systems where basic BPM is combined with a claims bonus/claims penalty system; (3) BPM systems based on absolute CO2 emission. The comparison of different BPM systems consists of (1) providing insight in the financial incentive that various systems provide to consumers to buy a more efficient car, and (2) making an assessment of the CO2 reductions that could be realized in the implementation of the different systems. In both cases the run-down of the BPM system has been taken into account in preparation of the implementation of road pricing. [nl

  9. Influence of exercise modality on agreement between gas exchange and heart rate variability thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, F A; Montenegro, R A; Midgley, A W; Vasconcellos, F; Soares, P P; Farinatti, P

    2014-08-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the level of agreement between the gas exchange threshold (GET) and heart rate variability threshold (HRVT) during maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) using three different exercise modalities. A further aim was to establish whether there was a 1:1 relationship between the percentage heart rate reserve (%HRR) and percentage oxygen uptake reserve (%VO2 R) at intensities corresponding to GET and HRVT. Sixteen apparently healthy men 17 to 28 years of age performed three maximal CPETs (cycling, walking, and running). Mean heart rate and VO2 at GET and HRVT were 16 bpm (P0.05). There was a strong relationship between GET and HRVT, with R2 ranging from 0.69 to 0.90. A 1:1 relationship between %HRR and % VO2 R was not observed at GET and HRVT. The %HRR was higher during cycling (GET mean difference=7%; HRVT mean difference=11%; both P<0.001), walking (GET mean difference=13%; HRVT mean difference=13%; both P<0.001), or running (GET mean difference=11%; HRVT mean difference=10%; both P<0.001). Therefore, using HRVT to prescribe aerobic exercise intensity appears to be valid. However, to assume a 1:1 relationship between %HRR and % VO2 R at HRVT would probably result in overestimation of the energy expenditure during the bout of exercise.

  10. Effect of propranolol on heart rate variability in hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankeu, Aurel T; Azabji-Kenfack, Marcel; Nganou, Chris-Nadège; Ngassam, Eliane; Kuate-Mfeukeu, Liliane; Mba, Camille; Dehayem, Mesmin Y; Mbanya, Jean-Claude; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2018-02-22

    We aimed to determine the effect of propanolol on heart rate variability (HRV) in hyperthyroidism before antithyroid treatment. This was a before and after study, on ten patients presenting overt hyperthyroidism naïve to treatment. In each patient, a resting electrocardiogram was done followed by estimation of cardiac autonomic dysfunction during five maneuvers (Ewing battery tests). Long term HRV measurement was done using 24 h ambulatory electrocardiographic recording. This automatically provided estimation of HRV using SDNN and RMSSD index, LF, HF, and HF/LF ratio. After baseline investigations, 40 mg of propanolol was given twice a day for 3 days and same parameters were measured after 72 h of treatment. Our patients were aged 40 ± 10 years. Propanolol significantly reduced RR and HR interval (669 ms vs 763 ms and 91 vs 79 bpm; p hyperthyroidism. Trial registration NCT03393728 "Retrospectively registered".

  11. A Robust Dynamic Heart-Rate Detection Algorithm Framework During Intense Physical Activities Using Photoplethysmographic Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Song

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic accurate heart-rate (HR estimation using a photoplethysmogram (PPG during intense physical activities is always challenging due to corruption by motion artifacts (MAs. It is difficult to reconstruct a clean signal and extract HR from contaminated PPG. This paper proposes a robust HR-estimation algorithm framework that uses one-channel PPG and tri-axis acceleration data to reconstruct the PPG and calculate the HR based on features of the PPG and spectral analysis. Firstly, the signal is judged by the presence of MAs. Then, the spectral peaks corresponding to acceleration data are filtered from the periodogram of the PPG when MAs exist. Different signal-processing methods are applied based on the amount of remaining PPG spectral peaks. The main MA-removal algorithm (NFEEMD includes the repeated single-notch filter and ensemble empirical mode decomposition. Finally, HR calibration is designed to ensure the accuracy of HR tracking. The NFEEMD algorithm was performed on the 23 datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Cup Database. The average estimation errors were 1.12 BPM (12 training datasets, 2.63 BPM (10 testing datasets and 1.87 BPM (all 23 datasets, respectively. The Pearson correlation was 0.992. The experiment results illustrate that the proposed algorithm is not only suitable for HR estimation during continuous activities, like slow running (13 training datasets, but also for intense physical activities with acceleration, like arm exercise (10 testing datasets.

  12. Relationship between Resting Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Pulse Pressure in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro; Casonatto, Juliano; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Cucato, Gabriel Grizzo; Dias, Raphael Mendes Ritti

    2017-05-01

    High resting heart rate is considered an important factor for increasing mortality chance in adults. However, it remains unclear whether the observed associations would remain after adjustment for confounders in adolescents. To analyze the relationship between resting heart rate, blood pressure and pulse pressure in adolescents of both sexes. A cross-sectional study with 1231 adolescents (716 girls and 515 boys) aged 14-17 years. Heart rate, blood pressure and pulse pressure were evaluated using an oscillometric blood pressure device, validated for this population. Weight and height were measured with an electronic scale and a stadiometer, respectively, and waist circumference with a non-elastic tape. Multivariate analysis using linear regression investigated the relationship between resting heart rate and blood pressure and pulse pressure in boys and girls, controlling for general and abdominal obesity. Higher resting heart rate values were observed in girls (80.1 ± 11.0 beats/min) compared to boys (75.9 ± 12.7 beats/min) (p ≤ 0.001). Resting heart rate was associated with systolic blood pressure in boys (Beta = 0.15 [0.04; 0.26]) and girls (Beta = 0.24 [0.16; 0.33]), with diastolic blood pressure in boys (Beta = 0.50 [0.37; 0.64]) and girls (Beta = 0.41 [0.30; 0.53]), and with pulse pressure in boys (Beta = -0.16 [-0.27; -0.04]). This study demonstrated a relationship between elevated resting heart rate and increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure in both sexes and pulse pressure in boys even after controlling for potential confounders, such as general and abdominal obesity. A frequência cardíaca de repouso é considerada um importante fator de aumento de mortalidade em adultos. Entretanto, ainda é incerto se as associações observadas permanecem após ajuste para fatores de confusão em adolescentes. Analisar a relação entre frequência cardíaca de repouso, pressão arterial e pressão de pulso em adolescentes dos dois sexos. Estudo transversal

  13. The Association between Noise, Cortisol and Heart Rate in a Small-Scale Gold Mining Community-A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Allyson; Jones, Andrew D; Sun, Kan; Neitzel, Richard L

    2015-08-21

    We performed a cross-sectional pilot study on salivary cortisol, heart rate, and personal noise exposures in a small-scale gold mining village in northeastern Ghana in 2013. Cortisol level changes between morning and evening among participants showed a relatively low decline in cortisol through the day (-1.44 ± 4.27 nmol/L, n = 18), a pattern consistent with chronic stress. A multiple linear regression, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, and time between samples indicated a significant increase of 0.25 nmol/L cortisol from afternoon to evening per 1 dBA increase in equivalent continuous noise exposure (Leq) over that period (95% CI: 0.08-0.42, Adj R(2) = 0.502, n = 17). A mixed effect linear regression model adjusting for age and sex indicated a significant increase of 0.29 heart beats per minute (BPM) for every 1 dB increase in Leq. Using standard deviations (SDs) as measures of variation, and adjusting for age and sex over the sampling period, we found that a 1 dBA increase in noise variation over time (Leq SD) was associated with a 0.5 BPM increase in heart rate SD (95% CI: 0.04--0.9, Adj. R(2) = 0.229, n = 16). Noise levels were consistently high, with 24-hour average Leq exposures ranging from 56.9 to 92.0 dBA, with a mean daily Leq of 82.2 ± 7.3 dBA (mean monitoring duration 22.1 ± 1.9 hours, n = 22). Ninety-five percent of participants had 24-hour average Leq noise levels over the 70 dBA World health Organization (WHO) guideline level for prevention of hearing loss. These findings suggest that small-scale mining communities may face multiple, potentially additive health risks that are not yet well documented, including hearing loss and cardiovascular effects of stress and noise.

  14. The influence factors in image quality of multi-slice spiral CT coronary angiography (MSCTA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Huiliang; Zhu Xinjin; Liang Jianhao; Zhong Yingze; Chen Xueguang; Ou Weiqian; Wen Haomao; Li Peiwen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of heart rate on image quality of multi-slice spiral CT coronary angiography(MSCTA) and the optimization of image reconstruction windows. Methods: Retrospectively ECG-gated MSCT coronary angiography were performed in 67 cases. The cases were divided into four groups by heart rate, groupl with heart rate less than 60 beats per minute(bpm), group 2 with heart rate 61-70 bpm, group 3 with heart rate 71-80 bpm and group 4 with heart rate over 81 bpm. The impact of heart rate on image quality of MSCTA and the optimization of image reconstruction windows were evaluated. Results: 4 coronary (RCA,LM,LAD,LCX) segments were analyzed in each patients with regard to image quality. 86.7%(112/128) of the coronary segments were sufficient for analysis in patients with heart rate less than 60 bpm,62.5%(55/88) with 61-70 bpm,40%(8/20) with 71-80 bpm and 12.5%(2/16) with heart rate over 81 bpm, respectively. There were statistically significances between every coronary segments of group 1 and 2, group 3 and 4 (P<0.05). All coronary segments of group 1 were optimally visualized on the image reconstructed at 75% image reconstruction window of' cardiac cycle; 89.5% cases at 75% in group 2; for group 3.55% of coronary artery were best presented at 75% image reconstruction window, 45% of coronary artery at 45%; All coronary segments of group 4 were optimally visualized on the image reconstructed at 45% image reconstruction window. Conclusion: Image quality of MSCT coronary angiography is highly dependent on heart rate. Coronary artery is usually best shown at 75% image reconstruction window of cardiac cycle for those with heart rate less than 70 bpm. 30%-90% image reconstruction should be performed when heart rate is over 71 bpm. (authors)

  15. Distant Measurement of Plethysmographic Signal in Various Lighting Conditions Using Configurable Frame-Rate Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przybyło Jaromir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Videoplethysmography is currently recognized as a promising noninvasive heart rate measurement method advantageous for ubiquitous monitoring of humans in natural living conditions. Although the method is considered for application in several areas including telemedicine, sports and assisted living, its dependence on lighting conditions and camera performance is still not investigated enough. In this paper we report on research of various image acquisition aspects including the lighting spectrum, frame rate and compression. In the experimental part, we recorded five video sequences in various lighting conditions (fluorescent artificial light, dim daylight, infrared light, incandescent light bulb using a programmable frame rate camera and a pulse oximeter as the reference. For a video sequence-based heart rate measurement we implemented a pulse detection algorithm based on the power spectral density, estimated using Welch’s technique. The results showed that lighting conditions and selected video camera settings including compression and the sampling frequency influence the heart rate detection accuracy. The average heart rate error also varies from 0.35 beats per minute (bpm for fluorescent light to 6.6 bpm for dim daylight.

  16. Real-time heart rate measurement for multi-people using compressive tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingling; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Ming; Kong, Lingqin; Dong, Liquan; Ma, Feilong; Pang, Zongguang; Cai, Zhi; Zhang, Yachu; Hua, Peng; Yuan, Ruifeng

    2017-09-01

    The rise of aging population has created a demand for inexpensive, unobtrusive, automated health care solutions. Image PhotoPlethysmoGraphy(IPPG) aids in the development of these solutions by allowing for the extraction of physiological signals from video data. However, the main deficiencies of the recent IPPG methods are non-automated, non-real-time and susceptible to motion artifacts(MA). In this paper, a real-time heart rate(HR) detection method for multiple subjects simultaneously was proposed and realized using the open computer vision(openCV) library, which consists of getting multiple subjects' facial video automatically through a Webcam, detecting the region of interest (ROI) in the video, reducing the false detection rate by our improved Adaboost algorithm, reducing the MA by our improved compress tracking(CT) algorithm, wavelet noise-suppression algorithm for denoising and multi-threads for higher detection speed. For comparison, HR was measured simultaneously using a medical pulse oximetry device for every subject during all sessions. Experimental results on a data set of 30 subjects show that the max average absolute error of heart rate estimation is less than 8 beats per minute (BPM), and the processing speed of every frame has almost reached real-time: the experiments with video recordings of ten subjects under the condition of the pixel resolution of 600× 800 pixels show that the average HR detection time of 10 subjects was about 17 frames per second (fps).

  17. Fiber optic sensor based on reflectivity configurations to detect heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunianto, M.; Marzuki, A.; Riyatun, R.; Lestari, D.

    2016-11-01

    Research of optical fiber-based heart rate detection sensor has been conducted using the reflection configurationon the thorax motion modified. Optical fiber used in this research was Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) with a diameter of 0.5. Optical fiber system is made with two pieces of fiber, the first fiber is to serve as a transmitter transmitting light from the source to the reflector membrane, the second fiber serves as a receiver. One of the endsfrom the two fibersis pressed and positioned perpendicular of reflector membrane which is placed on the surface of the chest. The sensor works on the principle of intensity changes captured by the receiver fiber when the reflector membrane gets the vibe from the heart. The light source used is in the form of Light Emitting Diode (LED) and Light Dependent Resistor (LDR) as a light sensor. Variations are performed on the reflector membrane diameter. The light intensity received by the detector increases along with the increasing width of the reflector membrane diameter. The results show that this sensor can detect the harmonic peak at a frequency of 1.5 Hz; 7.5 Hz; 10.5 Hz; and 22.5 Hz in a healthy human heart with an average value of Beat Per Minute (BPM) by 78 times, a prototype sensor that is made can work and function properly.

  18. BPM in practice : who is doing what?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijers, H.A.; Wijk, van S.; Mutschler, B.; Leurs, M.T.J.; Hull, R.; Mending, J.; Mendling, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the adoption of BPM, i.e., the use and deployment of BPM concepts in different kinds of organizations. A set of 33 completed, industrial BPM projects is analyzed based on project documentation and interviews with involved project members. In addition to the main study, which

  19. Fetal heart rate patterns at 20 to 24 weeks gestation as recorded by fetal electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyr, F; Groenewald, CA; Nel, DG; Myers, MM; Fifer, WP; Signore, C; Hankins, GDV; Odendaal, HJ

    2014-01-01

    Introduction With advancing technology it has become possible to accurately record and assess fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns from gestations as early as 20 weeks. The aim of our study was to describe early patterns of FHR, as recorded by transabdominal fetal electrocardiogram according to the Dawes-Redman criteria. Accordingly, short-term variability, basal heart rate, accelerations and decelerations were quantified at 20-24 weeks gestation among women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Methods This study was conducted in a subset of participants enrolled in a large prospective pregnancy cohort study. Our final data set consisted of 281 recordings of women with good perinatal outcomes that had undergone fetal electrocardiographic assessment as part of the Safe Passage Study. Results The success rate of the recordings was 95.4%. The mean frequency of small and large accelerations was 0.5 and 0.1 per 10 minutes respectively and that of small and large decelerations 0.3 and 0.008 per 10 minutes respectively. The mean and basal heart rates were both equal to 148.0 bpm at a median gestation of 161 days. The mean short term variation was 6.2 (SD 1.4) milliseconds and mean minute range 35.1 (SD 7.1) milliseconds. Conclusion The 20 to 24 week fetus demonstrates FHR patterns with more accelerations and decelerations, as well as higher baseline variability than was anticipated. Information from this study provides an important foundation for further, more detailed, studies of early FHR patterns. PMID:23991757

  20. HEART RATE AND BLOOD LACTATE RESPONSES TO CHANGQUAN AND DAOSHU FORMS OF MODERN WUSHU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerri Luiz Ribeiro

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of specific training designed to enhance physiological aspects of performance relies heavily on the availability of accurate and validity physiological data. In the combat sport of Wushu, katas are used to develop aerobic fitness. It is arguably important to assess and monitor heart rate (HR and lactate (La responses when designing effective training programs. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate heart rate and lactate responses to forms execution among Wushu combatants. Male elite modern Wushu athletes (n = 4 from a South Brazilian regional team participated in the study. Athletes were aged 22.5 ± 2.08 years old and had at least eight years of Wushu experience. Athletes carried out the Changquan and Daoshu forms in random order, HR and La were measured pre- and post-exercise. Results indicate that HR was 176 ± 3 and 176 ± 2 bpm and La was 4.38 ± 1.3 and 5.15 ± 1.07 mmol·l-1 for Changquan and Daoshu forms, respectively. There were no significantly differences in HR and La between the two forms. HR values represent 89.2 ± 1.1 and 89.1 ± 1.8% of age-predicted maximal heart rate and lactate was near of 4 mmol·l-1 point. In conclusion, training programs to Wushu combatants could target the range of physiological values cited above with no differences between two forms

  1. Effects of Liraglutide on Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumarathurai, Preman; Anholm, Christian; Larsen, Bjørn Strøier

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Reduced heart rate variability (HRV) and increased heart rate (HR) have been associated with cardiovascular mortality. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) increase HR, and studies have suggested that they may reduce HRV. We examined the effect of the GLP-1 RA...

  2. Six Years in the Life of a Mother Bear - The Longest Continuous Heart Rate Recordings from a Free-Ranging Mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laske, Timothy G.; Iaizzo, Paul A.; Garshelis, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Physiological monitoring of free-ranging wild animals is providing new insights into their adaptations to a changing environment. American black bears (Ursus americanus) are highly adaptable mammals, spending up to half the year hibernating, and the remainder of the year attempting to gain weight on a landscape with foods that vary seasonally and year to year. We recorded heart rate (HR) and corresponding activity of an adult female black bear over the course of six years, using an implanted monitor. Despite yearly differences in food, and an every-other year reproductive cycle, this bear exhibited remarkable consistency in HR and activity. HR increased for 12 weeks in spring, from minimal hibernation levels (mean 20-25 beats/minute [bpm]; min 10 bpm) to summer active levels (July daytime: mean 95 bpm). Timing was delayed following one cold winter. In August the bear switched from primarily diurnal to nocturnal, coincident with the availability of baits set by legal hunters. Activity in autumn was higher when the bear was with cubs. Birthing of cubs in January was identified by a transient increase in HR and activity. Long-term physiological and behavioral monitoring is valuable for understanding adaptations of free-ranging animals to climate change, food availability, and human-related stressors.

  3. Oracle BPM Suite 11g Developer's cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    This book is written in simple, easy to understand format with lots of screenshots and step-by-step explanations. If you are a BPM developer, looking to develop robust BPM solutions without impediments, then this is the best guide for you. This book assumes that you have a fundamental knowledge of BPM.

  4. Heart rate monitoring mobile applications

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhry, Beenish M.

    2016-01-01

    Total number of times a heart beats in a minute is known as the heart rate. Traditionally, heart rate was measured using clunky gadgets but these days it can be measured with a smartphone?s camera. This can help you measure your heart rate anywhere and at anytime, especially during workouts so you can adjust your workout intensity to achieve maximum health benefits. With simple and easy to use mobile app, ?Unique Heart Rate Monitor?, you can also maintain your heart rate history for personal ...

  5. Heart rate monitoring mobile applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Beenish M

    2016-01-01

    Total number of times a heart beats in a minute is known as the heart rate. Traditionally, heart rate was measured using clunky gadgets but these days it can be measured with a smartphone's camera. This can help you measure your heart rate anywhere and at anytime, especially during workouts so you can adjust your workout intensity to achieve maximum health benefits. With simple and easy to use mobile app, 'Unique Heart Rate Monitor', you can also maintain your heart rate history for personal reflection and sharing with a provider.

  6. Reliability and validity of a smartphone pulse rate application for the assessment of resting and elevated pulse rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Katy; Graff, Megan; Hedt, Corbin; Simmons, James

    2016-08-01

    Purpose/hypothesis: This study was designed to investigate the test-retest reliability, concurrent validity, and the standard error of measurement (SEm) of a pulse rate assessment application (Azumio®'s Instant Heart Rate) on both Android® and iOS® (iphone operating system) smartphones as compared to a FT7 Polar® Heart Rate monitor. Number of subjects: 111. Resting (sitting) pulse rate was assessed twice and then the participants were asked to complete a 1-min standing step test and then immediately re-assessed. The smartphone assessors were blinded to their measurements. Test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC 2,1] and 95% confidence interval) for the three tools at rest (time 1/time 2): iOS® (0.76 [0.67-0.83]); Polar® (0.84 [0.78-0.89]); and Android® (0.82 [0.75-0.88]). Concurrent validity at rest time 2 (ICC 2,1) with the Polar® device: IOS® (0.92 [0.88-0.94]) and Android® (0.95 [0.92-0.96]). Concurrent validity post-exercise (time 3) (ICC) with the Polar® device: iOS® (0.90 [0.86-0.93]) and Android® (0.94 [0.91-0.96]). The SEm values for the three devices at rest: iOS® (5.77 beats per minute [BPM]), Polar® (4.56 BPM) and Android® (4.96 BPM). The Android®, iOS®, and Polar® devices showed acceptable test-retest reliability at rest and post-exercise. Both the smartphone platforms demonstrated concurrent validity with the Polar® at rest and post-exercise. The Azumio® Instant Heart Rate application when used by either platform appears to be a reliable and valid tool to assess pulse rate in healthy individuals.

  7. The Effect of Heart Rate on Exposure Window and Best Phase for Stress Perfusion Computed Tomography: Lessons From the CORE320 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steveson, Chloe; Schuijf, Joanne D; Vavere, Andrea L; Mather, Richard T; Caton, Teresa; Mehra, Vishal; Betoko, Aisha; Cox, Christopher; Lima, Joao Ac; George, Richard T

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of heart rate on exposure window, best phase, and image quality for stress computed tomography perfusion (CTP) in the CORE320 study. The CTP data sets were analyzed to determine the best phase for perfusion analysis. A predefined exposure window covering 75% to 95% of the R-R cycle was used. Of the 368 patients included in the analysis, 93% received oral β blockade before the rest scan. The median heart rate during the stress acquisition was 69 bpm (interquartile range [IQR], 60-77). The median best phase was 81% (IQR, 76-90), and length of exposure window was 22% (IQR, 19-24). The best phase was significantly later in the cardiac cycle with higher heart rates (P stress scan was 5.3 mSv (IQR, 3.8-6.1). Stress myocardial CTP imaging can be performed using prospective electrocardiography triggering, an exposure window of 75% to 95%, and β-blockade resulting in good or excellent image quality in the majority (80%) of patients while maintaining a low effective radiation dose.

  8. Lattice function measurement with TBT BPM data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    At Fermilab Main Ring some of the Beam Position Monitors (BPM) are instrumented with Turn-By-Turn (TBT) capability to record up to 1,024 consecutive turns of BPM data for each given trigger. For example, there are 9 horizontal plane and 8 vertical plane BPM's in the sector D3 and D4. The BPM data, which records the betatron oscillation, is fitted to obtain beam parameters x, x', y, y', and Δp/p, using the calculated beam line transfer matrix. The resulted TBT beam parameters (x, x') or (y, y') are fitted to ellipses to obtain the lattice function β, α, and the emittance associated with the betatron oscillation. The tune of the machine can be calculated from the phase space angles of the successive turns, in the normalized phase space. The beam parameters can also be used to extract transfer matrix to be used for local and global coupling analysis. The process of fitting the BPM data produces information that can be used to diagnose problems such as calibration, noise level and polarity. Being available at every turn and at changing beam position the information carries a lot of statistical power. Since most of the BPM's are located at high beta location only the x and y beam position information is not simultaneously available. The BPM data fitting processing essentially bridged the gap

  9. Influence of trigger type, tube voltage and heart rate on calcified plaque imaging in dual source cardiac computed tomography: phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Donandt, Eva; Isfort, Peter; Allmendinger, Thomas; Kuhl, Christiane K; Mahnken, Andreas H; Bruners, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the impact of high pitch cardiac CT vs. retrospective ECG gated CT on the quantification of calcified vessel stenoses, with assessment of the influence of tube voltage, reconstruction kernel and heart rate. A 4D cardiac movement phantom equipped with three different plaque phantoms (12.5%, 25% and 50% stenosis at different calcification levels), was scanned with a 128-row dual source CT scanner, applying different trigger types (gated vs. prospectively triggered high pitch), tube voltages (100-120 kV) and heart rates (50–90 beats per minute, bpm). Images were reconstructed using different standard (B26f, B46f, B70f) and iterative (I26f, I70f) convolution kernels. Absolute and relative plaque sizes were measured and statistically compared. Radiation dose associated with the different methods (gated vs. high pitch, 100 kV vs. 120 kV) were compared. Compared to the known diameters of the phantom plaques and vessels both CT-examination techniques overestimated the degrees of stenoses. Using the high pitch CT-protocol plaques appeared larger (0.09 ± 0.31 mm, 2 ± 8 percent points, PP) in comparison to the ECG-gated CT-scans. Reducing tube voltage had a similar effect, resulting in higher grading of the same stenoses by 3 ± 8 PP. In turn, sharper convolution kernels lead to a lower grading of stenoses (differences of up to 5%). Pairwise comparison of B26f and I26f, B46f and B70f, and B70f and I70f showed differences of 0–1 ± 6–8 PP of the plaque depiction. Motion artifacts were present only at 90 bpm high pitch experiments. High-pitch protocols were associated with significantly lower radiation doses compared with the ECG-gated protocols (258.0 mGy vs. 2829.8 mGy CTDI vol , p ≤ 0.0001). Prospectively triggered high-pitch cardiac CT led to an overestimation of plaque diameter and degree of stenoses in a coronary phantom. This overestimation is only slight and probably negligible in a clinical situation. Even at higher heart rates high pitch CT

  10. Night-time heart rate cut-off point definition by resting office tachycardia in untreated hypertensive patients: data of the Spanish ABPM registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyoles, Ernest; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Roso, Albert; de la Cruz, Juan J; Gorostidi, Manuel; Segura, Julián; Banegas, José R; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Ruilope, Luís M

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that an elevated resting heart rate (HR) is a risk factor for both total and cardiovascular mortality. Our aim was to estimate the night-time HR cut-off point that best predicts cardiovascular risk office tachycardia in hypertensive patients. Untreated hypertensive patients without concomitant cardiovascular diseases were included. Office and ambulatory HRs were measured. Cardiovascular risk office tachycardia was defined by office HR at least 85 beats per minute (bpm). Different night-time HR cut-offs were estimated by receiver operating characteristic curve analyses to predict cardiovascular risk office tachycardia. The best cut-off was selected on the basis of its combined sensitivity and specificity. A total of 32 569 hypertensive patients were included: 46.5% women, mean age (SD) 52 (14) years, office blood pressure 146 (16)/89 (11) mmHg, diabetes 10.3%, smoking 19.2%, BMI 29 (6.8) kg/m, office HR 77 (11.2) bpm, and night-time HR 64.9 (9.3) bpm. A total of 7070 (21.7%) patients were found to have cardiovascular risk office tachycardia. The night-time HR value that better predicted cardiovascular risk office tachycardia was more than 66 bpm. In comparison with patients with night HR below this value, those with night-time tachycardia were predominantly women, younger, with higher ambulatory blood pressure, greater BMI, and higher prevalence of diabetes and smoking. All comparisons were statistically significant (P less than 0.001). A mean night-time HR more than 66 bpm is a good predictor of cardiovascular risk office tachycardia in untreated hypertensive patients and could be considered a variable associated with an increased cardiovascular risk.

  11. Surveying the critical success factors of BPM-systems implementation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravesteyn, P.; Batenburg, R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore if there is a common ground for the definition of business process management (BPM) and BPM-systems, as well as the critical success factors (CSFs) for BPM-system implementation. A BPM-system implementation framework is validated that classifies the

  12. Associations of acute stress and overnight heart rate with feed efficiency in beef heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, J C; Schenkel, F S; Physick-Sheard, P W; Fontoura, A B P; Miller, S P; Tennessen, T; Montanholi, Y R

    2017-03-01

    Proxies have the potential to accelerate feed efficiency (residual feed intake (RFI); kg dry matter/day) improvement, assisting with the reduction of beef cattle feed costs and environmental impact. Heart rate (HR) (beats per minute (BPM)) is associated with feed efficiency and influenced by autonomic activity and peripheral metabolism, suggesting HR could be used as a proxy for feed efficiency. Objectives were to assess associations between overnight HR, lying patterns and RFI, and between acute stress HR and RFI. Heifer calves (n=107; 408±28 days of age, 341±42.2 kg) and yearling heifers (n=36; 604±92 days of age, 539±52.2 kg) were exposed to a performance test to determine productive performance. Overnight HR (electrode based) and lying patterns (accelerometer based) were monitored on a subgroup of heifer calves (n=40; 20 lowest RFI; 20 highest RFI). In the 10-min acute stress assessment, all heifers were individually exposed to the opening and closing of an umbrella and HR before (HRBEF), in response to (HRMAX), after (HRAFT) and change (HRCHG; HRAFT-HRBEF) as a result of exposure were determined. Using polynomial regression, rate of HR decrease pre-exposure (β 1) and rates of HR increase (β 2) and decrease (β 3, β 4) post-exposure were determined. Heifer calves in the overnight assessment were classified into equal RFI groups (low RFI; high RFI) and HR means were treated as repeated measures and compared using multiple regression. In the acute stress assessment, heifers were classified within cattle category into equal RFI groups (low RFI; high RFI) and means and polynomial regression parameters were compared using multiple regression. Low-RFI heifer calves had a lower overnight HR (69.2 v. 72.6 BPM), similar HR change from lying to standing intervals (8.9 v. 9.2 BPM) and similar time lying (61.1% v. 64.5%) compared with high-RFI heifer calves. Low-RFI heifer calves had a higher absolute HRMAX (162.9 v. 145.7 BPM) and β 2 (-0.34 v. -0.20) than high

  13. In Search of Competencies Needed in BPM Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M.E. de Waal; J.P.P. Ravesteijn; Ronald Batenburg

    2008-01-01

    Business Process Management (BPM) and supporting BPM-systems are increasingly implemented within organizations and supply chains. However a common accepted definition of the BPM-concept is omitted and the same is true for the competencies (knowledge, skills and attitudes) that project members need

  14. Heart Rate Variability Monitoring during Sleep Based on Capacitively Coupled Textile Electrodes on a Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ji Lee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed and tested a capacitively coupled electrocardiogram (ECG measurement system using conductive textiles on a bed, for long-term healthcare monitoring. The system, which was designed to measure ECG in a bed with no constraints of sleep position and posture, included a foam layer to increase the contact region with the curvature of the body and a cover to ensure durability and easy installation. Nine healthy subjects participated in the experiment during polysomnography (PSG, and the heart rate (HR coverage and heart rate variability (HRV parameters were analyzed to evaluate the system. The experimental results showed that the mean of R-peak coverage was 98.0% (95.5%–99.7%, and the normalized errors of HRV time and spectral measures between the Ag/AgCl system and our system ranged from 0.15% to 4.20%. The root mean square errors for inter-beat (RR intervals and HR were 1.36 ms and 0.09 bpm, respectively. We also showed the potential of our developed system for rapid eye movement (REM sleep and wake detection as well as for recording of abnormal states.

  15. Nicotine chewing gum (2 mg, 4 mg) and cigarette smoking: comparative effects upon vigilance and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, A C; Winder, G

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen male smokers, abstinent the morning before testing, were assessed under four conditions: placebo chewing gum, 2 mg nicotine chewing gum, 4 mg nicotine gum, and cigarette smoking. Placebo gum was administered in the cigarette condition, while sham smoking occurred in the gum conditions. Pre-drug administration and post-drug difference scores were calculated for each assessment measure: rapid visual information processing (RVIP), memory for new information, and heart rate. Nicotine raised heart rate in a significant monotonic dose-related manner (P less than 0.001): placebo +0.2; 2 mg gum +5.1; 4 mg gum +9.8; cigarette +17.5 bpm. Rapid visual information processing target detections were also significantly related to dose (P less than 0.01), with this increased vigilance significant under 4 mg nicotine gum and cigarette smoking. Memory task performance was not significantly affected. Self-reported feelings of alertness/energy were higher while smoking than under placebo or 4 mg gum. Complaints about the taste of the 4 mg nicotine gum were frequent.

  16. Ivabradine: Current and Future Treatment of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorup, Lene; Simonsen, Ulf; Grimm, Daniela; Hedegaard, Elise R

    2017-08-01

    In heart failure (HF), the heart cannot pump blood efficiently and is therefore unable to meet the body's demands of oxygen, and/or there is increased end-diastolic pressure. Current treatments for HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotension receptor type 1 (AT 1 ) antagonists, β-adrenoceptor antagonists, aldosterone receptor antagonists, diuretics, digoxin and a combination drug with AT 1 receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor. In HF, the risk of readmission for hospital and mortality is markedly higher with a heart rate (HR) above 70 bpm. Here, we review the evidence regarding the use of ivabradine for lowering HR in HF. Ivabradine is a blocker of an I funny current (I(f)) channel and causes rate-dependent inhibition of the pacemaker activity in the sinoatrial node. In clinical trials of HFrEF, treatment with ivabradine seems to improve clinical outcome, for example improved ejection fraction (EF) and less readmission for hospital, but the effect appears most pronounced in patients with HRs above 70 bpm, while the effect on cardiovascular death appears less consistent. The adverse effects of ivabradine include bradycardia, atrial fibrillation and visual disturbances, but ivabradine avoids the negative inotrope effects observed with β-adrenoceptor antagonists. In conclusion, in patients with stable HFrEF with EF<35% and HR above 70 bpm, ivabradine improves the outcome and might be a first choice of therapy, if beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are not tolerated. Further studies must show whether that can be extended to HF patients with preserved EF. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  17. Heart rate response to breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Pagh, K; Nielsen, J S

    1987-01-01

    Heart rate responses to stepwise and periodic changes in lung volume were studied in seven young healthy males. Stepwise inspiration and expiration both resulted in an increase in heart rate followed by a rapid decrease in heart rate. The fastest heart rate was reached in 1.6 +/- 0.5 s and in 3.......6 +/- 1.4 s in response to inspiration and expiration, respectively (P less than 0.01). The slowest heart rate was reached in 4.8 +/- 1.0 s and in 7.6 +/- 1.9 s in response to inspiration and expiration, respectively (P less than 0.01). Following this biphasic change the heart rate returned to a steady...... level. The difference between the fastest and the slowest heart rates was significantly larger in response to inspiration (21.7 +/- 7.3 beats per minute) than in response to expiration (12.0 +/- 7.3 beats per minute; P less than 0.01). Periodic changes in lung volume were performed with frequencies from...

  18. Muscular Contraction Mode Differently Affects Autonomic Control During Heart Rate Matched Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eWeippert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The precise contributions of afferent feedback to cardiovascular and respiratory responses to exercise are still unclear. Aim of this crossover study was to assess whether and how autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory control differed in response to dynamic (DYN and isometric contractions (ISO at a similar, low heart rate (HR level. Therefore, 22 healthy males (26.7 ± 3.6 yrs performed two kinds of voluntary exercises at similar HR: ISO and DYN of the right quadriceps femoris muscle. Although HR was eqivalent (82 ± 8 bpm for DYN and ISO, respectively, rating of exertion, blood pressures, and rate pressure product were higher, whereas breathing frequency, minute ventilation, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide output were significantly lower during ISO. Tidal volume, end-tidal partial pressures of O2 and CO2, respiratory exchange ratio and capillary blood lactate concentration were comparable between both contraction modes. Heart rate variability (HRV indicators, SDNN, HF-Power and LF-Power, representing both vagal and sympathetic influences, were significantly higher during ISO. Sample entropy, a nonlinear measure of HRV was also significantly affected by contraction mode. It can be concluded that, despite the same net effect on HR, the quality of cardiovascular control during low intensity exercise is significantly different between DYN and ISO. HRV analysis indicated a sympatho-vagal coactivation during ISO. Whether mechanoreceptor feedback alone, a change in central command, or the interaction of both mechanisms is the main contributor of the distinct autonomic responses to the different exercise modes remains to be elucidated.

  19. FileNet's BPM life-cycle support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netjes, M.; Reijers, H.A.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Business Process Management (BPM) systems provide a broad range of facilities to enact and manage operational business processes. Ideally, these systems should provide support for the complete BPM life-cycle: (re)design, configuration, execution, control, and diagnosis of processes. In the research

  20. Initial Beam Test of the Prototype Strip Line BPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Ryu, Jin Yeong; Jang, Ji Ho; Cho, Yong Sub

    2011-01-01

    A beam position monitor (BPM) was developed which would be used for the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) beam line. It is a strip line BPM which is commonly used one for the proton beam. The BPM cross section was designed with the SUPERFISH code and the matching section to the feed through was designed by the MWS code. The design parameters of the BPM are shown in Table 1. The designed BPM was fabricated to verify the manufacturing process and check its electrical performance. After the low power test at the test stand, the BPM was installed at the 20-MeV proton accelerator beam line as shown in Fig. 1

  1. Control of the heart rate of rat embryos during the organogenic period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritchie HE

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Helen E Ritchie,1 Carolina Ragnerstam,2 Elin Gustafsson,2 Johanna M Jonsson,2 William S Webster2 1Discipline of Biomedical Science, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, 2Department of Anatomy and Histology, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: The aim of this study was to gain insight into whether the first trimester embryo could control its own heart rate (HR in response to hypoxia. The gestational day 13 rat embryo is a good model for the human embryo at 5–6 weeks gestation, as the heart is comparable in development and, like the human embryo, has no functional autonomic nerve supply at this stage. Utilizing a whole-embryo culture technique, we examined the effects of different pharmacological agents on HR under normoxic (95% oxygen and hypoxic (20% oxygen conditions. Oxygen concentrations ≤60% caused a concentration-dependent decrease in HR from normal levels of ~210 bpm. An adenosine agonist, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activator and KATP channel opener all caused bradycardia in normoxic conditions; however, putative antagonists for these systems failed to prevent or ameliorate hypoxia-induced bradycardia. This suggests that the activation of one or more of these systems is not the primary cause of the observed hypoxia-induced bradycardia. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation also decreased HR in normoxic conditions, highlighting the importance of ATP levels. The β-blocker metoprolol caused a concentration-dependent reduction in HR supporting reports that β1-adrenergic receptors are present in the early rat embryonic heart. The cAMP inducer colforsin induced a positive chronotropic effect in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Overall, the embryonic HR at this stage of development is responsive to the level of oxygenation, probably as a consequence of its influence on ATP production. Keywords: embryonic heart rate, embryo, bradycardia, in vitro, ATP, hypoxia

  2. What makes the heart of Boa constrictor (Squamata: Boidae beat faster?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Fabrício Mota Rodrigues

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Body size is highly correlated with metabolism, which in turn influences physiological rates such as heart rate. In general, heart rate is negatively influenced by the size of animal's body, but there is insufficient data corroborating this pattern in snakes. This study evaluated how body size affects heart rate in captive Boa constrictor Linnaeus, 1758. We measured the heart rate of 30 snakes using digital palpation and evaluated how this rate is influenced by body mass and sex using Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA. The heart rate of the snakes was 58.8 ± 6.7 bpm (beats per minute. Body size, estimated as log-transformed body mass, negatively influenced heart rate (F1,28 = 10.27, p = 0.003, slope = -0.00004, R2 = 0.27, but sex had no effect (F1,27 = 0.07, p = 0.80. In conclusion, this result corroborates the negative relationship between body size and heart rate for snakes and reinforces the influence of related metabolic characteristics, such as body size, on the physiological parameters of snakes.

  3. Measurement and Compensation of BPM Chamber Motion in HLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J. W.; Sun, B. G.; Cao, Y.; Xu, H. L.; Lu, P.; Li, C.; Xuan, K.; Wang, J. G.

    2010-06-01

    Significant horizontal drifts in the beam orbit in the storage ring of HLS (Hefei Light Source) have been seen for many years. What leads to the motion of Beam Position Monitor (BPM) chamber is thermal expansion mainly caused by the synchrotron light. To monitor the BPM chamber motions for all BPMs, a BPM chamber motion measurement system is built in real-time. The raster gauges are used to measure the displacements. The results distinctly show the relation between the BPM chamber motion and the beam current. To suppress the effect of BPM chamber motion, a compensation strategy is implemented at HLS. The horizontal drifts of beam orbit have been really suppressed within 20μm without the compensation of BPM chamber motion in the runtime.

  4. Measurement and Compensation of BPM Chamber Motion in HLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J. W.; Sun, B. G.; Cao, Y.; Xu, H. L.; Lu, P.; Li, C.; Xuan, K.; Wang, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Significant horizontal drifts in the beam orbit in the storage ring of HLS (Hefei Light Source) have been seen for many years. What leads to the motion of Beam Position Monitor (BPM) chamber is thermal expansion mainly caused by the synchrotron light. To monitor the BPM chamber motions for all BPMs, a BPM chamber motion measurement system is built in real-time. The raster gauges are used to measure the displacements. The results distinctly show the relation between the BPM chamber motion and the beam current. To suppress the effect of BPM chamber motion, a compensation strategy is implemented at HLS. The horizontal drifts of beam orbit have been really suppressed within 20μm without the compensation of BPM chamber motion in the runtime.

  5. The Association between Noise, Cortisol and Heart Rate in a Small-Scale Gold Mining Community—A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson Green

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed a cross-sectional pilot study on salivary cortisol, heart rate, and personal noise exposures in a small-scale gold mining village in northeastern Ghana in 2013. Cortisol level changes between morning and evening among participants showed a relatively low decline in cortisol through the day (−1.44 ± 4.27 nmol/L, n = 18, a pattern consistent with chronic stress. A multiple linear regression, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, and time between samples indicated a significant increase of 0.25 nmol/L cortisol from afternoon to evening per 1 dBA increase in equivalent continuous noise exposure (Leq over that period (95% CI: 0.08–0.42, Adj R2 = 0.502, n = 17. A mixed effect linear regression model adjusting for age and sex indicated a significant increase of 0.29 heart beats per minute (BPM for every 1 dB increase in Leq. Using standard deviations (SDs as measures of variation, and adjusting for age and sex over the sampling period, we found that a 1 dBA increase in noise variation over time (Leq SD was associated with a 0.5 BPM increase in heart rate SD (95% CI: 0.04–−0.9, Adj. R2 = 0.229, n = 16. Noise levels were consistently high, with 24-hour average Leq exposures ranging from 56.9 to 92.0 dBA, with a mean daily Leq of 82.2 ± 7.3 dBA (mean monitoring duration 22.1 ± 1.9 hours, n = 22. Ninety-five percent of participants had 24-hour average Leq noise levels over the 70 dBA World health Organization (WHO guideline level for prevention of hearing loss. These findings suggest that small-scale mining communities may face multiple, potentially additive health risks that are not yet well documented, including hearing loss and cardiovascular effects of stress and noise.

  6. [Twenty-four hour time and frequency domain variability of systolic blood pressure and heart rate in an experimental model of arterial hypertension plus obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelat, M; Verwaerde, P; Lazartiques, E; Cabrol, P; Galitzky, J; Berlan, M; Montastruc, J L; Senard, J M

    1998-08-01

    Modifications of heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) variabilities (V) have been reported in the human syndrome arterial hypertension plus insulin-resistance. The aim of this study was to characterize the 24 h SBPV and HRV in both time and frequency domains during weight increase in dogs fed ad libitum with a high fat diet. Implantable transmitter units for measurement of blood pressure and heart rate were surgically implanted in five beagle male dogs. BP and HR were continuously recorded using telemetric measurements during 24 hours, before and after 6 and 9 weeks of hypercaloric diet in quiet animals submitted to a 12h light-dark cycle. To study nychtemeral cycle of SBP and HR, two periods were chosen: day (from 6.00 h to 19.00 h) and night (from 23.00 h to 6.00 h). Spontaneous baroreflex efficiency was measured using the sequence method. Spectral variability of HR and SBP was analyzed using a fast Fourier transformation on 512 consecutive values and normalized units of low (LF: 50-150 mHz, reflecting sympathetic activity) and high (HF: respiratory rate +/- 50 mHz, reflecting parasympathetic activity) frequency bands were calculated. The energy of total spectrum (from 0.004 to 1 Hz) was also studied. Body weight (12.4 +/- 0.9 vs 14.9 +/- 0.9 kg, p vs 147 +/- 1 mmHg, p vs night: 71 +/- 1 bpm) but not after 9 weeks (day: 91 +/- 4 bpm ; night: 86 +/- 2 bpm). Concomitantly, the efficiency of spontaneous baroreflex decreased at 6 weeks (36 +/- 1 vs 42 +/- 2 mmHg/ms, p energy of HRV was found after 6 but not after 9 weeks. LF energy of SBPV was increased at 6 but not at 9 weeks (table). [table: see text] In conclusion, this study shows that an hyperlipidic and hypercaloric diet induces transient variations in autonomic nervous system activity which could be the physiopathological link between obesity, insulin-resistance and arterial hypertension.

  7. Towards a BPM cloud architecture with data and activity distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duipmans, Evert F.; Ferreira Pires, Luis; Bonino da Silva Santos, L.O.; Chi, CH.; Grossmann, G.

    Nowadays, many organizations use BPM for capturing and monitoring their business processes. The introduction of BPM in an organization may become expensive, because of the upfront investments on software and hardware. Therefore, organizations can choose for a cloud-based BPM system, in which a BPM

  8. A Computational Study on the Relation between Resting Heart Rate and Atrial Fibrillation Hemodynamics under Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Anselmino

    Full Text Available Clinical data indicating a heart rate (HR target during rate control therapy for permanent atrial fibrillation (AF and assessing its eventual relationship with reduced exercise tolerance are lacking. The present study aims at investigating the impact of resting HR on the hemodynamic response to exercise in permanent AF patients by means of a computational cardiovascular model.The AF lumped-parameter model was run to simulate resting (1 Metabolic Equivalent of Task-MET and various exercise conditions (4 METs: brisk walking; 6 METs: skiing; 8 METs: running, considering different resting HR (70 bpm for the slower resting HR-SHR-simulations, and 100 bpm for the higher resting HR-HHR-simulations. To compare relative variations of cardiovascular variables upon exertion, the variation comparative index (VCI-the absolute variation between the exercise and the resting values in SHR simulations referred to the absolute variation in HHR simulations-was calculated at each exercise grade (VCI4, VCI6 and VCI8.Pulmonary venous pressure underwent a greater increase in HHR compared to SHR simulations (VCI4 = 0.71, VCI6 = 0.73 and VCI8 = 0.77, while for systemic arterial pressure the opposite is true (VCI4 = 1.15, VCI6 = 1.36, VCI8 = 1.56.The computational findings suggest that a slower, with respect to a higher resting HR, might be preferable in permanent AF patients, since during exercise pulmonary venous pressure undergoes a slighter increase and systemic blood pressure reveals a more appropriate increase.

  9. A Computational Study on the Relation between Resting Heart Rate and Atrial Fibrillation Hemodynamics under Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmino, Matteo; Scarsoglio, Stefania; Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Clinical data indicating a heart rate (HR) target during rate control therapy for permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) and assessing its eventual relationship with reduced exercise tolerance are lacking. The present study aims at investigating the impact of resting HR on the hemodynamic response to exercise in permanent AF patients by means of a computational cardiovascular model. The AF lumped-parameter model was run to simulate resting (1 Metabolic Equivalent of Task-MET) and various exercise conditions (4 METs: brisk walking; 6 METs: skiing; 8 METs: running), considering different resting HR (70 bpm for the slower resting HR-SHR-simulations, and 100 bpm for the higher resting HR-HHR-simulations). To compare relative variations of cardiovascular variables upon exertion, the variation comparative index (VCI)-the absolute variation between the exercise and the resting values in SHR simulations referred to the absolute variation in HHR simulations-was calculated at each exercise grade (VCI4, VCI6 and VCI8). Pulmonary venous pressure underwent a greater increase in HHR compared to SHR simulations (VCI4 = 0.71, VCI6 = 0.73 and VCI8 = 0.77), while for systemic arterial pressure the opposite is true (VCI4 = 1.15, VCI6 = 1.36, VCI8 = 1.56). The computational findings suggest that a slower, with respect to a higher resting HR, might be preferable in permanent AF patients, since during exercise pulmonary venous pressure undergoes a slighter increase and systemic blood pressure reveals a more appropriate increase.

  10. Freqüência Cardíaca Fetal durante o Primeiro Trimestre da Gestação Fetal Heart Rate in the First Trimester of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heverton Pettersen

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: estabelecer curva de normalidade da freqüência cardíaca fetal (FCF entre a 10ª e a 14ª semana de gestação. Métodos: a FCF foi avaliada em 1078 fetos entre 10 e 14 semanas de gestação. Para uma melhor correlação da FCF com a idade gestacional, os fetos foram divididos em quatro grupos de acordo com a idade gestacional: Grupo I (10 semanas, Grupo II (11 semanas, Grupo III (12 semanas e Grupo IV (13 semanas. Por meio de corte sagital, o coração fetal foi visualizado e o registro da FCF foi realizado usando Modo-B e Modo-M em tempo real. Calculou-se a FCF média eletronicamente por meio da colocação dos cálipers que registravam 3 ciclos consecutivos. Resultados: a FCF variou entre 136 e 178 bpm entre os 1078 fetos estudados. Construiu-se uma curva de normalidade estabelecendo-se a mediana e os percentis 5 e 95 da FCF para cada grupo. No Grupo I a FCF variou de 158 a 184 bpm; no Grupo II, de 155 a 175 bpm; no Grupo III, de 152 a 172 bpm; no Grupo IV, de 149 a 168 bpm. Houve diminuição progressiva e significativa da FCF com o avanço da idade gestacional durante o período estudado. Conclusões: a avaliação da FCF no primeiro trimestre de gestação é um procedimento simples e que deve ser analisado não só na sua forma qualitativa (batimentos cardíacos fetais rítmicos mas também na sua forma quantitativa, já que trabalhos publicados mostram a sua relação com o prognóstico fetal.Purpose: to determine normal ranges for fetal heart rate (FHR between the 10th and 14th week of pregnancy. Methods: a total of 1078 fetuses within a crown-rump length (CRL from the 10th to the 14th week of pregnancy were evaluated. The fetuses were divided into 4 groups: Group I (10 weeks, Group II (11 weeks, Group III (12 weeks, Group IV (13 weeks. The fetal heart was seen using B-mode/M-mode at a sagital plane and FHR was recorded. FHR was electronically calculated using calipers within 3 consecutive cycles without fetal moveiments

  11. RHIC BPM System Modifications and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Satogata, Todd; Cameron, Peter; Cerniglia, Phil; Cupolo, John; Curcio, Anthony J; Dawson, William C; Degen, Christopher; Gullotta, Justin; Mead, Joe; Michnoff, Robert; Russo, Thomas; Sikora, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The RHIC beam position monitor (BPM) system provides independent average orbit and turn-by-turn (TBT) position measurements. In each ring, there are 162 measurement locations per plane (horizontal and vertical) for a total of 648 BPM planes in the RHIC machine. During 2003 and 2004 shutdowns, BPM processing electronics were moved from the RHIC tunnel to controls alcoves to reduce radiation impact, and the analog signal paths of several dozen modules were modified to eliminate gain-switching relays and improve signal stability. This paper presents results of improved system performance, including stability for interaction region and sextupole beam-based alignment efforts. We also summarize performance of improved million-turn TBT acquisition channels for nonlinear dynamics and echo studies.

  12. Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator RF BPM System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, R.M.; Morrison, L.H.; Waldschmidt, G.J.; Walters, D.R.; Argonne; Johnson, R.; Li, Z.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T.; SLAC

    2007-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) when it becomes operational in 2009. The LCLS is currently in the construction phase. The beam position monitor (BPM) system planned for the LCLS undulator will incorporate a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM system described in this paper. The BPM system will provide high-resolution measurements of the electron beam trajectory on a pulse-to-pulse basis and over many shots. The X-band cavity BPM size, simple fabrication, and high resolution make it an ideal choice for LCLS beam position detection. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results

  13. Automatic exposure control at single- and dual-heartbeat CTCA on a 320-MDCT volume scanner: effect of heart rate, exposure phase window setting, and reconstruction algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funama, Yoshinori; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Oda, Seitaro; Shimonobo, Toshiaki; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2014-05-01

    To investigate whether electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated single- and dual-heartbeat computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) with automatic exposure control (AEC) yields images with uniform image noise at reduced radiation doses. Using an anthropomorphic chest CT phantom we performed prospectively ECG-gated single- and dual-heartbeat CTCA on a second-generation 320-multidetector CT volume scanner. The exposure phase window was set at 75%, 70-80%, 40-80%, and 0-100% and the heart rate at 60 or 80 or corr80 bpm; images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) or iterative reconstruction (IR, adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D). We applied AEC and set the image noise level to 20 or 25 HU. For each technique we determined the image noise and the radiation dose to the phantom center. With half-scan reconstruction at 60 bpm, a 70-80% phase window- and a 20-HU standard deviation (SD) setting, the imagenoise level and -variation along the z axis manifested similar curves with FBP and IR. With half-scan reconstruction, the radiation dose to the phantom center with 70-80% phase window was 18.89 and 12.34 mGy for FBP and 4.61 and 3.10 mGy for IR at an SD setting SD of 20 and 25 HU, respectively. At 80 bpm with two-segment reconstruction the dose was approximately twice that of 60 bpm at both SD settings. However, increasing radiation dose at corr80 bpm was suppressed to 1.39 times compared to 60 bpm. AEC at ECG-gated single- and dual-heartbeat CTCA controls the image noise at different radiation dose. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Heart rate variability in the standing position reflects training adaptation in professional soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravé, Guillaume; Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier

    2016-08-01

    To show that heart rate variability (HRV) in the standing position better reflects the way in which athletes adapt to training in so-called intermittent sports than the indicator of resting parasympathetic tone usually employed in endurance sports. Twenty professional soccer players (intermittent sport) took part in a 5-week training session divided into three successive periods: "Warm-up", "Intensive training" and "Tapering". At the beginning and end of each of the three periods, a stand test was carried out and the heart rate was recorded, beat by beat (Polar Team 2). We analysed HRV to determine the indicator mostly used to demonstrate training adaptation in endurance sports (lnRMSSD supine, natural logarithm of root mean square of the successive differences) as well as indicators obtained by means of spectral analysis in both supine and standing position. A decrease in heart rate was observed in the supine position at rest during training (-5.2 ± 1.3 bpm) while lnRMSSD and spectral analysis indicators remained unchanged. The "Warm-up" caused an increase in spectral analysis total power in standing position which was further highlighted by "Tapering" (3.39 ± 0.09, 3.61 ± 0.08 and 3.65 ± 0.09 log ms(2), respectively). However, the autonomic changes are probably more complex than a change in autonomic activity or balance since spectral analysis autonomic indicators remained unchanged. HRV in the standing position could monitor training adaptation in intermittent sports contrary to the indicator usually employed in endurance sports. However, the significance of the HRV change in the standing position during training remains unclear.

  15. The less familiar side of heart failure: symptomatic diastolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Spencer A; Van Swol, Mark; Udani, Bela

    2005-06-01

    Arrange for echocardiography or radionuclide angiography within 72 hours of a heart failure exacerbation. An ejection fraction >50% in the presence of signs and symptoms of heart failure makes the diagnosis of diastolic heart failure probable. To treat associated hypertension, use angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, or diuretics to achieve a blood pressure goal of <130/80 mm Hg. When using beta-blockers to control heart rate, titrate doses more aggressively than would be done for systolic failure, to reach a goal of 60 to 70 bpm. Use ACE inhibitors/ARBs to decrease hospitalizations, decrease symptoms, and prevent left ventricular remodeling.

  16. The Tail of BPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruba, Steve; Meyer, Jim

    Business process management suites (BPMS's) represent one of the fastest growing segments in the software industry as organizations automate their key business processes. As this market matures, it is interesting to compare it to Chris Anderson's 'Long Tail.' Although the 2004 "Long Tail" article in Wired magazine was primarily about the media and entertainment industries, it has since been applied (and perhaps misapplied) to other markets. Analysts describe a "Tail of BPM" market that is, perhaps, several times larger than the traditional BPMS product market. This paper will draw comparisons between the concepts in Anderson's article (and subsequent book) and the BPM solutions market.

  17. Quadrupole to BPM offset determination in Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jena, Saroj; Ghodke, A.D.; Singh, G.

    2009-01-01

    A feasibility of finding the quadrupole to BPM offset using beam based alignment (BBA) technique in Indus-2 has been studied. The measurements of the offsets between BPM and quadrupoles could be performed by using quadratic fitting for the minima of the orbit response w. r. t. changes in the quadrupole strengths. These offsets will be integrated to the orbit data during closed orbit correction. There are 72 quadrupoles and 56 BPMs in Indus-2. However the assessment of Quad-BPM offsets is not feasible in some cases due to non-availability of BPM adjacent to quadrupole and also in some cases because of a large phase advance between quadrupole and nearby BPM. Here single corrector method is used to obtain these offsets and assumed the current of each quadrupole can be varied independently. A graphical user interface (GUI) is developed in MATLAB for the use of BBA in Indus-2. (author)

  18. Characterization of Embedded BPM Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    VALENTINO, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    During LS1, 16 tertiary collimators (TCTs) and 2 secondary collimators (TCSGs) in IR6 were replaced by new embedded BPM collimators. The BPM functionality allows the possibility to align the collimators more quickly and therefore be able to respond faster to machine configuration changes, as well as a direct monitoring of the beam orbit at the collimators. Following an initial commissioning phase, an MD was carried out to test the new collimators and acquisition electronics with beam in the LHC.

  19. Comparison of O2 saturation, heart and respiratory rate following injection of vasoconstrictor containing anesthetic (lidocaine 2% and without vasoconstrictor anesthetic (Mepivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayat M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Along with higher usage of dental local anesthesia with risks to people health together with their positive role, the important goal of dentistry, patients’ health, has been stressed repeatedly nowadays. This study was conducted to compare O2 saturation, respiratory rate and heart rate of patients following injection of anesthetic containing vasoconstrictor (lidocaine 2% and without vasoconstrictor (Mepivacaine. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 32 healthy humans (16 females and 16 males with 25-50 years age range and no history of drug usage. Cases were classified into two matched groups. O2 saturation, heart and respiratory rate were recorded before extraction of a mandibular posterior tooth. In the first group, 3.6 ml lidocaine 2% with 1:80,000 epinephrine and in the second group Mepivacaine 3% was injected, using inferior alveolar dental nerve block with aspiration. Variables were measured and recorded. Tooth extraction was performed and the mentioned variables were recorded again. Data were analyzed with SPSS software using t and Paired t-test with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: After injection of lidocaine, the heart rate was increased (12.25±1.75 bpm, and the time to reach the maximum rate was 64.75±11.26 seconds. After extraction of tooth, heart rate in both groups was increased not considering the type of injection. Conclusion: The study showed that the injection of lidocaine (containing epinephrine in patients without contraindication has no risk. Also, possible increase in heart rate is not risky and is not associated with O2 saturation decrease and respiratory interruption.

  20. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Heart Rate Sensing Device during Elective Pediatric Surgical Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Pelizzo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of wearable photoplethysmography (PPG sensors to measure heart rate (HR in hospitalized patients has only been demonstrated in adults. We evaluated the accuracy of HR monitoring with a personal fitness tracker (PFT in children undergoing surgery. HR monitoring was performed using a wrist-worn PFT (Fitbit Charge HR in 30 children (8.21 ± 3.09 years undergoing laparoscopy (n = 8 or open surgery (n = 22. HR values were analyzed preoperatively and during surgery. The accuracy of HR recordings was compared with measurements recorded during continuous electrocardiographic (cECG monitoring; HRs derived from continuous monitoring with pulse oximetry (SpO2R were used as a positive control. PFT-derived HR values were in agreement with those recorded during cECG (r = 0.99 and SpO2R (r = 0.99 monitoring. PFT performance remained high in children < 8 years (r = 0.99, with a weight < 30 kg (r = 0.99 and when the HR was < 70 beats per minute (bpm (r = 0.91 or > 140 bpm (r = 0.99. PFT accuracy was similar during laparoscopy and open surgery, as well as preoperatively and during the intervention (r > 0.9. PFT–derived HR showed excellent accuracy compared with HRs measured by cECG and SpO2R during pediatric surgical procedures. Further clinical evaluation is needed to define whether PFTs can be used in different health care settings.

  1. Personalized Hydration Strategy Attenuates the Rise in Heart Rate and in Skin Temperature Without Altering Cycling Capacity in the Heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo-Marins, Denise; Souza-Silva, Ana Angélica; da Silva-Santos, Gabriel Lucas Leite; Freire-Júnior, Francisco de Assis; Lee, Jason Kai Wei; Laitano, Orlando

    2018-01-01

    The optimal hydration plan [i.e., drink to thirst, ad libitum (ADL), or personalized plan] to be adopted during exercise in recreational athletes has recently been a matter of debate and, due to conflicting results, consensus does not exist. In the present investigation, we tested whether a personalized hydration strategy based on sweat rate would affect cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses and exercise capacity in the heat. Eleven recreational male cyclists underwent two familiarization cycling sessions in the heat (34°C, 40% RH) where sweat rate was also determined. A fan was used to enhance sweat evaporation. Participants then performed three randomized time-to-exhaustion (TTE) trials in the heat with different hydration strategies: personalized volume (PVO), where water was consumed, based on individual sweat rate, every 10 min; ADL, where free access to water was allowed; and a control (CON) trial with no fluids. Blood osmolality and urine-specific gravity were measured before each trial. Heart rate (HR), rectal, and skin temperatures were monitored throughout trials. Time to exhaustion at 70% of maximal workload was used to define exercise capacity in the heat, which was similar in all trials ( p  = 0.801). Body mass decreased after ADL ( p  = 0.008) and CON ( p  skin temperature during PVO trial in comparison with CON (2.1 ± 0.6 vs. 2.9 ± 0.5°C, p  = 0.0038). HR was lower toward the end of TTE in PVO (162 ± 8 bpm) in comparison with ADL (168 ± 12 bpm) and CON (167 ± 10 bpm), p  hydration strategy can reduce HR during a moderate to high intensity exercise session in the heat and halt the increase in skin temperature. Despite these advantages, cycling capacity in the heat remained unchanged.

  2. Efficacy of pre-scan beta-blockade and impact of heart rate on image quality in patients undergoing coronary multidetector computed tomography angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Michael D. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Pena, Antonio J.; Nichols, John H. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Worrell, Stewart [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Bamberg, Fabian [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Dannemann, Nina [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Abbara, Suhny; Cury, Ricardo C.; Brady, Thomas J. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States)], E-mail: uhoffmann@partners.org

    2008-04-15

    Objective: While beta-blockers are routinely administered to patients prior to coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), their effectiveness is unknown. We therefore assessed the efficacy of beta-blockade with regards to heart rate (HR) control and image quality in an unselected patient cohort. Methods: We studied 150 consecutive patients (104 men/46 female; mean age, 56 {+-} 13 years) referred for coronary CTA. Intravenous metoprolol (5-20 mg) was administered to patients with a HR >65 beats per minute (bpm). The goal HR was defined as an average HR <65 bpm without a single measurement above 68 bpm. Results: Overall, 45% (68/150) of patients met the HR criteria for beta-blocker administration of which 76% (52/68) received metoprolol (mean dose 12 {+-} 10 mg). Of the 52 patients who received beta-blocker versus the 98 who did not, 18 (35%) versus 62 (64%) patients achieved the goal HR, respectively. All patients who achieved the target HR had an evaluable CTA while five patients who did not achieve the target HR had at least one non-evaluable coronary artery due to motion artifact. There was also a significant reduction in any motion artifact among those who achieved the goal HR as compared to those who did not (p = 0.001). Logistic regression revealed an increase in the odds of stair step artifact of 11.6% (95% CI: 2.4% decrease, 27.5% increase) per 1 bpm increase in the standard deviation of scan HR. Conclusion: Overall, efficacy of beta-blocker administration to reach target HR is limited. Improvements in CT scanner temporal resolution are mandatory to achieve consistently high image quality independent of HR and beta-blocker administration.

  3. Efficacy of pre-scan beta-blockade and impact of heart rate on image quality in patients undergoing coronary multidetector computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, Michael D.; Pena, Antonio J.; Nichols, John H.; Worrell, Stewart; Bamberg, Fabian; Dannemann, Nina; Abbara, Suhny; Cury, Ricardo C.; Brady, Thomas J.; Hoffmann, Udo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: While beta-blockers are routinely administered to patients prior to coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), their effectiveness is unknown. We therefore assessed the efficacy of beta-blockade with regards to heart rate (HR) control and image quality in an unselected patient cohort. Methods: We studied 150 consecutive patients (104 men/46 female; mean age, 56 ± 13 years) referred for coronary CTA. Intravenous metoprolol (5-20 mg) was administered to patients with a HR >65 beats per minute (bpm). The goal HR was defined as an average HR <65 bpm without a single measurement above 68 bpm. Results: Overall, 45% (68/150) of patients met the HR criteria for beta-blocker administration of which 76% (52/68) received metoprolol (mean dose 12 ± 10 mg). Of the 52 patients who received beta-blocker versus the 98 who did not, 18 (35%) versus 62 (64%) patients achieved the goal HR, respectively. All patients who achieved the target HR had an evaluable CTA while five patients who did not achieve the target HR had at least one non-evaluable coronary artery due to motion artifact. There was also a significant reduction in any motion artifact among those who achieved the goal HR as compared to those who did not (p = 0.001). Logistic regression revealed an increase in the odds of stair step artifact of 11.6% (95% CI: 2.4% decrease, 27.5% increase) per 1 bpm increase in the standard deviation of scan HR. Conclusion: Overall, efficacy of beta-blocker administration to reach target HR is limited. Improvements in CT scanner temporal resolution are mandatory to achieve consistently high image quality independent of HR and beta-blocker administration

  4. Heart rate variability in healthy population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M.; Hussain, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Heart rate variability has been considered as an indicator of autonomic status. Little work has been done on heart rate variability in normal healthy volunteers. We aimed at evolving the reference values of heart rate variability in our healthy population. Methods: Twenty-four hour holter monitoring of 37 healthy individuals was done using Holter ECG recorder 'Life card CF' from 'Reynolds Medical'. Heart rate variability in both time and frequency domains was analysed with 'Reynolds Medical Pathfinder Digital/700'. Results: The heart rate variability in normal healthy volunteers of our population was found in time domain using standard deviation of R-R intervals (SDNN), standard deviation of average NN intervals (SDANN), and Square root of the mean squared differences of successive NN intervals (RMSSD). Variation in heart rate variability indices was observed between local and foreign volunteers and RMSSD was found significantly increased (p<0.05) in local population. Conclusions: The values of heart rate variability (RMSSD) in healthy Pakistani volunteers were found increased compared to the foreign data reflecting parasympathetic dominance in our population. (author)

  5. Age-Predicted Maximal Heart Rate in Recreational Marathon Runners: A Cross-Sectional Study on Fox's and Tanaka's Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelis T. Nikolaidis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Age-based prediction equations of maximal heart rate (HRmax, such as the popular formulas Fox's 220-age, or Tanaka's 208-0.7 × age, have been widely used in various populations. Surprisingly, so far these equations have not been validated in marathon runners, despite the importance of the role of HRmax for training purposes in endurance running. The aim of the present study was to examine the validity of Fox and Tanaka equations in a large sample of women and men recreational marathon runners. Participants (n = 180, age 43.2 ± 8.5 years, VO2max 46.8 mL/min/kg, finishers in at least one marathon during the last year performed a graded exercise test on a treadmill, where HRmax was measured. Measured HRmax correlated largely with age in the total sample (r = −0.50, p < 0.001, women (r = −0.60, p < 0.001 and men (r = −0.53, p < 0.001. In women, a large main effect of method on HRmax (p = 0.001, η2 = 0.294 was shown with measured HRmax lower than Fox-HRmax (−4.8 bpm; −8.4, −1.3 and Tanaka-HRmax (−4.9 bpm; −8.1, −1.8. In men, a moderate effect of assessment method on HRmax was found (p = 0.001, η2 = 0.066 with measured HRmax higher than Fox-HRmax (+2.8; 1.0, 4.6, Tanaka-HRmax higher than Fox-HRmax (+1.2; 0.7, 1.7. Based on these findings, it was concluded that Fox and Tanaka' formulas overestimated HRmax by ~5 bpm in women, whereas Fox underestimated HRmax in men by ~3 bpm. Thus, we recommend the further use of Tanaka's formula in men marathon runners. In addition, exercise physiologists and sport scientists should consider the observed differences among various assessment methods when performing exercise testing or prescribing training program relying on HR.

  6. Monitoring apparatus for monitoring a user's heart rate and/or heart rate variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A monitoring apparatus (4) monitors a user's heart rate and/or heart rate variation. The apparatus includes a capacitor (22) which is positionable on or near a body part of a person, for example a person's limb, for example an arm (3), such that an electrical capacitance of the capacitor (22) is

  7. Reduced Dietary Sodium Intake Increases Heart Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels A; Hubeck-Graudal, Thorbjørn; Jürgens, Gesche

    2016-01-01

    Reduced dietary sodium intake (sodium reduction) increases heart rate in some studies of animals and humans. As heart rate is independently associated with the development of heart failure and increased risk of premature death a potential increase in heart rate could be a harmful side......-effect of sodium reduction. The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of sodium reduction on heart rate. Relevant studies were retrieved from an updated pool of 176 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the period 1973-2014. Sixty-three of the RCTs including 72 study...... populations reported data on heart rate. In a meta-analysis of these data sodium reduction increased heart rate with 1.65 beats per minute [95% CI: 1.19, 2.11], p heart rate. This effect was independent of baseline blood pressure. In conclusion sodium reduction...

  8. Linac coherent light source (LCLS) undulator RF BPM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, R.; Waldschmidt, G.; Morrison, L.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T; Li, Z.; Johnson, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) when it becomes operational in 2009. The LCLS is currently in the construction phase. The beam position monitor (BPM) system planned for the LCLS undulator will incorporate a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM system described in this paper. The BPM system will provide high-resolution measurements of the electron beam trajectory on a pulse-to-pulse basis and over many shots. The X-band cavity BPM size, simple fabrication, and high resolution make it an ideal choice for LCLS beam position detection. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  9. Model-independent analysis with BPM correlation matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.; Wang, C.X.; Yan, Y.T.; Bane, K.; Cai, Y.; Decker, F.; Minty, M.; Stupakov, G.; Zimmermann, F.

    1998-06-01

    The authors discuss techniques for Model-Independent Analysis (MIA) of a beamline using correlation matrices of physical variables and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) of a beamline BPM matrix. The beamline matrix is formed from BPM readings for a large number of pulses. The method has been applied to the Linear Accelerator of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC)

  10. Limiar anaeróbico (V4 e frequência cardíaca de cavalos Crioulos condicionados para prova funcional Anaerobic threshold (V4 and heart rate of Crioulo horses conditioned for functional testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Amaral

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Determinou-se o limiar anaeróbico (V4 de 23 cavalos Crioulos hígidos em treinamento. Os animais selecionados foram submetidos a testes de desempenho, composto por três etapas de velocidade progressiva de 6m/s, 8m/s e 10m/s, com duração de cinco minutos cada etapa, até que fosse atingida a concentração de 4mmol/dL de lactato sanguíneo. As concentrações de lactato sanguíneo elevaram-se a partir da velocidade de exercício de 6,0m/s, sendo que 20 animais (90% atingiram 4mmol/L de lactato na velocidade entre 6 - 8m/s, com média de frequência cardíaca que variou de 121 a 140bpm. Concluiu-se que a V4 do cavalo Crioulo está entre as velocidades de 6 - 8m/s e a frequência cardíaca entre 121 - 140bpm.The anaerobic threshold (V4 while running on a track is used in many breeds to evaluate physical conditioning and to establish a training regimen, but these data have not been obtained for the Crioulo breed. This study evaluated 23 healthy Crioulo horses to determine the anaerobic threshold (V4 during training. The selected animals were subjected to a performance test on a track. The test consisted of three five minute stages with increasing speeds of 6m/s, 8 m/s and 10m/s until the blood lactate concentration reached 4mmol/dL. Blood lactate concentrations began to increase at the exercise speed of 6m/s, and 90% (n=20 of the animals reached 4mmol/dL lactate between 6-8m/s, with an average heart rate ranging from 121 to 140bpm at these speeds. Our results demonstrate that the V4 of the Crioulo horse is between 6-8m/s at a heart rate between 121 and 140bpm.

  11. Effects of social stress on heart rate and heart rate variability in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de I.C.; Sgoifo, A.; Lambooij, E.; Korte, S.M.; Blokhuis, H.J.; Koolhaas, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of social stress on heart rate, heart rate variability and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias were studied in 12 growing pigs. Social stress was induced during a good competition test with a pen mate, and subsequently during a resident-intruder test with an unacquainted pig in which

  12. Effects of social stress on heart rate and heart rate variability in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, IC; Sgoifo, A; Lambooij, E; Korte, SM; Blokhuis, HJ; Koolhaas, JM

    The effects of social stress on heart rate, heart rate variability and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias were studied in 12 growing pigs. Social stress was induced during a good competition test with a pen mate, and subsequently during a resident-intruder test with an unacquainted pig in which

  13. A pilot investigation of the effect of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields on humans' heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Emilio; Baldi, Claudio; Lithgow, Brian J

    2007-01-01

    The question whether pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) can affect the heart rhythm is still controversial. This study investigates the effects on the cardiocirculatory system of ELF-PEMFs. It is a follow-up to an investigation made of the possible therapeutic effect ELF-PEMFs, using a commercially available magneto therapeutic unit, had on soft tissue injury repair in humans. Modulation of heart rate (HR) or heart rate variability (HRV) can be detected from changes in periodicity of the R-R interval and/or from changes in the numbers of heart-beat/min (bpm), however, R-R interval analysis gives only a quantitative insight into HRV. A qualitative understanding of HRV can be obtained considering the power spectral density (PSD) of the R-R intervals Fourier transform. In this study PSD is the investigative tool used, more specifically the low frequency (LF) PSD and high frequency (HF) PSD ratio (LF/HF) which is an indicator of sympatho-vagal balance. To obtain the PSD value, variations of the R-R time intervals were evaluated from a continuously recorded ECG. The results show a HR variation in all the subjects when they are exposed to the same ELF-PEMF. This variation can be detected by observing the change in the sympatho-vagal equilibrium, which is an indicator of modulation of heart activity. Variation of the LF/HF PSD ratio mainly occurs at transition times from exposure to nonexposure, or vice versa. Also of interest are the results obtained during the exposure of one subject to a range of different ELF-PEMFs. This pilot study suggests that a full investigation into the effect of ELF-PEMFs on the cardiovascular system is justified.

  14. Developing cloud-based Business Process Management (BPM): a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercia; Gunawan, W.; Fajar, A. N.; Alianto, H.; Inayatulloh

    2018-03-01

    In today’s highly competitive business environment, modern enterprises are dealing difficulties to cut unnecessary costs, eliminate wastes and delivery huge benefits for the organization. Companies are increasingly turning to a more flexible IT environment to help them realize this goal. For this reason, the article applies cloud based Business Process Management (BPM) that enables to focus on modeling, monitoring and process management. Cloud based BPM consists of business processes, business information and IT resources, which help build real-time intelligence systems, based on business management and cloud technology. Cloud computing is a paradigm that involves procuring dynamically measurable resources over the internet as an IT resource service. Cloud based BPM service enables to address common problems faced by traditional BPM, especially in promoting flexibility, event-driven business process to exploit opportunities in the marketplace.

  15. Initial heart rate and cardiovascular outcomes in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaad, Nidal; El-Menyar, Ayman; AlHabib, Khalid F; Shabana, Adel; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Almahmeed, Wael; Al Faleh, Hussam; Hersi, Ahmad; Al Saif, Shukri; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al Nemer, Khalid; Amin, Haitham; Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2014-06-01

    To assess the impact of on-admission heart rate (HR) in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Data were collected retrospectively from the second Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events. Patients were divided according to their initial HR into: (I: < 60, II: 60-69, III: 70-79, IV: 80-89 and V: ≥ 90 bpm). Patients' characteristics and hospital and one- and 12-month outcomes were analyzed and compared. Among 7939 consecutive ACS patients, groups I to V represented 7%, 13%, 20%, 23.5%, and 37%, respectively. Mean age was higher in groups I and V. Group V were more likely males, diabetic and hypertensive. ST-elevation myocardial infarction was the main presentation in groups I and V. Reperfusion therapies were less likely given to group V. Beta blockers were more frequently prescribed to group III in comparison to groups with higher HR. Groups I and V were associated with worse hospital outcomes. Multivariate analysis showed initial tachycardia as an independent predictor for heart failure (OR 2.2; 95%CI: 1.39-3.32), while bradycardia was independently associated with higher one-month mortality (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.04-3.85) CONCLUSION: The majority of ACS patients present with tachycardia. However, low or high HR is a marker of high risk that needs more attention and management.

  16. A proposal of business processes management (BPM structure and use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Araujo Kluska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The organizational processes, also known as business processes, have became a fundamental structure for the management of the modern organizations. Knowing the work flow of the organization is a necessary condition for the development of continuous improvement processes. The benefits and advantages provided by the use of an approach based on BPM (Business Processes Management are evident. The benefits include improvements in efficiency, quality and flexibility, besides other aspects generating sustainable competitive advantages. There is a wide range of studies on BPM, which display several definitions and elements characterizing the various applications. This work aims to propose a conceptual framework for interconnection between BPM elements, thus providing a better understanding of organizational processes and performance in organizational management environment. As a result, a group of BPM elements is identified and classified in: methodologies, techniques and tools which are a part of or can be efficiently connected to BPM conceptual structure. A framework for conceptual interconnection between those elements is also provided. The results of BPM application are not limited to the search for operational efficiency, but might also be considered as an element to support the organizational management.

  17. Resting heart rate and the incidence and progression of valvular calcium: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoakwa, Kojo; Fashanu, Oluwaseun E; Tibuakuu, Martin; Zhao, Di; Guallar, Eliseo; Whelton, Seamus P; O'Neal, Wesley T; Post, Wendy S; Budoff, Matthew J; Michos, Erin D

    2018-06-01

    Left-sided valvular calcification is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. Resting heart rate (RHR) may influence valvular calcium progression through shear stress. Whether RHR, an established CVD risk factor, is associated with valvular calcium progression is unknown. We assessed whether RHR predicts incidence and progression of mitral annular calcium (MAC) and aortic valve calcium (AVC) in a community-based cohort free of CVD at baseline. RHR was obtained from baseline electrocardiograms of 5498 MESA participants. MAC and AVC were quantified using Agatston scoring from cardiac computed tomography scans obtained at baseline and at a second examination during follow-up. We examined associations of RHR with incident MAC/AVC and annual change in MAC/AVC scores, after adjusting for demographics, CVD risk factors, physical activity, and atrioventricular nodal blocker use. At baseline, participants had mean age of 62 ± 10 years and mean RHR of 63 ± 10 bpm; 12.3% and 8.9% had prevalent AVC and MAC, respectively. Over a median of 2.3 years, 4.1% and 4.5% developed incident AVC and MAC, respectively. Each 10 bpm higher RHR was significantly associated with incident MAC [Risk Ratio 1.17 (95% CI 1.03-1.34)], but not incident AVC. However, RHR was associated with AVC progression [β = 1.62 (0.45-2.80) Agatston units/year for every 10 bpm increment], but not MAC progression. Higher RHR was associated with MAC incidence and AVC progression, independent of traditional CVD risk factors. Future studies are needed to determine whether modification of RHR through lifestyle or pharmacologic interventions can reduce valvular calcium incidence or progression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of radiation exposure on a dual-source computed tomography-scanner performing coronary computed tomography-angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhoff, S.; Herzog, P.; Johnson, T.; Boehm, H.; Nikolaou, K.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The radiation exposure of a dual-source-64-channel multi-detector-computed-tomography-scanner (Somatom-Defintion, Siemens, Germany) was assessed in a phantom-study performing coronary-CT-angiography (CTCA) in comparison to patients' data randomly selected from routine scanning. Methods: 240 CT-acquisitions of a computed tomography dose index (CTDI)-phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) were performed using a synthetically generated Electrocardiography (ECG)-signal with variable heart rates (30-180 beats per minute (bpm)). 120 measurements were acquired using continuous tube-output; 120 measurements were performed using ECG-synchronized tube-modulation. The pulsing window was set at minimum duration at 65% of the cardiac cycle between 30 and 75 bpm. From 90-180 bpm the pulsing window was set at 30-70% of the cardiac cycle. Automated pitch adaptation was always used. A comparison between phantom CTDI and two patient groups' CTDI corresponding to the two pulsing groups was performed. Results: Without ECG-tube-modulation CDTI-values were affected by heart-rate-changes resulting in 85.7 mGray (mGy) at 30 and 45 bpm, 65.5 mGy/60 bpm, 54.7 mGy/75 bpm, 46.5 mGy/90 bpm, 34.2 mGy/120 bpm, 27.0 mGy/150 bpm and 22.1 mGy/180 bpm equal to effective doses between 14.5 mSievert (mSv) at 30/45 bpm and 3.6 mSv at 180 bpm. Using ECG-tube-modulation these CTDI-values resulted: 32.6 mGy/30 bpm, 36.6 mGy/45 bpm, 31.4 mGy/60 bpm, 26.8 mGy/75 bpm, 23.7 mGy/90 bpm, 19.4 mGy/120 bpm, 17.2 mGy/150 bpm and 15.6 mGy/180 bpm equal to effective doses between 5.5 mSv at 30 bpm and 2.6 mSv at 180 bpm. Significant CTDI-differences were found between patients with lower/moderate and higher heart rates in comparison to the phantom CTDI-results. Conclusions: Dual source CTCA is particularly dose efficient at high heart rates when automated pitch adaptation, especially in combination with ECG-based tube-modulation is used. However in clinical routine scanning for patients with higher heart rates

  19. Dimensional analysis of heart rate variability in heart transplant recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbilut, J.P.; Mayer-Kress, G.; Geist, K.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss periodicities in the heart rate in normal and transplanted hearts. We then consider the possibility of dimensional analysis of these periodicities in transplanted hearts and problems associated with the record.

  20. Personalized Hydration Strategy Attenuates the Rise in Heart Rate and in Skin Temperature Without Altering Cycling Capacity in the Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise de Melo-Marins

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The optimal hydration plan [i.e., drink to thirst, ad libitum (ADL, or personalized plan] to be adopted during exercise in recreational athletes has recently been a matter of debate and, due to conflicting results, consensus does not exist. In the present investigation, we tested whether a personalized hydration strategy based on sweat rate would affect cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses and exercise capacity in the heat. Eleven recreational male cyclists underwent two familiarization cycling sessions in the heat (34°C, 40% RH where sweat rate was also determined. A fan was used to enhance sweat evaporation. Participants then performed three randomized time-to-exhaustion (TTE trials in the heat with different hydration strategies: personalized volume (PVO, where water was consumed, based on individual sweat rate, every 10 min; ADL, where free access to water was allowed; and a control (CON trial with no fluids. Blood osmolality and urine-specific gravity were measured before each trial. Heart rate (HR, rectal, and skin temperatures were monitored throughout trials. Time to exhaustion at 70% of maximal workload was used to define exercise capacity in the heat, which was similar in all trials (p = 0.801. Body mass decreased after ADL (p = 0.008 and CON (p < 0.001 and was maintained in PVO trials (p = 0.171. Participants consumed 0 ml in CON, 166 ± 167 ml in ADL, and 1,080 ± 166 ml in PVO trials. The increase in mean body temperature was similar among trials despite a lower increase in skin temperature during PVO trial in comparison with CON (2.1 ± 0.6 vs. 2.9 ± 0.5°C, p = 0.0038. HR was lower toward the end of TTE in PVO (162 ± 8 bpm in comparison with ADL (168 ± 12 bpm and CON (167 ± 10 bpm, p < 0.001. In conclusion, a personalized hydration strategy can reduce HR during a moderate to high intensity exercise session in the heat and halt the increase in skin

  1. A development of BPM for P-LINAC at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almalki, Mohammed; Kester, Oliver; Forck, Peter; Kaufmann, Wolfgang; Sieber, Thomas; Kowina, Piotr; Vinzenz, Wolfgang; Krueger, Christoph [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Simon, Claire [CEA/DSM/IRFU (France); Tinta, Dejan; Hrovatin, Rok; Lemut, Promoz [Instrumentation Technologies, Solkan (Slovenia)

    2014-07-01

    Four-fold button Beam Position Monitor (BPM) has been developed for the planned Proton LINAC at the FAIR facility. These monitors will be installed at 14 locations along the LINAC and four of them will be mounted only about 40 mm upstream of the CH cavities. A BPM prototype will be fabricated to evaluate the rf power at the BPM location as generated by cavity excitation as well as to test different options in the mechanical design. For the read-out electronics, the I/Q digital signal processing will be implemented to derive the transverse beam position and the beam phase. This contribution presents the status of the BPM development and focuses on the mechanical design and the optimization of the button pick-ups. The development progress of digital signal processing system is discussed as well.

  2. Dose reduction in multi-slice CT of the heart by use of ECG-controlled tube current modulation (''ECG pulsing''): phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poll, L.W.; Cohnen, M.; Brachten, S.; Moedder, U.; Ewen, K.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of ECG-controlled tube current modulation on radiation exposure in retrospectively-ECG-gated multislice CT (MSCT) of the heart. Material and methods: Three different cardiac MSCT protocols with different slice collimation (4 x 1, and 4 x 2.5 mm), and a pitch-factor of 1.5 and 1.8 were investigated at a multi-slice CT scanner Somatom Volume Zoom, Siemens. An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom was equipped with LiF-Thermoluminescence dosimeters at several organ sites, and effective doses were calculated using ICRP-weighting factors. Scan protocols were performed with ECG-controlled tube current modulation ('ECG pulsing') at two different heart rates (60 and 80 bpm). These data were compared to previous data from MSCT of the heart without use of 'ECG pulsing'. Results: Radiation exposure with (60 bpm) and without tube current modulation using a 2.5 mm collimation was 1.8 mSv and 2.9 mSv for females, and 1.5 mSv and 2.4 mSv for males, respectively. For protocols using a 1 mm collimation with a pitch-factor of 1.5 (1.8), radiation exposure with and without tube current modulation was 5.6 (6.3) mSv and 9.5 (11.2) mSv for females, and 4.6 (5.2) mSv and 7.7 (9.2) mSv for males, respectively. At higher heart rates (80 bpm) radiation exposure is increased from 1.5-1.8 mSv to 1.8-2.1 mSv, using the 2.5 mm collimation, and from 4.6-5.6 mSv to 5.9-7.2 mSv, for protocols using 1 mm collimation. Conclusions: The ECG-controlled tube current modulation allows a dose reduction of 37% to 44% when retrospectively ECG-gated MSCT of the heart is performed. The tube current - as a function over time - and therefore the radiation exposure is dependent on the heart rate. (orig.) [de

  3. FPGA Implementation of Heart Rate Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahy, D; Rakshit, M; Sahu, P K

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation of a system that calculates the heart rate from Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. After heart rate calculation, tachycardia, bradycardia or normal heart rate can easily be detected. ECG is a diagnosis tool routinely used to access the electrical activities and muscular function of the heart. Heart rate is calculated by detecting the R peaks from the ECG signal. To provide a portable and the continuous heart rate monitoring system for patients using ECG, needs a dedicated hardware. FPGA provides easy testability, allows faster implementation and verification option for implementing a new design. We have proposed a five-stage based methodology by using basic VHDL blocks like addition, multiplication and data conversion (real to the fixed point and vice-versa). Our proposed heart rate calculation (R-peak detection) method has been validated, using 48 first channel ECG records of the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. It shows an accuracy of 99.84%, the sensitivity of 99.94% and the positive predictive value of 99.89%. Our proposed method outperforms other well-known methods in case of pathological ECG signals and successfully implemented in FPGA.

  4. Multicomponent exercise decreases blood pressure, heart rate and double product in normotensive and hypertensive older patients with high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Júnior, Hélio José; Asano, Ricardo Yukio; Gonçalvez, Ivan de Oliveira; Brietzke, Cayque; Pires, Flávio Oliveira; Aguiar, Samuel da Silva; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Caperuto, Erico Chagas; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2018-02-26

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a 6-month multicomponent exercise program on blood pressure, heart rate, and double product of uncontrolled and controlled normotensive and hypertensive older patients. The study included 183 subjects, 97 normotensives, of which 53 were controlled normotensives (CNS), and 44 uncontrolled normotensives (UNS), as well as 86 hypertensives, of which 43 were controlled hypertensives (CHS), and 43 uncontrolled hypertensives (UHS). Volunteers were recruited and blood pressure and heart rate measurements were made before and after a 6-month multicomponent exercise program. The program of physical exercise was performed twice a week for 26 weeks. The physical exercises program was based on functional and walking exercises. Exercise sessions were performed at moderate intensity. The results indicated that UHS showed a marked decrease in systolic (-8.0mmHg), diastolic (-11.1mmHg), mean (-10.1mmHg), and pulse pressures, heart rate (-6.8bpm), and double product (-1640bpmmmHg), when compared to baseline. Similarly, diastolic (-5.5mmHg) and mean arterial (-4.8mmHg) pressures were significantly decreased in UNS. Concomitantly, significant changes could be observed in the body mass index (-0.9kg/m 2 ; -1.5kg/m 2 ) and waist circumference (-3.3cm; only UHS) of UNS and UHS, which may be associated with the changes observed in blood pressure. In conclusion, the data of the present study indicate that a 6-month multicomponent exercise program may lead to significant reductions in blood pressure, heart rate, and double product of normotensive and hypertensive patients with high blood pressure values. Copyright © 2018 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Systolic reconstruction in patients with low heart rate using coronary dual-source CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Munemasa, E-mail: radokada@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Nakashima, Yoshiteru; Shigemoto, Youko; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Miura, Toshiro; Nao, Tomoko [Department of Cardiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Sano, Yuichi; Narazaki, Akiko [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Hospital (Japan); Kido, Shoji [Computer-aided Diagnosis and Biomedical Imaging Research Biomedical Engineering, Applied Medical Engineering Science Graduate School of Medicine, Yamaguchi University (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Objectives: The purpose of our study was to determine the relationship between the predictive factors and systolic reconstruction (SR) as an optimal reconstruction window in patients with low heart rate (LHR; less than 65 bpm). Methods: 391 patients (262 male and 129 female, mean age; 67.1 {+-} 10.1 years of age) underwent coronary CTA without the additional administration of a beta-blocker. Affecting factors for SR were analyzed in age, gender, body weight (BW), diabetes mellitus (DM), coronary arterial disease (CAD), ejection fraction (EF), systolic and diastolic body pressure (BP) and heart rate variability (HRV) during coronary CTA. Results: In 29 (7.4%) of the 391 patients, SR was needed, but there was no apparent characteristic difference between the systolic and diastolic reconstruction groups in terms of gender, age, BW, DM, CAD and EF. In a multivariate analysis, the co-existence of DM [P < 0.05; OR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.092-0.80], diastolic BP [P < 0.01; OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98] and HRV [P < 0.01; OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99] were found to be the factors for SR. In gender-related analysis, HRV was an important factor regardless of sex, but co-existence of DM affected especially for female and BP for male. Conclusion: Especially in the patients with LHR who had a medication of DM, high HRV or high BP, SR, in addition to DR, was needed to obtain high-quality coronary CTA images.

  6. Systolic reconstruction in patients with low heart rate using coronary dual-source CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Munemasa; Nakashima, Yoshiteru; Shigemoto, Youko; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Miura, Toshiro; Nao, Tomoko; Sano, Yuichi; Narazaki, Akiko; Kido, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of our study was to determine the relationship between the predictive factors and systolic reconstruction (SR) as an optimal reconstruction window in patients with low heart rate (LHR; less than 65 bpm). Methods: 391 patients (262 male and 129 female, mean age; 67.1 ± 10.1 years of age) underwent coronary CTA without the additional administration of a beta-blocker. Affecting factors for SR were analyzed in age, gender, body weight (BW), diabetes mellitus (DM), coronary arterial disease (CAD), ejection fraction (EF), systolic and diastolic body pressure (BP) and heart rate variability (HRV) during coronary CTA. Results: In 29 (7.4%) of the 391 patients, SR was needed, but there was no apparent characteristic difference between the systolic and diastolic reconstruction groups in terms of gender, age, BW, DM, CAD and EF. In a multivariate analysis, the co-existence of DM [P < 0.05; OR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.092-0.80], diastolic BP [P < 0.01; OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98] and HRV [P < 0.01; OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99] were found to be the factors for SR. In gender-related analysis, HRV was an important factor regardless of sex, but co-existence of DM affected especially for female and BP for male. Conclusion: Especially in the patients with LHR who had a medication of DM, high HRV or high BP, SR, in addition to DR, was needed to obtain high-quality coronary CTA images.

  7. Aggresome formation is regulated by RanBPM through an interaction with HDAC6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa M. Salemi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In conditions of proteasomal impairment, the build-up of damaged or misfolded proteins activates a cellular response leading to the recruitment of damaged proteins into perinuclear aggregates called aggresomes. Aggresome formation involves the retrograde transport of cargo proteins along the microtubule network and is dependent on the histone deacetylase HDAC6. Here we show that ionizing radiation (IR promotes Ran-Binding Protein M (RanBPM relocalization into discrete perinuclear foci where it co-localizes with aggresome components ubiquitin, dynein and HDAC6, suggesting that the RanBPM perinuclear clusters correspond to aggresomes. RanBPM was also recruited to aggresomes following treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 and the DNA-damaging agent etoposide. Strikingly, aggresome formation by HDAC6 was markedly impaired in RanBPM shRNA cells, but was restored by re-expression of RanBPM. RanBPM was found to interact with HDAC6 and to inhibit its deacetylase activity. This interaction was abrogated by a RanBPM deletion of its LisH/CTLH domain, which also prevented aggresome formation, suggesting that RanBPM promotes aggresome formation through an association with HDAC6. Our results suggest that RanBPM regulates HDAC6 activity and is a central regulator of aggresome formation.

  8. A Comparative Study on Fetal Heart Rates Estimated from Fetal Phonography and Cardiotocography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad A. Ibrahim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate that fetal heart rates (fHR extracted from fetal phonocardiography (fPCG could convey similar information of fHR from cardiotocography (CTG. Four-channel fPCG sensors made of low cost (<$1 ceramic piezo vibration sensor within 3D-printed casings were used to collect abdominal phonogram signals from 20 pregnant mothers (>34 weeks of gestation. A novel multi-lag covariance matrix-based eigenvalue decomposition technique was used to separate maternal breathing, fetal heart sounds (fHS and maternal heart sounds (mHS from abdominal phonogram signals. Prior to the fHR estimation, the fPCG signals were denoised using a multi-resolution wavelet-based filter. The proposed source separation technique was first tested in separating sources from synthetically mixed signals and then on raw abdominal phonogram signals. fHR signals extracted from fPCG signals were validated using simultaneous recorded CTG-based fHR recordings.The experimental results have shown that the fHR derived from the acquired fPCG can be used to detect periods of acceleration and deceleration, which are critical indication of the fetus' well-being. Moreover, a comparative analysis demonstrated that fHRs from CTG and fPCG signals were in good agreement (Bland Altman plot has mean = −0.21 BPM and ±2 SD = ±3 with statistical significance (p < 0.001 and Spearman correlation coefficient ρ = 0.95. The study findings show that fHR estimated from fPCG could be a reliable substitute for fHR from the CTG, opening up the possibility of a low cost monitoring tool for fetal well-being.

  9. Reduced intrinsic heart rate is associated with reduced arrhythmic susceptibility in guinea-pig heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2014-12-01

    In the clinical setting, patients with slower resting heart rate are less prone to cardiovascular death compared with those with elevated heart rate. However, electrophysiological adaptations associated with reduced cardiac rhythm have not been thoroughly explored. In this study, relationships between intrinsic heart rate and arrhythmic susceptibility were examined by assessments of action potential duration (APD) rate adaptation and inducibility of repolarization alternans in sinoatrial node (SAN)-driven and atrioventricular (AV)-blocked guinea-pig hearts perfused with Langendorff apparatus. Electrocardiograms, epicardial monophasic action potentials, and effective refractory periods (ERP) were assessed in normokalemic and hypokalemic conditions. Slower basal heart rate in AV-blocked hearts was associated with prolonged ventricular repolarization during spontaneous beating, and with attenuated APD shortening at increased cardiac activation rates during dynamic pacing, when compared with SAN-driven hearts. During hypokalemic perfusion, the inducibility of repolarization alternans and tachyarrhythmia by rapid pacing was found to be lower in AV-blocked hearts. This difference was ascribed to prolonged ERP in the setting of reduced basal heart rate, which prevented ventricular capture at critically short pacing intervals required to induce arrhythmia. Reduced basal heart rate is associated with electrophysiological changes that prevent electrical instability upon an abrupt cardiac acceleration.

  10. Digital signal processing the Tevatron BPM signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancelo, G.; James, E.; Wolbers, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Beam Position Monitor (TeV BPM) readout system at Fermilab's Tevatron has been updated and is currently being commissioned. The new BPMs use new analog and digital hardware to achieve better beam position measurement resolution. The new system reads signals from both ends of the existing directional stripline pickups to provide simultaneous proton and antiproton measurements. The signals provided by the two ends of the BPM pickups are processed by analog band-pass filters and sampled by 14-bit ADCs at 74.3MHz. A crucial part of this work has been the design of digital filters that process the signal. This paper describes the digital processing and estimation techniques used to optimize the beam position measurement. The BPM electronics must operate in narrow-band and wide-band modes to enable measurements of closed-orbit and turn-by-turn positions. The filtering and timing conditions of the signals are tuned accordingly for the operational modes. The analysis and the optimized result for each mode are presented

  11. Process simulation support in BPM tools: The case of BPMN

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, António Paulo; Pereira, José Luís Mota

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing acceptance of BPM, nowadays BPM tools are extensively used in organizations. Core to BPM are the process modeling languages, of which BPMN is the one that has been receiving most attention these days. Once a business process is described using BPMN, one can use a process simulation approach in order to find its optimized form. In this context, the simulation of business processes, such as those defined in BPMN, appears as an obvious way of improving pro...

  12. Alternatives to Aerobic Exercise Prescription in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayron F Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exercise is essential for patients with heart failure as it leads to a reduction in morbidity and mortality as well as improved functional capacity and oxygen uptake (v̇O2. However, the need for an experienced physiologist and the cost of the exam may render the cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET unfeasible. Thus, the six-minute walk test (6MWT and step test (ST may be alternatives for exercise prescription. Objective: The aim was to correlate heart rate (HR during the 6MWT and ST with HR at the anaerobic threshold (HRAT and peak HR (HRP obtained on the CPET. Methods: Eighty-three patients (58 ± 11 years with heart failure (NYHA class II were included and all subjects had optimized medication for at least 3 months. Evaluations involved CPET (v̇O2, HRAT, HRP, 6MWT (HR6MWT and ST (HRST. Results: The participants exhibited severe ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction: 31 ± 7% and low peak v̇O2 (15.2 ± 3.1 mL.kg-1.min-1. HRP (113 ± 19 bpm was higher than HRAT (92 ± 14 bpm; p < 0.05 and HR6MWT (94 ± 13 bpm; p < 0.05. No significant difference was found between HRP and HRST. Moreover, a strong correlation was found between HRAT and HR6MWT (r = 0.81; p < 0.0001, and between HRP and HRST (r = 0.89; p < 0.0001. Conclusion: These findings suggest that, in the absence of CPET, exercise prescription can be performed by use of 6MWT and ST, based on HR6MWT and HRST

  13. A dose-response study of dexmedetomidine administered as the primary sedative in infants following open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Felice; Nicolson, Susan C; Zuppa, Athena F

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the dose-response relationship of dexmedetomidine in infants with congenital heart disease postoperative from open heart surgery. Prospective open-label dose-escalation pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study. Tertiary pediatric cardiac ICU. Thirty-six evaluable infants, 1-24 months old, postoperative from open heart surgery requiring mechanical ventilation. Cohorts of 12 infants were enrolled sequentially to one of the three IV loading doses of dexmedetomidine (0.35, 0.7, and 1 mcg/kg) over 10 minutes followed by respective continuous infusions (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mcg/kg/hr) for up to 24 hours. Dexmedetomidine plasma concentrations were obtained at timed intervals during and following discontinuation of infusion. Pharmacodynamic variables evaluated included sedation scores, supplemental sedation and analgesia medication administration, time to tracheal extubation, respiratory function, and hemodynamic parameters. Infants achieved a deeper sedation measured by the University of Michigan Sedation Scale score (2.6 vs 1) despite requiring minimal supplemental sedation (0 unit doses/hr) and fewer analgesic medications (0.07 vs 0.15 unit doses/hr) while receiving dexmedetomidine compared with the 12-hour follow-up period. Thirty-one patients were successfully extubated while receiving the dexmedetomidine infusion. Only one patient remained intubated due to oversedation during the infusion. While receiving dexmedetomidine, there was a decrease in heart rate compared with baseline, 132 versus 161 bpm, but there was an increase in heart rate compared with postinfusion values, 132 versus 128 bpm. There was no statistically or clinically significant change in mean arterial blood pressure. Dexmedetomidine administration in infants following open heart surgery can provide improved sedation with reduction in supplemental medication requirements, leading to successful extubation while receiving a continuous infusion. The postoperative hemodynamic changes that occur in

  14. BPM Magazine : biobased performance materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolck, C.H.; Bos, H.L.; Gennip, van E.; Zee, van der M.

    2011-01-01

    BPM magazine is een uitgave van het Biobased Performance Materials programma. In dit programma werken kennisinstellingen en bedrijven samen aan nieuwe biobased plastics en aan toepassingsgericht onderzoek om de eigenschappen van bestaande biokunststoffen te verbeteren.

  15. Heart-Rate Recovery After Warm-up in Swimming: A Useful Predictor of Training Heart-Rate Response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzevles, Sander P M; de Haan, Arnold; Beek, Peter J; Daanen, Hein A M; Truijens, Martin J

    2017-07-01

    For training to be optimal, daily training load has to be adapted to the momentary status of the individual athlete, which is often difficult to establish. Therefore, the current study investigated the predictive value of heart-rate recovery (HRR) during a standardized warm-up for training load. Training load was quantified by the variation in heart rate during standardized training in competitive swimmers. Eight female and 5 male Dutch national-level swimmers participated in the study. They all performed 3 sessions consisting of a 300-m warm-up test and a 10 × 100-m training protocol. Both protocols were swum in front crawl at individually standardized velocities derived from an incremental step test. Velocity was related to 75% and 85% heart-rate reserve (% HR res ) for the warm-up and training, respectively. Relative HRR during the first 60 s after the warm-up (HR Rw-up ) and differences between the actual and intended heart rate for the warm-up and the training (ΔHR w-up and ΔHR tr ) were determined. No significant relationship between HRR w-up and ΔHR tr was found (F 1,37 = 2.96, P = .09, R 2 = .07, SEE = 4.65). There was considerable daily variation in ΔHR tr at a given swimming velocity (73-93% HR res ). ΔHR w-up and ΔHR tr were clearly related (F 1,37 = 74.31, P warm-up does not predict heart rate during a directly subsequent and standardized training session. Instead, heart rate during the warm-up protocol seems a promising alternative for coaches to make daily individual-specific adjustments to training programs.

  16. Beam-based calibration system of BPM offset on BEPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Chunliang

    2004-01-01

    The ever-increasing demand for better performance from circular accelerators requires improved methods to calibrate beam position monitors (BPM). A beam based calibration system has been established to locate the centers of the BPM with respect to the magnetic center of quadrupole magnets. Additional windings are applied to the quadrupole magnets to make the quadrupole magnetic strength individually adjustable and the number of the power supply of all 32 additional windings is only one. Software system has been finished to automatically measure the offsets of BPMs. The effect of the beam-based calibration system shows that the calibration of BPM has been more quickly and accurately

  17. Heart rate profile during exercise in patients with early repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cay, Serkan; Cagirci, Goksel; Atak, Ramazan; Balbay, Yucel; Demir, Ahmet Duran; Aydogdu, Sinan

    2010-09-01

    Both early repolarization and altered heart rate profile are associated with sudden death. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate an association between early repolarization and heart rate profile during exercise. A total of 84 subjects were included in the study. Comparable 44 subjects with early repolarization and 40 subjects with normal electrocardiogram underwent exercise stress testing. Resting heart rate, maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and decrement were analyzed. Both groups were comparable for baseline characteristics including resting heart rate. Maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrement of the subjects in early repolarization group had significantly decreased maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to control group (all P decrement (multiple-adjusted OR of the risk of presence of early repolarization was 2.98 (95%CI 1.21-7.34) (P = 0.018) and 7.73 (95%CI 2.84-21.03) (P decrement compared to higher levels, respectively. Subjects with early repolarization have altered heart rate profile during exercise compared to control subjects. This can be related to sudden death.

  18. Genome-wide association studies and resting heart rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the search for genetic variants regulating resting heart rate. In the last 10 years, GWASs have led to the identification of at least 21 novel heart rate loci. These discoveries have provided valuable insights into the mechanisms...... and pathways that regulate heart rate and link heart rate to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. GWASs capture majority of genetic variation in a population sample by utilizing high-throughput genotyping chips measuring genotypes for up to several millions of SNPs across the genome in thousands...... of individuals. This allows the identification of the strongest heart rate associated signals at genome-wide level. While GWASs provide robust statistical evidence of the association of a given genetic locus with heart rate, they are only the starting point for detailed follow-up studies to locate the causal...

  19. BPM Magazine : biobased performance materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolck, C.H.; Bos, H.L.; Gennip, van E.; Zee, van der M.

    2011-01-01

    BPM magazine is a publication of the Biobased Performance Materials programme. In this programme, knowledge institutions and businesses are working together on new bio-based plastics and application-focused research to improve the properties of existing bio-plastics.

  20. Development of BPM Electronics at the JLAB FEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, D.; Evtushenko, P.; Jordan, K.; Yan, J.; Dutton, S.; Moore, W.; Evans, R.; Coleman, J.

    2006-11-01

    A new version of BPM electronics based on the AD8362 RMS detector, which is a direct RF to DC converter, is under development at the JLAB FEL. Each of these new BPM electronics utilizes an embedded ColdFire Microprocessor for data processing and communication with the EPICS control system via TCP/IP. The ColdFire runs RTEMS, which is an open source real-time operating system. The JLAB FEL is a SRF Energy Recovery LINAC capable of running up to 10 mA CW beam with a 74.85 MHz micropulse frequency. For diagnostic reasons and for machine tune up, the micropulse frequency can be reduced to 1.17 MHz, which corresponds to about 160 μA of beam current. It is required that the BPM system would be functional for all micropulse frequencies. By taking into account the headroom for the beam steering and current variations the dynamic range of the RF front end is required to be about 60 dB. A BPM resolution of at least 100 μm is required, whereas better resolution is very desirable to make it possible for more accurate measurements of the electron beam optics. Some results of the RF front end development are presented as well as the first measurements made with an electron beam.

  1. Heart Rate Variability - A Historical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E Billman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV, the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate or the duration of the R-R interval – the heart period, has become a popular clinical and investigational tool. The temporal fluctuations in heart rate exhibit a marked synchrony with respiration (increasing during inspiration and decreasing during expiration – the so called respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA and are widely believed to reflect changes in cardiac autonomic regulation. Although the exact contributions of the parasympathetic and the sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system to this variability are controversial and remain the subject of active investigation and debate, a number of time and frequency domain techniques have been developed to provide insight into cardiac autonomic regulation in both health and disease. It is the purpose of this essay to provide an historical overview of the evolution in the concept of heart rate variability. Briefly, pulse rate was first measured by ancient Greek physicians and scientists. However, it was not until the invention of the Physician’s Pulse Watch (a watch with a second hand that could be stopped in 1707 that changes in pulse rate could be accurately assessed. The Rev. Stephen Hales (1733 was the first to note that pulse varied with respiration and in 1847 Carl Ludwig was the first to record RSA. With the measurement of the ECG (1895 and advent of digital signal processing techniques in the 1960’s, investigation of HRV and its relationship to health and disease has exploded. This essay will conclude with a brief description of time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear dynamic analysis techniques (and their limitations that are commonly used to measure heart rate variability.

  2. Ivabradine for patients with stable coronary artery disease and left-ventricular systolic dysfunction (BEAUTIFUL): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, P Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    .9) beats per minute (bpm). Median follow-up was 19 months (IQR 16-24). Ivabradine reduced heart rate by 6 bpm (SE 0.2) at 12 months, corrected for placebo. Most (87%) patients were receiving beta blockers in addition to study drugs, and no safety concerns were identified. Ivabradine did not affect...... the primary composite endpoint (hazard ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.91-1.1, p=0.94). 1233 (22.5%) patients in the ivabradine group had serious adverse events, compared with 1239 (22.8%) controls (p=0.70). In a prespecified subgroup of patients with heart rate of 70 bpm or greater, ivabradine treatment did not affect...... disease outcomes in a subgroup of patients who have heart rates of 70 bpm or greater....

  3. Peak heart rates at extreme altitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Van Hall, Gerrit

    2001-01-01

    We have measured maximal heart rate during a graded maximal bicycle exercise test to exhaustion in five healthy climbers before and during an expedition to Mt. Everest. Maximal heart rates at sea level were 186 (177-204) beats/min(-1) at sea level and 170 (169-182) beats/min(-1) with acute hypoxi...

  4. The effect of relaxing music on heart rate and heart rate variability during ECG GATED-myocardial perfusion scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yusuf Ziya; Ozdemir, Semra; Temiz, Ahmet; Celik, Fatmanur

    2015-05-01

    The positive changes in human behavior caused by relaxing music demonstrate the psychological effect of music on human body. A meta-analytical study has shown that relaxing music affects blood pressure and heart rate in coronary heart patients and cancer patients. The aim of our study is to research whether there is a significant effect on heart rate and heart rate variability due to listening to relaxing music during ECG GATED MPS imaging under gamma camera. The music group (n = 50 patients) could choose from 15 different musical types including folk music (no lyric). The other 50 patients were placed in a "no music group" and did not get headphones or any music. There was a statistically significant reduction in the heart rate of patients in the music group compared to those in the control group. Relaxing music provides great benefits to both patient and clinician. There is close relationship between relaxing music and health procedure, can use every area of the health noninvasiv, safe, cheap and is a method don't have side effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cavity BPM system tests for the ILC energy spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, M.; Adolphsen, C.; Arnold, R.; Boogert, S.; Boorman, G.; Gournaris, F.; Hildreth, M.; Hlaing, C.; Jackson, F.; Khainovski, O.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lyapin, A.; Maiheu, B.; McCormick, D.; Miller, D. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Szalata, Z.; Thomson, M.; Ward, D.; Wing, M.; Woods, M.

    2008-07-01

    The main physics programme of the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires a measurement of the beam energy at the interaction point with an accuracy of 10-4 or better. To achieve this goal a magnetic spectrometer using high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs) has been proposed. This paper reports on the cavity BPM system that was deployed to test this proposal. We demonstrate sub-micron resolution and micron level stability over 20 h for a 1 m long BPM triplet. We find micron-level stability over 1 h for 3 BPM stations distributed over a 30 m long baseline. The understanding of the behaviour and response of the BPMs gained from this work has allowed full spectrometer tests to be carried out.

  6. Validation of Heart Rate Monitor Polar RS800 for Heart Rate Variability Analysis During Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, David; Garatachea, Nuria; Almeida, Rute; Casajús, Jose A; Bailón, Raquel

    2018-03-01

    Hernando, D, Garatachea, N, Almeida, R, Casajús, JA, and Bailón, R. Validation of heart rate monitor Polar RS800 for heart rate variability analysis during exercise. J Strength Cond Res 32(3): 716-725, 2018-Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis during exercise is an interesting noninvasive tool to measure the cardiovascular response to the stress of exercise. Wearable heart rate monitors are a comfortable option to measure interbeat (RR) intervals while doing physical activities. It is necessary to evaluate the agreement between HRV parameters derived from the RR series recorded by wearable devices and those derived from an electrocardiogram (ECG) during dynamic exercise of low to high intensity. Twenty-three male volunteers performed an exercise stress test on a cycle ergometer. Subjects wore a Polar RS800 device, whereas ECG was also recorded simultaneously to extract the reference RR intervals. A time-frequency spectral analysis was performed to extract the instantaneous mean heart rate (HRM), and the power of low-frequency (PLF) and high-frequency (PHF) components, the latter centered on the respiratory frequency. Analysis was done in intervals of different exercise intensity based on oxygen consumption. Linear correlation, reliability, and agreement were computed in each interval. The agreement between the RR series obtained from the Polar device and from the ECG is high throughout the whole test although the shorter the RR is, the more differences there are. Both methods are interchangeable when analyzing HRV at rest. At high exercise intensity, HRM and PLF still presented a high correlation (ρ > 0.8) and excellent reliability and agreement indices (above 0.9). However, the PHF measurements from the Polar showed reliability and agreement coefficients around 0.5 or lower when the level of the exercise increases (for levels of O2 above 60%).

  7. Individual’s Resistance Regarding BPM Initiative: Case Study of the Insurance Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejić Bach Mirjana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Though the individual’s resistance is very often considered a significant barrier to BPM success, the literature on that topic is quite scarce. With the aim to shed light on this topic, we have conducted research of a Croatian insurance company. We examined the impact of individual’s resistance regarding BPM initiative using the theory of reasoned action. Structural equation model was developed using the data collected by the survey among company employees. The results indicate that subjective norms are positively related to the individual’s resistance regarding BPM initiative, while positive initial belief regarding BPM initiative tends to decrease the probability of resistance to change.

  8. Fatigue shifts and scatters heart rate variability in elite endurance athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Schmitt

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This longitudinal study aimed at comparing heart rate variability (HRV in elite athletes identified either in 'fatigue' or in 'no-fatigue' state in 'real life' conditions. METHODS: 57 elite Nordic-skiers were surveyed over 4 years. R-R intervals were recorded supine (SU and standing (ST. A fatigue state was quoted with a validated questionnaire. A multilevel linear regression model was used to analyze relationships between heart rate (HR and HRV descriptors [total spectral power (TP, power in low (LF and high frequency (HF ranges expressed in ms(2 and normalized units (nu] and the status without and with fatigue. The variables not distributed normally were transformed by taking their common logarithm (log10. RESULTS: 172 trials were identified as in a 'fatigue' and 891 as in 'no-fatigue' state. All supine HR and HRV parameters (Beta±SE were significantly different (P<0.0001 between 'fatigue' and 'no-fatigue': HRSU (+6.27±0.61 bpm, logTPSU (-0.36±0.04, logLFSU (-0.27±0.04, logHFSU (-0.46±0.05, logLF/HFSU (+0.19±0.03, HFSU(nu (-9.55±1.33. Differences were also significant (P<0.0001 in standing: HRST (+8.83±0.89, logTPST (-0.28±0.03, logLFST (-0.29±0.03, logHFST (-0.32±0.04. Also, intra-individual variance of HRV parameters was larger (P<0.05 in the 'fatigue' state (logTPSU: 0.26 vs. 0.07, logLFSU: 0.28 vs. 0.11, logHFSU: 0.32 vs. 0.08, logTPST: 0.13 vs. 0.07, logLFST: 0.16 vs. 0.07, logHFST: 0.25 vs. 0.14. CONCLUSION: HRV was significantly lower in 'fatigue' vs. 'no-fatigue' but accompanied with larger intra-individual variance of HRV parameters in 'fatigue'. The broader intra-individual variance of HRV parameters might encompass different changes from no-fatigue state, possibly reflecting different fatigue-induced alterations of HRV pattern.

  9. Study Heart Rate by Tools from Complex Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowiec, D.; Wdowczyk-Szulc, J.; Zarczynska-Buchowiecka, M.; Gruchala, M.; Rynkiewicz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate measured as beat-to-beat time intervals varies in time. It is believed that time intervals between subsequent normal heart contractions carry information about the regulatory system of the heart. How to quantify such signals is not clear and because of that heart rate variability is still apart from the clinic routine. In the following, we propose a method for representing a heart rate signal as a directed network. Then we study the signal properties by complex network tools. The signals to study were collected from patients recovering after the heart transplantation. The aim is to classify the progress of adapting of the new heart - graft. Moreover, it is expected that the method allows for visual classification. Our investigations are preliminary, however the obtained results are promising. (authors)

  10. Metaiodobenzylguanidine and heart rate variability in heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Chinori; Shouda, Sakae; Mikami, Tadashi; Uehara, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Keiko; Tawarahara, Kei; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Matoh, Fumitaka; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    1998-01-01

    It is assumed that the low-frequency power (LF) of heart rate variability (HRV) increases with progress of congestive heart failure (CHF), therefore positively correlating with cardiac 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) washout. It is demonstrated here that HRV, including normalized LF, correlated inversely with MIBG washout and positively with the ratio of heart-to-mediastinum MIBG activity in controls and CHF patients, whereas these correlations were not observed within CHF patients. Thus MIBG washout may increase and HRV including normalized LF may decrease with CHF, although the HRV and MIBG measures may not similarly change in proportion to the severity of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in CHF. (author)

  11. Metaiodobenzylguanidine and heart rate variability in heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurata, Chinori; Shouda, Sakae; Mikami, Tadashi; Uehara, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Keiko [Hamamatsu Univ., Shizuoka (Japan). School of Medicine; Tawarahara, Kei; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Matoh, Fumitaka; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    1998-10-01

    It is assumed that the low-frequency power (LF) of heart rate variability (HRV) increases with progress of congestive heart failure (CHF), therefore positively correlating with cardiac {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) washout. It is demonstrated here that HRV, including normalized LF, correlated inversely with MIBG washout and positively with the ratio of heart-to-mediastinum MIBG activity in controls and CHF patients, whereas these correlations were not observed within CHF patients. Thus MIBG washout may increase and HRV including normalized LF may decrease with CHF, although the HRV and MIBG measures may not similarly change in proportion to the severity of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in CHF. (author)

  12. A new BPM-TOF system for CologneAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascovici, Gheorghe; Dewald, Alfred; Heinze, Stefan; Schiffer, Markus; Feuerstein, Mark [CologneAMS, Universitaet Koeln (Germany); Pfeiffer, Michael; Jolie, Jan; Zell, Karl Oskar [IKP, Universitaet Koeln (Germany); Blanckenburg, Friedhelm von [GFZ, Potsdam (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    At the center for accelerator mass spectrometry (CologneAMS) a complex beam detector consisting of a high resolution Beam Profile Monitor (BPM) and a Time of Flight (TOF) spectrometer with tracking capabilities was designed especially for the needs of the Cologne AMS facility. The complex beam detector assembly is designed to match the beam specifications of the 6MV Tandetron AMS setup and its DAQ system, which is presently in the commissioning phase at the IKP of the University of Cologne. The BPM-TOF system will have a reconfigurable structure, namely: either a very fast TOF subsystem with a small active area or a more complex BPM -TOF detector with beam tracking capabilities and with a large active area. The systems aims for background suppression in case of the spectrometry of heavy ions, e.g. U, Cm, Pu, Am etc. and could also be used as an additional filter e.g., for the isobar {sup 36}S in case of the spectrometry of {sup 36}Cl.

  13. Predictive value of casual ECG-based resting heart rate compared with resting heart rate obtained from Holter recording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Nicholas; Dixen, Ulrik; Marott, Jacob L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is associated with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Assessment of heart rate (HR) from Holter recording may afford a more precise estimate of the effect of RHR on cardiovascular risk, as compared to casual RHR. Comparative analysis was carried ...

  14. Transesophageal Doppler reliably tracks changes in cardiac output in comparison with intermittent pulmonary artery thermodilution in cardiac surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Cordtz, Joakim; Østergaard, Morten

    2017-01-01

    completed the study. Each patient were placed in the following successive positions: (1) supine, (2) head-down tilt, (3) head-up tilt, (4) supine, (5) supine with phenylephrine administration, (6) pace heart rate 80 beats per minute (bpm), (7) pace heart rate 110 bpm. The agreement of compared data...

  15. Measurements of cardiac output obtained with transesophageal echocardiography and pulmonary artery thermodilution are not interchangeable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Sørensen, H; Graeser, K; Hansen, K L

    2014-01-01

    was placed in the following successive positions: supine, head-down tilt, head-up tilt, supine, supine with phenylephrine administration, pace heart rate 80 beats per minute (bpm), pace heart rate 110 bpm. TEE CO and PAC CO were measured simultaneously. The agreement was analysed by Bland-Altman plots...

  16. The relationship between phase and heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, S.R.; Walton, S.; Brown, N.J.G.; Laming, P.J.; Ell, P.J.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The Fourier phase image is used in rest and stress radionuclide angiocardiography to assess the timing of ventricular wall motion in a regional fashion, and areas of high phase are taken to reprensent areas of delayed contraction. However, phase increases with heart rate and this can make interpretation difficult. This study investigates the relationship between phase and heart rate. A heterogenous group of 43 subjects was studied by ECG-gated equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography, all of the subjects having normal extent of left ventricular wall motion as judged by normal ejection fraction and normal amplitude image. Mean left ventricular phase correlated well with mean time of end systole (r=0.92), but there was no correlation with time of end diastole.Thus phase reflects the time of end systole as a proportion of cycle length and should be linearly related to heart rate provided the duration of systole is unchanged. In 28 normal subjects mean left ventricular phase correlated linearly with resting rate (r=0.91), and when exercised the relationship was maintained up to 90 beats per minute. Above this rate the increases were less marked as the duration of systole shortened. The same was true in 4 subjects paced at different rates. Mean resting heart rate in the normal subjects was 70 beats per minute and correcting phase linearly to rate 70 did not change mean left ventricular phase but did decrease the standard deviation from 18 degree to 12 degree. It is concluded that correcting phase for heart rate below 90 beats per minute will increase the sensitivity of the phase image to abnormalities of the timing of ventricular contraction. This correction should be appropriate in resting, isometric exercise, and cold pressor studies but because of the higher heart rates involved will not be appropriate for bicycle exercise. (Author)

  17. The effect of metaprolol alone and metaprolol plus bromazepam on heart rate and heart rate variability during multislice computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuyyab, F.; Naeem, M.Y.; Maken, G.R.; Najfi, M.H.; Hassan, F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of metaprolol alone and metaprolol plus bromazepam on heart rate and heart rate variability during multi slice computed tomography (MSCT) angiography. Methodology: This was a Double blind randomized controlled trial was conducted at AFIC/NIHD, Rawalpindi, from May 2011 to November 2011. Patients undergoing first MSCT angiography meeting inclusion criteria with heart rates (HR) more than 80 beats/min were included. Patients were randomized in to two groups using random numbers table. Group 1 was administered metaprolol plus placebo while group 2 was administered metaprolol plus bromazepam one hour before the scan. Both groups had scans under strictly similar conditions. HR before and during scan along with heart rate variability (HRV) were recorded. Results: A total of 80 patients were included. Patients mean age was 49 + 13, 57 % were males while 43 % were females. Risk factor profile was similar in both groups. HR reduction in group 1 was 15+ 6.0 and in group 2, was 21+9.0 (p= 0.002). HRV in group 1 was 3.9 + 1.32 and in group 2 was 2.3 + 1.0 (p= 0.003). Group 2 had significantly lower HR and significantly less HRV as compared with group 1. Conclusion: Combination of bromazepam and metaprolol results in significant and further reduction in heart rate and heart rate variability than metaprolol alone. Both drugs can be used together for a better control of heart rate and heart rate variability during MSCT angiography for improving the quality of images. (author)

  18. Status of the BPM upgrade at ANKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsching, Sebastian; Hiller, Nicole; Huttel, Erhard; Judin, Vitali; Kehrer, Benjamin; Klein, Marit; Meuter, Christina; Mueller, Anke-Susanne; Nasse, Michael; Schuh, Marcel; Smale, Nigel; Streichert, Max [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A new beam-position monitoring and diagnostic system is being commissioned at ANKA, the synchrotron light source of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. This system uses Instrumentation Technologies' Libera Brilliance devices for the BPM read-out electronics. This data-acquisition devices provide turn-by-turn information about the beam position. This information can be used for beam diagnostics (e.g. finding the position where the beam is lost during injection phase) and can also form the base of a fast orbit-correction scheme. We present studies comparing the performance of the new BPM electronics with the old devices and provide an insight into the experience gained during the commissioning process.

  19. Reproducibility of heart rate and perceptual demands of game-based training drills in handball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Ravier

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Game-based training are popular in team-sports; however there is a lack of research specific to team handball. The aim of this study was to assess i the test-retest reliability of heart rate (HR, time spent in HR zone intensities and rating of perceived exertion of a novel small-sided game, ii and whether it is comparable to that of generic intermittent shuttle running and match play with team handball players. Fourteen elite male handball players completed each exercise comprising two periods of 10min interspersed with 2min recovery in separate occasions and repeated them one week apart. Exercises consisted of intermittent 30s-30s shuttle running (ISR, intermittent 30s-30s small-sided game (with 3-a-side field players, 3vs3 and match play (with 6-a-side field players, 6vs6. Mean HR demonstrated high level of reproducibility for the three drills (r = 0.86-0.89, TEM = 2.21-2.63 bpm, CV = 1.23-1.55%. For time spent in heart rate zones TEMs reached up 1.12, 1.40 and 2.48 min for ISR, 6vs6 and 3vs3, respectively. Specifically for HR zone higher than 90% of HRmax, CVs showed wide extent of scores with 9.73 (ISR, 27.39 (6vs6 and 108.29% (3vs3. Mean HR results suggest that physiological response was consistent between sessions. Because of the poor reproducibility for time spent in the target zone higher than 90% of HRmax, the efficiency of both 3vs3 and 6vs6 in improving aerobic power should be analysed with caution. The present results suggest that reproducibility of physiological demand of ball-drills should be considered before prescribing them as conditioning training.

  20. Heating and cooling rates and their effects upon heart rate in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The heating and cooling rates of adult Chersina angulata were investigated to ascertain whether these tortoises can physiologically alter their rates of heat exchange. In addition, heart rates were recorded to provide an insight into the control of heat exchange. C. angulata heats significantly faster than it cools. Heart rates ...

  1. The Development of Functional Overreaching Is Associated with a Faster Heart Rate Recovery in Endurance Athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaël Aubry

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate whether heart rate recovery (HRR may represent an effective marker of functional overreaching (f-OR in endurance athletes.Thirty-one experienced male triathletes were tested (10 control and 21 overload subjects before (Pre, and immediately after an overload training period (Mid and after a 2-week taper (Post. Physiological responses were assessed during an incremental cycling protocol to exhaustion, including heart rate, catecholamine release and blood lactate concentration. Ten participants from the overload group developed signs of f-OR at Mid (i.e. -2.1 ± 0.8% change in performance associated with concomitant high perceived fatigue. Additionally, only the f-OR group demonstrated a 99% chance of increase in HRR during the overload period (+8 ± 5 bpm, large effect size. Concomitantly, this group also revealed a >80% chance of decreasing blood lactate (-11 ± 14%, large, plasma norepinephrine (-12 ± 37%, small and plasma epinephrine peak concentrations (-51 ± 22%, moderate. These blood measures returned to baseline levels at Post. HRR change was negatively correlated to changes in performance, peak HR and peak blood metabolites concentrations.These findings suggest that i a faster HRR is not systematically associated with improved physical performance, ii changes in HRR should be interpreted in the context of the specific training phase, the athletes perceived level of fatigue and the performance response; and, iii the faster HRR associated with f-OR may be induced by a decreased central command and by a lower chemoreflex activity.

  2. Validation of Biofeedback Wearables for Photoplethysmographic Heart Rate Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Jo, Kiana Lewis, Dean Directo, Michael J. Kim, Brett A. Dolezal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the validity of HR measurements by two commercial-use activity trackers in comparison to ECG. Twenty-four healthy participants underwent the same 77-minute protocol during a single visit. Each participant completed an initial rest period of 15 minutes followed by 5 minute periods of each of the following activities: 60W and 120W cycling, walking, jogging, running, resisted arm raises, resisted lunges, and isometric plank. In between each exercise task was a 5-minute rest period. Each subject wore a Basis Peak (BPk on one wrist and a Fitbit Charge HR (FB on the opposite wrist. Criterion measurement of HR was administered by 12-lead ECG. Time synced data from each device and ECG were concurrently and electronically acquired throughout the entire 77-minute protocol. When examining data in aggregate, there was a strong correlation between BPk and ECG for HR (r = 0.92, p 116 bpm, the BPk demonstrated an r = 0.77 and mean bias = -4.9 bpm (95% LoA 21.3, -31.0 while the FB demonstrated an r = 0.58 and mean bias = -12.7 bpm (95% LoA 28.6, -54.0. The BPk satisfied validity criteria for HR monitors, however showed a marginal decline in accuracy with increasing physical effort (ECG HR > 116 bpm. The FB failed to satisfy validity criteria and demonstrated a substantial decrease in accuracy during higher exercise intensities.

  3. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P; Koval, Olha M; Joiner, Mei-Ling A; Hall, Duane D; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2015-01-20

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant-negative (DN) MCU. Here, we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found that MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU-enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment before each heartbeat. Our findings show that MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest that MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate.

  4. The Role of BPM in the IT Value-Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Systems. This is studied through an analysis of the emerging architectures in four recent cases of BPM adoption in large enterprises. The cases are analyzed using an IT value chain framework. The cross case analysis suggest that a stable pattern emerges and the new role of BPM in managing the IT value...... chain is discussed. This paper suggests that research and the management of the IT value chain is an important emerging topic....

  5. Arduino-based noise robust online heart-rate detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sangita; Pal, Saurabh; Mitra, Madhuchhanda

    2017-04-01

    This paper introduces a noise robust real time heart rate detection system from electrocardiogram (ECG) data. An online data acquisition system is developed to collect ECG signals from human subjects. Heart rate is detected using window-based autocorrelation peak localisation technique. A low-cost Arduino UNO board is used to implement the complete automated process. The performance of the system is compared with PC-based heart rate detection technique. Accuracy of the system is validated through simulated noisy ECG data with various levels of signal to noise ratio (SNR). The mean percentage error of detected heart rate is found to be 0.72% for the noisy database with five different noise levels.

  6. Experiences in enhancing existing BPM Tools with BPEL Import and Export

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendling, Jan; Lassen, Kristian Bisgaard; Zdun, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    The Business Process Execution Language for Web Services (BPEL) has become a de-facto standard for executable process specifications. The broad industry acceptance of BPEL forces workflow and BPM system vendors to consider respective import and export interfaces. Yet, several existing systems...... graph-based BPM tools and BPEL. Furthermore, we present a case study in which we have applied these strategies in an industry project. This case study shows that transformation strategies are helpful for implementing import and export interfaces in a systematic way, and that they can easily be extended...... to address vendor-specific aspects of a graph-based BPM tool....

  7. Blood pressure, body mass index, heart rate and levels of blood cholesterol and glucose of volunteers during National Heart Weeks, 1995-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, K L; Tan, H; Liew, Y M; Sambhi, J S; Aljafri, A M; Hatijah, A

    2000-12-01

    The paper presents the results of a health screening programme conducted in 10 major centers in Malaysia--Kuala Lumpur, Penang, Ipoh, Johor Bahru, Alor Star, Kuala Terengganu, Malacca, Kota Bahru, Kuching and Kota Kinabalu during the National Heart Weeks, 1995-1997. There were 6,858 participants of both sexes aged between 6 years to 81 years old. The parameters involved in the screening programme were body mass index, blood pressure, heart rate, cholesterol and glucose. The following are the results of the study:- 1. The mean and standard deviation for the body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), total cholesterol (TC) and non fasting (random) blood glucose (GL) of the volunteers studied were 24.3 +/- 4.0 kg/m2, 128.3 +/- 21.1 mmHg, 79.6 +/- 11.9 mmHg, 77.2 +/- 12.1 bpm, 5.33 +/- 1.37 mmol/l and 5.11 +/- 1.97 mmol/l respectively. 2. There was a rising trend for BMI, SBP, DBP, TC and GL with age. The HR was higher in the younger age group of those below 20 years. Males tended to have higher mean values than females except for HR which was similar in both sexes. 3. The Malays, Chinese and Indians seemed to have closely similar mean values for SBP, DBP and HR but the Indians possessed the highest BMI (25.62 +/- 3.90 kg/m2), TC (5.61 +/- 1.48 mmol/l) and GL (5.41 +/- 2.43 mmol/l) among the three major ethnic groups. While the Ibans had highest TC (6.07 + 1.09 mmol/l), their GL level was the lowest (4.76 +/- 1.15 mmol/l). The Kadazans had the lowest TC level (4.94 +/- 1.39 mmol/l) among all the ethnic groups. 4. Among the participants screened, 31.9% were overweight (BMI > or = 25), 7.6% were obese (BMI > or = 30); 26.8% had raised SBP (> or = 140 mmHg) and 19.3% had raised DBP (> or = 90 mmHg); 13.6% of the participants had increased HR (> or = 90 bpm), 22% had raised TC (> or = 6.20 mmol/l) and 2% had raised GL (> or = 11.00 mmol/l). There was a higher prevalence for abnormal values with increasing age

  8. Heart rate variability interventions for concussion and rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Conder, Robert L.; Conder, Alanna A.

    2014-01-01

    The study of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) has emerged as an essential component of cardiovascular health, as well as a physiological mechanism by which one can increase the interactive communication between the cardiac and the neurocognitive systems (i.e., the body and the brain). It is well-established that lack of heart rate variability implies cardiopathology, morbidity, reduced quality-of-life, and precipitous mortality. On the positive, optimal heart rate variability has been associated ...

  9. Pulmonary Artery Wedge Pressure Relative to Exercise Work Rate in Older Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, Sam; Wright, Stephen P; Goodman, Jack M; Sasson, Zion; Mak, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    An augmented pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) response may explain exercise intolerance in some humans. However, routine use of exercise hemodynamic testing is limited by a lack of data from normal older men and women. Our objective was to evaluate the exercise PAWP response and the potential for sexual dimorphism in healthy, nondyspneic older adults. Thirty-six healthy volunteers (18 men [54 ± 7 yr] and 18 women [58 ± 6 yr]) were studied at rest (control) and during two stages of semi-upright cycle ergometry, at heart rates of 100 bpm (light exercise) and 120 bpm (moderate exercise). Right heart catheterization was performed to measure pulmonary pressures. The PAWP response to exercise was assessed in context of exercise work rate and body size. At control, PAWP was similar between men and women. Work rates were significantly smaller in women at comparable HR (P exercise, with no further increase at moderate exercise. When indexed to work rate alone or work rate adjusted to body weight and height, the PAWP response at light and moderate exercise was significantly elevated in women compared with men (P exercise. The similar rise in the PAWP response to submaximal exercise occurs despite lower work rate in healthy older women compared with men, even when adjusted for smaller body size. It is important to consider sex in the development of normal reference ranges for exercise hemodynamic testing.

  10. Heart Rate Monitoring in Team Sports—A Conceptual Framework for Contextualizing Heart Rate Measures for Training and Recovery Prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schneider

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive monitoring of fitness, fatigue, and performance is crucial for understanding an athlete's individual responses to training to optimize the scheduling of training and recovery strategies. Resting and exercise-related heart rate measures have received growing interest in recent decades and are considered potentially useful within multivariate response monitoring, as they provide non-invasive and time-efficient insights into the status of the autonomic nervous system (ANS and aerobic fitness. In team sports, the practical implementation of athlete monitoring systems poses a particular challenge due to the complex and multidimensional structure of game demands and player and team performance, as well as logistic reasons, such as the typically large number of players and busy training and competition schedules. In this regard, exercise-related heart rate measures are likely the most applicable markers, as they can be routinely assessed during warm-ups using short (3–5 min submaximal exercise protocols for an entire squad with common chest strap-based team monitoring devices. However, a comprehensive and meaningful monitoring of the training process requires the accurate separation of various types of responses, such as strain, recovery, and adaptation, which may all affect heart rate measures. Therefore, additional information on the training context (such as the training phase, training load, and intensity distribution combined with multivariate analysis, which includes markers of (perceived wellness and fatigue, should be considered when interpreting changes in heart rate indices. The aim of this article is to outline current limitations of heart rate monitoring, discuss methodological considerations of univariate and multivariate approaches, illustrate the influence of different analytical concepts on assessing meaningful changes in heart rate responses, and provide case examples for contextualizing heart rate measures using

  11. Heart Rate Monitoring in Team Sports-A Conceptual Framework for Contextualizing Heart Rate Measures for Training and Recovery Prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christoph; Hanakam, Florian; Wiewelhove, Thimo; Döweling, Alexander; Kellmann, Michael; Meyer, Tim; Pfeiffer, Mark; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    A comprehensive monitoring of fitness, fatigue, and performance is crucial for understanding an athlete's individual responses to training to optimize the scheduling of training and recovery strategies. Resting and exercise-related heart rate measures have received growing interest in recent decades and are considered potentially useful within multivariate response monitoring, as they provide non-invasive and time-efficient insights into the status of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and aerobic fitness. In team sports, the practical implementation of athlete monitoring systems poses a particular challenge due to the complex and multidimensional structure of game demands and player and team performance, as well as logistic reasons, such as the typically large number of players and busy training and competition schedules. In this regard, exercise-related heart rate measures are likely the most applicable markers, as they can be routinely assessed during warm-ups using short (3-5 min) submaximal exercise protocols for an entire squad with common chest strap-based team monitoring devices. However, a comprehensive and meaningful monitoring of the training process requires the accurate separation of various types of responses, such as strain, recovery, and adaptation, which may all affect heart rate measures. Therefore, additional information on the training context (such as the training phase, training load, and intensity distribution) combined with multivariate analysis, which includes markers of (perceived) wellness and fatigue, should be considered when interpreting changes in heart rate indices. The aim of this article is to outline current limitations of heart rate monitoring, discuss methodological considerations of univariate and multivariate approaches, illustrate the influence of different analytical concepts on assessing meaningful changes in heart rate responses, and provide case examples for contextualizing heart rate measures using simple heuristics. To

  12. Heart rate measurement based on face video sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang; Zhou, Qin-Wu; Wu, Peng; Chen, Xing; Yang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Hong-jian

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a new non-contact heart rate measurement method based on photoplethysmography (PPG) theory. With this method we can measure heart rate remotely with a camera and ambient light. We collected video sequences of subjects, and detected remote PPG signals through video sequences. Remote PPG signals were analyzed with two methods, Blind Source Separation Technology (BSST) and Cross Spectral Power Technology (CSPT). BSST is a commonly used method, and CSPT is used for the first time in the study of remote PPG signals in this paper. Both of the methods can acquire heart rate, but compared with BSST, CSPT has clearer physical meaning, and the computational complexity of CSPT is lower than that of BSST. Our work shows that heart rates detected by CSPT method have good consistency with the heart rates measured by a finger clip oximeter. With good accuracy and low computational complexity, the CSPT method has a good prospect for the application in the field of home medical devices and mobile health devices.

  13. Power spectral analysis of heart rate in hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatori, V; Bellavere, F; Pezzarossa, A; Dellera, A; Gemma, M L; Thomaseth, K; Castello, R; Moghetti, P; Muggeo, M

    1996-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of hyperthyroidism on the cardiovascular system by separately analyzing the sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on heart rate. Heart rate variability was evaluated by autoregressive power spectral analysis. This method allows a reliable quantification of the low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) components of the heart rate power spectral density; these are considered to be under mainly sympathetic and pure parasympathetic control, respectively. In 10 newly diagnosed untreated hyperthyroid patients with Graves' disease, we analyzed power spectral density of heart rate cyclic variations at rest, while lying, and while standing. In addition, heart rate variations during deep breathing, lying and standing, and Valsalva's maneuver were analyzed. The results were compared to those obtained from 10 age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched control subjects. In 8 hyperthyroid patients, the same evaluation was repeated after the induction of stable euthyroidism by methimazole. Heart rate power spectral analysis showed a sharp reduction of HF components in hyperthyroid subjects compared to controls [lying, 13.3 +/- 4.1 vs. 32.0 +/- 5.6 normalized units (NU; P hyperthyroid subjects while both lying (11.3 +/- 4.5 vs. 3.5 +/- 1.1; P hyperthyroid patients than in controls (1.12 +/- 0.03 vs. 1.31 +/- 0.04; P activity and, thus, a relative hypersympathetic tone.

  14. Heart rate response to hypoxic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Møller, P; Kanstrup, I L

    2001-01-01

    progressively decreased the maximal heart rate from day 1 and onwards; also, hypoxia by itself increased plasma noradrenaline levels after maximal exercise. Domperidone further increased maximal noradrenaline concentrations, but had no effect on maximal heart rate. On each study day at altitude, oxygen......This study examined the effects of dopamine D(2)-receptor blockade on the early decrease in maximal heart rate at high altitude (4559 m). We also attempted to clarify the time-dependent component of this reduction and the extent to which it is reversed by oxygen breathing. Twelve subjects performed...... two consecutive maximal exercise tests, without and with oxygen supplementation respectively, at sea level and after 1, 3 and 5 days at altitude. On each study day, domperidone (30 mg; n=6) or no medication (n=6) was given 1 h before the first exercise session. Compared with sea level, hypoxia...

  15. Therapeutic effects of selective atrioventricular node vagal stimulation in atrial fibrillation and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youhua; Popović, Zoran B; Kusunose, Kenya; Mazgalev, Todor N

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure (HF) frequently coexist. We have previously demonstrated that selective atrioventricular node (AVN) vagal stimulation (AVN-VS) can be used to control ventricular rate during AF. Due to withdrawal of vagal activity in HF, the therapeutic effects of AVN-VS may be compromised in the combined condition of AF and HF. Accordingly, this study was designed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of AVN-VS to control ventricular rate in AF and HF. A combined model of AF and HF was created by implanting a dual chamber pacemaker in 24 dogs. A newly designed bipolar electrode was inserted into the ganglionic AVN fat pad and connected to a nerve stimulator for delivering AVN-VS. In all dogs, HF was induced by high rate ventricular pacing at 220 bpm for 4 weeks. AF was then induced and maintained by rapid atrial pacing at 600 bpm after discontinuation of ventricular pacing. These HF + AF dogs were randomized into control (n = 9) and AVN-VS (n = 15) groups. In the latter group, vagal stimulation (310 μs, 20 Hz, 3-7 mA) was delivered continuously for 6 months. Compared with the control, AVN-VS had a consistent effect on ventricular rate slowing (by >50 bpm, all P AVN-VS was well tolerated by the treated animals. AVN-VS achieved consistent rate slowing, which was associated with improved ventricular function in a canine AF and HF model. Thus, AVN-VS may be a novel, effective therapeutic option in the combined condition of AF and HF. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. An Experiment on Creating Enterprise Specific BPM Languages and Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brahe, Steen

    Many enterprises use their own domain concepts in modeling business process and use technology in specialized ways when they implement them in a Business Process Management (BPM) system.In contrast, BPM tools used for modeling and implementing business processes often provide a standard modeling...... and automation to BPM tools through a tool experiment in Danske Bank, a large financial institute; We develop business process modeling languages, tools and transformations that capture Danske Banks specific modeling concepts and use of technology, and which automate the generation of code. An empirical...... language, a standard implementation technology and a fixed transformation that may generate the implementation from the model. This makes the tools inflexible and difficult to use.This paper presents another approach. It applies the basic model driven development principles of direct representation...

  17. The heart field effect: Synchronization of healer-subject heart rates in energy therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Christine Caldwell

    2008-01-01

    Recent health research has focused on subtle energy and vibrational frequency as key components of health and healing. In particular, intentional direction of bioenergy is receiving increasing scientific attention. This study investigates the effect of the healer's electromagnetic (EM) heart field upon subjects during energy healing as measured by synchronization of heart rates and scores on a Subjective Units of Distress (SUD) scale and a Profile of Mood States (POMS) inventory. A nonequivalent pretest-posttest design was used based on heart rate comparisons between healer and subject and correlated with pre-and posttest SUD and POMS scores. Subjects included those who sat within the 3- to 4-foot "strong" range of the independent variable, the healer's heart field, while performing self-application of WHEE (the wholistic hybrid derived from EMDR [eye movement desensitization and reprocessing], and EFT [emotional freedom technique]), a meridian-based tapping technique (n=50); and those who performed the same process beyond the 15- to 18-foot range of the healer's EM heart field (n=41). The dependent variables were heart rate, SUD, and POMS inventory. All subjects completed these measures within 1 hour. Study results showed statistically significant heart-rate synchronization with the intervention population. In addition, SUD and POMS scores demonstrated considerably more improvement than in the control population, indicating additional benefit beyond the meridian-based therapies, such as WHEE, alone. Additional findings and future research recommendations are presented in this article.

  18. Learning by Heart: Students Use Heart Rate Patterns To Identify Nervous System Imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerly, Spafford C.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a science unit on heart rate variability (HVR) patterns. Uses spectral analysis to determine the effects of environmental stimulants such as music and emotional stress on heart rate. Observes relaxation techniques and their effects on the autonomous nervous system. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  19. [Resonance hypothesis of heart rate variability origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheĭkh-Zade, Iu R; Mukhambetaliev, G Kh; Cherednik, I L

    2009-09-01

    A hypothesis is advanced of the heart rate variability being subjected to beat-to-beat regulation of cardiac cycle duration in order to ensure the resonance interaction between respiratory and own fluctuation of the arterial system volume for minimization of power expenses of cardiorespiratory system. Myogenic, parasympathetic and sympathetic machanisms of heart rate variability are described.

  20. Surmounting BPM challenges: the YAWL story

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russell, N.C.; Hofstede, ter A.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    The field of Business Process Management (BPM) has evolved considerably over the past decade. Many proposals for business process modelling and/or execution have emerged and some of these have faded into oblivion again. The Workflow Patterns Initiative aimed at achieving a more structured approach

  1. On the importance of agile communication skills in BPM education: Design principles for international seminars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan vom Brocke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Business Process Management (BPM has evolved as an integrated management discipline that aims to enable organizations to continuously innovate and improve their operations. BPM experts are exposed to communication processes involving people from various backgrounds (e.g., various business areas, fields of expertise, and cultures. Research in applied linguistics has shown that it is difficult to plan for constellations of such communication processes; thus, agile communication skills are vital for successful business communication. Teaching programs for BPM, however, do not account for these skills. Rather, they mainly address methods for the analysis, implementation, and management of business processes. As a result, graduates—though they may be technically and methodologically apt—face unexpected challenges due to communication deficiencies in BPM projects. BPM research has shown that deficiencies in communication are in fact among the most frequent reasons for project failure. In this paper, we present a course setting to teach agile communication skills in BPM education. The approach is informed by literature on BPM education as well as theories from virtual collaboration education. We have evaluated it in an international virtual seminar involving seven European universities. We argue for the importance of agile communication skills in BPM education. In addition, we present design principles for courses to teach agile communication skills that can be applied by fellow academics.

  2. Postural ortostatisk takykardi-syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise; Pors, Kirsten; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a heterogeneous condition of dysautonomia and suspected autoimmunity characterized by abnormal increments in heart rate upon assumption of the upright posture accompanied by symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion and sympathoexcitation. An increase...... in heart rate equal to or greater than 30 bpm or to levels higher than 120 bpm during a head-up tilt test is the main diagnostic criterion. Management includes both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment focusing on stress management, volume expansion and heart rate control....

  3. Postural ortostatisk takykardisyndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise; Pors, Kirsten; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a heterogeneous condition of dysautonomia and suspected autoimmunity characterized by abnormal increments in heart rate upon assumption of the upright posture accompanied by symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion and sympathoexcitation. An increase...... in heart rate equal to or greater than 30 bpm or to levels higher than 120 bpm during a head-up tilt test is the main diagnostic criterion. Management includes both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment focusing on stress management, volume expansion and heart rate control....

  4. Extending BPM Environments of Your Choice with Performance Related Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Mathias; Picht, Michael; Gilani, Wasif; Spence, Ivor; Brown, John; Kilpatrick, Peter

    What-if Simulations have been identified as one solution for business performance related decision support. Such support is especially useful in cases where it can be automatically generated out of Business Process Management (BPM) Environments from the existing business process models and performance parameters monitored from the executed business process instances. Currently, some of the available BPM Environments offer basic-level performance prediction capabilities. However, these functionalities are normally too limited to be generally useful for performance related decision support at business process level. In this paper, an approach is presented which allows the non-intrusive integration of sophisticated tooling for what-if simulations, analytic performance prediction tools, process optimizations or a combination of such solutions into already existing BPM environments. The approach abstracts from process modelling techniques which enable automatic decision support spanning processes across numerous BPM Environments. For instance, this enables end-to-end decision support for composite processes modelled with the Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) on top of existing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) processes modelled with proprietary languages.

  5. Resting Heart Rate is a Predictor of Mortality in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus T; Marott, Jacob Louis; Lange, Peter

    2012-01-01

    .001).Within each stage of COPD, RHR improved the prediction of median life expectancy; the difference between bpm and >85 bpm was 5.5 years in no COPD, 9.8 years in mild, 6.7 years in moderate, and 5.9 years in severe/very severe, (p

  6. Supporting the full BPM life-cycle using process mining and intelligent redesign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netjes, M.; Reijers, H.A.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Siau, K.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. Business Process Management (BPM) systems provide a broad range of facilities to enact and manage operational business processes. Ideally, these systems should provide support for the complete BPM life-cycle: (re)design, configuration, execution, control, and diagnosis by the FileNet P8

  7. Simultaneous measurement of instantaneous heart rate and chest wall plethysmography in short-term, metronome guided heart rate variability studies: suitability for assessment of autonomic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perring, S; Jones, E

    2003-08-01

    Instantaneous heart rate and chest wall motion were measured using a 3-lead ECG and an air pressure chest wall plethysmography system. Chest wall plethysmography traces were found to accurately represent the breathing pattern as measured by spirometry (average correlation coefficient 0.944); though no attempt was made to calibrate plethysmography voltage output to tidal volume. Simultaneous measurements of heart rate and chest wall motion were made for short periods under metronome guided breathing at 6 breaths per minute. The average peak to trough heart rate change per breath cycle (AVEMAX) and maximum correlation between heart rate and breathing cycle (HRBRCORR) were measured. Studies of 44 normal volunteers indicated clear inverse correlation of heart rate variability parameters with age (AVEMAX R = -0.502, P < 0.001) but no significant change in HRBRCORR with age (R = -0.115). Comparison of normal volunteers with diabetics with no history of symptoms associated with autonomic failure indicated significant lower heart rate variability in diabetics (P = 0.005 for AVEMAX) and significantly worse correlation between heart rate and breathing (P < 0.001 for HRBRCORR). Simultaneous measurement of heart rate and breathing offers the possibility of more sensitive diagnosis of autonomic failure in a simple bedside test and gives further insight into the nature of cardio-ventilatory coupling.

  8. Insufficient control of heart rate in stable coronary artery disease patients in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Balode

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Despite the wide use of beta-blockers, HR is insufficiently controlled in the analyzed sample of stable CAD patients in Latvia. Target HR ≤60 bpm is achieved only in 25% of the patients while more than one third have increased HR ≥70 bpm.

  9. Influence of iterative reconstruction on coronary calcium scores at multiple heart rates: a multivendor phantom study on state-of-the-art CT systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werf, N R; Willemink, M J; Willems, T P; Greuter, M J W; Leiner, T

    2017-12-28

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of iterative reconstruction on coronary calcium scores (CCS) at different heart rates for four state-of-the-art CT systems. Within an anthropomorphic chest phantom, artificial coronary arteries were translated in a water-filled compartment. The arteries contained three different calcifications with low (38 mg), medium (80 mg) and high (157 mg) mass. Linear velocities were applied, corresponding to heart rates of 0,  75 bpm. Data were acquired on four state-of-the-art CT systems (CT1-CT4) with routinely used CCS protocols. Filtered back projection (FBP) and three increasing levels of iterative reconstruction (L1-L3) were used for reconstruction. CCS were quantified as Agatston score and mass score. An iterative reconstruction susceptibility (IRS) index was used to assess susceptibility of Agatston score (IRS AS ) and mass score (IRS MS ) to iterative reconstruction. IRS values were compared between CT systems and between calcification masses. For each heart rate, differences in CCS of iterative reconstructed images were evaluated with CCS of FBP images as reference, and indicated as small ( 10%). Statistical analysis was performed with repeated measures ANOVA tests. While subtle differences were found for Agatston scores of low mass calcification, medium and high mass calcifications showed increased CCS up to 77% with increasing heart rates. IRS AS of CT1-T4 were 17, 41, 130 and 22% higher than IRS MS . Not only were IRS significantly different between all CT systems, but also between calcification masses. Up to a fourfold increase in IRS was found for the low mass calcification in comparison with the high mass calcification. With increasing iterative reconstruction strength, maximum decreases of 21 and 13% for Agatston and mass score were found. In total, 21 large differences between Agatston scores from FBP and iterative reconstruction were found, while only five large differences were found between

  10. Movement Characteristics and Heart Rate Profiles Displayed by Female University Ice Hockey Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Jackson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women’s ice hockey is widely popular but the various movement patterns, heart rate responses and work to rest ratios during competitive games has not been adequately investigated.  Objectives: This study determined the frequency and duration of movements that female players perform in ice hockey games using time-motion analysis. The intensity of the game activities were also assessed by heart rate (HR responses and work to rest ratios (W:R. Methods: Twenty-two university female ice hockey players were filmed performing a number of movements during three regular season league games. Results: The following movement patterns were categorized in percent of time performed during the games: forward gliding on ice (36.3 ± 6.2%, forward skating at a moderate intensity (31.2 ± 6.2%, backward glide (9.5 ± 4.1%, standing (7.1 ± 5.9%, struggling (6.3 ± 2.6%, forward skating at maximal intensity (5.3 ± 3.3%, backwards skating at moderate intensity (3.1 ± 3.3%. Defense stood and glided backward more than forwards but skated less at a high or maximal intensity. Positional differences were also observed during different game play situations. The highest HR (±SD achieved during shifts was 182 ± 10 and HR averaged 174 ± 9 bpm for the whole duration of the shifts. The shift and game W:R ratios for all players were 1:1.6 and 1: 3.7, respectively. Conclusions: The findings of this study indicate that female ice hockey games are played at a low to moderate intensity most of the time (~84% of the time spent and are interspersed with brief, intermittent high intensity activities that vary according to player position and game play situation. It was also apparent that female players display markedly high HR responses during game-play indicative of a substantial cardiovascular demand in ice hockey. Keywords: game analysis, work to rest ratios, exercise intensity

  11. Reliability of an incremental exercise test to evaluate acute blood lactate, heart rate and body temperature responses in Labrador retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferasin, Luca; Marcora, Samuele

    2009-10-01

    Thirteen healthy Labrador retrievers underwent a 5-stage incremental treadmill exercise test to assess its reliability. Blood lactate (BL), heart rate (HR), and body temperature (BT) were measured at rest, after each stage of exercise, and after a 20-min recovery. Reproducibility was assessed by repeating the test after 7 days. Two-way MANOVAs revealed significant differences between consecutive stages, and between values at rest and after recovery. There was also a significant reduction in physiological strain between the first and second trial (learning effect). Test reliability expressed as typical error (BL = 0.22 mmol/l, HR = 9.81 bpm, BT = 0.22 degrees C), coefficient of variation (BL = 19.3%, HR = 7.9% and BT = 0.6%) and test-retest correlation (BL = 0.89, HR = 0.96, BT = 0.95) was good. Results support test reproducibility although the learning effect needs to be controlled when investigating the exercise-related problems commonly observed in this breed.

  12. Heart Rate Fragmentation: A Symbolic Dynamical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalena D. Costa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: We recently introduced the concept of heart rate fragmentation along with a set of metrics for its quantification. The term was coined to refer to an increase in the percentage of changes in heart rate acceleration sign, a dynamical marker of a type of anomalous variability. The effort was motivated by the observation that fragmentation, which is consistent with the breakdown of the neuroautonomic-electrophysiologic control system of the sino-atrial node, could confound traditional short-term analysis of heart rate variability.Objective: The objectives of this study were to: (1 introduce a symbolic dynamical approach to the problem of quantifying heart rate fragmentation; (2 evaluate how the distribution of the different dynamical patterns (“words” varied with the participants' age in a group of healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD; and (3 quantify the differences in the fragmentation patterns between the two sample populations.Methods: The symbolic dynamical method employed here was based on a ternary map of the increment NN interval time series and on the analysis of the relative frequency of symbolic sequences (words with a pre-defined set of features. We analyzed annotated, open-access Holter databases of healthy subjects and patients with CAD, provided by the University of Rochester Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse (THEW.Results: The degree of fragmentation was significantly higher in older individuals than in their younger counterparts. However, the fragmentation patterns were different in the two sample populations. In healthy subjects, older age was significantly associated with a higher percentage of transitions from acceleration/deceleration to zero acceleration and vice versa (termed “soft” inflection points. In patients with CAD, older age was also significantly associated with higher percentages of frank reversals in heart rate acceleration (transitions from acceleration to

  13. Heart rate variability - a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billman, George E

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate or the duration of the R-R interval - the heart period, has become a popular clinical and investigational tool. The temporal fluctuations in heart rate exhibit a marked synchrony with respiration (increasing during inspiration and decreasing during expiration - the so called respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) and are widely believed to reflect changes in cardiac autonomic regulation. Although the exact contributions of the parasympathetic and the sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system to this variability are controversial and remain the subject of active investigation and debate, a number of time and frequency domain techniques have been developed to provide insight into cardiac autonomic regulation in both health and disease. It is the purpose of this essay to provide an historical overview of the evolution in the concept of HRV. Briefly, pulse rate was first measured by ancient Greek physicians and scientists. However, it was not until the invention of the "Physician's Pulse Watch" (a watch with a second hand that could be stopped) in 1707 that changes in pulse rate could be accurately assessed. The Rev. Stephen Hales (1733) was the first to note that pulse varied with respiration and in 1847 Carl Ludwig was the first to record RSA. With the measurement of the ECG (1895) and advent of digital signal processing techniques in the 1960s, investigation of HRV and its relationship to health and disease has exploded. This essay will conclude with a brief description of time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear dynamic analysis techniques (and their limitations) that are commonly used to measure HRV.

  14. Influence of heavy cigarette smoking on heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagirci, Goksel; Cay, Serkan; Karakurt, Ozlem

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking increases the risk of cardiovascular events related with several mechanisms. The most suggested mechanism is increased activity of sympathetic nervous system. Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence (HRT) has been shown to be independent and powerful......, 69 subjects and nonsmokers 74 subjects (control group) were enrolled in this study. HRV and HRT analyses [turbulence onset (TO) and turbulence slope (TS)] were assessed from 24-hour Holter recordings. RESULTS: The values of TO were significantly higher in heavy cigarette smokers than control group...... (-1.150 +/- 4.007 vs -2.454 +/- 2.796, P = 0.025, respectively), but values of TS were not statistically different between two groups (10.352 +/- 7.670 vs 9.613 +/- 7.245, P = 0.555, respectively). Also, the number of patients who had abnormal TO was significantly higher in heavy cigarette smokers...

  15. Analysis of air temperature changes on blood pressure and heart rate and performance of undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Joseana C F; da Silva, Luiz Bueno; Coutinho, Antônio S; Rodrigues, Rafaela M

    2017-01-01

    The increase in air temperature has been associated with human deaths, some of which are related to cardiovascular dysfunctions, and with the reduction of physical and cognitive performance in humans. To analyze the relationship between blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) and the cognitive performance of students who were submitted to temperature changes in classrooms. The university students answered a survey that was adapted from the Battery of Reasoning Tests over 3 consecutive days at different air temperatures while their thermal state and HR were measured. During those 3 days, BP and HR were evaluated before and after the cognitive test. The average and final HR increased at high temperatures; the tests execution time was reduced at high temperatures; and the cognitive tests was related to Mean BP at the beginning of the test, the maximum HR during the test and the air temperature. The cognitive performance of undergraduate students in the field of engineering and technology will increase while performing activities in a learning environment with an air temperature of approximately 23.3°C (according to their thermal perception), if students have an initial MBP of 93.33 mmHg and a 60 bpm HRmax.

  16. The alteration of the BPM, burden neutrality and autonomous greening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The foundation of the purchase tax on passenger cars (BPM) in the Netherlands is gradually altered from catalogue value to CO2 emission per kilometer of the new car. The tariffs have been established in such a way that they meet the precondition of burden neutrality of the BPM alteration. There is some discussion about this and the first part of this publication will address this issue. The issue of burden neutrality is part of a study by DHV Investment Services (DHV). The first main conclusion of the DHV study is that the alteration is not budget neutral. The study entails an applied welfare analysis of the alteration of the BPM foundation. Some comments on the welfare analysis are provided in the second part of this memo. Another issue that is addressed involves the question if and how the autonomous decrease in CO2 emission of newly sold cars can be established in practice. [nl

  17. Democratizing Process Innovation? On Citizen Involvement in Public Sector BPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaves, Björn; Malsch, Robert

    ‘Open Innovation’ has been heavily discussed for product innovations; however, an information systems (IS) perspective on ‘process innovation’ has not yet been taken. Analyzing the example of the public sector in Germany, the paper seeks to investigate the factors that hinder and support ‘open process innovation’, a concept we define as the involvement of citizens in business process management (BPM) activities. With the help of a quantitative study (n=358), six factors are examined for their impact on citizen involvement in local government BPM initiatives. The results show that citizen involvement in reform processes is not primarily motivated by the aim of cost reduction, but rather related to legitimacy reasons and the intent to increase employee motivation. Based on these findings, implications for (design) theory and practice are discussed: Instead of detailed collaborative business processes modeling, the key of citizen involvement in public sector BPM lies in communication and mutual understanding.

  18. Development and application of the new BPM system data processing program at Hefei light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Tianji; Yang Yongliang; Sun Baogen; Zou Junying; Lu Ping; Zhou Zeran; Xu Hongliang

    2012-01-01

    A data processing program has been applied for the new beam position monitor (BPM) system of the storage ring at Hefei Light Source (HLS). The new BPM system in the upgrade project will be equipped with Libera Brilliance BPM processors to replace the old Bergoz MX-BPM processors. The embedded Linux system on Libera has completed some important work, including instrument status check, data acquisition, position calculation, EPICS IOC data release, and so on. A new EPICS record type has been developed to recalculate the beam position with log-ratio method. The property of the new position data was analyzed in the time and frequency domain. The results show that the rms value of beam position measurement resolution can be up to submicron. Preliminary studies have been carried out on the measurement of the tune and the beam lifetime with this new BPM system. (authors)

  19. Hidradenitis Suppurativa and electrocardiographic changes - a cross-sectional population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, C R; Miller, I M; Jemec, G B

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease, recently associated with metabolic syndrome, subclinical atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the hitherto unknown electrocardiographic c...... resting electrocardiograms. We investigated the difference in means by unpaired t-test or the analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. RESULTS: Heart rate was significantly higher (mean difference: 2.3 bpm [1.2:3.4] p..., there was no significant difference (0.3 bpm [-0.7:1.4] p=0.52). Severe HS was significantly associated with increased heart rate across all models (2.9 bpm [0.7:5.1] p=0.01). Mean QRS-duration was significantly shorter in the mild HS group, but not in the moderate- and severe HS groups CONCLUSION: Mean resting heart rate...

  20. Measurement of CP violation in the phase space of $B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow K^{+} K^{-} \\pi^{\\pm}$ and $B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-} \\pi^{\\pm}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Adrover, Cosme; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Mar-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Callot, Olivier; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coca, Cornelia; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bonis, Isabelle; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dogaru, Marius; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; van Eijk, Daan; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garosi, Paola; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorbounov, Petr; Gordon, Hamish; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hicks, Emma; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Huse, Torkjell; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Iakovenko, Viktor; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Wallaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Kochebina, Olga; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Li Gioi, Luigi; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Ian; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luisier, Johan; Luo, Haofei; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Maratas, Jan; Marconi, Umberto; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Martynov, Aleksandr; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Maurice, Emilie; Mazurov, Alexander; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mountain, Raymond; Mous, Ivan; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Muryn, Bogdan; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Nomerotski, Andrey; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrick, Glenn; Patrignani, Claudia; Pavel-Nicorescu, Carmen; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Phan, Anna; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Polok, Grzegorz; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redford, Sophie; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Roberts, Douglas; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Oksana; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Teodorescu, Eliza; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Webber, Adam Dane; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiechczynski, Jaroslaw; Wiedner, Dirk; Wiggers, Leo; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The charmless decays $B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}\\pi^{\\pm}$ and $B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{\\pm}$ are reconstructed in a data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by LHCb in 2011. The inclusive charge asymmetries of these modes are measured to be $A_{CP}(B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}\\pi^{\\pm}) =-0.141 \\pm 0.040 (stat) \\pm 0.018 (syst) \\pm 0.007 (J/\\psi K^{\\pm})$ and $A_{CP}(B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{\\pm}) = 0.117 \\pm 0.021 (stat) \\pm 0.009 (syst) \\pm 0.007 (J/\\psi K^{\\pm})$, where the third uncertainty is due to the CP asymmetry of the $B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow J/\\psi K^{\\pm}$ reference mode. In addition to the inclusive CP asymmetries, larger asymmetries are observed in localized regions of phase space.

  1. BPM Electronics based on Compensated Diode Detectors – Results from development Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gasior, M; Steinhagen, RJ

    2012-01-01

    High resolution beam position monitor (BPM) electronics based on diode peak detectors is being developed for processing signals from button BPMs embedded into future LHC collimators. Its prototypes were measured in a laboratory as well as with beam signals from the collimator BPM installed on the SPS and with LHC BPMs. Results from these measurements are presented and discussed.

  2. Effect of oxygen treatment on heart rate after abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Lie, C; Bernhard, A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac complications are common during the postoperative period and may be associated with hypoxemia and tachycardia. Preliminary studies in high-risk patients after operation have shown a possible beneficial effect of oxygen therapy on arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate....... METHODS: The authors studied the effect of oxygen therapy on arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate in 100 consecutive unselected patients randomly and double blindly allocated to receive air or oxygen therapy between the first and fourth day after major abdominal surgery. RESULTS: The median arterial...... oxygen saturation rate increased significantly from 96% to 99% (P heart rate decreased significantly from 85 beats/min to 81 beats/min (P heart rate occurred...

  3. Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Nov 13,2017 ... This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  4. The complete business process handbook body of knowledge from process modeling to BPM

    CERN Document Server

    Rosing, Mark von; Scheer, August-Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    The Complete Business Process Handbook is the most comprehensive body of knowledge on business processes with revealing new research. Written as a practical guide for Executives, Practitioners, Managers and Students by the authorities that have shaped the way we think and work with process today. It stands out as a masterpiece, being part of the BPM bachelor and master degree curriculum at universities around the world, with revealing academic research and insight from the leaders in the market. This book provides everything you need to know about the processes and frameworks, methods, and approaches to implement BPM. Through real-world examples, best practices, LEADing practices and advice from experts, readers will understand how BPM works and how to best use it to their advantage. Cases from industry leaders and innovators show how early adopters of LEADing Practices improved their businesses by using BPM technology and methodology. As the first of three volumes, this book represents the most comprehensive...

  5. Heart rate and heart rate variability modification in chronic insomnia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Benedetto; Dittoni, Serena; Colicchio, Salvatore; Testani, Elisa; Losurdo, Anna; Gnoni, Valentina; Di Blasi, Chiara; Brunetti, Riccardo; Contardi, Anna; Mazza, Salvatore; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic insomnia is highly prevalent in the general population, provoking personal distress and increased risk for psychiatric and medical disorders. Autonomic hyper-arousal could be a pathogenic mechanism of chronic primary insomnia. The aim of this study was to investigate autonomic activity in patients with chronic primary insomnia by means of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Eighty-five consecutive patients affected by chronic primary insomnia were enrolled (38 men and 47 women; mean age: 53.2 ± 13.6). Patients were compared with a control group composed of 55 healthy participants matched for age and gender (23 men and 32 women; mean age: 54.2 ± 13.9). Patients underwent an insomnia study protocol that included subjective sleep evaluation, psychometric measures, and home-based polysomnography with evaluation of HRV in wake before sleep, in all sleep stages, and in wake after final awakening. Patients showed modifications of heart rate and HRV parameters, consistent with increased sympathetic activity, while awake before sleep and during Stage-2 non-REM sleep. No significant differences between insomniacs and controls could be detected during slow-wave sleep, REM sleep, and post-sleep wake. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that autonomic hyper-arousal is a major pathogenic mechanism in primary insomnia, and confirm that this condition is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk.

  6. LHCb: Observation of CP violation in $B^{\\pm} \\to D^0 K^{\\pm}$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Johnson, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of $B^\\pm \\to DK^\\pm$ and $B^\\pm \\to D\\pi^\\pm$ decays is presented where the D meson is reconstructed in the two-body final states: $K^\\pm \\pi^\\mp$, $K^+K^−$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^-$. Using 1.0 fb$^{−1}$ of LHCb data, measurements of several observables are made including the first observation of the suppressed mode $B^\\pm \\to [\\pi^\\pm K^\\mp] DK^\\pm$. CP violation in $B^\\pm \\to DK^\\pm$ decays is observed with $5.8\\sigma$ significance. We also comment on the prospects for similar measurements using different final states.

  7. Exaggerated heart rate oscillations during two meditation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, C K; Mietus, J E; Liu, Y; Khalsa, G; Douglas, P S; Benson, H; Goldberger, A L

    1999-07-31

    We report extremely prominent heart rate oscillations associated with slow breathing during specific traditional forms of Chinese Chi and Kundalini Yoga meditation techniques in healthy young adults. We applied both spectral analysis and a novel analytic technique based on the Hilbert transform to quantify these heart rate dynamics. The amplitude of these oscillations during meditation was significantly greater than in the pre-meditation control state and also in three non-meditation control groups: i) elite athletes during sleep, ii) healthy young adults during metronomic breathing, and iii) healthy young adults during spontaneous nocturnal breathing. This finding, along with the marked variability of the beat-to-beat heart rate dynamics during such profound meditative states, challenges the notion of meditation as only an autonomically quiescent state.

  8. Association of heart rate profile during exercise with the severity of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cay, Serkan; Ozturk, Sezgin; Biyikoglu, Funda; Yildiz, Abdulkadir; Cimen, Tolga; Uygur, Belma; Tuna, Funda

    2009-05-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. Autonomic nervous system abnormalities are associated with coronary artery disease and its complications. Exercise stress tests are routinely used for the detection of the presence of coronary artery disease. In this study, we observed the association between heart rate profile during exercise and the severity of coronary artery disease. One hundred and sixty patients with abnormal exercise treadmill test (> or =1 mm horizontal or downsloping ST-segment depression; 119 men, 41 women; mean age = 57 +/- 9 years) were included in the study. Use of any drug affecting heart rate was not permitted. Resting heart rate before exercise, maximum heart rate during exercise, and resting heart rate after exercise (5 min later) were measured and two parameters were calculated: heart rate increment (maximum heart rate - resting heart rate before exercise) and heart rate decrement (maximum heart rate - resting heart rate after exercise). All patients underwent selective coronary angiography and subclassified into two groups according to stenotic lesion severity. Group 1 had at least 50% of stenotic lesion and group 2 had less than 50%. Patients in the first group had increased resting heart rate, decreased maximum heart rate, decreased heart rate increment, and decreased heart rate decrement compared with second group. All patients were classified into tertiles of resting heart rate, heart rate increment, and heart rate decrement level to evaluate whether these parameters were associated with severity of coronary artery stenosis in the study. The multiple-adjusted odds ratio of the risk of severe coronary atherosclerosis was 21.888 (95% confidence interval 6.983-68.606) for the highest tertile of resting heart rate level compared with the lowest tertile. In addition, the multiple-adjusted odds ratio of the risk of severe coronary atherosclerosis was 20.987 (95% confidence interval 6

  9. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Marten E; Warren, Helen R; Cabrera, Claudia P

    2017-01-01

    Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This study aims to di......) and fetal muscle samples by including our novel variants.Our findings advance the knowledge of the genetic architecture of heart rate, and indicate new candidate genes for follow-up functional studies....

  10. Image quality on dual-source computed-tomographic coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rixe, Johannes; Rolf, Andreas; Conradi, Guido; Elsaesser, Albrecht; Moellmann, Helge; Nef, Holger M.; Hamm, Christian W.; Dill, Thorsten; Bachmann, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Multi-detector CT reliably permits visualization of coronary arteries, but due to the occurrence of motion artefacts at heart rates >65 bpm caused by a temporal resolution of 165 ms, its utilisation has so far been limited to patients with a preferably low heart rate. We investigated the assessment of image quality on computed tomography of coronary arteries in a large series of patients without additional heart rate control using dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). DSCT (Siemens Somatom Definition, 83-ms temporal resolution) was performed in 165 consecutive patients (mean age 64±11.4 years) after injection of 60-80 ml of contrast. Data sets were reconstructed in 5% intervals of the cardiac cycle and evaluated by two readers in consensus concerning evaluability of the coronary arteries and presence of motion and beam-hardening artefacts using the AHA 16-segment coronary model. Mean heart rate during CT was 65±10.5 bpm; visualisation without artefacts was possible in 98.7% of 2,541 coronary segments. Only two segments were considered unevaluable due to cardiac motion; 30 segments were unassessable due to poor signal-to-noise ratio or coronary calcifications (both n=15). Data reconstruction at 65-70% of the cardiac cycle provided for the best image quality. For heart rates >85 bpm, a systolic reconstruction at 45% revealed satisfactory results. Compared with earlier CT generations, DSCT provides for non-invasive coronary angiography with diagnostic image quality even at heart rates >65 bpm and thus may broaden the spectrum of patients that can be investigated non-invasively. (orig.)

  11. A randomised, simulated study assessing auscultation of heart rate at birth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogdt, Kevin G. J. A.; Morrison, Allison C.; Wood, Fiona E.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.; Wyllie, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    Heart rate is a primary clinical indicator directing newborn resuscitation. The time taken to assess the heart rate by auscultation in relation to accuracy during newborn resuscitation is not known. To assess both the accuracy and time taken to assess heart rate by stethoscope in simulated

  12. Volumetric Single-Beat Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Relationship of Image Quality, Heart Rate, and Body Mass Index. Initial Patient Experience With a New Computed Tomography Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Muhammad Aamir; Sanchez, Frank W; Sayegh, Karl; Veledar, Emir; Aziz, Muhammad; Malik, Rehan; Haider, Imran; Agatston, Arthur S; Batlle, Juan C; Janowitz, Warren; Peña, Constantino; Ziffer, Jack A; Nasir, Khurram; Cury, Ricardo C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) image quality (IQ) is very important for accurate diagnosis. We propose to evaluate IQ expressed as Likert scale, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from coronary CT angiography images acquired with a new volumetric single-beat CT scanner on consecutive patients and assess the IQ dependence on heart rate (HR) and body mass index (BMI). We retrospectively analyzed the data of the first 439 consecutive patients (mean age, 55.13 [SD, 12.1] years; 51.47% male), who underwent noninvasive coronary CT angiography in a new single-beat volumetric CT scanner (Revolution CT) to evaluate chest pain at West Kendall Baptist Hospital. Based on patient BMI (mean, 29.43 [SD, 5.81] kg/m), the kVp (kilovolt potential) value and tube current were adjusted within a range of 80 to 140 kVp and 122 to 720 mA, respectively. Each scan was performed in a single-beat acquisition within 1 cardiac cycle, regardless of the HR. Motion correction software (SnapShot Freeze) was used for correcting motion artifacts in patients with higher HRs. Autogating was used to automatically acquire systolic and diastolic phases for higher HRs with electrocardiographic milliampere dose modulation. Image quality was assessed qualitatively by Likert scale and quantitatively by SNR and CNR for the 4 major vessels right coronary, left main, left anterior descending, and left circumflex arteries on axial and multiplanar reformatted images. Values for Likert scale were as follows: 1, nondiagnostic; 2, poor; 3, good; 4, very good; and 5, excellent. Signal-to-noise ratio and CNR were calculated from the average 2 CT attenuation values within regions of interest placed in the proximal left main and proximal right coronary artery. For contrast comparison, a region of interest was selected from left ventricular wall at midcavity level using a dedicated workstation. We divided patients in 2 groups related to the HR: less than or equal to 70 beats/min (bpm) and

  13. Assessment of post-laparotomy pain in laboratory mice by telemetric recording of heart rate and heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arras, Margarete; Rettich, Andreas; Cinelli, Paolo; Kasermann, Hans P; Burki, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    Background Pain of mild to moderate grade is difficult to detect in laboratory mice because mice are prey animals that attempt to elude predators or man by hiding signs of weakness, injury or pain. In this study, we investigated the use of telemetry to identify indicators of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain. Results Adult mice were subjected to laparotomy, either combined with pain treatment (carprofen or flunixin, 5 mg/kg s/c bid, for 1 day) or without pain relief. Controls received anesthesia and analgesics or vehicle only. Telemetrically measured locomotor activity was undisturbed in all animals, thus confirming that any pain experienced was of the intended mild level. No symptoms of pain were registered in any of the groups by scoring the animals' outer appearance or spontaneous and provoked behavior. In contrast, the group receiving no analgesic treatment after laparotomy demonstrated significant changes in telemetry electrocardiogram recordings: increased heart rate and decreased heart rate variability parameters pointed to sympathetic activation and pain lasting for 24 hours. In addition, core body temperature was elevated. Body weight and food intake were reduced for 3 and 2 days, respectively. Moreover, unstructured cage territory and destroyed nests appeared for 1–2 days in an increased number of animals in this group only. In controls these parameters were not affected. Conclusion In conclusion, real-time telemetric recordings of heart rate and heart rate variability were indicative of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain and could define its duration in our mouse model. This level of pain cannot easily be detected by direct observation. PMID:17683523

  14. Effects of Malaria on Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, Electrocardiogram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of malaria on blood pressure, heart rate, electrocardiogram and the cardiovascular responses to postural change were studied in malaria patients. Blood pressure was measured by the sphygmomanometric-auscultatory method. Standard ECG machine was used to record the electrocardiogram. Heart rate was ...

  15. Probability of detection of clinical seizures using heart rate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ivan; Manly, B F J

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate-based seizure detection is a viable complement or alternative to ECoG/EEG. This study investigates the role of various biological factors on the probability of clinical seizure detection using heart rate. Regression models were applied to 266 clinical seizures recorded from 72 subjects to investigate if factors such as age, gender, years with epilepsy, etiology, seizure site origin, seizure class, and data collection centers, among others, shape the probability of EKG-based seizure detection. Clinical seizure detection probability based on heart rate changes, is significantly (pprobability of detecting clinical seizures (>0.8 in the majority of subjects) using heart rate is highest for complex partial seizures, increases with a patient's years with epilepsy, is lower for females than for males and is unrelated to the side of hemisphere origin. Clinical seizure detection probability using heart rate is multi-factorially dependent and sufficiently high (>0.8) in most cases to be clinically useful. Knowledge of the role that these factors play in shaping said probability will enhance its applicability and usefulness. Heart rate is a reliable and practical signal for extra-cerebral detection of clinical seizures originating from or spreading to central autonomic network structures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. "Heart rate-dependent" electrocardiographic diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madias, John E

    2013-05-01

    A case is presented revealing the common phenomenon of heart rate-dependent diagnosis of electrocardiographic (ECG) diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), which consists of satisfaction of LVH criteria only at faster rates whereas ECGs with a slow heart rate do not satisfy such criteria. The mechanism of the phenomenon has been attributed to the tachycardia-mediated underfilling of the left ventricle bringing the electrical "centroid" of the heart closer to the recording electrodes, which results in augmentation of the amplitude of QRS complexes, particularly in leads V2-V4. ©2012, The Author. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Analysis of Time-Motion and Heart Rate in Elite Male and Female Beach Handball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basilio Pueo, Jose M. Jimenez-Olmedo, Alfonso Penichet-Tomas, Manuel Ortega Becerra, Jose J. Espina Agullo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Beach handball is a spectacular new team sport; however, scientific knowledge about the demands in beach handball is very low. Consequently, the aim of this study was to analyze the physical demands of elite beach handball players by means of time-motion analysis with GPS technology and physiological response with Heart Rate (HR. Both male (n = 12 and female (n = 12 players from the Spanish Beach Handball National Team were recruited for this study. The sample consisted in four matches of two 10-min periods each. Time-motion analysis was performed through GPS devices (SPI Pro X, 15 Hz, GPSports with synchronized HR monitoring (Polar Electro, Finland. All parameters were recorded for matches and halves to express overall and time-dependent physical and physiological responses. Total match distance covered by male and female players were 1234.7 ± 192 m and 1118.2 ± 221.8 m, respectively. Female players covered more total distance (p = 0.049, ES = 0.79 and distance walking (p < 0.001, ES = 2.04 in the first half, whereas they covered more distance standing (p = 0.008, ES = 1.05 in the second half at a higher average speed (p < 0.001, ES = 2.28. The number of accelerations distributed over low-, moderate- and high-intensity categories were 43.2 ± 11.6, 9.4 ± 4.9; 0.8 ± 0.9 m/s2 for male players, and 40.3 ± 12.7, 4.3 ± 3.0; 0.1 ± 0.3 m/s2 for female players; equivalent to one body acceleration every 23 s and 27 s, respectively. Finally, male and female players obtained a maximum/mean HR of 173 ± 13 / 137 ± 12 bpm, and 177 ± 13 / 138 ± 18 bpm, with 20.3% and 29.2% of the total time in the anaerobic zone (81 – 90% HRmax, respectively. These results demonstrated that beach handball is a demanding sport, with numerous moderate-to-high intensity displacements, distributed intermittently throughout the game: long periods of low intensity activity interspersed by short bursts of high intensity.

  18. Nemaline myopathy and heart failure: role of ivabradine; a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarullo, Filippo M; Vitale, Giuseppe; Di Franco, Antonino; Sarullo, Silvia; Salerno, Ylenia; Vassallo, Laura; Baviera, Emanuela Petrona; Marazia, Stefania; Mandalà, Giorgio; Lanza, Gaetano A

    2015-01-19

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by muscle weakness, hypotonia and the presence in muscle fibers of inclusions known as nemaline bodies and a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes, ranging from severe forms with neonatal onset to asymptomatic forms. The adult-onset form is heterogeneous in terms of clinical presentation and disease progression. Cardiac involvement occurs in the minority of cases and little is known about medical management in this subgroup of NM patients. We report a rare case of heart failure (HF) in a patient with adult-onset NM in whom ivabradine proved to be able to dramatically improve the clinical picture. We report a case of a 37-year-old man with adult-onset NM, presenting with weakness and hypotonia of the proximal limb muscles and shoulder girdle, severely limiting daily activities. He developed progressive HF over a period of 6 months while attending a rehabilitation program, with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF = 20%), manifested by dyspnea and signs of systemic congestion. The patient was started HF therapy with enalapril, carvedilol, spironolactone and loop diuretics. Target HF doses of these drugs (including carvedilol) were not reached because of symptomatic hypotension causing a high resting heart rate (HR) ≥70 beats per minute (bpm). Further deterioration of the clinical picture occurred with several life-threatening arrhythmic episodes requiring external defibrillation. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) was then implanted. Persistent high resting HR was successfully treated with ivabradine with HR lowering from 90 bpm to 55 bpm at 1 month follow up, LVEF rising to 50% at 3 month follow up and to 54% at 2,5 year follow up. To date no more hospitalizations for heart failure occurred. A single hospitalization due to aspiration pneumonia required insertion of a tracheostomy tube to protect airways from further aspiration. At present, the patient is attending

  19. Intrapartum fetal heart rate profiles with and without fetal asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, J A; Pancham, S R; Worthington, D N

    1977-04-01

    Fetal heart rate profiles for periods up to 12 hours prior to delivery have been reviewed in 515 patients with a fetus at risk. Mechanisms other than fetal asphyxia will cause fetal heart rate decelerations, and fetal asphyxia may in some instances develop in the absence of total or late decelerations. However, an increasing incidence of total decelerations and late decelerations and particularly a marked pattern of total decelerations and late decelerations are of value in the prediction of fetal asphyxia. Fetal heart rate deceleration patterns can predict the probability of fetal asphyxia at the time of initial intervention, while a progression of fetal heart rate deceleration patterns in the individual fetus can be of assistance in the subsequent scheduling of serial acid-base assessments during labor.

  20. Relative influence of age, resting heart rate and sedentary life style in short-term analysis of heart rate variability

    OpenAIRE

    E.R. Migliaro; P. Contreras; S. Bech; A. Etxagibel; M. Castro; R. Ricca; K. Vicente

    2001-01-01

    In order to assess the relative influence of age, resting heart rate (HR) and sedentary life style, heart rate variability (HRV) was studied in two different groups. The young group (YG) consisted of 9 sedentary subjects aged 15 to 20 years (YG-S) and of 9 nonsedentary volunteers (YG-NS) also aged 15 to 20. The elderly sedentary group (ESG) consisted of 16 sedentary subjects aged 39 to 82 years. HRV was assessed using a short-term procedure (5 min). R-R variability was calculated in the time-...

  1. Assessment of post-laparotomy pain in laboratory mice by telemetric recording of heart rate and heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasermann Hans P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain of mild to moderate grade is difficult to detect in laboratory mice because mice are prey animals that attempt to elude predators or man by hiding signs of weakness, injury or pain. In this study, we investigated the use of telemetry to identify indicators of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain. Results Adult mice were subjected to laparotomy, either combined with pain treatment (carprofen or flunixin, 5 mg/kg s/c bid, for 1 day or without pain relief. Controls received anesthesia and analgesics or vehicle only. Telemetrically measured locomotor activity was undisturbed in all animals, thus confirming that any pain experienced was of the intended mild level. No symptoms of pain were registered in any of the groups by scoring the animals' outer appearance or spontaneous and provoked behavior. In contrast, the group receiving no analgesic treatment after laparotomy demonstrated significant changes in telemetry electrocardiogram recordings: increased heart rate and decreased heart rate variability parameters pointed to sympathetic activation and pain lasting for 24 hours. In addition, core body temperature was elevated. Body weight and food intake were reduced for 3 and 2 days, respectively. Moreover, unstructured cage territory and destroyed nests appeared for 1–2 days in an increased number of animals in this group only. In controls these parameters were not affected. Conclusion In conclusion, real-time telemetric recordings of heart rate and heart rate variability were indicative of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain and could define its duration in our mouse model. This level of pain cannot easily be detected by direct observation.

  2. Modulations of Heart Rate, ECG, and Cardio-Respiratory Coupling Observed in Polysomnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Penzel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac component of cardio-respiratory polysomnography is covered by ECG and heart rate recordings. However their evaluation is often underrepresented in summarizing reports. As complements to EEG, EOG, and EMG, these signals provide diagnostic information for autonomic nervous activity during sleep. This review presents major methodological developments in sleep research regarding heart rate, ECG and cardio-respiratory couplings in a chronological (historical sequence. It presents physiological and pathophysiological insights related to sleep medicine obtained by new technical developments. Recorded nocturnal ECG facilitates conventional heart rate variability analysis, studies of cyclical variations of heart rate, and analysis of ECG waveform. In healthy adults, the autonomous nervous system is regulated in totally different ways during wakefulness, slow-wave sleep, and REM sleep. Analysis of beat-to-beat heart-rate variations with statistical methods enables us to estimate sleep stages based on the differences in autonomic nervous system regulation. Furthermore, up to some degree, it is possible to track transitions from wakefulness to sleep by analysis of heart-rate variations. ECG and heart rate analysis allow assessment of selected sleep disorders as well. Sleep disordered breathing can be detected reliably by studying cyclical variation of heart rate combined with respiration-modulated changes in ECG morphology (amplitude of R wave and T wave.

  3. Modulations of Heart Rate, ECG, and Cardio-Respiratory Coupling Observed in Polysomnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzel, Thomas; Kantelhardt, Jan W; Bartsch, Ronny P; Riedl, Maik; Kraemer, Jan F; Wessel, Niels; Garcia, Carmen; Glos, Martin; Fietze, Ingo; Schöbel, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The cardiac component of cardio-respiratory polysomnography is covered by ECG and heart rate recordings. However, their evaluation is often underrepresented in summarizing reports. As complements to EEG, EOG, and EMG, these signals provide diagnostic information for autonomic nervous activity during sleep. This review presents major methodological developments in sleep research regarding heart rate, ECG, and cardio-respiratory couplings in a chronological (historical) sequence. It presents physiological and pathophysiological insights related to sleep medicine obtained by new technical developments. Recorded nocturnal ECG facilitates conventional heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, studies of cyclical variations of heart rate, and analysis of ECG waveform. In healthy adults, the autonomous nervous system is regulated in totally different ways during wakefulness, slow-wave sleep, and REM sleep. Analysis of beat-to-beat heart-rate variations with statistical methods enables us to estimate sleep stages based on the differences in autonomic nervous system regulation. Furthermore, up to some degree, it is possible to track transitions from wakefulness to sleep by analysis of heart-rate variations. ECG and heart rate analysis allow assessment of selected sleep disorders as well. Sleep disordered breathing can be detected reliably by studying cyclical variation of heart rate combined with respiration-modulated changes in ECG morphology (amplitude of R wave and T wave).

  4. Heart rate variability in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorka, K; Lehotska, Z; Kozar, M; Uhrikova, Z; Kolarovszki, B; Javorka, M; Zibolen, M

    2017-09-22

    Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in newborns is influenced by genetic determinants, gestational and postnatal age, and other variables. Premature infants have a reduced HRV. In neonatal HRV evaluated by spectral analysis, a dominant activity can be found in low frequency (LF) band (combined parasympathetic and sympathetic component). During the first postnatal days the activity in the high frequency (HF) band (parasympathetic component) rises, together with an increase in LF band and total HRV. Hypotrophy in newborn can cause less mature autonomic cardiac control with a higher contribution of sympathetic activity to HRV as demonstrated by sequence plot analysis. During quiet sleep (QS) in newborns HF oscillations increase - a phenomenon less expressed or missing in premature infants. In active sleep (AS), HRV is enhanced in contrast to reduced activity in HF band due to the rise of spectral activity in LF band. Comparison of the HR and HRV in newborns born by physiological vaginal delivery, without (VD) and with epidural anesthesia (EDA) and via sectio cesarea (SC) showed no significant differences in HR and in HRV time domain parameters. Analysis in the frequency domain revealed, that the lowest sympathetic activity in chronotropic cardiac chronotropic regulation is in the VD group. Different neonatal pathological states can be associated with a reduction of HRV and an improvement in the health conditions is followed by changes in HRV what can be use as a possible prognostic marker. Examination of heart rate variability in neonatology can provide information on the maturity of the cardiac chronotropic regulation in early postnatal life, on postnatal adaptation and in pathological conditions about the potential dysregulation of cardiac function in newborns, especially in preterm infants.

  5. Quantification of fetal heart rate regularity using symbolic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, P.; Cysarz, D.; Lange, S.; Geue, D.; Groenemeyer, D.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal heart rate complexity was examined on the basis of RR interval time series obtained in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In each fetal RR interval time series, short term beat-to-beat heart rate changes were coded in 8bit binary sequences. Redundancies of the 28 different binary patterns were reduced by two different procedures. The complexity of these sequences was quantified using the approximate entropy (ApEn), resulting in discrete ApEn values which were used for classifying the sequences into 17 pattern sets. Also, the sequences were grouped into 20 pattern classes with respect to identity after rotation or inversion of the binary value. There was a specific, nonuniform distribution of the sequences in the pattern sets and this differed from the distribution found in surrogate data. In the course of gestation, the number of sequences increased in seven pattern sets, decreased in four and remained unchanged in six. Sequences that occurred less often over time, both regular and irregular, were characterized by patterns reflecting frequent beat-to-beat reversals in heart rate. They were also predominant in the surrogate data, suggesting that these patterns are associated with stochastic heart beat trains. Sequences that occurred more frequently over time were relatively rare in the surrogate data. Some of these sequences had a high degree of regularity and corresponded to prolonged heart rate accelerations or decelerations which may be associated with directed fetal activity or movement or baroreflex activity. Application of the pattern classes revealed that those sequences with a high degree of irregularity correspond to heart rate patterns resulting from complex physiological activity such as fetal breathing movements. The results suggest that the development of the autonomic nervous system and the emergence of fetal behavioral states lead to increases in not only irregular but also regular heart rate patterns. Using symbolic dynamics to

  6. Performance of turbo high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary CT angiography: first ex vivo and patient experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morsbach, Fabian; Gordic, Sonja; Husarik, Daniela; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Divison of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany); Wildermuth, Simon [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Divison of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15

    To evaluate image quality, maximal heart rate allowing for diagnostic imaging, and radiation dose of turbo high-pitch dual-source coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). First, a cardiac motion phantom simulating heart rates (HRs) from 60-90 bpm in 5-bpm steps was examined on a third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT (prospective ECG-triggering, pitch 3.2; rotation time, 250 ms). Subjective image quality regarding the presence of motion artefacts was interpreted by two readers on a four-point scale (1, excellent; 4, non-diagnostic). Objective image quality was assessed by calculating distortion vectors. Thereafter, 20 consecutive patients (median, 50 years) undergoing clinically indicated CCTA were included. In the phantom study, image quality was rated diagnostic up to the HR75 bpm, with object distortion being 1 mm or less. Distortion increased above 1 mm at HR of 80-90 bpm. Patients had a mean HR of 66 bpm (47-78 bpm). Coronary segments were of diagnostic image quality for all patients with HR up to 73 bpm. Average effective radiation dose in patients was 0.6 ± 0.3 mSv. Our combined phantom and patient study indicates that CCTA with turbo high-pitch third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT can be performed at HR up to 75 bpm while maintaining diagnostic image quality, being associated with an average radiation dose of 0.6 mSv. (orig.)

  7. Performance of turbo high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary CT angiography: first ex vivo and patient experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsbach, Fabian; Gordic, Sonja; Husarik, Daniela; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Wildermuth, Simon

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate image quality, maximal heart rate allowing for diagnostic imaging, and radiation dose of turbo high-pitch dual-source coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). First, a cardiac motion phantom simulating heart rates (HRs) from 60-90 bpm in 5-bpm steps was examined on a third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT (prospective ECG-triggering, pitch 3.2; rotation time, 250 ms). Subjective image quality regarding the presence of motion artefacts was interpreted by two readers on a four-point scale (1, excellent; 4, non-diagnostic). Objective image quality was assessed by calculating distortion vectors. Thereafter, 20 consecutive patients (median, 50 years) undergoing clinically indicated CCTA were included. In the phantom study, image quality was rated diagnostic up to the HR75 bpm, with object distortion being 1 mm or less. Distortion increased above 1 mm at HR of 80-90 bpm. Patients had a mean HR of 66 bpm (47-78 bpm). Coronary segments were of diagnostic image quality for all patients with HR up to 73 bpm. Average effective radiation dose in patients was 0.6 ± 0.3 mSv. Our combined phantom and patient study indicates that CCTA with turbo high-pitch third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT can be performed at HR up to 75 bpm while maintaining diagnostic image quality, being associated with an average radiation dose of 0.6 mSv. (orig.)

  8. The effects of different concentrations of cocoa in the chocolate intaken by the mother on fetal heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscicchio, Giorgia; Lorenzi, Sara; Tranquilli, Andrea Luigi

    2013-10-01

    To analyze the effects of different concentrations (30% and 80%) of cocoa on fetal heart rate (FHR). One hundred pregnant women with uncomplicated gestation, matched for age and parity, underwent computerized FHR recording before and after the consumption of 30 g of 30% and 80% cocoa chocolate. After 1 week, those who had received 30% were shifted to 80% and vice versa to have a crossover. Computerized cardiotocography parameters (contractions, fetal movements, baseline FHR, accelerations greater than 15 bpm for 15 s, number of decelerations, minutes of high variability, short term variability in ms) were recorded and expressed as mean and SD. The differences were tested for statistical significance using the paired t test, with the significance at p cocoa intake. After 30% cocoa chocolate intake, only the number of accelerations was significantly increased. The percent change of the number of accelerations and the short-term FHR variation were significantly higher after 80% cocoa chocolate maternal intake. Maternal intake of dark chocolate has a stimulating action on fetal reactivity. The effect is more marked with high concentrations (80%) of cocoa. This finding is likely due to the pharmacological action of theobromine, a methilxanthine present in cocoa.

  9. Diminution of Heart Rate Variability in Bipolar Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Hage

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system (ANS dysregulation in depression is associated with symptoms associated with the ANS. The beat-to-beat pattern of heart rate defined as heart rate variability (HRV provides a noninvasive portal to ANS function and has been proposed to represent a means of quantifying resting vagal tone. We quantified HRV in bipolar depressed (BDD patients as a measure of ANS dysregulation seeking to establish HRV as a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for treatment outcome. Forty-seven BDD patients were enrolled. They were randomized to receive either escitalopram–celecoxib or escitalopram-placebo over 8 weeks in a double-blind study design. Thirty-five patients completed the HRV studies. Thirty-six healthy subjects served as controls. HRV was assessed at pretreatment and end of study and compared with that of controls. HRV was quantified and corrected for artifacts using an algorithm that incorporates time and frequency domains to address non-stationarity of the beat-to-beat heart rate pattern. Baseline high frequency-HRV (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia was lower in BDD patients than controls, although the difference did not reach significance. Baseline low-frequency HRV was significantly lower in BDD patients (ln4.20 than controls (ln = 5.50 (p < 0.01. Baseline heart period was significantly shorter (i.e., faster heart rate in BDD patients than controls. No significant change in HRV parameters were detected over the course of the study with either treatment. These findings suggest that components of HRV may be diminished in BDD patients.

  10. Modeling baroreflex regulation of heart rate during orthostatic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olufsen, Mette; Tran, Hien T.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    . The model uses blood pressure measured in the finger as an input to model heart rate dynamics in response to changes in baroreceptor nerve firing rate, sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, vestibulo-sympathetic reflex, and concentrations of norepinephrine and acetylcholine. We formulate an inverse...... in healthy and hypertensive elderly people the hysteresis loop shifts to higher blood pressure values and its area is diminished. Finally, for hypertensive elderly people the hysteresis loop is generally not closed indicating that during postural change from sitting to standing, the blood pressure resettles......During orthostatic stress, arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes play a key role in maintaining arterial pressure by regulating heart rate. This study, presents a mathematical model that can predict the dynamics of heart rate regulation in response to postural change from sitting to standing...

  11. Single-pass BPM system of the Photon Factory storage ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, T; Katoh, M; Mitsuhashi, T; Ueda, A; Tadano, M; Kobayashi, Y

    1998-05-01

    At the 2.5 GeV ring of the Photon Factory, a single-pass beam-position monitor (BPM) system is being prepared for the storage ring and the beam transport line. In the storage ring, the injected beam position during the first several turns can be measured with a single injection pulse. The BPM system has an adequate performance, useful for the commissioning of the new low-emittance lattice. Several stripline BPMs are being installed in the beam transport line. The continuous monitoring of the orbit in the beam transport line will be useful for the stabilization of the injection energy as well as the injection beam orbit.

  12. Relationship between heart rate and preference for tempo of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, M

    1995-10-01

    People prefer music with tempi ranging from 70 to 100 cycles per minute similar to that of adults' heart rate within normal daily situations. Previous studies of the relation between preferred tempi and heart rates using a pure tone also have indicated that subjects tended to prefer tempi similar to their heart rates. The present study examined this relationship using a musical piece (the theme of "It's a small world") as a stimulus. 14 undergraduate women were subjects who searched for their favorite tempi by controlling the musical tempo by themselves. The most preferred tempo was close to their cycle of heart beats, however, tempi that were one and a half and twice as fast as the heart rate were less preferred in the present study than in a previous study using a tone. Subjects preferred faster tempi in the descending series of stimuli than in the ascending one, and hence were influenced by the initial value of the tempo in the trial sequence. The effects due to the differences of the meaning of the stimuli are considered.

  13. On the maturity of open source BPM systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohed, P.; Hofstede, ter A.H.M.; Russell, N.C.; Andersson, B.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Two major trends in the area of information systems development are (1) the growing interest in Workflow and Business Process Management (BPM) systems and (2) the increasing acceptance and use of open source software. This development raises the following questions: 1. What are the

  14. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) activates STAT3 to protect against de novo acute heart failure (AHF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Gaurang P; Imamdin, Aqeela; Lecour, Sandrine; Opie, Lionel H

    2018-03-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a burden disease, with high mortality and re-hospitalisations. Using an ex-vivo model of AHF, we have previously reported that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) confers cardioprotection. However, the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to examine the role of the cardioprotective signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in S1P mediated improved functional recovery in AHF. Isolated hearts from male Long-Evans rats were subjected to hypotensive AHF for 35 min followed by a recovery phase of 30 min (n ≥ 4/group). S1P (10 nM) was given during either the hypotensive or the recovery phase with/without an inhibitor of STAT3, AG490. Functional parameters were recorded throughout the experiment. Following an AHF insult, S1P, given during the recovery phase, improved the heart rate (HR) compared to the control (175.2 ± 30.7 vs. 71.6 ± 27.4 beats per minute (BPM); p S1P abolished the cardioprotective effect of S1P (42.3 ± 17.1 vs. 148.8 ± 26.4 BPM for S1P; p S1P protects in an ex-vivo rat heart model of AHF by activation of STAT3 and provide further evidence for the usage of S1P as a potential therapy in patients suffering from AHF. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Heart-Rate Recovery Index Is Impaired in Behçet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ergun Baris; Yorgun, Hikmet; Akdogan, Ali; Ates, Ahmet Hakan; Canpolat, Ugur; Sunman, Hamza; Aytemir, Kudret; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Kabakci, Giray; Calguneri, Meral; Ozkutlu, Hilmi; Oto, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Behçet's disease, a multisystemic inflammatory disorder, has been associated with a number of cardiovascular dysfunctions, including ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Heart-rate recovery after exercise can provide both an estimate of impaired parasympathetic tone and a prognosis in regard to all-cause and cardiovascular death. The aim of our study was to evaluate heart-rate recovery in Behçet's disease From January through July 2008, we examined at our outpatient clinic and prospectively enrolled 30 consecutive patients with Behçet's disease and 50 healthy control participants who were matched for age and sex. Basal electrocardiography, echocardiography, and treadmill exercise testing were performed in all patients and control participants. The heart-rate recovery index was calculated in the usual manner, by subtracting the 1st-minute (Rec1), 2nd-minute (Rec2), and 3rd-minute (Rec3) recovery heart rates from the maximal heart rate after exercise stress testing. Patients with Behçet's disease exhibited significantly lower heart-rate recovery numbers, compared with healthy control participants: Rec1, 24.28 ± 8.2 vs 34.4 ± 7.6, P = 0.002; Rec2, 49.28 ± 11.2 vs 57.5 ± 7.0, P < 0.05; and Rec3, 56.2 ± 12.11 vs 67.4 ± 8.7, P = 0.014. To our knowledge, this is the 1st study that shows an impaired heart-rate recovery index (indicative of reduced parasympathetic activity) among patients with Behçet's disease. Given the independent prognostic value of the heart-rate recovery index, our results may explain the increased occurrence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in Behçet's patients. Therefore, this index may be clinically useful in the identification of high-risk patients. PMID:19693299

  16. Do high fetal catecholamine levels affect heart rate variability and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To deternrine the relationship between Umbilical arterial catecholamine levels and fetal heart rate variability and meconium passage. Study design. A prospective descriptive study was perfonned. Umbilical artery catecholamine levels were measured in 55 newborns and correlated with fetal heart rate before ...

  17. Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring during Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are the types of monitoring? • How is auscultation performed? • How is electronic fetal monitoring performed? • How ... methods of fetal heart rate monitoring in labor. Auscultation is a method of periodically listening to the ...

  18. Fast BPM data distribution for global orbit feedback using commercial gigabit ethernet technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulsart, R.; Cerniglia, P.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to correct beam perturbations in RHIC around 10Hz, a new fast data distribution network was required to deliver BPM position data at rates several orders of magnitude above the capability of the existing system. The urgency of the project limited the amount of custom hardware that could be developed, which dictated the use of as much commercially available equipment as possible. The selected architecture uses a custom hardware interface to the existing RHIC BPM electronics together with commercially available Gigabit Ethernet switches to distribute position data to devices located around the collider ring. Using the minimum Ethernet packet size and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based state machine logic instead of a software based driver, real-time and deterministic data delivery is possible using Ethernet. The method of adapting this protocol for low latency data delivery, bench testing of Ethernet hardware, and the logic to construct Ethernet packets using FPGA hardware will be discussed. A robust communications system using almost all commercial off-the-shelf equipment was developed in under a year which enabled retrofitting of the existing RHIC BPM system to provide 10 KHz data delivery for a global orbit feedback scheme using 72 BPMs. Total latencies from data acquisition at the BPMs to delivery at the controller modules, including very long transmission distances, were kept under 100 (micro)s, which provide very little phase error in correcting the 10 Hz oscillations. Leveraging off of the speed of Gigabit Ethernet and wide availability of Ethernet products enabled this solution to be fully implemented in a much shorter time and at lower cost than if a similar network was developed using a proprietary method.

  19. Effects of horticultural therapy on mood and heart rate in patients participating in an inpatient cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichrowski, Matthew; Whiteson, Jonathan; Haas, François; Mola, Ana; Rey, Mariano J

    2005-01-01

    To assess the effects of horticultural therapy (HT) on mood state and heart rate (HR) in patients participating in an inpatient cardiac rehabilitation program. Cardiac rehabilitation inpatients (n = 107) participated in the study. The HT group consisted of 59 subjects (34 males, 25 females). The control group, which participated in patient education classes (PECs), consisted of 48 subjects (31 males, 17 females). Both HT sessions and PEC are components of the inpatient rehabilitation program. Each group was evaluated before and after a class in their respective modality. Evaluation consisted of the completion of a Profile of Mood States (POMS) inventory, and an HR obtained by pulse oximetry. Changes in the POMS total mood disturbance (TMD) score and HR between preintervention and postintervention were compared between groups. There was no presession difference in either TMD score (16 +/- 3.6 and 19.0 +/- 3.2, PEC and HT, respectively) or HR (73.5 +/- 2.5 and 79 +/- 1.8, PEC and HT, respectively). Immediately following the intervention, the HT TMD was significantly reduced (post-TMD = 1.6 +/- 3.2, P < .001), while PEC TMD was not significantly changed (TMD = 17.0 +/- 28.5). After intervention, HR fell in HT by 4 +/- 9.6 bpm (P < .001) but was unchanged in PEC. These findings indicate that HT improves mood state, suggesting that it may be a useful tool in reducing stress. Therefore, to the extent that stress contributes to coronary heart disease, these findings support the role of HT as an effective component of cardiac rehabilitation.

  20. SOA and BPM, a Partnership for Successful Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe MATEI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to stay effective and competitive, companies have to be able to adapt themselves to permanent market requirements, to improve constantly their business process, to act as flexible and proactive economic agents. To achieve these goals, the IT systems within the organization have to be standardized and integrated, in order to provide fast and reliable data access to users both inside and outside the company. A proper system architecture for integrating company's IT assets is a service oriented one. A service-oriented architecture (SOA is an IT architectural style that allows integration of the company’s business as linked, repeatable tasks called services. A subject closely related to SOA is Business Process Management (BPM, an approach that aims to improve business processes. The paper also presents some aspects of this topic, as well as the relationship between SOA and BPM. They complement each other and help companies improve their business performance.

  1. The use of heart rate turbulence and heart rate variability in the assessment of autonomic regulation and circadian rhythm in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus without apparent heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliwczak, A R; Waszczykowska, E; Dziankowska-Bartkowiak, B; Koziróg, M; Dworniak, K

    2018-03-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus is a progressive autoimmune disease. There are reports suggesting that patients even without overt signs of cardiovascular complications have impaired autonomic function. The aim of this study was to assess autonomic function using heart rate turbulence and heart rate variability parameters indicated in 24-hour ECG Holter monitoring. Methods Twenty-six women with systemic lupus erythematosus and 30 healthy women were included. Twenty-four hour ambulatory ECG-Holter was performed in home conditions. The basic parameters of heart rate turbulence and heart rate variability were calculated. The analyses were performed for the entire day and separately for daytime activity and night time rest. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the basic anthropometric parameters. The mean duration of disease was 11.52 ± 7.42. There was a statistically significant higher turbulence onset (To) value in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, median To = -0.17% (minimum -1.47, maximum 3.0) versus To = -1.36% (minimum -4.53, maximum -0.41), P lupus erythematosus group than in the healthy controls, including SDANN and r-MSSD and p50NN. Concerning the morning activity and night resting periods, the results were similar as for the whole day. In the control group, higher values in morning activity were noted for parameters that characterise sympathetic activity, especially SDANN, and were significantly lower for parasympathetic parameters, including r-MSSD and p50NN, which prevailed at night. There were no statistically significant changes for systemic lupus erythematosus patients for p50NN and low and very low frequency. There was a positive correlation between disease duration and SDNN, R = 0.417; P < 0.05 and SDANN, R = 0.464; P < 0.05, a negative correlation between low/high frequency ratio and r-MSSD, R = -0.454; P < 0.05; p50NN, R = -0.435; P < 0.05 and high frequency

  2. Correlation of heart rate and radionuclide index of left ventricular contraction and relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Haruhiko; Sugihara, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Suetsugu; Kubota, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Masao

    1990-01-01

    Since the cardiac function indices derived from radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) are considered to depend on the heart rate, we studied the relationship between systolic or diastolic indices and heart rates in patients with normal RNV and devised a method of correcting these indices according to the heart rate. For the systolic indices, the heart rate showed significant correlation with ET (r=-0.640), PER (r=0.791) and TPE (r=-0.401) but not with EF, 1/3 EF, MNSER or 1/3 MNSER. For the diastolic indices, the heart rate correlated well with FT (r=-0.938), RFT (r=-0.736), SFT (r=-0.803), 1/3 FF (r=-0.758), PFR (r=0.759), 1/3 PFR (r=0.742) and TPF (r=-0.389) but not with AFT, 1/3 MNDFR or AFF. These results indicate that many systolic and diastolic indices derived from RNV are affected by the heart rate, So when cardiac function is evaluated with the use of radionuclide indices, those which are independent of the heart rate should be used, or they should be corrected for the heart rate. As a method of correction, we proposed a rotating method obtained by manipulation of the regression equation of heart rates and indices. This new method is certain and easier to use when the correcting equations are set into a computer program. (author)

  3. Freqüência cardíaca máxima em testes de exercício em esteira rolante e em cicloergômetro de membros inferiores Maximal heart rate in exercise tests on treadmill and in a cycloergometer of lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Gil Soares de Araújo

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar, retrospectivamente, os valores de freqüência cardíaca máxima (FCM e o descenso da freqüência cardíaca no primeiro minuto da recuperação (dFC, obtidos em teste de exercício (TE realizados em dois ergômetros e momentos distintos. MÉTODOS: Sessenta indivíduos (29 a 80 anos de idade, submetidos a TE cardiopulmonar em ciclo de membros inferiores (CMI em nosso laboratório e que possuíam TE prévio (até 36 meses em esteira (EST em outros laboratórios, nas condições idênticas de medicações de ação cronotrópica negativa. RESULTADOS: FCM foi semelhante no CMI: 156±3 e EST: 154±2 bpm (p=0,125, enquanto o dFC foi maior em CMI: 33±2, EST: 26±3 bpm (média ± erro padrão da média (pOBJECTIVE: To compare, retrospectively, the values of maximum heart rate (MHR and the decrease of the heart rate at the first minute of recovery, which were obtained in an exercise test (ET performed in two different ergometers and at different moments. METHODS: Sixty individuals (from 29 to 80 years old, submitted to cardiopulmonary ET in a cycle of lower limbs (CLL in our laboratory and who had previous ET (up to 36 months in a treadmill (TRM in other laboratories, under identical conditions of medications of negative chronotropic action. RESULTS: MHR was similar in CLL: 156±3 and TRM: 154±2 bpm (p=0.125, whereas dHR was higher in CLL: 33±2, EST: 26±3 bpm (mean ± standard error of the mean (p<0.001. In hemodynamic variables studied, the systolic blood pressure and the double product were higher in the ET-CLL (p<0.001. The electrocardiogram (ECG was similar in both ETs, except due to more frequent supraventricular arrhythmias in CLL. CONCLUSION: a With some diligence from the examiner and previous knowledge of MHR in a previous ET it is possible to obtain high levels of MHR in an ET-CLL; b interrupting the MHR-based ET forecast through equations tends to lead to sub-maximum efforts; c dHR differs in active and passive

  4. AUTONOMIC CONTROL OF HEART RATE AFTER EXERCISE IN TRAINED WRESTLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F Henríquez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to establish differences in vagal reactivation, through heart rate recovery and heart rate variability post exercise, in Brazilian jiu-jitsu wrestlers (BJJW. A total of 18 male athletes were evaluated, ten highly trained (HT and eight moderately trained (MT, who performed a maximum incremental test. At the end of the exercise, the R-R intervals were recorded during the first minute of recovery. We calculated heart rate recovery (HRR60s, and performed linear and non-linear (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability – SD1 analysis of heart rate variability (HRV, using the tachogram of the first minute of recovery divided into four segments of 15 s each (0-15 s, 15-30 s, 30-45 s, 45-60 s. Between HT and MT individuals, there were statistically significant differences in HRR60s (p <0.05 and in the non linear analysis of HRV from SD130-45s (p <0.05 and SD145-60s (p <0.05. The results of this research suggest that heart rate kinetics during the first minute after exercise are related to training level and can be used as an index for autonomic cardiovascular control in BJJW.

  5. Design of heart rate monitor based on piezoelectric sensor using an Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyowati, Veni; Muninggar, Jodelin; Shanti. N. A, Made R. S.

    2017-01-01

    Reading of result heart rate using an acoustic stethoscope needs a particular skill, quiet environment, and hearing sensitivity. This project had the purpose design of a user-friendly automatic heart rate monitor and especially in a noisy area which to eliminate problems and incorrect reading of result. The liquid crystal display shows a heart rate as a result of measurements. The design of the heart rate monitor has two main parts; the signal recorder that a piezoelectric sensor, a filter, and an amplifier as recorder. The second parts was Arduino microcontroller with reinforced. Besides, three supporting buttons provided as the manual switches, the ‘on’, the ‘start’, and ‘reset’ buttons. The values acquired from the heart rate monitor indicate that those were on the Vernier BPS-BTA value range. The measurement error factor of the heart rate monitor then compared to the Vernier BPS-BTA test device was 3.15%. Besides, the value of statistical independent-test indicates that there is no significant difference (P = 0.971) between the heart rate monitor device and the Vernier BPS-BTA. In conclusion, this device was ready to be used because it has almost the same accuracy with the standart device.

  6. Development of BPM/BLM DAQ System for KOMAC Beam Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Young-Gi; Kim, Jae-Ha; Yun, Sang-Pil; Kim, Han-Sung; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The proton beam is accelerated from 3 MeV to 100 MeV through 11 DTL tanks. The KOMAC installed 10 beam lines, 5 for 20-MeV beams and 5 for 100-MeV beams. The proton beam is transmitted to two target room. The KOMAC has been operating two beam lines, one for 20 MeV and one for 100 MeV. New beam line, RI beam line is under commissioning. A Data Acquisition (DAQ) system is essential to monitor beam signals in an analog front-end circuitry from BPM and BLM at beam lines. A data acquisition (DAQ) system is essential to monitor beam signals in an analog front-end circuitry from BPM and BLM at beam lines. The DAQ digitizes beam signal and the sampling is synchronized with a reference signal which is an external trigger for beam operation. The digitized data is accessible by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS)-based control system, which manages the whole accelerator control. The beam monitoring system integrates BLM and BPM signals into the control system and offers realtime data to operators. The IOC, which is implemented with Linux and a PCI driver, supports data acquisition as a very flexible solution.

  7. Clinical tolerability of generic versus brand beta blockers in heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction: a retrospective cohort from heart failure clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanchai, Rattanachai; Kanjanavanit, Rungsrit; Leemasawat, Krit; Amarittakomol, Anong; Topaiboon, Paleerat; Phrommintikul, Arintaya

    2018-01-01

    Background: Beta-blockers have been shown to decrease mortality and morbidity in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) patients. However, the side effects are also dose-related, leading to the underdosing. Cost constraint may be one of the limitations of appropriate beta-blocker use; this can be improved with generic drugs. However, the effects in real life practice have not been investigated. Methods and results: This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of generic and brand beta-blockers in HFrEF patients. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis in HFrEF patients who received either generic or brand beta-blocker in Chiang Mai Heart Failure Clinic. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who received at least 50% target dose of beta-blocker between generic and brand beta-blockers. Adverse events were secondary endpoints. 217 patients (119 and 98 patients received generic and brand beta-blocker, respectively) were enrolled. There were no differences between groups regarding age, gender, etiology of heart failure, New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), rate of receiving angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), angiotensin recepter blocker (ARB), or spironolactone. Patients receiving brand beta-blockers had lower resting heart rate at baseline (74.9 and 84.2 bpm, p  = .001). Rate of achieved 50% target dose and target daily dose did not differ between groups (40.4 versus 44.5% and 48.0 versus 55.0%, p  > .05, respectively). Rate of side effects was not different between groups (32.3 versus 29.5%, p  > .05) and the most common side effect was hypotension. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that beta-blocker tolerability was comparable between brand and generic formulations. Generic or brand beta-blockers should be prescribed to HFrEF patients who have no contraindications.

  8. A healthy heart is not a metronome: an integrative review of the heart's anatomy and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Fred; McCraty, Rollin; Zerr, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operate on different time scales to adapt to challenges and achieve optimal performance. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart, and its basic anatomy, the cardiac cycle, and the sinoatrial and atrioventricular pacemakers. The cardiovascular regulation center in the medulla integrates sensory information and input from higher brain centers, and afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. This article reviews sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on the heart, and examines the interpretation of HRV and the association between reduced HRV, risk of disease and mortality, and the loss of regulatory capacity. This article also discusses the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical and frontocortical areas, and motor cortex. It also considers new perspectives on the putative underlying physiological mechanisms and properties of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF), very-low-frequency (VLF), low-frequency (LF), and high-frequency (HF) bands. Additionally, it reviews the most common time and frequency domain measurements as well as standardized data collection protocols. In its final section, this article integrates Porges' polyvagal theory, Thayer and colleagues' neurovisceral integration model, Lehrer et al.'s resonance frequency model, and the Institute of HeartMath's coherence model. The authors conclude that a coherent heart is not a metronome because its rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales. Future research should expand understanding of how the heart and its intrinsic nervous system influence the brain.

  9. Heart rate variability in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Munkholm, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) has been suggested reduced in bipolar disorder (BD) compared with healthy individuals (HC). This meta-analysis investigated: HRV differences in BD compared with HC, major depressive disorder or schizophrenia; HRV differences between affective states; HRV...

  10. The clinical significance of detection to heart rate deceleration capacity and heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-rong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the change of heart rate deceleration capacity ( DC and heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF and its relationship with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF. Methods: DC, LVEF, time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were measured in 66 patients with CHF and 34 healthy adults (control group by using 24h Holter recordings and Echocardiography. The standard deviation of normal R-R intervals( SDNN, squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals ( RMSSD,low frequency power( LFn and high frequency power( HFn and the changes of LVEF were compared between  the two groups,the relationship between DC,LVEF and HRV were studied in patients with CHF. Results: The median value of DC in the patients with CHF was significantly lower than that in control group( 3.1 ± 2.4 ms vs 7.2 ± 1.3 ms,P <0.01.Incidence of abnormal DC in the CHF group was 57.5%,which was significantly higher than that in the control group (P <0.01.The HRV index, including SDNN、RMSSD、LFn、HFn, in the CHF group was significantly lower than that in normal control group (P < 0.01. Significant positive correlation between HRV index and LVEF were confirmed (P < 0.01. Conclusions: DC and HRV index are lower in patients with CHF and have a good correlation with the left ventricular ejection fraction.

  11. Heart Rate Variability Interventions for Concussion and Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lake Conder

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of Heart Rate Variability (HRV has emerged as an essential component of cardiovascular health, as well as a physiological mechanism by which one can increase the interactive communication between the cardiac and the neurocognitive systems (i.e., the body and the brain. It is well-established that lack of heart rate variability implies cardiopathology, morbidity, reduced quality-of-life, and precipitous mortality. On the positive, optimal heart rate variability has been associated with good cardiovascular health, autonomic nervous system (ANS control, emotional regulation, and enhanced neurocognitive processing. In addition to health benefits, optimal HRV has been shown to improve neurocognitive performance by enhancing focus, visual acuity and readiness, and by promoting emotional regulation needed for peak performance. In concussed athletes and soldiers, concussions not only alter brain connectivity, but also alter cardiac functioning and impair cardiovascular performance upon exertion. Altered sympathetic and parasympathetic balance in the ANS has been postulated as a critical factor in refractory Post Concussive Syndrome (PCS. This article will review both the pathological aspects of reduced heart rate variability on athletic performance, as well as the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular components of concussion and PCS. Additionally, this article will review interventions with HRV biofeedback (HRV BFB training as a promising and underutilized treatment for sports and military-related concussion. Finally, this article will review research and promising case studies pertaining to use of HRV BFB for enhancement of cognition and performance, with applicability to concussion rehabilitation.

  12. The Effect of Heart Rate on the Heart Rate Variability Response to Autonomic Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E Billman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV, the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate (HR or heart period (R-R interval, has become a popular clinical and investigational tool to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation. However, it is not widely appreciated that, due to the inverse curvilinear relationship between HR and R-R interval, HR per se can profoundly influence HRV. It is, therefore, critical to correct HRV for the prevailing HR particularly, as HR changes in response to autonomic neural activation or inhibition. The present study evaluated the effects of HR on the HRV response to autonomic interventions that either increased (submaximal exercise, n = 25 or baroreceptor reflex activation, n = 20 or reduced (pharmacological blockade: β-adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor antagonists alone and in combination, n = 25, or bilateral cervical vagotomy, n = 9 autonomic neural activity in a canine model. Both total (RR interval standard deviation, RRSD and the high frequency variability (HF, 0.2 to 1.04 Hz were determined before and in response to an autonomic intervention. All interventions that reduced or abolished cardiac parasympathetic regulation provoked large reductions in HRV even after HR correction [division by mean RRsec or (mean RRsec2 for RRSD and HF, respectively] while interventions that reduced HR yielded mixed results. β-adrenergic receptor blockade reduced HRV (RRSD but not HF while both RRSD and HF increased in response to increases in arterial blood (baroreceptor reflex activation even after HR correction. These data suggest that the physiological basis for HRV is revealed after correction for prevailing HR and, further, that cardiac parasympathetic activity is responsible for a major portion of the HRV in the dog.

  13. Novel Fingertip Image-Based Heart Rate Detection Methods for a Smartphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifat Zaman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that our fingertip image-based heart rate detection methods using smartphone reliably detect the heart rhythm and rate of subjects. We propose fingertip curve line movement-based and fingertip image intensity-based detection methods, which both use the movement of successive fingertip images obtained from smartphone cameras. To investigate the performance of the proposed methods, heart rhythm and rate of the proposed methods are compared to those of the conventional method, which is based on average image pixel intensity. Using a smartphone, we collected 120 s pulsatile time series data from each recruited subject. The results show that the proposed fingertip curve line movement-based method detects heart rate with a maximum deviation of 0.0832 Hz and 0.124 Hz using time- and frequency-domain based estimation, respectively, compared to the conventional method. Moreover, another proposed fingertip image intensity-based method detects heart rate with a maximum deviation of 0.125 Hz and 0.03 Hz using time- and frequency-based estimation, respectively.

  14. Patterns of Interspecific Variation in the Heart Rates of Embryonic Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei-Guo; Ye, Hua; Zhao, Bo; Pizzatto, Ligia; Ji, Xiang; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    New non-invasive technologies allow direct measurement of heart rates (and thus, developmental rates) of embryos. We applied these methods to a diverse array of oviparous reptiles (24 species of lizards, 18 snakes, 11 turtles, 1 crocodilian), to identify general influences on cardiac rates during embryogenesis. Heart rates increased with ambient temperature in all lineages, but (at the same temperature) were faster in lizards and turtles than in snakes and crocodilians. We analysed these data within a phylogenetic framework. Embryonic heart rates were faster in species with smaller adult sizes, smaller egg sizes, and shorter incubation periods. Phylogenetic changes in heart rates were negatively correlated with concurrent changes in adult body mass and residual incubation period among the lizards, snakes (especially within pythons) and crocodilians. The total number of embryonic heart beats between oviposition and hatching was lower in squamates than in turtles or the crocodilian. Within squamates, embryonic iguanians and gekkonids required more heartbeats to complete development than did embryos of the other squamate families that we tested. These differences plausibly reflect phylogenetic divergence in the proportion of embryogenesis completed before versus after laying. PMID:22174948

  15. Heart Rate Monitor for Portable MP3 Player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaywoo; Lee, Mi-Hee; Lee, Hyoung-Ki; Choi, Kiwan; Bang, Seokwon; Kim, Sangryong

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a photoplethysmography sensor based on a heart rate monitor for a portable MP3 player. Two major design issues are addressed: one is to acquire the sensor signal with a proper amplitude despite a wide range of variation and the other is to handle the noise contaminated signal which is caused by a motion artifact. A benchmarking test with a professional medical photoplethysmography sensor shows that our device performs very well in calculating heart rate even though our photoplethysmography sensor module was designed to be cost effective.

  16. Approximate entropy and point correlation dimension of heart rate variability in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storella, R J; Wood, H W; Mills, K M

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of nonlinear dynamics to heart rate variability in healthy humans was examined using surrogate data analysis. Several measures of heart rate variability were used and compared. Heart rates were recorded for three hours and original data sets of 8192 R-R intervals created. For each...... original data set (n = 34), three surrogate data sets were made by shuffling the order of the R-R intervals while retaining their linear correlations. The difference in heart rate variability between the original and surrogate data sets reflects the amount of nonlinear structure in the original data set....... Heart rate variability was analyzed by two different nonlinear methods, point correlation dimension and approximate entropy. Nonlinearity, though under 10 percent, could be detected with both types of heart rate variability measures. More importantly, not only were the correlations between...

  17. iHeartLift: a closed loop system with bio-feedback that uses music tempo variability to improve heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Thomas C T; Chen, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    "Musica delenit bestiam feram" translates into "Music soothes the savage beast". There is a hidden truth in this ancient quip passed down from generations. Besides soothing the heart, it also incites the heart to a healthier level of heart rate variability (HRV). In this paper, an approach to use and test music and biofeedback to increase the heart rate variability for people facing daily stress is discussed. By determining the music tempo variability (MTV) of a piece of music and current heart rate variability, iHeartLift is able to compare the 2 trends and locate a musical piece that is suited to increase the user's heart rate variability to a healthier level. With biofeedback, the 2 trends are continuously compared in real-time and the musical piece is changed in accordance with the current comparisons. A study was conducted and it was generally found that HRV can be uplifted by music regardless of language and meaning of musical lyrics but with limitations to musical genre.

  18. Heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity in bilateral lung transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontolliet, Timothée; Gianella, Pietro; Pichot, Vincent; Barthélémy, Jean-Claude; Gasche-Soccal, Paola; Ferretti, Guido; Lador, Frédéric

    2018-01-09

    The effects of lung afferents denervation on cardiovascular regulation can be assessed on bilateral lung transplantation patients. The high-frequency component of heart rate variability is known to be synchronous with breathing frequency. Then, if heart beat is neurally modulated by breathing frequency, we may expect disappearance of high frequency of heart rate variability in bilateral lung transplantation patients. On 11 patients and 11 matching healthy controls, we measured R-R interval (electrocardiography), blood pressure (Portapres ® ) and breathing frequency (ultrasonic device) in supine rest, during 10-min free breathing, 10-min cadenced breathing (0·25 Hz) and 5-min handgrip. We analysed heart rate variability and spontaneous variability of arterial blood pressure, by power spectral analysis, and baroreflex sensitivity, by the sequence method. Concerning heart rate variability, with respect to controls, transplant recipients had lower total power and lower low- and high-frequency power. The low-frequency/high-frequency ratio was higher. Concerning systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure variability, transplant recipients had lower total power (only for cadenced breathing), low frequency and low-frequency/high-frequency ratio during free and cadenced breathing. Baroreflex sensitivity was decreased. Denervated lungs induced strong heart rate variability reduction. The higher low-frequency/high-frequency ratio suggested that the total power drop was mostly due to high frequency. These results support the hypothesis that neural modulation from lung afferents contributes to the high frequency of heart rate variability. © 2018 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Elevated resting heart rate, physical fitness and all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus Thorsten; Suadicani, Poul; Hein, Hans Ole

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is an independent risk factor for mortality or a mere marker of physical fitness (VO2Max).......To examine whether elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is an independent risk factor for mortality or a mere marker of physical fitness (VO2Max)....

  20. High Resolution BPM Upgrade for the ATF Damping Ring at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, N.; Briegel, C.; Fellenz, B.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Prieto, P.; Rechenmacher, R.; Semenov, A.; Voy, D.; Wendt, M.; Zhang, D.; Terunuma, N.

    2011-01-01

    A beam position monitor (BPM) upgrade at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring has been accomplished, carried out by a KEK/FNAL/SLAC collaboration under the umbrella of the global ILC R and D effort. The upgrade consists of a high resolution, high reproducibility read-out system, based on analog and digital down-conversion techniques, digital signal processing, and also implements a new automatic gain error correction schema. The technical concept and realization as well as results of beam studies are presented. The next generation of linear colliders require ultra-low vertical emittance of <2 pm-rad. The damping ring at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is designed to demonstrate this mission critical goal. A high resolution beam position monitor (BPM) system for the damping ring is one of the key tools for realizing this goal. The BPM system needs to provide two distnict measurements. First, a very high resolution (∼100-200nm) closed-orbit measurement which is averaged over many turns and realized with narrowband filter techniques - 'narrowband mode'. This is needed to monitor and steer the beam along an optimum orbit and to facilitate beam-based alignment to minimize non-linear field effects. Second, is the ability to make turn by turn (TBT) measurements to support optics studies and corrections necessary to achieve the design performance. As the TBT measurement necessitates a wider bandwidth, it is often referred to as 'wideband mode'. The BPM upgrade was initiated as a KEK/SLAC/FNAL collaboration in the frame of the Global Design Initiative of the International Linear Collider. The project was realized and completed using Japan-US funds with Fermilab as the core partner.

  1. REST SOA Orchestration and BPM Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian DOSPINESCU

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BPM initiatives and SOA approaches emerged and developed as distinct efforts although they could be perceived as the two sides of the same coin in the context of online business and information systems. Thus, inherently, their modeling perspectives met (or collided and generated some frameworks and languages like SOAML or SOAMF. Starting from these standards and initiatives we will propose a methodological approach that could lead to a feasible implementation of web service integration in a formal Business Process context.

  2. Target Heart Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  3. Poincare indices for analyzing meditative heart rate signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Goshvarpour

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poincare plots are commonly used to study the nonlinear behavior of physiologic signals. The aim of this study is to evaluate the Poincare plot indices of human heart rate signals during meditation. Methods: For this purpose, heart rate time series of eight Chi meditators available in Physionet database were used. Poincare plots with lags of 1 and 6 were constructed, and the ratio of the minor axis to major axis (SD1/SD2 and the area of Poincare plots were calculated for each lag. Results: The results show that the SD1/SD2 ratio increased significantly during meditation compared to that before meditation, especially the index measured from Poincare plots reconstructed with a lag of 6 (p < 0.05. In addition, in both lags, the area of Poincare plots decreased significantly during meditation compared to before meditation (p < 0.05. Conclusion: The comparative dynamic measures of the Poincare plot indices during and before meditation give more insight of the heart rate signals in a specific psychophysiological state.

  4. Short- and long-term variations in non-linear dynamics of heart rate variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, J K; Højgaard, M V; Agner, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to investigate the short- and long-term variations in the non-linear dynamics of heart rate variability, and to determine the relationships between conventional time and frequency domain methods and the newer non-linear methods of characterizing heart rate...... rate and describes mainly linear correlations. Non-linear predictability is correlated with heart rate variability measured as the standard deviation of the R-R intervals and the respiratory activity expressed as power of the high-frequency band. The dynamics of heart rate variability changes suddenly...

  5. Long-term mortality risk in patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogwegt, Madelein T; Theuns, Dominic A M J; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2014-01-01

    .9)). The impact of heart rate and QRS duration on time to all-cause mortality was separately assessed with Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, adjusting for clinical factors and symptoms of depression and anxiety. RESULTS: Mean (SD) heart rate was 68.0 ± 13.3 bpm and mean QRS duration was 130.9 ± 36.9 ms....... Heart rate of ≥80 bpm was associated with increased risk of mortality (HR=1.86; 95% CI=1.15-3.00; p=.011) in unadjusted analysis. In adjusted analyses, this relationship remained significant both with depression (HR=1.86, 95% CI=1.12-3.09; p=.017) and anxiety (HR=1.82, 95% CI=1.10-3.03; p=.021...

  6. Heart rate detection from an electronic weighing scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González-Landaeta, R; Casas, O; Pallàs-Areny, R

    2008-01-01

    We propose a novel technique for beat-to-beat heart rate detection based on the ballistocardiographic (BCG) force signal from a subject standing on a common electronic weighing scale. The detection relies on sensing force variations related to the blood acceleration in the aorta, works even if wearing footwear and does not require any sensors attached to the body because it uses the load cells in the scale. We have devised an approach to estimate the sensitivity and frequency response of three commercial weighing scales to assess their capability to detect the BCG force signal. Static sensitivities ranged from 490 nV V −1 N −1 to 1670 nV V −1 N −1 . The frequency response depended on the subject's mass but it was broad enough for heart rate estimation. We have designed an electronic pulse detection system based on off-the-shelf integrated circuits to sense heart-beat-related force variations of about 0.24 N. The signal-to-noise ratio of the main peaks of the force signal detected was higher than 30 dB. A Bland–Altman plot was used to compare the RR time intervals estimated from the ECG and BCG force signals for 17 volunteers. The error was ±21 ms, which makes the proposed technique suitable for short-term monitoring of the heart rate

  7. Guided imagery, anxiety, heart rate, and heart rate variability during centrifuge training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaolu; Wu, Ping; Liu, Fang; Wu, Bin; Miao, Danmin

    2011-02-01

    Centrifuge training is an important method of improving the hypergravity tolerance of pilots, cosmonauts, and Chinese astronauts. However, the concomitants of tension or anxiety often impede training. Guided imagery (GI), a mind-body relaxation technique, provides a behavioral and cognitive means whereby individuals are able to exert control over the focus of attention. This study aims to investigate the immediate effects of GI for reducing stress in centrifuge training. There were 12 healthy young men who were randomly assigned to a GI group or music group. We measured changes in heart rate during centrifuge training, in heart rate variability before and after centrifuge training, and also evaluated relaxation and anxiety in three phases: before intervention, after intervention, and following centrifuge training. The change in the pattern of anxiety was different in the two groups over the three phases. Anxiety (measured by State Anxiety Inventory) in the GI group changed from 31.7 +/- 5.9 to 26.8 +/- 2.6 and 27.8 +/- 4.1, whereas for the music group this changed from 32.2 +/- 7.6 to 31.2 +/- 8.3 and 26.8 +/- 6.8. During centrifuge training, the maximal HR for the GI group (101.2 +/- 8.8) was lower than that of the music group (123.0 +/- 19.1). In addition GI showed a decrease in low frequency (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz) components and an increase in high frequency (HF, 0.15-0.4 Hz) components before and after centrifuge training. GI was capable of decreasing tension, anxiety, and sympathetic nervous system activity pre- or post-centrifugation.

  8. Resonance of about-weekly human heart rate rhythm with solar activity change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, G; Halberg, F; Wendt, H W; Bingham, C; Sothern, R B; Haus, E; Kleitman, E; Kleitman, N; Revilla, M A; Revilla, M; Breus, T K; Pimenov, K; Grigoriev, A E; Mitish, M D; Yatsyk, G V; Syutkina, E V

    1996-12-01

    In several human adults, certain solar activity rhythms may influence an about 7-day rhythm in heart rate. When no about-weekly feature was found in the rate of change in sunspot area, a measure of solar activity, the double amplitude of a circadian heart rate rhythm, approximated by the fit of a 7-day cosine curve, was lower, as was heart rate corresponds to about-weekly features in solar activity and/or relates to a sunspot cycle.

  9. BPM-in-the-Large - Towards a higher level of abstraction in Business Process Management

    OpenAIRE

    Houy , Constantin; Fettke , Peter; Loos , Peter; Aalst , Wil M. P.; Krogstie , John

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Business Process Management (BPM) has gained tremendous importance in recent years and BPM technologies and techniques are widely applied in practice. Furthermore there is a growing and very active research community looking at process modeling and analysis, reference models, workflow flexibility, process mining and process-centric Service-Oriented Architectures (SOA). However, it is clear that existing approaches have problems dealing with the enormous challenges real...

  10. Separating the effect of respiration from the heart rate variability for cases of constant harmonic breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kircher Michael

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart Rate Variability studies are a known measure for the autonomous control of the heart rate. In special situations, its interpretation can be ambiguous, since the respiration has a major influence on the heart rate variability. For this reason it has often been proposed to measure Heart Rate Variability, while the subjects are breathing at a constant respiration rate. That way the spectral influence of the respiration is known. In this work we propose to remove this constant respiratory influence from the heart rate and the Heart Rate Variability parameters to gain respiration free autonomous controlled heart rate signal. The spectral respiratory component in the heart rate signal is detected and characterized. Subsequently the respiratory effect on Heart Rate Variability is removed using spectral filtering approaches, such as the Notch filter or the Raised Cosine filter. As a result new decoupled Heart Variability parameters are gained, which could lead to new additional interpretations of the autonomous control of the heart rate.

  11. A prospective population study of resting heart rate and peak oxygen uptake (the HUNT Study, Norway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Nauman

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We assessed the prospective association of resting heart rate (RHR at baseline with peak oxygen uptake (VO(2peak 23 years later, and evaluated whether physical activity (PA could modify this association. BACKGROUND: Both RHR and VO(2peak are strong and independent predictors of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the association of RHR with VO(2peak and modifying effect of PA have not been prospectively assessed in population studies. METHODS: In 807 men and 810 women free from cardiovascular disease both at baseline (1984-86 and follow-up 23 years later, RHR was recorded at both occasions, and VO(2peak was measured by ergospirometry at follow-up. We used Generalized Linear Models to assess the association of baseline RHR with VO(2peak, and to study combined effects of RHR and self-reported PA on later VO(2peak. RESULTS: There was an inverse association of RHR at baseline with VO(2peak (p<0.01. Men and women with baseline RHR greater than 80 bpm had 4.6 mL.kg(-1.min(-1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8 to 6.3 and 1.4 mL.kg(-1.min(-1 (95% CI, -0.4 to 3.1 lower VO(2peak at follow-up compared with men and women with RHR below 60 bpm at baseline. We found a linear association of change in RHR with VO(2peak (p=0.03, suggesting that a decrease in RHR over time is likely to be beneficial for cardiovascular fitness. Participants with low RHR and high PA at baseline had higher VO(2peak than inactive people with relatively high RHR. However, among participants with relatively high RHR and high PA at baseline, VO(2peak was similar to inactive people with relatively low RHR. CONCLUSION: RHR is an important predictor of VO(2peak, and serial assessments of RHR may provide useful and inexpensive information on cardiovascular fitness. The results suggest that high levels of PA may compensate for the lower VO(2peak associated with a high RHR.

  12. Functionality of the baroreceptor nerves in heart rate regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.; Olufsen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    are a consequence of the memory encapsulated by the models, and the nonlinearity gives rise to sigmoidal response curves. The nonlinear afferent baroreceptor models are coupled with an effector model, and the coupled model has been used to predict baroreceptor feedback regulation of heart rate during postural...... change from sitting to standing and during head-up tilt. The efferent model couples the afferent nerve paths to the sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow, and subsequently predicts the build up of an action potential at the sinus knot of the heart. In this paper, we analyze the nonlinear afferent model...... and show that the coupled model is able to predict heart rate regulation using blood pressure data as an input...

  13. New descriptors of T-wave morphology are independent of heart rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter; Xue, Joel Q; Graff, Claus

    2008-01-01

    from daytime Holter recordings. Duration parameters (QT, ToTe, TpTe, and others), a number of basic T-wave morphology parameters (amplitude, area, and others) as well as advanced morphology descriptors (asymmetry, flatness, and others) were measured automatically. Heart rate dependence was examined...... by means of analysis of covariance. The results showed clear heart rate dependence for the QT interval (R(2) = 0.53-0.57) and a moderate degree of heart rate dependence for the basic morphology parameters (amplitude, area, and others) (R(2) = 0.17-0.42). Both the advanced T-wave descriptors (asymmetry......T-wave morphology descriptors are sensitive to drug-induced changes and may be a useful addition to the QT interval in cardiac safety trials. Intrasubject heart rate dependence of T-wave morphology was investigated in a sample of 39 healthy individuals. Ten-second electrocardiograms were obtained...

  14. Unconstrained monitoring of long-term heart and breath rates during sleep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wenxi; Zhu, Xin; Wei, Daming; Nemoto, Tetsu; Sugitani, Kayo; Kitamura, Kei-ichiro

    2008-01-01

    An unconstrained method for the long-term monitoring of heart and breath rates during sleep is proposed. The system includes a sensor unit and a web-based network module. The sensor unit is set beneath a pillow to pick up the pressure variations from the head induced by inhalation/exhalation movements and heart pulsation during sleep. The measured pressure signal was digitized and transferred to a remote database server via the network module. A wavelet-based algorithm was employed to detect the heart and breath rates, as well as body movement, during sleep. The overall system was utilized for a total six-month trial operation delivered to a female subject. The profiles of the heart and breath rates on a beat-by-beat and daily basis were obtained. Movements during sleep were also estimated. The results show that the daily average percentage of undetectable periods (UPs) during 881.6 sleep hours over a 180 day period was 17.2%. A total of 89.2% of sleep hours had a UP of not more than 25%. The profile of the heart rate revealed a periodic property that corresponded to the female monthly menstrual cycle. Our system shows promise as a long-term unconstrained monitor for heart and breath rates, and for other physiological parameters related to the quality of sleep and the regularity of the menstrual cycle. (note)

  15. Identifying Lattice, Orbit, And BPM Errors in PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, F.-J.; SLAC

    2005-01-01

    The PEP-II B-Factory is delivering peak luminosities of up to 9.2 · 10 33 1/cm 2 · l/s. This is very impressive especially considering our poor understanding of the lattice, absolute orbit and beam position monitor system (BPM). A few simple MATLAB programs were written to get lattice information, like betatron functions in a coupled machine (four all together) and the two dispersions, from the current machine and compare it the design. Big orbit deviations in the Low Energy Ring (LER) could be explained not by bad BPMs (only 3), but by many strong correctors (one corrector to fix four BPMs on average). Additionally these programs helped to uncover a sign error in the third order correction of the BPM system. Further analysis of the current information of the BPMs (sum of all buttons) indicates that there might be still more problematic BPMs

  16. Characterization of BPM pickup designs for the HESR rate at FAIR using simulations and numerical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halama, Arthur; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Boehme, Christian; Srinivasan, Sudharsan [Forschungszentrum Juelich, IKP-4 (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The institute of Nuclear Physics 4(IKP-4) of the Research Center Juelich (FZJ) is in charge of building and commissioning the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) within the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. Simulations and numerical calculations were performed to characterize the initial beam position pickup design. Capacitive couplings of the electrodes and the behavior of the electrical equivalent circuit were investigated. This made room for changes to the design and performance increase. A prototype of the BPM pickup was constructed and tested on a dedicated test bench. Preliminary results will be presented. In order to gain higher signal levels and higher sensitivity, another suggested design was characterized as well and put into comparison.

  17. BPM STABILTIY STUDIES FOR THE APS MBA UPGRADE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lill, R.; Sereno, N.; Yang, B.

    2017-03-25

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is currently in the preliminary design phase for the multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice upgrade. Beam stability is critical for the MBA and will require long term drift defined as beam mo-tion over a seven-day timescale to be no more than 1 mi-cron at the insertion device locations and beam angle change no more than 0.25 micro-radian. Mechanical stabil-ity of beam position monitor (BPM) pickup electrodes mounted on insertion device vacuum chambers place a fun-damental limitation on long-term beam stability for inser-tion device beamlines. We present the design and imple-mentation of prototype mechanical motion system (MMS) instrumentation for quantifying this type of motion specif-ically in the APS accelerator tunnel and experiment hall floor under normal operating conditions. The MMS pres-ently provides critical position information on the vacuum chamber and BPM support systems. Initial results of the R&D prototype systems have demonstrated that the cham-ber movements far exceed the long-term drift tolerance specified for the APS Upgrade MBA storage ring.

  18. Aggressive behavior: an alternative model of resting heart rate and sensation seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laura C; Scarpa, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Low resting heart rate is a well-replicated biological correlate of aggression, and sensation seeking is frequently cited as the underlying causal explanation. However, little empirical evidence supports this mediating relationship. Furthermore, the biosocial model of violence and social push theory suggest sensation seeking may moderate the relationship between heart rate and aggression. In a sample of 128 college students (82.0% White; 73.4% female), the current study tested a moderation model as an alternative relationship between resting heart rate and sensation seeking in regard to aggression. Overall, the findings partially supported an interaction effect, whereby the relationship between heart rate and aggression was moderated by sensation seeking. Specifically, the oft-noted relationship between low resting heart rate and increased aggression was found, but only for individuals with low levels of sensation seeking. If replication supports this finding, the results may better inform prevention and intervention work. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Advances in the management of heart failure: the role of ivabradine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller-Werdan U

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ursula Müller-Werdan,1,2 Georg Stöckl,3 Karl Werdan4 1Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 2Protestant Geriatric Centre, Berlin, 3Department of Medical Affairs, Servier Deutschland GmbH, Munich, 4Department of Medicine III, University Hospital Halle (Saale, Martin-Luther-University Halle‑Wittenberg, Halle (Saale, Germany Abstract: A high resting heart rate (≥70–75 b.p.m. is a risk factor for patients with heart failure (HF with reduced ejection fraction (EF, probably in the sense of accelerated atherosclerosis, with an increased morbidity and mortality. Beta-blockers not only reduce heart rate but also have negative inotropic and blood pressure-lowering effects, and therefore, in many patients, they cannot be given in the recommended dose. Ivabradine specifically inhibits the pacemaker current (funny current, If of the sinoatrial node cells, resulting in therapeutic heart rate lowering without any negative inotropic and blood pressure-lowering effect. According to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines, ivabradine should be considered to reduce the risk of HF hospitalization and cardiovascular death in symptomatic patients with a reduced left ventricular EF ≤35% and sinus rhythm ≥70 b.p.m. despite treatment with an evidence-based dose of beta-blocker or a dose below the recommended dose (recommendation class “IIa” = weight of evidence/opinion is in favor of usefulness/efficacy: “should be considered”; level of evidence “B” = data derived from a single randomized clinical trial or large nonrandomized studies. Using a heart rate cutoff of ≥ 75 b.p.m., as licensed by the European Medicines Agency, treatment with ivabradine 5–7.5 mg b.i.d. reduces cardiovascular mortality by 17%, HF mortality by 39% and HF hospitalization rate by 30%. A high resting heart rate is not only a risk factor in HF with reduced EF but also at least a risk marker in HF with preserved EF, in acute HF and also in special forms of HF

  20. End-tidal CO₂ detection of an audible heart rate during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation after asystole in asphyxiated piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalak, Lina F; Barber, Chad A; Hynan, Linda; Garcia, Damian; Christie, Lucy; Wyckoff, Myra H

    2011-05-01

    Even brief interruption of cardiac compressions significantly reduces critical coronary perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). End-tidal CO₂ (ETCO₂) monitoring may provide a continuous noninvasive method of assessing return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) without stopping to auscultate for heart rate (HR). However, the ETCO₂ value that correlates with an audible HR is unknown. Our objective was to determine the threshold ETCO₂ that is associated with ROSC after asphyxia-induced asystole. Neonatal swine (n = 46) were progressively asphyxiated until asystole occurred. Resuscitation followed current neonatal guidelines with initial ventilation with 100% O₂ followed by cardiac compressions followed by epinephrine for continued asystole. HR was auscultated every 30 s, and ETCO₂ was continuously recorded. A receiver operator curve was generated using the calculated sensitivity and specificity for various ETCO₂ values, where a positive test was defined as the presence of HR >60 bpm by auscultation. An ETCO₂ cut-off value of 14 mm Hg is the most sensitive ETCO₂ value with the least false positives. When using ETCO₂ to guide uninterrupted CPR in this model of asphyxia-induced asystole, auscultative confirmation of return of an adequate HR should be performed when ETCO₂ ≥ 14 mm Hg is achieved. Correlation during human neonatal CPR needs further investigation.

  1. Heart Rate and Increased Intravascular Volume

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, M.; Kára, T.; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Špinarová, L.; Meluzín, J.; Toman, J.; Řiháček, I.; Šumbera, J.; Fráňa, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, - (2003), s. 137 - 140 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/02/1339 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : kidneys * heart rate * atrial mechanisms Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2003

  2. Business process management : 3rd international conference, BPM 2005, Nancy, France, September 5-8, 2005 : proceedings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Benatallah, B.; Casati, F.; Curbera, F.

    2005-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Business Process Management (BPM 2005), organized by LORIA in Nancy, France, September 5–8, 2005. This year, BPM included several innovations with respect to previous editions, most notably the addition of an industrial

  3. Measurements of $C\\!P$ violation in the three-body phase space of charmless $B^{\\pm}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The charmless three-body decay modes $B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow K^{\\pm} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$, $B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow K^{\\pm} K^{+} K^{-}$, $B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow \\pi^{\\pm} K^{+} K^{-}$ and $B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow \\pi^{\\pm} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ are reconstructed using data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb detector. The inclusive $C\\!P$ asymmetries of these modes are measured to be \\begin{eqnarray} A_{C\\!P}(B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow K^{\\pm} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-})= +0.025 \\pm 0.004 \\pm 0.004 \\pm 0.007, \\end{eqnarray} \\begin{eqnarray} A_{C\\!P}(B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow K^{\\pm} K^{+} K^{-}) = -0.036 \\pm 0.004 \\pm 0.002 \\pm 0.007, \\end{eqnarray} \\begin{eqnarray} A_{C\\!P}(B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow \\pi^{\\pm} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-})= +0.058 \\pm 0.008 \\pm 0.009 \\pm 0.007, \\end{eqnarray} \\begin{eqnarray} A_{C\\!P}(B^{\\pm} \\rightarrow \\pi^{\\pm} K^{+} K^{-})= -0.123 \\pm 0.017 \\pm 0.012 \\pm 0.007, \

  4. BPM Offset Determination by Sinusoidal Quadrupole K-modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, T; Wenninger, J

    2011-01-01

    To ensure an adequate orbit steering that maximizes the machine aperture, a good knowledge of the BPM measurement offsets is crucial. During this MD, a sinusoidal k-modulation of individually powered quadrupoles was performed to determine the offsets of the nearby BPMs. An accuracy of 10µm for the determination of the absolute beam position is reached.

  5. Triboelectric Nanogenerator Enabled Body Sensor Network for Self-Powered Human Heart-Rate Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiming; Chen, Jun; Li, Xiaoshi; Zhou, Zhihao; Meng, Keyu; Wei, Wei; Yang, Jin; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-09-26

    Heart-rate monitoring plays a critical role in personal healthcare management. A low-cost, noninvasive, and user-friendly heart-rate monitoring system is highly desirable. Here, a self-powered wireless body sensor network (BSN) system is developed for heart-rate monitoring via integration of a downy-structure-based triboelectric nanogenerator (D-TENG), a power management circuit, a heart-rate sensor, a signal processing unit, and Bluetooth module for wireless data transmission. By converting the inertia energy of human walking into electric power, a maximum power of 2.28 mW with total conversion efficiency of 57.9% was delivered at low operation frequency, which is capable of immediately and sustainably driving the highly integrated BSN system. The acquired heart-rate signal by the sensor would be processed in the signal process circuit, sent to an external device via the Bluetooth module, and displayed on a personal cell phone in a real-time manner. Moreover, by combining a TENG-based generator and a TENG-based sensor, an all-TENG-based wireless BSN system was developed, realizing continuous and self-powered heart-rate monitoring. This work presents a potential method for personal heart-rate monitoring, featured as being self-powered, cost-effective, noninvasive, and user-friendly.

  6. Relationships between heart rate and age, bodyweight and breed in 10,849 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezzell, M J; Dennis, S G; Humm, K; Agee, L; Boswood, A

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate relationships between heart rate and clinical variables in healthy dogs and dogs examined at a referral hospital. Clinical data were extracted from the electronic patient records of a first opinion group (5000 healthy dogs) and a referral hospital (5849 dogs). Univariable and multi-variable general linear models were used to assess associations between heart rate and clinical characteristics. Separate multi-variable models were constructed for first opinion and referral populations. In healthy dogs, heart rate was negatively associated with bodyweight (PChihuahuas. The mean difference in heart rate between a 5 and 55 kg dog was 10.5 beats per minute. In dogs presenting to a referral hospital, heart rate was negatively associated with bodyweight (P<0.001) and the following breeds; border collie, golden retriever, Labrador retriever, springer spaniel and West Highland white terrier and positively associated with age, admitting service (emergency and critical care, emergency first opinion and cardiology) and the following breeds; Cavalier King Charles spaniel, Staffordshire bull terrier and Yorkshire terrier. Bodyweight, age, breed and disease status all influence heart rate in dogs, although these factors account for a relatively small proportion of the overall variability in heart rate. © 2013 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  7. Influence of different characteristics of sport on heart rate recovery in elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđić Radovan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the benefits of regular physical activity is lower resting heart rate and its faster recovery after maximal exercise test, as a result of a stronger parasympatic (vagal tone. Heart rate recovery is used as reliable parameter for prescription of the training program and also in prognostic purposes as a parameter of risk for developing cardiovascular diseases. Aim: The purpose of this study is to show significant differences in heart rate recovery after maximal exercise test and resting heart rate among different groups of elite athletes. Material and Methods: This study subjected 575 adult (23.1 ± 4.3 years, male athletes divided into four sport groups: skill, power, mixed and endurance. Every subject performed progressive, maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a treadmill. Heart rate recovery in first (ΔHRR1 and third (ΔHRR3 minute was calculated as a difference of maximal heart rate and heart rate in the first and the third minute after cessation of exercise, respectively. Results: Compared to skill, power and mixed group (62.9 ± 11.4; 61.5 ± 10.0; 59.9 ± 10.4 min-1 respectively, significantly lower values od resting heart rate are recorded in the endurance group (56.2 ± 10.6 min-1 (p = 0,05. Also, ΔHRR1 was significantly higher in the endurance group (33.5 ±14.3 min-1 compared to skill, power and mixed group (24.3 ± 10.9; 25.5 ± 11.2; 27.8 ± 15.6 min-1 respectively (p = 0,05. Values od ΔHRR3 were significantly higher in power, mixed and endurance groups (74.8 ± 14.3; 79.5 ± 12.7; 79.4 ± 12.6 min-1 respectively compared to skill group (67.3±16.1 min-1 (p = 0,05. Conclusion: Training endurance group of sports has the most contribution to lower resting heart rate and faster recovery of heart rate in the first minute after exercising, due to dominant parasympatic tone.

  8. Measurement of the $B^\\pm$ production cross-section in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves Jr, A.A.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R.B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J.J.; Bailey, D.S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P.M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N.H.; Brown, H.; de Bruyn, K.; Buchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H.V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Constantin, F.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G.A.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P.N.Y.; De Bonis, I.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Lorenzi, F.; de Miranda, J.M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Bonal, F.Domingo; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Farber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V.V.; Gobel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gandara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L.A.; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S.C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P.F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J.A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R.S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C.R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T.M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y.M.; Knecht, M.; Koopman, R.F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V.N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R.W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Raighne, A.Mac; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I.V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R.M.D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Marki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martin Sanchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D.A.; Minard, M.N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Muller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Musy, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nedos, M.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A.D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J.M.; Owen, P.; Pal, K.; Palacios, J.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C.J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G.D.; Patel, M.; Paterson, S.K.; Patrick, G.N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D.L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petrella, A.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Plackett, R.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J.H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M.S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M.M.; dos Reis, A.C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G.J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Rosello, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J.J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R.Silva; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N.A.; Smith, E.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F.J.P.; Solomin, A.; Soomro, F.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V.K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M.T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M.Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Urquijo, P.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J.J.; Veltri, M.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Voss, H.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D.R.; Watson, N.K.; Webber, A.D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F.F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S.A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-01-01

    The production of $B^{\\pm}$ mesons in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV is studied using 35 pb$^{-1}$ of data collected by the LHCb detector. The $B^{\\pm}$ mesons are reconstructed exclusively in the $B^{\\pm}\\rightarrow J/\\psi K^{\\pm}$ mode, with $J/\\psi \\rightarrow \\mu^+ \\mu^-$. The differential production cross-section is measured as a function of the $B^{\\pm}$ transverse momentum in the fiducial region \\mbox{$0B^{\\pm} X,\\; 0

  9. QRS peak detection for heart rate monitoring on Android smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pambudi Utomo, Trio; Nuryani, Nuryani; Darmanto

    2017-11-01

    In this study, Android smartphone is used for heart rate monitoring and displaying electrocardiogram (ECG) graph. Heart rate determination is based on QRS peak detection. Two methods are studied to detect the QRS complex peak; they are Peak Threshold and Peak Filter. The acquisition of ECG data is utilized by AD8232 module from Analog Devices, three electrodes, and Microcontroller Arduino UNO R3. To record the ECG data from a patient, three electrodes are attached to particular body’s surface of a patient. Patient’s heart activity which is recorded by AD8232 module is decoded by Arduino UNO R3 into analog data. Then, the analog data is converted into a voltage value (mV) and is processed to get the QRS complex peak. Heart rate value is calculated by Microcontroller Arduino UNO R3 uses the QRS complex peak. Voltage, heart rate, and the QRS complex peak are sent to Android smartphone by Bluetooth HC-05. ECG data is displayed as the graph by Android smartphone. To evaluate the performance of QRS complex peak detection method, three parameters are used; they are positive predictive, accuracy and sensitivity. Positive predictive, accuracy, and sensitivity of Peak Threshold method is 92.39%, 70.30%, 74.62% and for Peak Filter method are 98.38%, 82.47%, 83.61%, respectively.

  10. Heart rate effects of intraosseous injections using slow and fast rates of anesthetic solution deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Louis; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel; Drum, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a single-blind manner, 3 primary intraosseous injections to 61 subjects using: the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 45 seconds (fast injection); the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection); a conventional syringe injection at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection), in 3 separate appointments spaced at least 3 weeks apart. A pulse oximeter measured heart rate (pulse). The results demonstrated the mean maximum heart rate was statistically higher with the fast intraosseous injection (average 21 to 28 beats/min increase) than either of the 2 slow intraosseous injections (average 10 to 12 beats/min increase). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 slow injections. We concluded that an intraosseous injection of 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine with the Wand at a 45-second rate of anesthetic deposition resulted in a significantly higher heart rate when compared with a 4-minute and 45-second anesthetic solution deposition using either the Wand or traditional syringe.

  11. Prospectively Electrocardiogram-Gated High-Pitch Spiral Acquisition Mode Dual-Source CT Coronary Angiography in Patients with High Heart Rates: Comparison with Retrospective Electrocardiogram-Gated Spiral Acquisition Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Kai; Ma, Rui; Wang, Li Jun [Dept. of Radiology, Baotou Central Hospital, Baotou (China); Li, Li Gang; Chen, Jiu Hong [CT BM Clinic Marketing, Siemens Healthcare, Beijing (China)

    2012-11-15

    To assess the image quality and effective radiation dose of prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated high-pitch spiral acquisition mode (flash mode) of dual-source CT (DSCT) coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with high heart rates (HRs) as compared with retrospectively ECG-gated spiral acquisition mode. Two hundred and sixty-eight consecutive patients (132 female, mean age: 55 {+-} 11 years) with mean HR > 65 beats per minute (bpm) were prospectively included in this study. The patients were divided into two groups. Collection was performed in group A CTCA using flash mode setting at 20-30% of the R-R interval, and retrospectively ECG-gated spiral acquisition mode in group B. The image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), image quality scores, effective radiation dose and influencing factors on image quality between the two groups were assessed. There were no significant differences in image quality scores and proportions of non-diagnostic coronary artery segments between two groups (image quality scores: 1.064 {+-} 0.306 [group A] vs. 1.084 {+-} 0.327 [group B], p = 0.063; proportion of non-diagnostic coronary artery segments: segment-based analysis 1.52% (group A) vs. 1.74% (group B), p = 0.345; patient-based analysis 7.5% (group A) vs. 6.7% (group B), p = 0.812). The estimated radiation dose was 1.0 {+-} 0.16 mSv in group A and 7.1 {+-} 1.05 mSv in group B (p = 0.001). In conclusion, in patients with HRs > 65 bpm without cardiac arrhythmia, the prospectively high-pitch spiral-acquisition mode with image-acquired timing set at 20-30% of the R-R interval provides a similar image quality and low rate of non-diagnostic coronary segments to the retrospectively ECG-gated low-pitch spiral acquisition mode, with significant reduction of radiation exposure.

  12. Prospectively Electrocardiogram-Gated High-Pitch Spiral Acquisition Mode Dual-Source CT Coronary Angiography in Patients with High Heart Rates: Comparison with Retrospective Electrocardiogram-Gated Spiral Acquisition Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Kai; Ma, Rui; Wang, Li Jun; Li, Li Gang; Chen, Jiu Hong

    2012-01-01

    To assess the image quality and effective radiation dose of prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated high-pitch spiral acquisition mode (flash mode) of dual-source CT (DSCT) coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with high heart rates (HRs) as compared with retrospectively ECG-gated spiral acquisition mode. Two hundred and sixty-eight consecutive patients (132 female, mean age: 55 ± 11 years) with mean HR > 65 beats per minute (bpm) were prospectively included in this study. The patients were divided into two groups. Collection was performed in group A CTCA using flash mode setting at 20-30% of the R-R interval, and retrospectively ECG-gated spiral acquisition mode in group B. The image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), image quality scores, effective radiation dose and influencing factors on image quality between the two groups were assessed. There were no significant differences in image quality scores and proportions of non-diagnostic coronary artery segments between two groups (image quality scores: 1.064 ± 0.306 [group A] vs. 1.084 ± 0.327 [group B], p = 0.063; proportion of non-diagnostic coronary artery segments: segment-based analysis 1.52% (group A) vs. 1.74% (group B), p = 0.345; patient-based analysis 7.5% (group A) vs. 6.7% (group B), p = 0.812). The estimated radiation dose was 1.0 ± 0.16 mSv in group A and 7.1 ± 1.05 mSv in group B (p = 0.001). In conclusion, in patients with HRs > 65 bpm without cardiac arrhythmia, the prospectively high-pitch spiral-acquisition mode with image-acquired timing set at 20-30% of the R-R interval provides a similar image quality and low rate of non-diagnostic coronary segments to the retrospectively ECG-gated low-pitch spiral acquisition mode, with significant reduction of radiation exposure.

  13. Value of Serial Heart Rate Variability Measurement for Prediction of Appropriate ICD Discharge in Patients with Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Sande, Judith N.; Damman, Peter; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; de Groot, Joris R.; Knops, Reinoud E.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; van Dessel, Pascal F. H. M.

    2014-01-01

    HRV and Appropriate ICD Shock in Heart Failure Introduction Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with adverse outcomes in patients with heart failure. Our objective was to examine whether decreased HRV predicts appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. Methods

  14. Smart pillow for heart-rate monitoring using a fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihao; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yim, Huiqing

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a new method to monitor heart rate using fiber optic microbending based sensor for in-bed non-intrusive monitoring. The sensing system consists of transmitter, receiver, sensor mat, National Instrument (NI) data acquisition (DAQ) card and a computer for signal processing. The sensor mat is embedded inside a commercial pillow. The heart rate measurement system shows an accuracy of +/-2 beats, which has been successfully demonstrated in a field trial. The key technological advantage of our system is its ability to measure heart rate with no preparation and minimal compliance by the patient.

  15. A collaboration and productiveness analysis of the BPM community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijers, H.A.; Song, M.S.; Romero, H.L.; Dayal, U.; Eder, J.; Koehler, J.; Dayal, U.; Eder, J.; Koehler, J.; Reijers, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    The main scientific event for academics working in the field of Business Process Management is the International BPM Conference. In this paper, social network analysis techniques are used to unveil the co-authorship networks that can be derived from the papers presented at this conference. Links

  16. APS Storage Ring Monopulse RF BPM Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, R.; Pietryla, A.; Norum, E.; Lenkszus, F.

    2004-11-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a third-generation synchrotron light source in its ninth year of operation. The storage ring monopulse radio frequency (rf) beam position monitor (BPM) was designed to measure single-turn and multi-turn beam positions for operations and machine physics studies. Many of the components used in the original design are obsolete and costly to replace. In this paper we present a proposal to upgrade the monopulse rf BPMs in which the existing system hardware is repartitioned and the aging data acquisition system is replaced. By replacing only the data acquisition system, we will demonstrate a cost-effective approach to improved beam stability, reliability, and enhanced postmortem capabilities. An eight-channel ADC/digitizer VXI board with sampling rate of up to 105 MHz (per channel) and 14-bit resolution coupled with a field-programmable gate array and embedded central processing will provide the flexibility to revitalize this system for another decade of operation. We will discuss the upgrade system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  17. QT measurement and heart rate correction during hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Folke; Randløv, Jette; Christensen, Leif Engmann

    2010-01-01

    induced by intravenous injection of two insulin types in a cross-over design. QT measurements were done using the slope-intersect (SI) and manual annotation (MA) methods. Heart rate correction was done using Bazett's (QTcB) and Fridericia's (QTcF) formulas. Results. The SI method showed significant......Introduction. Several studies show that hypoglycemia causes QT interval prolongation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of QT measurement methodology, heart rate correction, and insulin types during hypoglycemia. Methods. Ten adult subjects with type 1 diabetes had hypoglycemia...... prolongation at hypoglycemia for QTcB (42(6) ms; P measuring the QT interval has...

  18. Age-related disappearance of Mayer-like heart rate waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarisch, W. R.; Ferguson, J. J.; Shannon, R. P.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of age on the principal spectral components of heart rate obtained immediately after passive upright tilt was investigated in human subjects who underwent a 60-deg tilt over 9 sec. Two groups were examined, the first of which consisting of healthy male subjects aged 22-26 years, while the second was comprised of subjects aged 65-84 years on no medication; radiograms were recorded continuously beginning just prior to tilt until 3 min posttilt. The results of spectral analysis showed that elderly subjects did not exhibit the Mayer-like heart rate waves (the 0.07-0.09 Hz oscillations) that were present in the spectra of young subjects immediately after passive upright tilt. The findings are consistent with the concept of a 'dysautonomia of aging'. It is suggested that postural stress testing with spectral analysis of heart rate fluctuations may provide a useful way of assessing physiologic vs chronologic age.

  19. Heart rate and energy expenditure during garbage collection in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Freqüência cardíaca e gasto energético durante a coleta de lixo domiciliar no Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz A. Anjos

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Physiological workload is used to estimate the physical demand of tasks in the workforce, but limited information is available for the various work activities in developing countries. Eighty-three randomly selected male workers participated in the present study, aimed at assessing the physiological workload of garbage collection (GC in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Heart rate (HR was obtained on four consecutive workdays. Energy expenditure (EE was extrapolated from heart rate data based on individual laboratory-established heart rate/oxygen consumption curve in 70 workers. Mean HR during GC was 104.0 ± 11.7bpm (± SD, representing 56.9 ± 7.5% of maximum heart rate. EE was 1608.3 ± 738.5kcal for an average of 293.1 ± 103.9 minutes of work per day. Based on all measurements, work in garbage collection in Rio de Janeiro can be considered excessively heavy. These data emphasize the need to develop appropriate classification of workload to be used in health-related research and in the development of maximum acceptable work time in association with the physiological workload, particularly in developing countries.A carga de trabalho fisiológica é utilizada para estimar a demanda física de uma tarefa na população de trabalhadores adultos; no entanto, nos países em desenvolvimento há poucos dados disponíveis sobre as diversas atividades ocupacionais. Oitenta e três trabalhadores masculinos participaram neste estudo, com o objetivo de avaliar a carga fisiológica do trabalho de coleta de lixo domiciliar no Município do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. A freqüência cardíaca foi medida em quatro dias de trabalho consecutivos. O gasto energético foi extrapolado a partir da freqüência cardíaca, com base em dados individuais obtidos em laboratório para a curva de freqüência cardíaca/consumo de oxigênio em 70 trabalhadores. A freqüência cardíaca média durante a coleta de lixo era 104,0 ± 11,7bpm, o que representa 56,9 ± 7,5% da freq

  20. Estimating energy expenditure from heart rate in older adults: a case for calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrack, Jennifer A; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Goldsmith, Jeff; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Accurate measurement of free-living energy expenditure is vital to understanding changes in energy metabolism with aging. The efficacy of heart rate as a surrogate for energy expenditure is rooted in the assumption of a linear function between heart rate and energy expenditure, but its validity and reliability in older adults remains unclear. To assess the validity and reliability of the linear function between heart rate and energy expenditure in older adults using different levels of calibration. Heart rate and energy expenditure were assessed across five levels of exertion in 290 adults participating in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Correlation and random effects regression analyses assessed the linearity of the relationship between heart rate and energy expenditure and cross-validation models assessed predictive performance. Heart rate and energy expenditure were highly correlated (r=0.98) and linear regardless of age or sex. Intra-person variability was low but inter-person variability was high, with substantial heterogeneity of the random intercept (s.d. =0.372) despite similar slopes. Cross-validation models indicated individual calibration data substantially improves accuracy predictions of energy expenditure from heart rate, reducing the potential for considerable measurement bias. Although using five calibration measures provided the greatest reduction in the standard deviation of prediction errors (1.08 kcals/min), substantial improvement was also noted with two (0.75 kcals/min). These findings indicate standard regression equations may be used to make population-level inferences when estimating energy expenditure from heart rate in older adults but caution should be exercised when making inferences at the individual level without proper calibration.

  1. Resemblances of Parents and Twins in Sport Participation and Heart Rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, D.I.; van den Bree, M.B.; Orlebeke, J.F.; Molenaar, P.C.M.

    1989-01-01

    A model to analyze resemblances of twins and parents using LISREL is outlined and applied to sports participation and heart-rate data. Sports participation and heart rate were measured in 44 monozygotic and 46 dizygotic adolescent twin pairs and in their parents. Genetic factors influence variation

  2. Gaussian Mixture Model of Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Tommaso; Boccignone, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is an important measure of sympathetic and parasympathetic functions of the autonomic nervous system and a key indicator of cardiovascular condition. This paper proposes a novel method to investigate HRV, namely by modelling it as a linear combination of Gaussians. Results show that three Gaussians are enough to describe the stationary statistics of heart variability and to provide a straightforward interpretation of the HRV power spectrum. Comparisons have been made also with synthetic data generated from different physiologically based models showing the plausibility of the Gaussian mixture parameters. PMID:22666386

  3. Getting it right! Critical Success Factors of BPM in the Public Sector: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehan Syed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuously evolving and dynamic social, economic, political environments and public pressures demand governments to deliver effective and efficient public services. In the quest for meeting these demands, governments respond by designing extensive reforms and performance objectives to improve the efficiency and responsiveness of their agencies. Many governments have adopted Business Process Management (BPM as a strategy to achieve these reforms. However, the successful implementation of BPM initiatives has been a challenging task for agencies responsible for these initiatives, with many projects not reaching completion or not achieving the intended outcomes. This paper reports the results of a systematic literature review on critical success factors (CSFs related to BPM projects in the public sector. We analysed 31 papers in this review covering both the developed and developing country contexts, sourced from refereed and peer reviewed journals. A quasi-deductive approach was applied for the qualitative data analysis using NVivo 10 software. This resulted in the synthesis and identification of 14 critical success factors of BPM in the public sector, each defined and described in detail with specific attention to the sub-factors mentioned within the literature. Any differences between developed and developing country contexts were sought for, and the observations critically analysed. We propose a series of research questions, designed to support the progression of BPM in the public sector of developed as well as developing countries.

  4. Adaptive Mean and Trend Removal of Heart Rate Variability Using Kalman Filtering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schloegl, A

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of heart rate van ability requires the calculation of the mean heart rate, Adaptive methods are important for online and real-time parameter estimation, In this paper we demonstrate the use...

  5. Heart rate variability in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a systematic review and methodological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusik, P S; Matusik, P T; Stein, P K

    2018-07-01

    Aim The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge about the scientific findings and potential clinical utility of heart rate variability measures in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods PubMed, Embase and Scopus databases were searched for the terms associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and heart rate variability, including controlled vocabulary, when appropriate. Articles published in English and available in full text were considered. Finally, 11 publications were selected, according to the systematic review protocol and were analyzed. Results In general, heart rate variability, measured in the time and frequency domains, was reported to be decreased in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus compared with controls. In some systemic lupus erythematosus studies, heart rate variability was found to correlate with inflammatory markers and albumin levels. A novel heart rate variability measure, heart rate turbulence onset, was shown to be increased, while heart rate turbulence slope was decreased in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Reports of associations of changes in heart rate variability parameters with increasing systemic lupus erythematosus activity were inconsistent, showing decreasing heart rate variability or no relationship. However, the low/high frequency ratio was, in some studies, reported to increase with increasing disease activity or to be inversely correlated with albumin levels. Conclusions Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus have abnormal heart rate variability, which reflects cardiac autonomic dysfunction and may be related to inflammatory cytokines but not necessarily to disease activity. Thus measurement of heart rate variability could be a useful clinical tool for monitoring autonomic dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus, and may potentially provide prognostic information.

  6. BPEO/BPM in recycling of low level waste metal in the UK - 16210

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, Kevin; Robinson, Joe; Lindberg, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Best Practicable Environmental Option (BPEO) and Best Practicable Means (BPM) are concepts well established in the nuclear industry to help guide and inform waste management decision making. The recycling of contaminated metal waste in the UK is not well established, with the majority of waste disposed of at the Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) at Drigg. This paper presents an overview of the Strategic BPEO study completed by Studsvik examining the options for low level metal waste management and a subsequent BPM study completed in support of a proposed metals recycling service. The environmental benefits of recycling metals overseas is further examined through the application of life cycle analysis to the metals recycling process. The methodologies used for both studies are discussed and the findings of these studies presented. These indicate that recycling contaminated metal is the preferred option, using overseas facilities until UK facilities are available. The BPM for metals recycling is discussed in detail and indicates that a tool box for processing metal waste is required to ensure BPM is applied on a case by case basis. This is supported by effective management of waste transport and waste acceptance criteria. Whilst the transport of contaminated metal overseas for treatment adds to the environmental burden of metals recycling, this when compared with the production of virgin metal, is shown to remain beneficial. The results of the Studsvik studies demonstrate the benefits of recycling metals, the options available for such a service and challenges that remain. (authors)

  7. iHeartrate: a heart rate controlled in-flight music recommendation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, H.; Hu, J.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.; Spink, A.J.; Grieco, O.E.; Krips, L.W.S.; Loijens, L.P.J.J.; Noldus, xx; Zimmerman, P.H.

    2010-01-01

    Travel by air, especially long distance, the enclosed environment of the aircraft cabin causes discomfort and even stress to flight passengers. In this paper, we present a new heart rate controlled music recommendation system. Heart rate is used as a stress indicator. If the user is stressed and

  8. 24-HOUR ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHY IN CLINICAL HEALTHY CAVALIER KING CHARLES SPANIELS, WIRE-HAIRED DACHSHUNDS AND CAIRN TERRIERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Vesterholm, Stina; Ludvigsen, Trine Pagh

    2010-01-01

    analysis were analyzed for influence by breed, age, gender, relevant heart rate (HR) parameters and bodyweight. CKCS had a significantly higher HRex (mean 121 ± SD 12 bpm) compared to wD (94±18 bpm) (P>0.0001) and CT (102±16bpm) (P=0.0009). The minimum HR (HRmin) measured during Holter recording...... was significantly higher in CKCS (51±10 bpm) compared to wD (42±7 bpm) (P=0.001) and CT (45±7 bpm) (P=0.05). In addition, CKCS had a higher mean HR (HRmean) during Holter recording (83±13 bpm) compared to wD (68±8 bpm) (P>0.0001) and CT (75±10 bpm) (P=0.04). Both HRmean (P>0.0001) and HRmin (P=0.001) were...

  9. Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu

    2013-01-01

    of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate-increasing and heart rate-decreasing variants associate...

  10. Gender differences of heart rate variability in healthy volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, S.; Majeed, S.M.I.; Khan, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the basic values of heart rate variability in Pakistani population and to verify our hypothesis that there are gender differences in cardiovascular autonomic modulation. Methods: The descriptive cross sectional study based on convenience probability sampling was conducted at Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology/National Institute of Heart Diseases (AFIC/NIHD) Pakistan. The duration of the study was from December 2009 to July 2010. It involved 24-hour holter monitoring of 45 healthy individuals using holter electrocardiography (ECG) recorder. Heart rate variability was analysed in time (SDNN, SDANN, SDNNi, rMSSD, pNN50) and frequency domains (power, VLF, LF, and HF). Results: The time domain indices; SDNN (male=140 +- 36 ms vs. females=122 +- 33 ms; p =0.09), SDANN (male=123 +- 34 ms vs. females=111+- 34 ms; P= 0.23), SDNNi (male=64 +-19 ms vs. females=52 +- 14 ms; P= 0.03), and pNN50 (male=14 +- 10 ms vs. females=12 +- 7 ms; P= 0.43) were decreased in female volunteers when compared with males. Comparison of frequency domain indices; Total power (male=4041 +- 3150 ms/sup 2/ vs. females=2750 +- 1439 ms/sup 2/; P= 0.07), VLF (male=291 2675 ms/sup 2/ vs. females=1843 +- 928 ms/sup 2/; P= 0.06), LF (male=788 +- 397 ms/sup 2/ vs. females=556 +- 346 ms/sup 2/; P= 0.04) and HF (male=318 +- 251 ms/sup 2/ vs. females=31 277 ms/sup 2/; P= 0.94) amongst males and females showed attenuated heart rate variability in females. Of all the observed values, SDNNi and LF were found significantly (p <0.05) decreased in women. Conclusion: In healthy population, heart rate variability is low in women than men. It reflects sympathetic dominance in women in our population. (author)

  11. Heart rate variability as determinism with jump stochastic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiongxuan; Skufca, Joseph D; Bollt, Erik M

    2013-08-01

    We use measured heart rate information (RR intervals) to develop a one-dimensional nonlinear map that describes short term deterministic behavior in the data. Our study suggests that there is a stochastic parameter with persistence which causes the heart rate and rhythm system to wander about a bifurcation point. We propose a modified circle map with a jump process noise term as a model which can qualitatively capture such this behavior of low dimensional transient determinism with occasional (stochastically defined) jumps from one deterministic system to another within a one parameter family of deterministic systems.

  12. Cardiotoxicity of Senna occidentalis in sheep (Ovis aries)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tulyasys

    2016-02-09

    Feb 9, 2016 ... Alterations in the liver, central nervous system, and heart muscle have ..... mean heart rate of 119 bpm in normal sheep (Tório et al., 1997). In this ... heart samples could reveal information on remodeling of the extracellular ...

  13. Change of Diurnal Heart Rate Patterns During Pregnancy and Lactation in Dogs (Canis familiaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häggström J

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy and lactation involve great demands on the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the heart rate and diurnal heart rate pattern change when dogs become pregnant or lactate. Five clinically healthy female beagle dogs were mated, and delivered three to seven healthy puppies. The heart rate was investigated with 24-h ECG (Holter once during anoestrus, at 3, 5, 7 and 9 weeks of pregnancy, and at week 4 postpartum (lactation. However, at 9 weeks, the ECG could not be recorded for the fully 24 h in 4 of 5 dogs, because labour started and the dogs then appeared disturbed by the recordings. The results at this date are not included in the statistical comparison. The heart rate increased progressively during pregnancy and was still elevated at 4 weeks of lactation. During late pregnancy the difference in heart rates between daytime and nighttime became smaller, but the heart rate was significantly higher in daytime in all periods. In conclusion, the increased heart rates during pregnancy and lactation reflect increased demands on the cardiovascular system and may be important to consider in clinical practice.

  14. Homeostasis and biological rhythms in the rat during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on the physiological regulation of homeostatic systems is studied. The temperature and heart rate of rats exposed to seven days of microgravity and a 12:12 light/dark cycle are analyzed. A 24-hour nocturnal rhythmicity is observed in the control and in-flight heart rates and body temperatures. The preflight daytime body temperature was calculated as 37.2 + or - 0.03 C and in-flight as 37.4 + or 0.04 C; nighttime body temperature preflight daytime was determined as 38.0 + or - 0.02 C, and in-flight as 37.8 + or 0.06 C. The 24-hour mean heart rate was depressed from 412 + or - 3.3 bpm preflight to 373 + or - 2.4 bpm in-flight; this change is noted in both dark and light conditions. It is detected that microgravity alters the steady state regulation of heart rate and body temperature.

  15. Dietary sodium influences the effect of mental stress on heart rate variability: a randomized trial in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Alexander R; Gullixson, Leah R; Wolhart, Sarah C; Kost, Susan L; Schroeder, Darrell R; Eisenach, John H

    2014-02-01

    Dietary sodium influences intermediate physiological traits in healthy adults independent of changes in blood pressure. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that dietary sodium affects cardiac autonomic modulation during mental stress. In a prospective, randomized cross-over design separated by 1 month between diets, 70 normotensive healthy young adults (F/M: 44/26, aged 18-38 years) consumed a 5-day low (10 mmol/day), normal (150 mmol), and high (400 mmol) sodium diet followed by heart rate variability (HRV) recordings at rest and during 5-min computerized mental arithmetic. Women were studied in the low hormone phase of the menstrual cycle following each diet. Diet did not affect resting blood pressure, but heart rate (HR) (mean ± SE) was 66 ± 1, 64 ± 1, and 63 ± 1 bpm in low, normal, and high sodium conditions, respectively (analysis of variance P = 0.02). For HRV, there was a main effect of sodium on resting SD of normalized RR intervals (SDNN), square root of the mean squared difference of successive normalized RR intervals (RMSSD), high frequency, low-frequency normalized units (LFnu), and high-frequency normalized units (HFnu) (P sodium was most marked and consistent with sympathetic activation and reduced vagal activity, with increased LFnu and decreased SDNN, RMSSD, and HFnu compared to both normal and high sodium conditions (P ≤0.05 for all). Dietary sodium-by-mental stress interactions were significant for mean NN, RMSSD, high-frequency power, LFnu, and low frequency/high frequency ratio (P sodium restriction evoked an increase in resting sympathetic activity and reduced vagal activity to the extent that mental stress caused modest additional disruptions in autonomic balance. Conversely, normal and high sodium evoked a reduction in resting sympathetic activity and incremental increase in resting vagal activity, which were disrupted to a greater extent during mental stress compared to low sodium. We conclude that autonomic control of

  16. Conventional heart rate variability analysis of ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings fails to predict imminent ventricular fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vybiral, T.; Glaeser, D. H.; Goldberger, A. L.; Rigney, D. R.; Hess, K. R.; Mietus, J.; Skinner, J. E.; Francis, M.; Pratt, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this report was to study heart rate variability in Holter recordings of patients who experienced ventricular fibrillation during the recording. BACKGROUND. Decreased heart rate variability is recognized as a long-term predictor of overall and arrhythmic death after myocardial infarction. It was therefore postulated that heart rate variability would be lowest when measured immediately before ventricular fibrillation. METHODS. Conventional indexes of heart rate variability were calculated from Holter recordings of 24 patients with structural heart disease who had ventricular fibrillation during monitoring. The control group consisted of 19 patients with coronary artery disease, of comparable age and left ventricular ejection fraction, who had nonsustained ventricular tachycardia but no ventricular fibrillation. RESULTS. Heart rate variability did not differ between the two groups, and no consistent trends in heart rate variability were observed before ventricular fibrillation occurred. CONCLUSIONS. Although conventional heart rate variability is an independent long-term predictor of adverse outcome after myocardial infarction, its clinical utility as a short-term predictor of life-threatening arrhythmias remains to be elucidated.

  17. Behaviour, heart rate, and heart rate variability in pigs exposed to novelty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manja Zupan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present study, we investigated behavioural responses and determined parameters of heart rate variability (HRV to elucidate a relative activation of autonomic nervous system (ANS during baseline (10 min and in response to potentially stressful situations (10 min in two pig breeds and sexes. Gilts (n = 21 and barrows (n = 9 of the Landrace × Yorkshire (LY; n = 15 and Landrace/Yorkshire × Landrace/Duroc (LYLD; n = 15 breeds were subjected to a novel object test (NOT and a novel arena test (NAT. Basal ANS state differed in pigs across breeds but not sexes. Landrace × Yorkshire pigs had a significantly lower basal heart rate (HR and low-frequency band (LF with a higher root mean square of successive interbeat intervals (RMSSD and high-frequency band (HF than LYLD pigs. In the NOT, despite having similar cardiac responses, gilts had a longer duration of contact with a novel object, higher lying and standing duration, and a lower duration of walking compared with barrows. In the NAT, we found similar behaviour across sexes but a different degree of ANS state, with barrows having a significantly higher increase in LF/HF (power of the low frequency component divided by the power of the high-frequency band compared with gilts. Landrace/Yorkshire × Landrace/Duroc pigs showed longer duration of contact with a novel object in the NOT accompanied by less lying and standing than LY pigs in both tests. No difference in ANS activation between breeds was found in the NOT. In the NAT, HR increased more from baseline to testing in LY pigs than in LYLD pigs. There is a complex and often contradictory nature of relationships between behaviour and cardiac responses to novelty in pigs of different breeds and sexes.

  18. Effects of metronome breathing on the assessment of autonomic control using heart rate variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaksma, J; Brouwer, J; vandenBerg, MP; Dijk, WA; Dassen, WRM; Crijns, HJGM; Mulder, Lambertus; Mulder, Gysbertus

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of Heart Rate Variability is a non-invasive quantitative tool to study the influence of the autonomic nervous system on the heart. Rapid variations in heart rate, related to breathing are primarily mediated by the vagal limb of the autonomic nervous system. The resulting variations in heart

  19. Small-volume amnioinfusion: a potential stimulus of intrapartum fetal heart rate accelerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Joseph R; Flaherty, Nina; Pinette, Michael G; Blackstone, Jacquelyn; Cartin, Angelina

    2004-02-01

    We describe a recurrent nonreassuring fetal heart rate pattern in which small-volume amnioinfusions apparently evoked fetal heart rate accelerations suggested fetal well-being, allowing that progressive labor that culminated in the vaginal delivery of a healthy infant.

  20. Aerobic exercise during pregnancy and presence of fetal-maternal heart rate synchronization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Van Leeuwen

    Full Text Available It has been shown that short-term direct interaction between maternal and fetal heart rates may take place and that this interaction is affected by the rate of maternal respiration. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of maternal aerobic exercise during pregnancy on the occurrence of fetal-maternal heart rate synchronization.In 40 pregnant women at the 36th week of gestation, 21 of whom exercised regularly, we acquired 18 min. RR interval time series obtained simultaneously in the mothers and their fetuses from magnetocardiographic recordings. The time series of the two groups were examined with respect to their heart rate variability, the maternal respiratory rate and the presence of synchronization epochs as determined on the basis of synchrograms. Surrogate data were used to assess whether the occurrence of synchronization was due to chance.In the original data, we found synchronization occurred less often in pregnancies in which the mothers had exercised regularly. These subjects also displayed higher combined fetal-maternal heart rate variability and lower maternal respiratory rates. Analysis of the surrogate data showed shorter epochs of synchronization and a lack of the phase coordination found between maternal and fetal beat timing in the original data.The results suggest that fetal-maternal heart rate coupling is present but generally weak. Maternal exercise has a damping effect on its occurrence, most likely due to an increase in beat-to-beat differences, higher vagal tone and slower breathing rates.

  1. Aerobic exercise during pregnancy and presence of fetal-maternal heart rate synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen, Peter; Gustafson, Kathleen M; Cysarz, Dirk; Geue, Daniel; May, Linda E; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that short-term direct interaction between maternal and fetal heart rates may take place and that this interaction is affected by the rate of maternal respiration. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of maternal aerobic exercise during pregnancy on the occurrence of fetal-maternal heart rate synchronization. In 40 pregnant women at the 36th week of gestation, 21 of whom exercised regularly, we acquired 18 min. RR interval time series obtained simultaneously in the mothers and their fetuses from magnetocardiographic recordings. The time series of the two groups were examined with respect to their heart rate variability, the maternal respiratory rate and the presence of synchronization epochs as determined on the basis of synchrograms. Surrogate data were used to assess whether the occurrence of synchronization was due to chance. In the original data, we found synchronization occurred less often in pregnancies in which the mothers had exercised regularly. These subjects also displayed higher combined fetal-maternal heart rate variability and lower maternal respiratory rates. Analysis of the surrogate data showed shorter epochs of synchronization and a lack of the phase coordination found between maternal and fetal beat timing in the original data. The results suggest that fetal-maternal heart rate coupling is present but generally weak. Maternal exercise has a damping effect on its occurrence, most likely due to an increase in beat-to-beat differences, higher vagal tone and slower breathing rates.

  2. Aerobic Exercise during Pregnancy and Presence of Fetal-Maternal Heart Rate Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen, Peter; Gustafson, Kathleen M.; Cysarz, Dirk; Geue, Daniel; May, Linda E.; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that short-term direct interaction between maternal and fetal heart rates may take place and that this interaction is affected by the rate of maternal respiration. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of maternal aerobic exercise during pregnancy on the occurrence of fetal-maternal heart rate synchronization. Methods In 40 pregnant women at the 36th week of gestation, 21 of whom exercised regularly, we acquired 18 min. RR interval time series obtained simultaneously in the mothers and their fetuses from magnetocardiographic recordings. The time series of the two groups were examined with respect to their heart rate variability, the maternal respiratory rate and the presence of synchronization epochs as determined on the basis of synchrograms. Surrogate data were used to assess whether the occurrence of synchronization was due to chance. Results In the original data, we found synchronization occurred less often in pregnancies in which the mothers had exercised regularly. These subjects also displayed higher combined fetal-maternal heart rate variability and lower maternal respiratory rates. Analysis of the surrogate data showed shorter epochs of synchronization and a lack of the phase coordination found between maternal and fetal beat timing in the original data. Conclusion The results suggest that fetal-maternal heart rate coupling is present but generally weak. Maternal exercise has a damping effect on its occurrence, most likely due to an increase in beat-to-beat differences, higher vagal tone and slower breathing rates. PMID:25162592

  3. Caracterização da variabilidade de freqüência cardíaca e sensibilidade do barorreflexo em indivíduos sedentários e atletas do sexo masculino Characterization of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity in sedentary individuals and male athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Yukio A. Kawaguchi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A capacidade de variar a freqüência cardíaca representa importante papel fisiológico na vida diária. As variações dos intervalos RR estão na dependência de moduladores biológicos, como o sistema nervoso autônomo. Essas variações constituem a variabilidade da freqüência cardíaca (VFC. MÉTODOS: 10 indivíduos atletas (Atl e 10 sedentários (Sed (20-35 anos foram submetidos a eletrocardiografia digital, em repouso, antes, durante e após a manobra. Os valores de RR foram tratados (software Matlab 6.1, no domínio do tempo. RESULTADOS: Os grupos Sed e Atl apresentaram freqüência cardíaca média igual a 73,59bpm ± 2,5 e 51,01bpm ± 2,4, respectivamente. Quanto aos intervalos RR, o grupo de Sed apresentou média de 826,58ms ± 5,3 e o grupo Atl, 1.189,18 ± 6,9. O tempo de retorno simpático após a manobra 72 ± 12s (Sed 37 ± 6s (Atl. O tempo de retorno parassimpático foi de 80 ± 11s (Sed 40 ± 8s (Atl. O pNN50 foi de 10 ± 3,3 (Sed e 42,10 ± 6,9 (Atl. O valor da variação dos RR acima da média de todo o sinal foi de 343 ± 40ms (Sed e 175 ± 39ms (Atl. A variação abaixo da média de todo o sinal foi de 281 ± 27ms (Sed e 425 ± 26ms (Atl. CONCLUSÕES: A análise da VFC associada à manobra de Valsalva pode representar uma ferramenta simples, mas importante, para possíveis inferências sobre aptidão física.INTRODUCTION: The capacity to vary the heart rate represents important physiologic role in the daily life. The variations of the RR intervals is dependent of biological modulators as the autonomic nervous system. Those variations constitute the heart rate variability (HRV. METHODS: 10 athletes (Atl and 10 sedentary (Sed male individuals (20-35 age were submitted to digital electrocardiography, in rest, before, during and after the maneuver. The values of RR were analyzed (software Matlab 6.1, in the time domain. RESULTS: Both Sed and Atl presented mean heart rate of 73.5 bpm ± 2,5 and 51 bpm ± 2

  4. Heart Rate and Energy Expenditure in Division I Field Hockey Players During Competitive Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Katie M; Ledesma, Allison B

    2016-08-01

    Sell, KM and Ledesma, AB. Heart rate and energy expenditure in Division I field hockey players during competitive play. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2122-2128, 2016-The purpose of this study was to quantify energy expenditure and heart rate data for Division I female field hockey players during competitive play. Ten female Division I collegiate field hockey athletes (19.8 ± 1.6 years; 166.4 ± 6.1 cm; 58.2 ± 5.3 kg) completed the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test to determine maximal heart rate. One week later, all subjects wore a heart rate monitor during a series of 3 matches in an off-season competition. Average heart rate (AvHR), average percentage of maximal heart rate (AvHR%), peak exercise heart rate (PExHR), and percentage of maximal heart rate (PExHR%), time spent in each of the predetermined heart rate zones, and caloric expenditure per minute of exercise (kcalM) were determined for all players. Differences between positions (backs, midfielders, and forwards) were assessed. No significant differences in AvHR, AvHR%, PExHR, PExHR%, and %TM were observed between playing positions. The AvHR% and PExHR% for each position fell into zones 4 (77-93% HRmax) and 5 (>93% HRmax), respectively, and significantly more time was spent in zone 4 compared with zones 1, 2, 3, and 5 across all players (p ≤ 0.05). The kcalM reflected very heavy intensity exercise. The results of this study will contribute toward understanding the sport-specific physiological demands of women's field hockey and has specific implications for the duration and schedule of training regimens.

  5. Improved compliance by BPM-driven workflow automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmüller-Laue, Silke; Göde, Bernd; Fleischer, Heidi; Thurow, Kerstin

    2014-12-01

    Using methods and technologies of business process management (BPM) for the laboratory automation has important benefits (i.e., the agility of high-level automation processes, rapid interdisciplinary prototyping and implementation of laboratory tasks and procedures, and efficient real-time process documentation). A principal goal of the model-driven development is the improved transparency of processes and the alignment of process diagrams and technical code. First experiences of using the business process model and notation (BPMN) show that easy-to-read graphical process models can achieve and provide standardization of laboratory workflows. The model-based development allows one to change processes quickly and an easy adaption to changing requirements. The process models are able to host work procedures and their scheduling in compliance with predefined guidelines and policies. Finally, the process-controlled documentation of complex workflow results addresses modern laboratory needs of quality assurance. BPMN 2.0 as an automation language to control every kind of activity or subprocess is directed to complete workflows in end-to-end relationships. BPMN is applicable as a system-independent and cross-disciplinary graphical language to document all methods in laboratories (i.e., screening procedures or analytical processes). That means, with the BPM standard, a communication method of sharing process knowledge of laboratories is also available. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  6. Paradoxical response to an emotional task: Trait characteristics and heart-rate dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balocchia, R.; Varanini, M.; Paoletti, G.; Mecacci, G.; Santarcangelo, E.L.

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the heart-rate dynamics of subjects reporting decreased (responders) or paradoxically increased relaxation (nonresponders) at the end of a threatening movie. Heart-rate dynamics were characterized by indices extracted through recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) and

  7. Image quality and radiation dose of coronary CT angiography performed with whole-heart coverage CT scanner with intra-cycle motion correction algorithm in patients with atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreini, Daniele; Fiorentini, Cesare; Pontone, Gianluca; Mushtaq, Saima; Mancini, Maria Elisabetta; Conte, Edoardo; Guglielmo, Marco; Volpato, Valentina; Annoni, Andrea; Baggiano, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Ditali, Valentina; Pepi, Mauro; Perchinunno, Marco; Bartorelli, Antonio L.

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate image quality, coronary evaluability and radiation exposure of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) performed with whole-heart coverage cardiac-CT in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We prospectively enrolled 164 patients with AF who underwent a clinically indicated CCTA with a 16-cm z-axis coverage scanner. In all patients CCTA was performed using prospective ECG-triggering with targeted RR interval. We evaluated image quality, coronary evaluability and effective dose (ED). Patients were divided in two subgroups based on heart rate (HR) during imaging. Group 1: 64 patients with low HR (<75 bpm), group 2: 100 patients with high HR (≥75 bpm). Written informed consent was obtained from all patients and the institutional ethics committee approved the study protocol. In a segment-based analysis, coronary evaluability was 98.4 % (2,577/2,620 segments) in the whole population, without significant differences between groups (1,013/1,024 (98.9 %) and 1,565/1,596 (98.1 %), for groups 1 and 2, respectively, p=0.15). Mean ED was similar in both groups (3.8±1.9 mSv and 3.9±2.1 mSv in groups 1 and 2, respectively, p=0.75) The whole-heart-coverage scanner could evaluate coronary arteries with high image quality and without increase in radiation exposure in AF patients, even in the high HR group. (orig.)

  8. HEART RATE RECOVERY AFTER EXERCISE AND NEURAL REGULATION OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN 30-40 YEAR OLD FEMALE MARATHON RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Matsuoka

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of endurance training on heart rate (HR recovery after exercise and cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS modulation in female marathon runners by comparing with untrained controls. Six female marathon runners (M group aged 32-40 years and eight age-matched untrained females (C group performed a maximum-effort treadmill running exercise. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max was measured during the exercise with a gas analyzer connected to subjects through a face mask. Heart rate, blood pressure and blood lactate were measured before and after the exercise. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE to the exercise was obtained immediately after the exercise. Holter ECG was recorded and analyzed with power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV to investigate the cardiac ANS modulation. The M group had significantly higher VO2max, faster HR recovery after exercise, higher Mean RR, SDRR, HF power and lower LF/HF ratio at rest compared with the C group. The M group also presented greater percent decrease of blood pressure after exercise, although their blood pressure after exercise was higher than the C group. It is suggested that endurance training induced significant alterations in cardiac ANS modulation at rest and significant acceleration of HR recovery after exercise in female marathon runners. Faster HR recovery after exercise in the female marathon runners should result from their higher levels of HRV, higher aerobic capacity and exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise compared with untrained controls.

  9. Heart rate variability based on risk stratification for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-E-Oliveira, Julia; Amélio, Pâmela Marina; Abranches, Isabela Lopes Laguardia; Damasceno, Dênis Derly; Furtado, Fabianne

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate heart rate variability among adults with different risk levels for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus was assessed in 130 participants (89 females) based on the questionnaire Finnish Diabetes Risk Score and was classified as low risk (n=26), slightly elevated risk (n=41), moderate risk (n=27) and high risk (n=32). To measure heart rate variability, a heart-rate monitor Polar S810i® was employed to obtain RR series for each individual, at rest, for 5 minutes, followed by analysis of linear and nonlinear indexes. The groups at higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus had significantly lower linear and nonlinear heart rate variability indexes. The individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus have lower heart rate variability. Avaliar a variabilidade da frequência cardíaca em adultos com diferentes níveis de risco para diabetes mellitus tipo 2. O grau de risco para diabetes mellitus tipo 2 de 130 participantes (41 homens) foi avaliado pelo questionário Finnish Diabetes Risk Score. Os participantes foram classificados em baixo risco (n=26), risco levemente elevado (n=41), risco moderado (n=27) e alto risco (n=32). Para medir a variabilidade da frequência cardíaca, utilizou-se o frequencímetro Polar S810i® para obter séries de intervalo RR para cada indivíduo, em repouso, durante 5 minutos; posteriormente, realizou-se análise por meio de índices lineares e não-lineares. O grupo com maior risco para diabetes mellitus tipo 2 teve uma diminuição significante nos índices lineares e não-lineares da variabilidade da frequência cardíaca. Os resultados apontam que indivíduos com risco alto para diabetes mellitus tipo 2 tem menor variabilidade da frequência cardíaca. To evaluate heart rate variability among adults with different risk levels for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus was assessed in 130 participants (89 females) based on the questionnaire Finnish Diabetes Risk Score

  10. Pill-Box Cavity BPM For TESLA Cryomodul

    CERN Document Server

    Sargsyan, V

    2003-01-01

    A new cavity BPM with 10 μm resolution is designed and fabricated to perform single bunch measurements at the TESLA linear collider. In order to have a low energy dissipation in the cryogenic supermodule, the inner surface of the cavity is copper plated. Cross-talk is minimised by a special polarisation design. The electronics, at 1.5 GHz, is a homodyne receiver normalised to the bunch charge. Its LO-signal for down-conversion is taken from the same cavity.

  11. Virtual cardiotomy based on 3-D MRI for preoperative planning in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, Thomas Sangild; Beerbaum, Philipp; Razavi, Reza; Greil, Gerald Franz; Mosegaard, Jesper; Rasmusson, Allan; Schaeffter, Tobias; Austin, Conal

    2008-01-01

    Patient-specific preoperative planning in complex congenital heart disease may be greatly facilitated by virtual cardiotomy. Surgeons can perform an unlimited number of surgical incisions on a virtual 3-D reconstruction to evaluate the feasibility of different surgical strategies. To quantitatively evaluate the quality of the underlying imaging data and the accuracy of the corresponding segmentation, and to qualitatively evaluate the feasibility of virtual cardiotomy. A whole-heart MRI sequence was applied in 42 children with congenital heart disease (age 3±3 years, weight 13±9 kg, heart rate 96± 21 bpm). Image quality was graded 1-4 (diagnostic image quality ≥2) by two independent blinded observers. In patients with diagnostic image quality the segmentation quality was also graded 1-4 (4 no discrepancies, 1 misleading error). The average image quality score was 2.7 - sufficient for virtual reconstruction in 35 of 38 patients (92%) older than 1 month. Segmentation time was 59±10 min (average quality score 3.5). Virtual cardiotomy was performed in 19 patients. Accurate virtual reconstructions of patient-specific cardiac anatomy can be produced in less than 1 h from 3-D MRI. The presented work thus introduces a new, clinically feasible noninvasive technique for improved preoperative planning in complex cases of congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  12. Impact of metoprolol treatment on mental status of chronic heart failure patients with neuropsychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Xuelu Liu,1 Xueming Lou,1 Xianliang Cheng,2 Yong Meng1 1Department of Cardiology, 2Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, Yunnan, People’s Republic of China Background: Metoprolol treatment is well established for chronic heart failure (CHF patients, but the central nervous system side effects are often a potential drawback.Objective: To investigate the impact of metoprolol treatment on change in mental status of CHF patients with clinical psychological disorders (such as depression, anxiety, and burnout syndrome.Methods: From February 2013 to April 2016, CHF patients with clinical mental disorders received metoprolol (23.75 or 47.5 mg, qd PO, dose escalated with 23.75 mg each time until target heart rate [HR] <70 bpm was achieved at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University. Mental status was assessed by means of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI scale. The primary outcome assessed was change in mental status of patients post-metoprolol treatment and the association with reduction in HR achieved by metoprolol.Results: A total of 154 patients (median age: 66.39 years; males: n=101 were divided into eight groups on the basis of their mental status. HR decreased significantly from baseline values in all the groups to <70 bpm in the 12th month, P≤0.0001. The HADS depression and CBI scores significantly increased from baseline throughout the study frame (P≤0.0001 for all groups, but a significant decrease in the HADS anxiety score was observed in patients with anxiety (P≤0.0001 for all groups. Regression analysis revealed no significant correlation in any of the groups between the HR reduction and the change in the HADS/CBI scores, except for a change in the CBI scores of CHF patients with depression (P=0.01, which was HR dependent.Conclusion: Metoprolol treatment worsens the depressive and high burnout

  13. Optimized imaging quality and radiation dose for coronary artery angiography using 128-slice, dual-source Flash Spiral CT under the natural heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yuejun; Qian Nong; Shao Yanhui; Pan Changjie; Rong Weiliang; Xu Yiqun; Tao Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the quality and radiation doses of coronary artery angiography under the natural heart rate condition between Flash spiral heart mode and prospective electrocardiogram- triggering sequence mode using dual-source, in order to choose personalized low doses of coronary artery scanning mode. Methods: Sixty patients who underwent coronary angiography (CTA) on a 128-slice, dual- source CT scanner were divided into 2 group i.e, group A (27 cases) and group B (33 cases). Flash spiral heart scan mode was employed for group A. Inclusion criteria included: heart rate 75 bpm), date acquisition was set at 30%-50% of the R-R interval. (3) At the arrhythmias, premature beat, fibrillation atrial, date acquisition was set at 20%-90% of the R-R interval. In both groups, patients with a BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m 2 were examined with a tube voltage of 120 kV, while the other patients with a BMI 2 were examined with a tube voltage of 100 kV. The BMI was (24.6±1.0) kg/m 2 in group A, while that was (24.6±0.9) kg/m 2 in group B. In both groups, all images were transferred to the workstation for further processing and analysis. The imaging quality of coronary artery segments and the radiation dose were compared with t test. Results: A total of 336 coronary artery segments were evaluated in group A and 412 segments were evaluated in group B. The imaging quality of coronary artery segments were scored. Excellent or good was achieved in 98.2% (330 of 336) artery segments in group A, and that was 98.1% (404 of 412) in group B. There was no statistical difference in imaging quality between the two groups (t=0.513, P=0.608). The average effective dose was (0.74±0.29) mSv in group A, whereas that was (3.67± 1.37) mSv in group B. There was a significant difference between the two groups (t=-10.858, P= 0.000). Conclusions: The personalized low doses coronary artery scanning mode can substantially reduce radiation damage while preserving good imaging quality. (authors)

  14. Preview of BPM6 Methodology and Analysis of Foreign Direct Investment in 2015 in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šlogar Helena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Foreign direct investments include equity capital, reinvested earnings and debt relations between ownership-related residents and non-residents. Since 31 October 2014, the Croatian National Bank has started to publish information in the field of statistics Relations (balance of payments, foreign debt and the IIP in accordance with the methodology prescribed by the sixth edition of the Manual on Balance of Payments (Eng. Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual, BPM6, thus changing the presentational form of direct investment. Direct investments are not classified according to the so-called direction of investments (Eng. directional principle on direct investment in Croatia and direct investment abroad anymore, but according to BPM6 apply the socalled principle of assets and liabilities (Eng. Assets / Liabilities principle. The aim is to point out the differences between the standards BPM5 and BPM6 and determine which activities and which countries are the most represented in the structure of direct investments in Croatia. By identifying relevant activities and countries in the structure of foreign direct investment, relevant information is obtained about the macroeconomic state of the Republic of Croatia and about the opportunities and potential dangers that certain activities and countries provide.

  15. Heart rate variability in normal-weight patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilit, Celal; Paşalı Kilit, Türkan

    2017-05-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disease closely related to several risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Obese women with PCOS show altered autonomic modulation. The results of studies investigating cardiac autonomic functions of normal-weight women with PCOS are conflicting. The aim of the study was to assess the reactivity of cardiac sympathovagal balance in normal-weight women with PCOS by heart rate variability analysis. We examined the heart rate variability in 60 normal-weight women with PCOS and compared them with that in 60 age-matched healthy women having a similar metabolic profile. Time and frequency domain parameters of heart rate variability were analyzed based on 5-min-long continuous electrocardiography recordings for the following 3 periods: (1) during rest in supine position, (2) during controlled breathing, and (3) during isometric handgrip exercise. Time and frequency domain parameters of heart rate variability for the 3 periods assessed were similar in the two groups. Although modified Ferriman-Gallwey score and serum testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels were significantly higher in women with PCOS, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was not different the between the PCOS and control groups. There were no significant correlations between serum testosterone levels and heart rate variability parameters among the study population. The findings of this study suggest that the reactivity of cardiac sympathovagal balance is not altered in normal-weight women with PCOS having a normal HOMA-IR.

  16. Reduced heart rate variability in social anxiety disorder: associations with gender and symptom severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail A Alvares

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polyvagal theory emphasizes that autonomic nervous system functioning plays a key role in social behavior and emotion. The theory predicts that psychiatric disorders of social dysfunction are associated with reduced heart rate variability, an index of autonomic control, as well as social inhibition and avoidance. The purpose of this study was to examine whether heart rate variability was reduced in treatment-seeking patients diagnosed with social anxiety disorder, a disorder characterized by social fear and avoidance. METHODS: Social anxiety patients (n = 53 were recruited prior to receiving psychological therapy. Healthy volunteers were recruited through the University of Sydney and the general community and were matched by gender and age (n = 53. Heart rate variability was assessed during a five-minute recording at rest, with participants completing a range of self-report clinical symptom measures. RESULTS: Compared to controls, participants with social anxiety exhibited significant reductions across a number of heart rate variability measures. Reductions in heart rate variability were observed in females with social anxiety, compared to female controls, and in patients taking psychotropic medication compared to non-medicated patients. Finally, within the clinical group, we observed significant associations between reduced heart rate variability and increased social interaction anxiety, psychological distress, and harmful alcohol use. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study confirm that social anxiety disorder is associated with reduced heart rate variability. Resting state heart rate variability may therefore be considered a marker for social approach-related motivation and capacity for social engagement. Additionally, heart rate variability may provide a useful biomarker to explain underlying difficulties with social approach, impaired stress regulation, and behavioral inhibition, especially in disorders associated with

  17. Heart rate and activity profile for young female soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Barbero Álvarez, José Carlos; Gómez López, Maite; Barbero Álvarez, Verónica; Granda Vera, Juan; Castagna, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The physical and physiological demands of high-level male soccer have been studied extensively, while few studies have investigated the demands placed on females during match-play, however, there is no information available about the heart rate and activity profile of young female soccer players during match play. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine cardiovascular (heart-rates HR) and physical demands of young female soccer players during a match. Players were observed during a fr...

  18. Cavitation behavior observed in three monoleaflet mechanical heart valves under accelerated testing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chi-Wen; Liu, Jia-Shing; Li, Chi-Pei; Lu, Po-Chien; Hwang, Ned H

    2008-01-01

    Accelerated testing provides a substantial amount of data on mechanical heart valve durability in a short period of time, but such conditions may not accurately reflect in vivo performance. Cavitation, which occurs during mechanical heart valve closure when local flow field pressure decreases below vapor pressure, is thought to play a role in valve damage under accelerated conditions. The underlying flow dynamics and mechanisms behind cavitation bubble formation are poorly understood. Under physiologic conditions, random perivalvular cavitation is difficult to capture. We applied accelerated testing at a pulse rate of 600 bpm and transvalvular pressure of 120 mm Hg, with synchronized videographs and high-frequency pressure measurements, to study cavitation of the Medtronic Hall Standard (MHS), Medtronic Hall D-16 (MHD), and Omni Carbon (OC) valves. Results showed cavitation bubbles between 340 and 360 micros after leaflet/housing impact of the MHS, MHD, and OC valves, intensified by significant leaflet rebound. Squeeze flow, Venturi, and water hammer effects each contributed to cavitation, depending on valve design.

  19. Music close to one's heart: heart rate variability with music, diagnostic with e-bra and smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Shantala; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Rai, Pratyush; Mathur, Gyanesh N.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-04-01

    Music is a powerful elicitor of emotions. Emotions evoked by music, through autonomic correlates have been shown to cause significant modulation of parameters like heart rate and blood pressure. Consequently, Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis can be a powerful tool to explore evidence based therapeutic functions of music and conduct empirical studies on effect of musical emotion on heart function. However, there are limitations with current studies. HRV analysis has produced variable results to different emotions evoked via music, owing to variability in the methodology and the nature of music chosen. Therefore, a pragmatic understanding of HRV correlates of musical emotion in individuals listening to specifically chosen music whilst carrying out day to day routine activities is needed. In the present study, we aim to study HRV as a single case study, using an e-bra with nano-sensors to record heart rate in real time. The e-bra developed previously, has several salient features that make it conducive for this study- fully integrated garment, dry electrodes for easy use and unrestricted mobility. The study considers two experimental conditions:- First, HRV will be recorded when there is no music in the background and second, when music chosen by the researcher and by the subject is playing in the background.

  20. Increased heart rate variability but normal resting metabolic rate in hypocretin/orexin-deficient human narcolepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Overeem, S.; Reijntjes, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Dijk, J.G.M.; Pijl, H.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: We investigated autonomic balance and resting metabolic rate to explore their possible involvement in obesity in hypocretin/orexin-deficient narcoleptic subjects. METHODS: Resting metabolic rate (using indirect calorimetry) and variability in heart rate and blood pressure were

  1. The effect of oxygen content during an initial sustained inflation on heart rate in asphyxiated near-term lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotka, K S; Ong, T; Polglase, G R; Crossley, K J; Moss, T J M; Hooper, S B

    2015-07-01

    At birth, an initial sustained inflation (SI) uniformly aerates the lungs, increases arterial oxygenation and rapidly improves circulatory recovery in asphyxiated newborns. We hypothesised that lung aeration, in the absence of an increase in arterial oxygenation, can increase heart rate (HR) in asphyxiated near-term lambs. Lambs were delivered and instrumented at 139±2 days of gestation. Asphyxia was induced by umbilical cord clamping and then delaying the onset of ventilation until mean carotid arterial pressures (CAPs) had decreased <20 mm Hg. Lambs then received a single 30-s SI using nitrogen (N2; n=6), 5% oxygen (O2; n=6), 21% O2 (n=6) or 100% O2 (n=6) followed by ventilation in air for 30 min. HR, CAP and pulmonary blood flow (PBF) were continuously recorded. HR and PBF increased more quickly in lambs resuscitated with 100% and 21% O2 than with 5% O2 or N2. HR and PBF recovery in the 5% O2 group was delayed relative to all other oxygen SI groups. HR in 5%, 21% and 100% O2 groups reached 100 bpm before the SI was complete. HR and PBF in the N2 group did not increase until 10 s after the SI was completed and ventilation was initiated with air. CAP tended to increase quicker in all O2 groups than in N2 group. Oxygen content during an SI is important for circulatory recovery in asphyxiated lambs. This increase in HR is likely driven by the increase in PBF and venous return to the heart. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Vigorous physical activity predicts higher heart rate variability among younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Richard; McBerty, Victoria; Zaky, Adam; Gianotti, Melino

    2017-06-14

    Baseline heart rate variability (HRV) is linked to prospective cardiovascular health. We tested intensity and duration of weekly physical activity as predictors of heart rate variability in young adults. Time and frequency domain indices of HRV were calculated based on 5-min resting electrocardiograms collected from 82 undergraduate students. Hours per week of both moderate and vigorous activity were estimated using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. In regression analyses, hours of vigorous physical activity, but not moderate activity, significantly predicted greater time domain and frequency domain indices of heart rate variability. Adjusted for weekly frequency, greater daily duration of vigorous activity failed to predict HRV indices. Future studies should test direct measurements of vigorous activity patterns as predictors of autonomic function in young adulthood.

  3. One way to save the number of BPM buttons in the arcs that is not recommended

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.; Kheifets, S.

    1983-12-01

    It has been suggested as a possibility by the beam dynamic task force that the SLC arcs be provided a beam position monitor at every gap between magnets. In this scenario of orbit correction scheme, the BPM's are used alternately for the horizontal and the vertical orbit measurements. One way to construct these BPM's is therefore in the x and y planes. One problem of this construction, as pointed out by Pellegrin and Rees, is that synchrotron radiation will hit the buttons of the x-BPM's. It was suggested then that the x-BPM's should use four buttons, orthogonal, but rotated 45 0 from the x and y planes. This construction requires 4 buttons instead of 2, meaning an increase of cost. As an attempt to reduce the number of buttons needed for arc orbit correction, we have studied a variation of the orbit correction scheme. In this scheme, orbits are not corrected in the x and y coordinates but in the coordinates that are tilted by 45 0 relative to x and y. Let these coordinates be called u and v. The result of the study is that this scheme is not recommended

  4. Determination of heart rate variability with an electronic stethoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamran, Haroon; Naggar, Isaac; Oniyuke, Francisca; Palomeque, Mercy; Chokshi, Priya; Salciccioli, Louis; Stewart, Mark; Lazar, Jason M

    2013-02-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is widely used to characterize cardiac autonomic function by measuring beat-to-beat alterations in heart rate. Decreased HRV has been found predictive of worse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. HRV is determined from time intervals between QRS complexes recorded by electrocardiography (ECG) for several minutes to 24 h. Although cardiac auscultation with a stethoscope is performed routinely on patients, the human ear cannot detect heart sound time intervals. The electronic stethoscope digitally processes heart sounds, from which cardiac time intervals can be obtained. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of obtaining HRV from electronically recorded heart sounds. We prospectively studied 50 subjects with and without CV risk factors/disease and simultaneously recorded single lead ECG and heart sounds for 2 min. Time and frequency measures of HRV were calculated from R-R and S1-S1 intervals and were compared using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). The majority of the indices were strongly correlated (ICC 0.73-1.0), while the remaining indices were moderately correlated (ICC 0.56-0.63). In conclusion, we found HRV measures determined from S1-S1 are in agreement with those determined by single lead ECG, and we demonstrate and discuss differences in the measures in detail. In addition to characterizing cardiac murmurs and time intervals, the electronic stethoscope holds promise as a convenient low-cost tool to determine HRV in the hospital and outpatient settings as a practical extension of the physical examination.

  5. Estimating Energy Expenditure from Heart Rate in Older Adults: A Case for Calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Schrack, Jennifer A.; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Goldsmith, Jeff; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate measurement of free-living energy expenditure is vital to understanding changes in energy metabolism with aging. The efficacy of heart rate as a surrogate for energy expenditure is rooted in the assumption of a linear function between heart rate and energy expenditure, but its validity and reliability in older adults remains unclear. Objective To assess the validity and reliability of the linear function between heart rate and energy expenditure in older adults using diffe...

  6. Evaluation of therapy for dilated cardiomyopathy with heart failure by iodine-123 metaiodobenzyl-guanidine imaging. Comparison with heart rate variability power spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shou-lin; Ikeda, Jun; Takita, Tamotsu; Sekiguchi, Yohei; Demachi, Jun; Chikama, Hisao; Goto, Atsushi; Shirato, Kunio [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-11-01

    The relationship between the myocardial uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-MIBG) and heart rate variability parameters has not been determined. This study determined the relationship between the change in myocardial uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG and improvement in left ventricular function after treatment, to determine the usefulness of {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging to assess the effect of therapy on heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were performed before and after treatment in 17 patients with heart failure due to DCM. The following parameters were compared before and after treatment: New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, radiographic cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), blood pressure, echocardiographic data (left ventricular end-systolic (LVDs) and end-diastolic (LVDd) diameters, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)), plasma concentrations of norepinephrine and epinephrine, heart rate variability power spectral analysis data (mean low frequency (MLF) and high frequency power (MHF)) and the myocardium to mediastinum activity ratio (MYO/M) obtained in early and late images, and washout rate calculated by anterior planar imaging of {sup 123}I-MIBG. The NYHA functional class, LVEF, LVDs, CTR, MLF and MHF improved after treatment. Early MYO/M and late MYO/M improved after treatment. The rate of increase in late MYO/M was positively correlated with the rate of improvement of LVEF after treatment. Furthermore, the late MYO/M was negatively correlated with MLF. Washout rate revealed no correlation with hemodynamic parameters. These findings suggest that late MYO/M is more useful than washout rate to assess the effect of treatment on heart failure due to DCM. Furthermore, the {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging and heart rate variability parameters are useful to assess the autonomic tone in DCM with heart failure. (author)

  7. Evaluation of therapy for dilated cardiomyopathy with heart failure by iodine-123 metaiodobenzyl-guanidine imaging. Comparison with heart rate variability power spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shou-lin; Ikeda, Jun; Takita, Tamotsu; Sekiguchi, Yohei; Demachi, Jun; Chikama, Hisao; Goto, Atsushi; Shirato, Kunio

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between the myocardial uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-MIBG) and heart rate variability parameters has not been determined. This study determined the relationship between the change in myocardial uptake of 123 I-MIBG and improvement in left ventricular function after treatment, to determine the usefulness of 123 I-MIBG imaging to assess the effect of therapy on heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). 123 I-MIBG imaging and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were performed before and after treatment in 17 patients with heart failure due to DCM. The following parameters were compared before and after treatment: New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, radiographic cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), blood pressure, echocardiographic data (left ventricular end-systolic (LVDs) and end-diastolic (LVDd) diameters, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)), plasma concentrations of norepinephrine and epinephrine, heart rate variability power spectral analysis data (mean low frequency (MLF) and high frequency power (MHF)) and the myocardium to mediastinum activity ratio (MYO/M) obtained in early and late images, and washout rate calculated by anterior planar imaging of 123 I-MIBG. The NYHA functional class, LVEF, LVDs, CTR, MLF and MHF improved after treatment. Early MYO/M and late MYO/M improved after treatment. The rate of increase in late MYO/M was positively correlated with the rate of improvement of LVEF after treatment. Furthermore, the late MYO/M was negatively correlated with MLF. Washout rate revealed no correlation with hemodynamic parameters. These findings suggest that late MYO/M is more useful than washout rate to assess the effect of treatment on heart failure due to DCM. Furthermore, the 123 I-MIBG imaging and heart rate variability parameters are useful to assess the autonomic tone in DCM with heart failure. (author)

  8. Reliability of heart rate mobile apps in young healthy adults: exploratory study and research directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Parpinel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, a number of smartphone apps appeared that allow for heart rate measurements basing on the photoplethysmography principle. In fact, almost every smartphone now has a camera with flash that could be used for that. Some studies appeared on the reliability of some of those apps, with heterogeneous results. Objectives: The present study aims at adding up evidence in particular during physical activity, by comparing 3 apps on two different platforms (IOs and Android, on a broad range of heart rates. As gold standard, heart rate has been measured with a traditional heart rate monitor. Results: The results suggest that heart rate apps might be used for measuring heart rate for fitness aims for many individuals, but further research is needed to i analyse influence of smartphone features; ii identify personal factors hindering measurements, and iii verify reliability on different measurement sites.

  9. Heart rate profiles and energy cost of locomotion during cross-country skiing races.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mognoni, P; Rossi, G; Gastaldelli, F; Canclini, A; Cotelli, F

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare heart rate responses and speed in two cross-country skiing races, which were run by seven male and seven female subjects by using classic and free style. Heart rates and skiing velocities were analyzed over flat, uphill and downhill sections, which were run from one to three times. Heart rates were higher in uphill sections than in flat sections; a steady-state heart rate was never reached in the downhill section. When the same uphill section was repeated, the heart rate tended to increase but the speed to decrease. Oxygen uptake (VO2) was calculated from heart rate:VO2 ratio, measured during uphill walking with the aid of poles. The mean (SD) energy cost of locomotion (i.e., the ratio between net VO2 and speed) was 162.1 (9.4) ml.km(-1).kg(-1) and 147.7 (7.1) ml.km(-1).kg(-1) when male subjects ran the flat section after first downhill by using classic and free style, respectively. Females had lower values for VO2 and speed, but similar energy costs. In general, the variability of the energy cost of locomotion in skiers of a similar competitive level is of the same order as that found in uphill walking on a treadmill.

  10. Assessing Metabolic Syndrome Through Increased Heart Rate During Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadeghi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to assess changes in resting and maximum heart rates as primary indicators of cardiac autonomic function in metabolic syndrome (MetS patients and to determine their value for discriminating MetS from non-MetS. 468 participants were enrolled in this cross-sectional study and assessed according to the updated adult treatment panel III (ATP-III definition of MetS. Resting and maximum heart rates were recorded following the Bruce protocol during an exercise. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to identify the best cutoff point for discriminating MetS from the non-MetS state. 194 participants (41.5% were diagnosed as MetS. The mean resting heart rate (RHR was not statistically different between the two groups (P=0.078. However, the mean maximum heart (MHR rate was considerably higher in participants with MetS (142.37±14.84 beats per min compared to the non-MetS group (134.62±21.63 beats per min (P<0.001. In the MetS group, the MHR was positively correlated with the serum triglyceride level (β=0.185, P=0.033 and was inversely associated with age (β=-0.469, P<0.001. The MHR had a moderate value for discriminating MetS from the non-MetS state (c=0.580, P=0.004 with the optimal cutoff point of 140 beats per min. In MetS patients, the MHR was significantly greater compared to non-MetS subjects and was directly correlated with serum triglyceride levels and inversely with advanced age. Moreover, MHR can be used as a suspicious indicator for identifying MetS.

  11. Assessing Metabolic Syndrome Through Increased Heart Rate During Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Gharipour, Mojgan; Nezafati, Pouya; Shafie, Davood; Aghababaei, Esmaeil; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2016-11-01

    The present study aimed to assess changes in resting and maximum heart rates as primary indicators of cardiac autonomic function in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients and to determine their value for discriminating MetS from non-MetS. 468 participants were enrolled in this cross-sectional study and assessed according to the updated adult treatment panel III (ATP-III) definition of MetS. Resting and maximum heart rates were recorded following the Bruce protocol during an exercise. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to identify the best cutoff point for discriminating MetS from the non-MetS state. 194 participants (41.5%) were diagnosed as MetS. The mean resting heart rate (RHR) was not statistically different between the two groups (P=0.078). However, the mean maximum heart (MHR) rate was considerably higher in participants with MetS (142.37±14.84 beats per min) compared to the non-MetS group (134.62±21.63 beats per min) (P<0.001). In the MetS group, the MHR was positively correlated with the serum triglyceride level (β=0.185, P=0.033) and was inversely associated with age (β=-0.469, P<0.001). The MHR had a moderate value for discriminating MetS from the non-MetS state (c=0.580, P=0.004) with the optimal cutoff point of 140 beats per min. In MetS patients, the MHR was significantly greater compared to non-MetS subjects and was directly correlated with serum triglyceride levels and inversely with advanced age. Moreover, MHR can be used as a suspicious indicator for identifying MetS.

  12. Valor preditivo da frequência cardíaca em repouso do teste ergométrico na mortalidade Valor predictivo de la frecuencia cardíaca en reposo del test ergométrico en la mortalidad Predictive value of resting heart rate for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Eilert Fagundes

    2010-12-01

    , de enero de 1995 a junio de 2007. Fueron analizados 7.055 pacientes, siendo 1.645 (23,3% del grupo caso (óbitos y 5.410 (76,7% del grupo control (vivos. Fue calculado el punto de corte de la FCR para mortalidad, a través de la curva ROC y realizado el análisis multivariado para las variables seleccionadas. Los desenlaces fueron mortalidad CV y general. RESULTADOS: La incidencia de mortalidad CV fue de 674 casos (9,5%; la FCR > 78 lpm fue el punto de corte. Después de ajustado para las variables seleccionadas, el odds ratio (OR para FCR > 78 lpm fue de 3,5 (IC 95% = 2,9 - 4,2 para mortalidad CV y 3,6 (IC 95% = 3,2 - 4,0 para mortalidad general. CONCLUSIÓN: La FCR > 78 lpm es un predictor independiente de mortalidad cardiovascular y general.BACKGROUND: Resting heart rate (which ranges from 60 to 80 bpm is one of the simplest cardiovascular parameters, and has been considered as a predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. OBJECTIVE: To determine the predictive value of resting heart rate (RHR before exercise stress testing (ET for cardiovascular (CV and all-cause mortality. METHODS: This was a case-control study using data from the database of the Exercise Testing Laboratory of a cardiac hospital and the death records of the Health Department of a city located in the South of Brazil from January 1995 to June 2007. A total of 7,055 patients were studied; 1,645 (23.3% in the case group (deceased and 5,410 (76.7% in the control group (alive. The cut-off value of RHR for mortality was derived from the ROC curve, and a multivariate analysis was performed for the selected variables. The study's outcome measures were cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Six hundred and seventy-four patients died of cardiovascular diseases (9.5%; the cut-off value was RHR > 78 bpm. After adjusting for selected variables, the odds ratio (OR of RHR > 78 bpm was 3.5 (95% CI 2.9 to 4.2 for CV mortality and 3.6 (95% CI 3.2 to 4.0 for all-cause mortality. CONCLUSION

  13. 256-slice CT coronary angiography in atrial fibrillation: The impact of mean heart rate and heart rate variability on image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liang-Kuang [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); College of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Shih-Ming [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Mok, Greta S.P. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China); Law, Wei-Yip; Lu, Kun-Mu [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ching-Ching, E-mail: g39220003@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiological Technology, Tzu Chi College of Technology, 880, Sec.2, Chien-kuo Rd. Hualien 970, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin, E-mail: tung@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Sec. 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-21

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 256-MDCT in atrial fibrillation and to compare the findings with those among patients in sinus rhythm. Materials: All reconstructed images were evaluated by two independent experienced readers blinded to patient information, heart rate, and ECG results to assess the diagnostic quality of images of the coronary artery segments using axial images, multi-planar reformations, maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering technique. Results: No statistical significance was detected in terms of the overall image quality between patients in sinus rhythm and with atrial fibrillation. Pearson's correlation analysis showed no significant association between image quality and mean heart rate no matter for patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Similarly, there was no correlation between image quality and heart rate variability for either patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Our results showed that the optimal reconstruction window depends on patient's HR, and the pattern for patients in atrial fibrillation is similar to that obtained from non-atrial fibrillation patients. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of using 256-MDCT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation. Our results suggest that when appropriate reconstruction timing window is applied, patients with atrial fibrillation do not have to be excluded from MDCT coronary angiographic examinations.

  14. 256-slice CT coronary angiography in atrial fibrillation: The impact of mean heart rate and heart rate variability on image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liang-Kuang; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Mok, Greta S.P.; Law, Wei-Yip; Lu, Kun-Mu; Yang, Ching-Ching; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 256-MDCT in atrial fibrillation and to compare the findings with those among patients in sinus rhythm. Materials: All reconstructed images were evaluated by two independent experienced readers blinded to patient information, heart rate, and ECG results to assess the diagnostic quality of images of the coronary artery segments using axial images, multi-planar reformations, maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering technique. Results: No statistical significance was detected in terms of the overall image quality between patients in sinus rhythm and with atrial fibrillation. Pearson's correlation analysis showed no significant association between image quality and mean heart rate no matter for patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Similarly, there was no correlation between image quality and heart rate variability for either patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Our results showed that the optimal reconstruction window depends on patient's HR, and the pattern for patients in atrial fibrillation is similar to that obtained from non-atrial fibrillation patients. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of using 256-MDCT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation. Our results suggest that when appropriate reconstruction timing window is applied, patients with atrial fibrillation do not have to be excluded from MDCT coronary angiographic examinations.

  15. An adaptive Kalman filter approach for cardiorespiratory signal extraction and fusion of non-contacting sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foussier, Jerome; Teichmann, Daniel; Jia, Jing; Misgeld, Berno; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2014-05-09

    Extracting cardiorespiratory signals from non-invasive and non-contacting sensor arrangements, i.e. magnetic induction sensors, is a challenging task. The respiratory and cardiac signals are mixed on top of a large and time-varying offset and are likely to be disturbed by measurement noise. Basic filtering techniques fail to extract relevant information for monitoring purposes. We present a real-time filtering system based on an adaptive Kalman filter approach that separates signal offsets, respiratory and heart signals from three different sensor channels. It continuously estimates respiration and heart rates, which are fed back into the system model to enhance performance. Sensor and system noise covariance matrices are automatically adapted to the aimed application, thus improving the signal separation capabilities. We apply the filtering to two different subjects with different heart rates and sensor properties and compare the results to the non-adaptive version of the same Kalman filter. Also, the performance, depending on the initialization of the filters, is analyzed using three different configurations ranging from best to worst case. Extracted data are compared with reference heart rates derived from a standard pulse-photoplethysmographic sensor and respiration rates from a flowmeter. In the worst case for one of the subjects the adaptive filter obtains mean errors (standard deviations) of -0.2 min(-1) (0.3 min(-1)) and -0.7 bpm (1.7 bpm) (compared to -0.2 min(-1) (0.4 min(-1)) and 42.0 bpm (6.1 bpm) for the non-adaptive filter) for respiration and heart rate, respectively. In bad conditions the heart rate is only correctly measurable when the Kalman matrices are adapted to the target sensor signals. Also, the reduced mean error between the extracted offset and the raw sensor signal shows that adapting the Kalman filter continuously improves the ability to separate the desired signals from the raw sensor data. The average total computational time needed

  16. Achy breaky makey wakey heart? A randomised crossover trial of musical prompts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollard, Malcolm; Poposki, Jason; McWhinnie, Brae; Rawlins, Lettie; Munro, Graham; O'Meara, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Compared with no music (NM), does listening to 'Achy breaky heart' (ABH) or 'Disco science' (DS) increase the proportion of prehospital professionals delivering chest compressions at 2010 guideline-compliant rates of 100-120 bpm and 50-60 mm depths? A randomised crossover trial recruiting at an Australian ambulance conference. Volunteers performed three 1-min sequences of continuous chest compressions on a manikin accompanied by NM, repeated choruses of ABH and DS, prerandomised for order. 37 of 74 participants were men; median age 37 years; 61% were paramedics, 20% students and 19% other health professionals. 54% had taken cardiopulmonary resuscitation training within 1 year. Differences in compression rate (mode, IQR) were significant for NM (105, 99-116) versus ABH (120, 107-120) and DS (104, 103-107) versus ABH (p0.5). Listening to DS significantly increased the proportion of prehospital professionals compressing at 2010 guideline-compliant rates. Regardless of intervention more than half gave compressions that were too shallow. Alternative audible feedback mechanisms may be more effective.

  17. Robust efficient estimation of heart rate pulse from video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuchang; Sun, Lingyun; Rohde, Gustavo Kunde

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple but robust algorithm for estimating the heart rate pulse from video sequences containing human skin in real time. Based on a model of light interaction with human skin, we define the change of blood concentration due to arterial pulsation as a pixel quotient in log space, and successfully use the derived signal for computing the pulse heart rate. Various experiments with different cameras, different illumination condition, and different skin locations were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm. Examples computed with normal illumination show the algorithm is comparable with pulse oximeter devices both in accuracy and sensitivity. PMID:24761294

  18. Mental load, heart rate and heart rate variability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blitz, P.S.; Hoogstraten, J.; Mulder, G.

    1970-01-01

    "Several investigators have shown that diminished sinus arrhythmia can be seen as an indication of increased mental load. The present experiment deals with the influence of different levels of mental load, operationalized as the number of binary choices per minute, on the regularity of the heart

  19. Electrocardiogram application based on heart rate variability ontology and fuzzy markup language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, M.-H.; Lee, C.-S.; Acampora, G.; Loia, V.; Gacek, A.; Pedrycz, W.

    2011-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) signal is adopted extensively as a low-cost diagnostic procedure to provide information concerning the healthy status of the heart. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a physiological phenomenon where the time interval between heart beats varies. It is measured by the

  20. Onset of decreased heart work is correlated with increased heart rate and shortened QT interval in high-carbohydrate fed overweight rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durak, Aysegul; Olgar, Yusuf; Tuncay, Erkan; Karaomerlioglu, Irem; Kayki Mutlu, Gizem; Arioglu Inan, Ebru; Altan, Vecdi Melih; Turan, Belma

    2017-11-01

    Mechanical activity of the heart is adversely affected in metabolic syndrome (MetS) characterized by increased body mass and marked insulin resistance. Herein, we examined the effects of high carbohydrate intake on cardiac function abnormalities by evaluating in situ heart work, heart rate, and electrocardiograms (ECGs) in rats. MetS was induced in male Wistar rats by adding 32% sucrose to drinking water for 22-24 weeks and was confirmed by insulin resistance, increased body weight, increased blood glucose and serum insulin, and increased systolic and diastolic blood pressures in addition to significant loss of left ventricular integrity and increased connective tissue around myofibrils. Analysis of in situ ECG recordings showed a markedly shortened QT interval and decreased QRS amplitude with increased heart rate. We also observed increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant defense characterized by decreases in serum total thiol level and attenuated paraoxonase and arylesterase activities. Our data indicate that increased heart rate and a shortened QT interval concomitant with higher left ventricular developed pressure in response to β-adrenoreceptor stimulation as a result of less cyclic AMP release could be regarded as a natural compensation mechanism in overweight rats with MetS. In addition to the persistent insulin resistance and obesity associated with MetS, one should consider the decreased heart work, increased heart rate, and shortened QT interval associated with high carbohydrate intake, which may have more deleterious effects on the mammalian heart.

  1. Hemodynamic responses of unfit healthy women at a training session with nintendo wii: a possible impact on the general well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro-Junior, Renato S; Figueiredo, Luiz F; Conceição, Isabel; Carvalho, Carolina; Lattari, Eduardo; Mura, Gioia; Machado, Sérgio; da Silva, Elirez B

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was assess the effect of a training session with Nintendo Wii® on the hemodynamic responses of healthy women not involved in regular physical exercise. Twenty-five healthy unfit women aged 28 ± 6 years played for 10 minutes the game Free Run (Wii Fit Plus). The resting heart rate (RHR), systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP), and double (rate-pressure) product (DP) were measured before and after activity. The HR during the activity (exercise heart rate, EHR) was measured every minute. A statistically significant difference was observed between the RHR (75 ± 9 bpm) and the mean EHR (176 ± 15 bpm) (P < 0.001). The EHR remained in the target zone for aerobic exercise until the fifth minute of activity, which coincided with the upper limit of the aerobic zone (80% heart rate reserve (HRR) + RHR) from the sixth to tenth minute. The initial (110 ± 8 mmHg) and final (145 ± 17 mmHg) SBP (P < 0.01) were significantly different, as were the initial (71 ± 8 mmHg) and final (79 ± 9 mmHg) DBP (P < 0.01). A statistically significant difference was observed between the pre- (8.233 ± 1.141 bpm-mmHg) and post-activity (25.590 ± 4.117 bpm-mmHg) DP (P < 0.01). Physical exercise while playing Free Run sufficed to trigger acute hemodynamic changes in healthy women who were not engaged in regular physical exercise.

  2. Heart Rates of Elementary Physical Education Students during the Dancing Classrooms Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Larry; Evans, Melissa; Guess, Wendy; Morris, Mary; Olson, Terry; Buckwalter, John

    2011-01-01

    We examined how different types of dance activities, along with their duration, influenced heart rate responses among fifth-grade physical education students (N = 96) who participated in the Dancing Classrooms program. Results indicated that the overall Dancing Classrooms program elicits a moderate cardiovascular heart rate response (M = 124.4…

  3. Heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkeçeci, Gülay; Ünlü, Bekir Serdar; Dursun, Hüseyin; Akçi, Önder; Köken, Gülengül; Onrat, Ersel; Avşar, Alaettin

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac autonomic dysfunction may develop in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence (HRT) are used in assessing cardiac autonomic functions. The goal of this study was to compare the cardiac autonomic functions in patients with PCOS and healthy controls. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating cardiac autonomic functions in patients with PCOS with respect to both HRV and HRT. Twenty-three patients with PCOS (mean age 22.8±3.9 years) and 25 healthy female volunteers who were matched for age and body mass index (BMI) (mean age 23.5±6.2 years) were enrolled in this as case-control study. Twenty-four hour ambulatory electrocardiogram recordings of all participants were taken using Pathfinder software. The time domain parameters of HRV and HRT, including turbulence onset (TO) and turbulence slope, were calculated. Diagnosis of PCOS was made with physical and laboratory findings of hirsutism or biochemical hyperandrogenism and chronic anovulation. Diabetes mellitus, other hormon disorders or hormon therapy, pregnancy, atrial fibrilation, obesite, chronic diseases, disorders of the autonomic nervous system, a history of drug use affecting the autonomic nervous system were excluded. There were no significant differences in HRV and HRT parameters between the two groups. Cardiovascular risk factors, such as BMI, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and lipid parameters, were also similar. Triangular index measure of HRV was negatively correlated with high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (r=-0.47, p<0.05), while age and BMI were significantly correlated with TO (r=0.31 and 0.47, respectively; p<0.05 for all). Cardiac autonomic functions were not found to be altered in patients with PCOS in comparison with healthy controls. These results may be explained with the absence of concomitant cardiovascular risk factors with the patients being in the early stage of the disease.

  4. Heart Rate Measures of Flight Test and Evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonner, Malcolm A; Wilson, Glenn F

    2001-01-01

    .... Because flying is a complex task, several measures are required to derive the best evaluation. This article describes the use of heart rate to augment the typical performance and subjective measures used in test and evaluation...

  5. Consensus statement on management of chronic heart failure in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Seth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary of the Consensus Statement: This statement has been prepared keeping Indian heart failure patients in mind. Optimal management of CHF improves quality of life, reduces hospitalization rates and prolongs survival for people with this condition. Echocardiography is the single most useful test in the evaluation of heart failure, and is necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Plasma B-natriuretic peptide (BNP measurements may be useful in excluding CHF but not mandatory in India. Educate people with CHF about lifestyle changes (e.g., increase physical activity levels, reduce salt intake and manage weight. Educate people with CHF about CHF symptoms and how to manage fluid load. Avoid prescribing drugs that exacerbate CHF. Prescribe angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI at effective doses for people with all grades of systolic heart failure, and titrate to the highest recommended dose tolerated. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA may be used as alternatives in people who cannot tolerate ACEIs. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs should also be used. For people with stabilised systolic heart failure, prescribe beta-blockers that have been shown to improve outcome in heart failure (e.g., bisoprolol, carvedilol, extended release metoprolol or nebivolol. Titrate to the highest recommended dose tolerated. Prescribe diuretics, digoxin and nitrates for people already using ACEIs and beta-blockers to manage symptoms as indicated. For people who have systolic heart failure (New York Heart Association (NYHA Class II-IV despite appropriate doses of ACEIs and diuretics, consider prescribing spironolactone. Eplerenone can be considered in certain setting especially post myocardial infarction though it is more expensive. Consider direct sinus node inhibition with ivabradine for people with CHF who have impaired systolic function, have had a recent heart failure hospitalisation and are in sinus rhythm with a heart rate >70 bpm despite

  6. Hemodynamics of a functional centrifugal-flow total artificial heart with functional atrial contraction in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Takuya; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Sano, Kyosuke; Taira, Yasunori; Tsuboko, Yusuke; Yamada, Akihiro; Miura, Hidekazu; Katahira, Shintaro; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2016-03-01

    Implantation of a total artificial heart (TAH) is one of the therapeutic options for the treatment of patients with end-stage biventricular heart failure. There is no report on the hemodynamics of the functional centrifugal-flow TAH with functional atrial contraction (fCFTAH). We evaluated the effects of pulsatile flow by atrial contraction in acute animal models. The goats received fCFTAH that we created from two centrifugal-flow ventricular assist devices. Some hemodynamic parameters maintained acceptable levels: heart rate 115.5 ± 26.3 bpm, aortic pressure 83.5 ± 10.1 mmHg, left atrial pressure 18.0 ± 5.9 mmHg, pulmonary pressure 28.5 ± 9.7 mmHg, right atrial pressure 13.6 ± 5.2 mmHg, pump flow 4.0 ± 1.1 L/min (left) 3.9 ± 1.1 L/min (right), and cardiac index 2.13 ± 0.14 L/min/m(2). fCFTAH with atrial contraction was able to maintain the TAH circulation by forming a pulsatile flow in acute animal experiments. Taking the left and right flow rate balance using the low internal pressure loss of the VAD pumps may be easier than by other pumps having considerable internal pressure loss. We showed that the remnant atrial contraction effected the flow rate change of the centrifugal pump, and the atrial contraction waves reflected the heart rate. These results indicate that remnant atria had the possibility to preserve autonomic function in fCFTAH. We may control fCFTAH by reflecting the autonomic function, which is estimated with the flow rate change of the centrifugal pump.

  7. Office and 24-hour heart rate and target organ damage in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-García Ángel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the association between heart rate and its variability with the parameters that assess vascular, renal and cardiac target organ damage. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed including a consecutive sample of 360 hypertensive patients without heart rate lowering drugs (aged 56 ± 11 years, 64.2% male. Heart rate (HR and its standard deviation (HRV in clinical and 24-hour ambulatory monitoring were evaluated. Renal damage was assessed by glomerular filtration rate and albumin/creatinine ratio; vascular damage by carotid intima-media thickness and ankle/brachial index; and cardiac damage by the Cornell voltage-duration product and left ventricular mass index. Results There was a positive correlation between ambulatory, but not clinical, heart rate and its standard deviation with glomerular filtration rate, and a negative correlation with carotid intima-media thickness, and night/day ratio of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. There was no correlation with albumin/creatinine ratio, ankle/brachial index, Cornell voltage-duration product or left ventricular mass index. In the multiple linear regression analysis, after adjusting for age, the association of glomerular filtration rate and intima-media thickness with ambulatory heart rate and its standard deviation was lost. According to the logistic regression analysis, the predictors of any target organ damage were age (OR = 1.034 and 1.033 and night/day systolic blood pressure ratio (OR = 1.425 and 1.512. Neither 24 HR nor 24 HRV reached statistical significance. Conclusions High ambulatory heart rate and its variability, but not clinical HR, are associated with decreased carotid intima-media thickness and a higher glomerular filtration rate, although this is lost after adjusting for age. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01325064

  8. Effect of Heart rate on Basketball Three-Point Shot Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca P. Ardigò

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The three-point shot (3S is a fundamental basketball skill used frequently during a game, and is often a main determinant of the final result. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of different metabolic conditions, in terms of heart rates, on 3S accuracy (3S% in 24 male (Under 17 basketball players (age 16.3 ± 0.6 yrs. 3S performance was specifically investigated at different heart rates. All sessions consisted of 10 consecutive 3Ss from five different significant field spots just beyond the FIBA three-point line, i.e., about 7 m from the basket (two counter-clockwise “laps” at different heart rates: rest (0HR, after warm-up (50%HRMAX [50HR], and heart rate corresponding to 80% of its maximum value (80%HRMAX [80HR]. We found that 50HR does not significantly decrease 3S% (−15%, P = 0.255, while 80HR significantly does when compared to 0HR (−28%, P = 0.007. Given that 50HR does not decrease 3S% compared to 0HR, we believe that no preliminary warm-up is needed before entering a game in order to specifically achieve a high 3S%. Furthermore, 3S training should be performed in conditions of moderate-to-high fatigued state so that a high 3S% can be maintained during game-play.

  9. An open-source LabVIEW application toolkit for phasic heart rate analysis in psychophysiological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duley, Aaron R; Janelle, Christopher M; Coombes, Stephen A

    2004-11-01

    The cardiovascular system has been extensively measured in a variety of research and clinical domains. Despite technological and methodological advances in cardiovascular science, the analysis and evaluation of phasic changes in heart rate persists as a way to assess numerous psychological concomitants. Some researchers, however, have pointed to constraints on data analysis when evaluating cardiac activity indexed by heart rate or heart period. Thus, an off-line application toolkit for heart rate analysis is presented. The program, written with National Instruments' LabVIEW, incorporates a variety of tools for off-line extraction and analysis of heart rate data. Current methods and issues concerning heart rate analysis are highlighted, and how the toolkit provides a flexible environment to ameliorate common problems that typically lead to trial rejection is discussed. Source code for this program may be downloaded from the Psychonomic Society Web archive at www.psychonomic.org/archive/.

  10. Statin therapy reduces inappropriate shock in non-ischemic patients with mild heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Anne-Christine H.; Zareba, Wojciech; Jons, Christian

    2013-01-01

    tachycardia zone of 170 to 199 bpm (arm A), high-rate cutoff with a ventricular tachycardia zone ≥200 bpm (arm B), or 60-second-delayed therapy (arm C). The end points of inappropriate therapy, appropriate therapy, and death were assessed among 485 patients with and 998 without diabetes mellitus. Innovative...

  11. Cardiovascular Reactivity and Heart Rate Variability in Panic Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santiago, Helen T

    1999-01-01

    .... Because previous studies of cardiovascular reactivity and heart rate variability have been inconclusive, these factors were re-examined in panickers and controls during physiological challenge...

  12. The effect of orthostatic stress on multiscale entropy of heart rate and blood pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turianikova, Zuzana; Javorka, Kamil; Calkovska, Andrea; Javorka, Michal; Baumert, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular control acts over multiple time scales, which introduces a significant amount of complexity to heart rate and blood pressure time series. Multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis has been developed to quantify the complexity of a time series over multiple time scales. In previous studies, MSE analyses identified impaired cardiovascular control and increased cardiovascular risk in various pathological conditions. Despite the increasing acceptance of the MSE technique in clinical research, information underpinning the involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the MSE of heart rate and blood pressure is lacking. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of orthostatic challenge on the MSE of heart rate and blood pressure variability (HRV, BPV) and the correlation between MSE (complexity measures) and traditional linear (time and frequency domain) measures. MSE analysis of HRV and BPV was performed in 28 healthy young subjects on 1000 consecutive heart beats in the supine and standing positions. Sample entropy values were assessed on scales of 1–10. We found that MSE of heart rate and blood pressure signals is sensitive to changes in autonomic balance caused by postural change from the supine to the standing position. The effect of orthostatic challenge on heart rate and blood pressure complexity depended on the time scale under investigation. Entropy values did not correlate with the mean values of heart rate and blood pressure and showed only weak correlations with linear HRV and BPV measures. In conclusion, the MSE analysis of heart rate and blood pressure provides a sensitive tool to detect changes in autonomic balance as induced by postural change

  13. Heart Disease Death Rates Among Blacks and Whites Aged ≥35 Years - United States, 1968-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Miriam; Greer, Sophia; Odom, Erika; Schieb, Linda; Vaughan, Adam; Kramer, Michael; Casper, Michele

    2018-03-30

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. In 2015, heart disease accounted for approximately 630,000 deaths, representing one in four deaths in the United States. Although heart disease death rates decreased 68% for the total population from 1968 to 2015, marked disparities in decreases exist by race and state. 1968-2015. The National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) data on deaths in the United States were abstracted for heart disease using diagnosis codes from the eighth, ninth, and tenth revisions of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-8, ICD-9, and ICD-10) for 1968-2015. Population estimates were obtained from NVSS files. National and state-specific heart disease death rates for the total population and by race for adults aged ≥35 years were calculated for 1968-2015. National and state-specific black-white heart disease mortality ratios also were calculated. Death rates were age standardized to the 2000 U.S. standard population. Joinpoint regression was used to perform time trend analyses. From 1968 to 2015, heart disease death rates decreased for the total U.S. population among adults aged ≥35 years, from 1,034.5 to 327.2 per 100,000 population, respectively, with variations in the magnitude of decreases by race and state. Rates decreased for the total population an average of 2.4% per year, with greater average decreases among whites (2.4% per year) than blacks (2.2% per year). At the national level, heart disease death rates for blacks and whites were similar at the start of the study period (1968) but began to diverge in the late 1970s, when rates for blacks plateaued while rates for whites continued to decrease. Heart disease death rates among blacks remained higher than among whites for the remainder of the study period. Nationwide, the black-white ratio of heart disease death rates increased from 1.04 in 1968 to 1.21 in 2015, with large increases occurring during the 1970s and 1980s followed by small but steady

  14. Effect of Heart rate on Basketball Three-Point Shot Accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Luca P. Ardigò; Goran Kuvacic; Antonio D. Iacono; Giacomo Dascanio; Johnny Padulo; Johnny Padulo

    2018-01-01

    The three-point shot (3S) is a fundamental basketball skill used frequently during a game, and is often a main determinant of the final result. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of different metabolic conditions, in terms of heart rates, on 3S accuracy (3S%) in 24 male (Under 17) basketball players (age 16.3 ± 0.6 yrs). 3S performance was specifically investigated at different heart rates. All sessions consisted of 10 consecutive 3Ss from five different significant field spot...

  15. Spectral analysis of time series of events: effect of respiration on heart rate in neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Drongelen, Wim; Williams, Amber L; Lasky, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    Certain types of biomedical processes such as the heart rate generator can be considered as signals that are sampled by the occurring events, i.e. QRS complexes. This sampling property generates problems for the evaluation of spectral parameters of such signals. First, the irregular occurrence of heart beats creates an unevenly sampled data set which must either be pre-processed (e.g. by using trace binning or interpolation) prior to spectral analysis, or analyzed with specialized methods (e.g. Lomb's algorithm). Second, the average occurrence of events determines the Nyquist limit for the sampled time series. Here we evaluate different types of spectral analysis of recordings of neonatal heart rate. Coupling between respiration and heart rate and the detection of heart rate itself are emphasized. We examine both standard and data adaptive frequency bands of heart rate signals generated by models of coupled oscillators and recorded data sets from neonates. We find that an important spectral artifact occurs due to a mirror effect around the Nyquist limit of half the average heart rate. Further we conclude that the presence of respiratory coupling can only be detected under low noise conditions and if a data-adaptive respiratory band is used

  16. Heart rate-based lactate minimum test: a reproducible method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strupler, M.; Muller, G.; Perret, C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To find the individual intensity for aerobic endurance training, the lactate minimum test (LMT) seems to be a promising method. LMTs described in the literature consist of speed or work rate-based protocols, but for training prescription in daily practice mostly heart rate is used. The

  17. Heart rate variability analysis in healthy subjects, patients suffering from congestive heart failure and heart transplanted patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argentina Leite

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to find parameters to characterize heart rate variability (HRV and discriminate healthy subjects and patients with heart diseases. The parameters used for discrimination characterize the different components of HRV memory (short and long and are extracted from HRV recordings using parametric as well as non parametric methods. Thus, the parameters are: spectral components at low frequencies (LH and high frequencies (HF which are associated with the short memory of HRV and the long memory parameter (d obtained from autoregressive fractionally integrated moving average (ARFIMA models. In the non parametric context, short memory (α1 and long memory (α2 parameters are obtained from detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA. The sample used in this study contains 24-hour Holter HRV recordings of 30 subjects: 10 healthy individuals, 10 patients suffering from congestive heart failure and 10 heart transplanted patients from the Noltisalis database. It was found that short memory parameters present higher values for the healthy individuals whereas long memory parameters present higher values for the diseased individuals. Moreover, there is evidence that ARFIMA modeling allows the discrimination between the 3 groups under study, being advantageous over DFA.

  18. Effect of atrioventricular conduction on heart rate variability

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmad, Talha Jamal; Ali, Hussnain; Majeed, S. M Imran; Khan, Shoab A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of atrioventricular conduction time (AVCT) on the short-term Heart Rate Variability (HRV) by computing HRV parameters using intervals between the onsets of successive P waves (PP time series) for three groups: normal

  19. Hopfield neural network and optical fiber sensor as intelligent heart rate monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Kussay Nugamesh

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a design and fabrication of an intelligent fiber-optic sensor used for examining and monitoring heart rate activity. It is found in the literature that the use of fiber sensors as heart rate sensor is widely studied. However, the use of smart sensors based on Hopfield neural networks is very low. In this work, the sensor is a three fibers without cladding of about 1 cm, fed by laser light of 1550 nm of wavelength. The sensing portions are mounted with a micro sensitive diaphragm to transfer the pulse pressure on the left radial wrist. The influenced light intensity will be detected by a three photodetectors as inputs into the Hopfield neural network algorithm. The latter is a singlelayer auto-associative memory structure with a same input and output layers. The prior training weights are stored in the net memory for the standard recorded normal heart rate signals. The sensors' heads work on the reflection intensity basis. The novelty here is that the sensor uses a pulse pressure and Hopfield neural network in an integrity approach. The results showed a significant output measurements of heart rate and counting with a plausible error rate.

  20. Modeling human orthostatic responses on the Moon and on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Paula; Tank, Jens; Gauger, Peter; Beck, Luis E J; Zirngibl, Hubert; Jordan, Jens; Limper, Ulrich

    2018-04-26

    Since manned missions to the Moon and Mars are planned, we conducted active standing tests with lunar, Martian, terrestrial, and 1.8 loads of inertial resistance (+G z ) modeled through defined parabolic flight maneuvers. We hypothesized that the cardiovascular response to active standing is proportional to the +G z load. During partial-+G z parabolic flights, 14 healthy test subjects performed active stand-up maneuvers under 1 +G z , lunar (0.16 +G z ), Martian (0.38 +G z ), and hyper inertial resistance (1.8 +G z ) while heart rate and finger blood pressure were continuously monitored. We quantified amplitudes and timing of orthostatic response immediately following standing up. The maximum early heart rate increase was 21 (SD ± 10) bpm with lunar, 23 (± 11) bpm with Martian, 34 (± 17) bpm with terrestrial +G z , and 40 (± 11) bpm hyper +G z . The time to maximum heart rate increased gradually with increasing loads of inertial resistance. The transient blood pressure reduction was most pronounced with hyper +G z but did not differ significantly between lunar and Martian +G z . The mean arterial pressure nadir was reached significantly later with Martian and lunar compared to 1 +G z . Paradoxically, the time for blood pressure to recover was shortest with terrestrial +G z . While load of inertial resistance directly affects the magnitude of the transient blood pressure reduction and heart rate response to active standing, blood pressure stabilization is most rapidly attained during terrestrial +G z . The observation might suggest that the human cardiovascular system is tuned to cope with orthostatic stress on earth.

  1. gHRV: Heart rate variability analysis made easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Liñares, L; Lado, M J; Vila, X A; Méndez, A J; Cuesta, P

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the gHRV software tool is presented. It is a simple, free and portable tool developed in python for analysing heart rate variability. It includes a graphical user interface and it can import files in multiple formats, analyse time intervals in the signal, test statistical significance and export the results. This paper also contains, as an example of use, a clinical analysis performed with the gHRV tool, namely to determine whether the heart rate variability indexes change across different stages of sleep. Results from tests completed by researchers who have tried gHRV are also explained: in general the application was positively valued and results reflect a high level of satisfaction. gHRV is in continuous development and new versions will include suggestions made by testers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Using a smartphone to measure heart rate changes during relived happiness and anger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakens, D.

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring heart rate differences associated with emotional states such as anger and happiness with a smartphone. Novice experimenters measured higher heart rates during relived anger and happiness (replicating findings in the literature) outside a

  3. Automatic heart rate normalization for accurate energy expenditure normalization : an analysis of activities of daily living and heart rate features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altini, M.; Penders, J.; Vullers, R.J.M.; Amft, O.D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This article is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Pervasive Intelligent Technologies for Health". Background: Energy Expenditure (EE) estimation algorithms using Heart Rate (HR) or a combination of accelerometer and HR data suffer from large error due to

  4. Effect of the Torrance Creative Thinking Test on Heart Rate Signal Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakeri S.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Showing a meta-cognitive aspect, creativity is related to higher mental processes such as thinking, intelligence, imagination, and information process. There are many studies on the physiological bases of creativity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of creative thinking on the heart rate signal. Materials & Methods: In this semi-experimental study, 52 medical engineering, electrical, and control students of Sahand University were studied in 2012. The subjects were selected via accessible sampling method. To assess the level of the students’ creative thinking, Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (B form; figural was used. Before and during creative thinking test, heart signal in the rest position was recorded by 1000Hz sampling frequency. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon non-parametric test.   Findings: There was an increase in the mean heart power amplitude during creative thinking than the rest position. However, passing time and conducting the last sessions of the creativity test, it showed a reduction. There was an increase in the heart rate in persons with high creativity than those with low creativity. In addition, based on the test scores, there was a higher creativity level in females and three-lingual persons than males and bi-lingual persons, respectively. There was an increase in the heart rate in females than males (p=0.0398. Nevertheless, there was no significant difference between three-lingual and bilingual persons (p>0.05.    Conclusion: Creative thinking results in an increase in the heart rate in persons with high creativity than persons with low creativity. Therefore, the creativity level can be detected via heart signal. 

  5. Heart rate variability in normal-weight patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kilit, Celal; Kilit, T?rkan Pa?al?

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disease closely related to several risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Obese women with PCOS show altered autonomic modulation. The results of studies investigating cardiac autonomic functions of normal-weight women with PCOS are conflicting. The aim of the study was to assess the reactivity of cardiac sympathovagal balance in normal-weight women with PCOS by heart rate variability analysis. Methods: We examined the heart rate va...

  6. Early warnings of heart rate deterioration

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Vânia G.; Nabney, Ian T.

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals can experience difficulty in detecting and responding to early signs of patient deterioration leading to late intensive care referrals, excess mortality and morbidity, and increased hospital costs. Our study aims to explore potential indicators of physiological deterioration by the analysis of vital-signs. The dataset used comprises heart rate (HR) measurements from MIMIC II waveform database, taken from six patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and diagnosed with sever...

  7. End-tidal CO2 Detection of an Audible Heart Rate During Neonatal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Following Asystole in Asphyxiated Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalak, Lina F.; Barber, Chad A.; Hynan, Linda; Garcia, Damian; Christie, Lucy; Wyckoff, Myra H.

    2011-01-01

    Even brief interruption of cardiac compressions significantly reduces critical coronary perfusion pressure during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) monitoring may provide a continuous non-invasive method of assessing return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) without stopping to auscultate for heart rate (HR). However, the ETCO2 value that correlates with an audible HR is unknown. Our objective was to determine the threshold ETCO2 that is associated with ROSC following asphyxia-induced asystole. Neonatal swine (n=46) were progressively asphyxiated until asystole occurred. Resuscitation followed current neonatal guidelines with initial ventilation with 100% O2 followed by cardiac compressions followed by epinephrine for continued asystole. HR was auscultated every 30 sec and ETCO2 was continuously recorded. A receiver operator curve was generated using the calculated sensitivity and specificity for various ETCO2 values where a positive test was defined as the presence of HR >60 bpm by auscultation. An ETCO2 cut off value of 14 mmHg is the most sensitive ETCO2 value with the least false positives. When using ETCO2 to guide uninterrupted CPR in this model of asphyxia-induced asystole, auscultative confirmation of return of an adequate HR should be performed when ETCO2 ≥14 mmHg is achieved. Correlation during human neonatal CPR needs further investigation. PMID:21283051

  8. Continuous measurement of heart rate variability following carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Previous studies of autonomic nervous system activity through analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) have demonstrated increased sympathetic activity during positive-pressure pneumoperitoneum. We employed an online, continuous method for rapid HRV analysis (MemCalc™, Tarawa, Suwa Trust, Tokyo, ...

  9. Endogenous Pain Modulation: Association with Resting Heart Rate Variability and Negative Affectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Houte, Maaike; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Bogaerts, Katleen; Van Diest, Ilse; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2017-07-21

    Several chronic pain syndromes are characterized by deficient endogenous pain modulation as well as elevated negative affectivity and reduced resting heart rate variability. In order to elucidate the relationships between these characteristics, we investigated whether negative affectivity and heart rate variability are associated with endogenous pain modulation in a healthy population. An offset analgesia paradigm with noxious thermal stimulation calibrated to the individual's pain threshold was used to measure endogenous pain modulation magnitude in 63 healthy individuals. Pain ratings during constant noxious heat stimulation to the arm (15 seconds) were compared with ratings during noxious stimulation comprising a 1 °C rise and return of temperature to the initial level (offset trials, 15 seconds). Offset analgesia was defined as the reduction in pain following the 1 °C decrease relative to pain at the same time point during continuous heat stimulation. Evidence for an offset analgesia effect could only be found when noxious stimulation intensity (and, hence, the individual's pain threshold) was intermediate (46 °C or 47 °C). Offset analgesia magnitude was also moderated by resting heart rate variability: a small but significant offset effect was found in participants with high but not low heart rate variability. Negative affectivity was not related to offset analgesia magnitude. These results indicate that resting heart rate variability (HRV) is related to endogenous pain modulation (EPM) in a healthy population. Future research should focus on clarifying the causal relationship between HRV and EPM and chronic pain by using longitudinal study designs. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Incident solar radiation and coronary heart disease mortality rates in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    The reported low mortality rate from coronary heart disease in Portugal, Spain, Italy, Greece, and France, to a lesser extent, has been attributed in numerous nutritional studies to the consumption of a Mediterranean-type diet. There are still many unresolved issues about the direct causal effect of the Mediterranean dietary regime on low incidence of coronary heart disease. An analysis of coronary heart disease mortality rates in Europe from a latitudinal gradient perspective has shown to have a close correlation to incident solar radiation. It is surmised that the resulting increased in situ biosynthesis of Vitamin D 3 could be the critical missing confounder in the analysis of the beneficial health outcome of the Mediterranean diet

  11. Effect of pre operative heart rate on post spinal hypotension in obsteric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.; Zahoor, M.U.; Zaid, A.Y.; Buland, K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the association between of preoperative heart rate and post spinal hypotension in women undergoing cesarean section, Two hundred patients undergoing caesarean were included in the study selected on non probability convenience sampling technique, The patients were divided into two groups depending upon their pre operative heart rate. Spinal anesthesia was administered and number of patients developing hypotension was noted. Among 200 patients, who were included in the study; 112 were placed in group A and 88 were placed in group B depending on mean heart rate of 90 beats per minute or less or 91 beats per minute or more respectively. In group A 14 (11.86%) patients developed hypotension where as in group B 28 (31,82%) patients developed hypotension. Pre operative heart rate is significantly associated with post spinal hypotension in obstetric patients undergoing cesarean section. (author)

  12. Design of a heart rate controller for treadmill exercise using a recurrent fuzzy neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chun-Hao; Wang, Wei-Cheng; Tai, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Tien-Chi

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we developed a computer controlled treadmill system using a recurrent fuzzy neural network heart rate controller (RFNNHRC). Treadmill speeds and inclines were controlled by corresponding control servo motors. The RFNNHRC was used to generate the control signals to automatically control treadmill speed and incline to minimize the user heart rate deviations from a preset profile. The RFNNHRC combines a fuzzy reasoning capability to accommodate uncertain information and an artificial recurrent neural network learning process that corrects for treadmill system nonlinearities and uncertainties. Treadmill speeds and inclines are controlled by the RFNNHRC to achieve minimal heart rate deviation from a pre-set profile using adjustable parameters and an on-line learning algorithm that provides robust performance against parameter variations. The on-line learning algorithm of RFNNHRC was developed and implemented using a dsPIC 30F4011 DSP. Application of the proposed control scheme to heart rate responses of runners resulted in smaller fluctuations than those produced by using proportional integra control, and treadmill speeds and inclines were smoother. The present experiments demonstrate improved heart rate tracking performance with the proposed control scheme. The RFNNHRC scheme with adjustable parameters and an on-line learning algorithm was applied to a computer controlled treadmill system with heart rate control during treadmill exercise. Novel RFNNHRC structure and controller stability analyses were introduced. The RFNNHRC were tuned using a Lyapunov function to ensure system stability. The superior heart rate control with the proposed RFNNHRC scheme was demonstrated with various pre-set heart rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A review of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carew, Sheila

    2012-01-31

    A 21-year-old female reports an 18-month history of light-headedness on standing. This is often associated with palpitations and a feeling of intense anxiety. She has had two black-outs in the past 12 months. She is not taking any regular medications. Her supine blood pressure was 126\\/84 mmHg with a heart rate of 76 bpm, and her upright blood pressure was 122\\/80 mmHg with a heart rate of 114 bpm. A full system examination was otherwise normal. She had a 12-lead electrocardiogram performed which was unremarkable. She was referred for head-up tilt testing. She was symptomatic during the test and lost consciousness at 16 min. Figure 1 summarizes her blood pressure and heart rate response to tilting. A diagnosis of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome with overlapping vasovagal syncope was made.

  14. Activity and heart rate in semi-domesticated reindeer during adaptation to emergency feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, A; Ahman, B; Norberg, H; Redbo, I; Eloranta, E; Olsson, K

    2006-06-15

    Although reindeer are well adapted to limited food resources during winter, semi-domesticated reindeer are regularly fed when snow conditions are bad in order to prevent starvation. Feeding sometimes results in health problems and loss of animals. This study was made to assess if activity pattern in reindeer could be used as a tool for the reindeer herder in early detection of animals that are not adapting to feeding. The frequency of 10 behavioural categories was recorded in five groups of penned, eight-month-old, female semi-domesticated reindeer. Three reindeer per group were fitted with heart rate monitors. Lying was the most frequent behaviour, whilst there were few cases of agonistic behaviour. Heart rate varied during the day, with peaks during feeding and low heart rates in the early morning. Restricted feed intake resulted in more locomotion and seeking but less ruminating compared to feeding ad libitum. This was followed by a generally lower heart rate in reindeer in the restricted groups compared to controls. Subsequent feeding with different combinations of lichens, silage and pellets ad libitum resulted initially in significantly more of the animals lying curled up, compared to controls, combined with increased heart rates. As the experiment continued the general activity pattern, as well as the heart rate, gradually became more similar in all groups. Lying curled was the behavioural indicator most consistently affected by feed deprivation and adaptation to feeding and may thus be a useful indicator to distinguish individual reindeer that are not adjusting to feeding.

  15. Freqüência cardíaca máxima em idosas brasileiras: uma comparação entre valores medidos e previstos Maximum heart rate in Brazilian elderly women: comparing measured and predicted values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Abrantes Pereira da Silva

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O presente estudo objetivou comparar os valores de freqüência cardíaca máxima (FCmáx medidos durante um teste de esforço progressivo (TEP, com os obtidos através de equações de predição, em idosas brasileiras. MÉTODOS: Um TEP máximo sob o protocolo modificado de Bruce, realizado em esteira, foi utilizado para obtenção dos valores de referência da freqüência cardíaca máxima (FCmáx, em 93 mulheres idosas (67,1±5,16 anos. Os valores obtidos foram comparados aos estimados pelas equações "220 - idade" e a de Tanaka e cols., através da ANOVA, para amostras repetidas. A correlação e a concordância entre os valores medidos e os estimados foram testadas. Adicionalmente, a correlação entre os valores de FCmáx medidos e a idade das voluntárias foi examinada. RESULTADOS: Os resultados foram os seguintes: 1 a média da FCmáx atingida no TEP foi de 145,5±12,5 batimentos por minuto (bpm; 2 as equações "220 - idade" e a de Tanaka e cols. (2001 superestimaram significativamente (p OBJECTIVE: This study sought to compare maximum heart rate (HRmax values measured during a graded exercise test (GXT with those calculated from prediction equations in Brazilian elderly women. METHODS: A treadmill maximal graded exercise test in accordance with the modified Bruce protocol was used to obtain reference values for maximum heart rate (HRmax in 93 elderly women (mean age 67.1 ± 5.16. Measured values were compared with those estimated from the "220 - age" and Tanaka et al formulas using repeated-measures ANOVA. Correlation and agreement between measured and estimated values were tested. Also evaluated was the correlation between measured HRmax and volunteers’ age. RESULTS: Results were as follows: 1 mean HRmax reached during GXT was 145.5 ± 12,5 beats per minute (bpm; 2 both the "220 - age" and Tanaka et al (2001 equations significantly overestimated (p < 0.001 HRmax by a mean difference of 7.4 and 15.5 bpm, respectively; 3

  16. Improvement of the noise figure of the CEBAF switched electrode electronics BPM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, T.

    1998-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a high-intensity continuous wave electron accelerator for nuclear physics located at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A beam energy of 4 GeV is achieved by recirculating the electron beam five times through two anti-parallel 400 MeV linacs. In the linacs, where there is recirculated beam, the BPM specifications must be met for beam intensities between 1 and 100 μA. In the transport lines the BPM specifications must be met for beam intensities between 100 nA and 200 μA. To avoid a complete redesign of the existing electronics, we investigated ways to improve the noise figure of the linac BPM switched-electrode electronics (SEE) so that they could be used in the transport lines. We found that the out-of-band noise contributed significantly to the overall system noise figure. This paper will focus on the source of the excessive out-of-band noise and how it was reduced. The development, commissioning and operational results of this low noise variant of the linac style SEE BPMs as well as techniques for determining the noise figure of the rf chain will also be presented. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  17. Changes in heart rate associated with contest outcome in agonistic encounters in lobsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernáindez-Falcón, Jesús; Basu, Alo C; Govindasamy, Siddhartan; Kravitz, Edward A

    2005-03-01

    Agonistic contests between lobsters housed together in a confined space progress through encounters of increasing intensity until a dominance relationship is established. Once this relationship is established, losing animals continually retreat from the advances of winners. These encounters are likely to consume much energy in both winning and losing animals. Therefore, one might expect involvement of many physiological systems before, during and after fights. Here, we report effects of agonistic encounters on cardiac frequency in winning and losing adult lobsters involved in dyadic interactions. The results show that: (i) small but significant increases in heart rate are observed upon chemical detection of a conspecific; (ii) during agonistic interactions, further increases in heart rate are seen; and (iii) ultimate winners exhibit greater increases in heart rate lasting longer periods of time compared to ultimate losers. Heart rate in winners remains elevated for at least 15 min after the contests have ended and animals have been returned to their home tanks. Reduced effects are seen in second and third pairings between familiar opponents. The sustained changes in heart rate that we observe in winning lobsters may result from hormonal modulation of cardiac function related to the change in social status brought about by contest outcome.

  18. Comparative evaluation of heart rate-based monitors: Apple Watch vs Fitbit Charge HR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Hibbing, Paul; Mantis, Constantine; Welk, Gregory J

    2018-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the validity of energy expenditure (EE), steps, and heart rate measured with the Apple Watch 1 and Fitbit Charge HR. Thirty-nine healthy adults wore the two monitors while completing a semi-structured activity protocol consisting of 20 minutes of sedentary activity, 25 minutes of aerobic exercise, and 25 minutes of light intensity physical activity. Criterion measures were obtained from an Oxycon Mobile for EE, a pedometer for steps, and a Polar heart rate strap worn on the chest for heart rate. For estimating whole-trial EE, the mean absolute percent error (MAPE) from Fitbit Charge HR (32.9%) was more than twice that of Apple Watch 1 (15.2%). This trend was consistent for the individual conditions. Both monitors accurately assessed steps during aerobic activity (MAPE Apple : 6.2%; MAPE Fitbit : 9.4%) but overestimated steps in light physical activity. For heart rate, Fitbit Charge HR produced its smallest MAPE in sedentary behaviors (7.2%), followed by aerobic exercise (8.4%), and light activity (10.1%). The Apple Watch 1 had stronger validity than the Fitbit Charge HR for assessing overall EE and steps during aerobic exercise. The Fitbit Charge HR provided heart rate estimates that were statistically equivalent to Polar monitor.

  19. Embryos in the fast lane: high-temperature heart rates of turtles decline after hatching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Guo Du

    Full Text Available In ectotherms such as turtles, the relationship between cardiovascular function and temperature may be subject to different selective pressures in different life-history stages. Because embryos benefit by developing as rapidly as possible, and can "afford" to expend energy to do so (because they have access to the yolk for nutrition, they benefit from rapid heart (and thus, developmental rates. In contrast, hatchlings do not have a guaranteed food supply, and maximal growth rates may not enhance fitness--and so, we might expect a lower heart rate, especially at high temperatures where metabolic costs are greatest. Our data on two species of emydid turtles, Chrysemys picta, and Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii, support these predictions. Heart rates of embryos and hatchlings were similar at low temperatures, but heart rates at higher temperatures were much greater before than after hatching.

  20. Continuous measurement of heart rate variability following carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-16

    Jul 16, 2010 ... Power spectral analysis of the electrocardiographic R-R interval [heart rate variability: (HRV)] is a well known, non- invasive method for assessing autonomic nervous activity.1. Studies using HRV analysis during positive-pressure pneumoperitoneum (PPP) have demonstrated increased sympathetic ...

  1. Universal design of a microcontroller and IoT system to detect the heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwamahoro, Raphael; Mushikiwabeza, Alexie; Minani, Gerard; Mohan Murari, Bhaskar

    2017-11-01

    Heart rate analysis provides vital information of the present condition of the human body. It helps medical professionals in diagnosis of various malfunctions of the body. The limitation of vision impaired and blind people to access medical devices cause a considerable loss of life. In this paper, we intended to develop a heart rate detection system that is usable for people with normal and abnormal vision. The system is based on a non-invasive method of measuring the variation of the tissue blood flow rate by means of a photo transmitter and detector through fingertip known as photoplethysmography (PPG). The signal detected is firstly passed through active low pass filter and then amplified by a two stages high gain amplifier. The amplified signal is feed into the microcontroller to calculate the heart rate and displays the heart beat via sound systems and Liquid Crystal Display (LCD). To distinguish arrhythmia, normal heart rate and abnormal working conditions of the system, recognition is provided in different sounds, LCD readings and Light Emitting Diodes (LED).

  2. Lack of evidence for low-dimensional chaos in heart rate variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, J K; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Agner, E

    1994-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The term chaos is used to describe erratic or apparently random time-dependent behavior in deterministic systems. It has been suggested that the variability observed in the normal heart rate may be due to chaos, but this question has not been settled. METHODS AND RESULTS: Heart rate...... in the experimental data, but the prediction error as a function of the prediction length increased at a slower rate than characteristic of a low-dimensional chaotic system. CONCLUSION: There is no evidence for low-dimensional chaos in the time series of RR intervals from healthy human subjects. However, nonlinear...

  3. Dynamic range extension of BPM at the NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordoley, M.

    1993-01-01

    In order to overcome range limitations, the existing Beam Position Monitor (BPM) receiver was modified, extending the dynamic range from 35 dB to 60 dB. The modifications include the insertion of an RF PIN attenuator, RF amplifier, and control circuitry in line with the RF link to add an extra 25dB to the existing AGC loop. This stand alone 25dB RF gain control stage is integrated into the present system without any change to the existing receiver

  4. Visualization of heart rate variability of long-term heart transplant patient by transition networks: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eWdowczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a heart transplant patient at his 17th year of uncomplicated follow-up. Within a frame of routine check out several tests were performed. With such a long and uneventful follow-up some degree of graft reinnervation could be anticipated. However, the patient's electrocardiogram and exercise parameters seemed largely inconclusive in this regard. The exercise heart rate dynamics were suggestive of only mild, if any parasympathetic reinnervation of the graft with persisting sympathetic activation. On the other hand, traditional heart rate variability (HRV indices were inadequately high, due to erratic rhythm resulting from interference of the persisting recipient sinus node or nonconducted atrial parasystole. New tools, originated from network representation of time series, by visualization short-term dynamical patterns, provided a method to discern HRV increase due to reinnervation from other reasons.

  5. Statistical characteristics of mechanical heart valve cavitation in accelerated testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changfu; Hwang, Ned H C; Lin, Yu-Kweng M

    2004-07-01

    Cavitation damage has been observed on mechanical heart valves (MHVs) undergoing accelerated testing. Cavitation itself can be modeled as a stochastic process, as it varies from beat to beat of the testing machine. This in-vitro study was undertaken to investigate the statistical characteristics of MHV cavitation. A 25-mm St. Jude Medical bileaflet MHV (SJM 25) was tested in an accelerated tester at various pulse rates, ranging from 300 to 1,000 bpm, with stepwise increments of 100 bpm. A miniature pressure transducer was placed near a leaflet tip on the inflow side of the valve, to monitor regional transient pressure fluctuations at instants of valve closure. The pressure trace associated with each beat was passed through a 70 kHz high-pass digital filter to extract the high-frequency oscillation (HFO) components resulting from the collapse of cavitation bubbles. Three intensity-related measures were calculated for each HFO burst: its time span; its local root-mean-square (LRMS) value; and the area enveloped by the absolute value of the HFO pressure trace and the time axis, referred to as cavitation impulse. These were treated as stochastic processes, of which the first-order probability density functions (PDFs) were estimated for each test rate. Both the LRMS value and cavitation impulse were log-normal distributed, and the time span was normal distributed. These distribution laws were consistent at different test rates. The present investigation was directed at understanding MHV cavitation as a stochastic process. The results provide a basis for establishing further the statistical relationship between cavitation intensity and time-evolving cavitation damage on MHV surfaces. These data are required to assess and compare the performance of MHVs of different designs.

  6. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  7. Analyses of Heart Rate, Respiration and Cardiorespiratory Coupling in Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Schulz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder associated with a significantly increased cardiovascular mortality rate. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to this cardiovascular disease (CVD are not fully known. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the cardiorespiratory influence by investigating heart rate, respiration and the causal strength and direction of cardiorespiratory coupling (CRC, based mainly on entropy measures. We investigated 23 non-medicated patients with schizophrenia (SZ, comparing them to 23 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (CO. A significantly reduced complexity was found for the heart rate and a significantly increased complexity in respiration and CRC in SZ patients when compared to corresponding measurements from CO (p < 0.001. CRC analyses revealed a clear coupling, with a driver-responder relationship from respiration to heart rate in SZ patients. Moreover, a slight driver-responder relationship from heart rate to respiration could be recognized. These findings lead to the assumption that SZ should be considered to be a high-risk group for CVD. We hypothesize that the varying cardiorespiratory regulation contributes to the increased risk for cardiac mortality. Therefore, regular monitoring of the cardiorespiratory status of SZ is suggested to identify autonomic regulation impairment at an early stage—to develop timely and effective treatment and intervention strategies.

  8. Nonlinear analysis of heart rate variability in patients with eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigo, Daniel E.; Castro, Mariana N.; Dorpinghaus, Andrea; Weidema, Hylke; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Siri, Leonardo Nicola; Rovira, Bernardo; Fahrer, Rodolfo D.; Nogues, Martin; Leiguarda, Ramon C.; Guinjoan, Salvador M.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa often have signs of autonomic dysfunction potentially deleterious to the heart. The aim of this study was to ascertain the nonlinear properties of heart rate variability in patients with eating disorders. A group of 33 women with eating disorders (14

  9. Evaluation of sympathetic nerve system activity with MIBG. Comparison with heart rate variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Chinori; Wakabayashi, Yasushi; Shouda, Sakae; Mikami, Tadashi; Tawarahara, Kei; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Suzuki, Toshihiko.

    1997-01-01

    Authors attempted to elucidate the relations of plasma concentration of norepinephrine (pNE) and findings of heart rate variability and MIBG myocardial scintigraphy and evaluated cardiac autonomic nervous activity in chronic renal failure. Subjects were 211 patients with various heart diseases (coronary artery lesion, cardiomyopathy, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal failure and so on), 60 patients with artificial kidney due to chronic renal failure, 13 of whom were found to have coronary arterial disease by Tl myocardial scintigraphy, and 14 normal volunteers. ECG was recorded with the portable recorder for heart rate variability. Together with collection of blood for pNE measurement, myocardial scintigraphy was done at 15 and 150 min after intravenous administration of 111 MBq of MIBG for acquisition of early and delayed, respectively, images of the frontal breast. Accumulation at and elimination during the time points of MIBG were computed in cps unit. Variability of heart rate was found to have the correlation positive with MIBG delayed accumulation and negative with the elimination, and pNE, negative with heart rate variability and the delayed accumulation and positive with the elimination. Thus cardiac autonomic nervous abnormality was suggested to occur before uremic cardiomyopathy. (K.H.)

  10. Glutamate transporter type 3 knockout leads to decreased heart rate possibly via parasympathetic mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Jiao; Li, Jiejie; Li, Liaoliao; Feng, Chenzhuo; Xiong, Lize; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-01-01

    Parasympathetic tone is a dominant neural regulator for basal heart rate. Glutamate transporters (EAAT) via their glutamate uptake functions regulate glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. We showed that EAAT type 3 (EAAT3) knockout mice had a slower heart rate than wild-type mice when they were anesthetized. We design this study to determine whether non-anesthetized EAAT3 knockout mice have a slower heart rate and, if so, what may be the mechanism for this effect. Young a...

  11. Experiences in enhancing existing BPM Tools with BPEL Import and Export

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendling, Jan; Lassen, Kristian Bisgaard; Zdun, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    utilize graph-based BPM languages such as EPCs, Workflow Nets, UML Activity Diagrams, and BPMN in their modeling component while BPEL is rather a block-oriented language inspired by process calculi. In this paper we identify transformation strategies as reusable solutions for mapping control flow between...

  12. Effect of game format on heart rate, activity profile, and player involvement in elite and recreational youth players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randers, Morten Bredsgaard; Andersen, T B; Rasmussen, L S

    2014-01-01

     ± 12 bpm, P = 0.001, d = 0.59) and number of technical actions (65.1 ± 2