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  1. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells.

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    Anatoly Buchin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR. While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing.

  2. A signal processing analysis of Purkinje cells in vitro

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    Ze'ev R Abrams

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar Purkinje cells in vitro fire recurrent sequences of Sodium and Calcium spikes. Here, we analyze the Purkinje cell using harmonic analysis, and our experiments reveal that its output signal is comprised of three distinct frequency bands, which are combined using Amplitude and Frequency Modulation (AM/FM. We find that the three characteristic frequencies - Sodium, Calcium and Switching – occur in various combinations in all waveforms observed using whole-cell current clamp recordings. We found that the Calcium frequency can display a frequency doubling of its frequency mode, and the Switching frequency can act as a possible generator of pauses that are typically seen in Purkinje output recordings. Using a reversibly photo-switchable kainate receptor agonist, we demonstrate the external modulation of the Calcium and Switching frequencies. These experiments and Fourier analysis suggest that the Purkinje cell can be understood as a harmonic signal oscillator, enabling a higher level of interpretation of Purkinje signaling based on modern signal processing techniques.

  3. A note on the definition and the development of cerebellar purkinje cell zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Voogd (Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe definition of Purkinje cell zones by their white matter comprtments, their physiological properties, and their molecular identity and the birthdate of their Purkinje cells will be reviewed.

  4. A Note on the Definition and the Development of Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Zones

    OpenAIRE

    Voogd, J.

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe definition of Purkinje cell zones by their white matter comprtments, their physiological properties, and their molecular identity and the birthdate of their Purkinje cells will be reviewed.

  5. Structural study of Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes in essential tremor.

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    Louis, Elan D; Yi, Hong; Erickson-Davis, Cordelia; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul G; Faust, Phyllis L

    2009-02-06

    Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common neurological diseases. A basic understanding of its neuropathology is now emerging. Aside from Purkinje cell loss, a prominent finding is an abundance of torpedoes (rounded swellings of Purkinje cell axons). Such swellings often result from the mis-accumulation of cell constituents. Identifying the basic nature of these accumulations is an important step in understanding the underlying disease process. Torpedoes, only recently identified in ET, have not yet been characterized ultrastructurally. Light and electron microscopy were used to characterize the structural constituents of torpedoes in ET. Formalin-fixed cerebellar cortical tissue from four prospectively collected ET brains was sectioned and immunostained with a monoclonal phosphorylated neurofilament antibody (SMI-31, Covance, Emeryville, CA). Using additional sections from three ET brains, torpedoes were assessed using electron microscopy. Immunoreactivity for phosphorylated neurofilament protein revealed clear labeling of torpedoes in each case. Torpedoes were strongly immunoreactive; in many instances, two or more torpedoes were noted in close proximity to one another. On electron microscopy, torpedoes were packed with randomly arranged 10-12nm neurofilaments. Mitochondria and smooth endoplasmic reticulum were abundant as well, particularly at the periphery of the torpedo. We demonstrated that the torpedoes in ET represent the mis-accumulation of disorganized neurofilaments and other organelles. It is not known where in the pathogenic cascade these accumulations occur (i.e., whether these accumulations are the primary event or a secondary/downstream event) and this deserves further study.

  6. Calcium Imaging Reveals Coordinated Simple Spike Pauses in Populations of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

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    Jorge E. Ramirez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain’s control of movement is thought to involve coordinated activity between cerebellar Purkinje cells. The results reported here demonstrate that somatic Ca2+ imaging is a faithful reporter of Na+-dependent “simple spike” pauses and enables us to optically record changes in firing rates in populations of Purkinje cells in brain slices and in vivo. This simultaneous calcium imaging of populations of Purkinje cells reveals a striking spatial organization of pauses in Purkinje cell activity between neighboring cells. The source of this organization is shown to be the presynaptic gamma-Aminobutyric acid producing (GABAergic network, and blocking ionotropic gamma-Aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAARs abolishes the synchrony. These data suggest that presynaptic interneurons synchronize (inactivity between neighboring Purkinje cells, and thereby maximize their effect on downstream targets in the deep cerebellar nuclei.

  7. Fear conditioning-related changes in cerebellar Purkinje cell activities in goldfish

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    Yoshida Masayuki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fear conditioning-induced changes in cerebellar Purkinje cell responses to a conditioned stimulus have been reported in rabbits. It has been suggested that synaptic long-term potentiation and the resulting increases in firing rates of Purkinje cells are related to the acquisition of conditioned fear in mammals. However, Purkinje cell activities during acquisition of conditioned fear have not been analysed, and changes in Purkinje cell activities throughout the development of conditioned fear have not yet been investigated. In the present study, we tracked Purkinje cell activities throughout a fear conditioning procedure and aimed to elucidate further how cerebellar circuits function during the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear. Methods Activities of single Purkinje cells in the corpus cerebelli were tracked throughout a classical fear conditioning procedure in goldfish. A delayed conditioning paradigm was used with cardiac deceleration as the conditioned response. Conditioning-related changes of Purkinje cell responses to a conditioned stimulus and unconditioned stimulus were examined. Results The majority of Purkinje cells sampled responded to the conditioned stimulus by either increasing or decreasing their firing rates before training. Although there were various types of conditioning-related changes in Purkinje cells, more than half of the cells showed suppressed activities in response to the conditioned stimulus after acquisition of conditioned fear. Purkinje cells that showed unconditioned stimulus-coupled complex-spike firings also exhibited conditioning-related suppression of simple-spike responses to the conditioned stimulus. A small number of Purkinje cells showed increased excitatory responses in the acquisition sessions. We found that the magnitudes of changes in the firing frequencies of some Purkinje cells in response to the conditioned stimulus correlated with the magnitudes of the conditioned

  8. The volume of Purkinje cells decreases in the cerebellum of acrylamide-intoxicated rats, but no cells are lost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Tandrup, T; Braendgaard, H

    1994-01-01

    The effects of acrylamide intoxication on the numbers of granule and Purkinje cells and the volume of Purkinje cell perikarya have been evaluated with stereological methods. The analysis was carried out in the cerebella of rats that had received a dose of 33.3 mg/kg acrylamide, twice a week, for 7.......5 weeks. The total numbers of cerebellar granule and Purkinje cells were estimated using the optical fractionator and the mean volume of the Purkinje cell perikarya was estimated with the vertical rotator technique. The volumes of the molecular layer, the granular cell layer and the white matter were...... estimated using the Cavalieri principle. The mean weight of the cerebellum of the intoxicated rats was 7% lower than that of the control rats (2P = 0.001). The numbers of the Purkinje cells and granule cells were the same in both groups, but the mean volume of the perikarya of the Purkinje cells...

  9. Regularity, variability and bi-stability in the activity of cerebellar purkinje cells.

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    Rokni, Dan; Tal, Zohar; Byk, Hananel; Yarom, Yosef

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the membrane potential of Purkinje cells is bi-stable and that this phenomenon underlies bi-modal simple spike firing. Membrane potential alternates between a depolarized state, that is associated with spontaneous simple spike firing (up state), and a quiescent hyperpolarized state (down state). A controversy has emerged regarding the relevance of bi-stability to the awake animal, yet recordings made from behaving cat Purkinje cells have demonstrated that at least 50% of the cells exhibit bi-modal firing. The robustness of the phenomenon in vitro or in anaesthetized systems on the one hand, and the controversy regarding its expression in behaving animals on the other hand suggest that state transitions are under neuronal control. Indeed, we have recently demonstrated that synaptic inputs can induce transitions between the states and suggested that the role of granule cell input is to control the states of Purkinje cells rather than increase or decrease firing rate gradually. We have also shown that the state of a Purkinje cell does not only affect its firing but also the waveform of climbing fiber-driven complex spikes and the associated calcium influx. These findings call for a reconsideration of the role of Purkinje cells in cerebellar function. In this manuscript we review the recent findings on Purkinje cell bi-stability and add some analyses of its effect on the regularity and variability of Purkinje cell activity.

  10. Regularity, variabilty and bi-stability in the activity of cerebellar Purkinje cells

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    Dan Rokni

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that the membrane potential of Purkinje cells is bi-stable and that this phenomenon underlies bi-modal simple spike firing. Membrane potential alternates between a depolarized state, that is associated with spontaneous simple spike firing (up state, and a quiescent hyperpolarized state (down state. A controversy has emerged regarding the relevance of bi-stability to the awake animal, yet recordings made from behaving cat Purkinje cells have demonstrated that at least 50% of the cells exhibit bi-modal firing. The robustness of the phenomenon in-vitro or in anaesthetized systems on the one hand, and the controversy regarding its expression in behaving animals on the other hand suggest that state transitions are under neuronal control. Indeed, we have recently demonstrated that synaptic inputs can induce transitions between the states and suggested that the role of granule cell input is to control the states of Purkinje cells rather than increase or decrease firing rate gradually. We have also shown that the state of a Purkinje cell does not only affect its firing but also the waveform of climbing fiber-driven complex spikes and the associated calcium influx. These findings call for a reconsideration of the role of Purkinje cells in cerebellar function. In this manuscript we review the recent findings on Purkinje cell bi-stability and add some analyses of its effect on the regularity and variability of Purkinje cell activity.

  11. The Knockout of Secretin in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells Impairs Mouse Motor Coordination and Motor Learning

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    Zhang, Li; Chung, Sookja Kim; Chow, Billy Kwok Chong

    2014-01-01

    Secretin (SCT) was first considered to be a gut hormone regulating gastrointestinal functions when discovered. Recently, however, central actions of SCT have drawn intense research interest and are supported by the broad distribution of SCT in specific neuronal populations and by in vivo physiological studies regarding its role in water homeostasis and food intake. The direct action of SCT on a central neuron was first discovered in cerebellar Purkinje cells in which SCT from cerebellar Purkinje cells was found to potentiate GABAergic inhibitory transmission from presynaptic basket cells. Because Purkinje neurons have a major role in motor coordination and learning functions, we hypothesize a behavioral modulatory function for SCT. In this study, we successfully generated a mouse model in which the SCT gene was deleted specifically in Purkinje cells. This mouse line was tested together with SCT knockout and SCT receptor knockout mice in a full battery of behavioral tasks. We found that the knockout of SCT in Purkinje neurons did not affect general motor ability or the anxiety level in open field tests. However, knockout mice did exhibit impairments in neuromuscular strength, motor coordination, and motor learning abilities, as shown by wire hanging, vertical climbing, and rotarod tests. In addition, SCT knockout in Purkinje cells possibly led to the delayed development of motor neurons, as supported by the later occurrence of key neural reflexes. In summary, our data suggest a role in motor coordination and motor learning for SCT expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. PMID:24356714

  12. Physiological and pharmacological properties of Purkinje cells in rat cerebellum degranulated by postnatal x irradiation

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    Woodward, D.J.; Hoffer, B.J.; Altman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Elimination of most granule, basket, and stellate interneurons in the rat cerebellum was achieved by repeated doses of low level x irradiation applied during the first two weeks of postnatal life. Purkinje neurons in these rats, studied when adults, exhibited sustained spiking activity in Halothane anesthetized preparations. Mean firing rates were 35 to 40/sec, no different from normal. Spontaneous bursts presumed to be generated by climbing fiber synaptic activity differed from normal by often consisting of full sized spikes rather than characteristic inactivation responses. Intracellularly observed correlates of bursts consisted of epsp's of several discretely different amplitudes appearing independently in time. Stimulation of white matter revealed evidence for, a) graded synaptic excitation of Purkinje cells indicating more than one converging excitatory synapse, and b) inhibitory actions on Purkinje cells either through a few remaining inhibitory interneurons or through Purkinje cell recurrent collaterals. Iontophoretic drug application studies showed normal chemosensitivity of the Purkinje cell membrane, i.e., excitation by flutamate and inhibition by gamma-amino butyric acid, serotonin, norepinephrine, and 3'5' cyclic AMP. These studies indicate considerable autonomy of Purkinje cell ontogenesis in the absence of normal interneuronal input. A unique synaptic relation only rarely found in normal cerebellum is the innervation of single Purkinje cells by more than one climbing fiber. (U.S.)

  13. Systematic Regional Variations in Purkinje Cell Spiking Patterns

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    Xiao, Jianqiang; Cerminara, Nadia L.; Kotsurovskyy, Yuriy; Aoki, Hanako; Burroughs, Amelia; Wise, Andrew K.; Luo, Yuanjun; Marshall, Sarah P.; Sugihara, Izumi; Apps, Richard; Lang, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the uniform anatomy of the cerebellar cortex, molecular and physiological studies indicate that significant differences exist between cortical regions, suggesting that the spiking activity of Purkinje cells (PCs) in different regions could also show distinct characteristics. To investigate this possibility we obtained extracellular recordings from PCs in different zebrin bands in crus IIa and vermis lobules VIII and IX in anesthetized rats in order to compare PC firing characteristics between zebrin positive (Z+) and negative (Z−) bands. In addition, we analyzed recordings from PCs in the A2 and C1 zones of several lobules in the posterior lobe, which largely contain Z+ and Z− PCs, respectively. In both datasets significant differences in simple spike (SS) activity were observed between cortical regions. Specifically, Z− and C1 PCs had higher SS firing rates than Z+ and A2 PCs, respectively. The irregularity of SS firing (as assessed by measures of interspike interval distribution) was greater in Z+ bands in both absolute and relative terms. The results regarding systematic variations in complex spike (CS) activity were less consistent, suggesting that while real differences can exist, they may be sensitive to other factors than the cortical location of the PC. However, differences in the interactions between SSs and CSs, including the post-CS pause in SSs and post-pause modulation of SSs, were also consistently observed between bands. Similar, though less strong trends were observed in the zonal recordings. These systematic variations in spontaneous firing characteristics of PCs between zebrin bands in vivo, raises the possibility that fundamental differences in information encoding exist between cerebellar cortical regions. PMID:25144311

  14. Systematic regional variations in Purkinje cell spiking patterns.

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    Jianqiang Xiao

    Full Text Available In contrast to the uniform anatomy of the cerebellar cortex, molecular and physiological studies indicate that significant differences exist between cortical regions, suggesting that the spiking activity of Purkinje cells (PCs in different regions could also show distinct characteristics. To investigate this possibility we obtained extracellular recordings from PCs in different zebrin bands in crus IIa and vermis lobules VIII and IX in anesthetized rats in order to compare PC firing characteristics between zebrin positive (Z+ and negative (Z- bands. In addition, we analyzed recordings from PCs in the A2 and C1 zones of several lobules in the posterior lobe, which largely contain Z+ and Z- PCs, respectively. In both datasets significant differences in simple spike (SS activity were observed between cortical regions. Specifically, Z- and C1 PCs had higher SS firing rates than Z+ and A2 PCs, respectively. The irregularity of SS firing (as assessed by measures of interspike interval distribution was greater in Z+ bands in both absolute and relative terms. The results regarding systematic variations in complex spike (CS activity were less consistent, suggesting that while real differences can exist, they may be sensitive to other factors than the cortical location of the PC. However, differences in the interactions between SSs and CSs, including the post-CS pause in SSs and post-pause modulation of SSs, were also consistently observed between bands. Similar, though less strong trends were observed in the zonal recordings. These systematic variations in spontaneous firing characteristics of PCs between zebrin bands in vivo, raises the possibility that fundamental differences in information encoding exist between cerebellar cortical regions.

  15. Modulation, plasticity and pathophysiology of the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse

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    Eriola Hoxha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse represents the point of maximal signal divergence in the cerebellar cortex with an estimated number of about 60 billion synaptic contacts in the rat and 100,000 billions in humans. At the same time, the Purkinje cell dendritic tree is a site of remarkable convergence of more than 100,000 parallel fiber synapses. Parallel fibers activity generates fast postsynaptic currents via AMPA receptors, and slower signals, mediated by mGlu1 receptors, resulting in Purkinje cell depolarization accompanied by sharp calcium elevation within dendritic regions. Long-term depression and long-term potentiation have been widely described for the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse and have been proposed as mechanisms for motor learning. The mechanisms of induction for LTP and LTD involve different signaling mechanisms within the presynaptic terminal and/or at the postsynaptic site, promoting enduring modification in the neurotransmitter release and change in responsiveness to the neurotransmitter. The parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse is finely modulated by several neurotransmitters, including serotonin, noradrenaline, and acetylcholine. The ability of these neuromodulators to gate LTP and LTD at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse could, at least in part, explain their effect on cerebellar-dependent learning and memory paradigms. Overall, these findings have important implications for understanding the cerebellar involvement in a series of pathological conditions, ranging from ataxia to autism. For example, parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse dysfunctions have been identified in several murine models of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA types 1, 3, 5 and 27. In some cases, the defect is specific for the AMPA receptor signaling (SCA27, while in others the mGlu1 pathway is affected (SCA1, 3, 5. Interestingly, the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse has been shown to be hyper-functional in a mutant mouse model of autism

  16. Purkinje Cell Signaling Deficits in Animal Models of Ataxia

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    Eriola Hoxha

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purkinje cell (PC dysfunction or degeneration is the most frequent finding in animal models with ataxic symptoms. Mutations affecting intrinsic membrane properties can lead to ataxia by altering the firing rate of PCs or their firing pattern. However, the relationship between specific firing alterations and motor symptoms is not yet clear, and in some cases PC dysfunction precedes the onset of ataxic signs. Moreover, a great variety of ionic and synaptic mechanisms can affect PC signaling, resulting in different features of motor dysfunction. Mutations affecting Na+ channels (NaV1.1, NaV1.6, NaVβ4, Fgf14 or Rer1 reduce the firing rate of PCs, mainly via an impairment of the Na+ resurgent current. Mutations that reduce Kv3 currents limit the firing rate frequency range. Mutations of Kv1 channels act mainly on inhibitory interneurons, generating excessive GABAergic signaling onto PCs, resulting in episodic ataxia. Kv4.3 mutations are responsible for a complex syndrome with several neurologic dysfunctions including ataxia. Mutations of either Cav or BK channels have similar consequences, consisting in a disruption of the firing pattern of PCs, with loss of precision, leading to ataxia. Another category of pathogenic mechanisms of ataxia regards alterations of synaptic signals arriving at the PC. At the parallel fiber (PF-PC synapse, mutations of glutamate delta-2 (GluD2 or its ligand Crbl1 are responsible for the loss of synaptic contacts, abolishment of long-term depression (LTD and motor deficits. At the same synapse, a correct function of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1 receptors is necessary to avoid ataxia. Failure of climbing fiber (CF maturation and establishment of PC mono-innervation occurs in a great number of mutant mice, including mGlu1 and its transduction pathway, GluD2, semaphorins and their receptors. All these models have in common the alteration of PC output signals, due to a variety of mechanisms affecting incoming

  17. Transient developmental Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes in healthy and ataxic mouse cerebellum

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    Lovisa Ljungberg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Information is carried out of the cerebellar cortical microcircuit via action potentials propagated along Purkinje cell axons. In several human neurodegenerative diseases, focal axonal swellings on Purkinje cells – known as torpedoes – have been associated with Purkinje cell loss. Interestingly, torpedoes are also reported to appear transiently during development in rat cerebellum. The function of Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes in health as well as in disease is poorly understood. We investigated the properties of developmental torpedoes in the postnatal mouse cerebellum of wildtype and transgenic mice. We found that Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes transiently appeared on axons of Purkinje neurons, with the largest number of torpedoes observed at postnatal day 11 (P11. This was after peak developmental apoptosis had occurred, when Purkinje cell counts in a lobule were static, suggesting that most developmental torpedoes appear on axons of neurons that persist into adulthood. We found that developmental torpedoes were not associated with a presynaptic GABAergic marker, indicating that they are not synapses. They were seldom found at axonal collateral branch points, and lacked microglia enrichment, suggesting that they are unlikely to be involved in axonal refinement. Interestingly, we found several differences between developmental torpedoes and disease-related torpedoes: developmental torpedoes occured largely on myelinated axons, and were not associated with changes in basket cell innervation on their parent soma. Disease-related torpedoes are typically reported to contain neurofilament; while the majority of developmental torpedoes did as well, a fraction of smaller developmental torpedoes did not. These differences indicate that developmental torpedoes may not be functionally identical to disease-related torpedoes. To study this further, we used a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6, and found elevated disease

  18. Quantitative neuroanatomy of all Purkinje cells with light sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis

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    Ludovico eSilvestri

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the cytoarchitecture of mammalian central nervous system on a brain-wide scale is becoming a compelling need in neuroscience. For example, realistic modeling of brain activity requires the definition of quantitative features of large neuronal populations in the whole brain. Quantitative anatomical maps will also be crucial to classify the cytoarchtitectonic abnormalities associated with neuronal pathologies in a high reproducible and reliable manner. In this paper, we apply recent advances in optical microscopy and image analysis to characterize the spatial distribution of Purkinje cells across the whole cerebellum. Light sheet microscopy was used to image with micron-scale resolution a fixed and cleared cerebellum of an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all Purkinje cells are fluorescently labeled. A fast and scalable algorithm for fully automated cell identification was applied on the image to extract the position of all the fluorescent Purkinje cells. This vectorized representation of the cell population allows a thorough characterization of the complex three-dimensional distribution of the neurons, highlighting the presence of gaps inside the lamellar organization of Purkinje cells, whose density is believed to play a significant role in autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, clustering analysis of the localized somata permits dividing the whole cerebellum in groups of Purkinje cells with high spatial correlation, suggesting new possibilities of anatomical partition. The quantitative approach presented here can be extended to study the distribution of different types of cell in many brain regions and across the whole encephalon, providing a robust base for building realistic computational models of the brain, and for unbiased morphological tissue screening in presence of pathologies and/or drug treatments.

  19. Red sorrel (Hibiscus Sabdariffa) prevents the ethanol-induced deficits of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum.

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    Suryanti, S; Partadiredja, G; Atthobari, J

    2015-01-01

    The present study is aimed at investigating the possible protective effects of H. sabdariffa on ethanol-elicited deficits of motor coordination and estimated total number of the Purkinje cells of the cerebellums of adolescent male Wistar rats. Forty male Wistar rats aged 21 days were divided into five groups. Na/wtr group was given water orally and injected with normal saline intra peritoneally (ip). Eth/wtr group was given water orally and ethanol (ip). Another three experimental groups (Eth/Hsab) were given different dosages of H. sabdariffa and ethanol (ip). All groups were treated intermittently for the total period of treatment of two weeks. The motor coordination of rats was tested prior and subsequent to the treatments. The rats were euthanized, and their cerebellums were examined. The total number of Purkinje cells was estimated using physical fractionator method. Upon revolving drum test, the number of falls of rats increased following ethanol treatment. There was no significant difference between the total number of falls prior and subsequent to treatment in all Eth/Hsab groups. The estimated total number of Purkinje cells in Eth/Hsab groups was higher than in Eth/wtr group. H. sabdariffa may prevent the ethanol-induced deficits of motor coordination and estimated total number of Purkinje cells of the cerebellums in adolescent rats (Tab. 3, Fig. 1, Ref. 42).

  20. A new approach for determining phase response curves reveals that Purkinje cells can act as perfect integrators.

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    Elena Phoka

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar Purkinje cells display complex intrinsic dynamics. They fire spontaneously, exhibit bistability, and via mutual network interactions are involved in the generation of high frequency oscillations and travelling waves of activity. To probe the dynamical properties of Purkinje cells we measured their phase response curves (PRCs. PRCs quantify the change in spike phase caused by a stimulus as a function of its temporal position within the interspike interval, and are widely used to predict neuronal responses to more complex stimulus patterns. Significant variability in the interspike interval during spontaneous firing can lead to PRCs with a low signal-to-noise ratio, requiring averaging over thousands of trials. We show using electrophysiological experiments and simulations that the PRC calculated in the traditional way by sampling the interspike interval with brief current pulses is biased. We introduce a corrected approach for calculating PRCs which eliminates this bias. Using our new approach, we show that Purkinje cell PRCs change qualitatively depending on the firing frequency of the cell. At high firing rates, Purkinje cells exhibit single-peaked, or monophasic PRCs. Surprisingly, at low firing rates, Purkinje cell PRCs are largely independent of phase, resembling PRCs of ideal non-leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. These results indicate that Purkinje cells can act as perfect integrators at low firing rates, and that the integration mode of Purkinje cells depends on their firing rate.

  1. The dynamic relationship between cerebellar Purkinje cell simple spikes and the spikelet number of complex spikes.

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    Burroughs, Amelia; Wise, Andrew K; Xiao, Jianqiang; Houghton, Conor; Tang, Tianyu; Suh, Colleen Y; Lang, Eric J; Apps, Richard; Cerminara, Nadia L

    2017-01-01

    Purkinje cells are the sole output of the cerebellar cortex and fire two distinct types of action potential: simple spikes and complex spikes. Previous studies have mainly considered complex spikes as unitary events, even though the waveform is composed of varying numbers of spikelets. The extent to which differences in spikelet number affect simple spike activity (and vice versa) remains unclear. We found that complex spikes with greater numbers of spikelets are preceded by higher simple spike firing rates but, following the complex spike, simple spikes are reduced in a manner that is graded with spikelet number. This dynamic interaction has important implications for cerebellar information processing, and suggests that complex spike spikelet number may maintain Purkinje cells within their operational range. Purkinje cells are central to cerebellar function because they form the sole output of the cerebellar cortex. They exhibit two distinct types of action potential: simple spikes and complex spikes. It is widely accepted that interaction between these two types of impulse is central to cerebellar cortical information processing. Previous investigations of the interactions between simple spikes and complex spikes have mainly considered complex spikes as unitary events. However, complex spikes are composed of an initial large spike followed by a number of secondary components, termed spikelets. The number of spikelets within individual complex spikes is highly variable and the extent to which differences in complex spike spikelet number affects simple spike activity (and vice versa) remains poorly understood. In anaesthetized adult rats, we have found that Purkinje cells recorded from the posterior lobe vermis and hemisphere have high simple spike firing frequencies that precede complex spikes with greater numbers of spikelets. This finding was also evident in a small sample of Purkinje cells recorded from the posterior lobe hemisphere in awake cats. In addition

  2. Selective Transgenic Expression of Mutant Ubiquitin in Purkinje Cell Stripes in the Cerebellum.

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    Verheijen, Bert M; Gentier, Romina J G; Hermes, Denise J H P; van Leeuwen, Fred W; Hopkins, David A

    2017-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is one of the major mechanisms for protein breakdown in cells, targeting proteins for degradation by enzymatically conjugating them to ubiquitin molecules. Intracellular accumulation of ubiquitin-B +1 (UBB +1 ), a frameshift mutant of ubiquitin-B, is indicative of a dysfunctional UPS and has been implicated in several disorders, including neurodegenerative disease. UBB +1 -expressing transgenic mice display widespread labeling for UBB +1 in brain and exhibit behavioral deficits. Here, we show that UBB +1 is specifically expressed in a subset of parasagittal stripes of Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex of a UBB +1 -expressing mouse model. This expression pattern is reminiscent of that of the constitutively expressed Purkinje cell antigen HSP25, a small heat shock protein with neuroprotective properties.

  3. Changes in Purkinje cell simple spike encoding of reach kinematics during adaption to a mechanical perturbation.

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    Hewitt, Angela L; Popa, Laurentiu S; Ebner, Timothy J

    2015-01-21

    The cerebellum is essential in motor learning. At the cellular level, changes occur in both the simple spike and complex spike firing of Purkinje cells. Because simple spike discharge reflects the main output of the cerebellar cortex, changes in simple spike firing likely reflect the contribution of the cerebellum to the adapted behavior. Therefore, we investigated in Rhesus monkeys how the representation of arm kinematics in Purkinje cell simple spike discharge changed during adaptation to mechanical perturbations of reach movements. Monkeys rapidly adapted to a novel assistive or resistive perturbation along the direction of the reach. Adaptation consisted of matching the amplitude and timing of the perturbation to minimize its effect on the reach. In a majority of Purkinje cells, simple spike firing recorded before and during adaptation demonstrated significant changes in position, velocity, and acceleration sensitivity. The timing of the simple spike representations change within individual cells, including shifts in predictive versus feedback signals. At the population level, feedback-based encoding of position increases early in learning and velocity decreases. Both timing changes reverse later in learning. The complex spike discharge was only weakly modulated by the perturbations, demonstrating that the changes in simple spike firing can be independent of climbing fiber input. In summary, we observed extensive alterations in individual Purkinje cell encoding of reach kinematics, although the movements were nearly identical in the baseline and adapted states. Therefore, adaption to mechanical perturbation of a reaching movement is accompanied by widespread modifications in the simple spike encoding. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351106-19$15.00/0.

  4. Activity-Dependent Plasticity of Spike Pauses in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

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    Giorgio Grasselli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasticity of intrinsic excitability has been described in several types of neurons, but the significance of non-synaptic mechanisms in brain plasticity and learning remains elusive. Cerebellar Purkinje cells are inhibitory neurons that spontaneously fire action potentials at high frequencies and regulate activity in their target cells in the cerebellar nuclei by generating a characteristic spike burst-pause sequence upon synaptic activation. Using patch-clamp recordings from mouse Purkinje cells, we find that depolarization-triggered intrinsic plasticity enhances spike firing and shortens the duration of spike pauses. Pause plasticity is absent from mice lacking SK2-type potassium channels (SK2−/− mice and in occlusion experiments using the SK channel blocker apamin, while apamin wash-in mimics pause reduction. Our findings demonstrate that spike pauses can be regulated through an activity-dependent, exclusively non-synaptic, SK2 channel-dependent mechanism and suggest that pause plasticity—by altering the Purkinje cell output—may be crucial to cerebellar information storage and learning.

  5. Apoptosis of Purkinje and granular cells of the cerebellum following chronic ethanol intake.

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    Oliveira, Suelen A; Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo A; Fioruci-Fontanelli, Beatriz Aparecida; Lizarte Neto, Fermino Sanches; Novais, Paulo Cezar; Tirapelli, Luiz Fernando; Oishi, Jorge Camargo; Takase, Luiz Fernando; Stefanini, Maira Aparecida; Martinez, Marcelo; Martinez, Francisco Eduardo

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol alters motricity, learning, cognition, and cellular metabolism in the cerebellum. We evaluated the effect of ethanol on apoptosis in Golgi, Purkinje, and granule cells of the cerebellum in adult rats. There were two groups of 20 rats: a control group that did not consume ethanol and an experimental group of UChA rats that consumed ethanol at 10% (cerebellum of adult UChA rats.

  6. Impaired succinic dehydrogenase activity of rat Purkinje cell mitochondria during aging.

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    Fattoretti, P; Bertoni-Freddari, C; Caselli, U; Paoloni, R; Meier-Ruge, W

    1998-03-16

    The perikaryal Purkinje cell mitochondria positive to the copper ferrocyanide histochemical reaction for succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) have been investigated by means of semiautomatic morphometric methods in rats of 3, 12 and 24 months of age. The number of organelles/microm3 of Purkinje cell cytoplasm (Numeric density: Nv), the average mitochondrial volume (V) and the mitochondrial volume fraction (Volume density: Vv) were the ultrastructural parameters taken into account. Nv was significantly higher at 12 than at 3 and 24 months of age. V was significantly decreased at 12 and 24 months of age, but no difference was envisaged between adult and old rats. Vv was significantly decreased in old animals vs. the other age groups. In young and old rats, the percentage of organelles larger than 0.32 microm3 was 13.5 and 11%, respectively, while these enlarged mitochondria accounted for less than 1% in the adult group. Since SDH activity is of critical importance when energy demand is high, the marked decrease of Vv supports an impaired capacity of the old Purkinje cells to match actual energy supply at sustained transmission of the nervous impulse. However, the high percentage of enlarged organelles found in old rats may witness a morphofunctional compensatory response.

  7. A novel approach to non-biased systematic random sampling: a stereologic estimate of Purkinje cells in the human cerebellum.

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    Agashiwala, Rajiv M; Louis, Elan D; Hof, Patrick R; Perl, Daniel P

    2008-10-21

    Non-biased systematic sampling using the principles of stereology provides accurate quantitative estimates of objects within neuroanatomic structures. However, the basic principles of stereology are not optimally suited for counting objects that selectively exist within a limited but complex and convoluted portion of the sample, such as occurs when counting cerebellar Purkinje cells. In an effort to quantify Purkinje cells in association with certain neurodegenerative disorders, we developed a new method for stereologic sampling of the cerebellar cortex, involving calculating the volume of the cerebellar tissues, identifying and isolating the Purkinje cell layer and using this information to extrapolate non-biased systematic sampling data to estimate the total number of Purkinje cells in the tissues. Using this approach, we counted Purkinje cells in the right cerebella of four human male control specimens, aged 41, 67, 70 and 84 years, and estimated the total Purkinje cell number for the four entire cerebella to be 27.03, 19.74, 20.44 and 22.03 million cells, respectively. The precision of the method is seen when comparing the density of the cells within the tissue: 266,274, 173,166, 167,603 and 183,575 cells/cm3, respectively. Prior literature documents Purkinje cell counts ranging from 14.8 to 30.5 million cells. These data demonstrate the accuracy of our approach. Our novel approach, which offers an improvement over previous methodologies, is of value for quantitative work of this nature. This approach could be applied to morphometric studies of other similarly complex tissues as well.

  8. Increased protein kinase C gamma activity induces Purkinje cell pathology in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia 14.

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    Ji, Jingmin; Hassler, Melanie L; Shimobayashi, Etsuko; Paka, Nagendher; Streit, Raphael; Kapfhammer, Josef P

    2014-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are hereditary diseases leading to Purkinje cell degeneration and cerebellar dysfunction. Most forms of SCA are caused by expansion of CAG repeats similar to other polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease. In contrast, in the autosomal dominant SCA-14 the disease is caused by mutations in the protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) gene which is a well characterized signaling molecule in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The study of SCA-14, therefore, offers the unique opportunity to reveal the molecular and pathological mechanism eventually leading to Purkinje cell dysfunction and degeneration. We have created a mouse model of SCA-14 in which PKCγ protein with a mutation found in SCA-14 is specifically expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. We find that in mice expressing the mutated PKCγ protein the morphology of Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures is drastically altered and mimics closely the morphology seen after pharmacological PKC activation. Similar morphological abnormalities were seen in localized areas of the cerebellum of juvenile transgenic mice in vivo. In adult transgenic mice there is evidence for some localized loss of Purkinje cells but there is no overall cerebellar atrophy. Transgenic mice show a mild cerebellar ataxia revealed by testing on the rotarod and on the walking beam. Our findings provide evidence for both an increased PKCγ activity in Purkinje cells in vivo and for pathological changes typical for cerebellar disease thus linking the increased and dysregulated activity of PKCγ tightly to the development of cerebellar disease in SCA-14 and possibly also in other forms of SCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Simple Mathematical Model Inspired by the Purkinje Cells: From Delayed Travelling Waves to Fractional Diffusion.

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    Dipierro, Serena; Valdinoci, Enrico

    2018-07-01

    Recently, several experiments have demonstrated the existence of fractional diffusion in the neuronal transmission occurring in the Purkinje cells, whose malfunctioning is known to be related to the lack of voluntary coordination and the appearance of tremors. Also, a classical mathematical feature is that (fractional) parabolic equations possess smoothing effects, in contrast with the case of hyperbolic equations, which typically exhibit shocks and discontinuities. In this paper, we show how a simple toy-model of a highly ramified structure, somehow inspired by that of the Purkinje cells, may produce a fractional diffusion via the superposition of travelling waves that solve a hyperbolic equation. This could suggest that the high ramification of the Purkinje cells might have provided an evolutionary advantage of "smoothing" the transmission of signals and avoiding shock propagations (at the price of slowing a bit such transmission). Although an experimental confirmation of the possibility of such evolutionary advantage goes well beyond the goals of this paper, we think that it is intriguing, as a mathematical counterpart, to consider the time fractional diffusion as arising from the superposition of delayed travelling waves in highly ramified transmission media. The case of a travelling concave parabola with sufficiently small curvature is explicitly computed. The new link that we propose between time fractional diffusion and hyperbolic equation also provides a novelty with respect to the usual paradigm relating time fractional diffusion with parabolic equations in the limit. This paper is written in such a way as to be of interest to both biologists and mathematician alike. In order to accomplish this aim, both complete explanations of the objects considered and detailed lists of references are provided.

  10. Absence of Rapid Propagation through the Purkinje Network as a Potential Cause of Line Block in the Human Heart with Left Bundle Branch Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Jun-Ichi; Washio, Takumi; Nakagawa, Machiko; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kadooka, Yoshimasa; Kariya, Taro; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yoko; Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Nagai, Ryozo; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2018-01-01

    Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy is an effective device therapy for heart failure patients with conduction block. However, a problem with this invasive technique is the nearly 30% of non-responders. A number of studies have reported a functional line of block of cardiac excitation propagation in responders. However, this can only be detected using non-contact endocardial mapping. Further, although the line of block is considered a sign of responders to therapy, the mechanism remains unclear. Methods: Herein, we created two patient-specific heart models with conduction block and simulated the propagation of excitation based on a cellmodel of electrophysiology. In one model with a relatively narrow QRS width (176 ms), we modeled the Purkinje network using a thin endocardial layer with rapid conduction. To reproduce a wider QRS complex (200 ms) in the second model, we eliminated the Purkinje network, and we simulated the endocardial mapping by solving the inverse problem according to the actual mapping system. Results: We successfully observed the line of block using non-contact mapping in the model without the rapid propagation of excitation through the Purkinje network, although the excitation in the wall propagated smoothly. This model of slow conduction also reproduced the characteristic properties of the line of block, including dense isochronal lines and fractionated local electrocardiograms. Further, simulation of ventricular pacing from the lateral wall shifted the location of the line of block. By contrast, in the model with the Purkinje network, propagation of excitation in the endocardial map faithfully followed the actual propagation in the wall, without showing the line of block. Finally, switching the mode of propagation between the two models completely reversed these findings. Conclusions: Our simulation data suggest that the absence of rapid propagation of excitation through the Purkinje network is the major cause of the functional line

  11. Releasing dentate nucleus cells from Purkinje cell inhibition generates output from the cerebrocerebellum.

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    Takahiro Ishikawa

    Full Text Available The cerebellum generates its vast amount of output to the cerebral cortex through the dentate nucleus (DN that is essential for precise limb movements in primates. Nuclear cells in DN generate burst activity prior to limb movement, and inactivation of DN results in cerebellar ataxia. The question is how DN cells become active under intensive inhibitory drive from Purkinje cells (PCs. There are two excitatory inputs to DN, mossy fiber and climbing fiber collaterals, but neither of them appears to have sufficient strength for generation of burst activity in DN. Therefore, we can assume two possible mechanisms: post-inhibitory rebound excitation and disinhibition. If rebound excitation works, phasic excitation of PCs and a concomitant inhibition of DN cells should precede the excitation of DN cells. On the other hand, if disinhibition plays a primary role, phasic suppression of PCs and activation of DN cells should be observed at the same timing. To examine these two hypotheses, we compared the activity patterns of PCs in the cerebrocerebellum and DN cells during step-tracking wrist movements in three Japanese monkeys. As a result, we found that the majority of wrist-movement-related PCs were suppressed prior to movement onset and the majority of wrist-movement-related DN cells showed concurrent burst activity without prior suppression. In a minority of PCs and DN cells, movement-related increases and decreases in activity, respectively, developed later. These activity patterns suggest that the initial burst activity in DN cells is generated by reduced inhibition from PCs, i.e., by disinhibition. Our results indicate that suppression of PCs, which has been considered secondary to facilitation, plays the primary role in generating outputs from DN. Our findings provide a new perspective on the mechanisms used by PCs to influence limb motor control and on the plastic changes that underlie motor learning in the cerebrocerebellum.

  12. Sensorimotor-correlated discharge recorded from ensembles of cerebellar Purkinje cells varies across the estrous cycle of the rat.

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    Smith, S S

    1995-09-01

    1. In the present study, locomotor-correlated activity of cerebellar Purkinje cells, recorded using arrays of microwires chronically implanted in adult female rats, was examined across estrous-cycle-associated fluctuations in endogenous sex steroids. Ongoing studies from this laboratory have shown that systemic and local administration of the sex steroid 17 beta-estradiol (E2) augments excitatory responses of cerebellar Purkinje cells to iontophoretically applied glutamate, recorded in vivo from anesthetized female rats. In addition, this steroid potentiated discharge correlated with limb movement. For the present study, extracellular single-unit activity was recorded from as many as 5-11 Purkinje cells simultaneously during treadmill locomotion paradigms. Motor modulation of activity was recorded across three to five consecutive estrous cycles from behaviorally identified cohorts of neurons to test the hypothesis that fluctuations in endogenous sex steroids alter motor modulation of Purkinje cell discharge. 2. Locomotor-associated discharge correlated with treadmill locomotion was increased by a mean of 47% on proestrus, when E2 levels are elevated, relative to diestrus 1. These changes in discharge rate during treadmill locomotion were of significantly greater magnitude than corresponding cyclic alterations in discharge during stationary periods. 3. Correlations with the circadian cycle were also significant, because peak levels of locomotor-associated discharge on the night of behavioral estrus, following elevations in circulating E2, were on average 67% greater than corresponding discharge recorded during the light (proestrus). 4. Alterations in the step cycle were also observed across the estrous cycle: significant decreases in the duration of the flexion phase (by 265 ms, P estrus compared with diestrus. 5. When recorded on estrus, Purkinje cell discharge correlated with the stance or flexion phase of the step cycle was greater in magnitude and preceded the

  13. TACTILE STIMULATION EVOKES LONG-LASTING POTENTIATION OF PURKINJE CELL DISCHARGE IN VIVO

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    Ramakrishnan eKanchipuram

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the cerebellar network, a precise relationship between plasticity and neuronal discharge has been predicted. However, the potential generation of persistent changes in PC spike discharge as a consequence of plasticity following natural stimulation patterns has not been clearly determined. Here we show that facial tactile stimuli organized in theta-patterns can induce stereotyped NMDA and GABA-A receptor-dependent changes in Purkinje cell (PCs and molecular layer interneuron (MLIs firing: invariably, all PCs showed a long-lasting increase (spike-related potentiation or SR-P and MLIs a long-lasting decrease (spike-related suppression or SR-S in baseline activity and spike response probability. These observations suggests that natural sensory stimulation engages multiple long-term plastic changes that are distributed along the mossy fiber – parallel fiber pathway and operate synergistically to potentiate spike generation in PCs. In contrast, theta-pattern electrical stimulation of PFs indistinctly induced SR-P and SR-S both in PCs and MLIs, suggesting that natural sensory stimulation preordinates plasticity upstream of the PF-PC synapse. All these effects occurred in the absence of complex spike changes, supporting the theoretical prediction that Purkinje cell activity is potentiated when the mossy fiber - parallel fiber system is activated in the absence of conjunctive climbing fiber activity.

  14. Geranylgeranyltransferase I is essential for dendritic development of cerebellar Purkinje cells

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    Wu Kong-Yan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During cerebellar development, Purkinje cells (PCs form the most elaborate dendritic trees among neurons in the brain, but the mechanism regulating PC arborization remains largely unknown. Geranylgeranyltransferase I (GGT is a prenyltransferase that is responsible for lipid modification of several signaling proteins, such as Rho family small GTPase Rac1, which has been shown to be involved in neuronal morphogenesis. Here we show that GGT plays an important role in dendritic development of PCs. Results We found that GGT was abundantly expressed in the developing rat cerebellum, in particular molecular layer (ML, the region enriched with PC dendrites. Inhibition or down-regulation of GGT using small interference RNA (siRNA inhibited dendritic development of PCs. In contrast, up-regulation of GGT promoted dendritic arborization of PCs. Furthermore, neuronal depolarization induced by high K+ or treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF promoted membrane association of Rac1 and dendritic development of PCs in cultured cerebellar slices. The effect of BDNF or high K+ was inhibited by inhibition or down-regulation of GGT. Conclusion Our results indicate that GGT plays an important role in Purkinje cell development, and suggest a novel role of GGT in neuronal morphogenesis in vivo.

  15. Dose response relationship of disturbed migration of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum due to X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmanto, W.; Inouye, Minoru; Hayasaka, Shizu; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Aolad, H.; Murata, Yoshiharu

    1998-01-01

    Pregnant rats were exposed to 2.0, 2.25 or 2.5 Gy X-irradiation on gestation day 21. Pups were sacrificed 12 hr after exposure, and on postnatal day 5 (P5), P7 and P9. Their cerebella were observed immunohistochemically using anti-inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate (IP3) receptor antibody to identify Purkinje cells. These cells were disturbed to migrate and remained in the internal granular layer and white matter of the cerebellum. They had short dendrites, and some showed an abnormal direction of dendrites in rats exposed to 2.25 or 2.5 Gy. Alignment of Purkinje cells was also disturbed when examined either on P5, P7 or P9 especially by doses of 2.25 and 2.5 Gy. There was a relationship between X-ray doses and the number of cells piling up in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. The dose-response relationship with the number of ectopic Purkinje cells was noted in the anterior lobes of the cerebellum. (author)

  16. Prophylactic role of melatonin against radiation induced damage in mouse cerebellum with special reference to Purkinje cells

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    Sisodia, Rashmi; Kumari, Seema; Verma, Rajesh Kumar; Bhatia, A L [Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302004 (India)

    2006-06-15

    Melatonin, a hormone with a proven antioxidative efficacy, crosses all morphophysiological barriers, including the blood-brain barrier, and distributes throughout the cell. The present study is an attempt to investigate the prophylactic influence of a chronic low level of melatonin against an acute radiation induced oxidative stress in the cerebellum of Swiss albino mice, with special reference to Purkinje cells. After 15 days of treatment the mice were sacrificed at various intervals from 1 to 30 days. Biochemical parameters included lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione (GSH) levels as the endpoints. The quantitative study included alterations in number and volume of Purkinje cells. Swiss albino mice were orally administered a very low dose of melatonin (0.25 mg/mouse/day) for 15 consecutive days before single exposure to 4 Gy gamma radiation. Melatonin checked the augmented levels of LPO, by approximately 55%, by day 30 day post-exposure. Radiation induced depleted levels of GSH could be raised by 68.9% by day 30 post-exposure. Radiation exposure resulted in a reduction of the volume of Purkinje cells and their total number. The administration of melatonin significantly protected against the radiation induced decreases in Purkinje cell volume and number. Results indicate the antioxidative properties of melatonin resulting in its prophylactic property against radiation induced biochemical and cellular alterations in the cerebellum. The findings support the idea that melatonin may be used as an anti-irradiation drug due to its potent free radical scavenging and antioxidative efficacy.

  17. Novel experimental results in human cardiac electrophysiology: measurement of the Purkinje fibre action potential from the undiseased human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Norbert; Szél, Tamás; Jost, Norbert; Tóth, András; Gy Papp, Julius; Varró, András

    2015-09-01

    Data obtained from canine cardiac electrophysiology studies are often extrapolated to the human heart. However, it has been previously demonstrated that because of the lower density of its K(+) currents, the human ventricular action potential has a less extensive repolarization reserve. Since the relevance of canine data to the human heart has not yet been fully clarified, the aim of the present study was to determine for the first time the action potentials of undiseased human Purkinje fibres (PFs) and to compare them directly with those of dog PFs. All measurements were performed at 37 °C using the conventional microelectrode technique. At a stimulation rate of 1 Hz, the plateau potential of human PFs is more positive (8.0 ± 1.8 vs 8.6 ± 3.4 mV, n = 7), while the amplitude of the spike is less pronounced. The maximal rate of depolarization is significantly lower in human PKs than in canine PFs (406.7 ± 62 vs 643 ± 36 V/s, respectively, n = 7). We assume that the appreciable difference in the protein expression profiles of the 2 species may underlie these important disparities. Therefore, caution is advised when canine PF data are extrapolated to humans, and further experiments are required to investigate the characteristics of human PF repolarization and its possible role in arrhythmogenesis.

  18. Abnormal nuclear envelope in the cerebellar Purkinje cells and impaired motor learning in DYT11 myoclonus-dystonia mouse models.

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    Yokoi, Fumiaki; Dang, Mai T; Yang, Guang; Li, Jindong; Doroodchi, Atbin; Zhou, Tong; Li, Yuqing

    2012-02-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a movement disorder characterized by myoclonic jerks with dystonia. DYT11 M-D is caused by mutations in SGCE which codes for ɛ-sarcoglycan. SGCE is maternally imprinted and paternally expressed. Abnormal nuclear envelope has been reported in mouse models of DYT1 generalized torsion dystonia. However, it is not known whether similar alterations occur in DYT11 M-D. We developed a mouse model of DYT11 M-D using paternally inherited Sgce heterozygous knockout (Sgce KO) mice and reported that they had myoclonus and motor coordination and learning deficits in the beam-walking test. However, the specific brain regions that contribute to these phenotypes have not been identified. Since ɛ-sarcoglycan is highly expressed in the cerebellar Purkinje cells, here we examined the nuclear envelope in these cells using a transmission electron microscope and found that they are abnormal in Sgce KO mice. Our results put DYT11 M-D in a growing family of nuclear envelopathies. To analyze the effect of loss of ɛ-sarcoglycan function in the cerebellar Purkinje cells, we produced paternally inherited cerebellar Purkinje cell-specific Sgce conditional knockout (Sgce pKO) mice. Sgce pKO mice showed motor learning deficits, while they did not show abnormal nuclear envelope in the cerebellar Purkinje cells, robust motor deficits, or myoclonus. The results suggest that ɛ-sarcoglycan in the cerebellar Purkinje cells contributes to the motor learning, while loss of ɛ-sarcoglycan in other brain regions may contribute to nuclear envelope abnormality, myoclonus and motor coordination deficits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dendritic excitability modulates dendritic information processing in a purkinje cell model.

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    Coop, Allan D; Cornelis, Hugo; Santamaria, Fidel

    2010-01-01

    Using an electrophysiological compartmental model of a Purkinje cell we quantified the contribution of individual active dendritic currents to processing of synaptic activity from granule cells. We used mutual information as a measure to quantify the information from the total excitatory input current (I(Glu)) encoded in each dendritic current. In this context, each active current was considered an information channel. Our analyses showed that most of the information was encoded by the calcium (I(CaP)) and calcium activated potassium (I(Kc)) currents. Mutual information between I(Glu) and I(CaP) and I(Kc) was sensitive to different levels of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity that, at the same time, resulted in the same firing rate at the soma. Since dendritic excitability could be a mechanism to regulate information processing in neurons we quantified the changes in mutual information between I(Glu) and all Purkinje cell currents as a function of the density of dendritic Ca (g(CaP)) and Kca (g(Kc)) conductances. We extended our analysis to determine the window of temporal integration of I(Glu) by I(CaP) and I(Kc) as a function of channel density and synaptic activity. The window of information integration has a stronger dependence on increasing values of g(Kc) than on g(CaP), but at high levels of synaptic stimulation information integration is reduced to a few milliseconds. Overall, our results show that different dendritic conductances differentially encode synaptic activity and that dendritic excitability and the level of synaptic activity regulate the flow of information in dendrites.

  20. Inositol Hexakisphosphate Kinase-3 Regulates the Morphology and Synapse Formation of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells via Spectrin/Adducin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chenglai; Xu, Jing; Li, Ruo-Jing; Crawford, Joshua A.; Khan, A. Basit; Ma, Ting Martin; Cha, Jiyoung Y.; Snowman, Adele M.; Pletnikov, Mikhail V.

    2015-01-01

    The inositol hexakisphosphate kinases (IP6Ks) are the principal enzymes that generate inositol pyrophosphates. There are three IP6Ks (IP6K1, 2, and 3). Functions of IP6K1 and IP6K2 have been substantially delineated, but little is known of IP6K3's role in normal physiology, especially in the brain. To elucidate functions of IP6K3, we generated mice with targeted deletion of IP6K3. We demonstrate that IP6K3 is highly concentrated in the brain in cerebellar Purkinje cells. IP6K3 physiologically binds to the cytoskeletal proteins adducin and spectrin, whose mutual interactions are perturbed in IP6K3-null mutants. Consequently, IP6K3 knock-out cerebella manifest abnormalities in Purkinje cell structure and synapse number, and the mutant mice display deficits in motor learning and coordination. Thus, IP6K3 is a major determinant of cytoskeletal disposition and function of cerebellar Purkinje cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We identified and cloned a family of three inositol hexakisphosphate kinases (IP6Ks) that generate the inositol pyrophosphates, most notably 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (IP7). Of these, IP6K3 has been least characterized. In the present study we generated IP6K3 knock-out mice and show that IP6K3 is highly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. IP6K3-deleted mice display defects of motor learning and coordination. IP6K3-null mice manifest aberrations of Purkinje cells with a diminished number of synapses. IP6K3 interacts with the cytoskeletal proteins spectrin and adducin whose altered disposition in IP6K3 knock-out mice may mediate phenotypic features of the mutant mice. These findings afford molecular/cytoskeletal mechanisms by which the inositol polyphosphate system impacts brain function. PMID:26245967

  1. The effect of the timing of prenatal exposure to x-irradiation on Purkinje cell numbers in rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, T.; Satriotomo, I.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kuma, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Gu

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Prenatal exposure of the developing brain to X-irradiation is known to cause various deleterious consequences. We have examined the effects of prenatal X-irradiation on the development of the cerebellum. Wistar rats were exposed to 1.5 Gy X-irradiation either on the 14, 15 or 16th day of gestation (E14, E15, E16). Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. At seven postnatal weeks of age, male rats were deeply anesthetized and killed by intracardiac perfusion with 2.5 % glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M phosphate buffer. The unbiased stereological procedure known as the fractionator method was used to estimate the total number of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. Body and cerebellar weights from E14 and E15, but not E16 irradiated rats showed significant deficits compared to control animals. Rats irradiated on E16 and control rats had about 285,100 - 304,800 Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. There was no significant difference between these values. However, E14 and E15 irradiated animals had about 117,500 and 196,300 Purkinje cells, respectively. These estimates were significantly different from those observed in both control and E16 irradiated rats. Given that the phase of division of Purkinje cell progenitors is mainly between E14-E15 and the phase of differentiation and migration is between E16-E20, it is concluded that the vulnerable period of the Purkinje cells to X-irradiation closely overlaps the phase of division of progenitors

  2. Organization of spinocerebellar projection map in three types of agranular cerebellum: Purkinje cells vs. granule cells as organizer element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenio Nunes, M.L.; Sotelo, C.; Wehrle, R.

    1988-01-01

    The organization of the spinocerebellar projection was analysed by the anterograde axonal WGA-HRP (horseradish peroxidase-wheat germ agglutinin conjugate) tracing method in three different types of agranular cerebellar cortex either induced experimentally by X-irradiation or occurring spontaneously in weaver (wv/wv) and staggerer (sg/sg) mutant mice. The results of this study show that in the X-irradiated rat and weaver mouse, in both of which the granule cells are directly affected and die early in development, the spinal axons reproduce, with few differences, the normal spinocerebellar pattern. Conversely, in staggerer mouse, in which the Purkinje cells are intrinsically affected and granule neurons do not seem to be primarily perturbed by the staggerer gene action, the spinocerebellar organization is severely modified. These findings appear somewhat paradoxical because if granule cells, the synaptic targets of mossy spinocerebellar fibers, were necessary for the organization of spinocerebellar projection, the staggerer cerebellum would exhibit a much more normal projectional map than the weaver and the X-irradiated cerebella. It is, therefore, obvious that granule cells, and even specific synaptogenesis, are not essential for the establishment of the normal spinocerebellar topography. On the other hand, the fact that the Purkinje cells are primarily affected in the unique agranular cortex in which the spinocerebellar organization is severely modified suggests that these neurons could be the main element in the organization of the spinocerebellar projection map. This hypothesis is discussed in correlation with already-reported findings on the zonation of the cerebellar cortex by biochemically different clusters of Purkinje cells

  3. Downregulation of the Glial GLT1 Glutamate Transporter and Purkinje Cell Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Myotonic Dystrophy

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    Géraldine Sicot

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain function is compromised in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. To gain insight into the cellular and molecular pathways primarily affected, we studied a mouse model of DM1 and brains of adult patients. We found pronounced RNA toxicity in the Bergmann glia of the cerebellum, in association with abnormal Purkinje cell firing and fine motor incoordination in DM1 mice. A global proteomics approach revealed downregulation of the GLT1 glutamate transporter in DM1 mice and human patients, which we found to be the result of MBNL1 inactivation. GLT1 downregulation in DM1 astrocytes increases glutamate neurotoxicity and is detrimental to neurons. Finally, we demonstrated that the upregulation of GLT1 corrected Purkinje cell firing and motor incoordination in DM1 mice. Our findings show that glial defects are critical in DM1 brain pathophysiology and open promising therapeutic perspectives through the modulation of glutamate levels.

  4. Bergmann glia and the recognition molecule CHL1 organize GABAergic axons and direct innervation of Purkinje cell dendrites.

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    Fabrice Ango

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The geometric and subcellular organization of axon arbors distributes and regulates electrical signaling in neurons and networks, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. In rodent cerebellar cortex, stellate interneurons elaborate characteristic axon arbors that selectively innervate Purkinje cell dendrites and likely regulate dendritic integration. We used GFP BAC transgenic reporter mice to examine the cellular processes and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of stellate cell axons and their innervation pattern. We show that stellate axons are organized and guided towards Purkinje cell dendrites by an intermediate scaffold of Bergmann glial (BG fibers. The L1 family immunoglobulin protein Close Homologue of L1 (CHL1 is localized to apical BG fibers and stellate cells during the development of stellate axon arbors. In the absence of CHL1, stellate axons deviate from BG fibers and show aberrant branching and orientation. Furthermore, synapse formation between aberrant stellate axons and Purkinje dendrites is reduced and cannot be maintained, leading to progressive atrophy of axon terminals. These results establish BG fibers as a guiding scaffold and CHL1 a molecular signal in the organization of stellate axon arbors and in directing their dendritic innervation.

  5. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease.

  6. Activation patterns of Purkinje fibers during long-duration ventricular fibrillation in an isolated canine heart model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabereaux, Paul B; Walcott, Greg P; Rogers, Jack M; Kim, Jong; Dosdall, Derek J; Robertson, Peter G; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; Smith, William M; Ideker, Raymond E

    2007-09-04

    The roles of Purkinje fibers (PFs) and focal wave fronts, if any, in the maintenance of ventricular fibrillation (VF) are unknown. If PFs are involved in VF maintenance, it should be possible to map wave fronts propagating from PFs into the working ventricular myocardium during VF. If wave fronts ever arise focally during VF, it should be possible to map them appearing de novo. Six canine hearts were isolated, and the left main coronary artery was cannulated and perfused. The left ventricular cavity was exposed, which allowed direct endocardial mapping of the anterior papillary muscle insertion. Nonperfused VF was induced, and 6 segments of data, each 5 seconds long, were analyzed during 10 minutes of VF. During 36 segments of data that were analyzed, 1018 PF or focal wave fronts of activation were identified. In 534 wave fronts, activation was mapped propagating from working ventricular myocardium to PF. In 142 wave fronts, activation was mapped propagating from PF to working ventricular myocardium. In 342 wave fronts, activation was mapped arising focally. More than 1 of these 3 patterns could occur in the same wave front. PFs are highly active throughout the first 10 minutes of VF. In addition to retrograde propagation from the working ventricular myocardium to PFs, antegrade propagation occurs from PFs to working ventricular myocardium, which suggests PFs are important in VF maintenance. Prior plunge needle recordings in dogs indicate activation propagates from the endocardium toward the epicardium after 1 minute of VF, which suggests that focal sites on the endocardium may represent foci and not breakthrough. If so, in addition to reentry, abnormal automaticity or triggered activity may also occur during VF.

  7. Effect of gabazine on sensory stimulation train evoked response in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells.

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    Bing, Yan-Hua; Jin, Wen-Zhe; Sun, Lei; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2015-02-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) respond to sensory stimulation via climbing fiber and mossy fiber-granule cell pathways, and generate motor-related outputs according to internal rules of integration and computation. However, the dynamic properties of sensory information processed by PC in mouse cerebellar cortex are currently unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor A (GABA(A)) antagonist, gabazine, on the stimulation train on the simple spike firing of PCs by electrophysiological recordings method. Our data showed that the output of cerebellar PCs could be significantly affected by all pulses of the low-frequency (0.25 -2 Hz) sensory stimulation train, but only by the 1st and 2nd pulses of the high-frequency (≥ 4 Hz) sensory stimulation train. In the presence of gabazine (20 μM), each pulse of 1 Hz facial stimulation evoked simple spike firing in the PCs, but only the 1st and 2nd pulses of 4 Hz stimulation induced an increase in simple spike firing of the PCs. These results indicated that GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition did not significantly affect the frequency properties of sensory stimulation evoked responses in the mouse cerebellar PCs.

  8. A spiking network model of cerebellar Purkinje cells and molecular layer interneurons exhibiting irregular firing

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    William eLennon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While the anatomy of the cerebellar microcircuit is well studied, how it implements cerebellar function is not understood. A number of models have been proposed to describe this mechanism but few emphasize the role of the vast network Purkinje cells (PKJs form with the molecular layer interneurons (MLIs – the stellate and basket cells. We propose a model of the MLI-PKJ network composed of simple spiking neurons incorporating the major anatomical and physiological features. In computer simulations, the model reproduces the irregular firing patterns observed in PKJs and MLIs in vitro and a shift toward faster, more regular firing patterns when inhibitory synaptic currents are blocked. In the model, the time between PKJ spikes is shown to be proportional to the amount of feedforward inhibition from an MLI on average. The two key elements of the model are: (1 spontaneously active PKJs and MLIs due to an endogenous depolarizing current, and (2 adherence to known anatomical connectivity along a parasagittal strip of cerebellar cortex. We propose this model to extend previous spiking network models of the cerebellum and for further computational investigation into the role of irregular firing and MLIs in cerebellar learning and function.

  9. Sensory processing and corollary discharge effects in posterior caudal lobe Purkinje cells in a weakly electric mormyrid fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alviña, Karina; Sawtell, Nathaniel B

    2014-07-15

    Although it has been suggested that the cerebellum functions to predict the sensory consequences of motor commands, how such predictions are implemented in cerebellar circuitry remains largely unknown. A detailed and relatively complete account of predictive mechanisms has emerged from studies of cerebellum-like sensory structures in fish, suggesting that comparisons of the cerebellum and cerebellum-like structures may be useful. Here we characterize electrophysiological response properties of Purkinje cells in a region of the cerebellum proper of weakly electric mormyrid fish, the posterior caudal lobe (LCp), which receives the same mossy fiber inputs and projects to the same target structures as the electrosensory lobe (ELL), a well-studied cerebellum-like structure. We describe patterns of simple spike and climbing fiber activation in LCp Purkinje cells in response to motor corollary discharge, electrosensory, and proprioceptive inputs and provide evidence for two functionally distinct Purkinje cell subtypes within LCp. Protocols that induce rapid associative plasticity in ELL fail to induce plasticity in LCp, suggesting differences in the adaptive functions of the two structures. Similarities and differences between LCp and ELL are discussed in light of these results. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Motor learning induces plastic changes in Purkinje cell dendritic spines in the rat cerebellum.

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    González-Tapia, D; González-Ramírez, M M; Vázquez-Hernández, N; González-Burgos, I

    2017-12-14

    The paramedian lobule of the cerebellum is involved in learning to correctly perform motor skills through practice. Dendritic spines are dynamic structures that regulate excitatory synaptic stimulation. We studied plastic changes occurring in the dendritic spines of Purkinje cells from the paramedian lobule of rats during motor learning. Adult male rats were trained over a 6-day period using an acrobatic motor learning paradigm; the density and type of dendritic spines were determined every day during the study period using a modified version of the Golgi method. The learning curve reflected a considerable decrease in the number of errors made by rats as the training period progressed. We observed more dendritic spines on days 2 and 6, particularly more thin spines on days 1, 3, and 6, fewer mushroom spines on day 3, fewer stubby spines on day 1, and more thick spines on days 4 and 6. The initial stage of motor learning may be associated with fast processing of the underlying synaptic information combined with an apparent "silencing" of memory consolidation processes, based on the regulation of the neuronal excitability. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Maturation of Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Population Activity during Postnatal Refinement of Climbing Fiber Network

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    Jean-Marc Good

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits undergo massive refinements during postnatal development. In the developing cerebellum, the climbing fiber (CF to Purkinje cell (PC network is drastically reshaped by eliminating early-formed redundant CF to PC synapses. To investigate the impact of CF network refinement on PC population activity during postnatal development, we monitored spontaneous CF responses in neighboring PCs and the activity of populations of nearby CF terminals using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging. Population activity is highly synchronized in newborn mice, and the degree of synchrony gradually declines during the first postnatal week in PCs and, to a lesser extent, in CF terminals. Knockout mice lacking P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel or glutamate receptor δ2, in which CF network refinement is severely impaired, exhibit an abnormally high level of synchrony in PC population activity. These results suggest that CF network refinement is a structural basis for developmental desynchronization and maturation of PC population activity.

  12. Differential association of GABAB receptors with their effector ion channels in Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, Rafael; Aguado, Carolina; Ciruela, Francisco; Cózar, Javier; Kleindienst, David; de la Ossa, Luis; Bettler, Bernhard; Wickman, Kevin; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yugo

    2018-04-01

    Metabotropic GABA B receptors mediate slow inhibitory effects presynaptically and postsynaptically through the modulation of different effector signalling pathways. Here, we analysed the distribution of GABA B receptors using highly sensitive SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labelling in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells. Immunoreactivity for GABA B1 was observed on presynaptic and, more abundantly, on postsynaptic compartments, showing both scattered and clustered distribution patterns. Quantitative analysis of immunoparticles revealed a somato-dendritic gradient, with the density of immunoparticles increasing 26-fold from somata to dendritic spines. To understand the spatial relationship of GABA B receptors with two key effector ion channels, the G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K + (GIRK/Kir3) channel and the voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channel, biochemical and immunohistochemical approaches were performed. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that GABA B receptors co-assembled with GIRK and Ca V 2.1 channels in the cerebellum. Using double-labelling immunoelectron microscopic techniques, co-clustering between GABA B1 and GIRK2 was detected in dendritic spines, whereas they were mainly segregated in the dendritic shafts. In contrast, co-clustering of GABA B1 and Ca V 2.1 was detected in dendritic shafts but not spines. Presynaptically, although no significant co-clustering of GABA B1 and GIRK2 or Ca V 2.1 channels was detected, inter-cluster distance for GABA B1 and GIRK2 was significantly smaller in the active zone than in the dendritic shafts, and that for GABA B1 and Ca V 2.1 was significantly smaller in the active zone than in the dendritic shafts and spines. Thus, GABA B receptors are associated with GIRK and Ca V 2.1 channels in different subcellular compartments. These data provide a better framework for understanding the different roles played by GABA B receptors and their effector ion channels in the cerebellar network.

  13. Climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic pathology in tremor and cerebellar degenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Ying; Wang, Jie; Sims, Peter A.; Pan, Ming-Kai; Liou, Jyun-you; Lee, Danielle; Tate, William J.; Kelly, Geoffrey C.; Louis, Elan D.; Faust, Phyllis L.

    2017-01-01

    Changes in climbing fiber-Purkinje cell (CF-PC) synaptic connections have been found in the essential tremor (ET) cerebellum, and these changes are correlated with tremor severity. Whether these postmortem changes are specific to ET remains to be investigated. We assessed CF-PC synaptic pathology in the postmortem cerebellum across a range of degenerative movement disorders [10 Parkinson’s disease (PD) cases, 10 multiple system atrophy (MSA) cases, 10 spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) cases, and 20 ET cases] and 25 controls. We observed differences in terms of CF pathological features across these disorders. Specifically, PD cases and ET cases both had more CFs extending into the parallel fiber (PF) territory, but ET cases had more complex branching and increased length of CFs in the PF territory along with decreased CF synaptic density compared to PD cases. MSA cases and SCA1 cases had the most severely reduced CF synaptic density and a marked paucity of CFs extending into the PF territory. Furthermore, CFs in a subset of MSA cases formed collateral branches parallel to the PC layer, a feature not seen in other diagnostic groups. Using unsupervised cluster analysis, the cases and controls could all be categorized into four clusters based on the CF pathology and features of PC pathology, including counts of PCs and their axonal torpedoes. ET cases and PD cases co-segregated into two clusters, whereas SCA1 cases and MSA cases formed another cluster, separate from the control cluster. Interestingly, the presence of resting tremor seemed to be the clinical feature that separated the cases into the two ET-PD clusters. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that these degenerative movement disorders seem to differ with respect to the pattern of CF synaptic pathology they exhibit. It remains to be determined how these differences contribute to the clinical presentations of these diseases. PMID:27704282

  14. Plasticity of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells in Behavioral Training of Body Balance Control

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    Ray X. Lee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural responses to sensory inputs caused by self-generated movements (reafference and external passive stimulation (exafference differ in various brain regions. The ability to differentiate such sensory information can lead to movement execution with better accuracy. However, how sensory responses are adjusted in regard to this distinguishability during motor learning is still poorly understood. The cerebellum has been hypothesized to analyze the functional significance of sensory information during motor learning, and is thought to be a key region of reafference computation in the vestibular system. In this study, we investigated Purkinje cell (PC spike trains as cerebellar cortical output when rats learned to balance on a suspended dowel. Rats progressively reduced the amplitude of body swing and made fewer foot slips during a 5-min balancing task. Both PC simple (SSs; 17 of 26 and complex spikes (CSs; 7 of 12 were found to code initially on the angle of the heads with respect to a fixed reference. Using periods with comparable degrees of movement, we found that such SS coding of information in most PCs (10 of 17 decreased rapidly during balance learning. In response to unexpected perturbations and under anesthesia, SS coding capability of these PCs recovered. By plotting SS and CS firing frequencies over 15-s time windows in double-logarithmic plots, a negative correlation between SS and CS was found in awake, but not anesthetized, rats. PCs with prominent SS coding attenuation during motor learning showed weaker SS-CS correlation. Hence, we demonstrate that neural plasticity for filtering out sensory reafference from active motion occurs in the cerebellar cortex in rats during balance learning. SS-CS interaction may contribute to this rapid plasticity as a form of receptive field plasticity in the cerebellar cortex between two receptive maps of sensory inputs from the external world and of efference copies from the will center for

  15. Purkinje Cell Compartmentation in the Cerebellum of the Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase 2 Mutant Mouse (Nax - Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse)

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    Bailey, Karen; Rahimi Balaei, Maryam; Mannan, Ashraf; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Marzban, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    The Acp2 gene encodes the beta subunit of lysosomal acid phosphatase, which is an isoenzyme that hydrolyzes orthophosphoric monoesters. In mice, a spontaneous mutation in Acp2 results in severe cerebellar defects. These include a reduced size, abnormal lobulation, and an apparent anterior cerebellar disorder with an absent or hypoplastic vermis. Based on differential gene expression in the cerebellum, the mouse cerebellar cortex can normally be compartmentalized anteroposteriorly into four transverse zones and mediolaterally into parasagittal stripes. In this study, immunohistochemistry was performed using various Purkinje cell compartmentation markers to examine their expression patterns in the Acp2 mutant. Despite the abnormal lobulation and anterior cerebellar defects, zebrin II and PLCβ4 showed similar expression patterns in the nax mutant and wild type cerebellum. However, fewer stripes were found in the anterior zone of the nax mutant, which could be due to a lack of Purkinje cells or altered expression of the stripe markers. HSP25 expression was uniform in the central zone of the nax mutant cerebellum at around postnatal day (P) 18–19, suggesting that HSP25 immunonegative Purkinje cells are absent or delayed in stripe pattern expression compared to the wild type. HSP25 expression became heterogeneous around P22–23, with twice the number of parasagittal stripes in the nax mutant compared to the wild type. Aside from reduced size and cortical disorganization, both the posterior zone and nodular zone in the nax mutant appeared less abnormal than the rest of the cerebellum. From these results, it is evident that the anterior zone of the nax mutant cerebellum is the most severely affected, and this extends beyond the primary fissure into the rostral central zone/vermis. This suggests that ACP2 has critical roles in the development of the anterior cerebellum and it may regulate anterior and central zone compartmentation. PMID:24722417

  16. An expandable embryonic stem cell-derived Purkinje neuron progenitor population that exhibits in vivo maturation in the adult mouse cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera, Gustavo A; Iaffaldano, Grazia; Bedar, Meiwand; Shpak, Guy; Broersen, Robin; Munshi, Shashini T; Dupont, Catherine; Gribnau, Joost; de Vrij, Femke M S; Kushner, Steven A; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2017-01-01

    The directed differentiation of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells into cell-type specific neurons has inspired the development of therapeutic discovery for neurodegenerative diseases. Many forms of ataxia result from degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells, but thus far it has not

  17. An expandable embryonic stem cell-derived Purkinje neuron progenitor population that exhibits in vivo maturation in the adult mouse cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Higuera (Gustavo A.); Iaffaldano, G. (Grazia); Bedar, M. (Meiwand); G. Shpak (Guy); R. Broersen (Robin); S.T. Munshi (Shashini T.); Dupont, C. (Catherine); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); F.M.S. Vrij (Femke); S.A. Kushner (Steven); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe directed differentiation of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells into cell-type specific neurons has inspired the development of therapeutic discovery for neurodegenerative diseases. Many forms of ataxia result from degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells, but thus far it

  18. Chronic treadmill exercise in rats delicately alters the Purkinje cell structure to improve motor performance and toxin resistance in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tung-Yi; Lin, Lung-Sheng; Cho, Keng-Chi; Chen, Shean-Jen; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yu, Lung; Wu, Fong-Sen; Chuang, Jih-Ing; Chen, Hsiun-Ing; Jen, Chauying J

    2012-09-01

    Although exercise usually improves motor performance, the underlying cellular changes in the cerebellum remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate whether and how chronic treadmill exercise in young rats induced Purkinje cell changes to improve motor performance and rendered the cerebellum less vulnerable to toxin insults. After 1-wk familiarization of treadmill running, 6-wk-old male Wistar rats were divided into exercise and sedentary groups. The exercise group was then subjected to 8 wk of exercise training at moderate intensity. The rotarod test was carried out to evaluate motor performance. Purkinje cells in cerebellar slices were visualized by lucifer yellow labeling in single neurons and by calbindin immunostaining in groups of neurons. Compared with sedentary control rats, exercised rats not only performed better in the rotarod task, but also showed finer Purkinje cell structure (higher dendritic volume and spine density with the same dendritic field). The exercise-improved cerebellar functions were further evaluated by monitoring the long-lasting effects of intraventricular application of OX7-saporin. In the sedentary group, OX7-saporin treatment retarded the rotarod performance and induced ∼60% Purkinje cell loss in 3 wk. As a comparison, the exercise group showed much milder injuries in the cerebellum by the same toxin treatment. In conclusion, exercise training in young rats increased the dendritic density of Purkinje cells, which might play an important role in improving the motor performance. Furthermore, as Purkinje cells in the exercise group were relatively toxin resistant, the exercised rats showed good motor performance, even under toxin-treated conditions.

  19. The Phospholipase D2 Knock Out Mouse Has Ectopic Purkinje Cells and Suffers from Early Adult-Onset Anosmia.

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    Matthieu M Vermeren

    Full Text Available Phospholipase D2 (PLD2 is an enzyme that produces phosphatidic acid (PA, a lipid messenger molecule involved in a number of cellular events including, through its membrane curvature properties, endocytosis. The PLD2 knock out (PLD2KO mouse has been previously reported to be protected from insult in a model of Alzheimer's disease. We have further analysed a PLD2KO mouse using mass spectrophotometry of its lipids and found significant differences in PA species throughout its brain. We have examined the expression pattern of PLD2 which allowed us to define which region of the brain to analyse for defect, notably PLD2 was not detected in glial-rich regions. The expression pattern lead us to specifically examine the mitral cells of olfactory bulbs, the Cornus Amonis (CA regions of the hippocampus and the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We find that the change to longer PA species correlates with subtle architectural defect in the cerebellum, exemplified by ectopic Purkinje cells and an adult-onset deficit of olfaction. These observations draw parallels to defects in the reelin heterozygote as well as the effect of high fat diet on olfaction.

  20. Dendritic and axonic fields of Purkinje cells in developing and X-irradiated rat cerebellum. A comparative study using intracellular staining with horseradish peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crepel, F.; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N.; Dupont, J.L.; Sotelo, C.

    1980-01-01

    Intracellular staining of cerebellar Purkinje cells with horseradish peroxidase was achieved in normal developing rats (8-13 days old), in normal adult rats and in adult rats in which the cerebellum had been degranulated by X-ray treatment. The mono- and multiple innervation of Purkinje cells by climbing fibres was electrophysiologically determined and correlated with their dendritic pattern and axonal field. In immature rats, considerable variations in dendritic arborization were observed between cells at the same age, according to their position in the vermis. In adult X-irradiated animals, a large variety of dendritic shapes was found, confirming previous anatomical data, but no obvious correlation was found between the morphology of the dendrites of Purkinje cells and their synaptic investment by climbing fibres. As regards the axonal field, the adult branching pattern of recurrent axon collaterals was almost established by postnatal day 8, except for some cells which exhibited richer recurrent collaterals. On the other hand, in X-irradiated animals, profuse plexuses were the rule and they originated either from one collateral stem, or from several collaterals, also independently of the number of afferent climbing fibres. The existence of these enlarged recurrent collateral plexuses can be explained by the persistence of an immature stage, and certainly also by the collateral sprouting following the largely impaired innervation of the terminal field during development. These results emphasize the role of the cellular interactions that occur during Purkinje cell growth in the formation of both its axonal and dendritic fields. (author)

  1. Dendritic and axonic fields of Purkinje cells in developing and X-irradiated rat cerebellum. A comparative study using intracellular staining with horseradish peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crepel, F; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N; Dupont, J L [Paris-5 Univ., 75 (France); Sotelo, C [Hopital Foch, 92 - Suresnes (France). Centre Medico-Chirurgical

    1980-01-01

    Intracellular staining of cerebellar Purkinje cells with horseradish peroxidase was achieved in normal developing rats (8-13 days old), in normal adult rats and in adult rats in which the cerebellum had been degranulated by X-ray treatment. The mono- and multiple innervation of Purkinje cells by climbing fibres was electrophysiologically determined and correlated with their dendritic pattern and axonal field. In immature rats, considerable variations in dendritic arborization were observed between cells at the same age, according to their position in the vermis. In adult X-irradiated animals, a large variety of dendritic shapes was found, confirming previous anatomical data, but no obvious correlation was found between the morphology of the dendrites of Purkinje cells and their synaptic investment by climbing fibres. As regards the axonal field, the adult branching pattern of recurrent axon collaterals was almost established by postnatal day 8, except for some cells which exhibited richer recurrent collaterals. On the other hand, in X-irradiated animals, profuse plexuses were the rule and they originated either from one collateral stem, or from several collaterals, also independently of the number of afferent climbing fibres. The existence of these enlarged recurrent collateral plexuses can be explained by the persistence of an immature stage, and certainly also by the collateral sprouting following the largely impaired innervation of the terminal field during development. These results emphasize the role of the cellular interactions that occur during Purkinje cell growth in the formation of both its axonal and dendritic fields.

  2. Heat Shock Protein Beta-1 Modifies Anterior to Posterior Purkinje Cell Vulnerability in a Mouse Model of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Chung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Selective neuronal vulnerability is characteristic of most degenerative disorders of the CNS, yet mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly characterized. Many forms of cerebellar degeneration exhibit an anterior-to-posterior gradient of Purkinje cell loss including Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC disease, a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive neurological deficits that often begin in childhood. Here, we sought to identify candidate genes underlying vulnerability of Purkinje cells in anterior cerebellar lobules using data freely available in the Allen Brain Atlas. This approach led to the identification of 16 candidate neuroprotective or susceptibility genes. We demonstrate that one candidate gene, heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1, promoted neuronal survival in cellular models of NPC disease through a mechanism that involved inhibition of apoptosis. Additionally, we show that over-expression of wild type HSPB1 or a phosphomimetic mutant in NPC mice slowed the progression of motor impairment and diminished cerebellar Purkinje cell loss. We confirmed the modulatory effect of Hspb1 on Purkinje cell degeneration in vivo, as knockdown by Hspb1 shRNA significantly enhanced neuron loss. These results suggest that strategies to promote HSPB1 activity may slow the rate of cerebellar degeneration in NPC disease and highlight the use of bioinformatics tools to uncover pathways leading to neuronal protection in neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Early increase and late decrease of purkinje cell dendritic spine density in prion-infected organotypic mouse cerebellar cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeau, Jody L; Wu, Gengshu; Bell, John R; Rasmussen, Jay; Sim, Valerie L

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are infectious neurodegenerative diseases associated with the accumulation of protease-resistant prion protein, neuronal loss, spongiform change and astrogliosis. In the mouse model, the loss of dendritic spines is one of the earliest pathological changes observed in vivo, occurring 4-5 weeks after the first detection of protease-resistant prion protein in the brain. While there are cell culture models of prion infection, most do not recapitulate the neuropathology seen in vivo. Only the recently developed prion organotypic slice culture assay has been reported to undergo neuronal loss and the development of some aspects of prion pathology, namely small vacuolar degeneration and tubulovesicular bodies. Given the rapid replication of prions in this system, with protease-resistant prion protein detectable by 21 days, we investigated whether the dendritic spine loss and altered dendritic morphology seen in prion disease might also develop within the lifetime of this culture system. Indeed, six weeks after first detection of protease-resistant prion protein in tga20 mouse cerebellar slice cultures infected with RML prion strain, we found a statistically significant loss of Purkinje cell dendritic spines and altered dendritic morphology in infected cultures, analogous to that seen in vivo. In addition, we found a transient but statistically significant increase in Purkinje cell dendritic spine density during infection, at the time when protease-resistant prion protein was first detectable in culture. Our findings support the use of this slice culture system as one which recapitulates prion disease pathology and one which may facilitate study of the earliest stages of prion disease pathogenesis.

  4. Posterior cerebellar Purkinje cells in an SCA5/SPARCA1 mouse model are especially vulnerable to the synergistic effect of loss of β-III spectrin and GLAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Emma M; Suminaite, Daumante; Clarkson, Yvonne L; Lee, Sin Kwan; Lyndon, Alastair R; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Wyllie, David J A; Tanaka, Kohichi; Jackson, Mandy

    2016-10-15

    Clinical phenotypes of spinocerebellar ataxia type-5 (SCA5) and spectrin-associated autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type-1 (SPARCA1) are mirrored in mice lacking β-III spectrin (β-III-/-). One function of β-III spectrin is the stabilization of the Purkinje cell-specific glutamate transporter EAAT4 at the plasma membrane. In β-III-/- mice EAAT4 levels are reduced from an early age. In contrast levels of the predominant cerebellar glutamate transporter GLAST, expressed in Bergmann glia, only fall progressively from 3 months onwards. Here we elucidated the roles of these two glutamate transporters in cerebellar pathogenesis mediated through loss of β-III spectrin function by studying EAAT4 and GLAST knockout mice as well as crosses of both with β-III-/- mice. Our data demonstrate that EAAT4 loss, but not abnormal AMPA receptor composition, in young β-III-/- mice underlies early Purkinje cell hyper-excitability and that subsequent loss of GLAST, superimposed on the earlier deficiency of EAAT4, is responsible for Purkinje cell loss and progression of motor deficits. Yet the loss of GLAST appears to be independent of EAAT4 loss, highlighting that other aspects of Purkinje cell dysfunction underpin the pathogenic loss of GLAST. Finally, our results demonstrate that Purkinje cells in the posterior cerebellum of β-III-/- mice are most susceptible to the combined loss of EAAT4 and GLAST, with degeneration of proximal dendrites, the site of climbing fibre innervation, most pronounced. This highlights the necessity for efficient glutamate clearance from these regions and identifies dysregulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission particularly within the posterior cerebellum as a key mechanism in SCA5 and SPARCA1 pathogenesis.

  5. Improved motor performance in Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in mice by cerebellar Purkinje-cell specific Dyt1 conditional knocking-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Fumiaki; Dang, Mai Tu; Li, Yuqing

    2012-05-01

    Early-onset generalized torsion dystonia (dystonia 1) is an inherited movement disorder caused by mutations in DYT1 (TOR1A), which codes for torsinA. Most patients have a 3-base pair deletion (ΔGAG) in one allele of DYT1, corresponding to a loss of a glutamic acid residue (ΔE) in the C-terminal region of the protein. Functional alterations in basal ganglia circuits and the cerebellum have been reported in dystonia. Pharmacological manipulations or mutations in genes that result in functional alterations of the cerebellum have been reported to have dystonic symptoms and have been used as phenotypic rodent models. Additionally, structural lesions in the abnormal cerebellar circuits, such as cerebellectomy, have therapeutic effects in these models. A previous study has shown that the Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in (KI) mice exhibit motor deficits in the beam-walking test. Both Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in (KI) and Dyt1 Purkinje cell-specific knockout (Dyt1 pKO) mice exhibit dendritic alterations of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Here, Dyt1 pKO mice exhibited significantly less slip numbers in the beam-walking test, suggesting better motor performance than control littermates, and normal gait. Furthermore, Dyt1 ΔGAG KI/Dyt1 pKO double mutant mice exhibited significantly lower numbers of slips than Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous KI mice, suggesting Purkinje-cell specific knockout of Dyt1 wild-type (WT) allele in Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous KI mice rescued the motor deficits. The results suggest that molecular lesions of torsinA in Purkinje cells by gene therapy or intervening in the signaling pathway downstream of the cerebellar Purkinje cells may rescue motor symptoms in dystonia 1. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Responses of Purkinje cells in the oculomotor vermis of monkeys during smooth pursuit eye movements and saccades: comparison with floccular complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Ramanujan T; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2017-08-01

    We recorded the responses of Purkinje cells in the oculomotor vermis during smooth pursuit and saccadic eye movements. Our goal was to characterize the responses in the vermis using approaches that would allow direct comparisons with responses of Purkinje cells in another cerebellar area for pursuit, the floccular complex. Simple-spike firing of vermis Purkinje cells is direction selective during both pursuit and saccades, but the preferred directions are sufficiently independent so that downstream circuits could decode signals to drive pursuit and saccades separately. Complex spikes also were direction selective during pursuit, and almost all Purkinje cells showed a peak in the probability of complex spikes during the initiation of pursuit in at least one direction. Unlike the floccular complex, the preferred directions for simple spikes and complex spikes were not opposite. The kinematics of smooth eye movement described the simple-spike responses of vermis Purkinje cells well. Sensitivities were similar to those in the floccular complex for eye position and considerably lower for eye velocity and acceleration. The kinematic relations were quite different for saccades vs. pursuit, supporting the idea that the contributions from the vermis to each kind of movement could contribute independently in downstream areas. Finally, neither the complex-spike nor the simple-spike responses of vermis Purkinje cells were appropriate to support direction learning in pursuit. Complex spikes were not triggered reliably by an instructive change in target direction; simple-spike responses showed very small amounts of learning. We conclude that the vermis plays a different role in pursuit eye movements compared with the floccular complex. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The midline oculomotor cerebellum plays a different role in smooth pursuit eye movements compared with the lateral, floccular complex and appears to be much less involved in direction learning in pursuit. The output from the

  7. Heterogeneity of Purkinje cell simple spike-complex spike interactions: zebrin- and non-zebrin-related variations.

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    Tang, Tianyu; Xiao, Jianqiang; Suh, Colleen Y; Burroughs, Amelia; Cerminara, Nadia L; Jia, Linjia; Marshall, Sarah P; Wise, Andrew K; Apps, Richard; Sugihara, Izumi; Lang, Eric J

    2017-08-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) generate two types of action potentials, simple and complex spikes. Although they are generated by distinct mechanisms, interactions between the two spike types exist. Zebrin staining produces alternating positive and negative stripes of PCs across most of the cerebellar cortex. Thus, here we compared simple spike-complex spike interactions both within and across zebrin populations. Simple spike activity undergoes a complex modulation preceding and following a complex spike. The amplitudes of the pre- and post-complex spike modulation phases were correlated across PCs. On average, the modulation was larger for PCs in zebrin positive regions. Correlations between aspects of the complex spike waveform and simple spike activity were found, some of which varied between zebrin positive and negative PCs. The implications of the results are discussed with regard to hypotheses that complex spikes are triggered by rises in simple spike activity for either motor learning or homeostatic functions. Purkinje cells (PCs) generate two types of action potentials, called simple and complex spikes (SSs and CSs). We first investigated the CS-associated modulation of SS activity and its relationship to the zebrin status of the PC. The modulation pattern consisted of a pre-CS rise in SS activity, and then, following the CS, a pause, a rebound, and finally a late inhibition of SS activity for both zebrin positive (Z+) and negative (Z-) cells, though the amplitudes of the phases were larger in Z+ cells. Moreover, the amplitudes of the pre-CS rise with the late inhibitory phase of the modulation were correlated across PCs. In contrast, correlations between modulation phases across CSs of individual PCs were generally weak. Next, the relationship between CS spikelets and SS activity was investigated. The number of spikelets/CS correlated with the average SS firing rate only for Z+ cells. In contrast, correlations across CSs between spikelet numbers and the

  8. Crista Supraventricularis Purkinje Network and Its Relation to Intraseptal Purkinje Network.

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    De Almeida, Marcos C; Araujo, Mayssa; Duque, Mathias; Vilhena, Virginia

    2017-10-01

    Using transparent specimens with a dual color injection, microscopy, and computer tomography, this report shows that the right and left ventricular subendocardial Purkinje networks are connected by an extensive septal network in the bovine heart. The septal network is present along the entire septum except at a free zone below ventricular valves. Being the only communication of the basal right septum with the right free wall, the supraventricular crest is an enigmatic but not, by any means, hidden muscular structure. It is one of the last structures to be activated in human heart. It is shown here that the supraventricular crest Purkinje network connects the anterosuperior right ventricular basal free wall Purkinje network to anterior right ventricular basal septal Purkinje network. It is suggested that the stimulus initiated at middle left ventricular endocardium will activate the supraventricular crest. The intraseptal connection found between the basal left ventricular subendocardial septal Purkinje network and the right ventricular basal septal Purkinje network is, probably, the pathway for the stimulus. An anatomic basis is provided to explain why the inflow tract contracts earlier than the outflow tract in the right ventricle systole. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Anat Rec, 300:1793-1801, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Antioxidant supplementation upregulates calbindin expression in cerebellar Purkinje cells of rat pups subjected to post natal exposure to sodium arsenite.

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    Dhar, Pushpa; Kaushal, Parul; Kumar, Pavan

    2018-07-01

    Optimal cytoplasmic calcium (Ca 2+ ) levels have been associated with adequate cell functioning and neuronal survival. Altered intracellular Ca 2+ levels following impaired Ca 2+ homeostasis could induce neuronal degeneration or even cell death. There are reports of arsenite induced oxidative stress and the associated disturbances in intracellular calcium homeostasis. The present study focused on determining the strategies that would modulate tissue redox status and calcium binding protein (CaBP) (Calbindin D28k-CB) expression affected adversely by sodium arsenite (NaAsO 2 ) exposure (postnatal) of rat pups. NaAsO 2 alone or along with antioxidants (AOXs) (alpha lipoic acid or curcumin) was administered by intraperitoneal (i.p.) route from postnatal day (PND) 1-21 (covering rapid brain growth period - RBGP) to experimental groups and animals receiving sterile water by the same route served as the controls. At the end of the experimental period, the animals were subjected to euthanasia and the cerebellar tissue obtained therefrom was processed for immunohistochemical localization and western blot analysis of CB protein. CB was diffusely expressed in cell body as well as dendritic processes of Purkinje cells (PCs) along the PC Layer (PCL) in all cerebellar folia of the control and the experimental animals. The multilayered pattern of CB +ve cells along with their downregulated expression and low packing density was significantly evident in the arsenic (iAs) alone exposed group as against the controls and AOX supplemented groups. The observations are suggestive of AOX induced restoration of CaBP expression in rat cerebellum following early postnatal exposure to NaAsO 2 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective loss of Purkinje cells in a patient with anti-gliadin-antibody-positive autoimmune cerebellar ataxia

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    Hasegawa Akira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The patient was an 84-year-old woman who had the onset of truncal ataxia at age 77 and a history of Basedow's disease. Her ataxic gait gradually deteriorated. She could not walk without support at age 81 and she was admitted to our hospital at age 83. Gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysarthria were observed. Mild ataxia was observed in all limbs. Her deep tendon reflex and sense of position were normal. IgA anti-gliadin antibody, IgG anti-gliadin antibody, anti-SS-A/Ro antibody, anti-SS-B/La antibody and anti-TPO antibody were positive. A conventional brain MRI did not show obvious cerebellar atrophy. However, MRI voxel based morphometry (VBM and SPECT-eZIS revealed cortical cerebellar atrophy and reduced cerebellar blood flow. IVIg treatment was performed and was moderately effective. After her death at age 85, the patient was autopsied. Neuropathological findings were as follows: selective loss of Purkinje cells; no apparent degenerative change in the efferent pathways, such as the dentate nuclei or vestibular nuclei; no prominent inflammatory reaction. From these findings, we diagnosed this case as autoimmune cerebellar atrophy associated with gluten ataxia. All 3 autopsies previously reported on gluten ataxia have noted infiltration of inflammatory cells in the cerebellum. In this case, we postulated that the infiltration of inflammatory cells was not found because the patient's condition was based on humoral immunity. The clinical conditions of gluten ataxia have not yet been properly elucidated, but are expected to be revealed as the number of autopsied cases increases.

  11. Synaptic responses evoked by tactile stimuli in Purkinje cells in mouse cerebellar cortex Crus II in vivo.

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    Chun-Ping Chu

    Full Text Available Sensory stimuli evoke responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs via the mossy fiber-granule cell pathway. However, the properties of synaptic responses evoked by tactile stimulation in cerebellar PCs are unknown. The present study investigated the synaptic responses of PCs in response to an air-puff stimulation on the ipsilateral whisker pad in urethane-anesthetized mice.Thirty-three PCs were recorded from 48 urethane-anesthetized adult (6-8-week-old HA/ICR mice by somatic or dendritic patch-clamp recording and pharmacological methods. Tactile stimulation to the ipsilateral whisker pad was delivered by an air-puff through a 12-gauge stainless steel tube connected with a pressurized injection system. Under current-clamp conditions (I = 0, the air-puff stimulation evoked strong inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs in the somata of PCs. Application of SR95531, a specific GABA(A receptor antagonist, blocked IPSPs and revealed stimulation-evoked simple spike firing. Under voltage-clamp conditions, tactile stimulation evoked a sequence of transient inward currents followed by strong outward currents in the somata and dendrites in PCs. Application of SR95531 blocked outward currents and revealed excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs in somata and a temporal summation of parallel fiber EPSCs in PC dendrites. We also demonstrated that PCs respond to both the onset and offset of the air-puff stimulation.These findings indicated that tactile stimulation induced asynchronous parallel fiber excitatory inputs onto the dendrites of PCs, and failed to evoke strong EPSCs and spike firing in PCs, but induced the rapid activation of strong GABA(A receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the somata and dendrites of PCs in the cerebellar cortex Crus II in urethane-anesthetized mice.

  12. Cerebellar cortex development in the weaver condition presents regional and age-dependent abnormalities without differences in Purkinje cells neurogenesis.

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    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Hervás, José P; Bayer, Shirley A; Villegas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Ataxias are neurological disorders associated with the degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). Homozygous weaver mice (wv/wv) have been proposed as a model for hereditary cerebellar ataxia because they present motor abnormalities and PC loss. To ascertain the physiopathology of the weaver condition, the development of the cerebellar cortex lobes was examined at postnatal day (P): P8, P20 and P90. Three approaches were used: 1) quantitative determination of several cerebellar features; 2) qualitative evaluation of the developmental changes occurring in the cortical lobes; and 3) autoradiographic analyses of PC generation and placement. Our results revealed a reduction in the size of the wv/wv cerebellum as a whole, confirming previous results. However, as distinguished from these reports, we observed that quantified parameters contribute differently to the abnormal growth of the wv/wv cerebellar lobes. Qualitative analysis showed anomalies in wv/wv cerebellar cytoarchitecture, depending on the age and lobe analyzed. Such abnormalities included the presence of the external granular layer after P20 and, at P90, ectopic cells located in the molecular layer following several placement patterns. Finally, we obtained autoradiographic evidence that wild-type and wv/wv PCs presented similar neurogenetic timetables, as reported. However, the innovative character of this current work lies in the fact that the neurogenetic gradients of wv/wv PCs were not modified from P8 to P90. A tendency for the accumulation of late-formed PCs in the anterior and posterior lobes was found, whereas early-generated PCs were concentrated in the central and inferior lobes. These data suggested that wv/wv PCs may migrate properly to their final destinations. The extrapolation of our results to patients affected with cerebellar ataxias suggests that all cerebellar cortex lobes are affected with several age-dependent alterations in cytoarchitectonics. We also propose that PC loss may be regionally

  13. Transferences of Purkinje systems

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    W. F. Harris

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The transferences of heterocentric astigmatic Purkinje systems are special: submatrices B and C, that is, the disjugacy and the divergence of the system, are symmetric and submatrix D (the divarication is the transpose of submatrix A (the dilation.  It is the primary purpose of this paper to provide a proof.  The paper also derives other relationships among the fundamental properties and compact expressions for the transference and optical axis locator of a Purkinje system. (S Afr Optom 2011 70(2 57-60

  14. Signals and Circuits in the Purkinje Neuron

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    Ze'ev R Abrams

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum have over 100,000 inputs organized in an orthogonal geometry, and a single output channel. As the sole output of the cerebellar cortex layer, their complex firing pattern has been associated with motor control and learning. As such they have been extensively modeled and measured using tools ranging from electrophysiology and neuroanatomy, to dynamic systems and artificial intelligence methods. However, there is an alternative approach to analyze and describe the neuronal output of these cells using concepts from Electrical Engineering, particularly signal processing and digital/analog circuits. By viewing the Purkinje neuron as an unknown circuit to be reverse-engineered, we can use the tools that provide the foundations of today’s integrated circuits and communication systems to analyze the Purkinje system at the circuit level. We use Fourier transforms to analyze and isolate the inherent frequency modes in the Purkinje neuron and define 3 unique frequency ranges associated with the cells’ output. Comparing the Purkinje neuron to a signal generator that can be externally modulated adds an entire level of complexity to the functional role of these neurons both in terms of data analysis and information processing, relying on Fourier analysis methods in place of statistical ones. We also re-describe some of the recent literature in the field, using the nomenclature of signal processing. Furthermore, by comparing the experimental data of the past decade with basic electronic circuitry, we can resolve the outstanding controversy in the field, by recognizing that the Purkinje neuron can act as a multivibrator circuit.

  15. Administration of memantine during ethanol withdrawal in neonatal rats: effects on long-term ethanol-induced motor incoordination and cerebellar Purkinje cell loss.

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    Idrus, Nirelia M; McGough, Nancy N H; Riley, Edward P; Thomas, Jennifer D

    2011-02-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can damage the developing fetus, illustrated by central nervous system dysfunction and deficits in motor and cognitive abilities. Binge drinking has been associated with an increased risk of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, likely due to increased episodes of ethanol withdrawal. We hypothesized that overactivity of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor during ethanol withdrawal leads to excitotoxic cell death in the developing brain. Consistent with this, administration of NMDA receptor antagonists (e.g., MK-801) during withdrawal can attenuate ethanol's teratogenic effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether administration of memantine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, during ethanol withdrawal could effectively attenuate ethanol-related deficits, without the adverse side effects associated with other NMDA receptor antagonists. Sprague-Dawley pups were exposed to 6.0 g/kg ethanol or isocaloric maltose solution via intubation on postnatal day 6, a period of brain development equivalent to a portion of the 3rd trimester. Twenty-four and 36 hours after ethanol, subjects were injected with 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg memantine, totaling doses of 0, 20, or 30 mg/kg. Motor coordination was tested on a parallel bar task and the total number of cerebellar Purkinje cells was estimated using unbiased stereology. Alcohol exposure induced significant parallel bar motor incoordination and reduced Purkinje cell number. Memantine administration significantly attenuated both ethanol-associated motor deficits and cerebellar cell loss in a dose-dependent manner. Memantine was neuroprotective when administered during ethanol withdrawal. These data provide further support that ethanol withdrawal contributes to fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Copyright © 2010 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  16. Effects of gadolinium-based contrast agents on thyroid hormone receptor action and thyroid hormone-induced cerebellar Purkinje cell morphogenesis

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    Noriyuki Koibuchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gadolinium (Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs are used in diagnostic imaging to enhance the quality of magnetic resonance imaging or angiography. After intravenous injection, GBCAs can accumulate in the brain. Thyroid hormones (THs are critical to the development and functional maintenance of the central nervous system. TH actions in brain are mainly exerted through nuclear TH receptors (TRs. We examined the effects of GBCAs on TR-mediated transcription in CV-1 cells using transient transfection-based reporter assay and thyroid hormone-mediated cerebellar Purkinje cell morphogenesis in primary culture. We also measured the cellular accumulation and viability of Gd after representative GBCA treatments in cultured CV-1 cells. Both linear (Gd-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-bis methyl acid, Gd-DTPA-BMA and macrocyclic (Gd-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid, Gd-DOTA GBCAs were accumulated without inducing cell death in CV-1 cells. In contrast, Gd chloride (GdCl3 treatment induced approximately 100 times higher Gd accumulation and significantly reduced the number of cells. Low doses of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−8–10−6 M augmented TR-mediated transcription, but the transcription was suppressed at higher dose (10−5 – 10−4 M, with decreased β-galactosidase activity indicating cellular toxicity. TR-mediated transcription was not altered by Gd-DOTA or GdCl3, but the latter induced a significant reduction in β-galactosidase activity at high doses, indicating cellular toxicity. In cerebellar cultures, the dendrite arborization of Purkinje cells induced by 10-9 M T4 was augmented by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−7 M but was suppressed by higher dose (10−5 M. Such augmentation by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA was not observed with 10-9 M T3, probably because of the greater dendrite arborization by T3; however, the arborization by T3 was suppressed by a higher dose of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10-5 M as seen in T4 treatment. The effect of Gd-DOTA on dendrite arborization

  17. The Sodium-Potassium Pump Controls the Intrinsic Firing of the Cerebellar Purkinje Neuron

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    Forrest, Michael D.; Wall, Mark J.; Press, Daniel A.; Feng, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01

    In vitro, cerebellar Purkinje cells can intrinsically fire action potentials in a repeating trimodal or bimodal pattern. The trimodal pattern consists of tonic spiking, bursting, and quiescence. The bimodal pattern consists of tonic spiking and quiescence. It is unclear how these firing patterns are generated and what determines which firing pattern is selected. We have constructed a realistic biophysical Purkinje cell model that can replicate these patterns. In this model, Na+/K+ pump activity sets the Purkinje cell's operating mode. From rat cerebellar slices we present Purkinje whole cell recordings in the presence of ouabain, which irreversibly blocks the Na+/K+ pump. The model can replicate these recordings. We propose that Na+/K+ pump activity controls the intrinsic firing mode of cerbellar Purkinje cells. PMID:23284664

  18. Calcium microdomains near R-type calcium channels control the induction of presynaptic LTP at parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses

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    Myoga, Michael H.; Regehr, Wade G.

    2011-01-01

    R-type calcium channels in postsynaptic spines signal through functional calcium microdomains to regulate a calcium-calmodulin sensitive potassium channel that in turn regulates postsynaptic hippocampal LTP. Here we ask whether R-type calcium channels in presynaptic terminals also signal through calcium microdomains to control presynaptic LTP. We focus on presynaptic LTP at parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses in the cerebellum (PF-LTP), which is mediated by calcium/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases. Although most presynaptic calcium influx is through N-type and P/Q-type calcium channels, blocking these channels does not disrupt PF-LTP, but blocking R-type calcium channels does. Moreover, global calcium signaling cannot account for the calcium dependence of PF-LTP because R-type channels contribute modestly to overall calcium entry. These findings indicate that within presynaptic terminals, R-type calcium channels produce calcium microdomains that evoke presynaptic LTP at moderate frequencies that do not greatly increase global calcium levels,. PMID:21471358

  19. Calbindin-D28k is a more reliable marker of human Purkinje cells than standard Nissl stains: a stereological experiment.

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    Whitney, Elizabeth R; Kemper, Thomas L; Rosene, Douglas L; Bauman, Margaret L; Blatt, Gene J

    2008-02-15

    In a study of human Purkinje cell (PC) number, a striking mismatch between the number of PCs observed with the Nissl stain and the number of PCs immunopositive for calbindin-D28k (CB) was identified in 2 of the 10 brains examined. In the remaining eight brains this mismatch was not observed. Further, in these eight brains, analysis of CB immunostained sections counterstained with the Nissl stain revealed that more than 99% Nissl stained PCs were also immunopositive for CB. In contrast, in the two discordant brains, only 10-20% of CB immunopositive PCs were also identified with the Nissl stain. Although this finding was unexpected, a historical survey of the literature revealed that Spielmeyer [Spielmeyer W. Histopathologie des nervensystems. Julius Springer: Berlin; 1922. p. 56-79] described human cases with PCs that lacked the expected Nissl staining intensity, an important historical finding and critical issue when studying postmortem human brains. The reason for this failure in Nissl staining is not entirely clear, but it may result from premortem circumstances since it is not accounted for by postmortem delay or processing variables. Regardless of the exact cause, these observations suggest that Nissl staining may not be a reliable marker for PCs and that CB is an excellent alternative marker.

  20. The Secreted Protein C1QL1 and Its Receptor BAI3 Control the Synaptic Connectivity of Excitatory Inputs Converging on Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

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    Séverine M. Sigoillot

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Precise patterns of connectivity are established by different types of afferents on a given target neuron, leading to well-defined and non-overlapping synaptic territories. What regulates the specific characteristics of each type of synapse, in terms of number, morphology, and subcellular localization, remains to be understood. Here, we show that the signaling pathway formed by the secreted complement C1Q-related protein C1QL1 and its receptor, the adhesion-GPCR brain angiogenesis inhibitor 3 (BAI3, controls the stereotyped pattern of connectivity established by excitatory afferents on cerebellar Purkinje cells. The BAI3 receptor modulates synaptogenesis of both parallel fiber and climbing fiber afferents. The restricted and timely expression of its ligand C1QL1 in inferior olivary neurons ensures the establishment of the proper synaptic territory for climbing fibers. Given the broad expression of C1QL and BAI proteins in the developing mouse brain, our study reveals a general mechanism contributing to the formation of a functional brain.

  1. Hydroxyurea Treatment and Development of the Rat Cerebellum: Effects on the Neurogenetic Profiles and Settled Patterns of Purkinje Cells and Deep Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons.

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    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, M C; Serra, Roger; Hervás, José P

    2016-11-01

    The current paper analyzes the development of the male and female rat cerebellum exposed to hydroxyurea (HU) (300 or 600 mg/kg) as embryo and collected at postnatal day 90. Our study reveals that the administration of this drug compromises neither the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellar cortex nor deep nuclei (DCN). However, in comparison with the saline group, we observed that several cerebellar parameters were lower in the HU injected groups. These parameters included area of the cerebellum, cerebellar cortex length, molecular layer area, Purkinje cell number, granule cell counts, internal granular layer, white matter and cerebellar nuclei areas, and number of deep cerebellar nuclei neurons. These features were larger in the rats injected with saline, smaller in those exposed to 300 mg/kg of HU and smallest in the group receiving 600 mg/kg of this agent. No sex differences in the effect of the HU were observed. In addition, we infer the neurogenetic timetables and the neurogenetic gradients of PCs and DCN neurons in rats exposed to either saline or HU as embryos. For this purpose, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine was injected into pregnant rats previously administered with saline or HU. This thymidine analog was administered following a progressively delayed cumulative labeling method. The data presented here show that systematic differences exist in the pattern of neurogenesis and in the spatial location of cerebellar neurons between rats injected with saline or HU. No sex differences in the effect of the HU were observed. These findings have implications for the administration of this compound to women in gestation as the effects of HU on the development of the cerebellum might persist throughout their offsprings' life.

  2. Reminiscing about Jan Evangelista Purkinje: a pioneer of modern experimental physiology.

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    Cavero, Icilio; Guillon, Jean-Michel; Holzgrefe, Henry H

    2017-12-01

    This article reminisces about the life and key scientific achievements of Jan Evangelista Purkinje (1787-1869), a versatile 19th century Czech pioneer of modern experimental physiology. In 1804, after completing senior high school, Purkinje joined the Piarist monk order, but, after a 3-yr novitiate, he gave up the religious calling "to deal more freely with science." In 1818, he earned a Medical Doctor degree from Prague University by defending a dissertation on intraocular phenomena observed in oneself. In 1823, Purkinje became a Physiology and Pathology professor at the Prussian Medical University in Breslau, where he innovated the traditional teaching methods of physiology. Purkinje's contributions to physiology were manifold: accurate descriptions of various visual phenomena (e.g., Purkinje-Sanson images, Purkinje phenomenon), discovery of the terminal network of the cardiac conduction system (Purkinje fibers), identification of cerebellar neuronal bodies (Purkinje cells), formulation of the vertigo law (Purkinje's law), discovery of criteria to classify human fingerprints, etc. In 1850, Purkinje accepted and held until his death the Physiology chair at Prague Medical Faculty. During this period, he succeeded in introducing the Czech idiom (in addition to long-established German and Latin) as a Medical Faculty teaching language. Additionally, as a zealous Czech patriot, he actively contributed to the naissance and consolidation of a national Czech identity conscience. Purkinje was a trend-setting scientist who, throughout his career, worked to pave the way for the renovation of physiology from a speculative discipline, ancilla of anatomy, into a factual, autonomous science committed to the discovery of mechanisms governing in-life functions. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. The ducky2J mutation in Cacna2d2 results in reduced spontaneous Purkinje cell activity and altered gene expression

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    Donato, Roberta; Page, Karen M.; Koch, Dietlind; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Foucault, Isabelle; Davies, Anthony; Wilkinson, Tonia; Rees, Michele; Edwards, Frances A.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2006-01-01

    The mouse mutant ducky and its allele ducky2J represent a model for absence epilepsy characterized by spike-wave seizures, and cerebellar ataxia. These mice have mutations in Cacna2d2, which encodes the α2δ-2 calcium channel subunit. Of relevance to the ataxic phenotype, α2δ-2 mRNA is strongly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). The Cacna2d2du2J mutation results in a two base-pair deletion in the coding region and a complete loss of α2δ-2 protein. Here we show that du2J/du2J mice have a 30% reduction in somatic calcium current, and a marked fall in the spontaneous PC firing rate at 22°C, accompanied by a decrease in firing regularity, which is not affected by blocking synaptic input to PCs. At 34°C du2J/du2J PCs show no spontaneous intrinsic activity. Du2J/du2J mice also have alterations in the cerebellar expression of several genes related to PC function. At P21 there is an elevation of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and a reduction in tenascin-C gene expression. Although du2J/+ mice have a marked reduction in α2δ-2 protein, they show no fall in PC somatic calcium currents or increase in cerebellar tryrosine hydroxylase gene expression. However, du2J/+ PCs do exhibit a significant reduction in firing rate, correlating with the reduction in α2δ-2. A hypothesis for future study is that effects on gene expression occur as a result of a reduction in somatic calcium currents, whereas effects on PC firing occur as a long-term result of loss of α2δ-2 and/or a reduction in calcium currents and calcium-dependent processes in regions other than the soma. PMID:17135419

  4. The ducky(2J) mutation in Cacna2d2 results in reduced spontaneous Purkinje cell activity and altered gene expression.

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    Donato, Roberta; Page, Karen M; Koch, Dietlind; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Foucault, Isabelle; Davies, Anthony; Wilkinson, Tonia; Rees, Michele; Edwards, Frances A; Dolphin, Annette C

    2006-11-29

    The mouse mutant ducky and its allele ducky(2J) represent a model for absence epilepsy characterized by spike-wave seizures and cerebellar ataxia. These mice have mutations in Cacna2d2, which encodes the alpha2delta-2 calcium channel subunit. Of relevance to the ataxic phenotype, alpha2delta-2 mRNA is strongly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). The Cacna2d2(du2J) mutation results in a 2 bp deletion in the coding region and a complete loss of alpha2delta-2 protein. Here we show that du(2J)/du(2J) mice have a 30% reduction in somatic calcium current and a marked fall in the spontaneous PC firing rate at 22 degrees C, accompanied by a decrease in firing regularity, which is not affected by blocking synaptic input to PCs. At 34 degrees C, du(2J)/du(2J) PCs show no spontaneous intrinsic activity. Du(2J)/du(2J) mice also have alterations in the cerebellar expression of several genes related to PC function. At postnatal day 21, there is an elevation of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and a reduction in tenascin-C gene expression. Although du(2J)/+ mice have a marked reduction in alpha2delta-2 protein, they show no fall in PC somatic calcium currents or increase in cerebellar tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression. However, du(2J)/+ PCs do exhibit a significant reduction in firing rate, correlating with the reduction in alpha2delta-2. A hypothesis for future study is that effects on gene expression occur as a result of a reduction in somatic calcium currents, whereas effects on PC firing occur as a long-term result of loss of alpha2delta-2 and/or a reduction in calcium currents and calcium-dependent processes in regions other than the soma.

  5. Acute and long-term Purkinje cell loss following a single ethanol binge during the early third trimester equivalent in the rat.

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    Idrus, Nirelia M; Napper, Ruth M A

    2012-08-01

    In the rat, binge-like ethanol (EtOH) exposure during the early neonatal period (a developmental period equivalent to the human third trimester) can result in a permanent deficit of cerebellar Purkinje cells (Pcells). However, the consequences of a moderate binge alcohol exposure on a single day during this postnatal period have not been established. This is an issue of importance as many pregnant women binge drink periodically at social drinking levels. This study aimed to identify both the acute and long-term effects of exposure to a single alcohol binge that achieved a mean peak blood EtOH concentration of approximately 250 mg/dl during early postnatal life using a rat model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Acute apoptotic Pcell death 10 hours after a moderate dose binge EtOH exposure from postnatal days (PDs) 0 to 10 was assessed using active caspase-3 immunolabeling. Acute Pcell apoptosis was quantified in cerebellar vermal lobules I-X using the physical disector method. Long-term effects were assessed at PD 60 using stereological methods to determine total Pcell numbers in the vermis, lobule III, and lobule IX, following a moderate dose binge EtOH exposure at PDs 0, 2, or 4. Acute apoptosis was induced by EtOH on PDs 1 to 8 in a time and lobular-dependent manner. For EtOH exposure on PD 2, significant long-term Pcell loss occurred in lobule III. EtOH exposure on PD 4 resulted in significant long-term Pcell loss throughout the entire vermis. These results indicate that a single, early EtOH episode of moderate dose can create significant and permanent Pcell loss in the developing cerebellum. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  6. Cell migration during heart regeneration in zebrafish.

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    Tahara, Naoyuki; Brush, Michael; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2016-07-01

    Zebrafish possess the remarkable ability to regenerate injured hearts as adults, which contrasts the very limited ability in mammals. Although very limited, mammalian hearts do in fact have measurable levels of cardiomyocyte regeneration. Therefore, elucidating mechanisms of zebrafish heart regeneration would provide information of naturally occurring regeneration to potentially apply to mammalian studies, in addition to addressing this biologically interesting phenomenon in itself. Studies over the past 13 years have identified processes and mechanisms of heart regeneration in zebrafish. After heart injury, pre-existing cardiomyocytes dedifferentiate, enter the cell cycle, and repair the injured myocardium. This process requires interaction with epicardial cells, endocardial cells, and vascular endothelial cells. Epicardial cells envelope the heart, while endocardial cells make up the inner lining of the heart. They provide paracrine signals to cardiomyocytes to regenerate the injured myocardium, which is vascularized during heart regeneration. In addition, accumulating results suggest that local migration of these major cardiac cell types have roles in heart regeneration. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of various heart injury methods used in the research community and regeneration of the major cardiac cell types. Then, we discuss local migration of these cardiac cell types and immune cells during heart regeneration. Developmental Dynamics 245:774-787, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Spiral-wave dynamics in a mathematical model of human ventricular tissue with myocytes and Purkinje fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Alok Ranjan; Panfilov, A V; Pandit, Rahul

    2017-02-01

    We present systematic numerical studies of the possible effects of the coupling of human endocardial and Purkinje cells at cellular and two-dimensional tissue levels. We find that the autorhythmic-activity frequency of the Purkinje cell in a composite decreases with an increase in the coupling strength; this can even eliminate the autorhythmicity. We observe a delay between the beginning of the action potentials of endocardial and Purkinje cells in a composite; such a delay increases as we decrease the diffusive coupling, and eventually a failure of transmission occurs. An increase in the diffusive coupling decreases the slope of the action-potential-duration-restitution curve of an endocardial cell in a composite. By using a minimal model for the Purkinje network, in which we have a two-dimensional, bilayer tissue, with a layer of Purkinje cells on top of a layer of endocardial cells, we can stabilize spiral-wave turbulence; however, for a sparse distribution of Purkinje-ventricular junctions, at which these two layers are coupled, we can also obtain additional focal activity and many complex transient regimes. We also present additional effects resulting from the coupling of Purkinje and endocardial layers and discuss the relation of our results to the studies performed in anatomically accurate models of the Purkinje network.

  8. Combination stem cell therapy for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichim Thomas E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with congestive heart failure (CHF that are not eligible for transplantation have limited therapeutic options. Stem cell therapy such as autologous bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, or purified cells thereof has been used clinically since 2001. To date over 1000 patients have received cellular therapy as part of randomized trials, with the general consensus being that a moderate but statistically significant benefit occurs. Therefore, one of the important next steps in the field is optimization. In this paper we discuss three ways to approach this issue: a increasing stem cell migration to the heart; b augmenting stem cell activity; and c combining existing stem cell therapies to recapitulate a "therapeutic niche". We conclude by describing a case report of a heart failure patient treated with a combination stem cell protocol in an attempt to augment beneficial aspects of cord blood CD34 cells and mesenchymal-like stem cells.

  9. Stem cell therapy for ischemic heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Lu, Kai; Zhu, Jinyun; Wang, Jian'an

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart diseases, especially the myocardial infarction, is a major hazard problem to human health. Despite substantial advances in control of risk factors and therapies with drugs and interventions including bypass surgery and stent placement, the ischemic heart diseases usually result in heart failure (HF), which could aggravate social burden and increase the mortality rate. The current therapeutic methods to treat HF stay at delaying the disease progression without repair and regeneration of the damaged myocardium. While heart transplantation is the only effective therapy for end-stage patients, limited supply of donor heart makes it impossible to meet the substantial demand from patients with HF. Stem cell-based transplantation is one of the most promising treatment for the damaged myocardial tissue. Key recent published literatures and ClinicalTrials.gov. Stem cell-based therapy is a promising strategy for the damaged myocardial tissue. Different kinds of stem cells have their advantages for treatment of Ischemic heart diseases. The efficacy and potency of cell therapies vary significantly from trial to trial; some clinical trials did not show benefit. Diverged effects of cell therapy could be affected by cell types, sources, delivery methods, dose and their mechanisms by which delivered cells exert their effects. Understanding the origin of the regenerated cardiomyocytes, exploring the therapeutic effects of stem cell-derived exosomes and using the cell reprogram technology to improve the efficacy of cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases. Recently, stem cell-derived exosomes emerge as a critical player in paracrine mechanism of stem cell-based therapy. It is promising to exploit exosomes-based cell-free therapy for ischemic heart diseases in the future. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Restoration of heart functions using human embryonic stem cells derived heart muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gepstein, Lior; Kehat, Izhak

    2005-02-01

    Extract: Recent advances in molecular and cellular biology and specifically in the areas of stem cell biology and tissue engineering have paved the way for the development of a new field in biomedicine, regenerative medicine. This exciting approach seeks to develop new biological solutions, using the mobilization of endogenous stem cells or delivery of exogenous cells to replace or modify the function of diseased, absent, or malfunctioning tissue. The adult heart represents an attractive candidate for these emerging technologies, since adult cardiomyocytes have limited regenerative capacity. Thus, any significant heart cell loss or dysfunction, such as occurs during heart attack, is mostly irreversible and may lead to the development of progressive heart failure, one of the leading causes of world-wide morbidity and mortality. Similarly, dysfunction of the specialized electrical conduction system within the heart may result in inefficient rhythm initiation or impulse conduction, leading to significant slowing of the heart rate, usually requiring the implantation of a permanent electronic pacemaker. Replacement of the dysfunctional myocardium (heart muscle) by implantation of external heart muscle cells is emerging as a novel paradigm for restoration of the myocardial electromechanical properties, but has been significantly hampered by the paucity of cell sources for human heart cells and by the relatively limited evidence for functional integration between grafted and host cells. The recently described human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines may provide a possible solution for the aforementioned cell sourcing problem.

  11. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoover-Plow J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-Plow, Yanqing GongDepartments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Joseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1 improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2 identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3 development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress.Keywords: mobilization, expansion, homing, survival, engraftment

  12. Stem cell therapy to treat heart ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali Qayyum, Abbas; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Kastrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    (CABG), morbidity and mortality is still high in patients with CAD. Along with PCI and CABG or in patients without options for revascularization, stem cell regenerative therapy in controlled trials is a possibility. Stem cells are believed to exert their actions by angiogenesis and regeneration...... of cardiomyocytes. Recently published clinical trials and meta-analysis of stem cell studies have shown encouraging results with increased left ventricle ejection fraction and reduced symptoms in patients with CAD and heart failure. There is some evidence of mesenchymal stem cell being more effective compared...... to other cell types and cell therapy may be more effective in patients with known diabetes mellitus. However, further investigations are warranted....

  13. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induction in Purkinje Neurons After Cerebellar Motor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeds, Nicholas W.; Williams, Brian L.; Bickford, Paula C.

    1995-12-01

    The cerebellar cortex is implicated in the learning of complex motor skills. This learning may require synaptic remodeling of Purkinje cell inputs. An extracellular serine protease, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), is involved in remodeling various nonneural tissues and is associated with developing and regenerating neurons. In situ hybridization showed that expression of tPA messenger RNA was increased in the Purkinje neurons of rats within an hour of their being trained for a complex motor task. Antibody to tPA also showed the induction of tPA protein associated with cerebellar Purkinje cells. Thus, the induction of tPA during motor learning may play a role in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity.

  14. A coupled 3D-1D numerical monodomain solver for cardiac electrical activation in the myocardium with detailed Purkinje network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Palamara, Simone; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for the electrophysiology in the heart to handle the electrical propagation through the Purkinje system and in the myocardium, with two-way coupling at the Purkinje-muscle junctions. In both the subproblems the monodomain model is considered, whereas at the junctions a resistor element is included that induces an orthodromic propagation delay from the Purkinje network towards the heart muscle. We prove a sufficient condition for convergence of a fixed-point iterative algorithm to the numerical solution of the coupled problem. Numerical comparison of activation patterns is made with two different combinations of models for the coupled Purkinje network/myocardium system, the eikonal/eikonal and the monodomain/monodomain models. Test cases are investigated for both physiological and pathological activation of a model left ventricle. Finally, we prove the reliability of the monodomain/monodomain coupling on a realistic scenario. Our results underlie the importance of using physiologically realistic Purkinje-trees with propagation solved using the monodomain model for simulating cardiac activation.

  15. Stem Cell Therapy for Congestive Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunduz E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHeart failure is a major cardiovascular health problem. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of congestive heart failure (CHF [1]. Cardiac transplantation remains the most effective long-term treatment option, however is limited primarily by donor availability, rejection and infections. Mechanical circulatory support has its own indications and limitations [2]. Therefore, there is a need to develop more effective therapeutic strategies.Recently, regenerative medicine has received considerable scientific attention in the cardiovascular arena. We report here our experience demonstrating the beneficial effects of cardiac stem cell therapy on left ventricular functions in a patient with Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL who developed CHF due to ischemic heart disease during the course of lymphoma treatment. Case reportA 58-year-old male with relapsed HL was referred to our bone marrow transplantation unit in October 2009. He was given 8 courses of combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, and dacarbazine (ABVD between June 2008 and February 2009 and achieved complete remission. However, his disease relapsed 3 months after completing the last cycle of ABVD and he was decided to be treated with DHAP (cisplatin, cytarabine, dexamethasone followed autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT. After the completion of first course of DHAP regimen, he developed acute myocardial infarction (AMI and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG was performed. After his cardiac function stabilized, 3 additional courses of DHAP were given and he was referred to our centre for consideration of autologous SCT. Computed tomography scans obtained after chemotherapy confirmed complete remission. Stem cells were collected from peripheral blood after mobilization with 10 µg/kg/day granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF subcutaneously. Collection was started on the fifth day of G-CSF and performed for 3 consecutive days. Flow cytometric

  16. Oligodendrocyte ablation affects the coordinated interaction between granule and Purkinje neurons during cerebellum development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collin, Ludovic; Doretto, Sandrine; Malerba, Monica; Ruat, Martial; Borrelli, Emiliana

    2007-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes (OLs) are the glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS) classically known to be devoted to the formation of myelin sheaths around most axons of the vertebrate brain. We have addressed the role of these cells during cerebellar development, by ablating OLs in vivo. Previous analyses had indicated that OL ablation during the first six postnatal days results into a striking cerebellar phenotype, whose major features are a strong reduction of granule neurons and aberrant Purkinje cells development. These two cell types are highly interconnected during cerebellar development through the production of molecules that help their proliferation, differentiation and maintenance. In this article, we present data showing that OL ablation has major effects on the physiology of Purkinje (PC) and granule cells (GC). In particular, OL ablation results into a reduction of sonic hedgehog (Shh), Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), and Reelin (Rln) expression. These results indicate that absence of OLs profoundly alters the normal cerebellar developmental program

  17. Axonal propagation of simple and complex spikes in cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Zayd M; Raman, Indira M

    2005-01-12

    In cerebellar Purkinje neurons, the reliability of propagation of high-frequency simple spikes and spikelets of complex spikes is likely to regulate inhibition of Purkinje target neurons. To test the extent to which a one-to-one correspondence exists between somatic and axonal spikes, we made dual somatic and axonal recordings from Purkinje neurons in mouse cerebellar slices. Somatic action potentials were recorded with a whole-cell pipette, and the corresponding axonal signals were recorded extracellularly with a loose-patch pipette. Propagation of spontaneous and evoked simple spikes was highly reliable. At somatic firing rates of approximately 200 spikes/sec, 375 Hz during somatic hyperpolarizations that silenced spontaneous firing to approximately 150 Hz during spontaneous activity. The probability of propagation of individual spikelets could be described quantitatively as a saturating function of spikelet amplitude, rate of rise, or preceding interspike interval. The results suggest that ion channels of Purkinje axons are adapted to produce extremely short refractory periods and that brief bursts of forward-propagating action potentials generated by complex spikes may contribute transiently to inhibition of postsynaptic neurons.

  18. Caspase-mediated apoptosis induction in zebrafish cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Thomas; Namikawa, Kazuhiko; Winter, Barbara; Müller-Brown, Karina; Kühn, Ralf; Wurst, Wolfgang; Köster, Reinhard W

    2016-11-15

    The zebrafish is a well-established model organism in which to study in vivo mechanisms of cell communication, differentiation and function. Existing cell ablation methods are either invasive or they rely on the cellular expression of prokaryotic enzymes and the use of antibiotic drugs as cell death-inducing compounds. We have recently established a novel inducible genetic cell ablation system based on tamoxifen-inducible Caspase 8 activity, thereby exploiting mechanisms of cell death intrinsic to most cell types. Here, we prove its suitability in vivo by monitoring the ablation of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in transgenic zebrafish that co-express the inducible caspase and a fluorescent reporter. Incubation of larvae in tamoxifen for 8 h activated endogenous Caspase 3 and cell death, whereas incubation for 16 h led to the near-complete loss of PCs by apoptosis. We observed synchronous cell death autonomous to the PC population and phagocytosing microglia in the cerebellum, reminiscent of developmental apoptosis in the forebrain. Thus, induction of apoptosis through targeted activation of caspase by tamoxifen (ATTAC TM ) further expands the repertoire of genetic tools for conditional interrogation of cellular functions. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. The anatomy and histology of the atrioventricular conducting system in the hedgehog (Hemiechinus auritus) heart

    OpenAIRE

    NABIPOUR, Abolghasem

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the atrioventricular conducting system in 4 adult male hedgehogs (Hemiechinus auritus). The histological structure of these components was studied using routine histological methods. The AVN was located at the lower and anterior part of the interatrial septum, near the root of the aorta. It was almost oval and consisted of twisted cells. Internodal pathways in the hedgehog heart were not observed, but there were numerous purkinje-like fibers within the myocardium of the at...

  20. Immunosuppressive T-cell antibody induction for heart transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Møller, Christian H; Gustafsson, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Heart transplantation has become a valuable and well-accepted treatment option for end-stage heart failure. Rejection of the transplanted heart by the recipient's body is a risk to the success of the procedure, and life-long immunosuppression is necessary to avoid this. Clear evidence is required...... to identify the best, safest and most effective immunosuppressive treatment strategy for heart transplant recipients. To date, there is no consensus on the use of immunosuppressive antibodies against T-cells for induction after heart transplantation....

  1. Drosophila heart cell movement to the midline occurs through both cell autonomous migration and dorsal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Timm; Schneider, Matthias; Schwendele, Bernd; Renault, Andrew D

    2014-12-15

    The Drosophila heart is a linear organ formed by the movement of bilaterally specified progenitor cells to the midline and adherence of contralateral heart cells. This movement occurs through the attachment of heart cells to the overlying ectoderm which is undergoing dorsal closure. Therefore heart cells are thought to move to the midline passively. Through live imaging experiments and analysis of mutants that affect the speed of dorsal closure we show that heart cells in Drosophila are autonomously migratory and part of their movement to the midline is independent of the ectoderm. This means that heart formation in flies is more similar to that in vertebrates than previously thought. We also show that defects in dorsal closure can result in failure of the amnioserosa to properly degenerate, which can physically hinder joining of contralateral heart cells leading to a broken heart phenotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Translational aspects of cell therapy for heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Nasseri, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This cumulative “habilitation” thesis focuses on myocardial regeneration by means of cell therapy and on experimental and clinical approaches. To supplement the articles published by the author the work gives an overview of the pathogenesis of heart failure and remodeling of the heart, taking into account the role of nitric oxide and statins. Further, the treatment of ischemic heart failure including organ transplantation and mechanical circulatory support is discussed. Different approaches t...

  3. Stem cell therapy for end-stage heart failure : indispensable role for the cell?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijsen, K. R.; Chamuleau, S. A. J.; Noort, W. A.; Doevendans, P. A.; Sluijter, J. P. G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review For heart failure patients, the urgent need for heart transplantation exceeds the availability of donor hearts. Therefore, cell transplantation has emerged as an interesting and potential solution. This review will focus on the capability of different types of stem cells to

  4. Tbx1 coordinates addition of posterior second heart field progenitor cells to the arterial and venous poles of the heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rana, M. Sameer; Théveniau-Ruissy, Magali; de Bono, Christopher; Mesbah, Karim; Francou, Alexandre; Rammah, Mayyasa; Domínguez, Jorge N.; Roux, Marine; Laforest, Brigitte; Anderson, Robert H.; Mohun, Timothy; Zaffran, Stephane; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Kelly, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells from the second heart field (SHF) contribute to rapid growth of the embryonic heart, giving rise to right ventricular and outflow tract (OFT) myocardium at the arterial pole of the heart, and atrial myocardium at the venous pole. Recent clonal analysis and cell-tracing

  5. Embryonic stem cell therapy of heart failure in genetic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre

    2008-10-01

    Pathogenic causes underlying nonischemic cardiomyopathies are increasingly being resolved, yet repair therapies for these commonly heritable forms of heart failure are lacking. A case in point is human dilated cardiomyopathy 10 (CMD10; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man #608569), a progressive organ dysfunction syndrome refractory to conventional therapies and linked to mutations in cardiac ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel subunits. Embryonic stem cell therapy demonstrates benefit in ischemic heart disease, but the reparative capacity of this allogeneic regenerative cell source has not been tested in inherited cardiomyopathy. Here, in a Kir6.2-knockout model lacking functional K(ATP) channels, we recapitulated under the imposed stress of pressure overload the gene-environment substrate of CMD10. Salient features of the human malignant heart failure phenotype were reproduced, including compromised contractility, ventricular dilatation, and poor survival. Embryonic stem cells were delivered through the epicardial route into the left ventricular wall of cardiomyopathic stressed Kir6.2-null mutants. At 1 month of therapy, transplantation of 200,000 cells per heart achieved teratoma-free reversal of systolic dysfunction and electrical synchronization and halted maladaptive remodeling, thereby preventing end-stage organ failure. Tracked using the lacZ reporter transgene, stem cells engrafted into host heart. Beyond formation of cardiac tissue positive for Kir6.2, transplantation induced cell cycle activation and halved fibrotic zones, normalizing sarcomeric and gap junction organization within remuscularized hearts. Improved systemic function induced by stem cell therapy translated into increased stamina, absence of anasarca, and benefit to overall survivorship. Embryonic stem cells thus achieve functional repair in nonischemic genetic cardiomyopathy, expanding indications to the therapy of heritable heart failure. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is

  6. Chemical ablation of the Purkinje system causes early termination and activation rate slowing of long-duration ventricular fibrillation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosdall, Derek J; Tabereaux, Paul B; Kim, Jong J; Walcott, Gregory P; Rogers, Jack M; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; Huang, Jian; Robertson, Peter G; Smith, William M; Ideker, Raymond E

    2008-08-01

    Endocardial mapping has suggested that Purkinje fibers may play a role in the maintenance of long-duration ventricular fibrillation (LDVF). To determine the influence of Purkinje fibers on LDVF, we chemically ablated the Purkinje system with Lugol solution and recorded endocardial and transmural activation during LDVF. Dog hearts were isolated and perfused, and the ventricular endocardium was exposed and treated with Lugol solution (n = 6) or normal Tyrode solution as a control (n = 6). The left anterior papillary muscle endocardium was mapped with a 504-electrode (21 x 24) plaque with electrodes spaced 1 mm apart. Transmural activation was recorded with a six-electrode plunge needle on each side of the plaque. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced, and perfusion was halted. LDVF spontaneously terminated sooner in Lugol-ablated hearts than in control hearts (4.9 +/- 1.5 vs. 9.2 +/- 3.2 min, P = 0.01). After termination of VF, both the control and Lugol hearts were typically excitable, but only short episodes of VF could be reinduced. Endocardial activation rates were similar during the first 2 min of LDVF for Lugol-ablated and control hearts but were significantly slower in Lugol hearts by 3 min. In control hearts, the endocardium activated more rapidly than the epicardium after 4 min of LDVF with wave fronts propagating most often from the endocardium to epicardium. No difference in transmural activation rate or wave front direction was observed in Lugol hearts. Ablation of the subendocardium hastens VF spontaneous termination and alters VF activation sequences, suggesting that Purkinje fibers are important in the maintenance of LDVF.

  7. Circulating cells in heart and renal failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jie, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of combined chronic heart failure and chronic kidney disease, i.e. the cardiorenal syndrome (CRS), is a rising problem with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In CRS, disease progression in both organs is amplified. In this thesis, we aimed to gain insight into

  8. VEGF improves survival of mesenchymal stem cells in infarcted hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons, Jennifer; Huang Yu; Arakawa-Hoyt, Janice; Washko, Daniel; Takagawa, Junya; Ye, Jianqin; Grossman, William; Su Hua

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a promising source for cell-based treatment of myocardial infarction (MI), but existing strategies are restricted by low cell survival and engraftment. We examined whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) improve MSC viability in infracted hearts. We found long-term culture increased MSC-cellular stress: expressing more cell cycle inhibitors, p16 INK , p21 and p19 ARF . VEGF treatment reduced cellular stress, increased pro-survival factors, phosphorylated-Akt and Bcl-xL expression and cell proliferation. Co-injection of MSCs with VEGF to MI hearts increased cell engraftment and resulted in better improvement of cardiac function than that injected with MSCs or VEGF alone. In conclusion, VEGF protects MSCs from culture-induce cellular stress and improves their viability in ischemic myocardium, which results in improvements of their therapeutic effect for the treatment of MI

  9. Stem cell markers in the heart of the human newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Faa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The identification of cardiac progenitor cells in mammals raises the possibility that the human heart contains a population of stem cells capable of generating cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. Several recent studies now show that the different cell types that characterize the adult human heart arise from a common ancestor. Human cardiac stem cells differentiate into cardiomyocytes, and, in lesser extent, into smooth muscle and endothelial cells. The characterization of human cardiac stem cells (CSCs has important clinical implications. In recent years, CD117 (c-kit has been reported to mark a subtype of stem/progenitor cells in the human heart, with stem cell-like properties, including the ability to self-renewal and clonogenicity multipotentiality. Proceedings of the 2nd International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 26th-31st, 2015 · Cagliari (Italy · October 31st, 2015 · Stem cells: present and future Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Antonio Giordano

  10. Stem cell death and survival in heart regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Kalvelyte, Audrone; Stulpinas, Aurimas; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Foldes, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis disrupts cardiac function and leads to cardiac decompensation and terminal heart failure. Delineating the regulatory signaling pathways that orchestrate cell survival in the heart has significant therapeutic implications. Cardiac tissue has limited capacity to regenerate and repair. Stem cell therapy is a successful approach for repairing and regenerating ischemic cardiac tissue; however, transplanted cells display very high death percentage, a problem that affects success of tissue regeneration. Stem cells display multipotency or pluripotency and undergo self-renewal, however these events are negatively influenced by upregulation of cell death machinery that induces the significant decrease in survival and differentiation signals upon cardiovascular injury. While efforts to identify cell types and molecular pathways that promote cardiac tissue regeneration have been productive, studies that focus on blocking the extensive cell death after transplantation are limited. The control of cell death includes multiple networks rather than one crucial pathway, which underlies the challenge of identifying the interaction between various cellular and biochemical components. This review is aimed at exploiting the molecular mechanisms by which stem cells resist death signals to develop into mature and healthy cardiac cells. Specifically, we focus on a number of factors that control death and survival of stem cells upon transplantation and ultimately affect cardiac regeneration. We also discuss potential survival enhancing strategies and how they could be meaningful in the design of targeted therapies that improve cardiac function.

  11. [Hering, Vintschgau and the problem of Purkinje's succession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablik, K

    1989-01-01

    The problem of Jan Evangelista Purkinje's succession will be presented according to the results of archival research. The Ministery of Cult and Education in Vienna, and especially Karl Rokitansky, who was the adviser for medical education, in 1867 created a new professorship and Institute for Physiology, beside Purkinje and his Institute. Maximilian Vintschgau was to assist the world-famous 80 years old Purkinje but was not permitted to teach the whole field of physiology and to examine students. The fact that the professors of the Prague Medical Faculty in 1868 started to remove the restrictions for Vintschgau with the argument of academic freedom and in 1869 tried to keep the second institute for the future, is not yet mentioned in the literature. Discussions about the problems of the Czech language and its use in physiological lectures were scarcely mentioned by the Ministery: if one day there should be a Czech-speaking lecturer, the problem would be solved. Unfortunately Purkinje had no genuine pupil in Prague, and after his death, Vintschgau was provisional director of the Institute for half a year. In this situation Rokitansky decided that there should only be one institute for physiology in Prague. The Medical Faculty wanted to have Hermann Helmholtz to succeed Purkinje, but Helmholtz refused to come. Ewald Hering, who was nominated in the second place by the Faculty, accepted the call. Vintschgau had only rank four, third was Conrad Eckhard from Giessen. The Ministery in Vienna, however, made a special decision: The Medical Faculty of Innsbruck was founded in 1869, and there was not professor for physiology at the beginning of 1870. The candidates of the Insbruck Medical Faculty were neglected in favour of Vintschgau, who was considered to be a trustworthy Austrian patriot. Hering and Vintschgau became professors on March 6, 1870, and Hering started his work in Prague in a new institute in the "Wenzelsbad".

  12. Intracellular renin disrupts chemical communication between heart cells. Pathophysiological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walmor eDe Mello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of intracellular renin on the process of chemical communication between cardiac cells was investigated in cell pairs isolated from the left ventricle of adult Wistar Kyoto rats. The enzyme together with Lucifer yellow CH was dialyzed into one cell of the pair using the whole cell clamp technique. The diffusion of the dye in the dialyzed and in non-dialyzed cell was followed by measuring the intensity of fluorescence in both cells as a function of time. The results indicated that; 1 under normal conditions, Lucifer Yellow flows from cell-to-cell through gap junctions; 2 the intracellular dialysis of renin (100nM disrupts chemical communication-an effect enhanced by simultaneous administration of angiotensinogen (100nM; 3 enalaprilat (10-9M administered to the cytosol together with renin reduced drastically the uncoupling action of the enzyme; 4 aliskiren (10-8M inhibited the effect of renin on chemical communication;5 the possible role of intracellular renin independently of angiotensin II (Ang II was evaluated including the increase of the inward calcium current elicited by the enzyme and the possible role of oxidative stress on the disruption of cell communication; 6 the possible harmful versus the beneficial effect of intracellular renin during myocardial infarction was discussed;7 the present results indicate that intracellular renin due to internalization or in situ synthesis, causes a severe impairment of chemical communication in the heart resulting in derangement of metabolic cooperation with serious consequences for heart function.

  13. TRPC1 expression and distribution in rat hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Niu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC proteins have been identified as a family of plasma membrane calcium-permeable channels. TRPC proteins can be activated by various stimuli and act as cellular sensors in mammals. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs have been proposed to underlie cardiac mechano-electric feedback (MEF, although the molecular entity of SAC remains unknown. There is evidence suggesting that transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1 is a stretch-activated ion channel. As a non-selective cation channel, TRPC1 may cause stretch-induced depolarization and arrhythmia and thus may contribute to the MEF of the heart. In this study, we examined the expression patterns of TRPC1 in detail at both the mRNA and protein levels in rat hearts.We isolated total RNA from the left and right atria, and the left and right ventricles, and detected TRPC1 mRNA in these tissues using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. To study the protein localization and targeting, we performed immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence labeling with the antibody against TRPC1. TRPC1 was detected in the cardiomyocytes of the ventricle and atrium at both the mRNA and protein levels. The cell membrane and Ttubule showed strong fluorescence labeling in the ventricular myocytes. Purkinje cells, the endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells of the coronary arterioles also displayed TRPC1 labeling. No TRPC1 was detected in fibroblasts. In conclusion, TRPC1 is widely expressed in the rat heart, including in working cells, Purkinje cells and vascular cells, suggesting that it plays an important role in the heart. The specific distribution pattern offered a useful insight into its function in adult rat ventricular cells. Further investigations are needed to clarify the role of TRPC1 in regulating cardiac activity, including cardiac MEF.

  14. Embryonic Stem Cell Therapy of Heart Failure in Genetic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J.; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J.; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic causes underlying nonischemic cardiomyopathies are increasingly being resolved, yet repair therapies for these commonly heritable forms of heart failure are lacking. A case in point is human dilated cardiomyopathy 10 (CMD10; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man #608569), a progressive organ dysfunction syndrome refractory to conventional therapies and linked to mutations in cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel sub-units. Embryonic stem cell therapy demonstrates benefit in ischemi...

  15. Heterogeneous response of isolated adult rat heart cells to insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haworth, R.A.; Hunter, D.R.; Berkoff, H.A.

    1984-01-01

    3-O-Methylglucose uptake by Ca2+-resistant adult rat heart cells in suspension was measured, free of artifactual inhibitor-insensitive uptake, and with an accuracy of +/- 1.9% pellet water. (Ca2+-resistant cells are cells which retain their original rod-shaped morphology in the presence of physiological levels of Ca2+.) High levels of insulin (10(-6) M) stimulated the rate of 3-O-methylglucose uptake approximately 10-fold. In the presence of low levels of insulin (3 X 10(-11) M, 10(-10) M) uptake was biphasic; it could not be described by a single exponential function within experimental error, but required the sum of two exponentials. Deviation from a single exponential function was not so great with high levels of insulin (10(-6) M) or no insulin. Cell sugar uptake was also investigated using autoradiography of cells which had accumulated [2-14C]deoxyglucose under similar conditions. This showed considerable heterogeneity of 2-deoxyglucose uptake by cells treated with low levels of insulin, but significantly less heterogeneity of 2-deoxyglucose uptake by cells treated with high levels of insulin. It is concluded that the deviation of 3-O-methylglucose uptake from a single exponential observed at low insulin levels can be accounted for in terms of a heterogeneous response of cells to insulin

  16. Intraocular lens alignment from purkinje and Scheimpflug imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Patricia; De Castro, Alberto; Jiménez-Alfaro, Ignacio; Marcos, Susana

    2010-11-01

    The improved designs of intraocular lenses (IOLs) implanted during cataract surgery demand understanding of the possible effects of lens misalignment on optical performance. In this review, we describe the implementation, set-up and validation of two methods to measure in vivo tilt and decentration of IOLs, one based on Purkinje imaging and the other on Scheimpflug imaging. The Purkinje system images the reflections of an oblique collimated light source on the anterior cornea and anterior and posterior IOL surfaces and relies on the well supported assumption of the linearity of the Purkinje images with respect to IOL tilt and decentration. Scheimpflug imaging requires geometrical distortion correction and image processing techniques to retrieve the pupillary axis, IOL axis and pupil centre from the three-dimensional anterior segment image of the eye. Validation of the techniques using a physical eye model indicates that IOL tilt is estimated within an accuracy of 0.261 degree and decentration within 0.161 mm. Measurements on patients implanted with aspheric IOLs indicate that IOL tilt and decentration tend to be mirror symmetric between left and right eyes. The average tilt was 1.54 degrees and the average decentration was 0.21 mm. Simulated aberration patterns using custom models of the patients eyes, built using anatomical data of the anterior cornea and foveal position, the IOL geometry and the measured IOL tilt and decentration predict the experimental wave aberrations measured using laser ray tracing aberrometry on the same eyes. This reveals a relatively minor contribution of IOL tilt and decentration on the higher-order aberrations of the normal pseudophakic eye.

  17. Cellular Therapeutics for Heart Failure: Focus on Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitabh C. Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resulting from a various etiologies, the most notable remains ischemia; heart failure (HF manifests as the common end pathway of many cardiovascular processes and remains among the top causes for hospitalization and a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current pharmacologic treatment for HF utilizes pharmacologic agents to control symptoms and slow further deterioration; however, on a cellular level, in a patient with progressive disease, fibrosis and cardiac remodeling can continue leading to end-stage heart failure. Cellular therapeutics have risen as the new hope for an improvement in the treatment of HF. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have gained popularity given their propensity of promoting endogenous cellular repair of a myriad of disease processes via paracrine signaling through expression of various cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules resulting in activation of signal transduction pathways. While the exact mechanism remains to be completely elucidated, this remains the primary mechanism identified to date. Recently, MSCs have been incorporated as the central focus in clinical trials investigating the role how MSCs can play in the treatment of HF. In this review, we focus on the characteristics of MSCs that give them a distinct edge as cellular therapeutics and present results of clinical trials investigating MSCs in the setting of ischemic HF.

  18. Chronic congestive heart failure is associated with a phenotypic shift of intramyocardial endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijianowski, M. M.; van Laar, M.; Bras, J.; Becker, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    There is evidence that patients with chronic congestive heart failure have endothelial cell-related abnormalities of the peripheral circulation and the coronary microvasculature. For that reason, we have studied the phenotypic expression of endothelial cells in hearts of patients with congestive

  19. Actionable Metabolic Pathways in Heart Failure and Cancer—Lessons From Cancer Cell Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Karlstaedt

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in cancer cell metabolism provide unprecedented opportunities for a new understanding of heart metabolism and may offer new approaches for the treatment of heart failure. Key questions driving the cancer field to understand how tumor cells reprogram metabolism and to benefit tumorigenesis are also applicable to the heart. Recent experimental and conceptual advances in cancer cell metabolism provide the cardiovascular field with the unique opportunity to target metabolism. This review compares cancer cell metabolism and cardiac metabolism with an emphasis on strategies of cellular adaptation, and how to exploit metabolic changes for therapeutic benefit.

  20. A comparative study of myosin and its subunits in adult and neonatal-rat hearts and in rat heart cells from young and old cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanbari, H A; McCarl, R L

    1980-01-01

    A possible explanation for the decrease in myosin Ca2+-dependent ATPase activity as rat heart cells age in culture is presented. The subunit structure and enzyme kinetics of myosin from adult and neonatal rat hearts and from rat heart cells of young and old cultures are compared. These studies indicate that the loss in Ca-ATPase activity of myosin from older cultures was an intrinsic property of the myosin itself. Myofibrillar fractions from the indicated four sources showed no qualitative or...

  1. Cerebellar Nuclear Neurons Use Time and Rate Coding to Transmit Purkinje Neuron Pauses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Shyam Kumar; Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; De Schutter, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Neurons of the cerebellar nuclei convey the final output of the cerebellum to their targets in various parts of the brain. Within the cerebellum their direct upstream connections originate from inhibitory Purkinje neurons. Purkinje neurons have a complex firing pattern of regular spikes interrupted by intermittent pauses of variable length. How can the cerebellar nucleus process this complex input pattern? In this modeling study, we investigate different forms of Purkinje neuron simple spike pause synchrony and its influence on candidate coding strategies in the cerebellar nuclei. That is, we investigate how different alignments of synchronous pauses in synthetic Purkinje neuron spike trains affect either time-locking or rate-changes in the downstream nuclei. We find that Purkinje neuron synchrony is mainly represented by changes in the firing rate of cerebellar nuclei neurons. Pause beginning synchronization produced a unique effect on nuclei neuron firing, while the effect of pause ending and pause overlapping synchronization could not be distinguished from each other. Pause beginning synchronization produced better time-locking of nuclear neurons for short length pauses. We also characterize the effect of pause length and spike jitter on the nuclear neuron firing. Additionally, we find that the rate of rebound responses in nuclear neurons after a synchronous pause is controlled by the firing rate of Purkinje neurons preceding it.

  2. Cerebellar Nuclear Neurons Use Time and Rate Coding to Transmit Purkinje Neuron Pauses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Shyam Kumar; Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; De Schutter, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Neurons of the cerebellar nuclei convey the final output of the cerebellum to their targets in various parts of the brain. Within the cerebellum their direct upstream connections originate from inhibitory Purkinje neurons. Purkinje neurons have a complex firing pattern of regular spikes interrupted by intermittent pauses of variable length. How can the cerebellar nucleus process this complex input pattern? In this modeling study, we investigate different forms of Purkinje neuron simple spike pause synchrony and its influence on candidate coding strategies in the cerebellar nuclei. That is, we investigate how different alignments of synchronous pauses in synthetic Purkinje neuron spike trains affect either time-locking or rate-changes in the downstream nuclei. We find that Purkinje neuron synchrony is mainly represented by changes in the firing rate of cerebellar nuclei neurons. Pause beginning synchronization produced a unique effect on nuclei neuron firing, while the effect of pause ending and pause overlapping synchronization could not be distinguished from each other. Pause beginning synchronization produced better time-locking of nuclear neurons for short length pauses. We also characterize the effect of pause length and spike jitter on the nuclear neuron firing. Additionally, we find that the rate of rebound responses in nuclear neurons after a synchronous pause is controlled by the firing rate of Purkinje neurons preceding it. PMID:26630202

  3. Cells and Angiogenic Cytokines in Therapeutic Angiogenesis for Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yu; Zhang, Dai-Fu; Liang, Bo

    2005-01-01

    In the past 20 to 30 years,great developments had been achieved in the applying of cells and angiogenic cytokines for ischemic heart disease.The thesis reviews latest studies of mechanism and clinic application of this novel therapy....

  4. Assessment of DNA synthesis in Islet-1{sup +} cells in the adult murine heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberger, Florian, E-mail: f.weinberger@uke.de; Mehrkens, Dennis, E-mail: dennis.mehrkens@uk-koeln.de; Starbatty, Jutta, E-mail: starbatty@uke.uni-hamburg.de; Nicol, Philipp, E-mail: Philipp.Nicol@gmx.de; Eschenhagen, Thomas, E-mail: t.eschenhagen@uke.de

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Islet-1 was expressed in the adult heart. • Islet-1-positive cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. • Sinoatrial node cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. - Abstract: Rationale: Islet-1 positive (Islet-1{sup +}) cardiac progenitor cells give rise to the right ventricle, atria and outflow tract during murine cardiac development. In the adult heart Islet-1 expression is limited to parasympathetic neurons, few cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, within the proximal aorta and pulmonary artery and sinoatrial node cells. Its role in these cells is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that Islet-1{sup +} cells retain proliferative activity and may therefore play a role in regenerating specialized regions in the heart. Methods and results: DNA synthesis was analyzed by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine ({sup 3}H-thymidine) in Isl-1-nLacZ mice, a transgenic model with an insertion of a nuclear beta-galactosidase in the Islet-1 locus. Mice received daily injections of {sup 3}H-thymidine for 5 days. DNA synthesis was visualized throughout the heart by dipping autoradiography of cryosections. Colocalization of an nLacZ-signal and silver grains would indicate DNA synthesis in Islet-1{sup +} cells. Whereas Islet{sup −} non-myocyte nuclei were regularly marked by accumulation of silver grains, colocalization with nLacZ-signals was not detected in >25,000 cells analyzed. Conclusions: Islet-1{sup +} cells are quiescent in the adult heart, suggesting that, under normal conditions, even pacemaking cells do not proliferate at higher rates than normal cardiac myocytes.

  5. Assessment of DNA synthesis in Islet-1+ cells in the adult murine heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberger, Florian; Mehrkens, Dennis; Starbatty, Jutta; Nicol, Philipp; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Islet-1 was expressed in the adult heart. • Islet-1-positive cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. • Sinoatrial node cells did not proliferate in the adult heart. - Abstract: Rationale: Islet-1 positive (Islet-1 + ) cardiac progenitor cells give rise to the right ventricle, atria and outflow tract during murine cardiac development. In the adult heart Islet-1 expression is limited to parasympathetic neurons, few cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, within the proximal aorta and pulmonary artery and sinoatrial node cells. Its role in these cells is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that Islet-1 + cells retain proliferative activity and may therefore play a role in regenerating specialized regions in the heart. Methods and results: DNA synthesis was analyzed by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine ( 3 H-thymidine) in Isl-1-nLacZ mice, a transgenic model with an insertion of a nuclear beta-galactosidase in the Islet-1 locus. Mice received daily injections of 3 H-thymidine for 5 days. DNA synthesis was visualized throughout the heart by dipping autoradiography of cryosections. Colocalization of an nLacZ-signal and silver grains would indicate DNA synthesis in Islet-1 + cells. Whereas Islet − non-myocyte nuclei were regularly marked by accumulation of silver grains, colocalization with nLacZ-signals was not detected in >25,000 cells analyzed. Conclusions: Islet-1 + cells are quiescent in the adult heart, suggesting that, under normal conditions, even pacemaking cells do not proliferate at higher rates than normal cardiac myocytes

  6. Region and cell-type resolved quantitative proteomic map of the human heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doll, Sophia; Dreßen, Martina; Geyer, Philipp E

    2017-01-01

    The heart is a central human organ and its diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide, but an in-depth knowledge of the identity and quantity of its constituent proteins is still lacking. Here, we determine the healthy human heart proteome by measuring 16 anatomical regions and three major...... cardiac cell types by high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics. From low microgram sample amounts, we quantify over 10,700 proteins in this high dynamic range tissue. We combine copy numbers per cell with protein organellar assignments to build a model of the heart proteome at the subcellular...

  7. Effects of systemic multiexon skipping with peptide-conjugated morpholinos in the heart of a dog model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echigoya, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akinori; Nagata, Tetsuya; Urasawa, Nobuyuki; Lim, Kenji Rowel Q; Trieu, Nhu; Panesar, Dharminder; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Moulton, Hong M; Saito, Takashi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Iversen, Patrick; Sazani, Peter; Kole, Ryszard; Maruyama, Rika; Partridge, Terry; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2017-04-18

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal genetic disorder caused by an absence of the dystrophin protein in bodywide muscles, including the heart. Cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of death in DMD. Exon skipping via synthetic phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) represents one of the most promising therapeutic options, yet PMOs have shown very little efficacy in cardiac muscle. To increase therapeutic potency in cardiac muscle, we tested a next-generation morpholino: arginine-rich, cell-penetrating peptide-conjugated PMOs (PPMOs) in the canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMD J ) dog model of DMD. A PPMO cocktail designed to skip dystrophin exons 6 and 8 was injected intramuscularly, intracoronarily, or intravenously into CXMD J dogs. Intravenous injections with PPMOs restored dystrophin expression in the myocardium and cardiac Purkinje fibers, as well as skeletal muscles. Vacuole degeneration of cardiac Purkinje fibers, as seen in DMD patients, was ameliorated in PPMO-treated dogs. Although symptoms and functions in skeletal muscle were not ameliorated by i.v. treatment, electrocardiogram abnormalities (increased Q-amplitude and Q/R ratio) were improved in CXMD J dogs after intracoronary or i.v. administration. No obvious evidence of toxicity was found in blood tests throughout the monitoring period of one or four systemic treatments with the PPMO cocktail (12 mg/kg/injection). The present study reports the rescue of dystrophin expression and recovery of the conduction system in the heart of dystrophic dogs by PPMO-mediated multiexon skipping. We demonstrate that rescued dystrophin expression in the Purkinje fibers leads to the improvement/prevention of cardiac conduction abnormalities in the dystrophic heart.

  8. Fate of tumor cells injected into left ventricle of heart in BALB/c mice: role of natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, P; Hokland, P; Heron, I

    1988-01-01

    The arrest, retention, and elimination (i.e., clearance) of radiolabeled YAC-1 lymphoma cells injected either iv or into the left ventricle (LV) of the heart were studied in male BALB/c mice, with special emphasis on the role of natural killer (NK) cells. After iv injection YAC-1 cells were...

  9. Sickle Cell Disease with Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease: Long-Term Outcomes in 5 Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannucci, Glen J; Adisa, Olufolake A; Oster, Matthew E; McConnell, Michael; Mahle, William T

    2016-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is a risk factor for cerebrovascular accidents in the pediatric population. This risk is compounded by hypoxemia. Cyanotic congenital heart disease can expose patients to prolonged hypoxemia. To our knowledge, the long-term outcome of patients who have combined sickle cell and cyanotic congenital heart disease has not been reported. We retrospectively reviewed patient records at our institution and identified 5 patients (3 girls and 2 boys) who had both conditions. Their outcomes were uniformly poor: 4 died (age range, 12 mo-17 yr); 3 had documented cerebrovascular accidents; and 3 developed ventricular dysfunction. The surviving patient had developmental delays. On the basis of this series, we suggest mitigating hypoxemia, and thus the risk of stroke, in patients who have sickle cell disease and cyanotic congenital heart disease. Potential therapies include chronic blood transfusions, hydroxyurea, earlier surgical correction to reduce the duration of hypoxemia, and heart or bone marrow transplantation.

  10. Innervating sympathetic neurons regulate heart size and the timing of cardiomyocyte cell cycle withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreipke, R E; Birren, S J

    2015-12-01

    Sympathetic drive to the heart is a key modulator of cardiac function and interactions between heart tissue and innervating sympathetic fibres are established early in development. Significant innervation takes place during postnatal heart development, a period when cardiomyocytes undergo a rapid transition from proliferative to hypertrophic growth. The question of whether these innervating sympathetic fibres play a role in regulating the modes of cardiomyocyte growth was investigated using 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to abolish early sympathetic innervation of the heart. Postnatal chemical sympathectomy resulted in rats with smaller hearts, indicating that heart growth is regulated by innervating sympathetic fibres during the postnatal period. In vitro experiments showed that sympathetic interactions resulted in delays in markers of cardiomyocyte maturation, suggesting that changes in the timing of the transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth of cardiomyocytes could underlie changes in heart size in the sympathectomized animals. There was also an increase in the expression of Meis1, which has been linked to cardiomyocyte cell cycle withdrawal, suggesting that sympathetic signalling suppresses cell cycle withdrawal. This signalling involves β-adrenergic activation, which was necessary for sympathetic regulation of cardiomyocyte proliferation and hypertrophy. The effect of β-adrenergic signalling on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy underwent a developmental transition. While young postnatal cardiomyocytes responded to isoproterenol (isoprenaline) with a decrease in cell size, mature cardiomyocytes showed an increase in cell size in response to the drug. Together, these results suggest that early sympathetic effects on proliferation modulate a key transition between proliferative and hypertrophic growth of the heart and contribute to the sympathetic regulation of adult heart size. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  11. Can stem cells really regenerate the human heart? Use your noggin, dickkopf! Lessons from developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Paula

    2013-06-01

    The human heart is the first organ to develop and its development is fairly well characterised. In theory, the heart has the capacity to regenerate, as its cardiomyocytes may be capable of cell division and the adult heart contains a cardiac stem cell niche, presumably capable of differentiating into cardiomyocytes and other cardiac-associated cell types. However, as with most other organs, these mechanisms are not activated upon serious injury. Several experimental options to induce regeneration of the damaged heart tissue are available: activate the endogenous cardiomyocytes to divide, coax the endogenous population of stem cells to divide and differentiate, or add exogenous cell-based therapy to replace the lost cardiac tissue. This review is a summary of the recent research into all these avenues, discussing the reasons for the limited successes of clinical trials using stem cells after cardiac injury and explaining new advances in basic science. It concludes with a reiteration that chances of successful regeneration would be improved by understanding and implementing the basics of heart development and stem cell biology.

  12. Biochemistry and biology: heart-to-heart to investigate cardiac progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenti, Isotta; Forte, Elvira; Angelini, Francesco; Messina, Elisa; Giacomello, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    Cardiac regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving field, with promising future developments for effective personalized treatments. Several stem/progenitor cells are candidates for cardiac cell therapy, and emerging evidence suggests how multiple metabolic and biochemical pathways strictly regulate their fate and renewal. In this review, we will explore a selection of areas of common interest for biology and biochemistry concerning stem/progenitor cells, and in particular cardiac progenitor cells. Numerous regulatory mechanisms have been identified that link stem cell signaling and functions to the modulation of metabolic pathways, and vice versa. Pharmacological treatments and culture requirements may be exploited to modulate stem cell pluripotency and self-renewal, possibly boosting their regenerative potential for cell therapy. Mitochondria and their many related metabolites and messengers, such as oxygen, ROS, calcium and glucose, have a crucial role in regulating stem cell fate and the balance of their functions, together with many metabolic enzymes. Furthermore, protein biochemistry and proteomics can provide precious clues on the definition of different progenitor cell populations, their physiology and their autocrine/paracrine regulatory/signaling networks. Interdisciplinary approaches between biology and biochemistry can provide productive insights on stem/progenitor cells, allowing the development of novel strategies and protocols for effective cardiac cell therapy clinical translation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Validation and potential mechanisms of red cell distribution width as a prognostic marker in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Larry A; Felker, G Michael; Mehra, Mandeep R; Chiong, Jun R; Dunlap, Stephanie H; Ghali, Jalal K; Lenihan, Daniel J; Oren, Ron M; Wagoner, Lynne E; Schwartz, Todd A; Adams, Kirkwood F

    2010-03-01

    Adverse outcomes have recently been linked to elevated red cell distribution width (RDW) in heart failure. Our study sought to validate the prognostic value of RDW in heart failure and to explore the potential mechanisms underlying this association. Data from the Study of Anemia in a Heart Failure Population (STAMINA-HFP) registry, a prospective, multicenter cohort of ambulatory patients with heart failure supported multivariable modeling to assess relationships between RDW and outcomes. The association between RDW and iron metabolism, inflammation, and neurohormonal activation was studied in a separate cohort of heart failure patients from the United Investigators to Evaluate Heart Failure (UNITE-HF) Biomarker registry. RDW was independently predictive of outcome (for each 1% increase in RDW, hazard ratio for mortality 1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12; hazard ratio for hospitalization or mortality 1.06; 95% CI 1.02-1.10) after adjustment for other covariates. Increasing RDW correlated with decreasing hemoglobin, increasing interleukin-6, and impaired iron mobilization. Our results confirm previous observations that RDW is a strong, independent predictor of adverse outcome in chronic heart failure and suggest elevated RDW may indicate inflammatory stress and impaired iron mobilization. These findings encourage further research into the relationship between heart failure and the hematologic system. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The heart tube forms and elongates through dynamic cell rearrangement coordinated with foregut extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidokoro, Hinako; Yonei-Tamura, Sayuri; Tamura, Koji; Schoenwolf, Gary C; Saijoh, Yukio

    2018-03-29

    In the initiation of cardiogenesis, the heart primordia transform from bilateral flat sheets of mesoderm into an elongated midline tube. Here, we discover that this rapid architectural change is driven by actomyosin-based oriented cell rearrangement and resulting dynamic tissue reshaping (convergent extension, CE). By labeling clusters of cells spanning the entire heart primordia, we show that the heart primordia converge toward the midline to form a narrow tube, while extending perpendicularly to rapidly lengthen it. Our data for the first time visualize the process of early heart tube formation from both the medial (second) and lateral (first) heart fields, revealing that both fields form the early heart tube by essentially the same mechanism. Additionally, the adjacent endoderm coordinately forms the foregut through previously unrecognized movements that parallel those of the heart mesoderm and elongates by CE. In conclusion, our data illustrate how initially two-dimensional flat primordia rapidly change their shapes and construct the three-dimensional morphology of emerging organs in coordination with neighboring morphogenesis. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Effects of microirradiation of heart cells in culture at the mitochondrial level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salet, Christian; Moreno, Giuliana; Lampidis, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    The technique of micro-irradiation has been applied in irradiating the nucleus or the mitochondria of heart cells in tissue culture. Using classical or stimulated (laser) sources, variations in the beating rate have been utilized as an endpoint in assaying effects of micro-irradiation on the function of cardiac cells. The most important target for the stimulation of the beating rate of heart cells in vitro is the mitochondrion. When the mitochondrial oxidative system is perturbed with either KCN, ATP or adriamycin this stimulating effect is inhibited. Consequently, this combination of micro-irradiation and beating heart cells in culture is a powerful tool in determining the localization and investigating the mechanism of action of various drugs at the mitochondrial level

  16. Intracoronary Injection of CD34-Cells in Chronic Ischemic Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Nyby, Sebastian; Eifer Møller, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Seven years ago, the DanCell study was carried out to test the hypothesis of improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) following repeated intracoronary injections of autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) in patients suffering from chronic ischemic heart...... was significantly associated with survival (hazard ratio: 0.90, 95% CI: 0.82-1.00, p = 0.04). Conclusions: Intracoronary injections of a high number of CD34(+) cells may have a beneficial effect on chronic ischemic heart failure in terms of long-term survival. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel....

  17. Pulmonary heart valve replacement using stabilized acellular xenogeneic scaffolds; effects of seeding with autologous stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpa Marius Mihai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We hypothesized that an ideal heart valve replacement would be acellular valve root scaffolds seeded with autologous stem cells. To test this hypothesis, we prepared porcine acellular pulmonary valves, seeded them with autologous adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs and implanted them in sheep and compared them to acellular valves.

  18. Effect of repeated intracoronary injection of bone marrow cells in patients with ischaemic heart failure the Danish stem cell study--congestive heart failure trial (DanCell-CHF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Møller, Jacob E; Thayssen, Per

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that myocardial regeneration may be achieved by a single intracoronary bone marrow derived stem cell infusion in selected patients with ischaemic heart disease. The effect is uncertain in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure and it is not known whether r...

  19. Interleukin-1β regulates cell proliferation and activity of extracellular matrix remodelling enzymes in cultured primary pig heart cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitta, Karina; Brandt, Berenice; Wuensch, Annegret; Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Steinfath, Markus; Scholz, Jens; Albrecht, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Levels of IL-1β are increased in the pig myocardium after infarction. → Cultured pig heart cells possess IL-1 receptors. → IL-1β increases cell proliferation of pig heart cells in-vitro. → IL-1β increases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in pig heart cells in-vitro. → IL-1β may be important for tissue remodelling events after myocardial infarction. -- Abstract: After myocardial infarction, elevated levels of interleukins (ILs) are found within the myocardial tissue and IL-1β is considered to play a major role in tissue remodelling events throughout the body. In the study presented, we have established a cell culture model of primary pig heart cells to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of IL-1β on cell proliferation as well as expression and activity of enzymes typically involved in tissue remodelling. Primary pig heart cell cultures were derived from three different animals and stimulated with recombinant pig IL-1β. RNA expression was detected by RT-PCR, protein levels were evaluated by Western blotting, activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was quantified by gelatine zymography and cell proliferation was measured using colorimetric MTS assays. Pig heart cells express receptors for IL-1 and application of IL-1β resulted in a dose-dependent increase of cell proliferation (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 24 h). Gene expression of caspase-3 was increased by IL-1β (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 3 h), and pro-caspase-3 but not active caspase was detected in lysates of pig heart cells by Western blotting. MMP-2 gene expression as well as enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were increased by IL-1β (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 3 h for gene expression, 48 and 72 h for enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively). Our in vitro data suggest that IL-1β plays a major role in the events of tissue remodelling in the heart. Combined with our recently published in vivo data (Meybohm et al., PLoS One

  20. Interleukin-1{beta} regulates cell proliferation and activity of extracellular matrix remodelling enzymes in cultured primary pig heart cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitta, Karina; Brandt, Berenice [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Wuensch, Annegret [Institute of Molecular Animal Breeding and Biotechnology, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Steinfath, Markus; Scholz, Jens [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Albrecht, Martin, E-mail: Albrecht@anaesthesie.uni-kiel.de [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Levels of IL-1{beta} are increased in the pig myocardium after infarction. {yields} Cultured pig heart cells possess IL-1 receptors. {yields} IL-1{beta} increases cell proliferation of pig heart cells in-vitro. {yields} IL-1{beta} increases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in pig heart cells in-vitro. {yields} IL-1{beta} may be important for tissue remodelling events after myocardial infarction. -- Abstract: After myocardial infarction, elevated levels of interleukins (ILs) are found within the myocardial tissue and IL-1{beta} is considered to play a major role in tissue remodelling events throughout the body. In the study presented, we have established a cell culture model of primary pig heart cells to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of IL-1{beta} on cell proliferation as well as expression and activity of enzymes typically involved in tissue remodelling. Primary pig heart cell cultures were derived from three different animals and stimulated with recombinant pig IL-1{beta}. RNA expression was detected by RT-PCR, protein levels were evaluated by Western blotting, activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was quantified by gelatine zymography and cell proliferation was measured using colorimetric MTS assays. Pig heart cells express receptors for IL-1 and application of IL-1{beta} resulted in a dose-dependent increase of cell proliferation (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 24 h). Gene expression of caspase-3 was increased by IL-1{beta} (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 3 h), and pro-caspase-3 but not active caspase was detected in lysates of pig heart cells by Western blotting. MMP-2 gene expression as well as enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were increased by IL-1{beta} (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 3 h for gene expression, 48 and 72 h for enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively). Our in vitro data suggest that IL-1{beta} plays a major role in the events of tissue remodelling in the heart. Combined

  1. The Evolution of the Stem Cell Theory for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Menasché, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Various stem cell-based approaches for cardiac repair have achieved encouraging results in animal experiments, often leading to their rapid proceeding to clinical testing. However, freewheeling evolutionary developments of the stem cell theory might lead to dystopian scenarios where heterogeneous sources of therapeutic cells could promote mixed clinical outcomes in un-stratified patient populations. This review focuses on the lessons that should be learnt from the first generation of stem cell-based strategies and emphasizes the absolute requirement to better understand the basic mechanisms of stem cell biology and cardiogenesis. We will also discuss about the unexpected "big bang" in the stem cell theory, "blasting" the therapeutic cells to their unchallenged ability to release paracrine factors such as extracellular membrane vesicles. Paradoxically, the natural evolution of the stem cell theory for cardiac regeneration may end with the development of cell-free strategies with multiple cellular targets including cardiomyocytes but also other infiltrating or resident cardiac cells.

  2. Heart Cells with Regenerative Potential from Pediatric Patients with End Stage Heart Failure: A Translatable Method to Enrich and Propagate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Steele

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human cardiac-derived progenitor cells (hCPCs have shown promise in treating heart failure (HF in adults. The purpose of this study was to describe derivation of hCPCs from pediatric patients with end-stage HF. Methods. At surgery, discarded right atrial tissues (hAA were obtained from HF patients (n=25; hAA-CHF. Minced tissues were suspended in complete (serum-containing DMEM. Cells were selected for their tissue migration and expression of stem cell factor receptor (hc-kit. Characterization of hc-kitpositive cells included immunohistochemical screening with a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Results. Cells, including phase-bright cells identified as hc-kitpositive, spontaneously emigrated from hAA-CHF in suspended explant cultures (SEC after Day 7. When cocultured with tissue, emigrated hc-kitpositive cells proliferated, first as loosely attached clones and later as multicellular clusters. At Day 21~5% of cells were hc-kitpositive. Between Days 14 and 28 hc-kitpositive cells exhibited mesodermal commitment (GATA-4positive and NKX2.5positive; then after Day 28 cardiac lineages (flk-1positive, smooth muscle actinpositive, troponin-Ipositive, and myosin light chainpositive. Conclusions. C-kitpositive hCPCs can be derived from atrial tissue of pediatric patients with end-stage HF. SEC is a novel culture method for derivation of migratory hc-kitpositive cells that favors clinical translation by reducing the need for exogenously added factors to expand hCPCs in vitro.

  3. Left atrial appendages from adult hearts contain a reservoir of diverse cardiac progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi V Leinonen

    Full Text Available There is strong evidence supporting the claim that endogenous cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs are key players in cardiac regeneration, but the anatomic source and phenotype of the master cardiac progenitors remains uncertain. Our aim was to investigate the different cardiac stem cell populations in the left atrial appendage (LAA and their fates.We investigated the CPC content and profile of adult murine LAAs using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. We demonstrate that the LAA contains a large number of CPCs relative to other areas of the heart, representing over 20% of the total cell number. We grew two distinct CPC populations from the LAA by varying the degree of proteolysis. These differed by their histological location, surface marker profiles and growth dynamics. Specifically, CD45(pos cells grew with milder proteolysis, while CD45(neg cells grew mainly with more intense proteolysis. Both cell types could be induced to differentiate into cells with cardiomyocyte markers and organelles, albeit by different protocols. Many CD45(pos cells expressed CD45 initially and rapidly lost its expression while differentiating.Our results demonstrate that the left atrial appendage plays a role as a reservoir of multiple types of progenitor cells in murine adult hearts. Two different types of CPCs were isolated, differing in their epicardial-myocardial localization. Considering studies demonstrating layer-specific origins of different cardiac progenitor cells, our findings may shed light on possible pathways to study and utilize the diversity of endogenous progenitor cells in the adult heart.

  4. Modulation of ASIC channels in rat cerebellar purkinje neurons by ischaemia-related signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nicola J; Attwell, David

    2002-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), activated by a decrease of extracellular pH, are found in neurons throughout the nervous system. They have an amino acid sequence similar to that of ion channels activated by membrane stretch, and have been implicated in touch sensation. Here we characterize the pH-dependent activation of ASICs in cerebellar Purkinje cells and investigate how they are modulated by factors released in ischaemia. Lowering the external pH from 7.4 activated an inward current at −66 mV, carried largely by Na+ ions, which was half-maximal for a step to pH 6.4 and was blocked by amiloride and gadolinium. The H+-gated current desensitized within a few seconds, but approximately 30% of cells showed a sustained inward current (11% of the peak current) in response to the maintained presence of pH 6 solution. The peak H+-evoked current was potentiated by membrane stretch (which occurs in ischaemia when [K+]o rises) and by arachidonic acid (which is released when [Ca2+]i rises in ischaemia). Arachidonic acid increased to 77% the fraction of cells showing a sustained current evoked by acid pH. The ASIC currents were also potentiated by lactate (which is released when metabolism becomes anaerobic in ischaemia) and by FMRFamide (which may mimic the action of related mammalian RFamide transmitters). These data reinforce suggestions of a mechanosensory aspect to ASIC channel function, and show that the activation of ASICs reflects the integration of multiple signals which are present during ischaemia. PMID:12205186

  5. Could Cells from Your Nose Fix Your Heart? Transplantation of Olfactory Stem Cells in a Rat Model of Cardiac Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron McDonald

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the hypothesis that multipotent olfactory mucosal stem cells could provide a basis for the development of autologous cell transplant therapy for the treatment of heart attack. In humans, these cells are easily obtained by simple biopsy. Neural stem cells from the olfactory mucosa are multipotent, with the capacity to differentiate into developmental fates other than neurons and glia, with evidence of cardiomyocyte differentiation in vitro and after transplantation into the chick embryo. Olfactory stem cells were grown from rat olfactory mucosa. These cells are propagated as neurosphere cultures, similar to other neural stem cells. Olfactory neurospheres were grown in vitro, dissociated into single cell suspensions, and transplanted into the infarcted hearts of congeneic rats. Transplanted cells were genetically engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP in order to allow them to be identified after transplantation. Functional assessment was attempted using echocardiography in three groups of rats: control, unoperated; infarct only; infarcted and transplanted. Transplantation of neurosphere-derived cells from adult rat olfactory mucosa appeared to restore heart rate with other trends towards improvement in other measures of ventricular function indicated. Importantly, donor-derived cells engrafted in the transplanted cardiac ventricle and expressed cardiac contractile proteins.

  6. Tracking fusion of human mesenchymal stem cells after transplantation to the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Brian T; Kouris, Nicholas A; Ogle, Brenda M

    2015-06-01

    Evidence suggests that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can aid recovery of damaged myocardium caused by myocardial infarction. One possible mechanism for MSC-mediated recovery is reprogramming after cell fusion between transplanted MSCs and recipient cardiac cells. We used a Cre/LoxP-based luciferase reporter system coupled to biophotonic imaging to detect fusion of transplanted human pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs to cells of organs of living mice. Human MSCs, with transient expression of a viral fusogen, were delivered to the murine heart via a collagen patch. At 2 days and 1 week later, living mice were probed for bioluminescence indicative of cell fusion. Cell fusion was detected at the site of delivery (heart) and in distal tissues (i.e., stomach, small intestine, liver). Fusion was confirmed at the cellular scale via fluorescence in situ hybridization for human-specific and mouse-specific centromeres. Human cells in organs distal to the heart were typically located near the vasculature, suggesting MSCs and perhaps MSC fusion products have the ability to migrate via the circulatory system to distal organs and engraft with local cells. The present study reveals previously unknown migratory patterns of delivered human MSCs and associated fusion products in the healthy murine heart. The study also sets the stage for follow-on studies to determine the functional effects of cell fusion in a model of myocardial damage or disease. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are transplanted to the heart, cartilage, and other tissues to recover lost function or at least limit overactive immune responses. Analysis of tissues after MSC transplantation shows evidence of fusion between MSCs and the cells of the recipient. To date, the biologic implications of cell fusion remain unclear. A newly developed in vivo tracking system was used to identify MSC fusion products in living mice. The migratory patterns of fusion products were determined both in the target organ (i

  7. The Evolution of the Stem Cell Theory for Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Sébastien Silvestre

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Various stem cell-based approaches for cardiac repair have achieved encouraging results in animal experiments, often leading to their rapid proceeding to clinical testing. However, freewheeling evolutionary developments of the stem cell theory might lead to dystopian scenarios where heterogeneous sources of therapeutic cells could promote mixed clinical outcomes in un-stratified patient populations. This review focuses on the lessons that should be learnt from the first generation of stem cell-based strategies and emphasizes the absolute requirement to better understand the basic mechanisms of stem cell biology and cardiogenesis. We will also discuss about the unexpected “big bang” in the stem cell theory, “blasting” the therapeutic cells to their unchallenged ability to release paracrine factors such as extracellular membrane vesicles. Paradoxically, the natural evolution of the stem cell theory for cardiac regeneration may end with the development of cell-free strategies with multiple cellular targets including cardiomyocytes but also other infiltrating or resident cardiac cells.

  8. Bone marrow cell migration to the heart in a chimeric mouse model of acute chagasic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irion, Camila Iansen; Paredes, Bruno Diaz; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; Cunha, Sandro Torrentes da; Paula, Luis Felipe; Carvalho, Alysson Roncally; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos de; Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli Dos Santos

    2017-08-01

    Chagas disease is a public health problem caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. There is currently no effective therapy for Chagas disease. Although there is some evidence for the beneficial effect of bone marrow-derived cells in chagasic disease, the mechanisms underlying their effects in the heart are unknown. Reports have suggested that bone marrow cells are recruited to the chagasic heart; however, studies using chimeric mouse models of chagasic cardiomyopathy are rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the migration of bone marrow cells to the heart after T. cruzi infection in a model of chagasic disease in chimeric mice. To obtain chimerical mice, wild-type (WT) C57BL6 mice were exposed to full body irradiation (7 Gy), causing bone marrow ablation. Then, bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice were infused into the mice. Graft effectiveness was confirmed by flow cytometry. Experimental mice were divided into four groups: (i) infected chimeric (iChim) mice; (ii) infected WT (iWT) mice, both of which received 3 × 104 trypomastigotes of the Brazil strain; (iii) non-infected chimeric (Chim) mice; and (iv) non-infected WT mice. At one-month post-infection, iChim and iWT mice showed first degree atrioventricular block with decreased heart rate and treadmill exercise parameters compared to those in the non-infected groups. iChim mice showed an increase in parasitaemia, myocarditis, and the presence of amastigote nests in the heart tissue compared to iWT mice. Flow cytometry analysis did not detect haematopoietic progenitor cells in the hearts of infected mice. Furthermore, GFP+ cardiomyocytes were not detected in the tissues of chimeric mice.

  9. 'Shovel-Ready' applications of stem cell advances for pediatric heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Matthew D; Boucek, Robert J

    2012-10-01

    The past decade has seen remarkable advances in the field of stem cell biology. Many new technologies and applications are passing the translational phase and likely will soon be relevant for the clinical pediatric cardiologist. This review will focus on two advances in basic science that are now translating into clinical trials. The first advance is the recognition, characterization, and recent therapeutic application of resident cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). Early results of adult trials and scattered case reports in pediatric patients support expanding CPC-based trials for end-stage heart failure in pediatric patients. The relative abundance of CPCs in the neonate and young child offers greater potential benefits in heart failure treatment than has been realized to date. The second advance is the technology of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which reprograms differentiated somatic cells to an undifferentiated embryonic-like state. When iPSCs are differentiated into cardiomyocytes, they model a patient's specific disease, test pharmaceuticals, and potentially provide an autologous source for cell-based therapy. The therapeutic recruitment and/or replacement of CPCs has potential for enhancing cardiac repair and regeneration in children with heart failure. Use of iPSCs to model heart disease holds great potential to gain new insights into diagnosis, pathophysiology, and disease-specific management for genetic-based cardiovascular diseases that are prevalent in pediatric patients.

  10. Effect of oxygen deprivation on metabolism of arachidonic acid by cultures of rat heart cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyss-Beguin, M.; Millanvoye-van Brussel, E.; Duval, D.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms responsible for the impairment of phospholipid metabolism observed in ischemic cells, we have studied the effect of conditions simulating ischemia on the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) by muscle (M-) and nonmuscle (F-) cells isolated from newborn rat hearts and cultured separately. In muscle cells, oxygen deprivation induces a significant stimulation of the release of [ 14 C]AA from prelabeled cells associated with a preferential redistribution of [ 14 C]AA into cell triglycerides but not formation of radioactive prostaglandins. Moreover, the fatty acid content of phospholipids, as measured by capillary gas chromatography, appears markedly reduced in ischemic myocardial cells. This fact may be related to phospholipase stimulation during ischemia as suggested by the antagonistic effect of mepacrine or p-bromophenacyl bromide. In contrast, oxygen deprivation failed to induce any significant alteration of AA metabolism in fibroblast-like heart cells. Our results indicate that these cultures of newborn rat heart cells, which exhibit many of the features observed in intact organ during ischemia, may represent a useful experimental model to investigate the pharmacological control of the membrane phospholipid turnover

  11. Developmental disorders of the brain can be caused by PCBs; low doses of hydroxy-PCBs disrupt thyroid hormone-dependent dendrite formation from Purkinje neurons in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Y; Kimura-Kuroda, J [Tokyo Metropol. Inst. for Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, I [CREST/ JST, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Exposure to some environmental chemicals during the perinatal period causes developmental disorders of the brain. Cognitive impairment and hyperactivity in infants were reported in Taiwan, known as Yu-cheng incidents caused by the accidental contamination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Together with recent experimental data, Kuroda proposes a hypothesis that spatio-temporal disruptions of developing neuronal circuits by PCB exposure can cause the comobidity of learning disorders (LD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autsm with the co-exposure to other environmental chemicals. PCBs and hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs) have similar chemical structures to thyroid hormones (TH), thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). TH deficiency in the perinatal period causes cretinism children with severe cognitive and mental retardation. In primate model, Rice demonstrates that postnatal exposure to PCBs can dramatically influence later behavioral function. Epidemiological studies also indicate the possible developmental neurotoxicity of PCBs accumulated in human bodies. However, the precise underlying mechanisms and which types of PCB or OH-PCB with such effects have yet to be elucidated. It is important to establish a simple, reproducible, and sensitive in vitro assay for determining the effects of PCBs and OH-PCBs on the development of the central nervous system. Recently Iwasaki et al. established a reporter assay system and disclosed that low doses of PCBs potentially interfere TH-dependent gene expressions. This is the first demonstration that PCBs and OH-PCBs directly affect TH-receptor (TR)-mediated gene expressions crucial to the brain development, through unique mechanism. We also have demonstrated TH-dependent development of Purkinje neurons in vitro using a serum-free chemically defined medium. The degree of dendritic development of Purkinje cells is TH dose-dependent and exhibits high sensitivity in the pM order. Therefore, in the present study

  12. Fate of tumor cells injected into left ventricle of heart in BALB/c mice: role of natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, P; Hokland, P; Heron, I

    1988-01-01

    The arrest, retention, and elimination (i.e., clearance) of radiolabeled YAC-1 lymphoma cells injected either iv or into the left ventricle (LV) of the heart were studied in male BALB/c mice, with special emphasis on the role of natural killer (NK) cells. After iv injection YAC-1 cells were...... extent, the bone, skin, and muscle. The only organs that could arrest the LV-injected tumor cells were the lungs and the liver. In the lungs clearance of YAC-1 cells began immediately after the cells were arrested. However, the rate of clearance could be almost abrogated by pretreatment of the recipients...... with anti-asialo GM1 antiserum, which destroys most of the NK cells in vivo and strongly depresses the in vitro NK cell activity. In contrast, YAC-1 cells arrested in the liver were not cleared from this organ during the first 1-2 hours after arrest. After this delay clearance of the cells commenced...

  13. Improvement of Heart Failure by Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi Tousi, Seyed Mohammad Taghi; Faghihi, Mahdieh; Nobakht, Maliheh; Molazem, Mohammad; Kalantari, Elham; Darbandi Azar, Amir; Aboutaleb, Nahid

    2016-07-06

    Background: Recently, stem cells have been considered for the treatment of heart diseases, but no marked improvement has been recorded. This is the first study to examine the functional and histological effects of the transplantation of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs) in rats with heart failure (HF). Methods: This study was conducted in the years 2014 and 2015. 35 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into 5 equal experimental groups (7 rats each) as 1- Control 2- Heart Failure (HF) 3- Sham 4- Culture media 5- Stem Cell Transplantation (SCT). Heart failure was induced using 170 mg/kg/d of isoproterenol subcutaneously injection in 4 consecutive days. The failure confirmed by the rat cardiac echocardiography on day 28. In SCT group, 3×10 6 cells in 150 µl of culture media were transplanted to the myocardium. At the end, echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters together with histological evaluation were done. Results: Echocardiography results showed that cardiac ejection fraction in HF group increased from 58/73 ± 9% to 81/25 ± 6/05% in SCT group (p value < 0.001). Fraction shortening in HF group was increased from 27/53 ± 8/58% into 45/55 ± 6/91% in SCT group (p value < 0.001). Furthermore, hAMSCs therapy significantly improved mean diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, rate pressure product, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure compared to those in the HF group, with the values reaching the normal levels in the control group. A marked reduction in fibrosis tissue was also found in the SCT group (p value < 0.001) compared with the animals in the HF group. Conclusion: The transplantation of hAMSCs in rats with heart failure not only decreased the level of fibrosis but also conferred significant improvement in heart performance in terms of echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters.

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Mygind, Naja Dam; Ali Qayyum, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    is very costly for the health care system. Therefore, new treatment options and strategies are being researched intensely. Stem cell therapy to improve myocardial perfusion and stimulate growth of new cardiomyocytes could be a new way to go. Nevertheless, the results from clinical studies have varied...... considerably, probably due to the use of many different cell lines obtained from different tissues and the different patient populations. The present review will focus on treatment with the mesenchymal stromal cell from bone marrow and adipose tissue in animal and patients with acute and chronic IHD (CIHD)....

  15. Cardiomyocytes derived from embryonic stem cells resemble cardiomyocytes of the embryonic heart tube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijnvandraat, Arnoud C.; van Ginneken, Antoni C. G.; de Boer, Piet A. J.; Ruijter, Jan M.; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Moorman, Antoon F. M.; Lekanne Deprez, Ronald H.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: After formation of the linear heart tube a chamber-specific program of gene expression becomes active that underlies the formation of the chamber myocardium. To assess whether this program is recapitulated in in vitro differentiated embryonic stem cells, we performed qualitative and

  16. Human heart disease : lessons from human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, E.; Mummery, C.L.; Bellin, M.

    2017-01-01

    Technical advances in generating and phenotyping cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-CMs) are now driving their wider acceptance as in vitro models to understand human heart disease and discover therapeutic targets that may lead to new compounds for clinical use. Current

  17. Comment on: "Cell Therapy for Heart Disease: Trial Sequential Analyses of Two Cochrane Reviews"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellini, Greta; Nielsen, Emil Eik; Gluud, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Trial Sequential Analysis is a frequentist method to help researchers control the risks of random errors in meta-analyses (1). Fisher and colleagues used Trial Sequential Analysis on cell therapy for heart diseases (2). The present article discusses the usefulness of Trial Sequential Analysis and...

  18. Cryopreserved Off-the-Shelf Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease and Heart Failure-A Safety Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Juhl, Morten

    2017-01-01

    and ischemic heart failure (IHF). Batches of CSCC_ASC were isolated from three healthy donors by liposuction from abdominal adipose tissue. Adipose mesenchymal stromal cells were culture expanded in bioreactors without the use of animal constituents, cryopreserved, and stored in vials in nitrogen dry......The present first-in-human clinical trial evaluated the safety and feasibility of a newly developed and cryopreserved Cardiology Stem Cell Centre adipose-derived stromal cell (CSCC_ASC) product from healthy donors for intramyocardial injection in ten patients with ischemic heart disease......-storage containers until use. Direct injection of CSCC_ASC into the myocardium did not cause any complications or serious adverse events related to either treatment or cell administration in a 6-month follow-up period. Four out of ten heart failure patients developed donor-specific de novo human leukocyte antigen...

  19. Parthenogenetic stem cells for tissue-engineered heart repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didie, Michael; Christalla, Peter; Rubart, Michael; Muppala, Vijayakumar; Doeker, Stephan; Unsoeld, Bernhard; El-Armouche, Ali; Rau, Thomas; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Schwoerer, Alexander P.; Ehmke, Heimo; Schumacher, Udo; Fuchs, Sigrid; Lange, Claudia; Becker, Alexander; Tao, Wen; Scherschel, John A.; Soonpaa, Mark H.; Yang, Tao; Lin, Qiong; Zenke, Martin; Han, Dong-Wook; Schoeler, Hans R.; Rudolph, Cornelia; Steinemann, Doris; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Kattman, Steve; Witty, Alec; Keller, Gordon; Field, Loren J.; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    Uniparental parthenotes are considered an unwanted byproduct of in vitro fertilization. In utero parthenote development is severely compromised by defective organogenesis and in particular by defective cardiogenesis. Although developmentally compromised, apparently pluripotent stem cells can be

  20. The Apoptosome: Heart and Soul of the Cell Death Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul M. Chinnaiyan

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biologic process by which metazoan cells orchestrate their own self-demise. Genetic analyses of the nematode C elegans identified three core components of the suicide apparatus which include CED-3, CED-4, and CED-9. An analogous set of core constituents exists in mammalian cells and includes caspase-9, Apaf-1, and bcl-2/xL, respectively. CED-3 and CED-4, along with their mammalian counterparts, function to kill cells, whereas CED-9 and its mammalian equivalents protect cells from death. These central components biochemically intermingle in a ternary complex recently dubbed the “apoptosome.” The C elegans protein EGL-1 and its mammalian counterparts, pro-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family, induce cell death by disrupting apoptosome interactions. Thus, EGL-1 may represent a primordial signal integrator for the apoptosome. Various biochemical processes including oligomerization, adenosine triphosphate ATP/dATP binding, and cytochrome c interaction play a role in regulating the ternary death complex. Recent studies suggest that cell death receptors, such as CD95, may amplify their suicide signal by activating the apoptosome. These mutual associations by core components of the suicide apparatus provide a molecular framework in which diverse death signals likely interface. Understanding the apoptosome and its cellular connections will facilitate the design of novel therapeutic strategies for cancer and other disease states in which apoptosis plays a pivotal role.

  1. Circulating Endothelial Cells in Patients with Heart Failure and Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sales, Vicenta; Sánchez-Lázaro, Ignacio; Vila, Virtudes; Almenar, Luis; Contreras, Teresa; Reganon, Edelmiro

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: Acute and chronic heart failure may manifest different degrees of endothelial damage and angiogenesis. Circulating endothelial cells (CEC) have been identified as marker of vascular damage. The aim of our study was to evaluate the evolution of the CEC at different stages of patients with heart failure. We also investigated a potential correlation between CEC and markers of vascular damage and angiogenesis. Methods: We studied 32 heart failure patients at hospital admission (acute phase) and at revision after 3 months (stable phase) and 32 controls. Circulating markers of endothelial damage (CEC; von Willebrand factor, vWF and soluble E-selectin, sEsel) and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF and thrombospondin-1) were quantified. Results: Levels of CEC, vWF, sEsel and VEGF are significantly higher in heart failure patients than in controls. Levels of CEC (36.9 ± 15.3 vs. 21.5 ± 10.0 cells/ml; p < 0.001), vWF (325 ± 101 vs. 231 ± 82%; p < 0.001) and VEGF (26.3 ± 15.2 vs. 21.9 ± 11.9 ng/ml; p < 0.001) are significantly higher in the acute phase than in the stable phase of heart failure. CEC levels correlate with vWF and VEGF. Results show than 100% of patients in acute phase and 37.5% in stable phase have levels of CEC higher than the 99th percentile of the distribution of controls (16 cells/ml). Therefore, increases in CEC represent a relative risk of 9.5 for heart failure patients suffering from acute phase. Conclusions: CEC, in addition to being elevated in heart failure, correlate with vWF levels, providing further support for CEC as markers of endothelial damage. Levels of CEC are associated with the acute phase of heart failure and could be used as a marker of the worsening in heart failure. PMID:21897001

  2. Brain derived neurotrophic factor contributes to the cardiogenic potential of adult resident progenitor cells in failing murine heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmita Samal

    Full Text Available Resident cardiac progenitor cells show homing properties when injected into the injured but not to the healthy myocardium. The molecular background behind this difference in behavior needs to be studied to elucidate how adult progenitor cells can restore cardiac function of the damaged myocardium. Since the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF moderates cardioprotection in injured hearts, we focused on delineating its regulatory role in the damaged myocardium.Comparative gene expression profiling of freshly isolated undifferentiated Sca-1 progenitor cells derived either from heart failure transgenic αMHC-CyclinT1/Gαq overexpressing mice or wildtype littermates revealed transcriptional variations. Bdnf expression was up regulated 5-fold during heart failure which was verified by qRT-PCR and confirmed at protein level. The migratory capacity of Sca-1 cells from transgenic hearts was improved by 15% in the presence of 25 ng/ml BDNF. Furthermore, BDNF-mediated effects on Sca-1 cells were studied via pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling of Amino acids in Cell Culture (pSILAC proteomics approach. After BDNF treatment significant differences between newly synthesized proteins in Sca-1 cells from control and transgenic hearts were observed for CDK1, SRRT, HDGF, and MAP2K3 which are known to regulate cell cycle, survival and differentiation. Moreover BDNF repressed the proliferation of Sca-1 cells from transgenic hearts.Comparative profiling of resident Sca-1 cells revealed elevated BDNF levels in the failing heart. Exogenous BDNF (i stimulated migration, which might improve the homing ability of Sca-1 cells derived from the failing heart and (ii repressed the cell cycle progression suggesting its potency to ameliorate heart failure.

  3. Materializing Heart Regeneration: Biomimicry of Key Observations in Cell Transplantation Therapies and Natural Cardiac Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yen P.; Jongpaiboonkit, Leena

    2016-07-01

    New regenerative paradigms are needed to address the growing global problem of heart failure as existing interventions are unsatisfactory. Outcomes from the current paradigm of cell transplantation have not been stellar but the mechanistic knowledge learned from them is instructive in the development of future paradigms. An emerging biomaterial-based approach incorporating key mechanisms and additional ones scrutinized from the process of natural heart regeneration in zebrafish may become the next evolution in cardiac repair. We highlight, with examples, tested key concepts and pivotal ones that may be integrated into a successful therapy.

  4. Development of cardiac parasympathetic neurons, glial cells, and regional cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregoso, S P; Hoover, D B

    2012-09-27

    Very little is known about the development of cardiac parasympathetic ganglia and cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart. Accordingly, we evaluated the growth of cholinergic neurons and nerve fibers in mouse hearts from embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) through postnatal day 21(P21). Cholinergic perikarya and varicose nerve fibers were identified in paraffin sections immunostained for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Satellite cells and Schwann cells in adjacent sections were identified by immunostaining for S100β calcium binding protein (S100) and brain-fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP). We found that cardiac ganglia had formed in close association to the atria and cholinergic innervation of the atrioventricular junction had already begun by E18.5. However, most cholinergic innervation of the heart, including the sinoatrial node, developed postnatally (P0.5-P21) along with a doubling of the cross-sectional area of cholinergic perikarya. Satellite cells were present throughout neonatal cardiac ganglia and expressed primarily B-FABP. As they became more mature at P21, satellite cells stained strongly for both B-FABP and S100. Satellite cells appeared to surround most cardiac parasympathetic neurons, even in neonatal hearts. Mature Schwann cells, identified by morphology and strong staining for S100, were already present at E18.5 in atrial regions that receive cholinergic innervation at later developmental times. The abundance and distribution of S100-positive Schwann cells increased postnatally along with nerve density. While S100 staining of cardiac Schwann cells was maintained in P21 and older mice, Schwann cells did not show B-FABP staining at these times. Parallel development of satellite cells and cholinergic perikarya in the cardiac ganglia and the increase in abundance of Schwann cells and varicose cholinergic nerve fibers in the atria suggest that neuronal-glial interactions could be important for development of the parasympathetic nervous

  5. Embryonic and foetal Islet-1 positive cells in human hearts are also positive to c-Kit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Serradifalco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During embryogenesis, the mammalian heart develops from a primitive heart tube originating from two bilateral primary heart fields located in the lateral plate mesoderm. Cells belongings to the pre-cardiac mesoderm will differentiate into early cardiac progenitors, which express early transcription factors which are also common to the Isl-1 positive cardiac progenitor cells isolated from the developing pharyngeal mesoderm and the foetal and post-natal mice hearts. A second population of cardiac progenitor cells positive to c-Kit has been abundantly isolated from adult hearts. Until now, these two populations have been considered two different sets of progenitor cells present in the heart in different stages of an individual life. In the present study we collected embryonic, foetal and infant hearts, and we tested the hypotheses that c-Kit positive cells, usually isolated from the adult heart, are also present in the intra-uterine life and persist in the adult heart after birth, and that foetal Isl-1 positive cells are also positive to c-Kit. Using immunohistochemistry we studied the temporal distribution of Isl-1 positive and c-Kit/CD105 double positive cells, and by immunofluorescence and confocal analysis we studied the co-localization of c-Kit and Isl-1 positive cells. The results indicated that cardiomyocytes and interstitial cells were positive for c-Kit from the 9th to the 19th gestational week, that cells positive for both c-Kit and CD105 appeared in the interstitium at the 17th gestational week and persisted in the postnatal age, and that the Isl-1 positive cells were a subset of the c-Kit positive population.

  6. Cardiac endothelial cells isolated from mouse heart - a novel model for radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelonek, K.; Walaszczyk, A.; Gabrys, D.; Pietrowska, M.; Widlak, P.; Kanthou, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is recognized as an important clinical problem in radiotherapy and radiation protection. However, only few radiobiological models relevant for assessment of cardiotoxic effects of ionizing radiation are available. Here we describe the isolation of mouse primary cardiac endothelial cells, a possible target for cardiotoxic effects of radiation. Cells isolated from hearts of juvenile mice were cultured and irradiated in vitro. In addition, cells isolated from hearts of locally irradiated adult animals (up to 6 days after irradiation) were tested. A dose-dependent formation of histone γH 2 A.X foci was observed after in vitro irradiation of cultured cells. However, such cells were resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis. Increased levels of actin stress fibres were observed in the cytoplasm of cardiac endothelial cells irradiated in vitro or isolated from irradiated animals. A high dose of 16 Gy did not increase permeability to Dextran in monolayers formed by endothelial cells. Up-regulated expression of Vcam1, Sele and Hsp70i genes was detected after irradiation in vitro and in cells isolated few days after irradiation in vivo. The increased level of actin stress fibres and enhanced expression of stress-response genes in irradiated endothelial cells are potentially involved in cardiotoxic effects of ionizing radiation. (authors)

  7. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell treatment in patients with severe ischaemic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Jørgensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Regenerative treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been promising in patients with ischaemic heart failure but needs confirmation in larger randomized trials. We aimed to study effects of intra-myocardial autologous bone marrow-derived MSC treatment in patients with severe isc...... identified. CONCLUSION: Intra-myocardial injections of autologous culture expanded MSCs were safe and improved myocardial function in patients with severe ischaemic heart failure. STUDY REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00644410 (ClinicalTrials.gov)....... ischaemic heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: The MSC-HF trial is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patients were randomized 2 : 1 to intra-myocardial injections of MSC or placebo, respectively. The primary endpoint was change in left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV), measured...

  8. CD133 antibody conjugation to decellularized human heart valves intended for circulating cell capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossler, John D; Min Ju, Young; Williams, J Koudy; Goldstein, Steven; Hamlin, James; Lee, Sang Jin; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-09-03

    The long term efficacy of tissue based heart valve grafts may be limited by progressive degeneration characterized by immune mediated inflammation and calcification. To avoid this degeneration, decellularized heart valves with functionalized surfaces capable of rapid in vivo endothelialization have been developed. The aim of this study is to examine the capacity of CD133 antibody-conjugated valve tissue to capture circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Decellularized human pulmonary valve tissue was conjugated with CD133 antibody at varying concentrations and exposed to CD133 expressing NTERA-2 cl.D1 (NT2) cells in a microflow chamber. The amount of CD133 antibody conjugated on the valve tissue surface and the number of NT2 cells captured in the presence of shear stress was measured. Both the amount of CD133 antibody conjugated to the valve leaflet surface and the number of adherent NT2 cells increased as the concentration of CD133 antibody present in the surface immobilization procedure increased. The data presented in this study support the hypothesis that the rate of CD133(+) cell adhesion in the presence of shear stress to decellularized heart valve tissue functionalized by CD133 antibody conjugation increases as the quantity of CD133 antibody conjugated to the tissue surface increases.

  9. Changes in expression of a functional Gi protein in cultured rat heart cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, I.S.; Gaa, S.T.; Rogers, T.B.

    1988-01-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic agonist, carbachol, and pertussis toxin were used to examine the functional status of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein that inhibits adenylate cyclase (G i ) in cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes. The isoproterenol stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in myocyte membranes and adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in intact cells (4 days in culture) were insensitive to carbachol. However, in cells cultured for 11 days, carbachol inhibited isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation by 30%. Angiotensin II (ANG II) was also found to inhibit isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation in day 11 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin treatment reversed the inhibitory effects of both ANG II and carbachol, suggesting a role for G i in the process. Carbachol binding to membranes from day 4 cells was relatively insensitive to guanine nucleotides when compared with binding to membranes from day 11 or adult cells. Furthermore, pertussis toxin-mediated 32 P incorporation into a 39- to 41-kDa substrate in day 11 membranes was increased 3.2-fold over that measured in day 4 membranes. These findings support the view that, although G i is expressed, it is nonfunctional in 4-day-old cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes and acquisition of functional G i is dependent on culture conditions. Furthermore, the ANG II receptor can couple to G i in heart

  10. Inflammation-induced reversible switch of the neuron-specific enolase promoter from Purkinje neurons to Bergmann glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Yusuke; Konno, Ayumu; Nagaoka, Jun; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2016-06-13

    Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a glycolytic isoenzyme found in mature neurons and cells of neuronal origin. Injecting adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors carrying the NSE promoter into the cerebellar cortex is likely to cause the specific transduction of neuronal cells, such as Purkinje cells (PCs) and interneurons, but not Bergmann glia (BG). However, we found BG-predominant transduction without PC transduction along a traumatic needle tract for viral injection. The enhancement of neuroinflammation by the co-application of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with AAV9 significantly expanded the BG-predominant area concurrently with the potentiated microglial activation. The BG-predominant transduction was gradually replaced by the PC-predominant transduction as the neuroinflammation dissipated. Experiments using glioma cell cultures revealed significant activation of the NSE promoter due to glucose deprivation, suggesting that intracellularly stored glycogen is metabolized through the glycolytic pathway for energy. Activation of the glycolytic enzyme promoter in BG concurrently with inactivation in PC may have pathophysiological significance for the production of lactate in activated BG and the utilization of lactate, which is provided by the BG-PC lactate shuttle, as a primary energy resource in injured PCs.

  11. A red cell preservation strategy reduces postoperative transfusions in pediatric heart surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Meena; Tishler, Brielle; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Matte, Gregory S; Howe, Robert J; Durham, Linda; Boyle, Sharon; Mathieu, Derek; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; DiNardo, James A; Ibla, Juan C

    2018-03-25

    Blood transfusion has well-documented adverse effects. As part of a blood conservation initiative at our center, we began routine use of cell saver for all congenital heart surgery performed on cardiopulmonary bypass since 2014. This study aimed to compare transfusion rates prior to, and in the first and second year after this initiative. We hypothesized that cell saver use would decrease transfusion requirements in second year after use of the cell saver compared to the pre cell saver group. Consecutive patients under 18 years undergoing congenital heart surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass were retrospectively analyzed as 3 one-year cohorts defined above. We excluded patients who required mechanical support or reoperation at index admission. Baseline characteristics, and use of blood intraoperatively and postoperatively were compared between groups. The 3 groups had similar baseline characteristics. Blood use was significantly lower in year 2 after cell saver initiation as compared to the pre cell saver group both intra- and postoperatively. The median difference in volume of intraoperative blood transfusion was lower by 138 mL/m 2 (-266, -10 mL/m 2 ) in year 2 when compared to the pre cell saver group. Similarly, the proportion of subjects requiring red blood cell transfusion postoperatively on day of surgery was lower by 10% (-15%, -6%). Standardized use of cell saver significantly decreased perioperative blood use in children undergoing cardiac surgery at our center. A risk-adjusted transfusion threshold for children undergoing heart surgery needs to be developed to further decrease exposure to blood products and associated costs. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cell Death and Heart Failure in Obesity: Role of Uncoupling Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Ruiz-Ramírez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes are often characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in mitochondrial respiratory complexes, associated with fat accumulation in cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, and hepatocytes. Several rodents studies showed that lipid accumulation in cardiac myocytes produces lipotoxicity that causes apoptosis and leads to heart failure, a dynamic pathological process. Meanwhile, several tissues including cardiac tissue develop an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress and lipotoxicity by overexpressing uncoupling proteins (UCPs, specific mitochondrial membrane proteins. In heart from rodent and human with obesity, UCP2 and UCP3 may protect cardiomyocytes from death and from a state progressing to heart failure by downregulating programmed cell death. UCP activation may affect cytochrome c and proapoptotic protein release from mitochondria by reducing ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Therefore the aim of this review is to discuss recent findings regarding the role that UCPs play in cardiomyocyte survival by protecting against ROS generation and maintaining bioenergetic metabolism homeostasis to promote heart protection.

  13. Real-time relationship between PKA biochemical signal network dynamics and increased action potential firing rate in heart pacemaker cells: Kinetics of PKA activation in heart pacemaker cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Yael; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Yang, Dongmei; Ziman, Bruce D; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Levchenko, Andre; Zhang, Jin; Lakatta, Edward G

    2015-09-01

    cAMP-PKA protein kinase is a key nodal signaling pathway that regulates a wide range of heart pacemaker cell functions. These functions are predicted to be involved in regulation of spontaneous action potential (AP) generation of these cells. Here we investigate if the kinetics and stoichiometry of increase in PKA activity match the increase in AP firing rate in response to β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) stimulation or phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition, that alters the AP firing rate of heart sinoatrial pacemaker cells. In cultured adult rabbit pacemaker cells infected with an adenovirus expressing the FRET sensor AKAR3, the EC50 in response to graded increases in the intensity of β-AR stimulation (by Isoproterenol) the magnitude of the increases in PKA activity and the spontaneous AP firing rate were similar (0.4±0.1nM vs. 0.6±0.15nM, respectively). Moreover, the kinetics (t1/2) of the increases in PKA activity and spontaneous AP firing rate in response to β-AR stimulation or PDE inhibition were tightly linked. We characterized the system rate-limiting biochemical reactions by integrating these experimentally derived data into a mechanistic-computational model. Model simulations predicted that phospholamban phosphorylation is a potent target of the increase in PKA activity that links to increase in spontaneous AP firing rate. In summary, the kinetics and stoichiometry of increases in PKA activity in response to a physiological (β-AR stimulation) or pharmacological (PDE inhibitor) stimuli match those of changes in the AP firing rate. Thus Ca(2+)-cAMP/PKA-dependent phosphorylation limits the rate and magnitude of increase in spontaneous AP firing rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Limb-bud and Heart Overexpression Inhibits the Proliferation and Migration of PC3M Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qicai; Li, Ermao; Huang, Long; Cheng, Minsheng; Li, Li

    2018-01-01

    Background: The limb-bud and heart gene ( LBH ) was discovered in the early 21st century and is specifically expressed in the mouse embryonic limb and heart development. Increasing evidences have indicated that LBH not only plays an important role in embryo development, it is also closely correlated with the occurance and progression of many tumors. However, its function in prostate cancer (PCa) is still not well understood. Here, we explored the effects of LBH on the proliferation and migration of the PCa cell line PC3M. Methods: LBH expression in tissues and cell lines of PCa was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Lentivirus was used to transduct the LBH gene into the PC3M cells. Stable LBH-overexpressing PC3M-LBH cells and PC3M-NC control cells were obtained via puromycin screening. Cell proliferation was examined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis rate were investigated using flow cytometry. Cell migration was studied using the Transwell assay. Results: LBH expression level was down-regulated in 3 different PCa cell lines, especially in PC3M cells, compared with the normal prostate epithelial cells(RWPE-1). Cell lines of LBH-upregulated PC3M-LBH and PC3M-NC control were successfully constructed. Significantly increased LBH expression level and decreased cyclin D1 and cyclin E2 expression level was found in PC3M-LBH cells as compared to the PC3M-NC cells. The overexpression of LBH significantly inhibited PC3M cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in nude mice. LBH overexpression in PC3M cell, also induced cell cycle G0/G1 phase arrest and decreased the migration of PC3M cells. Conclusions : Our results reveal that LBH expression is down-regulated in the tissue and cell lines of PCa. LBH overexpression inhibits PC3M cell proliferation and tumor growth by inducing cell cycle arrest through down-regulating cyclin D1and cyclin E2 expression. LBH might

  15. Caffeoylxanthiazonoside exerts cardioprotective effects during chronic heart failure via inhibition of inflammatory responses in cardiac cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Wang, Fei; Cao, Huili; Liu, Guifang; Zhang, Yuean; Yan, Ping; Li, Bao

    2017-11-01

    Caffeoylxanthiazonoside (CYT) is an active constituent isolated from the fruit of the Xanthium strumarium L plant. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cardioprotective effects of oral administration of CYT on chronic heart failure (CHF) and its underlying mechanisms. A rat model of CHF was first established, and cardiac function indices, including the heart/body weight index, left heart/body weight index, fractional shortening (FS), ejection fraction (EF), cardiac output (CO) and heart rate (HR), were subsequently determined by cardiac ultrasound. Serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK), and the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β in heart tissues and cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) were determined using ELISA. In addition, the protein expression levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway members were determined by western blotting in CMECs. The results demonstrated that oral administration of 10, 20, 40 mg/kg CYT significantly reduced cardiac hypertrophy and reversed FS, EF, CO and HR when compared with CHF model rats. In addition, CYT administration significantly decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β in heart tissues, as well as serum LDH and CK levels. Furthermore, exposure of CMECs to 20, 40 and 80 µg/ml CYT significantly decreased the production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. The protein expression levels of cytoplasmic NF-κB p65 and IκB were upregulated, while nuclear NF-κB p65 was downregulated following treatment of CMECs with 20, 40 and 80 µg/ml CYT when compared with untreated CHF model controls. In conclusion, the results of the current study suggest that CYT demonstrates cardioprotective effects in CHF model rats by suppressing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  16. In vitro cultured progenitors and precursors of cardiac cell lineages from human normal and post-ischemic hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Di Meglio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The demonstration of the presence of dividing primitive cells in damaged hearts has sparked increased interest about myocardium regenerative processes. We examined the rate and the differentiation of in vitro cultured resident cardiac primitive cells obtained from pathological and normal human hearts in order to evaluate the activation of progenitors and precursors of cardiac cell lineages in post-ischemic human hearts. The precursors and progenitors of cardiomyocyte, smooth muscle and endothelial lineage were identified by immunocytochemistry and the expression of characteristic markers was studied by western blot and RT-PCR. The amount of proteins characteristic for cardiac cells (a-SA and MHC, VEGFR-2 and FVIII, SMA for the precursors of cardiomyocytes, endothelial and smooth muscle cells, respectively inclines toward an increase in both a-SA and MHC. The increased levels of FVIII and VEGFR2 are statistically significant, suggesting an important re-activation of neoangiogenesis. At the same time, the augmented expression of mRNA for Nkx 2.5, the trascriptional factor for cardiomyocyte differentiation, confirms the persistence of differentiative processes in terminally injured hearts. Our study would appear to confirm the activation of human heart regeneration potential in pathological conditions and the ability of its primitive cells to maintain their proliferative capability in vitro. The cardiac cell isolation method we used could be useful in the future for studying modifications to the microenvironment that positively influence cardiac primitive cell differentiation or inhibit, or retard, the pathological remodeling and functional degradation of the heart.

  17. Heart regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. His-Purkinje system-related incessant ventricular tachycardia arising from the left coronary cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Sato, MD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 23-year-old woman who had His-Purkinje system-related incessant ventricular tachycardia with a narrow QRS configuration. The ventricular tachycardia was ablated successfully in the left coronary cusp where the earliest endocardial activation had been recorded. We hypothesize that a remnant of the subaortic conducting tissue was the source of the ventricular arrhythmias.

  19. Effects of adriamycin and irradiation on beating of rat heart muscle cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, D.; Brown, S.M.; Yatvin, M.B.

    1977-01-01

    In an attempt to elucidate the mechanisms involved in Adriamycin (ADM) induced cardiotoxicity as well as determining the possible potentiating effect that irradiation has when it is combined with the drug, heart cells from newborn rats were isolated, cultured and treated with Adriamycin. The actions of these two agents separately or in combination on the survival of beating activity and beating frequency are measured. Beating activity could be decreased temporarily either by exposing the cells to 50 krad of γ-irradiation or 0.1 μg of Adriamycin. Following 100 krad of γ-radiation or 1.0 μg Adriamycin, an irreversible cessation of beating occurred. In the case of Adriamycin, cessation was preceded by a temporary sharp increase in beating frequency. Doses of radiation up to 10 krad in combination with Adriamycin were not potentiating. The results indicate that Adriamycin produces its cardiotoxic effects, at least in part, by a direct action on heart muscle cells. It is less likely, however, that damage which occurs in the heart following therapeutic doses of irradiation is the result of such direct action

  20. Cryopreserved Off-the-Shelf Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease and Heart Failure-A Safety Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Juhl, Morten

    2017-01-01

    The present first-in-human clinical trial evaluated the safety and feasibility of a newly developed and cryopreserved Cardiology Stem Cell Centre adipose-derived stromal cell (CSCC_ASC) product from healthy donors for intramyocardial injection in ten patients with ischemic heart disease...... and ischemic heart failure (IHF). Batches of CSCC_ASC were isolated from three healthy donors by liposuction from abdominal adipose tissue. Adipose mesenchymal stromal cells were culture expanded in bioreactors without the use of animal constituents, cryopreserved, and stored in vials in nitrogen dry...... developed cryopreserved product CSCC_ASC from healthy donors was a safe and feasible treatment. We observed a tendency toward efficacy in patients with IHF. These findings have to be confirmed in larger placebo controlled clinical trials. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1963-1971....

  1. Mapping the Pairwise Choices Leading from Pluripotency to Human Bone, Heart, and Other Mesoderm Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Kyle M; Chen, Angela; Koh, Pang Wei; Deng, Tianda Z; Sinha, Rahul; Tsai, Jonathan M; Barkal, Amira A; Shen, Kimberle Y; Jain, Rajan; Morganti, Rachel M; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Fernhoff, Nathaniel B; George, Benson M; Wernig, Gerlinde; Salomon, Rachel E A; Chen, Zhenghao; Vogel, Hannes; Epstein, Jonathan A; Kundaje, Anshul; Talbot, William S; Beachy, Philip A; Ang, Lay Teng; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-07-14

    Stem-cell differentiation to desired lineages requires navigating alternating developmental paths that often lead to unwanted cell types. Hence, comprehensive developmental roadmaps are crucial to channel stem-cell differentiation toward desired fates. To this end, here, we map bifurcating lineage choices leading from pluripotency to 12 human mesodermal lineages, including bone, muscle, and heart. We defined the extrinsic signals controlling each binary lineage decision, enabling us to logically block differentiation toward unwanted fates and rapidly steer pluripotent stem cells toward 80%-99% pure human mesodermal lineages at most branchpoints. This strategy enabled the generation of human bone and heart progenitors that could engraft in respective in vivo models. Mapping stepwise chromatin and single-cell gene expression changes in mesoderm development uncovered somite segmentation, a previously unobservable human embryonic event transiently marked by HOPX expression. Collectively, this roadmap enables navigation of mesodermal development to produce transplantable human tissue progenitors and uncover developmental processes. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nonreassuring fetal heart rate patterns and nucleated red blood cells in term neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalak, E Ebru; Dede, F Suat; Gelisen, Orhan; Dede, Hulya; Haberal, Ali

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between nonreassuring fetal heart rate patterns during labor and umbilical cord nucleated red blood cell counts. Nucleated red blood cell data was collected prospectively from 41 singleton term neonates presented with nonreassuring fetal heart rate patterns and/or meconium stained amniotic fluid during labor (study group) and from 45 term neonates without any evidence of nonreassuring fetal status (controls). Umbilical artery pH, blood gases and base excess were also determined to investigate the correlation between independent variables. The median nucleated red blood cells per 100 white blood cells were 13 (range 0-37) in the study group and 8 (range 0-21) in the control group. Stepwise regression analysis have identified meconium stained amniotic fluid (R(2) = 0.15, p patterns. Nucleated red blood cells in the cord blood of newborns were found to be elevated in patients with nonreassuring FHR patterns during labor. However, the wide range and the poor correlation of NRBC count with umbilical artery pH and blood gas values limit its clinical utility as a marker for fetal hypoxia.

  3. A Parametric Computational Model of the Action Potential of Pacemaker Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Weiwei; Patel, Nitish D; Roop, Partha S; Malik, Avinash; Andalam, Sidharta; Yip, Eugene; Allen, Nathan; Trew, Mark L

    2018-01-01

    A flexible, efficient, and verifiable pacemaker cell model is essential to the design of real-time virtual hearts that can be used for closed-loop validation of cardiac devices. A new parametric model of pacemaker action potential is developed to address this need. The action potential phases are modeled using hybrid automaton with one piecewise-linear continuous variable. The model can capture rate-dependent dynamics, such as action potential duration restitution, conduction velocity restitution, and overdrive suppression by incorporating nonlinear update functions. Simulated dynamics of the model compared well with previous models and clinical data. The results show that the parametric model can reproduce the electrophysiological dynamics of a variety of pacemaker cells, such as sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node, and the His-Purkinje system, under varying cardiac conditions. This is an important contribution toward closed-loop validation of cardiac devices using real-time heart models.

  4. Allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs): an innovative approach to treating advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdahl, Daniel E; Chang, David H; Hamilton, Michele A; Nakamura, Mamoo; Henry, Timothy D

    2016-09-01

    Over 37 million people worldwide are living with Heart Failure (HF). Advancements in medical therapy have improved mortality primarily by slowing the progression of left ventricular dysfunction and debilitating symptoms. Ultimately, heart transplantation, durable mechanical circulatory support (MCS), or palliative care are the only options for patients with end-stage HF. Regenerative therapies offer an innovative approach, focused on reversing myocardial dysfunction and restoring healthy myocardial tissue. Initial clinical trials using autologous (self-donated) bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) demonstrated excellent safety, but only modest efficacy. Challenges with autologous stem cells include reduced quality and efficacy with increased patient age. The use of allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs) offers an "off the shelf" therapy, with consistent potency and less variability than autologous cells. Preclinical and initial clinical trials with allogeneic MPCs have been encouraging, providing the support for a large ongoing Phase III trial-DREAM-HF. We provide a comprehensive review of preclinical and clinical data supporting MPCs as a therapeutic option for HF patients. The current data suggest allogeneic MPCs are a promising therapy for HF patients. The results of DREAM-HF will determine whether allogeneic MPCs can decrease major adverse clinical events (MACE) in advanced HF patients.

  5. Mast cells regulate myofilament calcium sensitization and heart function after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngkelo, Anta; Richart, Adèle; Kirk, Jonathan A; Bonnin, Philippe; Vilar, Jose; Lemitre, Mathilde; Marck, Pauline; Branchereau, Maxime; Le Gall, Sylvain; Renault, Nisa; Guerin, Coralie; Ranek, Mark J; Kervadec, Anaïs; Danelli, Luca; Gautier, Gregory; Blank, Ulrich; Launay, Pierre; Camerer, Eric; Bruneval, Patrick; Menasche, Philippe; Heymes, Christophe; Luche, Elodie; Casteilla, Louis; Cousin, Béatrice; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kass, David A; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-06-27

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Inflammatory cells orchestrate postischemic cardiac remodeling after MI. Studies using mice with defective mast/stem cell growth factor receptor c-Kit have suggested key roles for mast cells (MCs) in postischemic cardiac remodeling. Because c-Kit mutations affect multiple cell types of both immune and nonimmune origin, we addressed the impact of MCs on cardiac function after MI, using the c-Kit-independent MC-deficient (Cpa3(Cre/+)) mice. In response to MI, MC progenitors originated primarily from white adipose tissue, infiltrated the heart, and differentiated into mature MCs. MC deficiency led to reduced postischemic cardiac function and depressed cardiomyocyte contractility caused by myofilament Ca(2+) desensitization. This effect correlated with increased protein kinase A (PKA) activity and hyperphosphorylation of its targets, troponin I and myosin-binding protein C. MC-specific tryptase was identified to regulate PKA activity in cardiomyocytes via protease-activated receptor 2 proteolysis. This work reveals a novel function for cardiac MCs modulating cardiomyocyte contractility via alteration of PKA-regulated force-Ca(2+) interactions in response to MI. Identification of this MC-cardiomyocyte cross-talk provides new insights on the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the cardiac contractile machinery and a novel platform for therapeutically addressable regulators. ©2016 Ngkelo et al.

  6. Functional and biochemical responses of cultured heart cells to angiotensin II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, I.; Gaa, S.; Rogers, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have utilized a cultured neonatal rat heart myocyte system to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the stimulation of heart cells by angiotensin II (AII). The intact cultured cells, and membranes from these cells, have specific, high affinity receptors for 125 I-AII and for an AII antagonist, 125 I-Sar 1 ,Leu 8 -AII. Binding affinity was in the nanomolar range and was inhibited by guanine nucleotides. Functional studies on intact, beating cells revealed a maximal increase in contractile frequency of 50%, observed at 5 nM AII, with half maximal effects noted at around 1 nM. These responses were reversible and specific as the antagonist, Sar 1 , Ala 8 -AII, inhibited AII-induced chronotropic stimulation. AII (100 nM) had no effect on basal adenylate cyclase activity (20 pmoles cAMP/mg prot/min at 2.5mM Mg 2+ ) in cell membranes. Further, in membranes where cyclase activity was stimulated with isoproterenol (290 pmoles cAMP/mg prot/min at 2.5mM Mg 2+ ), addition of AII had no effect. The cyclase-inhibitory muscarinic agonist, carbachol, also failed to reduce isoproterenol-stimulated activity. In preliminary work with the intact cells, AII again did not alter basal cAMP levels (3-10 pmoles cAMP/mg prot). However, the hormone increased isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP levels by almost 50%. These cells are an excellent system for correlating AII receptor binding with functional and biochemical responses

  7. Concise Review: Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Cells, A Promising Cell Source for Therapy of Heart Failure: Where Do We Stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouadon, Elodie; Moore-Morris, Thomas; Smit, Nicoline W; Chatenoud, Lucienne; Coronel, Ruben; Harding, Sian E; Jourdon, Philippe; Lambert, Virginie; Rucker-Martin, Catherine; Pucéat, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is still a major cause of hospitalization and mortality in developed countries. Many clinical trials have tested the use of multipotent stem cells as a cardiac regenerative medicine. The benefit for the patients of this therapeutic intervention has remained limited. Herein, we review the pluripotent stem cells as a cell source for cardiac regeneration. We more specifically address the various challenges of this cell therapy approach. We question the cell delivery systems, the immune tolerance of allogenic cells, the potential proarrhythmic effects, various drug mediated interventions to facilitate cell grafting and, finally, we describe the pathological conditions that may benefit from such an innovative approach. As members of a transatlantic consortium of excellence of basic science researchers and clinicians, we propose some guidelines to be applied to cell types and modes of delivery in order to translate pluripotent stem cell cardiac derivatives into safe and effective clinical trials. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  8. Ca2+ cycling in heart cells from ground squirrels: adaptive strategies for intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Chen Li

    Full Text Available Heart tissues from hibernating mammals, such as ground squirrels, are able to endure hypothermia, hypoxia and other extreme insulting factors that are fatal for human and nonhibernating mammals. This study was designed to understand adaptive mechanisms involved in intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis in cardiomyocytes from the mammalian hibernator, ground squirrel, compared to rat. Electrophysiological and confocal imaging experiments showed that the voltage-dependence of L-type Ca(2+ current (I(Ca was shifted to higher potentials in ventricular myocytes from ground squirrels vs. rats. The elevated threshold of I(Ca did not compromise the Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release, because a higher depolarization rate and a longer duration of action potential compensated the voltage shift of I(Ca. Both the caffeine-sensitive and caffeine-resistant components of cytosolic Ca(2+ removal were more rapid in ground squirrels. Ca(2+ sparks in ground squirrels exhibited larger amplitude/size and much lower frequency than in rats. Due to the high I(Ca threshold, low SR Ca(2+ leak and rapid cytosolic Ca(2+ clearance, heart cells from ground squirrels exhibited better capability in maintaining intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis than those from rats and other nonhibernating mammals. These findings not only reveal adaptive mechanisms of hibernation, but also provide novel strategies against Ca(2+ overload-related heart diseases.

  9. Cardiac Bmi1(+) cells contribute to myocardial renewal in the murine adult heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente-Alandi, Iñigo; Albo-Castellanos, Carmen; Herrero, Diego; Arza, Elvira; Garcia-Gomez, Maria; Segovia, José C; Capecchi, Mario; Bernad, Antonio

    2015-10-26

    The mammalian adult heart maintains a continuous, low cardiomyocyte turnover rate throughout life. Although many cardiac stem cell populations have been studied, the natural source for homeostatic repair has not yet been defined. The Polycomb protein BMI1 is the most representative marker of mouse adult stem cell systems. We have evaluated the relevance and role of cardiac Bmi1 (+) cells in cardiac physiological homeostasis. Bmi1 (CreER/+);Rosa26 (YFP/+) (Bmi1-YFP) mice were used for lineage tracing strategy. After tamoxifen (TM) induction, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is expressed under the control of Rosa26 regulatory sequences in Bmi1 (+) cells. These cells and their progeny were tracked by FACS, immunofluorescence and RT-qPCR techniques from 5 days to 1 year. FACS analysis of non-cardiomyocyte compartment from TM-induced Bmi1-YFP mice showed a Bmi1 (+)-expressing cardiac progenitor cell (Bmi1-CPC: B-CPC) population, SCA-1 antigen-positive (95.9 ± 0.4 %) that expresses some stemness-associated genes. B-CPC were also able to differentiate in vitro to the three main cardiac lineages. Pulse-chase analysis showed that B-CPC remained quite stable for extended periods (up to 1 year), which suggests that this Bmi1 (+) population contains cardiac progenitors with substantial self-maintenance potential. Specific immunostaining of Bmi1-YFP hearts serial sections 5 days post-TM induction indicated broad distribution of B-CPC, which were detected in variably sized clusters, although no YFP(+) cardiomyocytes (CM) were detected at this time. Between 2 to 12 months after TM induction, YFP(+) CM were clearly identified (3 ± 0.6 % to 6.7 ± 1.3 %) by immunohistochemistry of serial sections and by flow cytometry of total freshly isolated CM. B-CPC also contributed to endothelial and smooth muscle (SM) lineages in vivo. High Bmi1 expression identifies a non-cardiomyocyte resident cardiac population (B-CPC) that contributes to the main lineages of the heart in

  10. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (ogg1) maintains the function of cardiac progenitor cells during heart formation in zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Lifeng [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Zhou, Yong [Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Yu, Shanhe [Shanghai Institute of Hematology, RuiJin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Ji, Guixiang [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences/Key Laboratory of Pesticide Environmental Assessment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Nanjing 210042 (China); Wang, Lei [Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Liu, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Gu, Aihua, E-mail: aihuagu@njmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Genomic damage may devastate the potential of progenitor cells and consequently impair early organogenesis. We found that ogg1, a key enzyme initiating the base-excision repair, was enriched in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. So far, little is known about DNA repair in cardiogenesis. Here, we addressed the critical role of ogg1 in cardiogenesis for the first time. ogg1 mainly expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), the primary heart tube, and subsequently the embryonic myocardium by in situ hybridisation. Loss of ogg1 resulted in severe cardiac morphogenesis and functional abnormalities, including the short heart length, arrhythmia, decreased cardiomyocytes and nkx2.5{sup +} cardiac progenitor cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis and repressed proliferation of progenitor cells caused by ogg1 deficiency might contribute to the heart phenotype. The microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in embryonic heart tube morphogenesis and heart structure were significantly changed due to the lack of ogg1. Among those, foxh1 is an important partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage. Our work demonstrates the requirement of ogg1 in cardiac progenitors and heart development in zebrafish. These findings may be helpful for understanding the aetiology of congenital cardiac deficits. - Highlights: • A key DNA repair enzyme ogg1 is expressed in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. • We found that ogg1 is essential for normal cardiac morphogenesis in zebrafish. • The production of embryonic cardiomyocytes requires appropriate ogg1 expression. • Ogg1 critically regulated proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells in zebrafish. • foxh1 is a partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage.

  11. Changes in left ventricular filling patterns after repeated injection of autologous bone marrow cells in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Møller, Jacob E; Thayssen, Per

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives. We have previously shown that repeated intracoronary infusion of bone marrow cells (BMSC) did not improve left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction in patients with chronic ischemic heart failure. However, the impact of BMSC therapy on LV diastolic filling has remained uncertain....... Conclusion. In this non-randomised study repeated intracoronary BMSC infusions had a beneficial effect on LV filling in patients with chronic ischemic heart failure. Randomised studies are warranted....

  12. Are adipose-derived stem cells cultivated in human platelet lysate suitable for heart valve tissue engineering?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frese, L.; Sasse, T.; Sanders, B.; Baaijens, F.P.T.; Beer, G.M.; Hoerstrup, S.P.

    2017-01-01

    Tissue-engineered heart valves represent a promising strategy for the growing need for valve replacements in cardiovascular medicine. Recent studies have shown that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) are a viable cell source, as they are readily available in both the young and the elderly, show

  13. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Cultured in Serum from Heart Failure Patients Are More Resistant to Simulated Chronic and Acute Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Z. Nazari-Shafti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite regulatory issues surrounding the use of animal-derived cell culture supplements, most clinical cardiac cell therapy trials using mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs still rely on fetal bovine serum (FBS for cell expansion before transplantation. We sought to investigate the effect of human serum from heart failure patients (HFS on cord blood MSCs (CB-MSCs during short-term culture under regular conditions and during simulated acute and chronic stress. Cell survival, proliferation, metabolic activity, and apoptosis were quantified, and gene expression profiles of selected apoptosis and cell cycle regulators were determined. Compared to FBS, HFS and serum from healthy donors (CS showed similar effects by substantially increasing cell survival during chronic and acute stress and by increasing cell yields 5 days after acute stress. Shortly after the termination of acute stress, both HFS and CS resulted in a marked decrease in apoptotic cells. Transcriptome analysis suggested a decrease in TNF-mediated induction of caspases and decreased activation of mitochondrial apoptosis. Our data confirm that human serum from both healthy donors and heart failure patients results in increased cell yields and increased resistance to cellular stress signals. Therefore, we consider autologous serum a valid alternative to FBS in cell-based therapies addressing severe heart disease.

  14. Sustained IGF-1 Secretion by Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Improves Infarcted Heart Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagno, Luiza L; Carvalho, Deivid; Mesquita, Fernanda; Louzada, Ruy A; Andrade, Bruno; Kasai-Brunswick, Taís H; Lago, Vivian M; Suhet, Grazielle; Cipitelli, Debora; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which stem cell-based therapy improves heart function is still unknown, but paracrine mechanisms seem to be involved. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) secrete several factors, including insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), which may contribute to myocardial regeneration. Our aim was to investigate whether the overexpression of IGF-1 in ADSCs (IGF-1-ADSCs) improves treatment of chronically infarcted rat hearts. ADSCs were transduced with a lentiviral vector to induce IGF-1 overexpression. IGF-1-ADSCs transcribe100- to 200-fold more IGF-1 mRNA levels compared to nontransduced ADSCs. IGF-1 transduction did not alter ADSC immunophenotypic characteristics even under hypoxic conditions. However, IGF-1-ADSCs proliferate at higher rates and release greater amounts of growth factors such as IGF-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Importantly, IGF-1 secreted by IGF-1-ADSCs is functional given that Akt-1 phosphorylation was remarkably induced in neonatal cardiomyocytes cocultured with IGF-1-ADSCs, and this increase was prevented with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor treatment. Next, we tested IGF-1-ADSCs in a rat myocardial infarction (MI) model. MI was performed by coronary ligation, and 4 weeks after MI, animals received intramyocardial injections of either ADSCs (n = 7), IGF-1-ADSCs (n = 7), or vehicle (n = 7) into the infarcted border zone. Left ventricular function was evaluated by echocardiography before and after 6 weeks of treatment, and left ventricular hemodynamics were assessed 7 weeks after cell injection. Notably, IGF-1-ADSCs improved left ventricular ejection fraction and cardiac contractility index, but did not reduce scar size when compared to the ADSC-treated group. In summary, transplantation of ADSCs transduced with IGF-1 is a superior therapeutic approach to treat MI compared to nontransduced ADSCs, suggesting that gene and cell

  15. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived inflammatory fibroblasts mediate interstitial fibrosis in the aging heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trial, JoAnn; Entman, Mark L; Cieslik, Katarzyna A

    2016-02-01

    Pathologic fibrosis in the aging mouse heart is associated with dysregulated resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) arising from reduced stemness and aberrant differentiation into dysfunctional inflammatory fibroblasts. Fibroblasts derived from aging MSC secrete higher levels of 1) collagen type 1 (Col1) that directly contributes to fibrosis, 2) monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) that attracts leukocytes from the blood and 3) interleukin-6 (IL-6) that facilitates transition of monocytes into myeloid fibroblasts. The transcriptional activation of these proteins is controlled via the farnesyltransferase (FTase)-Ras-Erk pathway. The intrinsic change in the MSC phenotype acquired by advanced age is specific for the heart since MSC originating from bone wall (BW-MSC) or fibroblasts derived from them were free of these defects. The potential therapeutic interventions other than clinically approved strategies based on findings presented in this review are discussed as well. This article is a part of a Special Issue entitled "Fibrosis and Myocardial Remodeling". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The stem-cell application in ischemic heart disease: Basic principles, specifics and practical experience from clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banović Marko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Longer life duration, different clinical presentations of coronary disease, as well as high incidence of comorbidity in patients with ischemic heart disease have led to an increase in the incidence of ischemic heart failure. Despite numerous and new treatment methods that act on different pathophysiological mechanisms that cause heart failure, and whose aim is to slowdown or stop the progression of this devastating disease, morbidity and mortality in these patients remain high. These facts have firstly led to the introduction of the experimental, and then clinical studies with the application of stem cells in patients with ischemic heart disease. Previous studies have shown that the application of stem cells is a feasible and safe method in patients with acute coronary syndrome, as well as in patients with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy, but the efficacy of these methods in both of the abovementioned clinical syndromes has yet to be established. This review paper outlines the basic principles of treatment of ischemic heart disease with stem cells, as well as the experience and knowledge gained in previous clinical studies.

  17. Distinct subsets of Eve-positive pericardial cells stabilise cardiac outflow and contribute to Hox gene-triggered heart morphogenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmojdzian, Monika; de Joussineau, Svetlana; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2018-01-17

    The Drosophila heart, composed of discrete subsets of cardioblasts and pericardial cells, undergoes Hox-triggered anterior-posterior morphogenesis, leading to a functional subdivision into heart proper and aorta, with its most anterior part forming a funnel-shaped cardiac outflow. Cardioblasts differentiate into Tin-positive 'working myocytes' and Svp-expressing ostial cells. However, developmental fates and functions of heart-associated pericardial cells remain elusive. Here, we show that the pericardial cells that express the transcription factor Even Skipped adopt distinct fates along the anterior-posterior axis. Among them, the most anterior Antp-Ubx-AbdA - negative cells form a novel cardiac outflow component we call the outflow hanging structure, whereas the Antp-expressing cells differentiate into wing heart precursors. Interestingly, Hox gene expression in the Even Skipped-positive cells not only underlies their antero-posterior diversification, but also influences heart morphogenesis in a non-cell-autonomous way. In brief, we identify a new cardiac outflow component derived from a subset of Even Skipped-expressing cells that stabilises the anterior heart tip, and demonstrate non-cell-autonomous effects of Hox gene expression in the Even Skipped-positive cells on heart morphogenesis. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Telomere elongation protects heart and lung tissue cells from fatal damage in rats exposed to severe hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaping; Zhao, Zhen; Zhu, Zhiyong; Li, Pingying; Li, Xiaolin; Xue, Xiaohong; Duo, Jie; Ma, Yingcai

    2018-02-17

    The effects of acute hypoxia at high altitude on the telomere length of the cells in the heart and lung tissues remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the change in telomere length of rat heart and lung tissue cells in response to acute exposure to severe hypoxia and its role in hypoxia-induced damage to heart and lung tissues. Forty male Wistar rats (6-week old) were randomized into control group (n = 10) and hypoxia group (n = 30). Rats in control group were kept at an altitude of 1500 m, while rats in hypoxia group were exposed to simulated hypoxia with an altitude of 5000 m in a low-pressure oxygen chamber for 1, 3, and 7 days (n = 10). The left ventricular and right middle lobe tissues of each rat were collected for measurement of telomere length and reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and the mRNA and protein levels of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), hypoxia-inducible factor1α (HIF-1α), and hypoxia-inducible factor1α (HIF-2α). Increased exposure to hypoxia damaged rat heart and lung tissue cells and increased ROS production and telomere length. The mRNA and protein levels of TERT and HIF-1α were significantly higher in rats exposed to hypoxia and increased with prolonged exposure; mRNA and protein levels of HIF-2α increased only in rats exposed to hypoxia for 7 days. TERT was positively correlated with telomere length and the levels of HIF-1α but not HIF-2α. Acute exposure to severe hypoxia causes damage to heart and lung tissues due to the production of ROS but promotes telomere length and adaptive response by upregulating TERT and HIF-1α, which protect heart and lung tissue cells from fatal damage.

  19. The contribution of matrix and cells to leaflet retraction in heart valve tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlimmeren, van M.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Heart valve tissue engineering is a promising technique to overcome the drawbacks of currently used mechanical and prosthetic heart valve replacements. Tissue engineered (TE) heart valves are viable and autologous implants that have the capacity to grow, remodel and repair throughout a patient’s

  20. Congestive heart failure effects on atrial fibroblast phenotype: differences between freshly-isolated and cultured cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Dawson

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are important in the atrial fibrillation (AF substrate resulting from congestive heart failure (CHF. We previously noted changes in in vivo indices of fibroblast function in a CHF dog model, but could not detect changes in isolated cells. This study assessed CHF-induced changes in the phenotype of fibroblasts freshly isolated from control versus CHF dogs, and examined effects of cell culture on these differences.Left-atrial fibroblasts were isolated from control and CHF dogs (ventricular tachypacing 240 bpm × 2 weeks. Freshly-isolated fibroblasts were compared to fibroblasts in primary culture. Extracellular-matrix (ECM gene-expression was assessed by qPCR, protein by Western blot, fibroblast morphology with immunocytochemistry, and K(+-current with patch-clamp. Freshly-isolated CHF fibroblasts had increased expression-levels of collagen-1 (10-fold, collagen-3 (5-fold, and fibronectin-1 (3-fold vs. control, along with increased cell diameter (13.4 ± 0.4 µm vs control 8.4 ± 0.3 µm and cell spreading (shape factor 0.81 ± 0.02 vs. control 0.87 ± 0.02, consistent with an activated phenotype. Freshly-isolated control fibroblasts displayed robust tetraethylammonium (TEA-sensitive K(+-currents that were strongly downregulated in CHF. The TEA-sensitive K(+-current differences between control and CHF fibroblasts were attenuated after 2-day culture and eliminated after 7 days. Similarly, cell-culture eliminated the ECM protein-expression and shape differences between control and CHF fibroblasts.Freshly-isolated CHF and control atrial fibroblasts display distinct ECM-gene and morphological differences consistent with in vivo pathology. Culture for as little as 48 hours activates fibroblasts and obscures the effects of CHF. These results demonstrate potentially-important atrial-fibroblast phenotype changes in CHF and emphasize the need for caution in relating properties of cultured fibroblasts to in vivo systems.

  1. Na-K pump site density and ouabain binding affinity in cultured chick heart cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobaugh, L.A.; Lieberman, M.

    1987-01-01

    The possible existence of multiple [ 3 H]ouabain binding sites and the relationship between ouabain binding and Na-K pump inhibition in cardiac muscle were studied using cultured embryonic chick heart cells. [ 3 H]ouabain bound to a single class of sites in 0.5 mM K (0.5 Ko) with an association rate constant (k+1) of 3.4 X 10(4) M-1.s-1 and a dissociation rate constant (k-1) of 0.0095 s. Maximal specific [ 3 H]ouabain binding RT to myocyte-enriched cultures is 11.7 pmol/mg protein and Kd is 0.43 microM in 0.5 Ko, whereas Kd,apparent is 6.6 microM in 5.4 Ko. The number of binding sites per myocyte was calculated by correcting for the contribution of fibroblasts in myocyte-enriched cultures using data from homogeneous fibroblast cultures (RT = 3.3 pmol/mg protein; Kd = 0.19 microM in 0.5 Ko). Equivalence of [ 3 H]ouabain binding sites and Na-K pumps was implied by agreement between maximal specific binding of [ 3 H]ouabain and 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody directed against Na+-K+-ATPase (approximately 2 X 10(6) sites/cell). However, [ 3 H]ouabain binding occurred at lower concentrations than inhibition of ouabain-sensitive 42 K uptake in 0.5 Ko. Further studies in both 0.5 K and 5.4 Ko showed that ouabain caused cell Na content Nai to increase over the same range of concentrations that binding occurred, implying that increased Nai may stimulate unbound Na-K pumps and prevent a proportional decrease in 42 K uptake rate. The results show that Na-K pump inhibition occurs as a functional consequence of specific ouabain binding and indicate that the Na-K pump is the cardiac glycoside receptor in cultured heart cells

  2. Cardiosphere-Derived Cells Facilitate Heart Repair by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization and Neutrophil Recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Shaimaa Hasan

    Full Text Available Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs, one of the promising stem cell sources for myocardial repair, have been tested in clinical trials and resulted in beneficial effects; however, the relevant mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that CDCs favor heart repair by switching the macrophages from a pro-inflammatory phenotype (M1 into a regulatory anti-inflammatory phenotype (M2. Macrophages from mice were cultured with CDCs-conditioned medium or with fibroblasts-conditioned medium as a control. Immunostaining showed that CDCs-conditioned medium significantly enhanced the expression of CD206 (a marker for M2 macrophages, but decreased the expression of CD86 (a marker for M1 macrophages 3 days after culture. For animal studies, we used an acute myocardial infarction model of mice. We injected CDCs, fibroblasts, or saline only into the border zone of infarction. Then we collected the heart tissues for histological analysis 5 and 14 days after treatment. Compared with control animals, CDCs treatment significantly decreased M1 macrophages and neutrophils but increased M2 macrophages in the infarcted heart. Furthermore, CDCs-treated mice had reduced infarct size and fewer apoptotic cells compared to the controls. Our data suggest that CDCs facilitate heart repair by modulating M1/M2 macrophage polarization and neutrophil recruitment, which may provide a new insight into the mechanisms of stem cell-based myocardial repair.

  3. Cardiosphere-Derived Cells Facilitate Heart Repair by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization and Neutrophil Recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Al Shaimaa; Luo, Lan; Yan, Chen; Zhang, Tian-Xia; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Mangoura, Safwat A.; Abdel-Raheem, Mahmoud H.; Zhang, Shouhua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs), one of the promising stem cell sources for myocardial repair, have been tested in clinical trials and resulted in beneficial effects; however, the relevant mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that CDCs favor heart repair by switching the macrophages from a pro-inflammatory phenotype (M1) into a regulatory anti-inflammatory phenotype (M2). Macrophages from mice were cultured with CDCs-conditioned medium or with fibroblasts-conditioned medium as a control. Immunostaining showed that CDCs-conditioned medium significantly enhanced the expression of CD206 (a marker for M2 macrophages), but decreased the expression of CD86 (a marker for M1 macrophages) 3 days after culture. For animal studies, we used an acute myocardial infarction model of mice. We injected CDCs, fibroblasts, or saline only into the border zone of infarction. Then we collected the heart tissues for histological analysis 5 and 14 days after treatment. Compared with control animals, CDCs treatment significantly decreased M1 macrophages and neutrophils but increased M2 macrophages in the infarcted heart. Furthermore, CDCs-treated mice had reduced infarct size and fewer apoptotic cells compared to the controls. Our data suggest that CDCs facilitate heart repair by modulating M1/M2 macrophage polarization and neutrophil recruitment, which may provide a new insight into the mechanisms of stem cell-based myocardial repair. PMID:27764217

  4. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  5. Effects of heme oxygenase-1 gene modulated mesenchymal stem cells on vasculogenesis in ischemic swine hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi-Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Tang, Yao-Liang; Ma, Gen-Shan; Shen, Cheng-Xing; Wei, Qin; Zhu, Qi; Yao, Yu-Yu; Liu, Nai-Feng

    2011-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation may partially restore heart function in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study was to explore the beneficial effects of MSCs modified with heme xygenase-1 (HO-1) on post-infarct swine hearts to determine whether the induction of therapeutic angiogenesis is modified by the angiogenic cytokines released from the implanted cells. In vitro, MSCs were divided into four groups: (1) non-transfected MSCs (MSCs group), (2) MSCs transfected with the pcDNA3.1-Lacz plasmid (Lacz-MSCs group), (3) MSCs transfected with pcDNA3.1-hHO-1 (HO-1-MSCs group), and (4) MSCs transfected with pcDNA3.1-hHO-1 and pretreatment with an HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP) (HO-1-MSCs + SnPP group). Cells were cultured in an airtight incubation bottle for 24 hours, in which the oxygen concentration was maintained at < 1%, followed by 12 hours of reoxygenation. After hypoxia/reoxygen treatment, ELISA was used to measure transforming growth factor (TGF-β) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) in the supernatant. In vivo, 28 Chinese mini-pigs were randomly allocated to the following treatment groups: (1) control group (saline), (2) Lacz-MSCs group, (3) HO-1-MSCs group, and (4) HO-1-MSCs + SnPP group. About 1 × 10(7) of autologous stem cells or an identical volume of saline was injected intracoronary into porcine hearts 1 hour after MI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assay and postmortem analysis were assessed four weeks after stem cell transplantation. Post hypoxia/reoxygenation in vitro, TGF-β in the supernatant was significantly increased in the HO-1-MSCs ((874.88 ± 68.23) pg/ml) compared with Lacz-MSCs ((687.81 ± 57.64) pg/ml, P < 0.001). FGF-2 was also significantly increased in the HO-1-MSCs ((1106.48 ± 107.06) pg/ml) compared with the Lacz-MSCs ((853.85 ± 74.44) pg/ml, P < 0.001). In vivo, at four weeks after transplantation, HO-1 gene transfer increased the capillary density in the peri-infarct area

  6. Amphiphile-induced heart muscle-cell (myocyte) injury: effects of intracellular fatty acid overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janero, D R; Burghardt, C; Feldman, D

    1988-10-01

    Lipid amphiphile toxicity may be an important contributor to myocardial injury, especially during ischemia/reperfusion. In order to investigate directly the potential biochemical and metabolic effects of amphiphile overload on the functioning heart muscle cell (myocyte), a novel model of nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA)-induced myocyte damage has been defined. The model uses intact, beating neonatal rat myocytes in primary monolayer culture as a study object and 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) as a nonmetabolizable fatty acid. Myocytes incubated with TOFA accumulated it as NEFA, and the consequent NEFA amphiphile overload elicited a variety of cellular defects (including decreased beating rate, depletion of high-energy stores and glycogen pools, and breakdown of myocyte membrane phospholipid) and culminated in cell death. The amphiphile-induced cellular pathology could be reversed by removing TOFA from the culture medium, which resulted in intracellular TOFA "wash-out." Although the development and severity of amphiphile-induced myocyte injury could be correlated with both the intracellular TOFA/NEFA content (i.e., the level of TOFA to which the cells were exposed) and the duration of this exposure, removal of amphiphile overload did not inevitably lead to myocyte recovery. TOFA had adverse effects on myocyte mitochondrial function in situ (decoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, impairing respiratory control) and on myocyte oxidative catabolism (transiently increasing fatty acid beta oxidation, citric acid cycle flux, and glucose oxidation). The amphiphile-induced bioenergetic abnormalities appeared to constitute a state of "metabolic anoxia" underlying the progression of myocyte injury to cell death. This anoxic state could be ameliorated to some extent, but not prevented, by carbohydrate catabolism.

  7. Altered Ca fluxes and contractile state during pH changes in cultured heart cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.; Smith, T.W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors studied mechanisms underlying changes in myocardial contractile state produced by intracellular (pH/sub i/) or extracellular (pH 0 ) changes in pH using cultured chick embryo ventricular cells. A change in pH 0 of HEPES-buffered medium from 7.4 to 6.0 or to 8.8 changed the amplitude of cell motion by -85 or +60%, and 45 Ca uptake at 10 s by -29 or +22%, respectively. The pH 0 induced change in Ca uptake was not sensitive to nifedipine but was Na gradient dependent. Changes in pH/sub i/ produced by NH 4 Cl or preincubation in media at pH values ranging from 6.0 to 8.8 failed to alter significantly 45 Ca uptake or efflux. However, larger changes in pH/sub i/ were associated with altered Ca uptake. Changes in pH 0 from 7.5 to 6.0 or to 8.8 were associated with initial changes in 45 Ca efflux by +17 or -18%, respectively, and these effects were not Na dependent. Exposure of cells to 20 mM NH 4 Cl produced intracellular alkalinization and a positive inotropic effect, whereas subsequent removal of NH 4 Cl caused intracellular acidification and a negative inotropic effect. There was, however, a lack of close temporal relationships between pH/sub i/ and contractile state. These results indicated that pH 0 -induced changes in contractile state in cultured heart cells are closely correlated with altered transarcolemmal Ca movements and presumably are due to these Ca flux changes

  8. Intramyocardial bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation in ischemic heart failure: Long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Miia; Pätilä, Tommi; Kankuri, Esko; Lauerma, Kirsi; Sinisalo, Juha; Laine, Mika; Kupari, Markku; Vento, Antti; Harjula, Ari

    2015-07-01

    Long-term results regarding treatment of chronic ischemic heart failure with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) have been few. We received encouraging results at the 1-year follow-up of patients treated with combined coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and BMMCs, so we decided to extend the follow-up. The study patients had received injections of BMMCs or vehicle into the myocardial infarction border area during CABG in a randomized and double-blind manner. We could contact 36 of the 39 patients recruited for the original study. Pre-operatively and after an extended follow-up period, we performed magnetic resonance imaging, measured pro-B-type amino-terminal natriuretic peptide, reviewed patient records from the follow-up period, and determined current quality of life with the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey. The median follow-up time was 60.7 months (interquartile range [IQR], 45.1-72.6 months). No statistically significant difference was detected in change of pro-B-type amino-terminal natriuretic peptide values or in quality of life between groups. The median change in left ventricular ejection fraction was 4.9% (IQR, -2.1% to 12.3%) for controls and 3.9% (IQR, -5.2% to 10.2%) for the BMMC group (p = 0.647). Wall thickening in injected segments increased by a median of 17% (IQR, -5% to 30%) for controls and 15% (IQR, -12% to 19%) for BMMC patients (p = 0.434). Scar size in injected segments increased by a median of 2% (IQR, -7% to 19%) for controls but diminished for BMMC patients, with a median change of -17% (IQR, -30% to -6%; p = 0.011). In the treatment of chronic ischemic heart failure, combining intramyocardial BMMC therapy with CABG fails to affect cardiac function but can sustainably reduce scar size, even in the long-term. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Heart of Lymphoma: Primary Mediastinal Large B-Cell Lymphoma with Endomyocardial Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Rogowitz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL is an uncommon aggressive subset of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Although PMBCL frequently spreads locally from the thymus into the pleura or pericardium, it rarely invades directly through the heart. Herein, we report a case of a young Mexican female diagnosed with PMBCL with clear infiltration of lymphoma through the cardiac wall and into the right atrium and tricuspid valve leading to tricuspid regurgitation. This was demonstrated by cardiac MRI and transthoracic echocardiogram. In addition, cardiac MRI and CT scan of the chest revealed the large mediastinal mass completely surrounding and eroding into the superior vena cava (SVC wall causing a collar of stokes. The cardiac and SVC infiltration created a significant therapeutic challenge as lymphomas are very responsive to chemotherapy, and treatment could potentially lead to vascular wall rupture and hemorrhage. Despite the lack of conclusive data on chemotherapy-induced hemodynamic compromise in such scenarios, her progressive severe SVC syndrome and respiratory distress necessitated urgent intervention. In addition to the unique presentation of this rare lymphoma, our case report highlights the safety of R-CHOP treatment.

  10. [Computer-assisted measurement of ocular misalignment in infants and young children using the digital Purkinje reflection pattern procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, J C; Effert, R; Kaupp, A; Kleine, M; Reim, M

    1994-02-01

    A digital image recording and processing system is presented that allows a quick diagnosis of microstrabismus in non-cooperative children. It is thus particularly suited for screening purposes. The Purkinje Reflection Pattern Evaluation (RPE) method is used: three small flashes are used to produce the desired Purkinje images. Two horizontal rows of the three 1st Purkinje images (anterior corneal reflections) and of the three 4th Purkinje images (posterior crystalline lens reflections) stemming from the three light sources form the characteristic Purkinje image reflection pattern. Each eye's position is calculated from the shift between the upper and lower rows of reflections by means of two simple formulae. From the angles obtained in binocular fixation and monocular fixation the manifest angle of strabismus corresponding to the angle measured in the simultaneous prism-and-cover test is computed. The measurement is performed at a fixation distance of 50 cm under natural viewing conditions. To obtain a picture one only has to get the child's attention for a short moment. The primary position is triggered with the fixation light, which is operated by a switch. The digital image recording is done with a hand-held device comprising two miniaturized video cameras, three photo flashes and a fixation light that is operated manually. An IBM-compatible PC equipped with a hard disk and two frame grabbers was adapted for the storage and processing of the pictures. The pictures are evaluated interactively in a few minutes on the workstation's monitor immediately after the measurement. To this end specially designed menu-driven software was implemented. Examples of the measuring procedure and clinical results in infants with microtropic highlight the potential of the system as a screening apparatus and for the exact measurement of small and large squint angles. Usually even 1-year-old children can cooperate well enough to get good-quality pictures in binocular fixation. The new

  11. Bradykinin induced a positive chronotropic effect via stimulation of T- and L-type calcium currents in heart cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bizri, Nesrine; Bkaily, Ghassan; Wang, Shimin; Jacques, Danielle; Regoli, Domenico; D'Orléans-Juste, Pedro; Sukarieh, Rami

    2003-03-01

    Using Fluo-3 calcium dye confocal microscopy and spontaneously contracting embryonic chick heart cells, bradykinin (10(-10) M) was found to induce positive chronotropic effects by increasing the frequency of the transient increase of cytosolic and nuclear free Ca2+. Pretreatment of the cells with either B1 or B2 receptor antagonists (R126 and R817, respectively) completely prevented bradykinin (BK) induced positive chronotropic effects on spontaneously contracting single heart cells. Using the whole-cell voltage clamp technique and ionic substitution to separate the different ionic current species, our results showed that BK (10(-6) M) had no effect on fast Na+ inward current and delayed outward potassium current. However, both L- and T-type Ca2+ currents were found to be increased by BK in a dose-dependent manner (10(-10)-10(-7) M). The effects of BK on T- and L-type Ca2+ currents were partially blocked by the B1 receptor antagonist [Leu8]des-Arg9-BK (R592) (10(-7) M) and completely reversed by the B2 receptor antagonist D-Arg[Hyp3,D-Phe7,Leu8]BK (R-588) (10(-7) M) or pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX). These results demonstrate that BK induced a positive chronotropic effect via stimulation of T- and L-type Ca2+ currents in heart cells mainly via stimulation of B2 receptor coupled to PTX-sensitive G-proteins. The increase of both types of Ca2+ current by BK in heart cells may explain the positive inotropic and chronotropic effects of this hormone.

  12. Alterations in plasma phosphorus, red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and P50 following open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, R A; Sarnaik, A P; Meert, K L; Dabbagh, S; Simpson, P; Makimi, M

    1994-12-01

    To evaluate changes in and the correlation between plasma phosphorus, red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and P50 in children following heart surgery. Prospective, observational study with factorial design. A pediatric intensive care unit in a university hospital. Twenty children undergoing open heart surgery for congenital heart defects. None. Red cell 2,3-DPG and ATP, P50, plasma phosphorus, and arterial lactate were obtained before and at 1, 8, 16, 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery. The amount of intravenous fluid and glucose administered, and age of blood utilized were documented. Variables were analyzed by repeated measure analysis of variance followed by paired t-tests. To investigate the relationship between variables at each time point, scatterplot matrices and correlation coefficients were obtained. There was a reduction in plasma phosphorus, red cell 2,3-DPG, and P50 and an increase in arterial lactate at 1, 8, 16, 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery. Red cell 2,3-DPG correlated with P50 at 1, 8 and 16 hours. The decrease in the plasma phosphorus correlated with the amounts of intravenous fluid and glucose administered on the day of surgery and on the first and second postoperative days. The age of the blood utilized correlated with the decrease in red cell 2,3-DPG on the day of surgery. Reduction in red cell 2,3-DPG, P50, and plasma phosphorus occurs after open heart surgery in children. These changes can potentially contribute to impaired oxygen utilization in the postoperative period, when adequacy of tissue oxygenation is critical.

  13. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  14. Fibrinogen, viscosity, and white blood cell count are major risk factors for ischemic heart disease. The Caerphilly and Speedwell collaborative heart disease studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnell, J W; Baker, I A; Sweetnam, P M; Bainton, D; O'Brien, J R; Whitehead, P J; Elwood, P C

    1991-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that hemostatic factors and white blood cell count are predictive of ischemic heart disease (IHD). The relations of fibrinogen, viscosity, and white blood cell count to the incidence of IHD in the Caerphilly and Speedwell prospective studies are described. The two studies have a common core protocol and are based on a combined cohort of 4,860 middle-aged men from the general population. The first follow-up was at a nearly constant interval of 5.1 years in Caerphilly and 3.2 years in Speedwell; 251 major IHD events had occurred. Age-adjusted relative odds of IHD for men in the top 20% of the distribution compared with the bottom 20% were 4.1 (95% confidence interval, 2.6-6.5) for fibrinogen, 4.5 (95% confidence interval, 2.8-7.4) for viscosity, and 3.2 (95% confidence interval, 2.0-4.9) for white blood cell count. Associations with IHD were similar in men who had never smoked, exsmokers, and current smokers, and the results suggest that at least part of the effect of smoking on IHD is mediated through fibrinogen, viscosity, and white blood cell count. Multivariate analysis shows that white blood cell count is an independent risk factor for IHD as is either fibrinogen or viscosity, or possibly both. Jointly, these three variables significantly improve the fit of a logistic regression model containing all the main conventional risk factors. Further, a model including age, smoking habits, fibrinogen, viscosity, and white blood cell count predicts IHD as well as one in which the three hemostatic/rheological variables are replaced by total cholesterol, diastolic pressure, and body mass index. Jointly, fibrinogen, viscosity, and white blood cell count are important risk factors for IHD.

  15. Nkx2.5 enhances the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells transplantation in treatment heart failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bo; Wang, Jin Xin; Hu, Xing Xing; Duan, Peng; Wang, Lin; Li, Yang; Zhu, Qing Lei

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether Nkx2.5 transfection of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) improves the efficacy of treatment of adriamycin-induced heart failure in a rat model. Nkx2.5 was transfected in MSCs by lentiviral vector transduction. The expressions of Nkx2.5 and cardiac specific genes in MSCs and Nkx2.5 transfected mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs-Nkx2.5) were analyzed with quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot in vitro. Heart failure models of rats were induced by adriamycin and were then randomly divided into 3 groups: injected saline, MSCs or MSCs-Nkx2.5 via the femoral vein respectively. Four weeks after injection, the cardiac function, expressions of cardiac specific gene, fibrosis formation and collagen volume fraction in the myocardium as well as the expressions of GATA4 and MEF2 in rats were analyzed with echocardiography, immunohistochemistry, Masson staining, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Nkx2.5 enhanced cardiac specific gene expressions including α-MHC, TNI, CKMB, connexin-43 in MSCs-Nkx2.5 in vitro. Both MSCs and MSCs-Nkx2.5 improved cardiac function, promoted the differentiation of transplanted MSCs into cardiomyocyte-like cells, decreased fibrosis formation and collagen volume fraction in the myocardium, as well as increased the expressions of GATA4 and MEF2 in adriamycin-induced rat heart failure models. Moreover, the effect was much more remarkable in MSCs-Nkx2.5 than in MSCs group. This study has found that Nkx2.5 enhances the efficacy of MSCs transplantation in treatment adriamycin-induced heart failure in rats. Nkx2.5 transfected to transplanted MSCs provides a potential effective approach to heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Telomere length of circulating leukocyte subpopulations and buccal cells in patients with ischemic heart failure and their offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza S M Wong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to find support for the hypothesis that telomere length (TL is causally involved in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart failure (IHF. We measured TL in IHF patients and their high-risk offspring and determined whether mean leukocyte TL reflects TL in CD34+ progenitor. We additionally measured TL of offspring of patients and controls to examine heritability throughout different cell types. METHODS AND RESULTS: TL was measured by qPCR in overall leukocytes, CD34+ progenitor cells, mononuclear cells (MNCs, and buccal cells in 27 IHF patients, 24 healthy controls and 60 offspring. TL in IHF patients was shorter than healthy controls in leukocytes (p = 0.002, but not in CD34+ cells (p = 0.39, MNCs (p = 0.31 or buccal cells (p = 0.19. Offspring of IHF patients had shorter TL in leukocytes than offspring of healthy subjects (p = 0.04 but not in other cell types. Controls and offspring showed a good within person correlation between leukocytes and CD34+ cells (r 0.562; p = 0.004 and r 0.602; p = 0.001, respectively. In IHF patients and offspring the correlation among cell types was blunted. Finally, we found strong correlations between parent and offspring TL in all four cell types. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced leukocyte TL in offspring of IHF subjects suggests a potential causal link of TL in ischemic heart disease. However, this causality is unlikely to originate from exhaustion of TL in CD34+ progenitor or MNC cells as their lengths are not well captured by overall leukocyte TL. Additionally, we found strong correlations between parent and offspring TL in all examined cell types, suggesting high heritability of TL among cell types.

  17. Omentum-derived stromal cells improve myocardial regeneration in pig post-infarcted heart through a potent paracrine mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Siena, Rocco; Balducci, Luigi; Blasi, Antonella; Montanaro, Manuela Gessica; Saldarelli, Marilisa [Medestea Research and Production Laboratories, Consorzio Carso, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Saponaro, Vittorio [Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Martino, Carmela [Medestea Research and Production Laboratories, Consorzio Carso, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Logrieco, Gaetano [Department of Surgery, Hospital ' F. Miulli' 70021 AcquaViva delle Fonti, Bari (Italy); Soleti, Antonio; Fiobellot, Simona [Medestea Research and Production Laboratories, Consorzio Carso, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Madeddu, Paolo [Experimental Cardiovascular Medicine, Bristol Heart Institute, Bristol BS2 8WH (United Kingdom); Rossi, Giacomo [Department of Pathology, University of Camerino, 63100 Ascoli Piceno (Italy); Ribatti, Domenico [Department of Human Anatomy, University of Bari, 70125 Bari (Italy); Crovace, Antonio [Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, 70010 Valenzano, Bari (Italy); Cristini, Silvia; Invernici, Gloria; Parati, Eugenio Agostino [Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Cerebrovascular Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute ' Carlo Besta' , 20133 Milan (Italy); Alessandri, Giulio, E-mail: cisiamo2@yahoo.com [Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Cerebrovascular Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Neurological Institute ' Carlo Besta' , 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    Cell-based therapy could be a valid option to treat myocardial infarct (MI). Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADStCs) have demonstrated tissue regenerative potential including cardiomyogenesis. Omentum is an extremely rich source of visceral fat and its accumulation seems to correlate with cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the capacity of human fat Omentum-derived StCs (FOStCs) to affect heart function upon acute infarct in pigs induced by permanent ligation of the anterior interventricular artery (IVA). We demonstrated for the first time that the local injection of 50 x 10{sup 6} of FOStCs ameliorates the functional parameters of post-infarct heart. Most importantly, histology of FOStCs treated hearts demonstrated a substantial improvement of cardiomyogenesis. In culture, FOStCs produced an impressive number and amount of angiogenic factors and cytokines. Moreover, the conditioned medium of FOStCs (FOStCs-CM) stimulates in vitro cardiac endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation and vascular morphogenesis and inhibits monocytes, EC activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Since FOStCs in vivo did not trans-differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells, we conclude that FOStCs efficacy was presumably mediated by a potent paracrine mechanism involving molecules that concomitantly improved angiogenesis, reduced inflammation and prevented cardiomyocytes death. Our results highlight for the first time the important role that human FOStCs may have in cardiac regeneration.

  18. Sox9 is required for precursor cell expansion and extracellular matrix organization during mouse heart valve development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Joy; Kist, Ralf; Scherer, Gerd; Yutzey, Katherine E

    2007-05-01

    Heart valve structures derived from mesenchymal cells of the endocardial cushions (ECs) are composed of highly organized cell lineages and extracellular matrix. Sox9 is a transcription factor required for both early and late stages of cartilage formation that is also expressed in the developing valves of the heart. The requirements for Sox9 function during valvulogenesis and adult valve homeostasis in mice were examined by conditional inactivation of Sox9 using Tie2-cre and Col2a1-cre transgenes. Sox9(flox/flox);Tie2-cre mice die before E14.5 with hypoplastic ECs, reduced cell proliferation and altered extracellular matrix protein (ECM) deposition. Sox9(flox/flox);Col2a1-cre mice die at birth with thickened heart valve leaflets, reduced expression of cartilage-associated proteins and abnormal ECM patterning. Thickened valve leaflets and calcium deposits, characteristic of valve disease, are observed in heterozygous adult Sox9(flox/+);Col2a1-cre mice. Therefore, Sox9 is required early in valve development for expansion of the precursor cell population and later is required for normal expression and distribution of valvular ECM proteins. These data indicate that Sox9 is required for early and late stages of valvulogenesis and identify a potential role for Sox9 in valve disease mechanisms.

  19. Obesity suppresses circulating level and function of endothelial progenitor cells and heart function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Tzu-Hsien

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim This study tested the hypothesis that obesity suppresses circulating number as well as the function of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF. Methods High fat diet (45 Kcal% fat was given to 8-week-old C57BL/6 J mice (n = 8 for 20 weeks to induce obesity (group 1. Another age-matched group (n = 8 were fed with control diet for 20 weeks as controls (group 2. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 20 weeks after obesity induction. Results By the end of study period, the heart weight, body weight, abdominal fat weight, serum levels of total cholesterol and fasting blood sugar were remarkably higher in group 1 than in group 2 (all p Conclusions Obesity diminished circulating EPC level, impaired the recovery of damaged endothelium, suppressed EPC angiogenesis ability and LVEF, and increased LV remodeling.

  20. Similar effect of autologous and allogeneic cell therapy for ischemic heart disease : Systematic review and meta-analysis of large animal studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen of Lorkeers, Sanne J.; Eding, Joep Egbert Coenraad; Vesterinen, Hanna Mikaela; van der Spoel, Tycho Ids Gijsbert; Sena, Emily Shamiso; Duckers, Henricus Johannes; Doevendans, Pieter Adrianus; Macleod, Malcolm Robert; Chamuleau, Steven Anton Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: In regenerative therapy for ischemic heart disease, use of both autologous and allogeneic stem cells has been investigated. Autologous cell can be applied without immunosuppression, but availability is restricted, and cells have been exposed to risk factors and aging. Allogeneic cell

  1. Effect of high-voltage impulse current on the structure and function of rabbit heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-ping XU

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effect of high-voltage impulse current(HVIC on the structure and function of rabbit heart.Methods Sixty healthy male rabbits were involved in present study and divided into 6 groups randomly(n=10.The rabbits were then shocked using a high-voltage pulse generator with current intensity of 0,50,100,150,250 and 500mA(pulse width 100μs,duration 5s respectively.The heart rate and electrocardiogram(ECG of rabbits were detected before and 0,1,3,7,14 and 28 days after the electric shock.Moreover,the myocardial tissue of rabbits was obtained immediately and 28 days after shock to observe the pathological changes.Results Immediately after electric shock of 50 to 500mA,the heart rate of rabbit increased by different degree,and the ECG showed arrhythmia,myocardial ischemia,atrial fibrillation and atrioventricular block,and the changes recovered gradually one day later.The pathological observation showed cell swelling,separation of myofibril and sarcoplasmic condensation of Purkinje fibers immediately after electric shock of 50 to 500mA,and the changes recovered 28 days after shock.The cardiac injuries aggravated with the increasing of current intensity,especially when it exceeded 150mA,and the recovery time prolonged.Conclusion High-voltage impulse current may induce recoverable injuries on heart structure and function,and the damage effect shows a correlation with the current intensity.

  2. Role of the Purkinje-Muscle Junction on the Ventricular Repolarization Heterogeneity in the Healthy and Ischemic Ovine Ventricular Myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine E. Martinez

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Alteration of action potential duration (APD heterogeneity contributes to arrhythmogenesis. Purkinje-muscle junctions (PMJs present differential electrophysiological properties including longer APD. The goal of this study was to determine if Purkinje-related or myocardial focal activation modulates ventricular repolarization differentially in healthy and ischemic myocardium. Simultaneous epicardial (EPI and endocardial (ENDO optical mapping was performed on sheep left ventricular (LV wedges with intact free-running Purkinje network (N = 7. Preparations were paced on either ENDO or EPI surfaces, or the free-running Purkinje fibers (PFs, mimicking normal activation. EPI and ENDO APDs were assessed for each pacing configuration, before and after (7 min of the onset of no-flow ischemia. Experiments were supported by simulations. In control conditions, maximal APD was found at endocardial PMJ sites. We observed a significant transmural APD gradient for PF pacing with PMJ APD = 347 ± 41 ms and EPI APD = 273 ± 36 ms (p < 0.001. A similar transmural gradient was observed when pacing ENDO (49 ± 31 ms; p = 0.005. However, the gradient was reduced when pacing EPI (37 ± 20 ms; p = 0.005. Global dispersion of repolarization was the most pronounced for EPI pacing. In ischemia, both ENDO and EPI APD were reduced (p = 0.005 and the transmural APD gradient (109 ± 55 ms was increased when pacing ENDO compared to control condition or when pacing EPI (p < 0.05. APD maxima remained localized at functional PMJs during ischemia. Local repolarization dispersion was significantly higher at the PMJ than at other sites. The results were consistent with simulations. We found that the activation sequence modulates repolarization heterogeneity in the ischemic sheep LV. PMJs remain active following ischemia and exert significant influence on local repolarization patterns.

  3. Heart murmurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  4. Rational Autologous Cell Sources For Therapy of Heart Failure - Vehicles and Targets For Gene and RNA Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampinen, Milla; Vento, Antti; Laurikka, Jari; Nystedt, Johanna; Mervaala, Eero; Harjula, Ari; Kankuri, Esko

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the possibilities for intraoperative processing and isolation of autologous cells, particularly atrial appendage-derived cells (AADCs) and cellular micrografts, and their straightforward use in cell transplantation for heart failure therapy. We review the potential of autologous tissues to serve as sources for cell therapy and consider especially those tissues that are used in surgery but from which the excess is currently discarded as surgical waste. We compare the inculture expanded cells to the freshly isolated ones in terms of evidence-based cost-efficacy and their usability as gene- and RNA therapy vehicles. We also review how financial and authority-based decisions and restrictions sculpt the landscape for patients to participate in academic-based trials. Finally, we provide an insight example into AADCs isolation and processing for epicardial therapy during coronary artery bypass surgery.

  5. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Disease Modeling and Precision Medicine: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musunuru, Kiran; Sheikh, Farah; Gupta, Rajat M; Houser, Steven R; Maher, Kevin O; Milan, David J; Terzic, Andre; Wu, Joseph C

    2018-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer an unprece-dented opportunity to study human physiology and disease at the cellular level. They also have the potential to be leveraged in the practice of precision medicine, for example, personalized drug testing. This statement comprehensively describes the provenance of iPSC lines, their use for cardiovascular disease modeling, their use for precision medicine, and strategies through which to promote their wider use for biomedical applications. Human iPSCs exhibit properties that render them uniquely qualified as model systems for studying human diseases: they are of human origin, which means they carry human genomes; they are pluripotent, which means that in principle, they can be differentiated into any of the human body's somatic cell types; and they are stem cells, which means they can be expanded from a single cell into millions or even billions of cell progeny. iPSCs offer the opportunity to study cells that are genetically matched to individual patients, and genome-editing tools allow introduction or correction of genetic variants. Initial progress has been made in using iPSCs to better understand cardiomyopathies, rhythm disorders, valvular and vascular disorders, and metabolic risk factors for ischemic heart disease. This promising work is still in its infancy. Similarly, iPSCs are only just starting to be used to identify the optimal medications to be used in patients from whom the cells were derived. This statement is intended to (1) summarize the state of the science with respect to the use of iPSCs for modeling of cardiovascular traits and disorders and for therapeutic screening; (2) identify opportunities and challenges in the use of iPSCs for disease modeling and precision medicine; and (3) outline strategies that will facilitate the use of iPSCs for biomedical applications. This statement is not intended to address the use of stem cells as regenerative therapy, such as transplantation into the body to

  6. Adipose-Derived Cell Construct Stabilizes Heart Function and Increases Microvascular Perfusion in an Established Infarct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang T.; Touroo, Jeremy S.; Aird, Allison L.; Chang, Raymond C.; Ng, Chin K.; Hoying, James B.; Williams, Stuart K.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that myocardial infarction (MI) immediately treated with an epicardial construct containing stromal vascular fraction (SVF) from adipose tissue preserved microvascular function and left ventricle contractile mechanisms. In order to evaluate a more clinically relevant condition, we investigated the cardiac recovery potential of an SVF construct implanted onto an established infarct. SVF cells were isolated from rat adipose tissue, plated on Vicryl, and cultured for 14 days. Fischer-344 rats were separated into MI groups: (a) 6-week MI (MI), (b) 6-week MI treated with an SVF construct at 2 weeks (MI SVF), (c) 6-week MI with Vicryl construct at 2 weeks (MI Vicryl), and (d) MI 2wk (time point of intervention). Emax, an indicator of systolic performance and contractile function, was lower in the MI and MI Vicryl versus MI SVF. Positron emission tomography imaging (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) revealed a decreased percentage of relative infarct volume in the MI SVF versus MI and MI Vicryl. Total vessel count and percentage of perfusion assessed via immunohistochemistry were both increased in the infarct region of MI SVF versus MI and MI Vicryl. Overall cardiac function, percentage of relative infarct, and percentage of perfusion were similar between MI SVF and MI 2wk; however, total vessel count increased after SVF treatment. These data suggest that SVF treatment of an established infarct stabilizes the heart at the time point of intervention by preventing a worsening of cardiac performance and infarcted volume, and is associated with increased microvessel perfusion in the area of established infarct. PMID:24106337

  7. Heart failure therapy: drugs, genes or stem cells?: by Caroline Telfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Sian

    2013-09-01

    Professor Sian Harding talks to Caroline Telfer, Assistant Commissioning Editor. Professor Sian Harding obtained her PhD in Pharmacology from King's College, London (UK) in 1981. She became Professor of Cardiac Pharmacology at the National Heart and Lung Institute, a division of the Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, in 2002. Her work has been funded by the British Heart Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, the Medical Research Council, the Biochemical and Biophysical Research Council, the The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research, Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline and SmithKline Beecham. Harding is former president of the European Section of the International Society for Heart Research and has organized international cardiovascular science meetings for this society, as well as for the European Society of Cardiology. She is the principal investigator for the first UK gene therapy trial aimed at improving cardiac contractility, organized jointly at Harefield and Papworth Hospitals. Harding is a member of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics and the Medical Research Coucil Regenerative Medicine Research Committee, and Director of a recently awarded British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine Centre. She has been elected Fellow of the American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology, International Society for Heart Research, Society of Biology and British Society of Pharmacology.

  8. The use of technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime labelled white blood cells to detect subclinical inflammation of the heart after cardiopulmonary bypass in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao Chiahung; Wang Yenliang; Wang Shyhjen (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Hsieh Kaisheng (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan). Dept. of Pediatrics)

    1992-11-01

    Ten children (6 boys and 4 girls, aged 1-9 years old) underwent operations with a cardiopulmonary bypass, and the technetium-99m hexamehtylpropylene amine oxine ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO) labelled white blood cell (WBC) heart scans were used to detect postoperative leukocyte infiltration in the hearts. The results showed that 80% (8/10) of the cases had subclinical inflammation in the hearts (grading of WBC scans {>=}score 2), and a positive correlation (R=0.77) was noted between the severity of the inflammation (grading of the WBC scans) and the duration of the cardiopulmonary bypass in the operations. Another control group (9 boys and 2 girls, aged 2-13 years old) underwent operations without a cardiopulmonary bypass, and subclinical inflammation of hearts was demonstrated in only 1 case (9%) by the {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO labelled WBC scans (grading of WBC scans heart damage in the two groups. In our preliminary conclusions, the {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO labelled WBC heart scans may provide non-invasive and directly discernible evidence of subclinical inflammation in the heart due to a transient ischaemic state during a cardiopulmonary bypass, even if the clinical symptoms and signs of carditis are not apparent. (orig.).

  9. Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy in heart disease: discrepancies and contradictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Darrel P; Mielewczik, Michael; Zargaran, David; Cole, Graham D

    2013-10-09

    Autologous bone marrow stem cell therapy is the greatest advance in the treatment of heart disease for a generation according to pioneering reports. In response to an unanswered letter regarding one of the largest and most promising trials, we attempted to summarise the findings from the most innovative and prolific laboratory. Amongst 48 reports from the group, there appeared to be 5 actual clinical studies ("families" of reports). Duplicate or overlapping reports were common, with contradictory experimental design, recruitment and results. Readers cannot always tell whether a study is randomised versus not, open-controlled or blinded placebo-controlled, or lacking a control group. There were conflicts in recruitment dates, criteria, sample sizes, million-fold differences in cell counts, sex reclassification, fractional numbers of patients and conflation of competitors' studies with authors' own. Contradictory results were also common. These included arithmetical miscalculations, statistical errors, suppression of significant changes, exaggerated description of own findings, possible silent patient deletions, fractional numbers of coronary arteries, identical results with contradictory sample sizes, contradictory results with identical sample sizes, misrepresented survival graphs and a patient with a negative NYHA class. We tabulate over 200 discrepancies amongst the reports. The 5 family-flagship papers (Strauer 2002, STAR, IACT, ABCD, BALANCE) have had 2665 citations. Of these, 291 citations were to the pivotal STAR or IACT-JACC papers, but 97% of their eligible citing papers did not mention any discrepancies. Five meta-analyses or systematic reviews covered these studies, but none described any discrepancies and all resolved uncertainties by undisclosed methods, in mutually contradictory ways. Meta-analysts disagreed whether some studies were randomised or "accepter-versus-rejecter". Our experience of presenting the discrepancies to journals is that readers may

  10. Adverse fibrosis in the aging heart depends on signaling between myeloid and mesenchymal cells; role of inflammatory fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslik, Katarzyna A; Trial, JoAnn; Crawford, Jeffrey R; Taffet, George E; Entman, Mark L

    2014-05-01

    Aging has been associated with adverse fibrosis. Here we formulate a new hypothesis and present new evidence that unresponsiveness of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and fibroblasts to transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), due to reduced expression of TGF-β receptor I (TβRI), provides a foundation for cardiac fibrosis in the aging heart via two mechanisms. 1) TGF-β promotes expression of Nanog, a transcription factor that retains MSC in a primitive state. In MSC derived from the aging heart, Nanog expression is reduced and therefore MSC gradually differentiate and the number of mesenchymal fibroblasts expressing collagen increases. 2) As TGF-β signaling pathway components negatively regulate transcription of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a reduced expression of TβRI prevents aging mesenchymal cells from shutting down their own MCP-1 expression. Elevated MCP-1 levels that originated from MSC attract transendothelial migration of mononuclear leukocytes from blood to the tissue. MCP-1 expressed by mesenchymal fibroblasts promotes further migration of monocytes and T lymphocytes away from the endothelial barrier and supports the monocyte transition into macrophages and finally into myeloid fibroblasts. Both myeloid and mesenchymal fibroblasts contribute to fibrosis in the aging heart via collagen synthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Myocyte-Fibroblast Signalling in Myocardium ". © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Function and expression differences between ergot and non-ergot dopamine D2 agonists on heart valve interstitial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oana, Fumiki; Onozuka, Hiroshi; Tsuchioka, Akihiro; Suzuki, Takayuki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kaidoh, Kouichi; Hoyano, Yuji; Hiratochi, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Shinji; Takehana, Yasuo; Shibata, Nobuo

    2014-03-01

    The symptoms of Parkinson's disease are alleviated by dopamine D2 agonists, which are classified as ergot dopamine D2 agonists and non-ergot D2 agonists. Among the former, pergolide has been associated with valvular heart disease, since it has both potent D2 receptor and serotonin 5-HT(2B) receptor agonistic properties. Among the latter, pramipexole has few incidences of heart valve disease onset, since it has an absence of 5-HT(2B) receptor agonism. A [3H]thymidine incorporation assay was performed to monitor function, and microarray global analysis to monitor gene expression, on porcine heart valve interstitial cells (VICs) treated with pergolide or pramipexole. The 5-HT(2B) receptor was abundantly expressed in porcine VICs. The 5-HT(2B) receptor agonist pergolide induced an increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation, accompanied by a decrease in 5-HT(2B) receptor mRNA expression. [3H]thymidine incorporation was blocked by lisuride, a 5-HT(2B) receptor antagonist, and also by LY-294002, a specific inhibitor of PI3K and Akt. Moreover, type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (Dio2) expression in porcine VICs treated with pergolide was shown, by a global analysis of mRNA, to be markedly increased compared to that induced by pramipexole. Such changes in VICs may correlate with the mechanism of heart valve disease pathogenesis. There were substantial differences (increased [3H]thymidine incorporation, and Dio2 expression) between pergolide and pramipexole, which might correlate with the mechanism of heart valve disease onset.

  12. Cardiac support device (ASD) delivers bone marrow stem cells repetitively to epicardium has promising curative effects in advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Shizhong; Naveed, Muhammad; Gang, Wang; Chen, Dingding; Wang, Zhijie; Yu, Feng; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2018-05-12

    Ventricular restraint therapy is a non-transplant surgical option for the management of advanced heart failure (HF). To augment the therapeutic applications, it is hypothesized that ASD shows remarkable capabilities not only in delivering stem cells but also in dilated ventricles. Male SD rats were divided into four groups (n = 6): normal, HF, HF + ASD, and HF + ASD-BMSCs respectively. HF was developed by left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery ligation in all groups except normal group. Post-infarcted electrocardiography (ECG) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) showed abnormal heart function in all model groups and HF + ASD-BMSCs group showed significant improvement as compared to other HF, HF + ASD groups on day 30. Masson's trichrome staining was used to study the histology, and a large blue fibrotic area has been observed in HF and HF + ASD groups and quantification of fibrosis was assessed. ASD-treated rats showed normal heart rhythm, demonstrated by smooth -ST and asymmetrical T-wave. The mechanical function of the heart such as left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and heart rate was brought to normal when treated with ASD-BMSCs. This effect was more prominent than that of ASD therapy alone. In comparison to HF group, the SD rats in HF + ASD-BMBCs group showed a significant decline in BNP levels. So ASD can deliver BMSCs to the cardiomyocytes successfully and broaden the therapeutic efficacy, in comparison to the restraint device alone. An effective methodology to manage the end-stage HF has been proved.

  13. Use of 5-Bromodeoxyuridine and irradiation for the estimation of the myoblast and myocyte content of primary rat heart cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, M.J.O.; Harary, I.

    1980-01-01

    A method for killing dividing cells was adapted for the elimination of dividing heart muscle cells (myoblasts) in cultures. We have used this method to demonstrate their presence and to estimate their number as well as the number of nondividing heart muscle cells (myocytes) in the neo-natal rat heart. Cells were cultivated in BUdR (5-bromodeoxyuridine) 10 -4 M for 3 days and then irradiated with long uv light. The selective elimination of dividing cells led to a loss of myosin Ca 2+ -activated ATPase in the cultures. The percent of ATPase left after irradiation was 32% of the control in cultures derived from 1-day postnatal rats and 48% in cultures from 4-day postnatal rats. This reflects an in vivo shift of myoblasts to myocytes in the muscle cell population as the rat ages

  14. Mast Cell Coupling to the Kallikrein–Kinin System Fuels Intracardiac Parasitism and Worsens Heart Pathology in Experimental Chagas Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa R. Nascimento

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During the course of Chagas disease, infectious forms of Trypanosoma cruzi are occasionally liberated from parasitized heart cells. Studies performed with tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCTs, Dm28c strain demonstrated that these parasites evoke neutrophil/CXCR2-dependent microvascular leakage by activating innate sentinel cells via toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. Upon plasma extravasation, proteolytically derived kinins and C5a stimulate immunoprotective Th1 responses via cross-talk between bradykinin B2 receptors (B2Rs and C5aR. Awareness that TCTs invade cardiovascular cells in vitro via interdependent activation of B2R and endothelin receptors [endothelin A receptor (ETAR/endothelin B receptor (ETBR] led us to hypothesize that T. cruzi might reciprocally benefit from the formation of infection-associated edema via activation of kallikrein–kinin system (KKS. Using intravital microscopy, here we first examined the functional interplay between mast cells (MCs and the KKS by topically exposing the hamster cheek pouch (HCP tissues to dextran sulfate (DXS, a potent “contact” activator of the KKS. Surprisingly, although DXS was inert for at least 30 min, a subtle MC-driven leakage resulted in factor XII (FXII-dependent activation of the KKS, which then amplified inflammation via generation of bradykinin (BK. Guided by this mechanistic insight, we next exposed TCTs to “leaky” HCP—forged by low dose histamine application—and found that the proinflammatory phenotype of TCTs was boosted by BK generated via the MC/KKS pathway. Measurements of footpad edema in MC-deficient mice linked TCT-evoked inflammation to MC degranulation (upstream and FXII-mediated generation of BK (downstream. We then inoculated TCTs intracardiacally in mice and found a striking decrease of parasite DNA (quantitative polymerase chain reaction; 3 d.p.i. in the heart of MC-deficient mutant mice. Moreover, the intracardiac parasite load was significantly reduced in WT

  15. Changes in the expression of Th17 cell-associated cytokines in the development of rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yun; Zeng, Zhiyu; Gui, Chun; Li, Lang; Li, Wenting

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity plays a critical role in the development of rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Recent studies have linked Th17 cells to the autoimmune mechanism associated with RHD. This study aimed to investigate changes in Th17 cell-related cytokine expression in acute and chronic RHD. We established a Lewis rat model of experimental RHD, which was induced by inactivated Group A streptococci and complete Freund's adjuvant. After 7- and 24-week intervention treatments, we measured serum levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17) and IL-6, key cytokines associated with Th17 cells, using a Luminex liquichip method, and levels of IL-17 and IL-6 in heart tissues using immunohistochemical assays. Moreover, expression levels of IL-17, IL-21, IL-6, and IL-23 in mitral valve tissues of human RHD patients were also measured using immunohistochemistry. Compared with the normal control group, serum IL-17 and IL-6 concentrations were significantly increased, and the expression levels of IL-17 and IL-6 in the mitral valve were also significantly increased in 7- or 24-week RHD rats (P<.017). Compared with the control group, expression of IL-17, IL-21, IL-6, and IL-23 in mitral valve tissues was significantly increased in RHD patients (P<.05). Our study suggested that the increased expression of Th17 cell-associated cytokines might play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of RHD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enlarged Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rheumatic fever, a heart defect, infections (infectious endocarditis), connective tissue disorders, certain medications or radiation treatments for cancer, your heart may enlarge. Disease of the heart ...

  17. Alcohol impairs long-term depression at the cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Belmeguenai (Amor); P. Botta (Paolo); J.T. Weber (John); M. Carta (Mario); M.M. de Ruiter (Martijn); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); C.F. Valenzuela (Fernando); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcute alcohol consumption causes deficits in motor coordination and gait, suggesting an involvement of cerebellar circuits, which play a role in the fine adjustment of movements and in motor learning. It has previously been shown that ethanol modulates inhibitory transmission in the

  18. Impact of Afferent Inputs on Purkinje Cell Spiking Patterns and Motor Coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Badura (Aleksandra)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe brain is what makes us human. Feelings, memories, complex social interactions, language and movement – all of it originates in the brain. On average, the human brain contains approximately 50–100 billion neurons that communicate with each other through the vast network of 100 –

  19. Fibroblast Growth Factor-9 Activates c-Kit Progenitor Cells and Enhances Angiogenesis in the Infarcted Diabetic Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinender Singla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that fibroblast growth factor-9 (FGF-9 would enhance angiogenesis via activating c-kit positive stem cells in the infarcted nondiabetic and diabetic heart. In brief, animals were divided into three groups: Sham, MI, and MI+FGF-9. Two weeks following MI or sham surgery, our data suggest that treatment with FGF-9 significantly diminished vascular apoptosis compared to the MI group in both C57BL/6 and db/db mice (p<0.05. Additionally, the number of c-kit+ve/SM α-actin+ve cells and c-kit+ve/CD31+ve cells were greatly enhanced in the MI+FGF-9 groups relative to the MI suggesting FGF-9 enhances c-Kit cell activation and their differentiation into vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, respectively (p<0.05. Histology shows that the total number of vessels were quantified for all groups and our data suggest that the FGF-9 treated groups had significantly more vessels than their MI counterparts (p<0.05. Finally, echocardiographic data suggests a significant improvement in left ventricular output, as indicated by fractional shortening and ejection fraction in both nondiabetic and diabetic animals treated with FGF-9 (p<0.05. Overall, our data suggests FGF-9 has the potential to attenuate vascular cell apoptosis, activate c-Kit progenitor cells, and enhance angiogenesis and neovascularization in C57BL/6 and db/db mice leading to improved cardiac function.

  20. The use of technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime labelled white blood cells to detect subclinical inflammation of the heart after cardiopulmonary bypass in children with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao Chiahung; Wang Yenliang; Wang Shyhjen; Hsieh Kaisheng

    1992-01-01

    Ten children (6 boys and 4 girls, aged 1-9 years old) underwent operations with a cardiopulmonary bypass, and the technetium-99m hexamehtylpropylene amine oxine ( 99m Tc-HMPAO) labelled white blood cell (WBC) heart scans were used to detect postoperative leukocyte infiltration in the hearts. The results showed that 80% (8/10) of the cases had subclinical inflammation in the hearts (grading of WBC scans ≥score 2), and a positive correlation (R=0.77) was noted between the severity of the inflammation (grading of the WBC scans) and the duration of the cardiopulmonary bypass in the operations. Another control group (9 boys and 2 girls, aged 2-13 years old) underwent operations without a cardiopulmonary bypass, and subclinical inflammation of hearts was demonstrated in only 1 case (9%) by the 99m Tc-HMPAO labelled WBC scans (grading of WBC scans 99m Tc-HMPAO labelled WBC heart scans may provide non-invasive and directly discernible evidence of subclinical inflammation in the heart due to a transient ischaemic state during a cardiopulmonary bypass, even if the clinical symptoms and signs of carditis are not apparent. (orig.)

  1. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga Yuniadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4±7.40 yo preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5±4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87±0.41, 0.63±0.66, 99.00±2.60, and 3.22±3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22±5.68 versus 26.8±7.93, p<0.001 during short and long term observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity.

  2. Bone marrow mononuclear cell implantation in myocardial laser channels in the ischemic heart disease surgery. Long-term results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyavskiy, Alexander; Fomichev, Alexey; Minin, Stanislav; Nikitin, Nikita

    2017-10-01

    Background: The problem of incomplete myocardial revascularization for diffuse and distal lesions of the myocardium is still relevant. We assessed the clinical and instrumental long-term results of autologous bone marrow cell (BMC) implantation in laser channels in ischemic heart disease with diffuse and distal coronary disease. 35 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients with diffuse and distal coronary disease during coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) underwent BMC implantation in laser channels. The control group consisted of 29 patients. All patients in this group underwent only CABG. Clinical and instrumental assessment of the method's effect was carried out at two weeks, six months, and six years after surgery. Indirect revascularization showed more significant decreasing of the functional class (FC) New York Heart Association (NYHA), myocardial perfusion and contractility improvement. Autologous BMC implantation in laser channels is an effective method of CHD surgical treatment if it is impossible to perform direct myocardial revascularization. The indirect revascularization effect is formed in the first six months after surgery and remains at the same level for six years.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Hypomethylation Is a Biomarker Associated with Induced Senescence in Human Fetal Heart Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehai Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fetal heart can regenerate to restore its normal anatomy and function in response to injury, but this regenerative capacity is lost within the first week of postnatal life. Although the specific molecular mechanisms remain to be defined, it is presumed that aging of cardiac stem or progenitor cells may contribute to the loss of regenerative potential. Methods. To study this aging-related dysfunction, we cultured mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from human fetal heart tissues. Senescence was induced by exposing cells to chronic oxidative stress/low serum. Mitochondrial DNA methylation was examined during the period of senescence. Results. Senescent MSCs exhibited flattened and enlarged morphology and were positive for the senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal. By scanning the entire mitochondrial genome, we found that four CpG islands were hypomethylated in close association with senescence in MSCs. The mitochondrial COX1 gene, which encodes the main subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex and contains the differentially methylated CpG island 4, was upregulated in MSCs in parallel with the onset of senescence. Knockdown of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3B also upregulated COX1 expression and induced cellular senescence in MSCs. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that mitochondrial CpG hypomethylation may serve as a critical biomarker associated with cellular senescence induced by chronic oxidative stress.

  4. Progressive rise in red cell distribution width is associated with disease progression in ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauthen, Clay A; Tong, Wilson; Jain, Anil; Tang, W H Wilson

    2012-02-01

    Single red cell distribution width (RDW) assessment is a consistent prognostic marker of poor outcomes in heart failure as well as in other patient cohorts. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of sequential RDW assessment in ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure. We reviewed 6,159 consecutive ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure between 2001-2006 and examined changes in RDW values from baseline to 1-year follow-up. Clinical, demographic, laboratory, and ICD-9 coding data were extracted from electronic health records, and all-cause mortality was followed over a mean follow-up of 4.4 ± 2.4 years. In this study cohort, median baseline RDW was 14.9%. RDW >16% at baseline (18.5% of cohort) was associated with a higher mortality rates than RDW ≤16%. For each +1% increment of baseline RDW, the risk ratio for all-cause mortality was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15-1.19; P < .0001). At 12-month follow-up (n = 1,601), a large majority of subjects (68% in first tertile, 56% in second tertile of baseline RDW) showed rising RDW and correspondingly higher risk for all-cause mortality (risk ratio for +1% increase in changes in RDW was 1.08 (95% CI 1.03-1.13; P = .001). This effect was independent of anemia status or other baseline cardiac or renal indices, and particularly strong in those with lower baseline RDW. In our ambulatory cohort of patients with chronic heart failure, baseline and serial increases in RDW were associated with poor long-term outcomes independently from standard cardiac, hematologic, and renal indices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo cell tracking imaging of hexadecyl-4-[{sup 123,} {sup 124}I]iodobenzoate labeled adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) in rat heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Kyo Chul [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Monitoring of transplanted stem cells for cardiac repair is important part in regenerative medicine. Direct cell labeling techniques using [{sup 18}F]FDG, [{sup 64}Cu]PTSM and [{sup 99m}Tc]-HMPAO have been developed for in vivo imaging. Especially, {sup 18}F-labeled derivates have been widely used for direct labeling agent. But the {sup 18}F has short half life (T{sub 1/2}={approx}2 h), thus this imaging agent has limitation of in vivo imaging. We used {sup 123}I or {sup 124}I which has relative long half life, to track the transplanted stem cells for a long-term imaging. This study is aimed to track the transplanted adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) in rat heart using hexadecyl-4-[{sup 123,} {sup 124}I]iodobenzoate ([{sup 123,} {sup 124}I]HIB) mediated direct labeling method in vivo

  6. Engineered Heart Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, B; Zimmermann, W-H

    2017-08-01

    There is a pressing need for the development of advanced heart failure therapeutics. Current state-of-the-art is protection from neurohumoral overstimulation, which fails to address the underlying cause of heart failure, namely loss of cardiomyocytes. Implantation of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes via tissue-engineered myocardium is being advanced to realize the remuscularization of the failing heart. Here, we discuss pharmacological challenges pertaining to the clinical translation of tissue-engineered heart repair with a focus on engineered heart muscle (EHM). © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  7. Effects of autologous bone marrow stem cell transplantation on beta-adrenoceptor density and electrical activation pattern in a rabbit model of non-ischemic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullmann Cris

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since only little is known on stem cell therapy in non-ischemic heart failure we wanted to know whether a long-term improvement of cardiac function in non-ischemic heart failure can be achieved by stem cell transplantation. Methods White male New Zealand rabbits were treated with doxorubicine (3 mg/kg/week; 6 weeks to induce dilative non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. Thereafter, we obtained autologous bone marrow stem cells (BMSC and injected 1.5–2.0 Mio cells in 1 ml medium by infiltrating the myocardium via a left anterolateral thoracotomy in comparison to sham-operated rabbits. 4 weeks later intracardiac contractility was determined in-vivo using a Millar catheter. Thereafter, the heart was excised and processed for radioligand binding assays to detect β1- and β2-adrenoceptor density. In addition, catecholamine plasma levels were determined via HPLC. In a subgroup we investigated cardiac electrophysiology by use of 256 channel mapping. Results In doxorubicine-treated animals β-adrenoceptor density was significantly down-regulated in left ventricle and septum, but not in right ventricle, thereby indicating a typical left ventricular heart failure. Sham-operated rabbits exhibited the same down-regulation. In contrast, BMSC transplantation led to significantly less β-adrenoceptor down-regulation in septum and left ventricle. Cardiac contractility was significantly decreased in heart failure and sham-operated rabbits, but was significantly higher in BMSC-transplanted hearts. Norepinephrine and epinephrine plasma levels were enhanced in heart failure and sham-operated animals, while these were not different from normal in BMSC-transplanted animals. Electrophysiological mapping revealed unaltered electrophysiology and did not show signs of arrhythmogeneity. Conclusion BMSC transplantation improves sympathoadrenal dysregualtion in non-ischemic heart failure.

  8. Rationale and Design of the First Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial with Allogeneic Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal Cell Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Ida

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemic heart failure (IHF) has a poor prognosis in spite of optimal therapy. We have established a new allogeneic Cardiology Stem Cell Centre adipose-derived stromal cell (CSCC_ASC) product from healthy donors. It is produced without animal products, in closed bioreactor systems...

  9. A simulation of T-wave alternans vectocardiographic representation performed by changing the ventricular heart cells action potential duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janusek, D; Kania, M; Zaczek, R; Zavala-Fernandez, H; Maniewski, R

    2014-04-01

    The presence of T wave alternans (TWA) in the surface ECG signals has been recognized as a marker of electrical instability, and is hypothesized to be related to patients at increased risk for ventricular arrhythmias. In this paper we present a TWA simulation study. The TWA phenomenon was simulated by changing the duration of the ventricular heart cells action potential. The magnitude was calculated in the surface ECG with the use of the time domain method. The spatially concordant TWA, where during one heart beat all ventricular cells display a short-duration action potential and during the next beat they exhibit a long-duration action potential, as well as the discordant TWA, where at least one region is out of phase, was simulated. The vectocardiographic representation was employed. The obtained results showed a high level of T-loop pattern and location disturbances connected to the discordant TWA simulation in contrast to the concordant one. This result may be explained by the spatial heterogeneity of the ventricular repolarization process, which could be higher for the discordant TWA than for the concordant TWA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A quantitative method for measurement of lysosomal acid phosphatase latency in cultured rat heart cells with 210Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, T.W.; Wenzel, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the latency of lysomal acid phosphatase in cultured rat heart endotheloid cells. 210 Pb was added to a medium used to demonstrate acid phosphatase activity by the Gomori lead method, and the amount of lead deposited was measured with a liquid scintillation counter. Deposition rates were measured after enzyme activation pretreatments with acetate buffer (pH 5.0) at various osmolalities, and after formaldehyde fixation. Formaldehyde, alloxan, or fluoride in the Gomori medium were evaluated for their differential effects on lysosomal and non-lysosomal acid phosphatase The method was found to provide a sensitive, rapid and quantitative evaluation of acid phosphatase latency and should be useful for studying the integrity of lysosomes within cells. (author)

  11. Effect of age on heart rate, blood lactate concentration, packed cell volume and hemoglobin to exercise in Jeju crossbreed horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ok-Deuk Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to analyze the on heart rate, blood lactate concentration, packed cell volume (PCV and hemoglobin (Hb response after conducting exercise in endurance horses. Methods A total of 20 healthy 3–9-years-old Jeju crossbreed mares (5.95 ± 2.24 year of age and 312.65 ± 13.59 kg of weight currently participating the endurance competition were used. The field tests selected for the experiment was gallop (approximately 8.3 m/s along the selected 2.5 km course (a natural forest trail, not artificial road; a closed loop course. The horses were divided into three groups according to their age; 3–4 years of age (G1, 3.29 ± 0.49 year, 6–7 years of age (G2, 6.42 ± 0.53, and 8–9 years of age (G3, 8.50 ± 0.55. The measurements times for the heart rate, blood lactate concentration, PCV, and Hb analysis were conducted before exercise (T0, shortly after exercise (T1, 15 min after exercise (T2, and 30 min after exercise (T3, respectively. Data was analyzed using an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA for repeated measures with times and groups. Results The results of the comparison depending on the passage of rest time after exercise suggest that the heart rate and blood lactate concentration of three groups at T2 significantly decreased compared to T1 (p < 0.001. PCV of the G2 and G3 groups were significantly decreased at T2 compared to T1 (p < 0.01. Hb values at G2 (p < 0.01 and G3 (p < 0.001 groups were significantly decreased at T2 as compared to T1. However, heart rate, blood lactate concentration, PCV and Hb level at T1 showed no difference in the comparison of horses from different age groups with the exception of G3 group in terms of heart rate. Conclusion The physiologic and hematological responses of horses during recovery time after 2,500 m exercise with gallop were no significant difference among the groups. These data are useful as a response evaluation method for

  12. Real-time relationship between PKA biochemical signal network dynamics and increased action potential firing rate in heart pacemaker cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Yael; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Yang, Dongmei; Ziman, Bruce D.; Lyashkov, Alexey E.; Levchenko, Andre; Zhang, Jin; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    cAMP-PKA protein kinase is a key nodal signaling pathway that regulates a wide range of heart pacemaker cell functions. These functions are predicted to be involved in regulation of spontaneous action potential (AP) generation of these cells. Here we investigate if the kinetics and stoichiometry of increase in PKA activity match the increase in AP firing rate in response to β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) stimulation or phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition, that alter the AP firing rate of heart sinoatrial pacemaker cells. In cultured adult rabbit pacemaker cells infected with an adenovirous expressing the FRET sensor AKAR3, the EC50 in response to graded increases in the intensity of β-AR stimulation (by Isoproterenol) the magnitude of the increases in PKA activity and the spontaneous AP firing rate were similar (0.4±0.1nM vs. 0.6±0.15nM, respectively). Moreover, the kinetics (t1/2) of the increases in PKA activity and spontaneous AP firing rate in response to β-AR stimulation or PDE inhibition were tightly linked. We characterized the system rate-limiting biochemical reactions by integrating these experimentally derived data into mechanistic-computational model. Model simulations predicted that phospholamban phosphorylation is a potent target of the increase in PKA activity that links to increase in spontaneous AP firing rate. In summary, the kinetics and stoichiometry of increases in PKA activity in response to a physiological (β-AR stimulation) or pharmacological (PDE inhibitor) stimuli match those of changes in the AP firing rate. Thus Ca2+-cAMP/PKA-dependent phosphorylation limits the rate and magnitude of increase in spontaneous AP firing rate. PMID:26241846

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells from sternum: the type of heart disease, ischemic or valvular, does not influence the cell culture establishment and growth kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Lucinara Dadda; Casali, Karina Rabello; Ghem, Carine; da Silva, Melissa Kristocheck; Sausen, Grasiele; Palma, Patrícia Bonini; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Kalil, Renato A K; Schaan, Beatriz D; Nardi, Nance Beyer; Markoski, Melissa Medeiros

    2017-07-25

    In an attempt to increase the therapeutic potential for myocardial regeneration, there is a quest for new cell sources and types for cell therapy protocols. The pathophysiology of heart diseases may affect cellular characteristics and therapeutic results. To study the proliferative and differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), isolated from bone marrow (BM) of sternum, we made a comparative analysis between samples of patients with ischemic (IHD) or non-ischemic valvular (VHD) heart diseases. We included patients with IHD (n = 42) or VHD (n = 20), with average age of 60 years and no differences in cardiovascular risk factors. BM samples were collected (16.4 ± 6 mL) and submitted to centrifugation with Ficoll-Paque, yielding 4.5 ± 1.5 × 10 7  cells/mL. Morphology, immunophenotype and differentiation ability had proven that the cultivated sternal BM cells had MSC features. The colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) frequency was similar between groups (p = 0.510), but VHD samples showed positive correlation to plated cells vs. CFU-F number (r = 0.499, p = 0.049). The MSC culture was established in 29% of collected samples, achieved passage 9, without significant difference in expansion kinetics between groups (p > 0.05). Dyslipidemia and the use of statins was associated with culture establishment for IHD patients (p = 0.049 and p = 0.006, respectively). Together, these results show that the sternum bone can be used as a source for MSC isolation, and that ischemic or valvular diseases do not influence the cellular yield, culture establishment or in vitro growth kinetics.

  14. Encapsulated Glucagon-Like Peptide-1-Producing Mesenchymal Stem Cells Have a Beneficial Effect on Failing Pig Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Elizabeth J.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Malik, Nadim; Kassem, Moustapha; Lewis, Andrew L.; Wallrapp, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is an exciting and emerging treatment option to promote post-myocardial infarction (post-MI) healing; however, cell retention and efficacy in the heart remain problematic. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone with cardioprotective properties but a short half-life in vivo. The effects of prolonged GLP-1 delivery from stromal cells post-MI were evaluated in a porcine model. Human mesenchymal stem cells immortalized and engineered to produce a GLP-1 fusion protein were encapsulated in alginate (bead-GLP-1 MSC) and delivered to coronary artery branches. Control groups were cell-free beads and beads containing unmodified MSCs (bead-MSC), n = 4–5 per group. Echocardiography confirmed left ventricular (LV) dysfunction at time of delivery in all groups. Four weeks after intervention, only the bead-GLP-1 MSC group demonstrated LV function improvement toward baseline and showed decreased infarction area compared with controls. Histological analysis showed reduced inflammation and a trend toward reduced apoptosis in the infarct zone. Increased collagen but fewer myofibroblasts were observed in infarcts of the bead-GLP-1 MSC and bead-MSC groups, and significantly more vessels per mm2 were noted in the infarct of the bead-GLP-1 MSC group. No differences were observed in myocyte cross-sectional area between groups. Post-MI delivery of GLP-1 encapsulated genetically modified MSCs provided a prolonged supply of GLP-1 and paracrine stem cell factors, which improved LV function and reduced epicardial infarct size. This was associated with increased angiogenesis and an altered remodeling response. Combined benefits of paracrine stem cell factors and GLP-1 were superior to those of stem cells alone. These results suggest that encapsulated genetically modified MSCs would be beneficial for recovery following MI. PMID:23197668

  15. Cell therapy for heart failure: a comprehensive overview of experimental and clinical studies, current challenges, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanganalmath, Santosh K; Bolli, Roberto

    2013-08-30

    Despite significant therapeutic advances, the prognosis of patients with heart failure (HF) remains poor, and current therapeutic approaches are palliative in the sense that they do not address the underlying problem of the loss of cardiac tissue. Stem cell-based therapies have the potential to fundamentally transform the treatment of HF by achieving what would have been unthinkable only a few years ago-myocardial regeneration. For the first time since cardiac transplantation, a therapy is being developed to eliminate the underlying cause of HF, not just to achieve damage control. Since the initial report of cell therapy (skeletal myoblasts) in HF in 1998, research has proceeded at lightning speed, and numerous preclinical and clinical studies have been performed that support the ability of various stem cell populations to improve cardiac function and reduce infarct size in both ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Nevertheless, we are still at the dawn of this therapeutic revolution. Many important issues (eg, mechanism(s) of action of stem cells, long-term engraftment, optimal cell type(s), and dose, route, and frequency of cell administration) remain to be resolved, and no cell therapy has been conclusively shown to be effective. The purpose of this article is to critically review the large body of work performed with respect to the use of stem/progenitor cells in HF, both at the experimental and clinical levels, and to discuss current controversies, unresolved issues, challenges, and future directions. The review focuses specifically on chronic HF; other settings (eg, acute myocardial infarction, refractory angina) are not discussed.

  16. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  17. Action of ouabain and an amino-cardenolide on Na+-pump function and contractility of isolated canine heart cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porterfield, L.M.; Songu-Mize, E.; Chryssanthis, T.; Caldwell, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Viable, rod-shaped, Ca ++ -tolerant cells were isolated from the cardiac ventricle of adult mongrel dogs, a digitalis-sensitive species. These cells do not contract spontaneously but contractions were driven by electrical field stimulation. Changes in contractile amplitude were assessed by computer-assisted analysis of recorded phase contrast images. Addition of a polar aminocardenolide (AC), ASI-222, produced a dose-related increase in contractility with a concentration producing a 50% maximal response (RC 50 ) of 4 x 10 -8 M. For ouabain (OB) the RC 50 was 7 x 10 -7 M. Cellular Na + -pump (NaP) function was determined as digitalis-sensitive 86 Rb + -uptake. Addition of AC and OB to these cells produced a dose-related decrease in 86 Rb + -uptake; concentrations which produced a 50% inhibition (IC 50 ) of NaP function were of 6 x 10 -8 M and 1.2 x 10 -6 M for AC and OB, respectively. Their data indicates that in isolated dog heart cells AC is both a more potent inotropic agent and an inhibitor of NaP function by 15-20 fold than OB. The RC 50 and IC 50 for these processes correlate for each glycoside

  18. MicroRNA-150 protects the mouse heart from ischaemic injury by regulating cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yaoping; Wang, Yongchao; Park, Kyoung-mi; Hu, Qiuping; Teoh, Jian-peng; Broskova, Zuzana; Ranganathan, Punithavathi; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Li, Jie; Su, Huabo; Tang, Yaoliang; Ramesh, Ganesan; Kim, Il-man

    2015-01-01

    Aims Cardiac injury is accompanied by dynamic changes in the expression of microRNAs (miRs). For example, miR-150 is down-regulated in patients with acute myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, dilated and ischaemic cardiomyopathy as well as in various mouse heart failure (HF) models. Circulating miR-150 has been recently proposed as a better biomarker of HF than traditional clinical markers such as brain natriuretic peptide. We recently showed using the β-arrestin-biased β-blocker, carvedilol that β-arrestin1-biased β1-adrenergic receptor cardioprotective signalling stimulates the processing of miR-150 in the heart. However, the potential role of miR-150 in ischaemic injury and HF is unknown. Methods and results Here, we show that genetic deletion of miR-150 in mice causes abnormalities in cardiac structural and functional remodelling after MI. The cardioprotective roles of miR-150 during ischaemic injury were in part attributed to direct repression of the pro-apoptotic genes egr2 (zinc-binding transcription factor induced by ischaemia) and p2x7r (pro-inflammatory ATP receptor) in cardiomyocytes. Conclusion These findings reveal a pivotal role for miR-150 as a regulator of cardiomyocyte survival during cardiac injury. PMID:25824147

  19. Atrial granular cells of the snail Achatina fulica release proteins into hemolymph after stimulation of the heart nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabelnikov, Sergej V; Bystrova, Olga A; Ivanov, Vadim A; Margulis, Boris A; Martynova, Marina

    2009-10-01

    The atrium of the gastropod mollusc Achatina fulica receives rich innervation and contains numerous granular cells (GCs). We studied the atrial innervation and discovered that axon profiles typical in appearance of peptidergic neurons form close unspecialized membrane contacts with GCs. Then, we investigated, at both morphological and biochemical levels, the effect of electrical stimulation of the heart nerve on GCs of Achatina heart perfused in situ. The ultrastructural study demonstrated changes in granule morphology consistent with secretion. These events included alteration of granule content, intracellular granule fusion and formation of complex degranulation channels, within which the granule matrix solubilized. It was shown that electrical stimulation resulted in a significant increase of the total protein concentration in the perfusate. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE analysis of the perfusate revealed three new proteins with molecular masses of 16, 22, and 57 kDa. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies against the 16 kDa protein were obtained; the whole-mount immunofluorescence technique revealed the presence of this protein in the granules of atrial GCs. In GCs of the stimulated atrium, a progressive loss of their granular content was observed. The results suggest that the central nervous system can modulate the secretory activity of the atrial GCs through non-synaptic pathways.

  20. Infrared fluorescent protein 1.4 genetic labeling tracks engrafted cardiac progenitor cells in mouse ischemic hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Chen

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has a potential for regenerating damaged myocardium. However, a key obstacle to cell therapy's success is the loss of engrafted cells due to apoptosis or necrosis in the ischemic myocardium. While many strategies have been developed to improve engrafted cell survival, tools to evaluate cell efficacy within the body are limited. Traditional genetic labeling tools, such as GFP-like fluorescent proteins (eGFP, DsRed, mCherry, have limited penetration depths in vivo due to tissue scattering and absorption. To circumvent these limitations, a near-infrared fluorescent mutant of the DrBphP bacteriophytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans, IFP1.4, was developed for in vivo imaging, but it has yet to be used for in vivo stem/progenitor cell tracking. In this study, we incorporated IFP1.4 into mouse cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs by a lentiviral vector. Live IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were imaged by their near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF using an Odyssey scanner following overnight incubation with biliverdin. A significant linear correlation was observed between the amount of cells and NIRF signal intensity in in vitro studies. Lentiviral mediated IFP1.4 gene labeling is stable, and does not impact the apoptosis and cardiac differentiation of CPC. To assess efficacy of our model for engrafted cells in vivo, IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were intramyocardially injected into infarcted hearts. NIRF signals were collected at 1-day, 7-days, and 14-days post-injection using the Kodak in vivo multispectral imaging system. Strong NIRF signals from engrafted cells were imaged 1 day after injection. At 1 week after injection, 70% of the NIRF signal was lost when compared to the intensity of the day 1 signal. The data collected 2 weeks following transplantation showed an 88% decrease when compared to day 1. Our studies have shown that IFP1.4 gene labeling can be used to track the viability of transplanted cells in vivo.

  1. Young at Heart: Pioneering Approaches to Model Nonischaemic Cardiomyopathy with Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife Gowran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A mere 9 years have passed since the revolutionary report describing the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human fibroblasts and the first in-patient translational use of cells obtained from these stem cells has already been achieved. From the perspectives of clinicians and researchers alike, the promise of induced pluripotent stem cells is alluring if somewhat beguiling. It is now evident that this technology is nascent and many areas for refinement have been identified and need to be considered before induced pluripotent stem cells can be routinely used to stratify, treat and cure patients, and to faithfully model diseases for drug screening purposes. This review specifically addresses the pioneering approaches to improve induced pluripotent stem cell based models of nonischaemic cardiomyopathy.

  2. Cell tracking using iron oxide fails to distinguish dead from living transplanted cells in the infarcted heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, E M; Hogers, B; van der Graaf, L M; Gittenberger-de Groot, A C; Poelmann, R E; van der Weerd, L

    2010-03-01

    Recently, debate has arisen about the usefulness of cell tracking using iron oxide-labeled cells. Two important issues in determining the usefulness of cell tracking with MRI are generally overlooked; first, the effect of graft rejection in immunocompetent models, and second, the necessity for careful histological confirmation of the fate of the labeled cells in the presence of iron oxide. Therefore, both iron oxide-labeled living as well as dead epicardium-derived cells (EPDCs) were investigated in ischemic myocardium of immunodeficient non-obese diabetic (NOD)/acid: non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/scid) mice with 9.4T MRI until 6 weeks after surgery, at which time immunohistochemical analysis was performed. In both groups, voids on MRI scans were observed that did not change in number, size, or localization over time. Based on MRI, no distinction could be made between living and dead injected cells. Prussian blue staining confirmed that the hypointense spots on MRI corresponded to iron-loaded cells. However, in the dead-EPDC recipients, all iron-positive cells appeared to be macrophages, while the living-EPDC recipients also contained engrafted iron-loaded EPDCs. Iron labeling is inadequate for determining the fate of transplanted cells in the immunodeficient host, since dead cells produce an MRI signal indistinguishable from incorporated living cells. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Heart failure-induced changes of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and cell excitability in rat cardiac postganglionic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Huiyin; Liu, Jinxu; Zhang, Dongze; Zheng, Hong; Patel, Kaushik P; Cornish, Kurtis G; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Muelleman, Robert L; Li, Yu-Long

    2014-01-15

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is characterized by decreased cardiac parasympathetic and increased cardiac sympathetic nerve activity. This autonomic imbalance increases the risk of arrhythmias and sudden death in patients with CHF. We hypothesized that the molecular and cellular alterations of cardiac postganglionic parasympathetic (CPP) neurons located in the intracardiac ganglia and sympathetic (CPS) neurons located in the stellate ganglia (SG) possibly link to the cardiac autonomic imbalance in CHF. Rat CHF was induced by left coronary artery ligation. Single-cell real-time PCR and immunofluorescent data showed that L (Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)1.3), P/Q (Ca(v)2.1), N (Ca(v)2.2), and R (Ca(v)2.3) types of Ca2+ channels were expressed in CPP and CPS neurons, but CHF decreased the mRNA and protein expression of only the N-type Ca2+ channels in CPP neurons, and it did not affect mRNA and protein expression of all Ca2+ channel subtypes in the CPS neurons. Patch-clamp recording confirmed that CHF reduced N-type Ca2+ currents and cell excitability in the CPP neurons and enhanced N-type Ca2+ currents and cell excitability in the CPS neurons. N-type Ca2+ channel blocker (1 μM ω-conotoxin GVIA) lowered Ca2+ currents and cell excitability in the CPP and CPS neurons from sham-operated and CHF rats. These results suggest that CHF reduces the N-type Ca2+ channel currents and cell excitability in the CPP neurons and enhances the N-type Ca2+ currents and cell excitability in the CPS neurons, which may contribute to the cardiac autonomic imbalance in CHF.

  4. Myosin binding protein-C activates thin filaments and inhibits thick filaments in heart muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Yan, Ziqian; Gautel, Mathias; Sun, Yin-Biao; Irving, Malcolm

    2014-12-30

    Myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C) is a key regulatory protein in heart muscle, and mutations in the MYBPC3 gene are frequently associated with cardiomyopathy. However, the mechanism of action of MyBP-C remains poorly understood, and both activating and inhibitory effects of MyBP-C on contractility have been reported. To clarify the function of the regulatory N-terminal domains of MyBP-C, we determined their effects on the structure of thick (myosin-containing) and thin (actin-containing) filaments in intact sarcomeres of heart muscle. We used fluorescent probes on troponin C in the thin filaments and on myosin regulatory light chain in the thick filaments to monitor structural changes associated with activation of demembranated trabeculae from rat ventricle by the C1mC2 region of rat MyBP-C. C1mC2 induced larger structural changes in thin filaments than calcium activation, and these were still present when active force was blocked with blebbistatin, showing that C1mC2 directly activates the thin filaments. In contrast, structural changes in thick filaments induced by C1mC2 were smaller than those associated with calcium activation and were abolished or reversed by blebbistatin. Low concentrations of C1mC2 did not affect resting force but increased calcium sensitivity and reduced cooperativity of force and structural changes in both thin and thick filaments. These results show that the N-terminal region of MyBP-C stabilizes the ON state of thin filaments and the OFF state of thick filaments and lead to a novel hypothesis for the physiological role of MyBP-C in the regulation of cardiac contractility.

  5. 'Hearts and bones': the ups and downs of 'plasticity' in stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Paola; Barrandon, Yann; Cossu, Giulio

    2012-05-01

    More than a decade ago, 'plasticity' suddenly became a 'fashionable' topic with overemphasized implications for regenerative medicine. The concept of 'plasticity' is supported by old transplantation work, at least for embryonic cells, and metaplasia is a classic example of plasticity observed in patients. Nevertheless, the publication of a series of papers showing rare conversion of a given cell type into another unrelated cell raised the possibility of using any unaffected tissue to create at will new cells to replace a different failing tissue or organ. This resulted in disingenuous interpretations and a reason not to fund anymore research on embryonic stem cells (ESc). Moreover, many papers on plasticity were difficult to reproduce and thus questioned; raising issues about plasticity as a technical artefact or a consequence of rare spontaneous cells fusion. More recently, reprogramming adult differentiated cells to a pluripotent state (iPS) became possible, and later, one type of differentiated cell could be directly reprogrammed into another (e.g. fibroblasts into neurons) without reverting to pluripotency. Although the latter results from different and more robust experimental protocols, these phenomena also exemplify 'plasticity'. In this review, we want to place 'plasticity' in a historical perspective still taking into account ethical and political implications. Copyright © 2012 EMBO Molecular Medicine.

  6. Optimization of delivery strategies for cardiac cell therapy in ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spoel, T.I.G.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac cell therapy has been proposed as an alternative treatment option for patients after acute myocardial infarction (MI). Irrespective of the chosen regenerative strategy, it is essential to deliver sufficient number of cells to the infarcted myocardium to become effective which is important

  7. The dynamic change of endothelial cell, endothelin and 6-K-PGF1α in circulating blood of the patients with coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Zhiyun; Wang Linglin; Zou Songhai

    1995-01-01

    With the circulating endothelial cell (CEC) as an indicator of vessel endothelial cell (VEC) injury, and plasma endothelin (ET) and prostaglandin F 1α (PGI 2 ) reflecting the functional change of the VEC, a comparative study between 85 patients with coronary heart disease and 30 normal health, and also a dynamic observation of 50 patients with unstable angina pectoris and 20 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were reported. The result showed that in patients with coronary heart disease, peripheral blood circulating CEC and ET level was increased (P 2 decreased (P<0.01). All these were more significant in patients with unstable angina pectoris and myocardial infarction, and its magnitude correlated closely with the severity of the disease. All these showed that the VEC injury and the imbalance of its endothelial relaxing and contracting factors have played an important role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease

  8. An open-label dose escalation study to evaluate the safety of administration of nonviral stromal cell-derived factor-1 plasmid to treat symptomatic ischemic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Marc S; Mendelsohn, Farrell O; Schaer, Gary L; Sherman, Warren; Farr, Maryjane; Pastore, Joseph; Rouy, Didier; Clemens, Ruth; Aras, Rahul; Losordo, Douglas W

    2013-03-01

    Preclinical studies indicate that adult stem cells induce tissue repair by activating endogenous stem cells through the stromal cell-derived factor-1:chemokine receptor type 4 axis. JVS-100 is a DNA plasmid encoding human stromal cell-derived factor-1. We tested in a phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation study with 12 months of follow-up in subjects with ischemic cardiomyopathy to see if JVS-100 improves clinical parameters. Seventeen subjects with ischemic cardiomyopathy, New York Heart Association class III heart failure, with an ejection fraction ≤40% on stable medical therapy, were enrolled to receive 5, 15, or 30 mg of JVS-100 via endomyocardial injection. The primary end points for safety and efficacy were at 1 and 4 months, respectively. The primary safety end point was a major adverse cardiac event. Efficacy end points were change in quality of life, New York Heart Association class, 6-minute walk distance, single photon emission computed tomography, N-terminal pro-brain natruretic peptide, and echocardiography at 4 and 12 months. The primary safety end point was met. At 4 months, all of the cohorts demonstrated improvements in 6-minute walk distance, quality of life, and New York Heart Association class. Subjects in the 15- and 30-mg dose groups exhibited improvements in 6-minute walk distance (15 mg: median [range]: 41 minutes [3-61 minutes]; 30 mg: 31 minutes [22-74 minutes]) and quality of life (15 mg: -16 points [+1 to -32 points]; 30 mg: -24 points [+17 to -38 points]) over baseline. At 12 months, improvements in symptoms were maintained. These data highlight the importance of defining the molecular mechanisms of stem cell-based tissue repair and suggest that overexpression of stromal cell-derived factor-1 via gene therapy is a strategy for improving heart failure symptoms in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy.

  9. Histamine-2 receptor antagonist famotidine modulates cardiac stem cell characteristics in hypertensive heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherin Saheera

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardiac stem cells (CSCs play a vital role in cardiac homeostasis. A decrease in the efficiency of cardiac stem cells is speculated in various cardiac abnormalities. The maintenance of a healthy stem cell population is essential for the prevention of adverse cardiac remodeling leading to cardiac failure. Famotidine, a histamine-2 receptor antagonist, is currently used to treat ulcers of the stomach and intestines. In repurposing the use of the drug, reduction of cardiac hypertrophy and improvement in cardiac function of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR was reported by our group. Given that stem cells are affected in cardiac pathologies, the effect of histamine-2 receptor antagonism on CSC characteristics was investigated. Methods To examine whether famotidine has a positive effect on CSCs, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR treated with the drug were sacrificed; and CSCs isolated from atrial appendages was evaluated. Six-month-old male SHRs were treated with famotidine (30 mg/kg/day for two months. The effect of famotidine treatment on migration, proliferation and survival of CSCs was compared with untreated SHRs and normotensive Wistar rats. Results Functional efficiency of CSCs from SHR was compromised relative to that in Wistar rat. Famotidine increased the migration and proliferation potential, along with retention of stemness of CSCs in treated SHRs. Cellular senescence and oxidative stress were also reduced. The expression of H2R was unaffected by the treatment. Discussion As anticipated, CSCs from SHRs were functionally impaired. Stem cell attributes of famotidine-treated SHRs was comparable to that of Wistar rats. Therefore, in addition to being cardioprotective, the histamine 2 receptor antagonist modulated cardiac stem cells characteristics. Restoration of stem cell efficiency by famotidine is possibly mediated by reduction of oxidative stress as the expression of H2R was unaffected by the treatment. Maintenance of

  10. Neovascularization Potential of Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells From Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Failure Is Preserved

    OpenAIRE

    Dauwe, Dieter; Pelacho, Beatriz; Wibowo, Arief; Walravens, Ann-Sophie; Verdonck, Kristoff; Gillijns, Hilde; Caluwe, Ellen; Pokreisz, Peter; van Gastel, Nick; Carmeliet, Geert; Depypere, Maarten; Maes, Frederik; Vanden Driessche, Nina; Droogne, Walter; Van Cleemput, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background Blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) mediate therapeutic neovascularization in experimental models, but outgrowth characteristics and functionality of BOECs from patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICMP) are unknown. We compared outgrowth efficiency and in?vitro and in?vivo functionality of BOECs derived from ICMP with BOECs from age?matched (ACON) and healthy young (CON) controls. Methods and Results We isolated 3.6?0.6 BOEC colonies/100?106 mononuclear cells (MNCs) from 6...

  11. A Cellular Automata-based Model for Simulating Restitution Property in a Single Heart Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzpoushan, Seyed Hojjat; Pourhasanzade, Fateme

    2011-01-01

    Ventricular fibrillation is the cause of the most sudden mortalities. Restitution is one of the specific properties of ventricular cell. The recent findings have clearly proved the correlation between the slope of restitution curve with ventricular fibrillation. This; therefore, mandates the modeling of cellular restitution to gain high importance. A cellular automaton is a powerful tool for simulating complex phenomena in a simple language. A cellular automaton is a lattice of cells where the behavior of each cell is determined by the behavior of its neighboring cells as well as the automata rule. In this paper, a simple model is depicted for the simulation of the property of restitution in a single cardiac cell using cellular automata. At first, two state variables; action potential and recovery are introduced in the automata model. In second, automata rule is determined and then recovery variable is defined in such a way so that the restitution is developed. In order to evaluate the proposed model, the generated restitution curve in our study is compared with the restitution curves from the experimental findings of valid sources. Our findings indicate that the presented model is not only capable of simulating restitution in cardiac cell, but also possesses the capability of regulating the restitution curve.

  12. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  13. Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  14. Multimodal Imaging for In Vivo Evaluation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Murine Model of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Sebastian V; Meier, Martin; Zweigerdt, Robert; Eckardt, Dominik; Rathert, Christian; Schecker, Natalie; Schmitto, Jan D; Rojas-Hernandez, Sara; Martin, Ulrich; Kutschka, Ingo; Haverich, Axel; Martens, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Myocardial stem cell therapy in heart failure is strongly dependent on successful cellular transfer, engraftment, and survival. Moreover, massive cell loss directly after intramyocardial injection is commonly observed, generating the need for efficient longitudinal monitoring of transplanted cells in order to develop more efficient transplantation techniques. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess viability and cardiac retention of induced pluripotent stem cells after intramyocardial delivery using in vivo bioluminescence analysis (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Murine induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were transfected for luciferase reporter gene expression and labeled intracellularly with supraparamagnetic iron oxide particles. Consequently, 5 × 10 5 cells were transplanted intramyocardially following left anterior descending coronary artery ligation in mice. Cardiac iPSCs were detected using BLI and serial T2* sequences by MRI in a 14-day follow-up. Additionally, infarct extension and left ventricular (LV) function were assessed by MRI. Controls received the same surgical procedure without cell injection. MRI sequences showed a strong MRI signal of labeled iPSCs correlating with myocardial late enhancement, demonstrating engraftment in the infarcted area. Mean iPSC volumes were 4.2 ± 0.4 mm 3 at Day 0; 3.1 ± 0.4 mm 3 at Day 7; and 5.1 ± 0.8 mm 3 after 2 weeks. Thoracic BLI radiance decreased directly after injection from 1.0 × 10 6  ± 4.2 × 10 4 (p/s/cm 2 /sr) to 1.0 × 10 5  ± 4.9 × 10 3 (p/s/cm 2 /sr) on Day 1. Afterward, BLI radiance increased to 1.1 × 10 6  ± 4.2 × 10 4 (p/s/cm 2 /sr) 2 weeks after injection. Cardiac graft localization was confirmed by ex vivo BLI analysis and histology. Left ventricular ejection fraction was higher in the iPSC group (30.9 ± 0.9%) compared to infarct controls (24.0 ± 2.1%; P stem cell fate in vivo, enabling cardiac graft localization with

  15. Genetic Polymorphism at CCL5 Is Associated With Protection in Chagas’ Heart Disease: Antagonistic Participation of CCR1+ and CCR5+ Cells in Chronic Chagasic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Angelica Martins Batista; Lucia Elena Alvarado-Arnez; Lucia Elena Alvarado-Arnez; Silvia Marinho Alves; Gloria Melo; Isabela Resende Pereira; Leonardo Alexandre de Souza Ruivo; Andrea Alice da Silva; Daniel Gibaldi; Thayse do E. S. Protásio da Silva; Virginia Maria Barros de Lorena; Adriene Siqueira de Melo; Ana Karine de Araújo Soares; Michelle da Silva Barros; Vláudia Maria Assis Costa

    2018-01-01

    Chronic cardiomyopathy is the main clinical manifestation of Chagas disease (CD), a disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection. A hallmark of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) is a fibrogenic inflammation mainly composed of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells and macrophages. CC-chemokine ligands and receptors have been proposed to drive cell migration toward the heart tissue of CD patients. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CC-chemokine ligand and receptor genes may determine protein expres...

  16. E-cigarette smoke damages DNA and reduces repair activity in mouse lung, heart, and bladder as well as in human lung and bladder cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Park, Sung-Hyun; Weng, Mao-wen; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Huang, William C.; Lepor, Herbert; Wu, Xue-Ru; Chen, Lung-Chi; Tang, Moon-shong

    2018-01-01

    Significance E-cigarette smoke (ECS) delivers nicotine through aerosols without burning tobacco. ECS is promoted as noncarcinogenic. We found that ECS induces DNA damage in mouse lung, bladder, and heart and reduces DNA-repair functions and proteins in lung. Nicotine and its nitrosation product 4-(methylnitrosamine)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone can cause the same effects as ECS and enhance mutations and tumorigenic cell transformation in cultured human lung and bladder cells. These results indica...

  17. Development of heart muscle-cell diversity: a help or a hindrance for phenotyping embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijnvandraat, Arnoud C.; Lekanne Deprez, Ronald H.; Moorman, Antoon F. M.

    2003-01-01

    Despite the advances in cardiovascular treatment, cardiac disease remains a major cause of morbidity in all industrialized countries. The extraordinary potential of (embryonic) stem cells for therapeutic purposes has revolutionized ideas about cardiac repair of diseased cardiac muscle to exciting

  18. Increase vs. decrease of calcium uptake by isolated heart cells induced by H2O2 vs. HOCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminishi, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Yanagishita, T.; Kako, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Adult rat heart myocytes were labeled rapidly with exogenous [45Ca2+]. Addition of 2.5 mM H2O2 to the heart cell suspension raised the content of rapidly exchangeable intracellular Ca2+ twofold, whereas addition of 1-30 mM HOCl decreased the Ca2+ content. The H2O2-induced increase in Ca2+ content was dependent on the medium Na+, pH, and temperature but was not significantly affected by addition of verapamil, diltiazem, amiloride, or 3-aminobenzamide. The [3H]ouabain binding to myocytes was suppressed by H2O2, whereas the Ca2+ efflux from myocytes was not influenced. An uncoupler, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, reduced Ca2+ content, implying that the H2O2-induced change in Ca2+ content was not directly related to ATP depletion. On the other hand, the H2O2-induced Ca2+ accumulation in myocytes was prevented by deferoxamine or o-phenanthroline. These results suggest that H2O2 inhibited Na+-K+-ATPase, resulting in an increase in intracellular Na+ concentration and stimulation of sarcolemmal Na+-Ca2+ exchange activity, which caused a transient net Ca2+ influx into myocytes. By contrast, HOCl decreased the Ca2+ content of the rapidly exchangeable pool below control levels and this action of HOCl was antagonized by 1,4-dithiothreitol. HOCl accelerated Ca2+ efflux from myocytes. Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+-ATPase of the isolated sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) fraction were highly sensitive to the action of HOCl. Ca2+ uptake by intracellular sites, studied with myocytes permeabilized with digitonin, was inhibited by both H2O2 and HOCl. Thus these results suggest that HOCl inhibits the SR Ca2+ pump, resulting in the observed acceleration of Ca2+ efflux from and decline in Ca2+ content of myocytes

  19. Acute cardiovascular toxicity of sterilizers, PHMG, and PGH: severe inflammation in human cells and heart failure in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Kim, Hak Hyeon; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2013-06-01

    In 2011, dozens of children and pregnant women in Korea died by exposure to sterilizer for household humidifier, such as Oxy(®) and Cefu(®). Until now, however, it remains unknown how the sterilizer affect the human health to cause the acute deaths. To find its toxicity for organ, we investigated the putative toxicity of the sterilizer in the cardiovascular system. The sterilizers, polyhexamethylene guanidine phosphate (PHMG, Cefu(®)), and oligo-[2-(2-ethoxy)-ethoxyethyl)-guanidinium-chloride (PGH, Oxy(®)) were treated to human lipoproteins, macrophages, and dermal fibroblast cells. The PGH and PHMG at normal dosages caused severe atherogenic process in human macrophages, cytotoxic effect, and aging in human dermal cell. Zebrafish embryos, which were exposed to the sterilizer, showed early death with acute inflammation and attenuated developmental speed. All zebrafish exposed to the working concentration of PHMG (final 0.3 %) and PGH (final 10 mM) died within 70 min and displayed acute increases in serum triacylglycerol level and fatty liver induction. The dead zebrafish showed severe accumulation of fibrous collagen in the bulbous artery of the heart with elevation of reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, the sterilizers showed acute toxic effect in blood circulation system, causing by severe inflammation, atherogenesis, and aging, with embryo toxicity.

  20. Maximum heart rate in brown trout (Salmo trutta fario) is not limited by firing rate of pacemaker cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverinen, Jaakko; Abramochkin, Denis V; Kamkin, Andre; Vornanen, Matti

    2017-02-01

    Temperature-induced changes in cardiac output (Q̇) in fish are largely dependent on thermal modulation of heart rate (f H ), and at high temperatures Q̇ collapses due to heat-dependent depression of f H This study tests the hypothesis that firing rate of sinoatrial pacemaker cells sets the upper thermal limit of f H in vivo. To this end, temperature dependence of action potential (AP) frequency of enzymatically isolated pacemaker cells (pacemaker rate, f PM ), spontaneous beating rate of isolated sinoatrial preparations (f SA ), and in vivo f H of the cold-acclimated (4°C) brown trout (Salmo trutta fario) were compared under acute thermal challenges. With rising temperature, f PM steadily increased because of the acceleration of diastolic depolarization and shortening of AP duration up to the break point temperature (T BP ) of 24.0 ± 0.37°C, at which point the electrical activity abruptly ceased. The maximum f PM at T BP was much higher [193 ± 21.0 beats per minute (bpm)] than the peak f SA (94.3 ± 6.0 bpm at 24.1°C) or peak f H (76.7 ± 2.4 at 15.7 ± 0.82°C) (P brown trout in vivo. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Transmural changes in mast cell density in rat heart after infarct induction in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, W.; Reiters, P. H.; Daemen, M. J.; Smits, J. F.; van der Vusse, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    The cardiac distribution of mast cells was investigated after the induction of acute myocardial infarction in the rat. The left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was occluded by ligation in the infarct group, whereas in sham rats only a superficial ligature was placed beside the LAD. Rats of

  2. Lack of interaction between digoxin and quinidine in cultured heart cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, J.D.; Barry, W.H.; Smith, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    Previous investigations have raised the possibility that the digoxin-quinidine interaction is associated with a reduction in the positive inotropic effect of digoxin due to displacement of digoxin from cardiac as well as skeletal muscle. To circumvent some of the complexities presented by intact animal models, this interaction was investigated in cultured chick embryo ventricular cells. Quinidine, even at relatively high concentrations (10(-4)--2 x 10(-3) M), did not significantly affect positive inotropic effects of digoxin and did not protect against cellular contracture induced by toxic digoxin concentrations, despite preincubation of cells with quinidine for 60 min. The effects of digoxin on monovalent cation transport, as judged by active uptake of the K analog 86Rb, were also not altered by 10(-4) M to 2 x 10(-3) M quinidine. These data suggest that quinidine does not displace digoxin from Na, K adenosine triphosphatase binding sites in this preparation. Although these data must be extrapolated to the intact animal with caution, our findings suggest that changes in digoxin clearance are more likely of primary importance in the digoxin-quinidine interaction, and indicate that the approximately 2-fold increase in serum digoxin concentration observed after addition of quinidine would be expected to have direct effects on myocardial cells comparable with those seen with increased digoxin concentration in the absence of quinidine

  3. Association between red cell distribution width and the risk of heart events in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weimin; Li, Xiaoting; Wang, Maofeng; Ge, Xuan; Li, Feixiang; Huang, Bian; Peng, Jiren; Li, Guohong; Lu, Liang; Yu, Zhuoyuan; Ma, Jiaojiao; Xu, Liaohang; Jin, Meijuan; Si, Hongping; Wan, Rugen

    2015-04-01

    Red cell distribution width (RDW) has been found to be a novel prognostic biomarker in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD); however, the association between RDW and the risk of heart events in patients with CAD is yet to be fully elucidated. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine whether an elevated RDW was associated with the Framingham risk score (FRS) in patients with CAD. Data were retrospectively collected from Affiliated Dongyang Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University (Dongyang, China). The patients had undergone a coronary angiography and their clinical data were integrated. The patients (male, 260; female, 132) were divided into two groups based on the results of the coronary angiography, namely the CAD (n=283) and control groups (n=109). The FRS was calculated for all the subjects, and complete blood count testing with biochemical measurements was performed. The mean RDW level was 13.7±1.8% in the CAD group and 13.1±1.0% in the control group, while the mean FRS was 9.0±4.9 in the CAD group and 6.4±3.9 in the control group. The RDW and FRS were significantly higher in the CAD group compared with the control group (P0.05). The RDW was shown to significantly correlate with the red blood cell (RBC) count ( r =-0.133, P=0.029), hemoglobin level ( r =-0.207, P=0.001) and TG level ( r =0.226, P<0.001) within the laboratory parameters, as well as the FRS ( r =0.206, P<0.001). In the stepwise multivariate linear regression, which included the RBC count, hemoglobin level, TG level and RDW, the FRS was predicted by hemoglobin ( r 2 =0.034, P=0.001), TG ( r 2 =0.059, P<0.001) and RDW ( r 2 =0.030, P=0.003) parameters. Therefore, a novel association was revealed between higher levels of RDW and an elevated FRS in patients with CAD, which raises the possibility that a simple marker, RDW, may be associated with an increased risk of heart events in CAD patients.

  4. Intramyocardial implantation of differentiated rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells enhanced by TGF-β1 improves cardiac function in heart failure rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Y. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China); Liu, B. [Department of Pathology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou, Hebei (China); Wang, H.P. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou, Hebei (China); Zhang, L. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2016-05-31

    The present study tested the hypotheses that i) transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) enhances differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) towards the cardiomyogenic phenotype and ii) intramyocardial implantation of the TGF-β1-treated MSCs improves cardiac function in heart failure rats. MSCs were treated with different concentrations of TGF-β1 for 72 h, and then morphological characteristics, surface antigens and mRNA expression of several transcription factors were assessed. Intramyocardial implantation of these TGF-β1-treated MSCs to infarcted heart was also investigated. MSCs were initially spindle-shaped with irregular processes. On day 28 after TGF-β1 treatment, MSCs showed fusiform shape, orientating parallel with one another, and were connected with adjoining cells forming myotube-like structures. Immunofluorescence revealed the expression of cardiomyocyte-specific proteins, α-sarcomeric actin and troponin T, in these cells. The mRNA expression of GATA4 and Nkx2.5 genes was slightly increased on day 7, enhanced on day 14 and decreased on day 28 while α-MHC gene was not expressed on day 7, but expressed slightly on day 14 and enhanced on day 28. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the induced cells had myofilaments, z line-like substances, desmosomes, and gap junctions, in contrast with control cells. Furthermore, intramyocardial implantation of TGF-β1-treated MSCs to infarcted heart reduced scar area and increased the number of muscle cells. This structure regeneration was concomitant with the improvement of cardiac function, evidenced by decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, increased left ventricular systolic pressure and increased maximal positive pressure development rate. Taken together, these results indicate that intramyocardial implantation of differentiated MSCs enhanced by TGF-β1 improved cardiac function in heart failure rats.

  5. Intramyocardial implantation of differentiated rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells enhanced by TGF-β1 improves cardiac function in heart failure rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Y.; Liu, B.; Wang, H.P.; Zhang, L.

    2016-01-01

    The present study tested the hypotheses that i) transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) enhances differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) towards the cardiomyogenic phenotype and ii) intramyocardial implantation of the TGF-β1-treated MSCs improves cardiac function in heart failure rats. MSCs were treated with different concentrations of TGF-β1 for 72 h, and then morphological characteristics, surface antigens and mRNA expression of several transcription factors were assessed. Intramyocardial implantation of these TGF-β1-treated MSCs to infarcted heart was also investigated. MSCs were initially spindle-shaped with irregular processes. On day 28 after TGF-β1 treatment, MSCs showed fusiform shape, orientating parallel with one another, and were connected with adjoining cells forming myotube-like structures. Immunofluorescence revealed the expression of cardiomyocyte-specific proteins, α-sarcomeric actin and troponin T, in these cells. The mRNA expression of GATA4 and Nkx2.5 genes was slightly increased on day 7, enhanced on day 14 and decreased on day 28 while α-MHC gene was not expressed on day 7, but expressed slightly on day 14 and enhanced on day 28. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the induced cells had myofilaments, z line-like substances, desmosomes, and gap junctions, in contrast with control cells. Furthermore, intramyocardial implantation of TGF-β1-treated MSCs to infarcted heart reduced scar area and increased the number of muscle cells. This structure regeneration was concomitant with the improvement of cardiac function, evidenced by decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, increased left ventricular systolic pressure and increased maximal positive pressure development rate. Taken together, these results indicate that intramyocardial implantation of differentiated MSCs enhanced by TGF-β1 improved cardiac function in heart failure rats

  6. Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells for Treatment of Patients with Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease (MyStromalCell Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Mygind, Naja Dam

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of intramyocardial injections of autologous VEGF-A165-stimulated adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) in patients with refractory angina. MyStromalCell trial is a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study including sixty patients with CCS/NYHA class II...... to 54) (P= 0.41), and in METs 0.1 (95%CI -1.7 to 1.9) (P= 0.757). The difference between the groups was not significant (P= 0.680,P= 0.608, andP= 0.720 for time duration, watt, and METs, resp.). Intramyocardial delivered VEGF-A165-stimulated ASC treatment was safe but did not improve exercise capacity...

  7. Cardiac cell modelling: Observations from the heart of the cardiac physiome project

    KAUST Repository

    Fink, Martin; Niederer, Steven A.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Fenton, Flavio H.; Koivumä ki, Jussi T.; Seemann, Gunnar; Thul, Rü diger; Zhang, Henggui; Sachse, Frank B.; Beard, Dan; Crampin, Edmund J.; Smith, Nicolas P.

    2011-01-01

    In this manuscript we review the state of cardiac cell modelling in the context of international initiatives such as the IUPS Physiome and Virtual Physiological Human Projects, which aim to integrate computational models across scales and physics. In particular we focus on the relationship between experimental data and model parameterisation across a range of model types and cellular physiological systems. Finally, in the context of parameter identification and model reuse within the Cardiac Physiome, we suggest some future priority areas for this field. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Heart Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health! Get a free badge or banner to post to your website or blog. Are you at risk for heart disease? Here's how to find out . Planning to use The Heart Truth logo? Check out our logo guidelines and downloads. ...

  9. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it may be caused by diseases, such as connective tissue disorders, excessive iron buildup in your body (hemochromatosis), the buildup of abnormal proteins (amyloidosis) or by some cancer treatments. Causes of heart infection A heart infection, ...

  10. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... family history of heart attack race – African Americans, Mexican Americans, Native Americans, and native Hawaiians are at ... Your doctor will prescribe the medicines that are right for you. If you have had a heart ...

  11. Heart pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac pacemaker implantation; Artificial pacemaker; Permanent pacemaker; Internal pacemaker; Cardiac resynchronization therapy; CRT; Biventricular pacemaker; Arrhythmia - pacemaker; Abnormal heart ...

  12. Differential number of CD34+, CD133+ and CD34+/CD133+ cells in peripheral blood of patients with congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritzenwanger M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC which are characterised by the simulateous expression of CD34, CD133 and vascular endothelial growth receptor 2 (VEGF 2 are involved in the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure (CHF and their number and function is reduced in CHF. But so far our knowledge about the number of circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (CPC expressing the early hematopoietic marker CD133 and CD34 in CHF is spares and therefore we determined their number and correlated them with New York Heart Association (NYHA functional class. Methods CD34 and CD133 surface expression was quantified by flow cytometry in the peripheral venous blood of 41 healthy adults and 101 patients with various degrees of CHF. Results CD34+, CD133+ and CD34+/CD133+ cells correlated inversely with age. Both the number of CD34+ and of CD34+/CD133+ cells inversely correlated with NYHA functional class. The number of CD133+ cells was not affected by NYHA class. Furthermore the number of CD133+ cells did not differ between control and CHF patients. Conclusion In CHF the release of CD34+, CD133+ and CD34+/CD133+ cells from the bone marrow seems to be regulated differently. Modulating the releasing process in CHF may be a tool in CHF treatment.

  13. Prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia among the UAE adolescent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging with superparamagnetic iron oxide fails to track the long-term fate of mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Cheng, Huaibing; Lu, Minjie; Liu, Qiong; Chen, Xiuyu; Yin, Gang; Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Lianfeng; Meng, Xianmin; Tang, Yue; Zhao, Shihua

    2015-03-12

    MRI for in vivo stem cell tracking remains controversial. Here we tested the hypothesis that MRI can track the long-term fate of the superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles labelled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) following intramyocardially injection in AMI rats. MSCs (1 × 10(6)) from male rats doubly labeled with SPIO and DAPI were injected 2 weeks after myocardial infarction. The control group received cell-free media injection. In vivo serial MRI was performed at 24 hours before cell delivery (baseline), 3 days, 1, 2, and 4 weeks after cell delivery, respectively. Serial follow-up MRI demonstrated large persistent intramyocardial signal-voids representing SPIO during the follow-up of 4 weeks, and MSCs did not moderate the left ventricular dysfunction. The TUNEL analysis confirmed that MSCs engrafted underwent apoptosis. The histopathological studies revealed that the site of cell injection was infiltrated by inflammatory cells progressively and the iron-positive cells were macrophages identified by CD68 staining, but very few or no DAPI-positive stem cells at 4 weeks after cells transplantation. The presence of engrafted cells was confirmed by real-time PCR, which showed that the amount of Y-chromosome-specific SRY gene was consistent with the results. MRI may not reliably track the long-term fate of SPIO-labeled MSCs engraftment in heart.

  15. Detection of occult pericardial hemorrhage early after open-heart surgery using technetium-99m red blood cell radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, T.M.; Czer, L.S.; Gray, R.J.; Kass, R.M.; Raymond, M.J.; Garcia, E.V.; Chaux, A.; Matloff, J.M.; Berman, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    Pericardial or mediastinal hemorrhage requiring reoperation occurs in 2% to 5% of patients, usually early (0 to 48 hours), after open-heart surgery. This hemorrhage may be occult, and resulting cardiac tamponade may easily be misinterpreted as ventricular dysfunction, common early postoperatively. In such cases, appropriate and timely intervention may not occur. Of 50 patients evaluated by technetium-99m red blood cell gated equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) because of early postoperative cardiogenic shock of uncertain etiology, 17 had unique scintigraphic images suggestive of intrathoracic hemorrhage. Of these 17, 5 had a generalized halo of abnormal radioactivity surrounding small hyperdynamic right and left ventricles, 11 had localized regions of intense blood pool activity outside the cardiac chambers (two with compression of single chambers), and one demonstrated marked radionuclide activity in the right hemithorax (2000 ml of blood at reoperation). Twelve patients had exploratory reoperation for control of hemorrhage as a direct result of the scintigraphic findings, three were successfully treated with fresh frozen plasma and platelet infusions along with medical interventions to optimize cardiac performance, and two patients died in cardiogenic shock (presumed tamponade) without reoperation. In the 12 reoperated patients, all were confirmed to have active pericardial bleeding. Scintigraphic localization of abnormal blood pools within the pericardium corresponded to the sites at which active bleeding was witnessed at reoperation. The abnormal bleeding was etiologically related to the tamponade state, with marked improvement in hemodynamics after reoperation. Nine additional patients were reoperated for presumed tamponade after RNV revealed an exaggerated halo of photon deficiency surrounding the cardiac chambers

  16. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance studies of sarcoplasmic oxygenation in the red cell-perfused rat heart

    OpenAIRE

    Jelicks, L.A.; Wittenberg, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    The proximal histidine N delta H proton of deoxymyoglobin experiences a large hyperfine shift resulting in its 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal appearing at approximately 76 ppm (at 35 degrees C), downfield of the diamagnetic spectral region. 1H NMR of this proton is used to monitor sarcoplasmic oxygen pressure in isolated perfused rat heart. This method monitors intracellular oxygenation in the whole heart and does not reflect oxygenation in a limited region. The deoxymyoglobin res...

  17. Hyperkalemia-induced complete heart block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Baratloo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Potassium, as an extracellular ion, plays an important role in the electrophysiologic function of the myocardium and any change in extracellular concentration of this ion might have a marked impression upon myocyte electrophysiologic gain. High serum potassium levels are thought to impair pulse conduction in Purkinje fibers and ventricles more than that in the Atrioventricular (AV node. Therefore, although complete AV block can occur, it is a rare initial presentation. Case Report: We describe a 62-year-old man with a history of diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease and previous Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG, who came to our emergency department due to generalized weakness starting 2 days before admission. The patient also had decreased force in lower limbs, exacerbating from the morning, and was finally diagnosed as a hyperkalemia-induced Complete Heart Block (CHB. It should also be noted that the patient responded dramatically to the administration of 10 mL of 10% calcium gluconate along with external pacing until potassium level correction became effective. Conclusion: In spite of the fact that Hyperkalemia can be associated with frequent Electrocardiogram (ECG abnormality, advanced heart blocks (second- and third-degree AV blocks are usually found only in patients with pre-existing heart failure, conduction abnormalities, or other cardiac diseases. Institution of effective treatment rapidly and forgiveness of traditional non-effective, time consumptive and sometimes risking full-adjustment modalities, such as sodium bicarbonate infusion or exchange resins that prevent their use in the emergent phase, can help minimize patient morbidity and mortality.

  18. Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    McMurray, John; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure.

  19. Artificial heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-18

    Super-pure plutonium-238 could use heat produced during fission to power an implanted artificial heart. Three model hearts have worked for some time. Concern that excess heat would make the procedure unsafe for humans has broadened the search for another energy source, such as electrohydraulic drive or an external power battery. A back pack approach may provide an interim solution until materials are developed which can withstand heart activity and be small enough for implantation.

  20. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Introduction Types of Heart Failure Classes of Heart Failure Heart Failure in Children Advanced Heart Failure • Causes and ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  1. Comparative study of human-induced pluripotent stem cells derived from bone marrow cells, hair keratinocytes, and skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streckfuss-Bömeke, Katrin; Wolf, Frieder; Azizian, Azadeh; Stauske, Michael; Tiburcy, Malte; Wagner, Stefan; Hübscher, Daniela; Dressel, Ralf; Chen, Simin; Jende, Jörg; Wulf, Gerald; Lorenz, Verena; Schön, Michael P; Maier, Lars S; Zimmermann, Wolfram H; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Guan, Kaomei

    2013-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a unique opportunity for the generation of patient-specific cells for use in disease modelling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. The aim of this study was to compare human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived from different somatic cell sources regarding their generation efficiency and cardiac differentiation potential, and functionalities of cardiomyocytes. We generated hiPSCs from hair keratinocytes, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and skin fibroblasts by using two different virus systems. We show that MSCs and fibroblasts are more easily reprogrammed than keratinocytes. This corresponds to higher methylation levels of minimal promoter regions of the OCT4 and NANOG genes in keratinocytes than in MSCs and fibroblasts. The success rate and reprogramming efficiency was significantly higher by using the STEMCCA system than the OSNL system. All analysed hiPSCs are pluripotent and show phenotypical characteristics similar to human embryonic stem cells. We studied the cardiac differentiation efficiency of generated hiPSC lines (n = 24) and found that MSC-derived hiPSCs exhibited a significantly higher efficiency to spontaneously differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes when compared with keratinocyte-, and fibroblast-derived hiPSCs. There was no significant difference in the functionalities of the cardiomyocytes derived from hiPSCs with different origins, showing the presence of pacemaker-, atrial-, ventricular- and Purkinje-like cardiomyocytes, and exhibiting rhythmic Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ sparks in hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, spontaneously and synchronously beating and force-developing engineered heart tissues were generated. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells can be reprogrammed from all three somatic cell types, but with different efficiency. All analysed iPSCs can differentiate into cardiomyocytes, and the functionalities of cardiomyocytes derived from different cell

  2. Towards the standardization of stem cell therapy studies for ischemic heart diseases: Bridging the gap between animal models and the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Fábio; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Ferreira-Martins, João; Ferreira, Rita; Falcão-Pires, Inês; Vitorino, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Today there is an increasing demand for heart transplantations for patients diagnosed with heart failure. Though, shortage of donors as well as the large number of ineligible patients hurdle such treatment option. This, in addition to the considerable number of transplant rejections, has driven the clinical research towards the field of regenerative medicine. Nonetheless, to date, several stem cell therapies tested in animal models fall by the wayside and when they meet the criteria to clinical trials, subjects often exhibit modest improvements. A main issue slowing down the admission of such therapies in the domain of human trials is the lack of protocol standardization between research groups, which hampers comparison between different approaches as well as the lack of thought regarding the clinical translation. In this sense, given the large amount of reports on stem cell therapy studies in animal models reported in the last 3years, we sought to evaluate their advantages and limitations towards the clinical setting and provide some suggestions for the forthcoming investigations. We expect, with this review, to start a new paradigm on regenerative medicine, by evoking the debate on how to plan novel stem cell therapy studies with animal models in order to achieve more consistent scientific production and accelerate the admission of stem cell therapies in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic Polymorphism at CCL5 Is Associated With Protection in Chagas’ Heart Disease: Antagonistic Participation of CCR1+ and CCR5+ Cells in Chronic Chagasic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Martins Batista

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic cardiomyopathy is the main clinical manifestation of Chagas disease (CD, a disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection. A hallmark of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC is a fibrogenic inflammation mainly composed of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells and macrophages. CC-chemokine ligands and receptors have been proposed to drive cell migration toward the heart tissue of CD patients. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in CC-chemokine ligand and receptor genes may determine protein expression. Herein, we evaluated the association of SNPs in the CC-chemokines CCL2 (rs1024611 and CCL5 (rs2107538, rs2280788 and the CCL5/RANTES receptors CCR1 (rs3181077, rs1491961, rs3136672 and CCR5 (rs1799987 with risk and progression toward CCC. We performed a cross-sectional association study of 406 seropositive patients from endemic areas for CD in the State of Pernambuco, Northeast Brazil. The patients were classified as non-cardiopathic (A, n = 110 or cardiopathic (mild, B1, n = 163; severe, C, n = 133. Serum levels of CCL5 and CCL2/MCP-1 were elevated in CD patients but were neither associated with risk/severity of CCC nor with SNP genotypes. After logistic regression analysis with adjustment for the covariates gender and ethnicity, CCL5 −403 (rs2107538 CT heterozygotes (OR = 0.5, P-value = 0.04 and T carriers (OR = 0.5, P-value = 0.01 were associated with protection against CCC. To gain insight into the participation of the CCL5–CCR5/CCR1 axis in CCC, mice were infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain. Increased CCL5 concentrations were detected in cardiac tissue. In spleen, frequencies of CCR1+ CD8+ T cells and CD14+ macrophages were decreased, while frequencies of CCR5+ cells were increased. Importantly, CCR1+CD14+ macrophages were mainly IL-10+, while CCR5+ cells were mostly TNF+. CCR5-deficient infected mice presented reduced TNF concentrations and injury in heart tissue. Selective blockade of CCR1 (Met-RANTES therapy

  4. Genetic Polymorphism at CCL5 Is Associated With Protection in Chagas' Heart Disease: Antagonistic Participation of CCR1+ and CCR5+ Cells in Chronic Chagasic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Angelica Martins; Alvarado-Arnez, Lucia Elena; Alves, Silvia Marinho; Melo, Gloria; Pereira, Isabela Resende; Ruivo, Leonardo Alexandre de Souza; da Silva, Andrea Alice; Gibaldi, Daniel; da Silva, Thayse do E S Protásio; de Lorena, Virginia Maria Barros; de Melo, Adriene Siqueira; de Araújo Soares, Ana Karine; Barros, Michelle da Silva; Costa, Vláudia Maria Assis; Cardoso, Cynthia C; Pacheco, Antonio G; Carrazzone, Cristina; Oliveira, Wilson; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2018-01-01

    Chronic cardiomyopathy is the main clinical manifestation of Chagas disease (CD), a disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection. A hallmark of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) is a fibrogenic inflammation mainly composed of CD8 + and CD4 + T cells and macrophages. CC-chemokine ligands and receptors have been proposed to drive cell migration toward the heart tissue of CD patients. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CC-chemokine ligand and receptor genes may determine protein expression. Herein, we evaluated the association of SNPs in the CC-chemokines CCL2 (rs1024611) and CCL5 (rs2107538, rs2280788) and the CCL5/RANTES receptors CCR1 (rs3181077, rs1491961, rs3136672) and CCR5 (rs1799987) with risk and progression toward CCC. We performed a cross-sectional association study of 406 seropositive patients from endemic areas for CD in the State of Pernambuco, Northeast Brazil. The patients were classified as non-cardiopathic (A, n  = 110) or cardiopathic (mild, B1, n  = 163; severe, C, n  = 133). Serum levels of CCL5 and CCL2/MCP-1 were elevated in CD patients but were neither associated with risk/severity of CCC nor with SNP genotypes. After logistic regression analysis with adjustment for the covariates gender and ethnicity, CCL5 -403 (rs2107538) CT heterozygotes (OR = 0.5, P -value = 0.04) and T carriers (OR = 0.5, P -value = 0.01) were associated with protection against CCC. To gain insight into the participation of the CCL5-CCR5/CCR1 axis in CCC, mice were infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain. Increased CCL5 concentrations were detected in cardiac tissue. In spleen, frequencies of CCR1 + CD8 + T cells and CD14 + macrophages were decreased, while frequencies of CCR5 + cells were increased. Importantly, CCR1 + CD14 + macrophages were mainly IL-10 + , while CCR5 + cells were mostly TNF + . CCR5-deficient infected mice presented reduced TNF concentrations and injury in heart tissue. Selective blockade of CCR1 (Met

  5. Genetic Polymorphism at CCL5 Is Associated With Protection in Chagas’ Heart Disease: Antagonistic Participation of CCR1+ and CCR5+ Cells in Chronic Chagasic Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Angelica Martins; Alvarado-Arnez, Lucia Elena; Alves, Silvia Marinho; Melo, Gloria; Pereira, Isabela Resende; Ruivo, Leonardo Alexandre de Souza; da Silva, Andrea Alice; Gibaldi, Daniel; da Silva, Thayse do E. S. Protásio; de Lorena, Virginia Maria Barros; de Melo, Adriene Siqueira; de Araújo Soares, Ana Karine; Barros, Michelle da Silva; Costa, Vláudia Maria Assis; Cardoso, Cynthia C.; Pacheco, Antonio G.; Carrazzone, Cristina; Oliveira, Wilson; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2018-01-01

    Chronic cardiomyopathy is the main clinical manifestation of Chagas disease (CD), a disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection. A hallmark of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) is a fibrogenic inflammation mainly composed of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells and macrophages. CC-chemokine ligands and receptors have been proposed to drive cell migration toward the heart tissue of CD patients. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CC-chemokine ligand and receptor genes may determine protein expression. Herein, we evaluated the association of SNPs in the CC-chemokines CCL2 (rs1024611) and CCL5 (rs2107538, rs2280788) and the CCL5/RANTES receptors CCR1 (rs3181077, rs1491961, rs3136672) and CCR5 (rs1799987) with risk and progression toward CCC. We performed a cross-sectional association study of 406 seropositive patients from endemic areas for CD in the State of Pernambuco, Northeast Brazil. The patients were classified as non-cardiopathic (A, n = 110) or cardiopathic (mild, B1, n = 163; severe, C, n = 133). Serum levels of CCL5 and CCL2/MCP-1 were elevated in CD patients but were neither associated with risk/severity of CCC nor with SNP genotypes. After logistic regression analysis with adjustment for the covariates gender and ethnicity, CCL5 −403 (rs2107538) CT heterozygotes (OR = 0.5, P-value = 0.04) and T carriers (OR = 0.5, P-value = 0.01) were associated with protection against CCC. To gain insight into the participation of the CCL5–CCR5/CCR1 axis in CCC, mice were infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain. Increased CCL5 concentrations were detected in cardiac tissue. In spleen, frequencies of CCR1+ CD8+ T cells and CD14+ macrophages were decreased, while frequencies of CCR5+ cells were increased. Importantly, CCR1+CD14+ macrophages were mainly IL-10+, while CCR5+ cells were mostly TNF+. CCR5-deficient infected mice presented reduced TNF concentrations and injury in heart tissue. Selective blockade of CCR1 (Met-RANTES therapy) in

  6. Hyperglycemia induces elevated expression of thyroid hormone binding protein in vivo in kidney and heart and in vitro in mesangial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kafaji, Ghada; Malik, Afshan N.

    2010-01-01

    During a search for glucose-regulated abundant mRNAs in the diabetic rat kidney, we cloned thyroid hormone binding protein (THBP), also known as μ-crystallin or CRYM. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hyperglycemia/high glucose on the expression of THBP. THBP mRNA copy numbers were determined in kidneys and hearts of diabetic GK rats vs normoglycemic Wistar rats, and in human mesangial cells (HMCs) exposed to high glucose using real-time qPCR, and THBP protein levels were measured by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Intracellular ROS was measured in THBP transfected cells using DCF fluorescence. Hyperglycemia significantly increased THBP mRNA in GK rat kidneys (326 ± 50 vs 147 ± 54, p < 0.05), and hearts (1583 ± 277 vs 191 ± 63, p < 0.05). Moreover, the levels of THBP mRNA increased with age and hyperglycemia in GK rat kidneys, whereas in normoglycemic Wistar rat kidneys there was a decline with age. High glucose significantly increased THBP mRNA (92 ± 37 vs 18 ± 4, p < 0.005), and protein in HMCs. The expression of THBP as a fusion protein in transfected HMCs resulted in reduction of glucose-induced intracellular ROS. We have shown that THBP mRNA is increased in diabetic kidney and heart, is regulated by high glucose in renal cells, and appears to attenuate glucose-induced intracellular ROS. These data suggest that THBP may be involved in the cellular pathways activated in response to glucose. This is the first report linking hyperglycemia with THBP and suggests that the role of THBP in diabetic complications should be further investigated.

  7. Hyperglycemia induces elevated expression of thyroid hormone binding protein in vivo in kidney and heart and in vitro in mesangial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kafaji, Ghada [Diabetes Research Group, Division of Reproduction and Endocrinology, King' s College London (United Kingdom); Malik, Afshan N., E-mail: afshan.malik@kcl.ac.uk [Diabetes Research Group, Division of Reproduction and Endocrinology, King' s College London (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-22

    During a search for glucose-regulated abundant mRNAs in the diabetic rat kidney, we cloned thyroid hormone binding protein (THBP), also known as {mu}-crystallin or CRYM. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hyperglycemia/high glucose on the expression of THBP. THBP mRNA copy numbers were determined in kidneys and hearts of diabetic GK rats vs normoglycemic Wistar rats, and in human mesangial cells (HMCs) exposed to high glucose using real-time qPCR, and THBP protein levels were measured by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Intracellular ROS was measured in THBP transfected cells using DCF fluorescence. Hyperglycemia significantly increased THBP mRNA in GK rat kidneys (326 {+-} 50 vs 147 {+-} 54, p < 0.05), and hearts (1583 {+-} 277 vs 191 {+-} 63, p < 0.05). Moreover, the levels of THBP mRNA increased with age and hyperglycemia in GK rat kidneys, whereas in normoglycemic Wistar rat kidneys there was a decline with age. High glucose significantly increased THBP mRNA (92 {+-} 37 vs 18 {+-} 4, p < 0.005), and protein in HMCs. The expression of THBP as a fusion protein in transfected HMCs resulted in reduction of glucose-induced intracellular ROS. We have shown that THBP mRNA is increased in diabetic kidney and heart, is regulated by high glucose in renal cells, and appears to attenuate glucose-induced intracellular ROS. These data suggest that THBP may be involved in the cellular pathways activated in response to glucose. This is the first report linking hyperglycemia with THBP and suggests that the role of THBP in diabetic complications should be further investigated.

  8. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart ...

  9. The Effects of Diabetes Induction on the Rat Heart: Differences in Oxidative Stress, Inflammatory Cells, and Fibrosis between Subendocardial and Interstitial Myocardial Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Guido

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM is characterized by cardiac remodeling and impaired diastolic function that may lead to heart failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative stress, inflammatory cells, and fibrosis in both subendocardial (SEN and interstitial (INT areas of the myocardium. Male Wistar rats were allocated to 2 groups of 9 animals, a control (CT group and streptozotocin-induced diabetes (DM. After 8 weeks, echocardiography morphometry, protein expression, and confocal microscopy in SEN and INT areas of the left ventricle (LV were performed. The echocardiographic analysis showed that diabetes induction leads to cardiac dilation, hypertrophy, and LV diastolic dysfunction. As compared to CT, the induction of diabetes increased inflammatory cells and fibrosis in both SEN and INT areas of DM myocardium and increased ROS generation only in SEN. Comparing the SEN and INT areas in the DM group, inflammatory cells and fibrosis in SEN were greater than in INT. In conclusion, diabetic myocardium SEN area, wherein oxidative stress was more pronounced, is more susceptible to cardiac dysfunction than INT area. This finding can be important for the understanding of the heart remodeling process occurring in DCM and perhaps to engender targeted therapies to attenuate or revert DCM-related diastolic dysfunction.

  10. Embryonic template-based generation and purification of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for heart repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierickx, P.; Doevendans, P.A.; Geijsen, N.; van Laake, L.W.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death in Western countries. Many types of cardiovascular diseases are due to a loss of functional cardiomyocytes, which can result in irreversible cardiac failure. Since the adult human heart has limited regenerative potential, cardiac

  11. Carcinoid heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Saamir A; Banchs, Jose; Iliescu, Cezar; Dasari, Arvind; Lopez-Mattei, Juan; Yusuf, Syed Wamique

    2017-10-01

    Rare neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) that most commonly arise in the gastrointestinal tract can lead to carcinoid syndrome and carcinoid heart disease. Patients with carcinoid syndrome present with vasomotor changes, hypermotility of the gastrointestinal system, hypotension and bronchospasm. Medical therapy for carcinoid syndrome, typically with somatostatin analogues, can help control symptoms, inhibit tumour progression and prolong survival. Carcinoid heart disease occurs in more than 50% of these patients and is the initial presentation of carcinoid syndrome in up to 20% of patients. Carcinoid heart disease has characteristic findings of plaque-like deposits composed of smooth muscle cells, myofibroblasts, extracellular matrix and an overlying endothelial layer which can lead to valve dysfunction. Valvular dysfunction can lead to oedema, ascites and right-sided heart failure. Medical therapy of carcinoid heart disease is limited to symptom control and palliation. Valve surgery for carcinoid heart disease should be considered for symptomatic patients with controlled metastatic carcinoid syndrome. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to guide optimal management. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Bcl-xL Genetic Modification Enhanced the Therapeutic Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in the Treatment of Heart Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaodong; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Tao; Yang, Zhonglu; Wang, Huishan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Low survival rate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) severely limited the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapy in the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI). Bcl-xL genetic modification might enhance MSC survival after transplantation. Methods. Adult rat bone marrow MSCs were modified with human Bcl-xL gene (hBcl-xL-MSCs) or empty vector (vector-MSCs). MSC apoptosis and paracrine secretions were characterized using flow cytometry, TUNEL, and ELISA in vitro. In vivo, randomized adult rats with MI received myocardial injections of one of the three reagents: hBcl-xL-MSCs, vector-MSCs, or culture medium. Histochemistry, TUNEL, and echocardiography were carried out to evaluate cell engraftment, apoptosis, angiogenesis, scar formation, and cardiac functional recovery. Results. In vitro, cell apoptosis decreased 43%, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and plate-derived growth factor (PDGF) increased 1.5-, 0.7-, and 1.2-fold, respectively, in hBcl-xL-MSCs versus wild type and vector-MSCs. In vivo, cell apoptosis decreased 40% and 26% in hBcl-xL-MSC group versus medium and vector-MSC group, respectively. Similar results were observed in cell engraftment, angiogenesis, scar formation, and cardiac functional recovery. Conclusions. Genetic modification of MSCs with hBcl-xL gene could be an intriguing strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of cell therapy in the treatment of heart infarction.

  13. Abnormal nuclear envelope in the cerebellar Purkinje cells and impaired motor learning in DYT11 myoclonus-dystonia mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoi, Fumiaki; Dang, Mai T.; Yang, Guang; Li, JinDong; Doroodchi, Atbin; Zhou, Tong; Li, Yuqing

    2011-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a movement disorder characterized by myoclonic jerks with dystonia. DYT11 M-D is caused by mutations in SGCE which codes for ε-sarcoglycan. SGCE is maternally imprinted and paternally expressed. Abnormal nuclear envelope has been reported in mouse models of DYT1 generalized torsion dystonia. However, it is not known whether similar alterations occur in DYT11 M-D. We developed a mouse model of DYT11 M-D using paternally-inherited Sgce heterozygous knockout (Sgce KO)...

  14. The role of sex steroid hormones in Purkinje cell death in the staggerer mutant during aging and development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janmaat, Sonja

    2007-01-01

    The comprehension of neuronal degeneration during aging has become one of the major objectives in Neuroscience during the last decades. This thesis will focus on both endocrine and neural senescence since they overlap during the aging process and are mechanistically intertwined. This thesis is

  15. Landolphia owariensis Attenuates Alcohol-induced Cerebellar Neurodegeneration: Significance of Neurofilament Protein Alteration in the Purkinje Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyinbo Charles A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alcohol-induced cerebellar neurodegeneration is a neuroadaptation that is associated with chronic alcohol abuse. Conventional drugs have been largely unsatisfactory in preventing neurodegeneration. Yet, multimodal neuro-protective therapeutic agents have been hypothesised to have high therapeutic potential for the treatment of CNS conditions; there is yet a dilemma of how this would be achieved. Contrarily, medicinal botanicals are naturally multimodal in their mechanism of action.

  16. Syndecans in heart fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunde, Ida G; Herum, Kate M; Carlson, Cathrine C; Christensen, Geir

    2016-09-01

    Heart disease is a deadly syndrome affecting millions worldwide. It reflects an unmet clinical need, and the disease mechanisms are poorly understood. Cardiac fibrosis is central to heart disease. The four-membered family of transmembrane proteoglycans, syndecan-1 to -4, is believed to regulate fibrosis. We review the current literature concerning syndecans in cardiac fibrosis. Syndecan expression is up-regulated in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli in various forms of heart disease with fibrosis. Mice lacking syndecan-1 and -4 show reduced activation of pro-fibrotic signaling and increased cardiac rupture upon infarction indicating an important role for these molecules. Whereas the short cytoplasmic tail of syndecans regulates signaling, their extracellular part, substituted with heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains, binds a plethora of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules involved in fibrosis, e.g., collagens, growth factors, cytokines, and immune cell adhesion proteins. Full-length syndecans induce pro-fibrotic signaling, increasing the expression of collagens, myofibroblast differentiation factors, ECM enzymes, growth factors, and immune cell adhesion molecules, thereby also increasing cardiac stiffness and preventing cardiac rupture. Upon pro-inflammatory stimuli, syndecan ectodomains are enzymatically released from heart cells (syndecan shedding). Shed ectodomains affect the expression of ECM molecules, promoting ECM degradation and cardiac rupture upon myocardial infarction. Blood levels of shed syndecan-1 and -4 ectodomains are associated with hospitalization, mortality, and heart remodeling in patients with heart failure. Improved understanding of syndecans and their modifying enzymes in cardiac fibrosis might contribute to the development of compounds with therapeutic potential, and enzymatically shed syndecan ectodomains might constitute a future prognostic tool for heart diseases with fibrosis. Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract summarizing

  17. Cardiac toxicity and radiation dose to the heart in definitive treated non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Brink, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    In this retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy, we did not find a correlation between high mean-dose to three different volumes of the heart (left ventricle, both ventricles or whole heart) and cardiac toxicity defined as having an cardiac event after radiotherapy start. This is not as shown in studies with other diseases treated with radiotherapy. Darby et al. recently published a review concerning radiation related heart disease. They reported a significantly worse survival beyond ten years for breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Some studies reported mortality from heart disease increased by 27%. In Hodgkin lymphoma patients an increased risk value of three to five for cardiac morbidity in general compared to general population and relative risk of death from myocardial infarction compared with general population in range 2 to 4. There may be several possible reasons why we did not experience a significant toxicity despite the high doses we delivered to the heart compared with patients receiving RT for breast cancer and lymphoma. Only relative few NSCLC patients live long enough to experience cardiac disease either due to lung cancer itself or comorbidity as a competitive risk factor. In our study the five year survival was 15% leaving very few patients at risk for developing cardiac disease. Without long-term survivors cardiac toxicity does not seem to be a problem, and this suggests that we should aim to increase tumour control by administrating larger doses of radiotherapy to the tumour and/or by adding concurrent chemotherapy. However, the latter may increase the risk of cardiac toxicity by itself, and the results given in present study, may not be extrapolated to this situation. Another reason might be that if NSCLC patients develop dyspnoea, chest pain, etc. it is interpreted as being due to a relapse of lung cancer and not cardiac disease. There are several studies indicating that

  18. Modulation of intracellular Ca2+ via L-type calcium channels in heart cells by the autoantibody directed against the second extracellular loop of the alpha1-adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bkaily, Ghassan; El-Bizri, Nesrine; Bui, Michel; Sukarieh, Rami; Jacques, Danielle; Fu, Michael L X

    2003-03-01

    The effects of methoxamine, a selective alpha1-adrenergic receptor agonist, and the autoantibody directed against the second extracellular loop of alpha1-adrenoceptors were studied on intracellular free Ca2+ levels using confocal microscopy and ionic currents using the whole-cell patch clamp technique in single cells of 10-day-old embryonic chick and 20-week-old fetal human hearts. We observed that like methoxamine, the autoantibody directed against the second extracellular loop of alpha1-adrenoreceptors significantly increased the L-type calcium current (I(Ca(L))) but had no effect on the T-type calcium current (I(Ca(T))), the delayed outward potassium current, or the fast sodium current. This effect of the autoantibody was prevented by a prestimulation of the receptors with methoxamine and vice versa. Moreover, treating the cells with prazosin, a selective alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist blocked the methoxamine and the autoantibody-induced increase in I(Ca(L)), respectively. In absence of prazosin, both methoxamine and the autoantibody showed a substantial enhancement in the frequency of cell contraction and that of the concomitant cytosolic and nuclear free Ca2+ variations. The subsequent addition of nifedipine, a specific L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, reversed not only the methoxamine or the autoantibody-induced effect but also completely abolished cell contraction. These results demonstrated that functional alpha1-adrenoceptors exist in both 10-day-old embryonic chick and 20-week-old human fetal hearts and that the autoantibody directed against the second extracellular loop of this type of receptors plays an important role in stimulating their activity via activation of L-type calcium channels. This loop seems to have a functional significance by being the target of alpha1-receptor agonists like methoxamine.

  19. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other diseases. Chronic diseases — such as diabetes, HIV, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or a buildup of iron (hemochromatosis) or ... transplantation or support with a ventricular assist device. Prevention The key to preventing heart failure is to ...

  20. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... properly causes your body's blood sugar levels to rise, increasing your risk of heart attack. Metabolic syndrome. This occurs when you have obesity, high blood pressure and high blood sugar. Having metabolic ...

  1. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Introduction Types of Heart Failure Classes of Heart Failure Heart Failure in Children Advanced Heart Failure • Causes and ... and Advanced HF • Tools and Resources • Personal Stories Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  2. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  3. Wine and heart health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... more often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and ...

  4. In Vitro Endothelial Cell Proliferation Assay Reveals Distinct Levels of Proangiogenic Cytokines Characterizing Sera of Healthy Subjects and of Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Voltan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although myocardial angiogenesis is thought to play an important role in heart failure (HF, the involvement of circulating proinflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines in the pathogenesis and/or prognosis of HF has not been deeply investigated. By using a highly standardized proliferation assay with human endothelial cells, we first demonstrated that sera from older (mean age 52±7.6 years; n=46 healthy donors promoted endothelial cell proliferation to a significantly higher extent compared to sera obtained from younger healthy donors (mean age 29±8.6 years; n=20. The promotion of endothelial cell proliferation was accompanied by high serum levels of several proangiogenic cytokines. When we assessed endothelial cell proliferation in response to HF patients’ sera, we observed that a subset of sera (n=11 promoted cell proliferation to a significantly lesser extent compared to the majority of sera (n=18. Also, in this case, the difference between the patient groups in the ability to induce endothelial cell proliferation correlated to significant (P<0.05 differences in serum proangiogenic cytokine levels. Unexpectedly, HF patients associated to the highest endothelial proliferation index showed the worst prognosis as evaluated in terms of subsequent cardiovascular events in the follow-up, suggesting that high levels of circulating proangiogenic cytokines might be related to a worse prognosis.

  5. Radiochemicals used to scan the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for heart scanning using 201 Tl and /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate are discussed. Thallium-201, produced artificially in a cyclotron, concentrates in normal heart muscle but not in abnormal tissue. Technetium-99m is deposited in mitochondria of heart cells that are irreversibly damaged. The combined use of 201 Tl and /sup 99m/Tc makes it possible to identify regions of recent heart damage as well as older heart damage. Advantages of using 129 Cs for heart scanning are also discussed

  6. Distinctive Left Ventricular Activations Associated With ECG Pattern in Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derval, Nicolas; Duchateau, Josselin; Mahida, Saagar; Eschalier, Romain; Sacher, Frederic; Lumens, Joost; Cochet, Hubert; Denis, Arnaud; Pillois, Xavier; Yamashita, Seigo; Komatsu, Yuki; Ploux, Sylvain; Amraoui, Sana; Zemmoura, Adlane; Ritter, Philippe; Hocini, Mélèze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre; Bordachar, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    In contrast to patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB), heart failure patients with narrow QRS and nonspecific intraventricular conduction delay (NICD) display a relatively limited response to cardiac resynchronization therapy. We sought to compare left ventricular (LV) activation patterns in heart failure patients with narrow QRS and NICD to patients with LBBB using high-density electroanatomic activation maps. Fifty-two heart failure patients (narrow QRS [n=18], LBBB [n=11], NICD [n=23]) underwent 3-dimensional electroanatomic mapping with a high density of mapping points (387±349 LV). Adjunctive scar imaging was available in 37 (71%) patients and was analyzed in relation to activation maps. LBBB patients typically demonstrated (1) a single LV breakthrough at the septum (38±15 ms post-QRS onset); (2) prolonged right-to-left transseptal activation with absence of direct LV Purkinje activity; (3) homogeneous propagation within the LV cavity; and (4) latest activation at the basal lateral LV. In comparison, both NICD and narrow QRS patients demonstrated (1) multiple LV breakthroughs along the posterior or anterior fascicles: narrow QRS versus LBBB, 5±2 versus 1±1; P =0.0004; NICD versus LBBB, 4±2 versus 1±1; P =0.001); (2) evidence of early/pre-QRS LV electrograms with Purkinje potentials; (3) rapid propagation in narrow QRS patients and more heterogeneous propagation in NICD patients; and (4) presence of limited areas of late activation associated with LV scar with high interindividual heterogeneity. In contrast to LBBB patients, narrow QRS and NICD patients are characterized by distinct mechanisms of LV activation, which may predict poor response to cardiac resynchronization therapy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Impact of T-cell-mediated immune response on xenogeneic heart valve transplantation: short-term success and mid-term failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, Anna C; Marzi, Julia; Brauchle, Eva; Schneider, Maria; Kornberger, Angela; Abdelaziz, Sherif; Wichmann, Julian L; Arendt, Christophe T; Nagel, Eike; Brockbank, Kelvin G M; Seifert, Martina; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Stock, Ulrich A

    2018-04-01

    Allogeneic frozen cryopreserved heart valves (allografts or homografts) are commonly used in clinical practice. A major obstacle for their application is the limited availability in particular for paediatrics. Allogeneic large animal studies revealed that alternative ice-free cryopreservation (IFC) results in better matrix preservation and reduced immunogenicity. The objective of this study was to evaluate xenogeneic (porcine) compared with allogeneic (ovine) IFC heart valves in a large animal study. IFC xenografts and allografts were transplanted in 12 juvenile merino sheep for 1-12 weeks. Immunohistochemistry, ex vivo computed tomography scans and transforming growth factor-β release profiles were analysed to evaluate postimplantation immunopathology. In addition, near-infrared multiphoton imaging and Raman spectroscopy were employed to evaluate matrix integrity of the leaflets. Acellular leaflets were observed in both groups 1 week after implantation. Allogeneic leaflets remained acellular throughout the entire study. In contrast, xenogeneic valves were infiltrated with abundant T-cells and severely thickened over time. No collagen or elastin changes could be detected in either group using multiphoton imaging. Raman spectroscopy with principal component analysis focusing on matrix-specific peaks confirmed no significant differences for explanted allografts. However, xenografts demonstrated clear matrix changes, enabling detection of distinct inflammatory-driven changes but without variations in the level of transforming growth factor-β. Despite short-term success, mid-term failure of xenogeneic IFC grafts due to a T-cell-mediated extracellular matrix-triggered immune response was shown.

  8. Comparative binding characteristics of Tc-CPI, Tc-TBI, and Tc-MIBI in cultured heart cells: Correlation with biochemical analysis and animal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwnica-Worms, D.; Kronauge, J.F.; Holman, B.L.; Davison, A.; Jones, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Hexakis (isonitrile)technetium (I) complexes are a new class of cationic, lipophilic myocaridal perfusion imaging agents. To better understand their cellular mechanisms of uptake and washout, chick heart cells grown in culture were used as a model myocardial system. Tc-MIBI showed uptake to a plateau at a rate similar to Tc-CPI (t1/2 = 4.1 +- 0.7 minutes); however, the plateau was 63% greater. Tc-TBI uptake approached a plateau 900% greater than Tc-CPI binding. Heart cell studies showed washout of Tc-CPI>Tc-TBI>Tc-MIBI, which correlated with kinetic analysis of rabbit myocardial images. Biochemical in vitro analysis in human plasma demonstrated 75% enzymatic ester hydrolysis of Tc-CPI by 3 minutes, but no hydrolysis of Tc-TBI and Tc-MIBI. The results suggest that metabolism of the ester function of Tc-CPI following myocardial uptake may in part account for the more rapid cellular washout rates of Tc-CPI compared with Tc-TBI and Tc-MIBI

  9. Hybrid approach of ventricular assist device and autologous bone marrow stem cells implantation in end-stage ischemic heart failure enhances myocardial reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khayat Andre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We challenge the hypothesis of enhanced myocardial reperfusion after implanting a left ventricular assist device together with bone marrow mononuclear stem cells in patients with end-stage ischemic cardiomyopathy. Irreversible myocardial loss observed in ischemic cardiomyopathy leads to progressive cardiac remodelling and dysfunction through a complex neurohormonal cascade. New generation assist devices promote myocardial recovery only in patients with dilated or peripartum cardiomyopathy. In the setting of diffuse myocardial ischemia not amenable to revascularization, native myocardial recovery has not been observed after implantation of an assist device as destination therapy. The hybrid approach of implanting autologous bone marrow stem cells during assist device implantation may eventually improve native cardiac function, which may be associated with a better prognosis eventually ameliorating the need for subsequent heart transplantation. The aforementioned hypothesis has to be tested with well-designed prospective multicentre studies.

  10. Effect of treatment with cyclophosphamide in low doses upon the onset of delayed type hypersensitivity in mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi: involvement of heart interstitial dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torriceli Souza The

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi results in intense myocarditis, which progresses to a chronic, asymptomatic indeterminate form. The evolution toward this chronic cardiac form occurs in approximately 30% of all cases of T. cruzi infection. Suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH has been proposed as a potential explanation of the indeterminate form. We investigated the effect of cyclophosphamide (CYCL treatment on the regulatory mechanism of DTH and the participation of heart interstitial dendritic cells (IDCs in this process using BALB/c mice chronically infected with T. cruzi. One group was treated with CYCL (20 mg/kg body weight for one month. A DTH skin test was performed by intradermal injection of T. cruzi antigen (3 mg/mL in the hind-footpad and measured the skin thickness after 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. The skin test revealed increased thickness in antigen-injected footpads, which was more evident in the mice treated with CYCL than in those mice that did not receive treatment. The thickened regions were characterised by perivascular infiltrates and areas of necrosis. Intense lesions of the myocardium were present in three/16 cases and included large areas of necrosis. Morphometric evaluation of lymphocytes showed a predominance of TCD8 cells. Heart IDCs were immunolabelled with specific antibodies (CD11b and CD11c and T. cruzi antigens were detected using a specific anti-T. cruzi antibody. Identification of T. cruzi antigens, sequestered in these cells using specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies was done, showing a significant increase in the number of these cells in treated mice. These results indicate that IDCs participate in the regulatory mechanisms of DTH response to T. cruzi infection.

  11. Fetal stem cells in combined treatment of chronic heart failure and their effect on morphofunctional parameters of the left ventricle myocardium and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klunnyk MO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mariya O Klunnyk, Nataliia S Sych, Irina G Matiyashchuk, Olena V Ivankova, Marina V Skalozub Cell Therapy Center EmCell, Kyiv, Ukraine Aim: To investigate the effect of combined treatment with the inclusion of fetal stem cells (FSCs on the morphology and functional dynamics of the left ventricle and cognitive functions in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF. Materials and methods: A comparative study was carried out on patients with CHF to examine the effect of combined treatment, including the experimental application of FSCs, on the morphofunctional parameters of the left ventricle and cognitive functions. Patients were examined before FSC treatment (FSCT, and 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment. The control group consisted of 20 CHF patients of similar age, sex, and New York Heart Association class. Results: It has been proven that FSCs positively affect objective and subjective clinical parameters. A significant reduction of serum type B brain natriuretic peptide was reported as early as 1 month after treatment. Significant increases in the left ventricle ejection fraction and decreases of the end diastolic volume were observed 6 months after treatment. Cognitive performance tests showed improvements on the Mini-Mental State Examination and Frontal Assessment Battery (conceptualization, mental flexibility, programming, sensitivity to interference, inhibitory control, and environmental autonomy scales. The treatment resulted in significant improvements in the general score and across all cognitive areas of the Mini-Mental State Examination (recall, orientation, attention, calculation, and complex commands after 3 months, and significant improvements across all Frontal Assessment Battery areas after 6 months. In the control group, these scores showed significant increases only at 6 months after the treatment. In the study group, depression was significantly reduced within 1 month after treatment versus 3 months in the control

  12. Small functional If current in sinoatrial pacemaker cells of the brown trout (Salmo trutta fario) heart despite strong expression of HCN channel transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinen, Minna; Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2017-12-01

    Funny current ( I f ), formed by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN channels), is supposed to be crucial for the membrane clock regulating the cardiac pacemaker mechanism. We examined the presence and activity of HCN channels in the brown trout ( Salmo trutta fario ) sinoatrial (SA) pacemaker cells and their putative role in heart rate ( f H ) regulation. Six HCN transcripts (HCN1, HCN2a, HCN2ba, HCN2bb, HCN3, and HCN4) were expressed in the brown trout heart. The total HCN transcript abundance was 4.0 and 4.9 times higher in SA pacemaker tissue than in atrium and ventricle, respectively. In the SA pacemaker, HCN3 and HCN4 were the main isoforms representing 35.8 ± 2.7 and 25.0 ± 1.5%, respectively, of the total HCN transcripts. Only a small I f with a mean current density of -1.2 ± 0.37 pA/pF at -140 mV was found in 4 pacemaker cells out of 16 spontaneously beating cells examined, despite the optimization of recording conditions for I f activity. I f was not found in any of the 24 atrial myocytes and 21 ventricular myocytes examined. HCN4 coexpressed with the MinK-related peptide 1 (MiRP1) β-subunit in CHO cells generated large I f currents. In contrast, HCN3 (+MiRP1) failed to produce I f in the same expression system. Cs + (2 mM), which blocked 84 ± 12% of the native I f , reversibly reduced f H 19.2 ± 3.6% of the excised multicellular pacemaker tissue from 53 ± 5 to 44 ± 5 beats/min ( P brown trout heart is largely independent on I f . Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. The use of cell-sheet technique eliminates arrhythmogenicity of skeletal myoblast-based therapy to the heart with enhanced therapeutic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Takuya; Shintani, Yasunori; Ikebe, Chiho; Kaneko, Masahiro; Harada, Narumi; Tshuma, Nomathamsanqa; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Campbell, Niall G; Coppen, Steven R; Yashiro, Kenta; Sawa, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ken

    2013-09-20

    Clinical application of skeletal myoblast transplantation has been curtailed due to arrhythmogenicity and inconsistent therapeutic benefits observed in previous studies. However, these issues may be solved by the use of a new cell-delivery mode. It is now possible to generate "cell-sheets" using temperature-responsive dishes without artificial scaffolds. This study aimed to validate the safety and efficacy of epicardial placement of myoblast-sheets (myoblast-sheet therapy) in treating heart failure. After coronary artery ligation in rats, the same numbers of syngeneic myoblasts were transplanted by intramyocardial injection or cell-sheet placement. Continuous radio-telemetry monitoring detected increased ventricular arrhythmias, including ventricular tachycardia, after intramyocardial injection compared to the sham-control, while these were abolished in myoblast-sheet therapy. This effect was conjunct with avoidance of islet-like cell-cluster formation that disrupts electrical conduction, and with prevention of increased arrhythmogenic substrates due to exaggerated inflammation. Persistent ectopic donor cells were found in the lung only after intramyocardial injection, strengthening the improved safety of myoblast-sheet therapy. In addition, myoblast-sheet therapy enhanced cardiac function, corresponding to a 9.2-fold increase in donor cell survival, compared to intramyocardial injection. Both methods achieved reduced infarct size, decreased fibrosis, attenuated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and increased neovascular formation, in association with myocardial upregulation of a group of relevant molecules. The pattern of these beneficial changes was similar between two methods, but the degree was more substantial after myoblast-sheet therapy. The cell-sheet technique enhanced safety and therapeutic efficacy of myoblast-based therapy, compared to the current method, thereby paving the way for clinical application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  14. Assessment of re-distribution and efficacy of stem cell transplantation in different heart status after acute myocardial infarction by MRI: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Minjie; Zhao Shihua; Song Peng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of MRI for assessment of re-distribution of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells injected intramyocardially in main organs (heart, liver, spleen and kidney) under different heart status (beating or arresting) in a porcine model. Methods: Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from the male swine and labeled with iron oxide during culture. Acute myocardial infarction was created in female swine, one week later, the survivors were randomly divided into 4 groups. Cardiopulmonary bypass was set up to arrest the heart, and then labeled cells (1 × 10 8 ) were intramyocardially injected into the border of the infracted myocardium in group 1 (n=6). The same volume of cells was grafted into the beating heart in group 2 (n=6). In group 3 and 4, saline was injected into either the arresting or beating myocardium. Three days later, re-distribution of stem cells and cardiac function were assessed by T 2 * WI and cine MRI, respectively. All animals were sacrificed for histology and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of sex-determining region on Y-chromosome (SRY) investigation. The ANOVA and t test was used for statistics. Results: The left ventricular end- diastolic volume (LVEDV) before transplantation for group 1-4 were: (56.8±5.3), (54.8±6.8), (57.4±4.3) and (56.8±2.8) ml, and after transplantation for group 1-4 were: (65.2±5.2), (63.2± 3.7), (60.2±4.7) and (62.2±4.4) ml. The left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV) before transplantation for group 1-4 were : (33.5±7.6), (32.3±5.3), (33.5±3.6) and (32.7±4.6) ml, and after transplantation for group 1-4 were: (37.3±5.6), (36.3±6.9), (34.3±5.4) and (36.3± 8.1) ml. The left ventricular EF values (LVEF) before transplantation for group 1-4 were: (42.3± 7.2)%, (41.7±6.8)%, (41.8±8.6)% and (42.7±7.7)%, and after transplantation for group 1- 4 were: (44.5±8.7)%, (43.1±7.4)%, (42.8±5.6)% and (43.3±8.4)%. The myocardial infarction

  15. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves; Prosthetic valves ... surgery. Your heart valve has been damaged by infection ( endocarditis ). You have received a new heart valve ...

  16. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  17. Gold nanoparticles administration induces disarray of heart muscle, hemorrhagic, chronic inflammatory cells infiltrated by small lymphocytes, cytoplasmic vacuolization and congested and dilated blood vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhalim Mohamed Anwar K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite significant research efforts on cancer therapy, diagnostics and imaging, many challenges remain unsolved. There are many unknown details regarding the interaction of nanoparticles (NPs and biological systems. The structure and properties of gold nanoparticles (GNPs make them useful for a wide array of biological applications. However, for the application of GNPs in therapy and drug delivery, knowledge regarding their bioaccumulation and associated local or systemic toxicity is necessary. Information on the biological fate of NPs, including distribution, accumulation, metabolism, and organ specific toxicity is still minimal. Studies specifically dealing with the toxicity of NPs are rare. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of intraperitoneal administration of GNPs on histological alterations of the heart tissue of rats in an attempt to identify and understand the toxicity and the potential role of GNPs as a therapeutic and diagnostic tool. Methods A total of 40 healthy male Wistar-Kyoto rats received 50 μl infusions of 10, 20 and 50 nm GNPs for 3 or 7 days. Animals were randomly divided into groups: 6 GNP-treated rats groups and one control group (NG. Groups 1, 2 and 3 received infusions of 50 μl GNPs of size 10 nm (3 or 7 days, 20 nm (3 or 7 days and 50 nm (3 or 7 days, respectively. Results In comparison with the respective control rats, exposure to GNPs doses produced heart muscle disarray with a few scattered chronic inflammatory cells infiltrated by small lymphocytes, foci of hemorrhage with extravasation of red blood cells, some scattered cytoplasmic vacuolization and congested and dilated blood vessels. None of the above alterations were observed in the heart muscle of any member of the control group. Conclusions The alterations induced by intraperitoneal administration of GNPs were size-dependent, with smaller ones inducing greater affects, and were also related to the time exposure to

  18. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP3 is a lysophosphatidic acid-binding protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoko Tsukahara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty-acid-binding protein 3, muscle and heart (FABP3, also known as heart-type FABP, is a member of the family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins. It is a small cytoplasmic protein with a molecular mass of about 15 kDa. FABPs are known to be carrier proteins for transporting fatty acids and other lipophilic substances from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where these lipids are released to a group of nuclear receptors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs. In this study, using lysophosphatidic acid (LPA-coated agarose beads, we have identified FABP3 as an LPA carrier protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs. Administration of LPA to HCAECs resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PPARγ activation. Furthermore, the LPA-induced PPARγ activation was abolished when the FABP3 expression was reduced using small interfering RNA (siRNA. We further show that the nuclear fraction of control HCAECs contained a significant amount of exogenously added LPA, whereas FABP3 siRNA-transfected HCAECs had a decreased level of LPA in the nucleus. Taken together, these results suggest that FABP3 governs the transcriptional activities of LPA by targeting them to cognate PPARγ in the nucleus.

  19. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter ... most common heart attack symptom in men and women is chest pain or discomfort. However, women also ...

  20. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... one of the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) ...

  1. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  2. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  3. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: A previous heart attack Open heart surgery Chest trauma A heart attack that has affected the thickness of your heart muscle Symptoms Symptoms include: Anxiety Chest pain from the swollen pericardium rubbing on the ...

  4. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on ... your high blood pressure Fast food tips Heart failure - discharge Heart failure - fluids and diuretics Heart failure - what to ...

  5. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular or abnormal ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  6. Heart disease and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  7. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  8. Heart attack first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle ...

  9. Cardiosphere-Derived Cells Reverse Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction in Rats by Decreasing Fibrosis and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Gallet, MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF is unclear. Myocardial fibrosis, inflammation, and cardiac hypertrophy have been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of HFpEF. Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs are heart-derived cell products with antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory properties. This study tested whether rat CDCs were sufficient to decrease manifestations of HFpEF in hypertensive rats. Starting at 7 weeks of age, Dahl salt-sensitive rats were fed a high-salt diet for 6 to 7 weeks and randomized to receive intracoronary CDCs or placebo. Dahl rats fed normal chow served as controls. High-salt rats developed hypertension, left ventricular (LV hypertrophy, and diastolic dysfunction, without impairment of ejection fraction. Four weeks after treatment, diastolic dysfunction resolved in CDC-treated rats but not in placebo. The improved LV relaxation was associated with lower LV end-diastolic pressure, decreased lung congestion, and enhanced survival in CDC-treated rats. Histology and echocardiography revealed no decrease in cardiac hypertrophy after CDC treatment, consistent with the finding of sustained, equally-elevated blood pressure in CDC- and placebo-treated rats. Nevertheless, CDC treatment decreased LV fibrosis and inflammatory infiltrates. Serum inflammatory cytokines were likewise decreased after CDC treatment. Whole-transcriptome analysis revealed that CDCs reversed changes in numerous transcripts associated with HFpEF, including many involved in inflammation and/or fibrosis. These studies suggest that CDCs normalized LV relaxation and LV diastolic pressure while improving survival in a rat model of HFpEF. The benefits of CDCs occurred despite persistent hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. By selectively reversing inflammation and fibrosis, CDCs may be beneficial in the treatment of HFpEF.

  10. Serial in vivo imaging of the porcine heart after percutaneous, intramyocardially injected 111In-labeled human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbaek, Stig; Ripa, Rasmus S; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana

    2010-01-01

    This pilot trial aimed to investigate the utilization of (111)In-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for in vivo tracking after intramyocardial transplantation in a xenotransplantation model with gender mismatched cells. Human male MSC were expanded ex vivo and labeled with (111)In...

  11. Serial in vivo imaging of the porcine heart after percutaneous, intramyocardially injected (111)In-labeled human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbæk, Stig; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana

    2009-01-01

    This pilot trial aimed to investigate the utilization of (111)In-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for in vivo tracking after intramyocardial transplantation in a xenotransplantation model with gender mismatched cells. Human male MSC were expanded ex vivo and labeled with (111)In...

  12. [EFFICIENCY OF COMBINATION OF ROFLUMILAST AND QUERCETIN FOR CORRECTION OXYGEN- INDEPENDENT MECHANISMS AND PHAGOCYTIC ACTIVITY OF MACROPHAGE CELLS OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE EXACERBATION OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE WHEN COMBINED WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerych, P; Yatsyshyn, R

    2015-01-01

    Studied oxygen independent reaction and phagocytic activity of macrophage cells of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) II-III stage when combined with coronary heart disease (CHD). The increasing oxygen independent reactions monocytes and neutrophils and a decrease of the parameters that characterize the functional state of phagocytic cells, indicating a decrease in the functional capacity of macrophage phagocytic system (MPS) in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD, which runs as its own or in combination with stable coronary heart disease angina I-II. FC. Severity immunodeficiency state in terms of cellular component of nonspecific immunity in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD II-III stage in conjunction with the accompanying CHD increases with the progression of heart failure. Inclusion of basic therapy of COPD exacerbation and standard treatment of coronary artery disease and drug combinations Roflumilastand quercetin causes normalization of phagocytic indices MFS, indicating improved immune status and improves myocardial perfusion in terms of daily ECG monitoring.

  13. Malignant Tumors Of The Heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrava, J.

    2007-01-01

    Autoptic prevalence of the heart tumors is 0,01 – 0,3 %. 12 – 25 % of them are malignant tumors and 75 – 88 % are benign. Malignancies are more frequently found in the right heart. Metastatic tumors occur 20 – 40-times more frequently than primary neoplasms. Even 94 % of primary malignant tumors are sarcomas. Most frequent of them are angio sarcomas. Heart metastases are only found in extensive dissemination. Highest prevalence of heart metastases is observed in melanoma, followed by malignant germ cell tumors, leukemia, lymphoma, lung cancer. The clinical presentation is due to the combination of heart failure, embolism, arrhythmias, pericardial effusion or tamponade. The symptoms depend on anatomical localization and the tumor size but not on the histological type. Prognosis of the heart malignancies is poor. Untreated patients die within several weeks to 2 years after the diagnosis was determined. Whenever possible the heart tumor should be resected, despite the surgery is usually neither definite nor sufficiently effective therapy. The patients with completely resectable sarcomas have better prognosis (median of survival 12 – 24 months) than the patients with incomplete resection (3 – 10 months). Complete excision is possible in only less than half of the patients. In some patients chemotherapy, radiotherapy, heart transplantation or combination of them prolonged the survival up to 2 years. Despite of this treatment median of the survival is only 1 year. (author)

  14. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  15. Modeling the mitochondrial cardiomyopathy of Barth syndrome with induced pluripotent stem cell and heart-on-chip technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Gang; McCain, Megan L.; Yang, Luhan; He, Aibin; Pasqualini, Francesco Silvio; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Yuan, Hongyan; Jiang, Dawei; Zhang, Donghui; Zangi, Lior; Geva, Judith; Roberts, Amy E.; Ma, Qing; Ding, Jian; Chen, Jinghai; Wang, Da-Zhi; Li, Kai; Wang, Jiwu; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Kulik, Wim; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Laflamme, Michael A.; Murry, Charles E.; Chien, Kenneth R.; Kelley, Richard I.; Church, George M.; Parker, Kevin Kit; Pu, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Study of monogenic mitochondrial cardiomyopathies may yield insights into mitochondrial roles in cardiac development and disease. Here, we combined patient-derived and genetically engineered induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with tissue engineering to elucidate the pathophysiology underlying

  16. The effect of CD34+ cell telomere length and hTERT expression on the outcome of autologous CD34+ cell transplantation in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozman, Jasmina-Ziva; Perme, Maja Pohar; Jez, Mojca; Malicev, Elvira; Krasna, Metka; Novakovic, Srdjan; Vrtovec, Bojan; Rozman, Primoz

    2017-09-01

    Age-related telomere attrition in stem/progenitor cells may diminish their functional capacity and thereby impair the outcome of cell-based therapies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of CD34 + cell telomere length and hTERT expression on the clinical outcome of autologous CD34 + cell transplantation. We studied 43 patients with cardiomyopathy. Their peripheral blood CD34 + cells were mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, enriched by immunoselection and delivered transendocardially. Relative telomere length and expression levels of hTERT were measured using a real-time PCR assay. Immunoselected CD34 + cells had longer telomere length compared to leukocytes in leukapheresis products (p=0.001). In multivariate analysis, CD34 + cell telomere length was not associated with the clinical outcome (b=3.306, p=0.540). While hTERT expression was undetectable in all leukapheresis products, 94.4% of the CD34 + enriched cell products expressed hTERT. Higher CD34 + hTERT expression was associated with a better clinical outcome on univariate analysis (b=87.911, p=0.047). Our findings demonstrate that CD34 + cell telomere length may not influence the clinical outcome in cardiomyopathy patients treated with autologous CD34 + cell transplantation. Larger studies are needed to validate the impact of the CD34 + hTERT expression on the clinical outcome of autologous CD34 + cell transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Encapsulated glucagon-like peptide-1-producing mesenchymal stem cells have a beneficial effect on failing pig hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, Elizabeth J; Farrell, Kelly A; Malik, Nadim

    2012-01-01

    -life in vivo. The effects of prolonged GLP-1 delivery from stromal cells post-MI were evaluated in a porcine model. Human mesenchymal stem cells immortalized and engineered to produce a GLP-1 fusion protein were encapsulated in alginate (bead-GLP-1 MSC) and delivered to coronary artery branches. Control groups...... were cell-free beads and beads containing unmodified MSCs (bead-MSC), n = 4-5 per group. Echocardiography confirmed left ventricular (LV) dysfunction at time of delivery in all groups. Four weeks after intervention, only the bead-GLP-1 MSC group demonstrated LV function improvement toward baseline...... and showed decreased infarction area compared with controls. Histological analysis showed reduced inflammation and a trend toward reduced apoptosis in the infarct zone. Increased collagen but fewer myofibroblasts were observed in infarcts of the bead-GLP-1 MSC and bead-MSC groups, and significantly more...

  18. Uniquely identifying cell orientation and sarcomere length in the intact rodent heart with oblique plane remote focussing microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, A. D.; Burton, R. A. B.; Bub, G.; Wilson, T.

    2015-07-01

    In cardiac imaging, the spacing between sub-cellular sarcomere structures is of great importance to physiologists in understanding muscle design and performance. Making accurate measurements of the sarcomere length (SL) presents a significant imaging challenge owing to the size of the SL (~2μm) and its naturally low variability (pathological models of chronic hypertension. As well as improving measurement precision, the distribution of α across the field of view provides additional structural information which can be related to disease morphology. To validate this new imaging protocol, the value of α calculated from the oblique planes provided the input to a rigid model cell which was used to predict the appearance of the cell in the conventional focal plane. The comparison of the model to the image data provided a confidence metric for our measurements. Finally, by considering the optical transfer function, the range of cell orientations for which the method is valid could be calculated.

  19. Atlantic salmon endothelial cells from the heart were more susceptible than fibroblasts from the bulbus arteriosus to four RNA viruses but protected from two viruses by dsRNA pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Phuc H; Tong, Winnie W L; Misk, Ehab; Jones, Ginny; Lumsden, John S; Bols, Niels C

    2017-11-01

    Heart diseases caused by viruses are major causes of Atlantic salmon aquaculture loss. Two Atlantic salmon cardiovascular cell lines, an endothelial cell line (ASHe) from the heart and a fibroblast cell line (BAASf) from the bulbus arteriosus, were evaluated for their response to four fish viruses, CSV, IPNV, VHSV IVa and VHSV IVb, and the innate immune agonist, double-stranded RNA mimic poly IC. All four viruses caused cytopathic effects in ASHe and BAASf. However, ASHe was more susceptible to all four viruses than BAASf. When comparing between the viruses, ASHe cells were found to be moderately susceptible to CSV and VHSV IVb, but highly susceptible to IPNV and VHSV IVa induced cell death. All four viruses were capable of propagating in the ASHe cell line, leading to increases in virus titre over time. In BAASf, CSV and IPNV produced more than one log increase in titre from initial infection, but VHSV IVb and IVa did not. When looking at the antiviral response of both cell lines, Mx proteins were induced in ASHe and BAASf by poly IC. All four viruses induced Mx proteins in BAASf, while only CSV and VHSV IVb induced Mx proteins in ASHe. IPNV and VHSV IVa suppressed Mx proteins expression in ASHe. Pretreatment of ASHe with poly IC to allow for Mx proteins accumulation protected the culture from subsequent infections with IPNV and VHSV IVa, resulting in delayed cell death, reduced virus titres and reduced viral proteins expression. These data suggest that endothelial cells potentially can serve as points of infections for viruses in the heart and that two of the four viruses, IPNV and VHSV IVa, have mechanisms to avoid or downregulate antiviral responses in ASHe cells. Furthermore, the high susceptibility of the ASHe cell line to IPNV and VHSV IVa can make it a useful tool for studying antiviral compounds against these viruses and for general detection of fish viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure ... problem may cause heart failure or make heart failure worse. Heart valve surgery may be needed to repair or ...

  1. Epicardium-Derived Heart Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke M. Smits

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, cell replacement therapy has emerged as a potential approach to treat patients suffering from myocardial infarction (MI. The transplantation or local stimulation of progenitor cells with the ability to form new cardiac tissue provides a novel strategy to overcome the massive loss of myocardium after MI. In this regard the epicardium, the outer layer of the heart, is a tractable local progenitor cell population for therapeutic pursuit. The epicardium has a crucial role in formation of the embryonic heart. After activation and migration into the developing myocardium, epicardial cells differentiate into several cardiac cells types. Additionally, the epicardium provides instructive signals for the growth of the myocardium and coronary angiogenesis. In the adult heart, the epicardium is quiescent, but recent evidence suggests that it becomes reactivated upon damage and recapitulates at least part of its embryonic functions. In this review we provide an update on the current knowledge regarding the contribution of epicardial cells to the adult mammalian heart during the injury response.

  2. Effect of everolimus initiation and early calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal on myocardial FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Kiran; Gustafsson, Finn; Gullestad, Lars

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Through immunosuppression CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in allograft rejection. Post-HTx treatment with everolimus is associated with slower progression of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) - chronic rejection - than CNI based therapy. We hypothes......BACKGROUND: Through immunosuppression CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in allograft rejection. Post-HTx treatment with everolimus is associated with slower progression of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) - chronic rejection - than CNI based therapy. We...... hypothesized treatment with everolimus reduced the risk of CAV by modulating myocardial FoxP3 levels. METHODS: 15 patients from the Schedule trial comparing everolimus, MMF, steroid and early CNI (Everolimus, n=8) withdrawal to conventional CNI based immunosuppression (Controls, n=7) after de novo HTx were...

  3. Effects of simvastatin/ezetimibe on microparticles, endothelial progenitor cells and platelet aggregation in subjects with coronary heart disease under antiplatelet therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, L.M.; França, C.N.; Izar, M.C.; Bianco, H.T.; Lins, L.S.; Barbosa, S.P.; Pinheiro, L.F.; Fonseca, F.A.H. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Departamento de Medicina, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    It is not known whether the addition of ezetimibe to statins adds cardiovascular protection beyond the expected changes in lipid levels. Subjects with coronary heart disease were treated with four consecutive 1-week courses of therapy (T) and evaluations. The courses were: T1, 100 mg aspirin alone; T2, 100 mg aspirin and 40 mg simvastatin/10 mg ezetimibe; T3, 40 mg simvastatin/10 mg ezetimibe, and 75 mg clopidogrel (300 mg initial loading dose); T4, 75 mg clopidogrel alone. Platelet aggregation was examined in whole blood. Endothelial microparticles (CD51), platelet microparticles (CD42/CD31), and endothelial progenitor cells (CD34/CD133; CDKDR/CD133, or CD34/KDR) were quantified by flow cytometry. Endothelial function was examined by flow-mediated dilation. Comparisons between therapies revealed differences in lipids (T2 and T3T1 and T4, P=0.001). Decreased platelet aggregation was observed after aspirin (arachidonic acid, T1cells. Cardiovascular protection following therapy with simvastatin/ezetimibe seems restricted to lipid changes and improvement of endothelial function not affecting the release of microparticles, mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells or decreased platelet aggregation.

  4. Effects of simvastatin/ezetimibe on microparticles, endothelial progenitor cells and platelet aggregation in subjects with coronary heart disease under antiplatelet therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, L.M.; França, C.N.; Izar, M.C.; Bianco, H.T.; Lins, L.S.; Barbosa, S.P.; Pinheiro, L.F.; Fonseca, F.A.H.

    2014-01-01

    It is not known whether the addition of ezetimibe to statins adds cardiovascular protection beyond the expected changes in lipid levels. Subjects with coronary heart disease were treated with four consecutive 1-week courses of therapy (T) and evaluations. The courses were: T1, 100 mg aspirin alone; T2, 100 mg aspirin and 40 mg simvastatin/10 mg ezetimibe; T3, 40 mg simvastatin/10 mg ezetimibe, and 75 mg clopidogrel (300 mg initial loading dose); T4, 75 mg clopidogrel alone. Platelet aggregation was examined in whole blood. Endothelial microparticles (CD51), platelet microparticles (CD42/CD31), and endothelial progenitor cells (CD34/CD133; CDKDR/CD133, or CD34/KDR) were quantified by flow cytometry. Endothelial function was examined by flow-mediated dilation. Comparisons between therapies revealed differences in lipids (T2 and T3T1 and T4, P=0.001). Decreased platelet aggregation was observed after aspirin (arachidonic acid, T1cells. Cardiovascular protection following therapy with simvastatin/ezetimibe seems restricted to lipid changes and improvement of endothelial function not affecting the release of microparticles, mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells or decreased platelet aggregation

  5. Valvular Heart Disease in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe MC Rosano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural valvular heart disease may be the cause of heart failure or may worsen the clinical status of patients with heart failure. Heart failure may also develop in patients treated with valve surgery. Patients with heart failure with valvular heart disease are at increased risk of events including sudden cardiac death. Before considering intervention (surgical or percutaneous all patients should receive appropriate medical and device therapy taking into account that vasodilators must be used with caution in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Numerous percutaneous and/or hybrid procedures have been introduced in the past few years and they are changing the management of valvular heart disease. In patients with heart failure and valvular heart disease, either primary or functional, the whole process of decision-making should be staged through a comprehensive evaluation of the risk– benefit ratio of different treatment strategies and should be made by a multidisciplinary ‘heart team’ with a particular expertise in valvular heart disease. The heart team should include heart failure cardiologists, cardiac surgeons/structural valve interventionists, imaging specialists, anaesthetists, geriatricians and intensive care specialists. This article will review recent developments and distill practical guidance in the management of this important heart failure co-morbidity.

  6. New Trends in Heart Regeneration: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochegarov A

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we focus on new approaches that could lead to the regeneration of heart muscle and the restoration of cardiac muscle function derived from newly-formed cardiomyocytes. Various strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, adult bone marrow stem cells and cardiac spheres from human heart biopsies are described. Pathological conditions which lead to atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease often are followed by myocardial infarction causing myocardial cell death. After cell death, there is very little self-regeneration of the cardiac muscle tissue, which is replaced by non-contractile connective tissue, thus weakening the ability of the heart muscle to contract fully and leading to heart failure. A number of experimental research approaches to stimulate heart muscle regeneration with the hope of regaining normal or near normal heart function in the damaged heart muscle have been attempted. Some of these very interesting studies have used a variety of stem cell types in combination with potential cardiogenic differentiation factors in an attempt to promote differentiation of new cardiac muscle for possible future use in the clinical treatment of patients who have suffered heart muscle damage from acute myocardial infarctions or related cardiovascular diseases. Although progress has been made in recent years relative to promoting the differentiation of cardiac muscle tissue from non-muscle cells, much work remains to be done for this technology to be used routinely in translational clinical medicine to treat patients with damaged heart muscle tissue and return such individuals to pre-heart-attack activity levels.

  7. Inhibition of Progenitor Dendritic Cell Maturation by Plasma from Patients with Peripartum Cardiomyopathy: Role in Pregnancy-associated Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E. Ellis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play dual roles in innate and adaptive immunity based on their functional maturity, and both innate and adaptive immune responses have been implicated in myocardial tissue remodeling associated with cardiomyopathies. Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a rare disorder which affects women within one month antepartum to five months postpartum. A high occurrence of PPCM in central Haiti (1 in 300 live births provided the unique opportunity to study the relationship of immune activation and DC maturation to the etiology of this disorder. Plasma samples from two groups (n = 12 of age- and parity-matched Haitian women with or without evidence of PPCM were tested for levels of biomarkers of cardiac tissue remodeling and immune activation. Significantly elevated levels of GM-CSF, endothelin-1, proBNP and CRP and decreased levels of TGF- were measured in PPCM subjects relative to controls. Yet despite these findings, in vitro maturation of normal human cord blood derived progenitor dendritic cells (CBDCs was significantly reduced (p < 0.001 in the presence of plasma from PPCM patients relative to plasma from post-partum control subjects as determined by expression of CD80, CD86, CD83, CCR7, MHC class II and the ability of these matured CBDCs to induce allo-responses in PBMCs. These results represent the first findings linking inhibition of DC maturation to the dysregulation of normal physiologic cardiac tissue remodeling during pregnancy and the pathogenesis of PPCM.

  8. [The Paris cell for collecting preoccupying information (la CRIP 75): an organization at the heart of child protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magny, J; Reveillère, C

    2011-09-01

    Within the objective of coordinating actions of the different partners whose mission involves childhood protection measures, and to allow convergence of preoccupying information toward a centralized unit, law n(o) 2007-293 of 5 March 2007 reforming child protection requires the creation of a departmental cell for the collection, processing, and assessment of preoccupying information (cellule départementale, de recueil, de traitement, et d'évaluation des informations préoccupantes, CRIP) on the circumstances of a minor in danger or at risk of being so. The CRIP 75 is a multidisciplinary cell comprising an administrative pole, a socio-educational pole, and a medical health officer. Its mission is to participate in assessing preoccupying information and directing it appropriately, with a preference toward treating situations within an administrative framework and in accordance with the parents. The public prosecutor is only called in when the recommended measures have not provided an adequate response to the danger. Situations that are a matter for prosecution as a criminal offence are transmitted directly to the public prosecutor's office, as are situations for which the social or medico social services are unable to make an assessment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Revealing Hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saghaug, Kristin Falck; Pattison, George; Lindgren, Peter

    2014-01-01

    with reference to Tillich’s account of the meaning of revelation through culture and art, summed up in the statement that “(...) revelation is the manifestation of the ground of being for human knowledge” (Tillich, 1951, p.94), which, we argue, can be extended to everyday experiences, for example, in business......Some small business owners want to balance personal values as well as economic values. “I have to follow my heart” or “it must be meaningful” some of them say. But how might they be able to know what gives meaning to the heart? The philosophical theologian Paul Tillich finds that the problem...... life. In Tillich’s own terms, even preliminary concerns may point at an ultimate concern (Tillich, 1964), which can also be understood as ‘knowledge of the heart’. Our account is also connected to wider discussions concerning the nature of intuition....

  10. Neuronal death and synapse elimination in the olivocerebellar system. II. Cell counts in the inferior olive of adult x-irradiated rats and weaver and reeler mutant mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shojaeian, H.; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N.; Mariani, J.

    1985-01-01

    Cell death in the developing rat inferior olive precedes the regression of the polyneuronal innervation of Purkinje cells by olivary axons (i.e., climbing fibers), suggesting that the involution of the redundant olivocerebellar contacts is caused by a withdrawal of supernumerary axonal collaterals rather than by degeneration of the parent cell. However, a subsequent apparent increase of the olivary population occurs, which could eventually mask a residual presynaptic cell death taking place at the same time. Therefore, cell counts were performed in the inferior olive of adult rodents in which the multiple innervation of Purkinje cells by olivary axons is maintained, with the idea that if cell death plays a role in the regression of supernumerary climbing fibers, the number of olivary cells should be higher in these animals than in their controls. The results show that the size of the cell population in the inferior olive of weaver and reeler mutant mice and rats degranulated by early postnatal x-irradiation does not differ significantly from that of their controls. Similarly, the distribution of the cells in the four main olivary subnuclei is not modified in weaver mice and x-irradiated rats. The present data further support the assumption that the regression of the polyneuronal innervation of Purkinje cells occurs independently of cell death in the presynaptic population

  11. Getting a New Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be able to replace it with an artificial (man-made) valve. Cardiac size reduction . During this procedure, your doctor removes a piece of the heart muscle from an enlarged heart. This makes your heart ...

  12. Heart-Health Screenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools For Your Heart Health • Watch, Learn & Live Animations Library Subscribe to Heart Insight magazine and monthly ... in Spanish . Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  13. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recommendations to make a full recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions ... Support Network Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  14. Open heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002950.htm Open heart surgery To use the sharing features on this ... large arteries connected to the heart. The term "open heart surgery" means that you are connected to a ...

  15. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  16. Congenital Heart Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart defects. Important Notice The Congenital Heart Information Network website is temporarily out of service. Please join ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright © ...

  17. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  18. Hypertensive heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000163.htm Hypertensive heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart problems that occur because of ...

  19. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  20. Right heart ventriculography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiography - right heart ... moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can ... is injected into the right side of the heart. It helps the cardiologist determine the size and ...

  1. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Fraser CD, Kane LC. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, ... Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern ...

  2. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  3. Mechanism of artificial heart

    CERN Document Server

    Yamane, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    This book first describes medical devices in relation to regenerative medicine before turning to a more specific topic: artificial heart technologies. Not only the pump mechanisms but also the bearing, motor mechanisms, and materials are described, including expert information. Design methods are described to enhance hemocompatibility: main concerns are reduction of blood cell damage and protein break, as well as prevention of blood clotting. Regulatory science from R&D to clinical trials is also discussed to verify the safety and efficacy of the devices.

  4. The feasibility of evaluating radiation dose to the heart by integrating kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography in stereotactic body radiotherapy of early non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chengxin; Gong, Guanzhong; Guo, Chen; Liu, Tonghai; Lu, Jie; Zhao, Hong; Dong, Wei; Yin, Yong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of contouring the planning risk organ volume (PRV) for the heart, and to determine the probability of evaluating radiation dose to the heart using kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) in early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Seventeen NSCLC patients who received SBRT (5Gy/f × 10f dose) were enrolled and subjected to CBCT and CT imaging analyses to plan treatment. Sequential planning CBCT images of individual patient’s hearts were analyzed for reproducibility of heart contouring and volume. Comparative analyses were made between the planning CT- and CBCT-detected heart margins and dose-volume indices for treatment. The heart volume from planning CT images was significantly smaller than that from CBCT scans (p < 0.05), and the volumes based on the different series of CBCT images were similar (p > 0.05).The overlap of the heart region on the same anatomical section between the first series of CBCT scans and other scans reached 0.985 ± 0.020 without statistically significant differences (p > 0.05). The mean margins of the heart from planning CT and CBCT scans were 10.5 ± 2.8 mm in the left direction, 5.9 ± 2.8 mm in the right direction, 2.2 ± 1.6 mm in the direction of the head, 3.3 ± 2.2 mm in the direction of the foot, 6.7 ± 1.1 mm in the anterior direction, and 4.5 mm ± 2.5 mm in the posterior direction. All relative and absolute dose-volume indices obtained from CBCT images were significantly larger than those from planning CT scans (p < 0.05), with the exception of the volume in the 5Gy region. The PRV of heart contouring based on kV-CBCT is feasible with good reproducibility. More accurate and objective dose-volume indices may be obtained for NSCLC patients by using kV-CBCT, instead of CT, to plan SBRT

  5. [A rare cause of heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutersohn, Andreas; Oestmann, Andreas

    2014-12-10

    We report the case of a 52 years old patient with dilated cardiomyopathy. Ischemic heart disease was excluded by coronary angiography. However, bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy was present on plain chest radiography. Transbronchial biopsy showed non-necrotizing, epitheloid cell granulomas and thus sarcoidosis was diagnosed. A MRI of the heart confirmed the cardiac involvement by the sarcoidosis with corresponding structural changes.

  6. From developmental biology to heart repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campione, M.; Moorman, A. F.; Kelly, R. G.

    2007-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of cardiac development have fuelled research into cellular approaches to myocardial repair of the damaged heart. In this collection of reviews we present recent advances into the basic mechanisms of heart development and the resident and non-resident progenitor cell

  7. Target Heart Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  8. Alcohol and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  9. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  10. Protein and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  11. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  12. The association between the transfusion of small volumes of leucocyte-depleted red blood cells and outcomes in patients undergoing open-heart valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittermann, Armin; Koster, Andreas; Faraoni, David; Börgermann, Jochen; Schirmer, Uwe; Gummert, Jan F

    2017-02-01

    The relationship between the transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) units and outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery is the subject of intense debates. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the transfusion of 1-2 leucocyte-depleted (LD) RBC units and outcomes in patients undergoing open-heart valve surgery. The investigation encompassed consecutive patients undergoing open-heart valve surgery at our institution between July 2009 and March 2015 who received no (RBC- group) or 1-2 units of LD RBC (RBC+ group). End-points were 30-day mortality (primary), the incidence of in-hospital major organ dysfunctions and 1-year mortality (secondary). Propensity score (PS)-adjusted statistical analysis was used to assess the effect of RBC transfusion on end-points. Thirty-day mortality rate was 0.2% (3/1485) in the RBC- group and 0.4% (6/1672) in the RBC+ group, with a PS-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for 30-day mortality of 1.00 (95% CI: 0.21-4.83;P = 0.99). The two groups showed no significant differences in PS-adjusted ORs for major complications, such as stroke, low cardiac output syndrome, thoracic wound infection and prolonged mechanical ventilation (>24 h). The PS-adjusted ORs for prolonged intensive care unit stay (>48 h) were, however, significantly higher in the RBC+ group (OR = 1.34 [95%CI: 1.04-1.72; P = 0.02]) than in the RBC- group. One-year mortality was comparable between groups (PS-adjusted hazard ratio for the RBC+ group: 0.85 [95% CI: 0.42-1.72; P = 0.65]). Our data do not provide evidence that in patients undergoing valve surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, transfusion of 1-2 units of LD RBC increases operative mortality, the incidence of postoperative complications or 1-year mortality. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  13. Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as lupus. People who have these diseases make proteins called antibodies that attack and damage the body's tissues or cells. In pregnant women, antibodies can cross the placenta. (The placenta ...

  14. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Stewart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses computations of blood flow through prosthetic tilting disk valve. Computational procedure developed in simulation used to design better artificial hearts and valves by reducing or eliminating following adverse flow characteristics: large pressure losses, which prevent hearts from working efficiently; separated and secondary flows, which causes clotting; and high turbulent shear stresses, which damages red blood cells. Report reiterates and expands upon part of NASA technical memorandum "Computed Flow Through an Artificial Heart and Valve" (ARC-12983). Also based partly on research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478).

  15. Paroxysmal atrioventricular block: Electrophysiological mechanism of phase 4 conduction block in the His-Purkinje system: A comparison with phase 3 block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenasa, Mohammad; Josephson, Mark E; Wit, Andrew L

    2017-11-01

    Paroxysmal atrioventricular (A-V) block is relatively rare, and due to its transient nature, it is often under recognized. It is often triggered by atrial, junctional, or ventricular premature beats, and occurs in the presence of a diseased His-Purkinje system (HPS). Here, we present a 45-year-old white male who was admitted for observation due to recurrent syncope and near-syncope, who had paroxysmal A-V block. The likely cellular electrophysiological mechanisms(s) of paroxysmal A-V block and its differential diagnosis and management are discussed. Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring was done while the patient was in the cardiac unit. Multiple episodes of paroxysmal A-V block were documented in this case. All episodes were initiated and terminated with atrial/junctional premature beats. The patient underwent permanent pacemaker implantation and has remained asymptomatic since then. Paroxysmal A-V block is rare and often causes syncope or near-syncope. Permanent pacemaker implantation is indicated according to the current guidelines. Paroxysmal A-V block occurs in the setting of diseased HPS and is bradycardia-dependent. The detailed electrophysiological mechanisms, which involve phase 4 diastolic depolarization, and differential diagnosis are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Take heart!

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    Recently, ten new semi-automatic defibrillators were installed at various locations around CERN. This is a preventive measure intended to provide cardiac arrest victims with the best possible response. The first responder could be you!   The Director-General has welcomed the initiative of the Medical Service and Fire Brigade for the installation of ten new semi-automatic defibrillators. You have probably seen them on your way to the restaurant, for example:  brand new semi-automatic defibrillators, ready for an emergency. Housed in a white wall-mounted case, the bright red defibrillators are marked with a white heart symbol crossed by a lightning bolt (see photo). The defibrillator is designed so that anyone can use it. “Anyone can use it, you don’t need to be a health professional,” says Dr Reymond from CERN's Medical Service. Together with the CERN Fire Brigade, he is behind the initiative to have these units put in place. And with good reason, as the unit...

  17. How Does the Ca2+-paradox Injury Induce Contracture in the Heart?—A Combined Study of the Intracellular Ca2+ Dynamics and Cell Structures in Perfused Rat Hearts—

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mani, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hideo; Adachi, Tetsuya; Ikegawa, Masaya; Dai, Ping; Fujita, Naohisa; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    The calcium (Ca 2+ )-paradox injury of the heart, induced by restoration of extracellular Ca 2+ after its short-term depletion, is known to provoke cardiomyocyte contracture. However, undetermined is how the Ca 2+ -paradox provokes such a distinctive presentation of myocytes in the heart. To address this, we imaged sequential intracellular Ca 2+ dynamics and concomitant structures of the subepicardial ventricular myocytes in fluo3-loaded, Langendorff-perfused rat hearts produced by the Ca 2+ paradox. Under rapid-scanning confocal microscopy, repletion of Ca 2+ following its depletion produced high-frequency Ca 2+ waves in individual myocytes with asynchronous localized contractions, resulting in contracture within 10 min. Such alterations of myocytes were attenuated by 5-mM NiCl 2 , but not by verapamil, SEA0400, or combination of ryanodine and thapsigargin, indicating a contribution of non-specific transmembrane Ca 2+ influx in the injury. However, saponin-induced membrane permeabilization of Ca 2+ showed no apparent contracture despite the emergence of high-frequency Ca 2+ waves, indicating an essential role of myocyte-myocyte and myocyte-extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanical connections in the Ca 2+ paradox. In immunohistochemistry Ca 2+ depletion produced separation of the intercalated disc that expresses cadherin and dissipation of β-dystroglycan located along the sarcolemma. Taken together, along with the trans-sarcolemmal Ca 2+ influx, disruption of cell-cell and cell-ECM connections is essential for contracture in the Ca 2+ -paradox injury

  18. MicroRNA-Mediated Down-Regulation of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) Attenuates the Apoptosis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) Transplanted into Infarcted Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Youn; Shin, Sunhye; Lee, Jiyun; Seo, Hyang-Hee; Lim, Kyu Hee; Kim, Hyemin; Choi, Jung-Won; Kim, Sang Woo; Lee, Seahyung; Lim, Soyeon; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2016-10-20

    Stem cell therapy using adult stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has produced some promising results in treating the damaged heart. However, the low survival rate of MSCs after transplantation is still one of the crucial factors that limit the therapeutic effect of stem cells. In the damaged heart, oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production can cause the death of transplanted MSCs. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) has been implicated in the development of oxidative stress-related pathologic conditions. Thus, we hypothesized that down-regulation of ASK1 in human MSCs (hMSCs) might attenuate the post-transplantation death of MSCs. To test this hypothesis, we screened microRNAs (miRNAs) based on a miRNA-target prediction database and empirical data and investigated the anti-apoptotic effect of selected miRNAs on human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and on rat myocardial infarction (MI) models. Our data indicated that miRNA-301a most significantly suppressed ASK1 expression in hASCs. Apoptosis-related genes were significantly down-regulated in miRNA-301a-enriched hASCs exposed to hypoxic conditions. Taken together, these data show that miRNA-mediated down-regulation of ASK1 protects MSCs during post-transplantation, leading to an increase in the efficacy of MSC-based cell therapy.

  19. MicroRNA-Mediated Down-Regulation of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1 Attenuates the Apoptosis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs Transplanted into Infarcted Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Youn Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy using adult stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has produced some promising results in treating the damaged heart. However, the low survival rate of MSCs after transplantation is still one of the crucial factors that limit the therapeutic effect of stem cells. In the damaged heart, oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS production can cause the death of transplanted MSCs. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 has been implicated in the development of oxidative stress-related pathologic conditions. Thus, we hypothesized that down-regulation of ASK1 in human MSCs (hMSCs might attenuate the post-transplantation death of MSCs. To test this hypothesis, we screened microRNAs (miRNAs based on a miRNA-target prediction database and empirical data and investigated the anti-apoptotic effect of selected miRNAs on human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs and on rat myocardial infarction (MI models. Our data indicated that miRNA-301a most significantly suppressed ASK1 expression in hASCs. Apoptosis-related genes were significantly down-regulated in miRNA-301a-enriched hASCs exposed to hypoxic conditions. Taken together, these data show that miRNA-mediated down-regulation of ASK1 protects MSCs during post-transplantation, leading to an increase in the efficacy of MSC-based cell therapy.

  20. Study on the effect of the survival time and the T cells in the discordant heart xenotransplantation produced by intrathymic inoculation with xenogeneic antigen using the model of pig to monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Jichen; Jiang Gening; Ding Jiaan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effect of survival time and T cells on the delayed xenograft rejection caused by intrathymic injection of xenogeneic antigen in the discordant cardiac xenotransplantation, and to investigate the possibility of inducing the tolerance for cardiac xenografts. Methods: In this experiment, pig and monkey were, respectively, selected as donor and recipient. Donor and recipient were divided randomly into four groups. In the blank group (group A) recipients didn't accept any treatments but heart xenotransplantation; In the whole body irradiation (WBI) group (group B) 3 Gy ( 60 Co) was received on d30 before transplantation. In the intrathymic injection group (group C) monkeys were pretreated by the intrathymic injection of pig spleen cells (5 x 10 7 ) on d21 before transplantation, the other treatments were the same as that in group A. In the irradiation and intrathymic injection group (group D) monkeys were pretreated by WBI and the intrathymic injection of pig spleen cells at the time just as that in group B and group C. In every group, monkeys were performed heterotopic heart xenotransplantation in abdomen in order to observe the survival time of cardiac xenografts. Results: (1) Survival time of donor heart in group D (91.1 ± 22.8 h) was significantly longer than group B(42.56 ± 1.4 h) and group A (35.6 ± 2.2 h) (P 0.05). (3) The results of MLR showed that there is significant reduction in group D than in group A and B (P + and CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood, but pretreatment with IT and WBI can induce T cells immune 4 suppression or immune tolerance, that is similar to allotransplantation in the rodent. (2) Pretreatment with IT and WBI can induce T cells immune suppression or immune tolerance. (authors)

  1. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... Making This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells improve mouse non-heart-beating liver graft survival by inhibiting Kupffer cell apoptosis via TLR4-ERK1/2-Fas/FasL-caspase3 pathway regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Tian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver transplantation is the optimal treatment option for end-stage liver disease, but organ shortages dramatically restrict its application. Donation after cardiac death (DCD is an alternative approach that may expand the donor pool, but it faces challenges such as graft dysfunction, early graft loss, and cholangiopathy. Moreover, DCD liver grafts are no longer eligible for transplantation after their warm ischaemic time exceeds 30 min. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been proposed as a promising therapy for treatment of certain liver diseases, but the role of MSCs in DCD liver graft function remains elusive. Methods In this study, we established an arterialized mouse non-heart-beating (NHB liver transplantation model, and compared survival rates, cytokine and chemokine expression, histology, and the results of in vitro co-culture experiments in animals with or without MSC infusion. Results MSCs markedly ameliorated NHB liver graft injury and improved survival post-transplantation. Additionally, MSCs suppressed Kupffer cell apoptosis, Th1/Th17 immune responses, chemokine expression, and inflammatory cell infiltration. In vitro, PGE2 secreted by MSCs inhibited Kupffer cell apoptosis via TLR4-ERK1/2-caspase3 pathway regulation. Conclusion Our study uncovers a protective role for MSCs and elucidates the underlying immunomodulatory mechanism in an NHB liver transplantation model. Our results suggest that MSCs are uniquely positioned for use in future clinical studies owing to their ability to protect DCD liver grafts, particularly in patients for whom DCD organs are not an option according to current criteria.

  3. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in the Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 Gene Is Associated with Coronary Heart Disease in Chinese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Feng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD is highly prevalent globally and a major cause of mortality. Genetic predisposition is a non-modifiable risk factor associated with CHD. Eighty-four Chinese patients with CHD and 253 healthy Chinese controls without CHD were recruited. Major clinical data were collected, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1 gene at position 801 (G to A, rs1801157 in the 3'-untranslated region was identified. The correlation between rs1801157 genotypes and CHD was evaluated by a multivariate logistic regression analysis. The allele frequency in the CHD and control groups was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE (p > 0.05. The frequency of the GG genotype in the CHD group (59.5% was significantly higher than that in the control group (49.8% (p = 0.036. A number of variables, including male sex, age, presence of hypertension, and the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, triglycerides (TG, uric acid, and total bilirubin, were associated with CHD in a primary univariate analysis. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, the GG genotype (GG:AA, odds ratio (OR = 2.31, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.21–5.23, male sex, advanced age (≥60 years, presence of hypertension, LDL-C level ≥ 3.33 mg/dL, HDL-C level < 1.03 mg/dL, and TG level ≥ 1.7 mg/dL were independent risk factors for CHD.

  4. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P; Koval, Olha M; Joiner, Mei-Ling A; Hall, Duane D; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2015-01-20

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant-negative (DN) MCU. Here, we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found that MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU-enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment before each heartbeat. Our findings show that MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest that MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate.

  5. Heart Age PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.

  6. Safety and Efficacy of the Intravenous Infusion of Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Patients With Heart Failure: A Phase 1/2 Randomized Controlled Trial (RIMECARD Trial [Randomized Clinical Trial of Intravenous Infusion Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Cardiopathy]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolucci, Jorge; Verdugo, Fernando J; González, Paz L; Larrea, Ricardo E; Abarzua, Ema; Goset, Carlos; Rojo, Pamela; Palma, Ivan; Lamich, Ruben; Pedreros, Pablo A; Valdivia, Gloria; Lopez, Valentina M; Nazzal, Carolina; Alcayaga-Miranda, Francisca; Cuenca, Jimena; Brobeck, Matthew J; Patel, Amit N; Figueroa, Fernando E; Khoury, Maroun

    2017-10-27

    Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSC) are easily accessible and expanded in vitro, possess distinct properties, and improve myocardial remodeling and function in experimental models of cardiovascular disease. Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have been previously assessed for their therapeutic potential in individuals with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, no clinical trial has evaluated intravenous infusion of UC-MSCs in these patients. Evaluate the safety and efficacy of the intravenous infusion of UC-MSC in patients with chronic stable heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. Patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction under optimal medical treatment were randomized to intravenous infusion of allogenic UC-MSCs (Cellistem, Cells for Cells S.A., Santiago, Chile; 1×10 6 cells/kg) or placebo (n=15 per group). UC-MSCs in vitro, compared with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, displayed a 55-fold increase in the expression of hepatocyte growth factor, known to be involved in myogenesis, cell migration, and immunoregulation. UC-MSC-treated patients presented no adverse events related to the cell infusion, and none of the patients tested at 0, 15, and 90 days presented alloantibodies to the UC-MSCs (n=7). Only the UC-MSC-treated group exhibited significant improvements in left ventricular ejection fraction at 3, 6, and 12 months of follow-up assessed both through transthoracic echocardiography ( P =0.0167 versus baseline) and cardiac MRI ( P =0.025 versus baseline). Echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction change from baseline to month 12 differed significantly between groups (+7.07±6.22% versus +1.85±5.60%; P =0.028). In addition, at all follow-up time points, UC-MSC-treated patients displayed improvements of New York Heart Association functional class ( P =0.0167 versus baseline) and Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire ( P <0.05 versus baseline). At study completion

  7. Heart rate index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, C; Pedersen, F H; Svendsen, J H

    1992-01-01

    after the myocardial infarction. A significant correlation (Spearman's correlation coefficient rs, p less than 0.05) was found between LVEF at rest and the following variables assessed at exercise test: 1) the heart rate at rest, 2) rise in heart rate, 3) ratio between maximal heart rate and heart rate...... at rest, 4) rise in systolic blood pressure, 5) rate pressure product at rest, 6) rise in rate pressure product, 7) ratio (rHR) between maximal rate pressure product and rate pressure product at rest, 8) total exercise time. The heart rate was corrected for effects caused by age (heart index (HR...

  8. Clinical significance of the changes of serum levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), endothelin (ET) and T cell subsets distribution type after treatment in patients with coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin; Zhu Xuejun; Liu Sheguo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes in serum SOD, ET levels and T-lymphocyte subsets distribution type after treatment in patients with coronary heart disease. Methods: The levels of serum SOD, ET were detected with RIA and T-lymphocyte subsets distribution type was detected with monoclonal antibody method in 42 cases of coronary heart disease both before and after a course of treatment and 35 controls. Results: before treatment, the levels of serum ET were significantly higher than those in controls (P 4 /CD 8 ratio were significantly lower than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Detection of serum SOD, ET and CD 4 /CD 8 ratio is valuable for the diagnosis and outcome prediction in patients with coronary heart disease. (authors)

  9. Cell Fusion along the Anterior-Posterior Neuroaxis in Mice with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasa R Sankavaram

    Full Text Available It is well documented that bone marrow-derived cells can fuse with a diverse range of cells, including brain cells, under normal or pathological conditions. Inflammation leads to robust fusion of bone marrow-derived cells with Purkinje cells and the formation of binucleate heterokaryons in the cerebellum. Heterokaryons form through the fusion of two developmentally differential cells and as a result contain two distinct nuclei without subsequent nuclear or chromosome loss.In the brain, fusion of bone marrow-derived cells appears to be restricted to the complex and large Purkinje cells, raising the question whether the size of the recipient cell is important for cell fusion in the central nervous system. Purkinje cells are among the largest neurons in the central nervous system and accordingly can harbor two nuclei.Using a well-characterized model for heterokaryon formation in the cerebellum (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis - a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, we report for the first time that green fluorescent protein-labeled bone marrow-derived cells can fuse and form heterokaryons with spinal cord motor neurons. These spinal cord heterokaryons are predominantly located in or adjacent to an active or previously active inflammation site, demonstrating that inflammation and infiltration of immune cells are key for cell fusion in the central nervous system. While some motor neurons were found to contain two nuclei, co-expressing green fluorescent protein and the neuronal marker, neuron-specific nuclear protein, a number of small interneurons also co-expressed green fluorescent protein and the neuronal marker, neuron-specific nuclear protein. These small heterokaryons were scattered in the gray matter of the spinal cord.This novel finding expands the repertoire of neurons that can form heterokaryons with bone marrow-derived cells in the central nervous system, albeit in low numbers, possibly leading to a novel therapy for spinal cord

  10. Reinforced chitosan-based heart valve scaffold and utility of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cardiovascular tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanna, Mohammad Zaki

    Recent research has demonstrated a strong correlation between the differentiation profile of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and scaffold stiffness. Chitosan is being widely studied for tissue engineering applications due to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. However, its use in load-bearing applications is limited due to moderate to low mechanical properties. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of a fiber reinforcement method for enhancing the mechanical properties of chitosan scaffolds. Chitosan fibers were fabricated using a solution extrusion and neutralization method and incorporated into porous chitosan scaffolds. The effects of different fiber/scaffold mass ratios, fiber mechanical properties and fiber lengths on scaffold mechanical properties were studied. The results showed that incorporating fibers improved scaffold strength and stiffness in proportion to the fiber/scaffold mass ratio. A fiber-reinforced heart valve leaflet scaffold achieved strength values comparable to the radial values of human pulmonary and aortic valves. Additionally, the effects of shorter fibers (2 mm) were found to be up to 3-fold greater than longer fibers (10 mm). Despite this reduction in fiber mechanical properties caused by heparin crosslinking, the heparin-modified fibers still improved the mechanical properties of the reinforced scaffolds, but to a lesser extent than the unmodified fibers. The results demonstrate that chitosan fiber-reinforcement can be used to generate tissue-matching mechanical properties in porous chitosan scaffolds and that fiber length and mechanical properties are important parameters in defining the degree of mechanical improvement. We further studied various chemical and physical treatments to improve the mechanical properties of chitosan fibers. With combination of chemical and physical treatments, fiber stiffness improved 40fold compared to unmodified fibers. We also isolated ovine bone marrow-derived MSCs and evaluated their

  11. Sex based levels of C-reactive protein and white blood cell count in subjects with metabolic syndrome: Isfahan Healthy Heart Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharipour, Mojgan; Ramezani, Mohammad Arash; Sadeghi, Masuomeh; Khosravi, Alireza; Masjedi, Mohsen; Khosravi-Boroujeni, Hossein; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2013-06-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell (WBC) are proinflammatory markers. They are major pathophysiological for the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS). This study aimed to address the independent associations between MetS and WBC counts and serum CRP levels and evaluation of their magnitude in relation to the MetS, based on the sex in the Iranian adults. In this cross-sectional study, subjects who met the MetS criteria, based on the Adult Treatment Panel III were selected from the Isfahan Healthy Heart Program database. A questionnaire containing the demographic data, weight, height, waist, and hip circumference of the respondents was completed for each person. Blood pressure was measured and the anthropometric measurements were done, and fasting blood samples were taken for 2 h postload plasma glucose (2 hpp). Serum [total, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and low-density lipoprotein] levels of cholesterol, triglyceride, and CRP as well as WBC counts were determined. The univariate analyses were carried out to assess the relation between the CRP levels, WBC counts with the MetS in both sexes the. In men with the abdominal obesity, the higher levels of WBC count, high serum triglyceride and blood glucose levels, a low serum HDL level, and raised systolic and diastolic blood pressure were observed. However, the higher serum CRP levels were only observed in those with the low serum HDL-cholesterol levels. The mean values of the WBC counts were statistically different between the men with and without MetS, but the mean values of the CRP levels were similar between the two groups. In women, the mean values of WBC count and CRP levels were statistically different in the subjects with and without a MetS components (except for the low serum HDL levels and high diastolic blood pressure for the WBC measures and abdominal obesity for the CRP measures) and for those with and without MetS. The age and smoking adjusted changes in the CRP levels and WBC counts

  12. The heart and hypothyroidism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-09

    Apr 9, 1983 ... influenced by the thyroid disorder and vice versa. We recenrly ... hypothyroidism is a rare cause of heart failure other causes of heart failure must be excluded ... signs of cardiac tamponade and echocardiographic features of a.

  13. Valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gelson, E; Gatzoulis, M; Johnson, M

    2007-01-01

    Valvular disease may be unmasked in pregnancy when physiological changes increase demands on the heart. Women with valvular heart disease require close follow-up during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum

  14. Nuclear Heart Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Nuclear Heart Scan Nuclear Heart Scan Also known as Nuclear Stress Test , ... Learn More Connect With Us Contact Us Directly Policies Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility ...

  15. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  16. Heart Attack Payment - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – national data. This data set includes national-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  17. Heart Attack Payment - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – provider data. This data set includes provider data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  18. Heart Attack Payment - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – state data. This data set includes state-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  19. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often DO NOT consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  20. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  1. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000540.htm Heart disease and intimacy To use the sharing features on ... Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald’s Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  2. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000092.htm Aspirin and heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... healthy people who are at low risk for heart disease. You provider will consider your overall medical condition ...

  3. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  4. Heart bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  5. Control of an air pressure actuated disposable bioreactor for cultivating heart valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beelen, M.J.; Neerincx, P.E.; Molengraft, van de M.J.G.

    2011-01-01

    A disposable injection molded bioreactor for growing tissue-engineered heart valves is controlled to mimic the physiological heart cycle. Tissue-engineered heart valves, cultured from human stem cells, are a possible alternative for replacing failing aortic heart valves, where nowadays biological

  6. Chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper, Ingrid; Easton, Kellie

    2017-01-01

    1. The common symptoms and signs of chronic heart failure are dyspnoea, ankle swelling, raised jugular venous pressure and basal crepitations. Other conditions may be confused with chronic heart failure, including dependent oedema or oedema due to renal or hepatic disease. Shortness of breath may be due to respiratory disease or severe anaemia. Heart failure secondary to lung disease (cor pulmonale) should be distinguished from congestive cardiac failure. Heart failure may also present with l...

  7. Chamber identity programs drive early functional partitioning of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosimann, Christian; Panáková, Daniela; Werdich, Andreas A; Musso, Gabriel; Burger, Alexa; Lawson, Katy L; Carr, Logan A; Nevis, Kathleen R; Sabeh, M Khaled; Zhou, Yi; Davidson, Alan J; DiBiase, Anthony; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-08-26

    The vertebrate heart muscle (myocardium) develops from the first heart field (FHF) and expands by adding second heart field (SHF) cells. While both lineages exist already in teleosts, the primordial contributions of FHF and SHF to heart structure and function remain incompletely understood. Here we delineate the functional contribution of the FHF and SHF to the zebrafish heart using the cis-regulatory elements of the draculin (drl) gene. The drl reporters initially delineate the lateral plate mesoderm, including heart progenitors. Subsequent myocardial drl reporter expression restricts to FHF descendants. We harnessed this unique feature to uncover that loss of tbx5a and pitx2 affect relative FHF versus SHF contributions to the heart. High-resolution physiology reveals distinctive electrical properties of each heart field territory that define a functional boundary within the single zebrafish ventricle. Our data establish that the transcriptional program driving cardiac septation regulates physiologic ventricle partitioning, which successively provides mechanical advantages of sequential contraction.

  8. Taking radionuclides to heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleynhans, P.H.T.; Lotter, M.G.; Van Aswegen, A.; Minnaar, P.C.; Iturralde, M.; Herbst, C.P.; Marx, D.

    1980-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is a main cause of death in South Africa. Non-invasive ECG gated radionuclide bloodpool imaging plays an increasingly useful role in the evalution of the function of the heart as a pump, and the extent of heart muscle perfusion defects is further pinpointed by invasive krypton-81m studies to improve patient management

  9. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: executive summary: a report of the American College ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  10. Heart attack - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and lifestyle Cholesterol - drug treatment Controlling your high blood pressure Deep vein thrombosis - discharge Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart attack - what to ask your doctor Heart bypass ... pacemaker - discharge High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor How to read ...

  11. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  12. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  13. The Heart of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  14. NADPH oxidase/ROS-dependent PYK2 activation is involved in TNF-α-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in rat heart-derived H9c2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chuen-Mao; Lee, I-Ta; Hsu, Ru-Chun; Chi, Pei-Ling; Hsiao, Li-Der

    2013-01-01

    TNF-α plays a mediator role in the pathogenesis of chronic heart failure contributing to cardiac remodeling and peripheral vascular disturbances. The implication of TNF-α in inflammatory responses has been shown to be mediated through up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). However, the detailed mechanisms of TNF-α-induced MMP-9 expression in rat embryonic-heart derived H9c2 cells are largely not defined. We demonstrated that in H9c2 cells, TNF-α induced MMP-9 mRNA and protein expression associated with an increase in the secretion of pro-MMP-9. TNF-α-mediated responses were attenuated by pretreatment with the inhibitor of ROS (N-acetyl-L-cysteine, NAC), NADPH oxidase [apocynin (APO) or diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)], MEK1/2 (U0126), p38 MAPK (SB202190), JNK1/2 (SP600125), NF-κB (Bay11-7082), or PYK2 (PF-431396) and transfection with siRNA of TNFR1, p47 phox , p42, p38, JNK1, p65, or PYK2. Moreover, TNF-α markedly induced NADPH oxidase-derived ROS generation in these cells. TNF-α-enhanced p42/p44 MAPK, p38 MAPK, JNK1/2, and NF-κB (p65) phosphorylation and in vivo binding of p65 to the MMP-9 promoter were inhibited by U0126, SB202190, SP600125, NAC, DPI, or APO. In addition, TNF-α-mediated PYK2 phosphorylation was inhibited by NAC, DPI, or APO. PYK2 inhibition could reduce TNF-α-stimulated MAPKs and NF-κB activation. Thus, in H9c2 cells, we are the first to show that TNF-α-induced MMP-9 expression is mediated through a TNFR1/NADPH oxidase/ROS/PYK2/MAPKs/NF-κB cascade. We demonstrated that NADPH oxidase-derived ROS generation is involved in TNF-α-induced PYK2 activation in these cells. Understanding the regulation of MMP-9 expression and NADPH oxidase activation by TNF-α on H9c2 cells may provide potential therapeutic targets of chronic heart failure. - Highlights: • TNF-α induces MMP-9 secretion and expression via a TNFR1-dependent pathway. • TNF-α induces ROS/PYK2-dependent MMP-9 expression in H9c2 cells. • TNF-α induces

  15. Limited-Access Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the side of the chest. With traditional open heart surgery, the incision is usually 6 to 8 ... attached to a heart-lung machine. In traditional open heart surgery, patients would be connected to the heart- ...

  16. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media for Heart.org Heart and Stroke Association Statistics Each year, the American Heart Association, in conjunction ... health and disease in the population. Heart & Stroke Statistics FAQs What is Prevalence? Prevalence is an estimate ...

  17. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Heart Failure Module 6: Managing Feelings About Heart Failure Download Module Order Hardcopy Heart failure can cause ... professional help for emotional problems. Common Feelings About Heart Failure It is common for people to feel depressed ...

  18. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease Updated:May 3,2018 Most illegal drugs can ... www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml Alcohol and Heart Disease Caffeine and Heart Disease Tobacco and Heart Disease ...

  19. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevent Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and ... can’t change some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of ...

  20. [Studies on the relationship between beta-adrenergic receptor density on cell wall lymphocytes, total serum catecholamine level and heart rate in patients with hyperthyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, J; Zieba, I; Zyśko, D

    2000-08-01

    Hyperthyreosis mimics the hyperadrenergic state and its symptoms were though to be dependent on increased level of catecholamines. Another reason for the symptoms could be the increased density or affinity of beta-adrenergic receptors to catecholamines. The aim of the study was to examine the elements of sympathetic nervous system, thyroid hormones level and their influence on heart rate control in patients with hyperthyreosis. The study was carried out in 18 women, mean age 48.9 +/- 8.7 yrs and 6 men, mean age 54.2 +/- 8.7 yrs. The control group consisted of 30 healthy persons matched for age and sex. We examined the density of beta-adrenergic receptors using radioligand labelling method with 125I-cyanopindolol, serum total catecholamines level with radioenzymatic assay kit, the levels of free thyroid hormones using radioimmunoassays and thyreotropine level with immunoradiometric assay. Maximal, minimal and mean heart rate were studied using Holter monitoring system. The density of beta-adrenergic receptors in hyperthyreosis was 37.3 +/- 21.7 vs 37.2 +/- 18.1 fmol/mg in the control group (p = NS). Total catecholamines level was significantly decreased in hyperthyreosis group: 1.5 +/- 0.89 vs 1.9 +/- 0.73 pmol/ml (p < 0.05). There was significantly higher minimal, maximal and mean heart rate in hyperthyreosis group (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001 and p < 0.05 respectively). There was a weak inverse correlation between minimum heart rate and triiodothyronine level (r = -0.38, p < 0.05). An inverse correlation between triiodothyronine and catecholamines level (r = -0.49, p < 0.05) was observed. Beta-adrenergic receptors density is unchanged and catecholamines level is decreased in hyperthyreosis when compared to normal subjects. There is no correlation between minimal heart rate and adrenergic receptors density or catecholamines level in hyperthyreosis.

  1. Heart Age PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-09-01

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.  Created: 9/1/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/1/2015.

  2. The Danish Heart Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. STUDY POPULATION: All adult (≥15 years) patients...... undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. MAIN VARIABLES: The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR...

  3. Improved motor performance in Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in mice by cerebellar Purkinje-cell specific Dyt1 conditional knocking-out

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoi, Fumiaki; Dang, Mai Tu; Li, Yuqing

    2012-01-01

    Early-onset generalized torsion dystonia (dystonia 1) is an inherited movement disorder caused by mutations in DYT1 (TOR1A), which codes for torsinA. Most patients have a 3-base pair deletion (ΔGAG) in one allele of DYT1, corresponding to a loss of a glutamic acid residue (ΔE) in the C-terminal region of the protein. Functional alterations in basal ganglia circuits and the cerebellum have been reported in dystonia. Pharmacological manipulations or mutations in genes that result in functional ...

  4. Nuclear triiodothyronine receptors in rabbit heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.K.; Ulrich, J.M.; Kaldor, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear triiodothyronine receptors from rat liver have been characterized in detail by several investigators. However, little work has been done in this area using heart tissue. In this study they examined and characterized the triiodothyronine binding in rabbit hearts. Nuclei have been prepared from ventricular muscle cells of normal and thyrotoxic rabbits as well as from atrial muscle cells of normal rabbit. Hearts were perfused with a minimum essential medium containing collagenase and bovine serum albumin. Myocardial cells were isolated and then disrupted by sonication and washing with a Triton X-100 buffer solution. A discontinuous sucrose density gradient was then used to isolate the mycoardial nuclei. Radiolabelled triiodothyronine (T 3 ) binding to nuclei was examined using conditions described by established procedures. Scatchard analysis of the binding data yields maximum binding capacity (B/sub max/) of 0.17 +/- 0.2 pmol/mg DNA and apparent dissociation constant (K/sub d/) of 400 +/- 50 pM for normal heart T 3 -receptors. The apparent capacity for T 3 binding is approximately 40% greater in myocardial nuclei prepared from hearts of hyperthyroid rabbits. The binding capacity of atrial muscle nuclei is about fourfold lower than ventricular cell nuclei. The results suggest that binding capacity for T 3 -receptor in the atrium is considerably lower than that found in the ventricle

  5. Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 cells to synthetic gastric fluid is greater following growth on ready-to-eat deli turkey meat than in brain heart infusion broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Luke D; Faith, Nancy G; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2007-11-01

    Ready-to-eat (RTE) deli meats have been categorized as high-risk foods for contraction of foodborne listeriosis. Several recent listeriosis outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of RTE deli turkey meat. In this study, we examined whether the growth of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 on commercially prepared RTE deli turkey meat causes listerial cells to become more resistant to inactivation by synthetic gastric fluid (SGF). Listerial cells grown on turkey meat to late logarithmic-early stationary phase were significantly more resistant to SGF at pH 7.0, 5.0, or 3.5 than listerial cells grown in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth. The pH was lower in the fluid in packages of turkey meat than in BHI broth (6.5 versus 7.5). However, listerial cells grown in BHI broth adjusted to a lower pH (6.0) did not exhibit enhanced resistance to SGF. The lesser resistance to SGF of listerial cells grown in BHI broth may be due, in part, to the presence of glucose (0.2%). This study indicates the environment presented by the growth of L. monocytogenes on deli turkey meat affects its ability to survive conditions it encounters in the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. "The Heart Game"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dithmer, Marcus; Rasmussen, Jack Ord; Grönvall, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this article is to describe the development and testing of a prototype application (“The Heart Game”) using gamification principles to assist heart patients in their telerehabilitation process in the Teledialog project. Materials and Methods: A prototype game was developed via...... (interviews, participant observations, focus group interviews, and workshop) was used. Interviews with three healthcare professionals and 10 patients were carried out over a period of 2 weeks in order to evaluate the use of the prototype. Results: The heart patients reported the application to be a useful...... activities. Conclusions: “The Heart Game” concept presents a new way to motivate heart patients by using technology as a social and active approach to telerehabilitation. The findings show the potential of using gamification for heart patients as part of a telerehabilitation program. The evaluation indicated...

  7. Heart Failure in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Biykem; Khalaf, Shaden

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in women, and they tend to develop it at an older age compared to men. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is more common in women than in men and accounts for at least half the cases of heart failure in women. When comparing men and women who have heart failure and a low left ventricular ejection fraction, the women are more symptomatic and have a similarly poor outcome. Overall recommendations for guideline-directed medical therapies show no differences in treatment approaches between men and women. Overall, women are generally underrepresented in clinical trials for heart failure. Further studies are needed to shed light into different mechanisms, causes, and targeted therapies of heart failure in women. PMID:29744014

  8. Cardiac telomere length in heart development, function, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, S A; Charchar, F J

    2017-07-01

    Telomeres are repetitive nucleoprotein structures at chromosome ends, and a decrease in the number of these repeats, known as a reduction in telomere length (TL), triggers cellular senescence and apoptosis. Heart disease, the worldwide leading cause of death, often results from the loss of cardiac cells, which could be explained by decreases in TL. Due to the cell-specific regulation of TL, this review focuses on studies that have measured telomeres in heart cells and critically assesses the relationship between cardiac TL and heart function. There are several lines of evidence that have identified rapid changes in cardiac TL during the onset and progression of heart disease as well as at critical stages of development. There are also many factors, such as the loss of telomeric proteins, oxidative stress, and hypoxia, that decrease cardiac TL and heart function. In contrast, antioxidants, calorie restriction, and exercise can prevent both cardiac telomere attrition and the progression of heart disease. TL in the heart is also indicative of proliferative potential and could facilitate the identification of cells suitable for cardiac rejuvenation. Although these findings highlight the involvement of TL in heart function, there are important questions regarding the validity of animal models, as well as several confounding factors, that need to be considered when interpreting results and planning future research. With these in mind, elucidating the telomeric mechanisms involved in heart development and the transition to disease holds promise to prevent cardiac dysfunction and potentiate regeneration after injury. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Texas Heart Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of seminars and conferences. Resources Texas Heart Institute Journal Scientific Publications Library & Learning Resources Resources for Physicians Fellowships & Residencies School of Perfusion Technology THI Spotlight Check out the ...

  10. Nutrition in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Reci Meseri

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is defined as decreased ability of heart due to various reasons. It%u2019s seen 2-3% but the prevalence increases sharply after the age of seventy. The objectives of nutrition therapy in heart failure are to prevent from water retention and edema, to avoid from hard digestion and to offer a balanced diet. In order to avoid fluid retention and edema, daily sodium and fluid intake must be monitored carefully. Main dilemma of the heart failure patients is the obesity-cachexia dilem...

  11. Heart Failure as an Aging-Related Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hiroyuki; Komuro, Issei

    2018-01-27

    The molecular pathophysiology of heart failure, which is one of the leading causes of mortality, is not yet fully understood. Heart failure can be regarded as a systemic syndrome of aging-related phenotypes. Wnt/β-catenin signaling and the p53 pathway, both of which are key regulators of aging, have been demonstrated to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Circulating C1q was identified as a novel activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, promoting systemic aging-related phenotypes including sarcopenia and heart failure. On the other hand, p53 induces the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in the failing heart. In these molecular mechanisms, the cross-talk between cardiomyocytes and non-cardiomyocytes (e,g,. endothelial cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, macrophages) deserves mentioning. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the molecular pathophysiology underlying heart failure, focusing on Wnt/β-catenin signaling and the p53 pathway.

  12. Podoplanin and the posterior heart field: epicardial-myocardial interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Mahtab, Edris Ahmad Faiz

    2008-01-01

    This thesis introduces the posterior heart field contributing to the venous pole of the heart by epithelial-mesenchymal-transformation of the coelomic epithelium. Based on studying of podoplanin and Sp3 (novel genes in cardiogenesis) wildtype and knockout mouse embryos between stages 9.5-18.5, we postulate that the posterior heart field contributes through mesenchymal and myocardial cell populations. The mesenchymal population is involved in the formation of the proepicardial organ, epicardiu...

  13. Dimensional analysis of heart rate variability in heart transplant recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbilut, J.P.; Mayer-Kress, G.; Geist, K.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss periodicities in the heart rate in normal and transplanted hearts. We then consider the possibility of dimensional analysis of these periodicities in transplanted hearts and problems associated with the record.

  14. Healthy Body, Happy Heart: Improve Your Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... November 2017 Print this issue Healthy Body, Happy Heart Improve Your Heart Health En español Send us your comments Every moment of the day, your heart is pumping blood throughout your body. In silent ...

  15. Human heart by art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Abraham

    2012-11-01

    Heart is of great importance in maintaining the life of the body. Enough to stop working for a few minutes to cause death, and hence the great importance in physiology, medicine, and research. This fact was already emphasized in the Bible in the Book of Proverbs, chapter 4 verse 23: "Keep your heart with all diligence, for out of it is the wellspring of life." Art was able to demonstrate the heart from various aspects; realistically, as done by Leonardo de Vinci who demonstrated the halves of the heart and its blood vessels. Symbolically, as a source of life, the heart was demonstrated by the artist Mrs. Erlondeiel, as a caricature by Salvador Dali, as an open heart by Sawaya, etc. Finally, it should be emphasized that different demonstrations of the human heart by many artworks make this most important organ of our body (that cannot be seen from outside) more familiar and clearer to us. And this is the purpose of this article-to demonstrate the heart through a large number of artworks of different kinds.

  16. Hyperthyroidism and the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna, Patricia Mejia; Udovcic, Maja; Sharma, Morali D

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones have a significant impact on cardiac function and structure. Excess thyroid hormone affects cardiovascular hemodynamics, leading to high-output heart failure and, in late stages, dilated cardiomyopathy. In this review, we discuss how hyperthyroidism affects cardiovascular pathophysiology and molecular mechanisms and examine the complications caused by excess thyroid hormone, such as heart failure and atrial fibrillation.

  17. Hypothyroidism and the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udovcic, Maja; Pena, Raul Herrera; Patham, Bhargavi; Tabatabai, Laila; Kansara, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a commonly encountered clinical condition with variable prevalence. It has profound effects on cardiac function that can impact cardiac contractility, vascular resistance, blood pressure, and heart rhythm. With this review, we aim to describe the effects of hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism on the heart. Additionally, we attempt to briefly describe how hypothyroid treatment affects cardiovascular parameters. PMID:28740582

  18. How the Heart Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... direction that blood flows through your heart. The light blue arrow shows that blood enters the right atrium of your heart from ... to your lungs through the pulmonary arteries. The light red arrow shows oxygen-rich blood coming from your lungs through the pulmonary veins ...

  19. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg Hansen, Louise; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  20. World Heart Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-01

    For World Heart Day, learn more about what heart-healthy steps you can take in the workplace.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/9/2009.

  1. Hypothyroidism and the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udovcic, Maja; Pena, Raul Herrera; Patham, Bhargavi; Tabatabai, Laila; Kansara, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a commonly encountered clinical condition with variable prevalence. It has profound effects on cardiac function that can impact cardiac contractility, vascular resistance, blood pressure, and heart rhythm. With this review, we aim to describe the effects of hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism on the heart. Additionally, we attempt to briefly describe how hypothyroid treatment affects cardiovascular parameters.

  2. The total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jason A; Shah, Keyur B; Quader, Mohammed A; Cooke, Richard H; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K; Smallfield, Melissa C; Tchoukina, Inna; Tang, Daniel G

    2015-12-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient's native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review.

  3. Mapping the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  4. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area there is an approximate 50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. PMID:27174952

  5. Options for Heart Valve Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide: Understanding Your Heart Valve Problem | Spanish Symptom Tracker | Spanish Pre-surgery Checklist | Spanish What Is Heart ... Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different? 7 Warning Signs of a Heart Attack 8 Low Blood Pressure - ...

  6. Heart Disease in Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease in Women Heart Disease in Hispanic Women “I thought it couldn’t be true,” says ... disease is their No. 1 killer. Why Hispanic women? While heart disease doesn’t discriminate, you could ...

  7. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000112.htm Heart failure - fluids and diuretics To use the sharing features ... to Expect at Home When you have heart failure, your heart does not pump out enough blood. This causes ...

  8. Heart Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and African Americans Although African American adults are ... were 30 percent more likely to die from heart disease than non-Hispanic whites. African American women are ...

  9. What is Broken Heart Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pumping action and blood flow, go to the Health Topics How the Heart Works article.) Researchers are trying to identify the precise way in which the stress hormones affect the heart. Broken heart syndrome may result from ...

  10. Creatine kinase isozyme expression in embryonic chicken heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; Geerts, W. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Dottin, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution pattern of creatine kinase (EC 2.7.3.2) isozymes in developing chicken heart was studied by immunohistochemistry. Creatine kinase M, which is absent from adult heart, is transiently expressed between 4 and 11 days of incubation. During that period, numerous muscular cells in the

  11. 3D whole-heart myocardial tissue analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, HT; de Jong, Leon; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Chamuleau, Steven A.J.; van Slochteren, Frebus J.; Van Es, René

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac regenerative therapies aim to protect and repair the injured heart in patients with ischemic heart disease. By injecting stem cells or other biologicals that enhance angio- or vasculogenesis into the infarct border zone (IBZ), tissue perfusion is improved, and the myocardium can be protected

  12. Dental Health and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  13. Mental Health and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  14. Hereditary muscular dystrophies and the heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, M. C. E.; Pinto, Y. M.; Merkies, I. S. J.; de Die-Smulders, C. E. M.; Crijns, H. J. G. M.; Faber, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac disease is a common clinical manifestation of neuromuscular disorders, particularly of muscular dystrophies. Heart muscle cells as well as specialized conducting myocardial fibres may be affected by the dystrophic process. The incidence and nature of cardiac involvement vary with different

  15. Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrsic, Zorana; Hopkins, Scott P; Antevil, Jared L; Mullenix, Philip S

    2018-03-01

    This article outlines the diagnosis and management of commonly occurring valvular heart diseases for the primary care provider. Basic understanding of pathologic murmurs is important for appropriate referral. Echocardiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and severity grading. Patients with progressive valvular heart disease should be followed annually by cardiology and imaging should be performed based on the severity of valvular dysfunction. Surgery or intervention is recommended only when symptoms dictate or when changes in left ventricular function occur. Surgery or intervention should be performed after discussion by a heart team, including cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Thyroid and the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Karas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular signs and symptoms of thyroid disease are some of the most clinically relevant findings that accompany both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. On the basis of the understanding of the mechanisms of thyroid hormone action on the heart and cardiovascular system, it is possible to explain the changes in cardiac output, cardiac contractility, blood pressure and rhythm disturbances that result from thyroid dysfunction. In the present review will integrate what is known about the mechanisms of thyroid hormone action on the heart and the alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism that accompany chronic congestive heart failure.

  17. [Total artificial heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antretter, H; Dumfarth, J; Höfer, D

    2015-09-01

    To date the CardioWest™ total artificial heart is the only clinically available implantable biventricular mechanical replacement for irreversible cardiac failure. This article presents the indications, contraindications, implantation procedere and postoperative treatment. In addition to a overview of the applications of the total artificial heart this article gives a brief presentation of the two patients treated in our department with the CardioWest™. The clinical course, postoperative rehabilitation, device-related complications and control mechanisms are presented. The total artificial heart is a reliable implant for treating critically ill patients with irreversible cardiogenic shock. A bridge to transplantation is feasible with excellent results.

  18. Forkhead box transcription factors in embryonic heart development and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic heart development is a very complicated process regulated precisely by a network composed of many genes and signaling pathways in time and space. Forkhead box (Fox, FOX) proteins are a family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of an evolutionary conserved "forkhead"or "winged-helix" DNA-binding domain and able to organize temporal and spatial gene expression during development. They are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, differentiation, migration, metabolism and DNA damage response. An abundance of studies in model organisms and systems has established that Foxa2, Foxc1/c2, Foxh1 and Foxm1, Foxos and Foxps are important components of the signaling pathways that instruct cardiogenesis and embryonic heart development, playing paramount roles in heart development. The previous studies also have demonstrated that mutations in some of the forkhead box genes and the aberrant expression of forkhead box gene are heavily implicated in the congenital heart disease (CHD) of humans. This review primarily focuses on the current understanding of heart development regulated by forkhead box transcription factors and molecular genetic mechanisms by which forkhead box factors modulate heart development during embryogenesis and organogenesis. This review also summarizes human CHD related mutations in forkhead box genes as well as the abnormal expression of forkhead box gene, and discusses additional possible regulatory mechanisms of the forkhead box genes during embryonic heart development that warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute heart failure syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the classical syndrome of chronic persistent heart failure develops. The vast ... Flash pulmonary oedema: This is a severely elevated blood pressure with an .... (CPAP or bilevelNPPV) for cardiogenic pulmonary edema (review). Cochrane.

  20. Overview of Heart Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors By Siddique A. Abbasi, MD, MSc, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University; Attending Cardiologist, Director of Heart Failure, and Director of Cardiac MRI, Providence VA Medical ...

  1. Women's Heart Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Email: Click for e-News archive The Women's Heart Foundation is a 501c3 dedicated to prevention, ... Care Initiative® to achieve excellence of care of women. Executive nurses, civic leaders, women survivors and sponsors ...

  2. Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should be completely closed For example: Watch an animation of mitral valve regurgitation A leaking mitral valve ... Not Alone Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  3. 201Tl heart studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    At the annual meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine there was a preponderance of papers dealing with the heart. The most impressive papers detailed the use of monovalent cation 201 Tl in the evaluation of coronary artery disease. Thallium-201 behaves like potassium in that it enters heart muscle quickly and persists in that organ for several hours. It is unlike most radioactive potassium analogues used for heart studies in that: (1) its gamma energy peaks (69 keV and 80 keV) are more easily collimated with resultant image improvement, (2) its physical half life of 72 hours is sufficiently short to attain high counting rates without too much radiation and is sufficiently long so that storage is not prohibitive, (3) its short half life and lack of Beta radiation results in lower radiation to the patient, and (4) its uptake in heart is greater and uptake in liver and stomach less than other potassium analogues

  4. Stress and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It Works Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Stress and Heart Health Updated:Jan 8,2018 When ... therapist in your community. Last reviewed 6/2014 Stress Management • Home • How Does Stress Affect You? Introduction ...

  5. Stress and your heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronary heart disease - stress; Coronary artery disease - stress ... Your body responds to stress on many levels. First, it releases stress hormones that make you breathe faster. Your blood pressure goes up. Your muscles ...

  6. Heart CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make to decrease the risk of heart disease. Risks Risks of CT scans include: Being exposed to ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  7. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  8. Heart failure overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bicycle. Your provider can provide a safe and effective exercise plan for you. DO NOT exercise on days ... changing your lifestyle . Get enough rest, including after exercise, ... as your health care team directed. These medicines: Help the heart ...

  9. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body ... Get Well" card and paying a visit. Can Kids Get Heart Disease? Kids usually don't have ...

  10. Heart failure - palliative care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is available as a pill, liquid, or tablet that dissolves under the tongue. Your provider will ... RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  11. Estrogen and the female heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, A A; Korzick, D H

    2014-05-25

    Estrogen has a plethora of effects in the cardiovascular system. Studies of estrogen and the heart span human clinical trials and basic cell and molecular investigations. Greater understanding of cell and molecular responses to estrogens can provide further insights into the findings of clinical studies. Differences in expression and cellular/intracellular distribution of the two main receptors, estrogen receptor (ER) α and β, are thought to account for the specificity and differences in responses to estrogen. Much remains to be learned in this area, but cellular distribution within the cardiovascular system is becoming clearer. Identification of GPER as a third ER has introduced further complexity to the system. 17β-estradiol (E2), the most potent human estrogen, clearly has protective properties activating a signaling cascade leading to cellular protection and also influencing expression of the protective heat shock proteins (HSP). E2 protects the heart from ischemic injury in basic studies, but the picture is more involved in the whole organism and clinical studies. Here the complexity of E2's widespread effects comes into play and makes interpretation of findings more challenging. Estrogen loss occurs primarily with aging, but few studies have used aged models despite clear evidence of differences between the response to estrogen deficiency in adult and aged animals. Thus more work is needed focusing on the effects of aging vs. estrogen loss on the cardiovascular system. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Contrast enhanced micro-computed tomography resolves the 3-dimensional morphology of the cardiac conduction system in mammalian hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S Stephenson

    Full Text Available The general anatomy of the cardiac conduction system (CCS has been known for 100 years, but its complex and irregular three-dimensional (3D geometry is not so well understood. This is largely because the conducting tissue is not distinct from the surrounding tissue by dissection. The best descriptions of its anatomy come from studies based on serial sectioning of samples taken from the appropriate areas of the heart. Low X-ray attenuation has formerly ruled out micro-computed tomography (micro-CT as a modality to resolve internal structures of soft tissue, but incorporation of iodine, which has a high molecular weight, into those tissues enhances the differential attenuation of X-rays and allows visualisation of fine detail in embryos and skeletal muscle. Here, with the use of a iodine based contrast agent (I(2KI, we present contrast enhanced micro-CT images of cardiac tissue from rat and rabbit in which the three major subdivisions of the CCS can be differentiated from the surrounding contractile myocardium and visualised in 3D. Structures identified include the sinoatrial node (SAN and the atrioventricular conduction axis: the penetrating bundle, His bundle, the bundle branches and the Purkinje network. Although the current findings are consistent with existing anatomical representations, the representations shown here offer superior resolution and are the first 3D representations of the CCS within a single intact mammalian heart.

  13. Ischaemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruttley, M.

    1985-01-01

    Radiology has an important role in the diagnosis and management of ischaemic heart disease, notably in the investigation of angina pectoris, the monitoring of acute myocardial infarction and the assessment of its non-fatal complications; recent application of catheter techniques to the treatment of ischaemic heart disease has been a progression from Dotter's original work on peripheral arterial dilation made possible by Gruntzig's development of a suitable dilating catheter for coronary stenosis

  14. Acute heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Sénior Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Gándara Ricardo, Jairo Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinical case of a 26 year-old woman who came to Hospital Universitario San Vicente Fundación (Medellín, Colombia) with symptoms and signs of acute heart failure. She had been previously diagnosed with chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction without clear origin, pulmonary thromboembolism and ischemic stroke, without optimal neurohormonal modulation. She was admitted with clinical findings of fluid overload and low tissue perfusion, with inotropic support requirem...

  15. Rethinking Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    F?rstenwerth, Hauke

    2012-01-01

    An increasing body of clinical observations and experimental evidence suggests that cardiac dysfunction results from autonomic dysregulation of the contractile output of the heart. Excessive activation of the sympathetic nervous system and a decrease in parasympathetic tone are associated with increased mortality. Elevated levels of circulating catecholamines closely correlate with the severity and poor prognosis in heart failure. Sympathetic over-stimulation causes increased levels of catech...

  16. [Obesity and heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svačina, Štěpán

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular complications of obesity are traditionally considered an important complication of obesity. Obesity itself is probably not direct cause of atherosclerosis or coronary heart disease. This may occur indirectly in metabolic complications of obesity, especially diabetes and metabolic syndrome. However, thrombogenicity potential of obesity contributes to embolism and atherosclerosis development. In cardiology is well-known a phenomenon of obesity paradox when obese patients have better prognosis than thin. This is the case of heart failure and some other cardiovascular diseases. Recently, a new concept has emerged of myokines - hormones from muscle tissue that have extensive protective effects on organism and probably on heart. Whether heart is a source of myokines is uncertain. However, undoubted importance has epicardial and pericardial fatty tissue. The epicardial fatty tissue has mainly protective effects on myocardium. This fatty tissue may produce factors of inflammation affecting the myocardium. Relationship between amount of epicardial fatty tissue and coronary heart disease is rather pathogenic. Currently, it is certain that obesity brings more metabolic and cancer complications than cardiovascular and accurate contribution to pathogenic or protective character of fatty tissue in cardiology requires further research. Nevertheless, the conclusion is that adipose tissue of organism and around the heart may be in some circumstances beneficial.

  17. Nutrition in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reci Meseri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is defined as decreased ability of heart due to various reasons. It%u2019s seen 2-3% but the prevalence increases sharply after the age of seventy. The objectives of nutrition therapy in heart failure are to prevent from water retention and edema, to avoid from hard digestion and to offer a balanced diet. In order to avoid fluid retention and edema, daily sodium and fluid intake must be monitored carefully. Main dilemma of the heart failure patients is the obesity-cachexia dilemma. Since one of the main reasons of heart failure is cardiovascular diseases, in first phase, the patient may be obese. In the later phases, cachexia may show up. It was shown that cachexia is associated with mortality. Within this period, patients should not be over-fed and the patient should pass from catabolic state to anabolic state slowly. If the gastrointestinal track is functional oral/enteral feeding must be preferred. Multi vitamin and mineral supportsmay be beneficial, which may replace the increased loss, increase anti-inflammatory response and be anti-oxidants. Large, controlled and well-designed studies must be conducted in order to evaluate the benefits of nutritional practices such as nutritional assessment, enteral feeding and nutrient supports in heart failure patients.

  18. Panic Attack or Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When in doubt about symptoms, seek care without delay to rule out heart disease. Heart disease affects your heart's ... which cause you concern, see your doctor without delay and ask for testing to rule out heart disease. 1 Gadolinium side effects could ...

  19. Establishing the framework to support bioartificial heart fabrication using fibrin-based three-dimensional artificial heart muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Matthew; Mohamed, Mohamed; Tao, Ze-Wei; Gutierrez, Laura; Birla, Ravi

    2015-02-01

    Only 3000 heart transplants are performed in the USA every year, leaving some 30 000-70 000 Americans without proper care. Current treatment modalities for heart failure have saved many lives yet still do not correct the underlying problems of congestive heart failure. Tissue engineering represents a potential field of study wherein a combination of cells, scaffolds, and/or bioreactors can be utilized to create constructs to mimic, replace, and/or repair defective tissue. The focus of this study was to generate a bioartificial heart (BAH) model using artificial heart muscle (AHM), composed of fibrin gel and neonatal rat cardiac myocytes, and a decellularized scaffold, formed by subjecting an adult rat heart to a series of decellularization solutions. By suturing the AHM around the outside of the decellularized heart and culturing while suspended in media, we were able to retain functional cardiac cells on the scaffold as evinced by visible contractility. Observed contractility rate was correlated with biopotential measurements to confirm essential functionality of cardiac constructs. Cross-sections of the BAH show successful decellularization of the scaffold and contiguous cell-rich AHM around the perimeter of the heart. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The adaption growth of the heart in the higher age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranz, D.; Kunde, D.; Fuhrmann, I.

    1976-01-01

    There was examined the influence of the age on the development of a compensatory hypertrophy of the heart in 4 to 16 month old masculin Wistar-rats autoradiographically. The valuation took place at various times after stenosing of the aorta and application of 3 H-thymidine separatly on both ventricular walls by counting of the nuclei of the marked muscle- and connective tissue cells of the heart and their mitosis. The 3 H-thymidine and mitotic index were calculated for the connective tissue cells and body and heart weight were determined. (author)