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Sample records for heart failure therapies

  1. [Diuretic therapy in heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luís; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-02-20

    Many of the primary clinical manifestations of heart failure (HF) are due to fluid retention, and treatments targeting congestion play a central role in HF management. Diuretic therapy remains the cornerstone of congestion treatment, and diuretics are prescribed to the majority of HF patients. Despite this ubiquitous use, there is limited evidence from prospective randomized studies to guide the use of diuretics. With the chronic use of diuretic and usually in advanced stages of HF, diuretics may fail to control salt and water retention. This review describes the mechanism of action of available diuretic classes, reviews their clinical use based on scientific evidence and discusses strategies to overcome diuretic resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Cellular Therapy for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J.; Schwarz, Nisha; Toledo-Flores, Deborah; Nicholls, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF) is underpinned by complex changes at subcellular, cellular and extracellular levels in the ventricular myocardium. For all of the gains that conventional treatments for HF have brought to mortality and morbidity, they do not adequately address the loss of cardiomyocyte numbers in the remodeling ventricle. Originally conceived to address this problem, cellular transplantation for HF has already gone through several stages of evolution over the past two decades. Various cell types and delivery routes have been implemented to positive effect in preclinical models of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy, with pleiotropic benefits observed in terms of myocardial remodeling, systolic and diastolic performance, perfusion, fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and electrophysiology. To a large extent, these salubrious effects are now attributed to the indirect, paracrine capacity of transplanted stem cells to facilitate endogenous cardiac repair processes. Promising results have also followed in early phase human studies, although these have been relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent. This review details the preclinical and clinical evidence currently available regarding the use of pluripotent stem cells and adult-derived progenitor cells for cardiomyopathy and HF. It outlines the important lessons that have been learned to this point in time, and balances the promise of this exciting field against the key challenges and questions that still need to be addressed at all levels of research, to ensure that cell therapy realizes its full potential by adding to the armamentarium of HF management. PMID:27280304

  3. Biomarker Guided Therapy in Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Sema

    2015-01-01

    This review article addresses the question of whether biomarker-guided therapy is ready for clinical implementation in chronic heart failure. The most well-known biomarkers in heart failure are natriuretic peptides, namely B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-BNP. They are well-established in the diagnostic process of acute heart failure and prediction of disease prognosis. They may also be helpful in screening patients at risk of developing heart failure. Although studied by 11 small- to medium-scale trials resulting in several positive meta-analyses, it is less well-established whether natriuretic peptides are also helpful for guiding chronic heart failure therapy. This uncertainty is expressed by differences in European and American guideline recommendations. In addition to reviewing the evidence surrounding the use of natriuretic peptides to guide chronic heart failure therapy, this article gives an overview of the shortcomings of the trials, how the results may be interpreted and the future directions necessary to fill the current gaps in knowledge. Therapy guidance in chronic heart failure using other biomarkers has not been prospectively tested to date. Emerging biomarkers, such as galectin-3 and soluble ST2, might be useful in this regard, as suggested by several post-hoc analyses. PMID:28785440

  4. Liver failure in total artificial heart therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, Alexandros Merkourios; Dapunt, Otto; Knez, Igor; Wasler, Andrae; Oberwalder, Peter; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero; Spiliopoulos, Sotirios

    2016-07-01

    Congestive hepatopathy (CH) and acute liver failure (ALF) are common among biventricular heart failure patients. We sought to evaluate the impact of total artificial heart (TAH) therapy on hepatic function and associated clinical outcomes. A total of 31 patients received a Syncardia Total Artificial Heart. Preoperatively 17 patients exhibited normal liver function or mild hepatic derangements that were clinically insignificant and did not qualify as acute or chronic liver failure, 5 patients exhibited ALF and 9 various hepatic derangements owing to CH. Liver associated mortality and postoperative course of liver values were prospectively documented and retrospectively analyzed. Liver associated mortality in normal liver function, ALF and CH cases was 0%, 20% (P=0.03) and 44.4% (P=0.0008) respectively. 1/17 (5.8%) patients with a normal liver function developed an ALF, 4/5 (80%) patients with an ALF experienced a markedly improvement of hepatic function and 6/9 (66.6%) patients with CH a significant deterioration. TAH therapy results in recovery of hepatic function in ALF cases. Patients with CH prior to surgery form a high risk group with increased liver associated mortality.

  5. [Diuretic therapy in acute heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luis; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-03-01

    Diuretics are widely recommended in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Unfortunately, despite their widespread use, limited data are available from randomized clinical trials to guide clinicians on the appropriate management of diuretic therapy. Loop diuretics are considered the first-line diuretic therapy, especially intravenous furosemide, but the best mode of administration (high-dose versus low-dose and continuous infusion versus bolus) is unclear. When diuretic resistance develops, different therapeutic strategies can be adopted, including combined diuretic therapy with thiazide diuretics and/or aldosterone antagonists. Low or "non-diuretic" doses (25-50mg QD) of aldosterone antagonists have been demonstrated to confer a survival benefit in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction and consequently should be prescribed in all such patients, unless contraindicated by potassium and/or renal function values. There is less evidence on the use of aldosterone antagonists at higher or "diuretic" doses (≥ 100mg QD) but these drugs could be useful in relieving congestive symptoms in combination with furosemide. Thiazide diuretics can also be helpful as they have synergic effects with loop diuretics by inhibiting sodium reabsorption in distal parts of the nephron. The effect of diuretic therapy in AHF should be monitored with careful observation of clinical signs and symptoms of congestion. Serum electrolytes and kidney function should also be monitored during the use of intravenous diuretics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Stem Cell Therapy for Congestive Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunduz E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHeart failure is a major cardiovascular health problem. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of congestive heart failure (CHF [1]. Cardiac transplantation remains the most effective long-term treatment option, however is limited primarily by donor availability, rejection and infections. Mechanical circulatory support has its own indications and limitations [2]. Therefore, there is a need to develop more effective therapeutic strategies.Recently, regenerative medicine has received considerable scientific attention in the cardiovascular arena. We report here our experience demonstrating the beneficial effects of cardiac stem cell therapy on left ventricular functions in a patient with Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL who developed CHF due to ischemic heart disease during the course of lymphoma treatment. Case reportA 58-year-old male with relapsed HL was referred to our bone marrow transplantation unit in October 2009. He was given 8 courses of combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, and dacarbazine (ABVD between June 2008 and February 2009 and achieved complete remission. However, his disease relapsed 3 months after completing the last cycle of ABVD and he was decided to be treated with DHAP (cisplatin, cytarabine, dexamethasone followed autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT. After the completion of first course of DHAP regimen, he developed acute myocardial infarction (AMI and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG was performed. After his cardiac function stabilized, 3 additional courses of DHAP were given and he was referred to our centre for consideration of autologous SCT. Computed tomography scans obtained after chemotherapy confirmed complete remission. Stem cells were collected from peripheral blood after mobilization with 10 µg/kg/day granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF subcutaneously. Collection was started on the fifth day of G-CSF and performed for 3 consecutive days. Flow cytometric

  7. Drug Therapy for Acute Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Magrini, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is globally one of most frequent reasons for hospitalization and still represents a challenge for the choice of the best treatment to improve patient outcome. According to current international guidelines, as soon as patients with acute heart failure arrive at the emergency department, the common therapeutic approach aims to improve their signs and symptoms, correct volume overload, and ameliorate cardiac hemodynamics by increasing vital organ perfusion. Recommended treatment for the early management of acute heart failure is characterized by the use of intravenous diuretics, oxygen, and vasodilators. Although these measures ameliorate the patient's symptoms, they do not favorably impact on short- and long-term mortality. Consequently, there is a pressing need for novel agents in acute heart failure treatment with the result that research in this field is increasing worldwide. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. [Therapy of terminal heart failure using heart transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, M; Warnecke, H; Schüler, S; Hempel, B; Spiegelsberger, S; Hetzer, R

    1991-08-16

    Heart transplantation (HTx) has now become an accepted treatment modality for end-stage heart disease. The limited supply of suitable donor organs imposes constraints upon the decision of who should be selected for transplantation. Usually patients are candidates for HTx, who remain NYHA functional class III or IV despite maximal medical therapy. Further criteria are low left ventricular ejection fraction (less than 20%) with heart rhythm disturbances class IIIA-V (LOWN), which are associated with poor prognosis. Additionally, the suffering of the patient and also the course of heart failure are essential for judging the urgency of HTx. Contraindications are absolute in patients with untreated infections, fixed pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) above 8 WOOD-degrees, severe irreversible kidney and liver disease, active ventricular or duodenal ulcers and acute, psychiatric illness. HTx is relatively contraindicated in patients with diabetes mellitus, age over 60 years, PVR above 6 WOOD-degrees and an unstable psychosocial situation. To prevent rejection of the transplant heart, live-long immunosuppressive therapy is needed. Most immunosuppressive regimes consist of Cyclosporine A and Azathioprine (double drug therapy) or in combination (tripple drug therapy) with Prednisolone. For monitoring of this therapy, control of hole blood cyclosporine A level and white blood count is needed. Rejection episodes can be suspected if there is a greater than 20 mmHg decrease of systolic blood pressure, elevated body temperature, malaise, tachycardia or heart rhythm disturbance. The diagnosis of cardiac rejection can be established by endomyocardial biopsy. Measurement of the voltage of either the surface or intramyocardial ECG, echocardiography with special consideration to early left ventricular filling time as well as immunological methods are additionally used tools. Graft sclerosis as the main risk factor of the late transplant period remains an unsolved problem.

  9. Anticoagulation Therapy and NOACs in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Isac; EncisoSilva, Jorge; Schlueter, Michelle; Greenberg, Barry

    2017-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that heart failure (HF) confers a hyper-coagulable state that is associated with adverse events including stroke, systemic embolism, and mortality. This may be due to the elevated levels of pro-thrombotic and pro-inflammatory cytokines that are seen in patients with acute and chronic HF. Left ventricular wall motion abnormalities in patients with systolic dysfunction predispose to local thrombosis due to blood stasis as does atrial fibrillation (AF) which leads to blood stasis in regions of the atria. The high risk of thromboemboli in HF patients with AF has resulted in the use anticoagulation therapy to prevent the occurrence of catastrophic events. There is evidence, however, that the pro-inflammatory, pro-thrombotic state that exists in HF puts patients who are in sinus rhythm at risk. The novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been shown in RCT to have at least equivalent efficacy in reducing stroke as warfarin while exposing patients to a lower risk of bleeding. The fact that the NOACs don't require routine monitoring to assure that patients remain within the therapeutic range and have relatively simple dosing requirements and a safer risk profile makes them attractive substitutes to warfarin in HF patients with atrial fibrillation and other conditions (e.g. deep venous thrombosis). Post hoc analyses from a subset of HF patients from the RCTs in AF patients have demonstrated similar findings as were reported in the entire populations that were included in the trials. As a result, NOACS are commonly used now in HF patients with AF. For HF patients with reduced ejection fraction in sinus rhythm, the use of warfarin in randomized clinical trials (RCT) to reduce stroke has been disappointing and associated with increase bleeding risk when compared to aspirin. The advantages of the NOACs over warfarin, however, raise the question of whether they might improve outcomes in HF patients who are in sinus rhythm. The currently ongoing COMMANDER

  10. Left ventricular assist device therapy in advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Rogers, Joseph G

    2017-01-01

    Despite improvements in pharmacological therapy and pacing, prognosis in advanced heart failure (HF) remains poor, with a 1-year mortality of 25-50%. While heart transplantation provides excellent survival and quality of life for eligible patients, only a few can be offered this treatment due...

  11. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernani Pinto de Lemos Júnior

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT has emerged as the predominant electrical treatment strategy for patients on pharmacological therapy who present heart failure with wide QRS and low ejection fraction. The objective of this study was to investigate whether cardiac resynchronization therapy improved mortality and morbidity among patients with heart failure. METHODS: This was a systematic review using the Cochrane Collaboration's methodology. The online search strategy included the Cochrane Library, Medline (Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde and cardiology congresses from 1990 to 2006. The criteria for considering studies for this review were as follows:-types of studies: randomized controlled trials; types of interventions: cardiac resynchronization therapy compared with other therapies; types of participants: patients with heart failure with low ejection fraction and wide QRS; outcomes: death or hospitalization. RESULTS: Seven trials met the selection criteria. The risk of death due to congestive heart failure was nonsignificant: relative risk (RR, 0.79; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.60 to 1.03. There was an absolute risk reduction of 4% in all-cause mortality for the experimental group #&091;RR 0.70; CI: 0.60 to 0.83; number needed to treat (NNT 25#&093;; sudden cardiac death showed a statistically significant difference favoring the experimental group, with absolute risk reduction of 1% (CI: 0.46 to 0.96; RR 0.67; NNT 100. There was an absolute risk reduction of 9% for hospitalization due to heart failure (RR 0.64; CI: 0.50 to 0.80; NNT 11 in the experimental group. CONCLUSIONS: Patients receiving CRT had a significantly lower risk of hospitalization due to heart failure, but death rates due to heart failure were similar.

  12. Update on digoxin therapy in congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, S A; Movahed, A

    2000-07-15

    Congestive heart failure is a progressive disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, the incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure have increased in recent years. Contributing factors include increased survival in patients with coronary artery disease (especially myocardial infarction), an aging population and significant advances in the control of other potentially lethal diseases. New and existing agents, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta blockers and, more recently, spironolactone, are being used increasingly to prolong life in patients with heart failure. Although digoxin has been used to treat heart failure for more than 200 years, its role in patients with congestive heart failure and sinus rhythm is still debatable. Over the past decade, digoxin has received renewed attention because of recognition of its neurohormonal effect and the successful use of lower dosages. In recent trials, digoxin has been shown to reduce morbidity associated with congestive heart failure but to have no demonstrable effect on survival. The goal of digoxin therapy in patients with congestive heart failure is to improve quality of life by reducing symptoms and preventing hospitalizations.

  13. The case for statin therapy in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, Pim; Boehm, Michael; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    Both primary and secondary prevention studies have provided a wealth of evidence that statin therapy effectively reduces cardiovascular events. However, this general statement on the efficacy and safety of statin treatment has not been validated in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF).

  14. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  15. Congestive Heart Failure Cardiopoietic Regenerative Therapy (CHART-1) trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartunek, Jozef; Davison, Beth; Sherman, Warren; Povsic, Thomas; Henry, Timothy D; Gersh, Bernard; Metra, Marco; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Hajjar, Roger; Behfar, Atta; Homsy, Christian; Cotter, Gad; Wijns, William; Tendera, Michal; Terzic, Andre

    2016-02-01

    Cardiopoiesis is a conditioning programme that aims to upgrade the cardioregenerative aptitude of patient-derived stem cells through lineage specification. Cardiopoietic stem cells tested initially for feasibility and safety exhibited signs of clinical benefit in patients with ischaemic heart failure (HF) warranting definitive evaluation. Accordingly, CHART-1 is designed as a large randomized, sham-controlled multicentre study aimed to validate cardiopoietic stem cell therapy. Patients (n = 240) with chronic HF secondary to ischaemic heart disease, reduced LVEF (Heart Failure Questionnaire score, 6 min walk test, LV end-systolic volume, and LVEF at 9 months. The secondary efficacy endpoint is the time to cardiovascular death or worsening HF at 12 months. Safety endpoints include mortality, readmissions, aborted sudden deaths, and serious adverse events at 12 and 24 months. The CHART-1 clinical trial is powered to examine the therapeutic impact of lineage-directed stem cells as a strategy to achieve cardiac regeneration in HF populations. On completion, CHART-1 will offer a definitive evaluation of the efficacy and safety of cardiopoietic stem cells in the treatment of chronic ischaemic HF. NCT01768702. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  16. Inflammation, cytokines and anti-inflammatory therapies in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabet, J Y; Lopes, M E; Champagne, S; Su, J B; Merlet, P; Hittinger, L

    2002-03-01

    Both experimental and clinical studies have shown a role for inflammation in the pathogenesis of heart failure. This seems related to an imbalance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Certain categories in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy have shown the presence of humoral and cellular immunity activation suggesting a possible relation between myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. Recent studies suggest a link between the circulating levels of cytokines (TNF alpha IL-1 et IL-6), the clinical status and prognostic. However, the mechanisms connecting heart failure and cytokine activation are unclear and the sites of cytokines production remain controversial. In the clinical setting, specific measurements of cytokines are not available. As tests of inflammation, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein concentration appear to have interesting pronostic values. Current conventional therapy i.e. ACE inhibitors, type I angiotensin II antagonist and beta-blockers have shown some anti-cytokine properties. Recently, immunosuppressive therapies have shown their ability to improve symptoms and LV ejection in selected patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and clear sign of myocardium inflammation. Specific anti-cytokine therapy have been developed and showed interesting results in preliminary clinical studies. However large clinical trials testing this new therapy have been stoppel prematurely because of deterious effects.

  17. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart failure due to systolic dysfunction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ... patient with heart failure or cardiomyopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ...

  18. Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorsal, Anders; Wiggers, Henrik; McMurray, John J V

    2018-01-01

    This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint.......This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint....

  19. Effect of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy on Inflammation in Congestive Heart Failure: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappegård, K T; Bjørnstad, H; Mollnes, T E; Hovland, A

    2015-09-01

    Congestive heart failure is associated with increased levels of several inflammatory mediators, and animal studies have shown that infusion of a number of cytokines can induce heart failure. However, several drugs with proven efficacy in heart failure have failed to affect inflammatory mediators, and anti-inflammatory therapy in heart failure patients has thus far been disappointing. Hence, to what extent heart failure is caused by or responsible for the increased inflammatory burden in the patient is still unclear. Over the past couple of decades, resynchronization therapy with a biventricular pacemaker has emerged as an effective treatment in a subset of heart failure patients, reducing both morbidity and mortality. Such treatment has also been shown to affect the inflammation associated with heart failure. In this study, we review recent data on the association between heart failure and inflammation, and in particular how resynchronization therapy can affect the inflammatory process. © 2015 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  20. [Elderly heart failure patients and the role of beta-blocker therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeljans-Tijssen, C.W.; Jansen, R.W.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this article different aspects of chronic heart failure in old age are described. We mainly focus on the place of beta-blocker therapy in chronic heart failure. Beta-blockers are recommended for the treatment of stable chronic heart failure with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. There is

  1. Destination therapy--time for a paradigm change in heart failure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Markus J; Ruschitzka, Frank; Falk, Volkmar

    2013-03-25

    Heart transplantation is only available for a limited number of patients with end-stage heart failure. Since the arrival of newer ventricular assist devices, mechanical circulatory support constitutes an alternative therapy for patients with advanced heart failure. The first-generation of pulsatile-flow devices were used only for bridging the sickest patients to transplantation. Frequent adverse events, limited durability and the patients' discomfort made them unsuitable for lifetime support. The second-generation continuous-flow devices were smaller, quieter and more durable. Survival rates of patients improved significantly. This led to a marked growth of device implantations, largely caused by an increase of lifetime support. Survival of destination therapy patients is somewhat inferior to the survival of bridge-to-transplant patients, in part due to their co-morbid conditions which limit life expectancy. A subgroup of patients on destination therapy with advanced, but stable heart failure and a low-risk profile reach short-term survival rates equal or superior to the survival after heart transplantation. These patients may be offered the choice of destination therapy versus heart transplantation. However it remains unclear if long-term survival, quality of life and functional status on lifetime support can compete with the excellent results after transplantation. A trend to implanting devices at earlier stages of heart failure has begun. In a current trial, patients with advanced, but stable heart failure are randomised to destination therapy versus optimal medical therapy. The results of this trial will be expected to more precisely determine the place of mechanical circulatory support in the treatment of advanced heart failure.

  2. Combined aquaretic and diuretic therapy in acute heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyfman M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael Goyfman,1 Paul Zamudio,2 Kristine Jang,3 Jennifer Chee,3 Catherine Miranda,2 Javed Butler,1 Nand K Wadhwa2 1Division of Cardiology, 2Division of Nephrology, 3Department of Medicine, Stony Brook School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA Introduction: Acute heart failure (AHF is a leading cause of hospitalization and readmission in the US. The present study evaluated maximum diuresis while minimizing electrolyte imbalances, hemodynamic instability, and kidney dysfunction, to achieve a euvolemic state safely in a shorter period of time.Methods and results: A protocol of combined therapy with furosemide, metolazone, and spironolactone, with or without tolvaptan and acetazolamide, was used in 17 hospitalized patients with AHF. The mean number of days on combination diuretic protocol was 3.8 days. The mean daily fluid balance was 3.0±2.1 L negative. The mean daily urine output (UOP was 4.1±2.0 L (range 1.8–10.5 L. There were minimal fluctuations in serum electrolyte levels and serum creatinine over the duration of diuretic therapy. There was no statistically significant change in patients’ creatinine from immediately prior to therapy to the last day of therapy, with a mean increase in creatinine of 0.14 mg/dL (95% CI −0.03, +0.30, p=0.10.Conclusion: Our strategy of treating AHF by achieving high UOP, while maintaining stable electrolytes and creatinine in a short period to euvolemic state, is safe. Keywords: diuretics, aquaretic, acute heart failure, volume overload

  3. The new concept of ''interventional heart failure therapy'': part 2--inotropes, valvular disease, pumps, and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Keith A; Philip, Kiran J; Simsir, Sinan; Schwarz, Ernst R

    2010-09-01

    Recent advances in heart failure therapy include a variety of mechanical and device-based technologies that target structural aspects of heart failure that cannot be treated with drug therapy alone; these newer therapies can collectively be described as interventional heart failure therapy. This article is the second in a 2-part series reviewing interventional heart failure therapy. Interventions included in this discussion include those indicated for the treatment of end-stage refractory heart failure, including interventional medical therapy, interventional treatment of valvular disease, mechanical assist devices, and heart transplantation. Also included is a review of the currently available catheter-based pumps, which are intended to provide temporary support in patients with acute hemodynamic compromise. The use of cellular or stem cell therapy for the treatment of heart failure is an emerging interventional therapy and data supporting its use for the treatment heart failure will also be presented, as will a discussion of the role of palliative care and self-care in heart failure therapy.

  4. [Alternatives to conventional diuretic therapy in heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Rull, José Luis; Trullàs, Joan Carles; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-03-01

    Although treatment of acute heart failure is based primarily on the administration of intravenous loop diuretics, evidence supporting this practice is still scarce and there is uncertainty about the optimal dose. The existence of a considerable percentage of patients refractory to diuretic therapy and worsening of renal failure associated with the use of these drugs, with possible implications for medium-term mortality, have prompted the search for more effective and safer alternatives. Extracorporeal purification techniques, such as ultrafiltration, have demonstrated efficacy, although their superiority is unclear, due to the possible adverse effects associated with the procedure. The use of low-dose dopamine is not superior to conventional diuretic therapy after the first few hours of treatment. Moreover, combination with furosemide and hypertonic saline could be a valid alternative for patients with refractory congestion and depressed ejection fraction and serum creatinine ≤ 2.5mg/dL, but further studies are needed before its widespread use. The use of tolvaptan may be an effective alternative in the short-term but its use may be limited by its price. There is still controversy about whether treatment with loop diuretics is associated with higher mortality in all groups of patients with HF exacerbations. These controversies should be clarified by future clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. PATIENT WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE. RATIONAL CHOICE OF THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of chronic hyperactivation of neurohormonal systems, in particular, sympathoadrenal and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone, is the basis of modern concepts of the pathogenesis of heart failure. The medicinal blocking of these two systems has proved to be effective in the treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (<40%. Antagonists of mineralocorticoid receptors, along with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers, are neurohumoral modulators. They are used to treat patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. The prescription of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in clinical practice remains insufficient despite their high efficacy. Demonstration of the site of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in the complex treatment of a patient with chronic heart failure and diabetes type 2 is the goal of this article.

  6. The Current and Future Landscape of SERCA Gene Therapy for Heart Failure: A Clinical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Carl; Banner, Nicholas R; Morley-Smith, Andrew; Lyon, Alexander R; Harding, Sian E

    2015-05-01

    Gene therapy has been applied to cardiovascular disease for over 20 years but it is the application to heart failure that has generated recent interest in clinical trials. There is laboratory and early clinical evidence that delivery of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a (SERCA2a) gene therapy is beneficial for heart failure and this therapy could become the first positive inotrope with anti-arrhythmic properties. In this review we will discuss the rationale for SERCA2a gene therapy as a viable strategy in heart failure, review the published data, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials, before concluding with comments on the future challenges and potential for this therapy.

  7. Increased mortality after dronedarone therapy for severe heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; McMurray, John J V

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dronedarone is a novel antiarrhythmic drug with electrophysiological properties that are similar to those of amiodarone, but it does not contain iodine and thus does not cause iodine-related adverse reactions. Therefore, it may be of value in the treatment of patients with heart failure....... METHODS: In a multicenter study with a double-blind design, we planned to randomly assign 1000 patients who were hospitalized with symptomatic heart failure and severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction to receive 400 mg of dronedarone twice a day or placebo. The primary end point was the composite...... of death from any cause or hospitalization for heart failure. RESULTS: After inclusion of 627 patients (310 in the dronedarone group and 317 in the placebo group), the trial was prematurely terminated for safety reasons, at the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, in accordance...

  8. Influence of diuretic therapy on the features of heart rhythm variability changes in chronic heart failure patients

    OpenAIRE

    K R Alyeva; A B Bakhshaliev; S M Kakhramanova

    2018-01-01

    Aim. To study comparative influence of furosemide and torasemide on heart rhythm variability in patients with chronic heart failure of ischemic origin. Methods. The study included 48 patients (29 males and 19 females) with ischemic heart disease complicated by chronic heart failure, NYHA functional classes II-IV. All patients were randomized into two groups: group 1 (25 patients) received furosemide as diuretic therapy, and group 2 (23 patients) received torasemide. All patient underwen...

  9. Exercise training as a therapy for chronic heart failure: can older people benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Miles D; Struthers, Allan D; McMurdo, Marion E T

    2003-05-01

    Despite recent advances in pharmacological therapy, chronic heart failure remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in older people. Studies of exercise training in younger, carefully selected patients with heart failure have shown improvements in symptoms and exercise capacity and in many pathophysiological aspects of heart failure, including skeletal myopathy, ergoreceptor function, heart rate variability, endothelial function, and cytokine expression. Data on mortality and hospitalization are lacking, and effects on everyday activity, depression, and quality of life are unclear. Exercise therapy for patients with heart failure appears to be safe and has the potential to improve function and quality of life in older people with heart failure. To realize these potential benefits, exercise programs that are suitable for older, frail people need to be established and tested in an older, frail, unselected population with comorbidities.

  10. ROLE OF THE METABOLITE THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Maksimova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Questions of metabolite therapy with drugs based on glutamic acid in patients with chronic heart failure are considered. Possible modes of action of these drugs are presented. Results of the proper study of glutamic acid based drug in chronic heart failure are presented as examples.

  11. HEART FAILURE OF INTENSIVE CARE UNIT SPECIALIST: DIAGNOSIS, FOLLOW-UP, AND THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldız, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the diseases that require intensive care unit. The complication, repetition rates and cost ratios are high. Careful follow-up, a good treatment and device therapy such as mechanical ventilation may be require. An intensive care unit specialist must have been experience in the pathophysiology and treatment of heart failure.

  12. What Is Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  13. What Causes Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  14. Living with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  15. Trimetazidine therapy for diabetic mouse hearts subjected to ex vivo acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedt, Emilene; Lacerda, Lydia; Essop, M Faadiel

    2017-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is the most common primary diagnosis for hospitalized heart diseases in Africa. As increased fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) during heart failure triggers detrimental effects on the myocardium, we hypothesized that trimetazidine (TMZ) (partial FAO inhibitor) offers cardioprotection under normal and obese-related diabetic conditions. Hearts were isolated from 12-14-week-old obese male and female diabetic (db/db) mice versus lean non-diabetic littermates (db/+) controls. The Langendorff retrograde isolated heart perfusion system was employed to establish an ex vivo AHF model: a) Stabilization phase-Krebs Henseleit buffer (10 mM glucose) at 100 mmHg (25 min); b) Critical Acute Heart Failure (CAHF) phase-(1.2 mM palmitic acid, 2.5 mM glucose) at 20 mmHg (25 min); and c) Recovery Acute Heart Failure phase (RAHF)-(1.2 mM palmitic acid, 10 mM glucose) at 100 mmHg (25 min). Treated groups received 5 μM TMZ in the perfusate during either the CAHF or RAHF stage for the full duration of each respective phase. Both lean and obese males benefited from TMZ treatment administered during the RAHF phase. Sex differences were observed only in lean groups where the phases of the estrous cycle influenced therapy; only the lean follicular female group responded to TMZ treatment during the CAHF phase. Lean luteal females rather displayed an inherent cardioprotection (without treatments) that was lost with obesity. However, TMZ treatment initiated during RAHF was beneficial for obese luteal females. TMZ treatment triggered significant recovery for male and obese female hearts when administered during RAHF. There were no differences between lean and obese male hearts, while lean females displayed a functional recovery advantage over lean males. Thus TMZ emerges as a worthy therapeutic target to consider for AHF treatment in normal and obese-diabetic individuals (for both sexes), but only when administered during the recovery phase and not during the very acute

  16. Decongestion: Diuretics and other therapies for hospitalized heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazir, Ali; Cowie, Martin R

    2016-04-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a potentially life-threatening clinical syndrome, usually requiring hospital admission. Often the syndrome is characterized by congestion, and is associated with long hospital admissions and high risk of readmission and further healthcare expenditure. Despite a limited evidence-base, diuretics remain the first-line treatment for congestion. Loop diuretics are typically the first-line diuretic strategy with some evidence that initial treatment with continuous infusion or boluses of high-dose loop diuretic is superior to an initial lower dose strategy. In patients who have impaired responsiveness to diuretics, the addition of an oral thiazide or thiazide-like diuretic to induce sequential nephron blockade can be beneficial. The use of intravenous low-dose dopamine is no longer supported in heart failure patients with preserved systolic blood pressure and its use to assist diuresis in patients with low systolic blood pressures requires further study. Mechanical ultrafiltration has been used to treat patients with heart failure and fluid retention, but the evidence-base is not robust, and its place in clinical practice is yet to be established. Several novel pharmacological agents remain under investigation. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. "Nihilism" of chronic heart failure therapy in children and why effective therapy is withheld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schranz, Dietmar; Voelkel, Norbert F

    2016-04-01

    Major advances in chronic heart failure (cHF) therapy have been achieved and documented in adult patients, while research regarding the mechanisms and therapy of cHF in children has lagged behind. Based on receptor physiological studies and pharmacological knowledge, treatment with specific ß1-adrenergic receptor blocker (ARB), tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I), and mineralocorticoid antagonists have to be recommended in children despite lack of sufficient data derived from prospective randomized studies. At our institution, bisoprolol, lisinopril, and spironolactone have been firmly established to treat systolic cHF, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) following hybrid approach and congenital left-right shunt diseases, latest in patients where surgery has to be delayed. Chronic therapy with long-acting diuretics and fluid restriction are not advocated because short-term effects are achieved at the expense of further neuro-humoral stimulation. It remains unclear why diuretics are recommended although evidence-based studies, documenting long-term benefit, are missing. However, that is true for all currently used drugs for pediatric cHF. This review focuses on the prevailing "nihilism" of cHF therapy in children with the goal to encourage physicians to treat pediatric cHF with a rationally designed therapy, which combines available agents that have been shown to improve survival in adult patients with cHF. Because of the lack of clinical trials, which generate the needed evidence, surrogate variables like heart and respiratory rate, weight gain, image-derived data, and biomarkers should be monitored and used instead. The recommended pharmacological therapy for systolic heart failure is also provided as the basis for utilizing reversible pulmonary arterial banding (PAB) as a novel strategy in young children with dilative cardiomyopathy (DCM) with preserved right ventricular function. • Heart failure (HF) in children is a serious public

  18. Current Treatment Strategies for Heart Failure: Role of Device Therapy and LV Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaswamy, Praneeth; Walters, Tomos E; Nazer, Babak; Lee, Randall J

    2016-09-01

    Medical care of heart failure (HF) begins with the determination of the cause of the heart failure and diagnosing potential reversible causes (i.e., coronary heart disease, hyperthyroidism, etc.). Medical therapy includes pharmacological and nonpharmacological strategies that limit and/or reverse the signs and symptoms of HF. Initial behavior modification includes dietary sodium and fluid restriction to avoid weight gain; and encouraging physical activity when appropriate. Optimization of medical therapy is the first line of treatment that includes the use of diuretics, vasodilators (i.e., ACE inhibitors or ARBs), beta blockers, and potentially inotropic agents and anticoagulation depending on the patient's severity of heart failure and LV dysfunction. As heart failure advances despite optimized medical management, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are appropriate device therapies. The development of progressive end-stage HF, despite maximal medical therapy, necessitates the consideration of mechanical circulatory devices such as ventricular assist devices (VADs) either as a bridge to heart transplantation or as destination therapy. Despite the advances in the treatment of heart failure, there is still a large morbidity and mortality associated with HF, thus the need to develop newer strategies for the treatment of HF.

  19. Influence of diuretic therapy on the features of heart rhythm variability changes in chronic heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K R Alyeva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study comparative influence of furosemide and torasemide on heart rhythm variability in patients with chronic heart failure of ischemic origin. Methods. The study included 48 patients (29 males and 19 females with ischemic heart disease complicated by chronic heart failure, NYHA functional classes II-IV. All patients were randomized into two groups: group 1 (25 patients received furosemide as diuretic therapy, and group 2 (23 patients received torasemide. All patient underwent clinical examination including assessment of complaints and physical examination, laboratory and instrumental tests (electrocardiography, echocardiography, 6-minute walk test, 24 Hour Holter ECG monitoring before and 30 days after starting diuretic therapy. Results. Against the background of one-month diuretic therapy, positive dynamics of clinical parameters was registered in both main groups of patients receiving both furosemide and torasemide. In furosemide group deterioration of heart rhythm variability was observed. Torasemide treatment resulted in considerable improvement of vegetative regulation of heart activity. Conclusion. Diuretic therapy with furosemide is characterized by changes of time and spectral parameters of vegetative regulation of heart rhythm towards strengthening of sympathetic and attenuation of parasympathetic influence; diuretic therapy with torasemide resulted in considerable improvement of heart rhythm variability parameters, attenuation of sympathetic and strengthening of parasympathetic influence on heart rhythm that provides additional cardioprotection in the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure of ischemic origin.

  20. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  1. Advanced Heart Failure Therapies for Cancer Therapeutics-Related Cardiac Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Christopher M; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2017-04-01

    End-stage heart failure in cancer survivors may result from cardiotoxic chemotherapy and/or chest radiation and require advanced therapies, including left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) and transplantation. Traditionally, such therapies have been underutilized in cancer survivors owing to lack of experience and perceived risk of cancer recurrence. Recent data from large registries, however, have shown excellent outcomes of LVADs and transplantation in cancer survivors, albeit subject to careful selection and special considerations. This article summarizes all aspects of advanced heart failure therapies in patients with cancer therapy-related cardiac dysfunction and underscores the need for careful selection of these candidates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Heart failure therapy in diabetic patients-comparison with the recent ESC/EASD guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angermann Christiane E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess heart failure therapies in diabetic patients with preserved as compared to impaired systolic ventricular function. Methods 3304 patients with heart failure from 9 different studies were included (mean age 63 ± 14 years; out of these, 711 subjects had preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (≥ 50% and 994 patients in the whole cohort suffered from diabetes. Results The majority (>90% of heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction (SHF and diabetes were treated with an ACE inhibitor (ACEi or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB or with beta-blockers. By contrast, patients with diabetes and preserved ejection fraction (HFNEF were less likely to receive these substance classes (p Conclusions Diabetic patients with HFNEF received less heart failure medication and showed a poorer control of blood pressure as compared to diabetic patients with SHF. SHF patients with diabetes were less likely to receive aldosterone receptor blocker therapy, irrespective of renal function.

  3. Heart failure - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart failure; Right-sided heart failure - cor pulmonale; Cardiomyopathy - heart failure; HF ... Disease Section. Heart Failure as a newly approved diagnosis for cardiac rehabilitation: challenges and opportunities. J Am ...

  4. New strategies for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: the importance of targeted therapies for heart failure phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senni, Michele; Paulus, Walter J.; Gavazzi, Antonello; Fraser, Alan G.; Díez, Javier; Solomon, Scott D.; Smiseth, Otto A.; Guazzi, Marco; Lam, Carolyn S. P.; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Tschöpe, Carsten; Metra, Marco; Hummel, Scott L.; Edelmann, Frank; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Stewart Coats, Andrew J.; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Anker, Stefan D.; Levy, Daniel; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Pieske, Burkert M.

    2014-01-01

    The management of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) has improved significantly over the last two decades. In contrast, little or no progress has been made in identifying evidence-based, effective treatments for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Despite the high prevalence, mortality, and cost of HF-PEF, large phase III international clinical trials investigating interventions to improve outcomes in HF-PEF have yielded disappointing results. Therefore, treatment of HF-PEF remains largely empiric, and almost no acknowledged standards exist. There is no single explanation for the negative results of past HF-PEF trials. Potential contributors include an incomplete understanding of HF-PEF pathophysiology, the heterogeneity of the patient population, inadequate diagnostic criteria, recruitment of patients without true heart failure or at early stages of the syndrome, poor matching of therapeutic mechanisms and primary pathophysiological processes, suboptimal study designs, or inadequate statistical power. Many novel agents are in various stages of research and development for potential use in patients with HF-PEF. To maximize the likelihood of identifying effective therapeutics for HF-PEF, lessons learned from the past decade of research should be applied to the design, conduct, and interpretation of future trials. This paper represents a synthesis of a workshop held in Bergamo, Italy, and it examines new and emerging therapies in the context of specific, targeted HF-PEF phenotypes where positive clinical benefit may be detected in clinical trials. Specific considerations related to patient and endpoint selection for future clinical trials design are also discussed. PMID:25104786

  5. Hyponatremia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Kanu

    2009-01-01

    Hyponatremia is one of the newer and emerging risk factors for an adverse prognosis in chronic heart failure. Why decreased serum sodium is associated with worse prognosis remains unclear. It may reflect worsening heart failure and the deleterious effects of activation of neurohormones. The mechanism of hyponatremia in heart failure also remains unclear. A relatively greater degree of free-water retention compared to sodium retention is probably the major mechanism. The treatment of significant hyponatremia in heart failure is difficult. The conventional treatments such as fluid restriction, infusion of hypertonic saline, and aggressive diuretic therapies are not usually effective. Vasopressin receptor antagonists have been shown to enhance aquaresis and correct hyponatremia. However, long-term beneficial effects of such treatments in chronic heart failure have not been documented.

  6. NEW ADVANCES IN BETA-BLOCKER THERAPY IN HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eBarrese

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of -blockers (BB in heart failure (HF has been considered a contradiction for many years. Considering HF simply as a state of inadequate systolic function, BB were contraindicated because of their negative effects on myocardial contractility. Nevertheless, evidence collected in the past years have suggested that additional mechanisms, such as compensatory neuro-humoral hyperactivation or inflammation, could participate in the pathogenesis of this complex disease. Indeed, chronic activation of the sympathetic nervous system, although initially compensating the reduced cardiac output from the failing heart, increases myocardial oxygen demand, ischemia and oxidative stress; moreover, high catecholamine levels induce peripheral vasoconstriction and increase both cardiac pre- and after-load, thus determining additional stress to the cardiac muscle (1. As a consequence of such a different view of the pathogenic mechanisms of HF, the efficacy of BB in the treatment of HF has been investigated in numerous clinical trials. Results from these trials highlighted BB as valid therapeutic tools in HF, providing rational basis for their inclusion in many HF treatment guidelines. However, controversy still exists about their use, in particular with regards to the selection of specific molecules, since BB differ in terms of adrenergic -receptors selectivity, adjunctive effects on -receptors, and effects on reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines production. Further concerns about the heterogeneity in the response to , as well as the use in specific patients, are matter of debate among clinicians. In this review, we will recapitulate the pharmacological properties and the classification of BB, and the alteration of the adrenergic system occurring during HF that provide a rationale for their use; we will also focus on the possible molecular mechanisms, such as genetic polymorphisms, underlying the different efficacy of molecules

  7. Ultrafiltration Therapy for Heart Failure: Balancing Likely Benefits against Possible Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazory, Amir

    2016-08-08

    Heart failure remains a major public health concern because of its high prevalence, morbidity, mortality, and financial burden. The poor clinical outcomes associated with acute decompensated heart failure, suboptimal efficacy and safety profile of conventional treatment regimens, and unsatisfactory experiences with the newer classes of pharmacologic therapy underlie the interest in the use of extracorporeal isolated ultrafiltration in this setting. In this article, selected mechanistic aspects of ultrafiltration therapy are briefly reviewed followed by a critical overview of the largest trials in this field. I will discuss the clinical relevance of renal dysfunction and decongestion as two commonly used end points of safety and efficacy in the ultrafiltration trials, with emphasis on the emerging pertinent notions that could challenge our conventional thinking. Finally, a number of practical recommendations (e.g., customization of ultrafiltration rates) are provided for ultrafiltration therapy in the setting of acute decompensated heart failure. Because of a paucity of evidence, universally accepted consensus guidelines cannot yet be generated. As such, when considering ultrafiltration therapy for acute decompensated heart failure, the likely benefits should be carefully balanced against the potential risks for an individual patient. A conceivable implication of the ultrafiltration trials is that collaborative heart failure programs benefiting from nephrology expertise and resources could improve the outcomes and reduce the cost. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  8. Established and emerging cardiovascular magnetic resonance techniques for prognostication and guiding therapy in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Peter P; Plein, Sven

    2014-01-01

    The syndrome of heart failure is prevalent and a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) offers a unique method to quantify the extent of left ventricular dysfunction and also characterize the myocardium, particularly according to the presence and distribution of late gadolinium enhancement. The prognostic value of late gadolinium enhancement in various etiologies of heart failure has been demonstrated. Newer techniques that non-invasively assess the extracellular volume may also add to the prognostic value of CMR in heart failure. Management decisions in patients with heart failure can often be complex. CMR can provide useful information when planning cardiac device therapy and the CMR assessment of viability is key when planning revascularization.

  9. Comparison of clinical results of pharmaceutical and surgical therapy in patients with severe chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotsoeva О.Т.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the presented paper is a meta-analysis of clinical studies on the comparative effectiveness of pharmaceutical therapy and surgical treatment such as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, cardiac resynchronization therapy with cardioversion-defibrillation (CRT-D, circulatory support system and heart transplantation in patients with severe chronic heart failure (CHF. Material and Methods. Results of 41 clinical studies (29799 patients with severe CHF were included in a meta-analysis. Data search was conducted in the following databases: Medline, Medscape, Pubmed, and websites dedicated to clinical research (National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center, ClinicalStudyResults.org, ClinicalTrials.gov. Results. As compared with pharmaceutical therapy, surgical treatment of severe CHF is better to reduce fatal risk, incidence of decompensation of CHF, frequency of cardiac arrhythmias, the need to perform or re-perform heart transplantation. It is also shown that CRT better reduced the mortality from progression of heart failure than heart transplantation. Both pharmaceutical therapy and surgical treatment improved functional class of CHF and quality of patients' life, but does not affect the left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion. It was found out that there was a number of significant advantages of surgical treatment of severe CHF, compared with pharmaceutical therapy. However, it is still a number of unresolved issues (particularly in relation to heart transplantation on the effectiveness comparing pharmaceutical and surgical therapies of severe CHF

  10. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillator Treatment in a Child with Heart Failure and Ventricular Arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hak Ju Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT is a new treatment for refractory heart failure. However, most patients with heart failure treated with CRT are adults, middle-aged or older with idiopathic or ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. We treated a 12-year-old boy, who was transferred after cardiac arrest, with dilated cardiomyopathy, left bundle-branch block, and ventricular tachycardia. We performed cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D. After CRT-D, left ventricular ejection fraction improved from 22% to 4 4% a ssessed by e chocardiog ram 1 year p ostoperatively. On e lectrocardiog ram, Q RS d uration was shortened from 206 to 144 ms. The patient’s clinical symptoms also improved. For pediatric patients with refractory heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia, CRT-D could be indicated as an effective therapeutic option.

  11. [Organ-protection therapy. A new therapeutic approach for acute heart failure?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivite, David; Formiga, Francesc; Corbella, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Unlike the prolonged benefit produced by the treatment of chronic heart failure, newer drugs tested for the treatment of acute heart failure in the last decade have failed to provide evidence of clinical benefit beyond some improvement in symptom relief. In particular, no drug has shown the ability to reduce the higher medium- and long-term risk of morbidity and mortality in these patients after an episode of decompensation. Current understanding of the pathophysiology of acute heart failure and its consequences has led to the hypothesis that, beyond symptom control, effective therapies for this syndrome should target not only the hemodynamic changes of the initial phase of the syndrome but should also "protect" the organism from the activation of neurohumoral and inflammatory pathways triggered by the decompensation episode, which persist in time and confer a risk of deleterious effects in several organs and tissues. Serelaxin, a new drug related to the peptidic endogenous hormones of the relaxin family, has recently been shown to provide multiple beneficial effects in terms of "organ protection" - not only in the cardiovascular and renal systems - from these acute heart failure-related deleterious changes. This drug has already been tested in acute heart failure patients with encouraging results in terms of medium-term clinical benefit, rendering serelaxin as a serious candidate for first-line, prognosis-modifying therapy in this syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Transvenous biventricular pacing in a child after congenital heart surgery as an alternative therapy for congestive heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Nico A.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Ottenkamp, Jaap; Schalij, Martin J.

    2003-01-01

    Transvenous Biventricular Pacing in Children. Cardiac resynchronization therapy improves short-term and long-term hemodynamics in adult patients with congestive heart failure and left bundle branch block. We describe the feasibility of transvenous biventricular pacemaker implantation in a 6-year-old

  13. Impact of Ejection Fraction on the Clinical Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Mild Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Cecilia; Daubert, Claude; Abraham, William T

    2013-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in mild heart failure (HF) patients with QRS prolongation and ejection fraction (EF) ≤30%. To assess the effect of CRT in less severe systolic dysfunction, outcomes in the REsynchronization reVErses Remodeling in Systolic left v...

  14. Distinct trajectories of disease-specific health status in heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H.; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Meine, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is well known that a significant proportion of heart failure patients (10-44 %) do not show improvement in symptoms or functioning from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), yet no study has examined patient-reported health status trajectories after implantation. METHODS: A cohort...

  15. Efficacy and safety of carvedilol in patients with chronic heart failure receiving concomitant amiodarone therapy. Australia/New Zealand Heart Failure Research Collaborative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krum, H; Shusterman, N; MacMahon, S; Sharpe, N

    1998-12-01

    The beta-blocker/vasodilator carvedilol is found to have beneficial effects in patients with chronic heart failure. However, the safety and efficacy of this agent in the presence of concomitant amiodarone therapy has not been previously determined. We retrospectively analyzed the Australia/New Zealand Carvedilol Heart Failure Research Collaborative Group study of 415 patients with mild to moderate ischemic heart failure where amiodarone was administered as part of the treatment therapy (in 52 patients). After the open-label carvedilol run-in, patients received carvedilol (target dose 25 mg twice daily) or placebo for an average of 19 months. The main adverse events during this double-blind period were worsened heart failure, hypotension/dizziness, bradycardia/atrioventricular block, and aggravation of angina. By Chi square analysis, carvedilol and amiodarone together were not associated with a greater overall incidence of adverse effects than either drug alone. The beneficial effects of carvedilol on left ventricular ejection that were observed in the main trial were preserved in the presence of amiodarone. Carvedilol is a useful additional therapy for patients with chronic heart failure already receiving amiodarone. Carvedilol can be added to amiodarone in these patients without expectation of increased adverse effects or loss of clinical efficacy.

  16. Arrhythmias in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auricchio; Klein

    2000-08-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are very common in the setting of heart failure, with atrial and ventricular arrhythmias often present in the same patient. The risk and the benefit of antiarrhythmic therapies are still a matter of debate. Class I antiarrhythmic drugs should be avoided in patients with heart failure, cardiac ischemia, or previous myocardial infarction. Beta-blocker agents reduce morbidity and decrease mortality in patients suffering from moderate to severe heart failure. Amiodarone may be beneficial in patients with advanced heart failure and increased resting heart rates. This class III drug may be effective to suppress episodes of atrial fibrillation but can also be beneficial in reducing ventricular response by slowing atrioventricular conduction during chronic atrial fibrillation. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) markedly reduce sudden cardiac death in patients with ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation. In patients with advanced heart failure, however, the ICD may not markedly extend survival. Recently analyzed data from the Canadian Implantable Defibrillator Study (CIDS), Antiarrhythmics Versus Implantable Defibrillators (AVID) registry, Multicenter Unsustained Tachycardia Trial (MUSTT), and Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial (MADIT) have consistently shown that it is the sickest patient who benefits the most from ICD therapy. Patients with markedly depressed ejection fraction (death will translate into a reduction of all-cause mortality. For patients resuscitated from sustained ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation, an ICD or, in some cases, amiodarone should be considered. Catheter or surgical ablation can be considered for selected patients with ventricular tachycardia.

  17. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in patients with heart failure: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Rebecca L

    2008-03-01

    Depression is a significant problem in patients with heart failure. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been proposed as a potential non-pharmacological treatment for depression in patients with heart failure. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence for the use of CBT in treating depression and depressive symptoms in patients with cardiovascular illness. In six of the ten studied reviewed, researchers found that CBT reduced depressive symptoms; however, the limitations of the studies prevent wide generalization of the results. There is insufficient evidence to support the use of CBT for the treatment of depressive symptoms in patients with cardiovascular illness at this time. Large randomized, controlled trials that demonstrate the efficacy of CBT are needed before nurses routinely refer patients with heart failure to CBT for the purpose of improving depression or depressive symptoms.

  18. Techniques for Identification of Left Ventricular Asynchrony for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schuster

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The most recent treatment option of medically refractory heart failure includes cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT by biventricular pacing in selected patients in NYHA functional class III or IV heart failure. The widely used marker to indicate left ventricular (LV asynchrony has been the surface ECG, but seems not to be a sufficient marker of the mechanical events within the LV and prediction of clinical response. This review presents an overview of techniques for identification of left ventricular intra- and interventricular asynchrony. Both manuscripts for electrical and mechanical asynchrony are reviewed, partly predicting response to CRT. In summary there is still no gold standard for assessment of LV asynchrony for CRT, but both traditional and new echocardiographic methods have shown asynchronous LV contraction in heart failure patients, and resynchronized LV contraction during CRT and should be implemented as additional methods for selecting patients to CRT.

  19. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken once ...

  20. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure ... problem may cause heart failure or make heart failure worse. Heart valve surgery may be needed to repair or ...

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of Adding Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy to an Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Among Patients With Mild Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woo, Christopher Y; Strandberg, Erika J; Schmiegelow, Michelle D

    2015-01-01

    -defibrillator (ICD) alone among patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, prolonged intraventricular conduction, and mild heart failure. DESIGN: Markov decision model. DATA SOURCES: Clinical trials, clinical registries, claims data from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and Centers for Disease......BACKGROUND: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces mortality and heart failure hospitalizations in patients with mild heart failure. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of adding CRT to an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D) compared with implantable cardioverter...

  2. Metabolic and toxicological considerations for diuretic therapy in patients with acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspromonte, Nadia; Cruz, Dinna N; Valle, Roberto; Bonello, Monica; Tubaro, Marco; Gambaro, Giovanni; Marchese, Giuseppe; Santini, Massimo; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-09-01

    Diuretics are widely recommended in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). However, loop diuretics predispose patients to electrolyte imbalance and hypovolemia, which in turn leads to neurohormonal activation and worsening renal function (WRF). Unfortunately, despite their widespread use, limited data from randomized clinical trials are available to guide clinicians with the appropriate management of this diuretic therapy. This review focuses on the current management of diuretic therapy and discusses data supporting the efficacy and safety of loop diuretics in patients with AHF. The authors consider the challenges in performing clinical trials of diuretics in AHF, and describe ongoing clinical trials designed to rigorously evaluate optimal diuretic use in this syndrome. The authors review the current evidence for diuretics and suggest hypothetical bases for their efficacy relying on the complex relationship among diuretics, neurohormonal activation, renal function, fluid and sodium management, and heart failure syndrome. Data from several large registries that evaluated diuretic therapy in hospitalized patients with AHF suggest that its efficacy is far from being universal. Further studies are warranted to determine whether high-dose diuretics are responsible for WRF and a higher rate of coexisting renal disease are instead markers of more severe heart failure. The authors believe that monitoring congestion during diuretic therapy in AHF would refine the current approach to AHF treatment. This would allow clinicians to identify high-risk patients and possibly reduce the incidence of complications secondary to fluid management strategies.

  3. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... Making This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  4. Amiodarone in patients with congestive heart failure and asymptomatic ventricular arrhythmia. Survival Trial of Antiarrhythmic Therapy in Congestive Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S N; Fletcher, R D; Fisher, S G; Singh, B N; Lewis, H D; Deedwania, P C; Massie, B M; Colling, C; Lazzeri, D

    1995-07-13

    Asymptomatic ventricular arrhythmias in patients with congestive heart failure are associated with increased rates of overall mortality and sudden death. Amiodarone is now used widely to prevent ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. We conducted a trial to determine whether amiodarone can reduce overall mortality in patients with congestive heart failure and asymptomatic ventricular arrhythmias. We used a double-blind, placebo-controlled protocol in which 674 patients with symptoms of congestive heart failure, cardiac enlargement, 10 or more premature ventricular contractions per hour, and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 40 percent or less were randomly assigned to receive amiodarone (336 patients) or placebo (338 patients). The primary end point was overall mortality, and the median follow-up was 45 months (range, 0 to 54). There was no significant difference in overall mortality between the two treatment groups (P = 0.6). The two-year actuarial survival rate was 69.4 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 64.2 to 74.6) for the patients in the amiodarone group and 70.8 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 65.7 to 75.9) for those in the placebo group. At two years, the rate of sudden death was 15 percent in the amiodarone group and 19 percent in the placebo group (P = 0.43). There was a trend toward a reduction in overall mortality among the patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy who received amiodarone (P = 0.07). Amiodarone was significantly more effective in suppressing ventricular arrhythmias and increased the left ventricular ejection fraction by 42 percent at two years. Although amiodarone was effective in suppressing ventricular arrhythmias and improving ventricular function, it did not reduce the incidence of sudden death or prolong survival among patients with heart failure, except for a trend toward reduced mortality among those with nonischemic cardiomyopathy.

  5. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is ...

  6. How Is Heart Failure Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  7. How Is Heart Failure Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  8. CARDIAC RESYNCHRONIZATION THERAPY OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AS «BRIDGE» TO CARDIAC TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Shumakov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac transplantation (CTX remains the gold standard for treatment of terminal forms of heart failure. Nevertheless, all over the world shortage of donors and postoperative complications leads to search of alternative therapeutic strategy. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is discussed alternative CTX. Besides, now it is not clear, whether it is possible to prevent CRT CTX in long-term prospect. Thus, we aspired to estimate long-term clinical results in the big group of candidates to CTX which have received CRT-systems in Institute of Transplantation last years. In total 70 patients are operated, from them 5 patients in connection with condition deterioration heart transplantation has been executed. The received experience shows that at patients with left ventricular dissinhroniсity, which are in a waiting list to heart transplantation, application of method CRT may to prevent or delay necessity for heart transplantation, or to become a link as «bridge» to transplantation. 

  9. Heart failure in children - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congestive heart failure - children; Cor pulmonale - children; Cardiomyopathy - children; CHF - children; Congenital heart defect - heart failure in children; Cyanotic heart disease - heart failure in children; Birth defect of the heart - heart ...

  10. Optimising Use of Evidence-Based Pharmacological Therapy in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    KEN LEE CHIN

    2018-01-01

    Heart failure remains a major clinical and public health problem, but the optimal use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments in patients with heart failure can further reduce mortality and morbidity. This doctoral thesis i) highlighted the 'treatment gap' in patients with chronic heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, ii) demonstrated that aspirin does not reduce the beneficial effects of eplerenone in patients with chronic heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, iii...

  11. THE POSSIBILITY OF USAGE OF METABOLIC CORRECTION THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE AND HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Sergienko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate an effect of metabolic corrector mildronate on cardiac hemodynamics and endothelium function in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD and heart failure (HFMaterial and methods. 60 patients with IHD and HF of I-III functional class according to NYHA were included into the study. 30 patients of the main group received mildronate at a daily dose of 1000 mg during 3 months additionally to standard therapy. Patients of the control group took standard therapy only. Cardiac function was estimated by 4D Gated Equilibrium Radionuclide Ventriculography. The endothelium function was measured as endothelium dependent vasodilation.Results. During 3 months mildronate therapy resulted in increase of left ventricular (LV ejection fraction, peak filling and peak ejecting rate of LV.Conclusion. Metabolic corrector mildronate has positive effect on cardiac function in patients with IHD and CHF.

  12. Metabolic mechanisms in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafian, Houman; Frenneaux, Michael P; Opie, Lionel H

    2007-07-24

    Although neurohumoral antagonism has successfully reduced heart failure morbidity and mortality, the residual disability and death rate remains unacceptably high. Though abnormalities of myocardial metabolism are associated with heart failure, recent data suggest that heart failure may itself promote metabolic changes such as insulin resistance, in part through neurohumoral activation. A detrimental self-perpetuating cycle (heart failure --> altered metabolism --> heart failure) that promotes the progression of heart failure may thus be postulated. Accordingly, we review the cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology of altered metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. It is hypothesized that the ensuing detrimental myocardial energetic perturbations result from neurohumoral activation, increased adverse free fatty acid metabolism, decreased protective glucose metabolism, and in some cases insulin resistance. The result is depletion of myocardial ATP, phosphocreatine, and creatine kinase with decreased efficiency of mechanical work. On the basis of the mechanisms outlined, appropriate therapies to mitigate aberrant metabolism include intense neurohumoral antagonism, limitation of diuretics, correction of hypokalemia, exercise, and diet. We also discuss more novel mechanistic-based therapies to ameliorate metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. For example, metabolic modulators may optimize myocardial substrate utilization to improve cardiac function and exercise performance beyond standard care. The ultimate success of metabolic-based therapy will be manifest by its capacity further to lessen the residual mortality in heart failure.

  13. Current management of congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druck, M N

    1987-04-01

    The author describes the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure and outlines treatment based on the mechanism and hemodynamics of heart failure. He discusses vasodilator therapy, ACE inhibitors in heart failure, and initiation of treatment. The paper concludes with a short discussion of methods of treating refractory heart failure.

  14. Current Management of Congestive Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Druck, Maurice N.

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure and outlines treatment based on the mechanism and hemodynamics of heart failure. He discusses vasodilator therapy, ACE inhibitors in heart failure, and initiation of treatment. The paper concludes with a short discussion of methods of treating refractory heart failure.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of defibrillator therapy or amiodarone in chronic stable heart failure: results from the Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure Trial (SCD-HeFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Daniel B; Nelson, Charlotte L; Anstrom, Kevin J; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Tsiatis, Anastasios A; Cowper, Patricia A; Clapp-Channing, Nancy E; Davidson-Ray, Linda; Poole, Jeanne E; Johnson, George; Anderson, Jill; Lee, Kerry L; Bardy, Gust H

    2006-07-11

    In the Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure Trial (SCD-HeFT), implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy significantly reduced all-cause mortality rates compared with medical therapy alone in patients with stable, moderately symptomatic heart failure, whereas amiodarone had no benefit on mortality rates. We examined long-term economic implications of these results. Medical costs were estimated by using hospital billing data and the Medicare Fee Schedule. Our base case cost-effectiveness analysis used empirical clinical and cost data to estimate the lifetime incremental cost of saving an extra life-year with ICD therapy relative to medical therapy alone. At 5 years, the amiodarone arm had a survival rate equivalent to that of the placebo arm and higher costs than the placebo arm. For ICD relative to medical therapy alone, the base case lifetime cost-effectiveness and cost-utility ratios (discounted at 3%) were dollar 38,389 per life-year saved (LYS) and dollar 41,530 per quality-adjusted LYS, respectively. A cost-effectiveness ratio < dollar 100,000 was obtained in 99% of 1000 bootstrap repetitions. The cost-effectiveness ratio was sensitive to the amount of extrapolation beyond the empirical 5-year trial data: dollar 127,503 per LYS at 5 years, dollar 88,657 per LYS at 8 years, and dollar 58,510 per LYS at 12 years. Because of a significant interaction between ICD treatment and New York Heart Association class, the cost-effectiveness ratio was dollar 29,872 per LYS for class II, whereas there was incremental cost but no incremental benefit in class III. Prophylactic use of single-lead, shock-only ICD therapy is economically attractive in patients with stable, moderately symptomatic heart failure with an ejection fraction < or = 35%, particularly those in NYHA class II, as long as the benefits of ICD therapy observed in the SCD-HeFT persist for at least 8 years.

  16. Regenerative cell therapy and pharmacotherapeutic intervention in heart failure Part 2 : Pharmacological targets, agents and intervention perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, C.; Schoemaker, R. G.; van Gilst, W. H.; Yu, B.; Roks, A. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Regenerative medicine represents a promising perspective on therapeutic angiogenesis in patients with cardiovascular disease, including heart failure. However, previous or ongoing clinical trials show ambiguous outcomes with respect to the benefit of regenerative therapy by means of bone marrow stem

  17. Combination decongestion therapy in hospitalized heart failure: loop diuretics, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Mentz, Robert J; Greene, Stephen J; Senni, Michele; Sato, Naoki; Nodari, Savina; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Congestion is the most common reason for admissions and readmissions for heart failure (HF). The vast majority of hospitalized HF patients appear to respond readily to loop diuretics, but available data suggest that a significant proportion are being discharged with persistent evidence of congestion. Although novel therapies targeting congestion should continue to be developed, currently available agents may be utilized more optimally to facilitate complete decongestion. The combination of loop diuretics, natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and vasopressin antagonists represents a regimen of currently available therapies that affects early and persistent decongestion, while limiting the associated risks of electrolyte disturbances, hemodynamic fluctuations, renal dysfunction and mortality.

  18. Heart failure severity, inappropriate ICD therapy, and novel ICD programming: a MADIT-RIT substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimee, Usama A; Vermilye, Katherine; Rosero, Spencer; Schuger, Claudio D; Daubert, James P; Zareba, Wojciech; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Moss, Arthur J; Kutyifa, Valentina

    2017-12-01

    The effects of heart failure (HF) severity on risk of inappropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy have not been thoroughly investigated. We aimed to study the association between HF severity and inappropriate ICD therapy in MADIT-RIT. MADIT-RIT randomized 1,500 patients to three ICD programming arms: conventional (Arm A), high-rate cut-off (Arm B: ≥200 beats/min), and delayed therapy (Arm C: 60-second delay for ≥170 beats/min). We evaluated the association between New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III (n = 256) versus class I-II (n = 251) and inappropriate ICD therapy in Arm A patients with ICD-only and cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D). We additionally assessed benefit of novel ICD programming in Arms B and C versus Arm A by NYHA classification. In Arm A, the risk of inappropriate therapy was significantly higher in those with NYHA III versus NYHA I-II for both ICD (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.55, confidence interval [CI]: 1.51-4.30, P programming significantly reduced inappropriate therapy in patients with both NYHA III (Arm B vs Arm A: HR = 0.08, P programming with high-rate cut-off or delayed detection reduces inappropriate ICD therapies in both mild and moderate HF. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. New-onset heart failure in association with severe hypertension during trastuzumab therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Joerg; Herrmann, Sandra M; Haddad, Tufia C

    2014-12-01

    Heart failure is a dreaded complication of trastuzumab therapy in women with breast cancer overexpressing the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2. Experimental studies have pointed out that the HER-2 signaling pathway is important in the adaptation to high afterload conditions and its inactivation leads to cardiac decompensation. Herein, we report on 2 patients with breast cancer who were receiving trastuzumab monotherapy and required hospital admission for new-onset heart failure. This occurred at a time of unprecedented blood pressure elevations, in one case due to cessation of antihypertensive medications and in the other case due to a scleroderma crisis. Although trastuzumab may not have been the precipitating factor for blood pressure dyscontrol in these patients, severe, uncontrolled hypertension may have been the precipitating factor for trastuzumab-related acute heart failure. These 2 cases add to previous reports recognizing systemic hypertension as a risk factor for the development of trastuzumab cardiotoxicity and translate experimental observations of the significance of the HER-2 signaling pathway to the bedside. Pending further confirmation, the present observations may raise awareness of the need for appropriate monitoring and control of systemic hypertension in patients receiving trastuzumab, or potentially any other HER-2-targeted therapy. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality of Life with Defibrillator Therapy or Amiodarone in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Daniel B.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Sun, Jie L.; Clapp-Channing, Nancy E.; Tsiatis, Anastasios A.; Davidson-Ray, Linda; Lee, Kerry L.; Bardy, Gust H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy significantly prolongs life in patients at increased risk of sudden cardiac death from depressed left ventricular function. However, it is unclear whether this increased longevity is accompanied by deterioration in quality of life. Methods The Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure Trial (SCD-HeFT) compared ICD therapy or amiodarone versus state-of-the-art medical therapy alone in 2521 stable heart failure patients with depressed left ventricular function. Quality of life, a secondary end point of the trial, was prospectively measured at baseline, 3, 12, and 30 months and was 93% to 98% complete. The Duke Activity Status Index (which measures cardiac physical functioning) and the SF-36 Mental Health Inventory (which measures psychological well-being or distress) were prespecified principal quality-of-life outcomes. Multiple additional quality-of-life outcomes were also examined. Results Compared with medical therapy alone, psychological well-being in the ICD arm significantly improved at 3 months (p=0.01) and 12 months (p=0.004) but not at 30 months. No clinically or statistically significant differences in physical functioning by treatment were observed. Some other quality-of-life measures improved in the ICD arm at 3 and/or 12 months but none differed significantly at 30 months. ICD shocks within the month preceding a scheduled assessment were associated with decreased quality of life in multiple domains. Amiodarone had no significant effects on the principal quality-of-life outcomes. Conclusions In a large primary prevention population with moderately symptomatic heart failure, single lead ICD therapy was not associated with any detectable adverse quality-of-life effects over 30 months of follow-up. PMID:18768943

  1. Heart Failure and Hypertension: Importance of Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Marc A

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the role of hypertension in heart failure. Elevated blood pressure has the greatest population attributable risk for the development of heart failure. The mortality rates following the clinical recognition of heart failure is increased multifold. The treatment of hypertension with antihypertensive agents is particularly effective in preventing heart failure, which makes it the most effective therapy for heart failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Does Long-Term Furosemide Therapy Cause Thiamine Deficiency in Patients with Heart Failure? A Focused Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katta, Natraj; Balla, Sudarshan; Alpert, Martin A

    2016-07-01

    Diuretic therapy is a cornerstone in the management of heart failure. Most studies assessing body thiamine status have reported variable degrees of thiamine deficiency in patients with heart failure, particularly those treated chronically with high doses of furosemide. Thiamine deficiency in patients with heart failure seems predominantly to be due to increased urine volume and urinary flow rate. There is also evidence that furosemide may directly inhibit thiamine uptake at the cellular level. Limited data suggest that thiamine supplementation is capable of increasing left ventricular ejection fraction and improving functional capacity in patients with heart failure and a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction who were treated with diuretics (predominantly furosemide). Therefore, it may be reasonable to provide such patients with thiamine supplementation during heart failure exacerbations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel markers and therapies for patients with acute heart failure and renal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Peter A; Jefferies, John L

    2015-03-01

    Acute kidney injury complicates decompensated heart failure in ∼33% of cases and is associated with morbidity and mortality; thus, we sought to systematically review this topic in order to summarize novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Structured PubMed searches on these topics were conducted in February 2014 and relevant literature was identified. The PubMed search identified a total of 192 articles that were individually screened for inclusion in this analysis, and 58 were included. Acute kidney injury, defined by substantial increases in serum creatinine, is associated consistently with prolonged length of stay, rehospitalization, and mortality. Biomarker studies suggested that natriuretic peptides are prognostic for shorter- and longer-term mortality. Novel proteins indicating kidney damage and albumin in the urine are associated with acute kidney injury. The most promising acute pharmacologic treatment appears to be serelaxin, which has been shown to improve acute heart failure symptoms, hemodynamic parameters, and renal function. The presence of acute kidney injury results in worse clinical outcomes for patients with acute heart failure. Novel biomarkers and therapies hold the promise of improving both cardiac and renal outcomes in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admissions.3 Therefore, heart failure is also an expensive disease. Pathophysiology. The first step in the ... hypertrophy or injury due to a valvular problem. This myocardial injury leads to ... heart failure is also an expensive disease. Keywords: acute myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, hypertension, obesity.

  5. Aortic Counterpulsation Therapy in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure: Analysis of the TBRIDGE Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Guedes Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The use of aortic counterpulsation therapy in advanced heart failure is controversial. Objectives: To evaluate the hemodynamic and metabolic effects of intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP and its impact on 30-day mortality in patients with heart failure. Methods: Historical prospective, unicentric study to evaluate all patients treated with IABP betwen August/2008 and July/2013, included in an institutional registry named TBRIDGE (The Brazilian Registry of Intra-aortic balloon pump in Decompensated heart failure - Global Evaluation. We analyzed changes in oxygen central venous saturation (ScvO2, arterial lactate, and use of vasoactive drugs at 48 hours after IABP insertion. The 30-day mortality was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and diferences in subgroups were evaluated by the Log-rank test. Results: A total of 223 patients (mean age 49 ± 14 years were included. Mean left ventricle ejection fraction was 24 ± 10%, and 30% of patients had Chagas disease. Compared with pre-IABP insertion, we observed an increase in ScvO2 (50.5% vs. 65.5%, p < 0.001 and use of nitroprusside (33.6% vs. 47.5%, p < 0.001, and a decrease in lactate levels (31.4 vs. 16.7 mg/dL, p < 0.001 and use of vasopressors (36.3% vs. 25.6%, p = 0.003 after IABP insertion. Thirty-day survival was 69%, with lower mortality in Chagas disease patients compared without the disease (p = 0.008. Conclusion: After 48 hours of use, IABP promoted changes in the use of vasoactive drugs, improved tissue perfusion. Chagas etiology was associated with lower 30-day mortality. Aortic counterpulsation therapy is an effective method of circulatory support for patients waiting for heart transplantation.

  6. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... second installment explains heart failure with muscle intact. Queen Latifah and her mom, Rita, share their personal ... a Heart Attack 10 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate *Red Dress ™ DHHS, Go Red ™ AHA ; National Wear Red ...

  7. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... second installment explains heart failure with muscle intact. Queen Latifah and her mom, Rita, share their personal ... a Heart Attack 10 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate *Red Dress ™ DHHS, Go Red ™ AHA ; National Wear Red ...

  8. EVALUATION CARDIAC RESYNCHRONIZATION THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ISCHEMIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Fishman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective — studying dyssynchrony characteristics and evaluation correction effectiveness in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic origin.Materials and methods. The study included 125 patients with chronic heart failure of ischemic etiology, 28 of them — with coronary heart disease (CHD who had undergone aorto-and / or mammarokoronary bypass and / or percutaneous coronary intervention, 42 — with coronary artery disease and postinfarction cardiosclerosis, 32 — with arrhythmic variant of coronary artery disease, 23 — with stable angina without evidence of arrhythmia. Among included patients, biventricular pacemakers were implanted for 17 patients. All patients underwent echocardiography with determination of the parameters of dyssynchrony.Results and conclusion. Among patients with CHF ischemic symptoms dyssynchrony was diagnosed in 36 (28.8 % cases. Statistically significant association between patients with cardiac arrhythmias and dyssynchrony was determined. At the same time the incidence of dyssynchrony was not associated with various forms of ischemic heart disease, and did not depend on the anamnesis of cardiac surgery. Dependence of the frequency of occurrence of dyssynchrony on the severity of CHF was revealed. Patients selected for implantation of biventricular pacemakers, especially in view of echocardiographic signs of dyssynchrony had significant improvement after providing cardiac resynchronization therapy. Effect of the treatment does not depend on the atrial fibrillation rhythm presence.

  9. The Impact of Bronchodilator Therapy on Systolic Heart Failure with Concomitant Mild to Moderate COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoto Kato

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In older adults, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is commonly associated with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF, and the high prevalence of this combination suggests that customized treatment is highly necessary in patients with COPD and HFrEF. To investigate whether the treatment of COPD with tiotropium, an anticholinergic bronchodilator, reduces the severity of heart failure in patients with HFrEF complicated by mild to moderate COPD, forty consecutive participants were randomly divided into two groups and enrolled in a crossover design study. Group A inhaled 18 μg tiotropium daily for 28 days and underwent observation for another 28 days. Group B completed the 28-day observation period first and then received tiotropium inhalation therapy for 28 days. Pulmonary and cardiac functions were measured on days 1, 29, and 56. In both groups, 28 days of tiotropium inhalation therapy substantially improved the left ventricular ejection fraction (from 36.3 ± 2.4% to 41.8 ± 5.9%, p < 0.01, in group A; from 35.7 ± 3.8% to 41.6 ± 3.8%, p < 0.01, in group B and plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels (from 374 ± 94 to 263 ± 92 pg/mL, p < 0.01, in group A; from 358 ± 110 to 246 ± 101 pg/mL, p < 0.01, in group B. Tiotropium inhalation therapy improves pulmonary function as well as cardiac function, and reduces the severity of heart failure in patients with compensated HFrEF with concomitant mild to moderate COPD.

  10. Intensification of Medication Therapy for Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodin, Justin L; Stevens, Susanna R; de Las Fuentes, Lisa; Kiernan, Michael; Birati, Edo Y; Gupta, Divya; Bart, Bradley A; Felker, G Michael; Chen, Horng H; Butler, Javed; Dávila-Román, Victor G; Margulies, Kenneth B; Hernandez, Adrian F; Anstrom, Kevin J; Tang, W H Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Worsening renal function in heart failure may be related to increased venous congestion, decreased cardiac output, or both. Diuretics are universally used in acute decompensated heart failure, but they may be ineffective and may lead to azotemia. We aimed to compare the decongestive properties of a urine output-guided diuretic adjustment and standard therapy for the management of cardiorenal syndrome in acute decompensated heart failure. Data were pooled from subjects randomized to the stepwise pharmacologic care algorithm (SPCA) in the CARRESS-HF trial and those who developed cardiorenal syndrome (rise in creatinine >0.3 mg/dL) in the DOSE-AHF and ROSE-AHF trials. Patients treated with SPCA (n = 94) were compared with patients treated with standard decongestive therapy (SDT) that included intravenous loop diuretic use (DOSE-AHF and ROSE-AHF; n = 107) at the time of cardiorenal syndrome and followed for net fluid balance, weight loss, and changing renal function. The SPCA group had higher degrees of jugular venous pressure (P cardiorenal syndrome. The group that received SPCA had more weight change (-3.4 ± 5.2 lb) and more net fluid loss (1.705 ± 1.417 L) after 24 hours than the SDT group (-0.8 ± 3.4 lb and 0.892 ± 1.395 L, respectively; P < .001 for both) with a slight improvement in renal function (creatinine change -0.1 ± 0.3 vs 0.0 ± 0.3 mg/dL, respectively; P = .03). Compared with SDT, patients who received an intensification of medication therapy for treating persisting congestion had greater net fluid and weight loss without being associated with renal compromise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Distinct trajectories of disease-specific health status in heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H.; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Meine, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is well known that a significant proportion of heart failure patients (10-44 %) do not show improvement in symptoms or functioning from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), yet no study has examined patient-reported health status trajectories after implantation. METHODS: A cohort......-specific health status over time. RESULTS: All health status trajectories showed an initial small to large improvement from baseline to 2-month follow-up, whereafter most trajectories displayed a stable pattern between short- and long-term follow-up. Low educational level, NYHA class III/IV, smoking, no use...

  12. Combination therapy with beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase inhibitors for chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Radwanski, Przemyslaw; Movsesian, Matthew; Munger, Mark A

    2008-12-01

    Abstract Rational use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors represents an ongoing controversy in contemporary pharmacotherapy for heart failure. In randomized clinical trials, phosphodiesterase inhibitors increased cardiac output at the expense of worsening the rates of sudden cardiac death and cardiovascular mortality. Preliminary findings from ongoing clinical and preclinical investigations of phosphodiesterase activity suggest that combined use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors with beta-adrenergic antagonists may prevent these adverse outcomes. Compartmentation of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate signaling may prove critical in determining myocardial response to combination therapy.

  13. Diuretics for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Rajaa F; Flather, Marcus; Purcell, Henry; Poole-Wilson, Philip A; Coats, Andrew J S

    2012-02-15

    Chronic heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diuretics are regarded as the first-line treatment for patients with congestive heart failure since they provide symptomatic relief. The effects of diuretics on disease progression and survival remain unclear. To assess the harms and benefits of diuretics for chronic heart failure Updated searches were run in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL Issue 1 of 4, 2011), MEDLINE (1966 to 22 February 2011), EMBASE (1980 to 2011 Week 07) and HERDIN database (1990 to February 2011). We hand searched pertinent journals and reference lists of papers were inspected. We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field. No language restrictions were applied. Double-blinded randomised controlled trials of diuretic therapy comparing one diuretic with placebo, or one diuretic with another active agent (e.g. ACE inhibitors, digoxin) in patients with chronic heart failure. Two authors independently abstracted the data and assessed the eligibility and methodological quality of each trial. Extracted data were analysed by determining the odds ratio for dichotomous data, and difference in means for continuous data, of the treated group compared with controls. The likelihood of heterogeneity of the study population was assessed by the Chi-square test. If there was no evidence of statistical heterogeneity and pooling of results was clinically appropriate, a combined estimate was obtained using the fixed-effects model. This update has not identified any new studies for inclusion. The review includes 14 trials (525 participants), 7 were placebo-controlled, and 7 compared diuretics against other agents such as ACE inhibitors or digoxin. We analysed the data for mortality and for worsening heart failure. Mortality data were available in 3 of the placebo-controlled trials (202 participants). Mortality was lower for participants treated with diuretics than for

  14. [Anti remodeling therapy: new strategies and future perspective in post-ischemic heart failure: Part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirico, Domenico; Salzano, Andrea; Celentani, Dario; Arcopinto, Michele; Marra, Alberto Maria; Bobbio, Emanuele; Russo, Angelo; Giallauria, Francesco; Vigorito, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the remarkable progress achieved in terms of survival after myocardial infarction have led to an increased incidence of chronic heart failure in survivors. This phenomenon is due to the still incomplete knowledge we possess about the complex pathophysiological mechanisms that regulate the response of cardiac tissue to ischemic injury. These involve various cell types such as fibroblasts, cells of the immune system, endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes and stem cells, as well as a myriad of mediators belonging to the system of cytokines and not only. In parallel with the latest findings on post-infarct remodeling, new potential therapeutic targets are arising to halt the progression of disease. In this review, we evaluate the results obtained from four new therapeutic strategies: in this part we evaluate gene therapy and novel aspect of stem cells therapy in remodeling; in the second part we will investigate, micro-RNA, posttranslational modification and microspheres based therapy.

  15. Incidence, time of occurrence and response to heart failure therapy in patients with anthracycline cardiotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arshad A; Ashraf, Asma; Singh, Rajinder; Rahim, Aadil; Rostom, Walid; Hussain, Mumtaz; Renner, Ian; Collins, Nicholas J

    2017-01-01

    Anthracyclines are commonly used chemotherapeutic medications. In the current analysis, we evaluated all-cause mortality and incidence, timing and response to medical therapy of anthracycline cardiotoxicity. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was serially assessed using gated heart pool scan/echocardiography in patients receiving anthracycline-based chemotherapy from January 2009 to December 2014. A total of 1204 patients was administered anthracyclines during the study period. During a median follow up of 32 (interquartile range: 15-58) months, all-cause mortality was 38% (n = 463), with the incidence of cardiotoxicity 10.2% (n = 123). Only 15.4% (n = 19) patients required heart failure hospitalisation, with 48% (n = 59) of patients commenced on beta blockade therapy and/or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The majority of patients (73.2%, n = 90) experienced cardiotoxicity within 1 year of anthracycline initiation. The proportion of patients with complete, partial and no LVEF recovery were 16.3% (n = 20), 29.3% (n = 36) and 54.4% (n = 67) respectively. Mortality was higher in the cardiotoxicity group (49% vs 37%, P < 0.01). History of coronary artery disease, leukaemia, idarubicin use and high cumulative anthracycline dose were predictors of cardiotoxicity. Cardiotoxicity after anthracycline use predictably occurs within the first year of therapy and is dose-related, with variable degrees of recovery. While the need for hospitalisation for heart failure was uncommon, medical therapy appears underutilised, suggesting there may be a role for improved surveillance and early initiation of treatment. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  16. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Heart Failure Module 6: Managing Feelings About Heart Failure Download Module Order Hardcopy Heart failure can cause ... professional help for emotional problems. Common Feelings About Heart Failure It is common for people to feel depressed ...

  17. Quality of life with defibrillator therapy or amiodarone in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Daniel B; Anstrom, Kevin J; Sun, Jie L; Clapp-Channing, Nancy E; Tsiatis, Anastasios A; Davidson-Ray, Linda; Lee, Kerry L; Bardy, Gust H

    2008-09-04

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy significantly prolongs life in patients at increased risk for sudden death from depressed left ventricular function. However, whether this increased longevity is accompanied by deterioration in the quality of life is unclear. In a randomized trial, we compared ICD therapy or amiodarone with state-of-the-art medical therapy alone in 2521 patients who had stable heart failure with depressed left ventricular function. We prospectively measured quality of life at baseline and at months 3, 12, and 30; data collection was 93 to 98% complete. The Duke Activity Status Index (which measures cardiac physical functioning) and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Mental Health Inventory 5 (which measures psychological well-being) were prespecified primary outcomes. Multiple additional quality-of-life outcomes were also examined. Psychological well-being in the ICD group, as compared with medical therapy alone, was significantly improved at 3 months (P=0.01) and at 12 months (P=0.003) but not at 30 months. No clinically or statistically significant differences in physical functioning among the study groups were observed. Additional quality-of-life measures were improved in the ICD group at 3 months, 12 months, or both, but there was no significant difference at 30 months. ICD shocks in the month preceding a scheduled assessment were associated with a decreased quality of life in multiple domains. The use of amiodarone had no significant effects on the primary quality-of-life outcomes. In a large primary-prevention population with moderately symptomatic heart failure, single-lead ICD therapy was not associated with any detectable adverse quality-of-life effects during 30 months of follow-up. 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  18. Aerobic Exercise and Pharmacological Therapies for Skeletal Myopathy in Heart Failure: Similarities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline V. Bacurau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal myopathy has been identified as a major comorbidity of heart failure (HF affecting up to 20% of ambulatory patients leading to shortness of breath, early fatigue, and exercise intolerance. Neurohumoral blockade, through the inhibition of renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAS and β-adrenergic receptor blockade (β-blockers, is a mandatory pharmacological therapy of HF since it reduces symptoms, mortality, and sudden death. However, the effect of these drugs on skeletal myopathy needs to be clarified, since exercise intolerance remains in HF patients optimized with β-blockers and inhibitors of RAS. Aerobic exercise training (AET is efficient in counteracting skeletal myopathy and in improving functional capacity and quality of life. Indeed, AET has beneficial effects on failing heart itself despite being of less magnitude compared with neurohumoral blockade. In this way, AET should be implemented in the care standards, together with pharmacological therapies. Since both neurohumoral inhibition and AET have a direct and/or indirect impact on skeletal muscle, this review aims to provide an overview of the isolated effects of these therapeutic approaches in counteracting skeletal myopathy in HF. The similarities and dissimilarities of neurohumoral inhibition and AET therapies are also discussed to identify potential advantageous effects of these combined therapies for treating HF.

  19. Iron therapy in heart failure patients without anaemia: possible implications for chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyszko, Jolanta; Anker, Stefan D

    2017-12-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is a global health problem that manifests as fatigue and poor physical endurance. Anaemia can be caused by dietary iron deficiency, blood loss or a combination of poor iron absorption and ineffective iron mobilization in patients with chronic disease. Nephrologists caring for patients with impaired renal function understand that iron treatment is necessary to provide adequate iron for erythropoiesis during the treatment of overt anaemia. However, a less well-understood health problem is iron deficiency, which creates symptoms that overlap with those of anaemia and often occurs in concert with chronic disease. Recently, several randomized controlled clinical trials have been conducted to investigate the effects of treatment with intravenous iron in heart failure patients with iron deficiency who may or may not also have anaemia. Given that heart and kidney disease are often comorbid, these clinical trials may have implications for the way nephrologists view their patients with iron deficiency. In this article, we review several clinical studies of intravenous iron therapy for patients with iron deficiency and heart failure and discuss possible implications for the treatment of patients with kidney disease.

  20. Heart failure following blood cancer therapy in pediatric and adult populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzon, Julie; Berry, Narelle M; Ullah, Shahid; Versace, Vincent L; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Atherton, John; Roder, David; Koczwara, Bogda; Coghlan, Douglas; Clark, Robyn A

    2017-10-12

    The link between chemotherapy treatment and cardiotoxicity is well established, particularly for adults with blood cancers. However, it is less clear for children. This analysis aimed to compare the trajectory and mortality of children and adults who received chemotherapy for blood cancers and were subsequently hospitalized for heart failure. Linked data from the Queensland Cancer Registry, Death Registry and Hospital Administration records for initial chemotherapy and later heart failure were reviewed (1996-2009). Of all identified blood cancer patients (N = 23 434), 8339 received chemotherapy, including 817 children (aged ≤18 years at time of cancer diagnosis) and 7522 adults. Time-varying Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to compare the characteristics and survival between the two groups. Of those who were subsequently hospitalized for heart failure, 70% of children and 46% of adults had the index admission within 12 months of their cancer diagnosis. Of these, 53% of the pediatric heart failure population and 71% of the adult heart failure population died within the study period. Following adjustment for age, sex and chemotherapy admissions, children with heart failure had an increased mortality risk compared to their non-heart failure counterparts, a difference which was much greater than that between the adult groups. The impact of heart failure on children previously treated for blood cancer is more severe than for adults, with earlier morbidity and greater mortality. Improved strategies are needed for the prevention and management of cardiotoxicity in this population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Drug therapy in heart failure : studies on prescribing, drug induced problems and compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvy, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the ageing of the population and increased survival of patients with acute coronary artery disease, an ‘epidemic’ of heart failure is emerging, illustrated by increasing rates of hospitalisations for heart failure and resulting in a considerable increase in the cost of care for these

  2. Results of a non-specific immunomodulation therapy on chronic heart failure (ACCLAIM trial): a placebo-controlled randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torre-Amione, G.; Anker, S.D.; Bourge, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    -controlled study of a device-based non-specific immunomodulation therapy (IMT) in patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II-IV chronic heart failure, left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction, and hospitalisation for heart failure or intravenous drug therapy in an outpatient setting...... within the past 12 months. Patients were randomly assigned to receive IMT (n=1213) or placebo (n=1213) by intragluteal injection on days 1, 2, 14, and every 28 days thereafter. Primary endpoint was the composite of time to death from any cause or first hospitalisation for cardiovascular reasons...... events in the IMT group and 429 in the placebo group (hazard ratio 0 . 92; 95% CI 0 . 80-1.05; p=0 . 22). In two prespecified subgroups of patients-those with no history of previous myocardial infarction (n=919) and those with NYHA II heart failure (n=689)-IMT was associated with a 26% (0.74; 0 . 57...

  3. Stem cell therapy for end-stage heart failure : indispensable role for the cell?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijsen, K. R.; Chamuleau, S. A. J.; Noort, W. A.; Doevendans, P. A.; Sluijter, J. P. G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review For heart failure patients, the urgent need for heart transplantation exceeds the availability of donor hearts. Therefore, cell transplantation has emerged as an interesting and potential solution. This review will focus on the capability of different types of stem cells to

  4. Meta-analysis of combined therapy with angiotensin receptor antagonists versus ACE inhibitors alone in patients with heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kuenzli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is insufficient evidence whether the benefit of adding angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors outweighs the increased risk of adverse effects in patients with heart failure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two independent reviewers searched and abstracted randomized controlled trials of ARBs and ACE inhibitors compared to ACE inhibitor therapy alone in patients with heart failure reporting mortality and hospitalizations having a follow-up of at least 6 months identified by a systematic literature search. Eight trials including a total of 18,061 patients fulfilled our inclusion criteria. There was no difference between patients treated with combination therapy and ACE inhibitor therapy alone for overall mortality, hospitalization for any reason, fatal or nonfatal MI. Combination therapy was, however, associated with fewer hospital admissions for heart failure (RR 0.81, 95%CI 0.72-0.91, although there was significant heterogeneity across trials (p-value for heterogeneity = 0.04; I(2 = 57% [95%CI 0-83%]. Patients treated with combination therapy had a higher risk of worsening renal function and symptomatic hypotension, and their trial medications were more often permanently discontinued. Lack of individual patient data precluded the analysis of time-to-event data and identification of subgroups which potentially benefit more from combination therapy such as younger patients with preserved renal function and thus at lower risk to experience worsening renal function or hyperkalemia. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Combination therapy with ARBs and ACE inhibitors reduces admissions for heart failure in patients with congestive heart failure when compared to ACE inhibitor therapy alone, but does not reduce overall mortality or all-cause hospitalization and is associated with more adverse events. Thus, based on current evidence, combination therapy with ARBs and ACE inhibitors may be reserved

  5. Predicting maximal HR in heart failure patients on β-blockade therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keteyian, Steven J; Kitzman, Dalane; Zannad, Faiez; Landzberg, Joel; Arnold, J Malcolm; Brubaker, Peter; Brawner, Clinton A; Bensimhon, Daniel; Hellkamp, Anne S; Ewald, Greg

    2012-03-01

    Standards for estimating maximal HR are important when interpreting the adequacy of physiologic stress during exercise testing, assessing chronotropic response, and prescribing an exercise training regimen. The equation 220 - age is used to estimate maximum HR; however, it overestimates measured maximal HR in patients taking β-adrenergic blockade (βB) therapy. This study developed and validated a practical equation to predict maximal HR in patients with heart failure (HF) taking βB therapy. Data from symptom-limited exercise tests completed on patients with systolic HF participating in the Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training trial and taking a βB agent were used to develop a simplified equation, which was validated using bootstrapping. The simplified derived equation was 119 + 0.5 (resting HR) - 0.5 (age) - (0, if test was completed using a treadmill; 5, if using a stationary bike). The R2 and SEE were 0.28 and 18 beats·min(-1), respectively. Validation of this equation yielded a mean R and SEE of 0.28 and 18 beats·min(-1), respectively. For the equation 220 - age, the R2 was -2.93, and the SEE was 43 beats·min(-1). We report a valid and simple population-specific equation for estimating peak HR in patients with HF taking βB therapy. This equation should be helpful when evaluating chronotropic response or assessing if a maximum effort was provided during exercise testing. We caution, however, that the magnitude of the variation (SEE = 18 beats·min(-1)) associated with this prediction equation may make it impractical when prescribing exercise intensity.

  6. Hyperkalemia in Heart Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Pitt, Bertram; Piña, Ileana; Zannad, Faiez; Anker, Stefan D; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-01-01

    .... Heart failure patients have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which further heightens the risk of hyperkalemia, especially when renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors are used...

  7. Intra-myocardial biomaterial injection therapy in the treatment of heart failure: Materials, outcomes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Devin M; Ma, Zuwei; Fujimoto, Kazuro L; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Wagner, William R

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure initiated by coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction (MI) is a widespread, debilitating condition for which there are a limited number of options to prevent disease progression. Intra-myocardial biomaterial injection following MI theoretically provides a means to reduce the stresses experienced by the infarcted ventricular wall, which may alter the pathological remodeling process in a positive manner. Furthermore, biomaterial injection provides an opportunity to concurrently introduce cellular components and depots of bioactive agents. Biologically derived, synthetic and hybrid materials have been applied, as well as materials designed expressly for this purpose, although optimal design parameters, including degradation rate and profile, injectability, elastic modulus and various possible bioactivities, largely remain to be elucidated. This review seeks to summarize the current body of growing literature where biomaterial injection, with and without concurrent pharmaceutical or cellular delivery, has been pursued to improve functional outcomes following MI. The literature to date generally demonstrates acute functional benefits associated with biomaterial injection therapy across a broad variety of animal models and material compositions. Further functional improvements have been reported when cellular or pharmaceutical agents have been incorporated into the delivery system. Despite these encouraging early results, the specific mechanisms behind the observed functional improvements remain to be fully explored and future studies employing hypothesis-driven material design and selection may increase the potential of this approach to alleviate the morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A systematic review of in-hospital worsening heart failure as an endpoint in clinical investigations of therapy for acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Cândida; Maggioni, Aldo Pietro; Marques, Filipa; Araújo, Inês; Brás, Daniel; Langdon, Ronald B; Lombardi, Carlo; Bettencourt, Paulo

    2018-01-01

    In-hospital worsening heart failure (WHF) occurs frequently in patients hospitalized for acute heart failure (AHF) and has strongly negative prognostic associations. It may be a useful endpoint in studies of AHF management but important questions remain regarding optimization of its definition and variability in its incidence. Our objective was to survey the full extent of clinical interest in WHF and assess the impact of baseline variables and trial design on outcomes. PubMed, Embase, and BIOSIS were searched systematically for clinical studies that had in-hospital WHF as an endpoint. Differences in definitions of in-hospital WHF were reviewed for their potential impact on observed incidence of WHF and its associations with post-discharge outcomes. The search identified 35 publications representing 13 interventional trials, 3 observational studies, several different classes of therapeutic agent, and 78,752 patients overall. Incidence of in-hospital WHF varied greatly-from 4.2% to 37%. Concerning the impact of differences in the way in which WHF was defined, two important factors were physician determination of worsening and whether intensification of diuretic therapy alone was defined as a WHF event. Patients having in-hospital WHF were at substantially greater risk for death and longer length of stay during index hospitalizations, all-cause and heart-failure rehospitalization, cardiovascular complications, renal failure, all-cause death, cardiovascular death, and higher healthcare costs post-discharge. There is diverse interest in selecting in-hospital WHF as an endpoint in clinical trials. Differences in reported incidence are complexly related to differences in the way in which WHF is defined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Beneficial effects of adaptive servo-ventilation therapy on albuminuria in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yoshikazu; Koyama, Takashi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Hosoya, Tomoki; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Short-duration adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) therapy can be effective for heart failure (HF) patients. Albuminuria is recognized as a prognostic marker for HF. We investigated whether short-duration and short-term ASV therapy reduced albuminuria in HF patients. Twenty-one consecutive HF patients were divided into two groups: those who tolerated ASV therapy (ASV group, n=14) and those who did not (non-ASV group, n=7). ASV therapy was administered to enrolled patients for 1 week for 2h per day (1h in the morning and 1h in the afternoon). The urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR), urinary 24h norepinephrine (NE) excretion, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels were measured before and 1 week after ASV therapy. In the ASV group, but not the non-ASV group, the UACR significantly decreased, together with a decrease in urinary NE and hs-CRP levels. There were significant correlations between the changes in UACR and hs-CRP and between the changes in urinary NE and hs-CRP. Multiple linear regression analyses indicated that ASV use was the strongest predictor of decreased UACR. Albuminuria, urinary NE, and hs-CRP levels reduced in HF patients who could receive short-duration and short-term ASV therapy. Anti-inflammatory effects of ASV therapy may partly mediate the reduction of albuminuria. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship Between Reverse Remodeling and Cardiopulmonary Exercise Capacity in Heart Failure Patients Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H; Sant, Jetske Van't; Versteeg, Henneke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on the relationship between left ventricular reverse remodeling and cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) are scarce and inconclusive. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-four patients with a 1st-time CRT...... response (left ventricular end-systolic volume decrease ≥15%) and a comprehensive set of CPX results was examined. Echocardiographic responders (54%) demonstrated higher peak oxygen consumption and better exercise performance than nonresponders at baseline and at 6-month follow-up. Furthermore, only...... correlates of higher average oxygen consumption during exercise, and that nonischemic etiology and smaller pre-implantation QRS width were associated with better ventilatory efficiency over time. CONCLUSIONS: During the first 6 months of CRT there was a significant positive association between reverse...

  11. Cardio-oncology Related to Heart Failure: Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Target-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenigsberg, Benjamin; Jain, Varun; Barac, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Cancer therapy targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene B (ErbB)/human EGFR receptor (HER) family of tyrosine kinases has been successfully used in treatment of several malignancies. The ErbB pathways play a role in the maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. This article summarizes current knowledge about EGFR/ErbB/HER receptor-targeted cancer therapeutics focusing on their cardiotoxicity profiles, molecular mechanisms, and implications in clinical cardio-oncology. The article discusses challenges in predicting, monitoring, and treating cardiac dysfunction and heart failure associated with ErbB-targeted cancer therapeutics and highlights opportunities for researchers and clinical investigators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute heart failure syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heart failure can be defined as a clinical syndrome in which a structural or functional cardiac abnormality impairs the capacity of the ventricle to fill or eject enough blood for the requirements of the body. Acute heart failure syndrome represents a complex, heterogeneous set of clinical conditions, all with the common.

  13. Long-term therapy for heart failure with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnie, J J; Bourgeois, R J; Husserl, F E

    1985-06-01

    This article reports the treatment with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis of a patient with intractable congestive heart failure secondary to an ischemic cardiomyopathy. Although the use of peritoneal dialysis to treat refractory heart failure is not new, the advent of an effective continuous peritoneal dialysis system has allowed its use over prolonged periods of time. The two-year treatment interval described herein represents the longest reported application of this technique, to the best of our knowledge.

  14. Targeting cardiac beta-adrenergic signaling via GRK2 inhibition for heart failure therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eCannavo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac cells, like those of the other tissues, undergo regulation through membrane-bound proteins known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. β-adrenergic receptors (βARs are key GPCRs expressed on cardiomyocytes and their role is crucial in cardiac physiology since they regulate inotropic and chronotropic responses of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS. In compromised conditions such as heart failure (HF chronic βAR hyperstimulation occurs via SNS activation resulting in receptor dysregulation and down-regulation and consequently there is a marked reduction of myocardial inotropic reserve and continued loss of pump function. Data has accumulated over the last two decades that a primary culprit in initiating and maintain βAR dysfunction in the injured and stressed heart is GPCR kinase 2 (GRK2, which was originally known as βARK1 (for βAR kinase. GRK2 is up-regulated in the failing heart due to chronic SNS activity and targeting this kinase has emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in HF. Indeed, its inhibition or genetic deletion in several disparate animal models of HF including a pre-clinical pig model has shown that GRK2 targeting improves functional and morphological parameters of the failing heart. Moreover, non-βAR properties of GRK2 appear to also contribute to its pathological effects and thus, its inhibition will likely complement existing therapies such as βAR blockade. This review will explore recent research regarding GRK2 inhibition, in particular it will focus on the GRK2 inhibitor peptide known as βARKct, which represents new hope in the treatment against HF progression. 

  15. Aerobic Exercise as an Adjunct Therapy for Improving Cognitive Function in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Gary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Persons with heart failure (HF are typically older and are at a much higher risk for developing cognitive impairment (CI than persons without HF. Increasingly, CI is recognized as a significant, independent predictor of worse clinical outcomes, more frequent hospital readmissions, and higher mortality rates in persons with HF. CI can have devastating effects on ability to carry out HF effective self-care behaviors. If CI occurs, however, there are currently no evidence based guidelines on how to manage or improve cognitive function in this population. Improvement in cognition has been reported following some therapies in HF and is thought to be the consequence of enhanced cerebral perfusion and oxygenation, suggesting that CI may be amenable to intervention. Because there is substantial neuronal loss with dementia and no effective restorative therapies, interventions that slow, reverse, or prevent cognitive decline are essential. Aerobic exercise is documented to increase cerebral perfusion and oxygenation by promoting neuroplasticity and neurogenesis and, in turn, cognitive functioning. Few studies have examined exercise as a potential adjunct therapy for attenuating or alleviating cognitive decline in HF. In this review, the potential benefit of aerobic exercise on cognitive functioning in HF is presented along with future research directions.

  16. THIAMINE SUPPLEMENT THERAPY IMPROVES EJECTION FRACTION VALUE IN STAGE II HEART FAILURE PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Jikrona, Rafi; Suharjono, Suharjono; Ahmad, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Thiamine, also called vitamin B1, is a water soluble vitamin that is involved in the formation of ATP in cells. The active metabolite of thiamine is a co-enzyme thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) that plays an active role in carbohydrate metabolism and the formation of amino acid binding conjugates. Directly, thiamine may increase energy production in heart muscle cells through such mechanism, whereas in conditions of heart failure, a decrease in the contractility of  heart muscle may be found. The...

  17. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory......: The main variables recorded in the DHFR are related to the indicators for quality of care in patients with incident HF: performance of echocardiography, functional capacity (New York Heart Association functional classification), pharmacological therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme/angiotensin II...

  18. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Heart Failure Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... not mean that the heart has stopped beating. Heart Failure in the United States About 5.7 million ...

  19. Identification of genetic markers for treatment success in heart failure patients: insight from cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Boris; De Maria, Renata; Gatsios, Dimitris; Chrysanthakopoulou, Theodora; Landolina, Maurizio; Gasparini, Maurizio; Campolo, Jonica; Parolini, Marina; Sanzo, Antonio; Galimberti, Paola; Bianchi, Michele; Lenders, Malte; Brand, Eva; Parodi, Oberdan; Lunati, Maurizio; Brand, Stefan-Martin

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can improve ventricular size, shape, and mass and reduce mitral regurgitation by reverse remodeling of the failing ventricle. About 30% of patients do not respond to this therapy for unknown reasons. In this study, we aimed at the identification and classification of CRT responder by the use of genetic variants and clinical parameters. Of 1421 CRT patients, 207 subjects were consecutively selected, and CRT responder and nonresponder were matched for their baseline parameters before CRT. Treatment success of CRT was defined as a decrease in left ventricular end-systolic volume >15% at follow-up echocardiography compared with left ventricular end-systolic volume at baseline. All other changes classified the patient as CRT nonresponder. A genetic association study was performed, which identified 4 genetic variants to be associated with the CRT responder phenotype at the allelic (Pheart failure patients in CRT responder and nonresponder status using clinical and genetic parameters. Our analysis included information on alleles and genotypes of 4 genetic loci, rs3766031 (ATPIB1), rs5443 (GNB3), rs5522 (NR3C2), and rs7325635 (TNFSF11), pathophysiologically associated with remodeling of the failing ventricle. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Ranolazine improves autonomic balance in heart failure when added to guideline-driven therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary L. Murray

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background The effect of ranolazine (RAN on cardiac autonomic balance in congestive heart failure (CHF was studied. Methods Fifty-four CHF patients were randomized to (1 open-label RAN (RANCHF added to usual therapy vs. (2 usual therapy (NORANCHF. Parasympathetic and sympathetic (P&S measurements were taken at baseline and at 12 months. Results A total of 16/27 (59% patients in both groups had initially abnormal P&S measures, including high sympathovagal balance (SB, cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN or both. High SB normalized in 10/12 (83% RANCHF patients vs. 2/11 (18% NORANCHF patients. SB became high in 5/11 (45% NORANCHF vs. 1/11 (9% RANCHF patients. CAN improved in 4/6 (67% RANCHF patients vs. 5/7 (45% NORANCHF patients. CAN developed in 1/11 (9% RANCHF vs. 4/11 (36% NORANCHF patients. Since improved P&S in RANCHF patients seemed independent of improved brain natriuretic peptide and impedance cardiography (BioZ measurements, 5 day RAN was given to 30 subjects without CHF but with high SB or CAN. P&S improved in 90% of these subjects. Conclusions RAN improves unfavorable P&S activity in CHF possibly by a direct effect upon autonomic sodium channels.

  1. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease and iron deficiency; the role of iron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cases Amenós, Aleix; Ojeda López, Raquel; Portolés Pérez, José María

    Chronic kidney disease and anaemia are common in heart failure (HF) and are associated with a worse prognosis in these patients. Iron deficiency is also common in patients with HF and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality, regardless of the presence or absence of anaemia. While the treatment of anaemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in patients with HF have failed to show a benefit in terms of morbidity and mortality, treatment with IV iron in patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction and iron deficiency is associated with clinical improvement. In a posthoc analysis of a clinical trial, iron therapy improved kidney function in patients with HF and iron deficiency. In fact, the European Society of Cardiology's recent clinical guidelines on HF suggest that in symptomatic patients with reduced ejection fraction and iron deficiency, treatment with IV ferric carboxymaltose should be considered to improve symptoms, the ability to exercise and quality of life. Iron plays a key role in oxygen storage (myoglobin) and in energy metabolism, and there are pathophysiological bases that explain the beneficial effect of IV iron therapy in patients with HF. All these aspects are reviewed in this article. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. EFFECT OF SIMVASTATIN THERAPY ON INDICATORS OF TRANSMITRAL BLOOD FLOW IN PATIENTS WITH DIASTOLIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Pinchuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of simvastatin added to standard therapy on the left ventricular structure functional status in patients with diastolic chronic heart failure (CHF.Material and methods. Patients (n=125 with diastolic CHF (relaxation disturbances and pseudonormalization were included into the open nonrandomized study. Patients of the main group (n=66 received simvastatin additionally to standard therapy of CHF. Patients of control group (n=59 received standard therapy only. Initially and after 6 months of treatment Doppler echocardiography (EchoCG was performed with assessment of transmitral blood flow indices. On the basis of EchoCG data diastolic dysfunction types were determined in patients of the main group. Dynamics of EchoCG indices were evaluated in accordance with these types.Results. Significant increase in E (peak early diastolic left ventricular filling velocity value by 14.1% (p<0.001 and E/A (where A - peak left ventricular filling velocity at atrial contraction ratio by 18.7% (p<0.001 was found in the main group in estimating of transmitral flow indicators. Deceleration time of early diastolic filling significantly decreased by 7.8% (p<0.01. Other parameters did not change significantly both in the main and control groups. Intra-group comparison in the main group demonstrated that transmitral blood flow indices changed significantly only in patients with delayed relaxation (type I of diastolic dysfunction.Conclusion. Simvаstatin added to standard therapy of CHF resulted in significant improvement in the left ventricle diastolic function.

  3. Cardiac resynchronization therapy improves psycho-cognitive performance in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, David; Friedel, Katrin; König, Thorben; Schreyer, Hendrik; Lüsebrink, Ulrich; Duncker, Mareke; Oswald, Hanno; Klein, Gunnar; Gardiwal, Ajmal

    2015-09-01

    Reduced cognitive performance and high prevalence of depression have been reported in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) and severe left ventricular dysfunction. However, effects of contemporary device therapy on cognitive performance and depression symptoms have not been studied thoroughly. Seventy-four consecutive CHF patients-45 receiving a biventricular defibrillator (CRT-D) and 29 receiving an implantable single or dual-chamber defibrillator (ICD) as a control group-were enrolled in this investigator-initiated, prospective, controlled, and investigator-blinded study. A set of neuropsychological tests (mini-mental state examination, DemTect, age-concentration test, and Beck depression inventory) was performed before, at 3 and at 6 months after device implantation. DemTect-score improved significantly (F = 7.8; P = 0.007) after CRT-D-implantation compared with ICD. Age-concentration test revealed better concentration ability after CRT-D-implantation (F = 8.3; P = 0.005) compared with ICD. Under CRT-D mini-mental state examination showed a significant improvement (F = 4.2; P = 0.043). CRT with defibrillator therapy also improved depression revealed by beck depression inventory (F = 14.7; P< 0.001) compared with ICD. This prospective study is the first to demonstrate psycho-cognitive improvement by resynchronization therapy in CHF patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. In contrast to ICD therapy, the beneficial effect of CRT-D on psycho-cognitive performance might be attributed to improved cardiac function and haemodynamics. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Prevalence of thiamine deficiency in heart failure patients on long-term diuretic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrenik Doshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Loop diuretics are an integral part of heart failure management. It has been shown that loop diuretics cause thiamine deficiency (TD by increasing its urinary loss. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of TD in heart failure patients on long-term oral loop diuretics. Methods: Heart failure patients (cases on oral loop diuretics (furosemide ≥40 mg/day or torsemide ≥20 mg/day, irrespective of the cause of heart failure, were compared to non-heart failure patients (controls not on loop diuretics in a 1:1 ratio. Whole blood free thiamine level was determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results: A total of 100 subjects were enrolled in a 1:1 ratio (50 cases and 50 controls. 67% of the total study population had TD, (defined as whole blood free thiamine level <0.7 ng/ml. There was no difference in mean thiamine level between cases and controls. On comparing patients with TD in both groups, patients on diuretics had significantly lower thiamine level compared to the patients, not on diuretics (P < 0.0001. Conclusions: There was no difference in the thiamine level when patients on loop diuretics were compared to controls. However, very low thiamine levels (<0.1 ng/ml was significantly more common in patients on loop diuretics.

  5. Lungs in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Apostolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung function abnormalities both at rest and during exercise are frequently observed in patients with chronic heart failure, also in the absence of respiratory disease. Alterations of respiratory mechanics and of gas exchange capacity are strictly related to heart failure. Severe heart failure patients often show a restrictive respiratory pattern, secondary to heart enlargement and increased lung fluids, and impairment of alveolar-capillary gas diffusion, mainly due to an increased resistance to molecular diffusion across the alveolar capillary membrane. Reduced gas diffusion contributes to exercise intolerance and to a worse prognosis. Cardiopulmonary exercise test is considered the “gold standard” when studying the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic adaptations to exercise in cardiac patients. During exercise, hyperventilation and consequent reduction of ventilation efficiency are often observed in heart failure patients, resulting in an increased slope of ventilation/carbon dioxide (VE/VCO2 relationship. Ventilatory efficiency is as strong prognostic and an important stratification marker. This paper describes the pulmonary abnormalities at rest and during exercise in the patients with heart failure, highlighting the principal diagnostic tools for evaluation of lungs function, the possible pharmacological interventions, and the parameters that could be useful in prognostic assessment of heart failure patients.

  6. Heart failure - palliative care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000365.htm Heart failure - palliative care To use the sharing features on this page, ... you may want to discuss the option of palliative or comfort care with your providers and loved ones. Many people ...

  7. Epidemiology of Heart Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roger, Véronique L

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) has been singled out as an epidemic and is a staggering clinical and public health problem, associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and healthcare expenditures, particularly among those aged ≥65 years...

  8. Carbohydrate Antigen-125-Guided Therapy in Acute Heart Failure: CHANCE-HF: A Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Julio; Llàcer, Pau; Bertomeu-González, Vicente; Bosch, Maria José; Merlos, Pilar; García-Blas, Sergio; Montagud, Vicente; Bodí, Vicent; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; Pedrosa, Valle; Mendizábal, Andrea; Cordero, Alberto; Gallego, Jorge; Palau, Patricia; Miñana, Gema; Santas, Enrique; Morell, Salvador; Llàcer, Angel; Chorro, Francisco J; Sanchis, Juan; Fácila, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to evaluate the prognostic effect of carbohydrate antigen-125 (CA125)-guided therapy (CA125 strategy) versus standard of care (SOC) after a hospitalization for acute heart failure (AHF). CA125 has emerged as a surrogate of fluid overload and inflammatory status in AHF. After an episode of AHF admission, elevated values of this marker at baseline as well as its longitudinal profile relate to adverse outcomes, making it a potential tool for treatment guiding. In a prospective multicenter randomized trial, 380 patients discharged for AHF and high CA125 were randomly assigned to the CA125 strategy (n = 187) or SOC (n = 193). The aim in the CA125 strategy was to reduce CA125 to ≤35 U/ml by up or down diuretic dose, enforcing the use of statins, and tightening patient monitoring. The primary endpoint was 1-year composite of death or AHF readmission. Treatment strategies were compared as a time to first event and longitudinally. Patients allocated to the CA125 strategy were more frequently visited, and treated with ambulatory intravenous loop diuretics and statins. Likewise, doses of oral loop diuretics and aldosterone receptor blockers were more frequently modified. The CA125 strategy resulted in a significant reduction of the primary endpoint, whether evaluated as time to first event (66 events vs. 84 events; p = 0.017) or as recurrent events (85 events vs. 165 events; incidence rate ratio: 0.49; 95% confidence interval: 0.28 to 0.82; p = 0.008). The effect was driven by significantly reducing rehospitalizations but not mortality. The CA125 strategy was superior to the SOC in terms of reducing the risk of the composite of 1-year death or AHF readmission. This effect was mainly driven by significantly reducing the rate of rehospitalizations. (Carbohydrate Antigen-125-guided Therapy in Heart Failure [CHANCE-HF]; NCT02008110). Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hyponatremia and Congestive Heart Failure: A Marker of Increased Mortality and a Target for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Romanovsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is one of the most common chronic medical conditions in the developed world. It is characterized by neurohormonal activation of multiple systems that can lead to clinical deterioration and significant morbidity and mortality. In this regard, hyponatremia is due to inappropriate and continued vasopressin activity despite hypoosmolality and volume overload. Hyponatremia is also due to diuretic use in an attempt to manage volume overload. When hyponatremia occurs, it is a marker of heart failure severity and identifies patients with increased mortality. The recent introduction of specific vasopressin-receptor antagonists offers a targeted pharmacological approach to these pathophysiological derangements. Thus far, clinical trials with vasopressin-receptor antagonists have demonstrated an increase in free-water excretion, improvement in serum sodium, modest improvements in dyspnea but no improvement in mortality. Continued clinical trials with these agents are needed to determine their specific role in the treatment of both chronic and decompensated heart failure.

  10. Cognitive impairment in heart failure: results from the Trial of Intensified versus standard Medical therapy in Elderly patients with Congestive Heart Failure (TIME-CHF) randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijts, Marjolein; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Duits, Annelien; Burkard, Thilo; Muzzarelli, Stefano; Maeder, Micha T; Schindler, Ruth; Pfisterer, Matthias E; Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter

    2013-06-01

    Up to 50% of patients with heart failure (HF) may suffer from severe cognitive impairment (SCI), but longitudinal studies are sparse, and effects of changes in HF severity on cognitive function are unknown. Therefore, we assessed the prevalence of SCI in HF patients, its relationship with HF severity, its effects on morbidity and mortality, and the relationship between changes in HF severity and cognitive function. We included 611 patients from the Trial of Intensified versus standard Medical therapy in Elderly patients with Congestive Heart Failure (TIME-CHF) and assessed cognitive function [Hodkinson Abbreviated Mental Test (AMT)] in relation to severity of HF (NYHA class, NT-proBNP) at baseline and 18 months (n = 382) and effects on hospitalization-free survival and mortality. SCI (i.e. AMT score ≤ 7) was present in 9.2% of patients at baseline, but only 20% of them had a diagnosis of dementia. Prevalence of SCI remained stable during follow-up. SCI was present at baseline more often in NYHA IV patients compared with NYHA II [odds ratio 2.94; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-7.51, P = 0.025], but it was not related to NT-proBNP levels. SCI was related to higher mortality (hazard ratio 1.53, 95% CI 1.02-2.30, P = 0.04), but not hospitalization-free survival. Changes in HF severity were not significantly related to changes in cognitive function. SCI is a frequent, but often unrecognized finding in HF patients, but the influence of HF severity and its changes on cognitive function were less than hypothesized. Trial registration ISRCTN43596477.

  11. 'End-stage' heart failure therapy: potential lessons from congenital heart disease: from pulmonary artery banding and interatrial communication to parallel circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schranz, Dietmar; Akintuerk, Hakan; Voelkel, Norbert F

    2017-02-15

    The final therapy of 'end-stage heart failure' is orthotopic heart, lung or heart-lung transplantation. However, these options are not available for many patients worldwide. Therefore, novel therapeutical strategies are needed. Based on pathophysiological insights regarding (1) the long-term impact of an obstructive pulmonary outflow tract in neonates with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, (2) the importance of a restrictive versus a non-restrictive atrial septum in neonates born with a borderline left ventricle and (3) the significance of both, a patent foramen ovale and/or open ductus arteriosus for survival of newborns with persistent pulmonary hypertension, the current review introduces some therapeutical strategies that may be applicable to selected patients with heart failure. These strategies include (1) reversible pulmonary artery banding in left ventricular-dilated cardiomyopathy with preserved right ventricular function, (2) the creation of restrictive interatrial communication to treat diastolic (systolic) heart failure, (3) atrioseptostomy or reverse Potts shunt in pulmonary arterial hypertension and (4) return to a fetal, parallel circulation by combining atrioseptostomy and reversed Potts shunt with or without placement of a bilateral pulmonary artery banding. While still being experimental, it is hoped that the procedures presented in the current overview will inspire future novel therapeutic strategies that may be applicable to selected patients with heart failure. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000112.htm Heart failure - fluids and diuretics To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is ...

  13. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory......: The main variables recorded in the DHFR are related to the indicators for quality of care in patients with incident HF: performance of echocardiography, functional capacity (New York Heart Association functional classification), pharmacological therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme/angiotensin II...... antagonist inhibitors, beta-blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist), nonpharmacological therapy (physical training, patient education), 4-week readmission rate, and 1-year mortality. Furthermore, basic patient characteristics and prognostic factors (eg, smoking and alcohol) are recorded...

  14. Who Is at Risk for Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  15. How Can Heart Failure Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  16. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease and iron deficiency: The role of iron therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleix Cases Amenós

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease and anaemia are common in heart failure (HF and are associated with a worse prognosis in these patients. Iron deficiency is also common in patients with HF and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality, regardless of the presence or absence of anaemia. While the treatment of anaemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in patients with HF have failed to show a benefit in terms of morbidity and mortality, treatment with IV iron in patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction and iron deficiency is associated with clinical improvement. In a post hoc analysis of a clinical trial, iron therapy improved kidney function in patients with HF and iron deficiency. In fact, the European Society of Cardiology's recent clinical guidelines on HF suggest that in symptomatic patients with reduced ejection fraction and iron deficiency, treatment with IV ferric carboxymaltose should be considered to improve symptoms, the ability to exercise and quality of life. Iron plays a key role in oxygen storage (myoglobin and in energy metabolism, and there are pathophysiological bases that explain the beneficial effect of IV iron therapy in patients with HF. All these aspects are reviewed in this article. Resumen: La enfermedad renal crónica y la anemia son frecuentes en la insuficiencia cardíaca (IC y su presencia se asocia con un peor pronóstico en estos pacientes. La ferropenia es frecuente en pacientes con IC y aumenta el riesgo de morbimortalidad, independientemente de la presencia o no de anemia. Mientras el tratamiento de la anemia con agentes estimuladores de la eritropoyesis en pacientes con IC no ha demostrado un beneficio sobre la morbimortalidad, el tratamiento con hierro intravenoso (iv en pacientes con IC y fracción de eyección disminuida y déficit de hierro se asocia con una mejoría clínica. Además, en un análisis post hoc de un ensayo clínico, la ferroterapia mejoró la función renal en pacientes con IC y

  17. Candesartan in heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Toni L; Chonlahan, Jennifer S; Germany, Robin E

    2006-01-01

    Candesartan cilexetil is a nonpeptide selective blocker of the angiotensin II receptor sub-type 1. It is a prodrug that is converted to its active metabolite during its variable absorption. It is highly protein bound with a small volume of distribution and a nine-hour half-life. Candesartan is one of two angiotensin receptor blockers approved for use in heart failure. MEDLINE was searched using OVID and PubMed to evaluate the evidence for using candesartan in patients with heart failure. Pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic evaluations, as well as clinical trials, were selected and are presented in this review. Clinical evidence supports the indication for use in systolic heart failure. Results for use in patients with diastolic heart failure were non-significant. Candesartan was well tolerated in the trials, with hyperkalemia, renal dysfunction, and hypotension being the most common adverse events. Use of angiotensin receptor blockers with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors needs further study; however, candesartan appears to provide added benefit in this setting. Candesartan is a safe and effective option for patients with systolic heart failure. Data regarding other angiotensin receptor blockers is underway. PMID:18046913

  18. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  19. Behind the Screen : -Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to Treat Depressive Symptoms in Persons with Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, Johan

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of depressive symptoms in persons with heart failure is higher than in age- and gender-matched populations not suffering from heart failure. Heart failure in itself is associated with an unpredictable trajectory of symptoms, a poor prognosis, high mortality and morbidity, and low health-related quality of life (HrQoL). With the addition of depressive symptoms to heart failure the negative health effects increase further. Though the negative consequences of depressi...

  20. Impact of etiology on the outcomes in heart failure patients treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmei Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT has been extensively demonstrated to benefit heart failure patients, but the role of underlying heart failure etiology in the outcomes was not consistently proven. This meta-analysis aimed to determine whether efficacy and effectiveness of CRT is affected by underlying heart failure etiology. METHODS AND RESULTS: Searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were conducted to identify RCTs and observational studies that reported clinical and functional outcomes of CRT in ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM patients. Efficacy of CRT was assessed in 7 randomized controlled trials (RCTs with 7072 patients and effectiveness of CRT was evaluated in 14 observational studies with 3463 patients In the pooled analysis of RCTs, we found that CRT decreased mortality or heart failure hospitalization by 29% in ICM patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 21% to 35%, and by 28% (95% CI, 18% to 37% in NICM patients. No significant difference was observed between the 2 etiology groups (P = 0.55. In the pooled analysis of observational studies, however, we found that ICM patients had a 54% greater risk for mortality or HF hospitalization than NICM patients (relative risk: 1.54; 95% CI: 1.30-1.83; P<0.001. Both RCTs and observational studies demonstrated that NICM patients had greater echocardiographic improvements in the left ventricular ejection fraction and end-systolic volume, as compared with ICM patients (both P<0.001. CONCLUSION: CRT might reduce mortality or heart failure hospitalization in both ICM and NICM patients similarly. The improvement of the left ventricular function and remodeling is greater in NICM patients.

  1. Changes in ventricular-arterial coupling during decongestive therapy in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Emmanuelle; Bihry, Nicolas; Brault-Melin, Ophelie; Assayag, Patrick; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Chemla, Denis; Logeart, Damien

    2014-10-01

    Coupled arterial and left ventricular properties are poorly documented in acute heart failure. The aim of this prospective noninvasive study was to document early changes in ventricular-arterial coupling in patients with acutely decompensated HF (ADHF). We studied 19 patients hospitalized for ADHF (age 62 ± 15 years, NYHA class 3 or 4). Patients with shock and sustained arrhythmias were excluded. All the patients received intravenous loop diuretics, and none received intravenous vasodilators or inotropes. Ongoing chronic treatments were maintained. Echocardiography and radial artery tonometry were performed simultaneously on admission and after clinical improvement (day 4 ± 1 after admission). Classical echocardiographic parameters were measured, including stroke volume (SV). End-systolic pressure (Pes) was derived from reconstructed central aortic pressure, and arterial elastance (Ea) was calculated as Ea = Pes/SV. End-systolic LV elastance (Ees) was calculated with the single-beat method. Ventricular-arterial coupling was quantified as the Ea/Ees ratio. Following IV diuretic therapy, mean weight loss was 5 ± 2 kg (P < 0·01) and BNP fell from 1813 (median) (IQR = 1284-2342) to 694 (334-1053) pg/mL (P < 0·01). Ea fell by 29%, from 2·46 (2·05-2·86) to 1·78 (1·55-2·00) mmHg/mL (P < 0·01), while Ees remained unchanged (1·28 (1·05-1·52) to 1·13 (0·92-1·34) mmHg/mL). The Ea/Ees ratio therefore fell, from 2·13 (1·70-2·56) to 1·81 (1·56-2·08) (P < 0·02). An early improvement in ventricular-arterial coupling was observed after diuretic-related decongestive therapy in ADHF patients and was related to a decrease in effective arterial elastance rather than to change in LV contractility. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  2. Copeptin in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and mortality in the modern Western world and an increasing proportion of the population will be affected by HF in the future. Although HF management has improved quality of life and prognosis, mortality remains very high...

  3. Cost-effectiveness of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic-guided therapy in elderly heart failure patients: results from TIME-CHF (Trial of Intensified versus Standard Medical Therapy in Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders-van Wijk, Sandra; van Asselt, Antoinette D I; Rickli, Hans; Estlinbaum, Werner; Erne, Paul; Rickenbacher, Peter; Vuillomenet, Andre; Peter, Martin; Pfisterer, Matthias E; Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to assess cost-effectiveness of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP)-guided versus symptom-guided therapy in heart failure (HF) patients ≥60 years old. Cost-effectiveness of NT-proBNP guidance in HF patients is unclear. It may create additional costs with uncertain benefits. In the TIME-CHF (Trial of Intensified versus Standard Medical Therapy in Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure), patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of ≤45% were randomized to receive intensified NT-proBNP-guided therapy or standard, symptom-guided therapy. For cost-effectiveness analysis, 467 (94%) patients (age 76 ± 7 years, 66% male) were eligible. Incremental cost-effectiveness was calculated as incremental costs per gained life-year and quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) within the 18-month trial period, as defined per protocol. NT-proBNP-guided therapy was dominant (i.e., more effective and less costly) over symptom-guided therapy, saving $2,979 USD (2.5 to 97.5% confidence interval [CI]: $8,758 to $3,265) per patient, with incremental effectiveness of +0.07 life-years and +0.05 QALYs. The probability of NT-proBNP-guided therapy being dominant was 80%, and the probability of saving 1 life-year or QALY at a cost of $50,000 was 97% and 93%, respectively. Exclusion of residence costs resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $5,870 per life-year gained. Cost-effectiveness of NT-proBNP-guided therapy was most pronounced in patients CHF]; ISRCTN43596477). Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Christine K; Rodgers, Jo E; Nappi, Jean M; Haines, Stuart T

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus and heart failure are common comorbidities, and their prevalence has increased significantly over the past decade. We examined the relationships between diabetes and heart failure, the effect of commonly prescribed antidiabetic drugs on the development of heart failure, and the benefits and risks of recommended heart failure therapies in patients with diabetes. Compared with patients with heart failure who do not have diabetes, patients with both diabetes and heart failure have a poorer prognosis, including a 1.5-2-fold higher risk of mortality. Based on the results of randomized controlled trials, insulin and sulfonylureas do not appear to protect against or contribute to the development of new-onset heart failure, whereas metformin may modestly reduce the risk. The use of metformin in patients with established heart failure is controversial; retrospective analyses have shown that metformin may have a beneficial effect on outcomes, but there are no prospective, randomized clinical trials to support its use in this population. The thiazolidinediones, however, contribute to the development of heart failure and increase the risk of heart failure exacerbations particularly when used in combination with insulin. Recommendations for the treatment of symptomatic heart failure in patients with diabetes have been largely derived from post hoc analyses or preplanned subgroup analyses in landmark clinical trials. The data clearly support the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers for both the prevention and treatment of symptomatic heart failure in patients with diabetes. Despite concerns regarding the potential risks of beta-blockers in patients with diabetes, these drugs have a clear mortality benefit in patients with stages B and C heart failure. Therefore, patients with diabetes should not be denied beta-blocker therapy unless there is a clear contraindication. Likewise, aldosterone receptor antagonists

  5. [Obesity and heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weismann, D; Wiedmann, S; Bala, M; Frantz, S; Fassnacht, M

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for the development of heart failure. In normotensive obese patients, a reduced peripheral resistance is typically observed and is accompanied by an increased fluid volume and an increase in cardiac work, resulting in hypertrophy and diastolic heart failure, which can be visualized with echocardiography. However, in the presence of arterial hypertension cardiac geometry is not different to hypertensive heart disease without obesity. Furthermore, the typical changes found with obesity, such as reduced peripheral resistance and increased blood volume, are no longer present. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is very common in obesity and warrants screening but levels of the heart failure marker N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP) might be misleading as the values are lower in obesity than in normal weight controls. Body weight reduction is advisable but difficult to achieve and much more difficult to maintain. Furthermore, diet and exercise has not been proven to enhance life expectancy in obesity. However, with bariatric surgery, long-term weight reduction can be achieved and mortality can be reduced. With effective weight loss and improved clinical outcome after bariatric surgery, treatment of obesity has shifted much more into focus. Regardless of technical challenges in the work-up of obese patients, clinical symptoms suggestive of cardiac disorders warrant prompt investigation with standard techniques following recommendations as established for normal weight patients.

  6. Heart Failure Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Regurgitation Resource Page Patient Clinical Trials Learn About Heart Failure Patient Tools Patient Resources Patient Webinar Series Patient Upcoming Events Research Heart Failure Research Resources and Guidelines Research General Information HFSA ...

  7. [Testosterone therapy improves cardiac function of male rats with right heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zong-Bin; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ju-Xiang; Chen, Xun-Min; Jiang, Shi-Sen

    2009-11-01

    Clinical studies have shown decreased levels of sexual hormones, particularly testosterone deficiency, in men with chronic heart failure (CHF). The authors aimed to investigate the effect of testosterone on cardiac function and the possible mechanism of androgen protecting the heart in male rats. Forty-three male SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: right heart failure (RHF, n = 15), physiologic testosterone treatment (TT, n = 15) and control (n = 13). The RHF group was given intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline at 60 mg/kg to make RHF models; the TT group was injected with testosterone at 5 mg/kg 3 days after monocrotaline administration; and the control group received equal volume of saline. The CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood of each rat were counted by flow cytometry. The levels of serum testosterone and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) were measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The hearts, lungs and livers of all the surviving rats were excised at 6 weeks for pathological and immunohistochemical examinations. The level of serum testosterone was gradually decreased, while that of TNF-alpha obviously increased in the RHF group. After testosterone treatment, the TT group showed a remarkable improvement of cardiac performance and a significant decrease in the level of serum TNF-alpha as compared with the RHF group. Statistically significant differences were observed neither in the CD34+ cell count in the peripheral blood nor in the CD34+ expression of the myocardial cells between the TT and RHF groups. Physiological supplementation of testosterone can improve the cardiac function of RHF male rats, probably through its inhibition of TNF-alpha rather than by autologous mobilization of bone marrow stem cells.

  8. Lifestyle Changes for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Lifestyle Changes for Heart Failure Updated:Sep 27,2017 Following recommendations about diet, ... making. This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  9. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 An important part of ... Care This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  10. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:May 9,2017 Patients with ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  11. Warning Signs of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... second installment explains heart failure with muscle intact. Queen Latifah and her mom, Rita, share their personal ... a Heart Attack 10 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate *Red Dress ™ DHHS, Go Red ™ AHA ; National Wear Red ...

  12. Copeptin in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasota B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bartosz Lasota,1 Katarzyna Mizia-Stec212nd Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland; 21st Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, PolandAbstract: Copeptin is a novel indicator of arginine–vasopressin activation in the body. Its value has primarily been documented in acute life-threatening conditions mediated by the stress response system. Recently, some studies have revealed copeptin's promising role as a marker in cardiovascular diseases. In our review, we summarize the current knowledge on copeptin in pathophysiology, as well as in risk assessment in different clinical settings involving the cardiovascular system with a special focus on heart failure.Keywords: copeptin, heart failure, arginine–vasopressin

  13. Rationale and Design of the Left Atrial Pressure Monitoring to Optimize Heart Failure Therapy Study (LAPTOP-HF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Mathew S; Adamson, Philip B; Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Eigler, Neal; Gilbert, Joanne; Gold, Michael R; Klapholz, Marc; Saxon, Leslie A; Singh, Jagmeet P; Troughton, Richard; Abraham, William T

    2015-06-01

    Daily measurements of left atrial pressure (LAP) may be useful for guiding adjustments in medical therapy that prevent clinical decompensation in patients with severe heart failure (HF). LAPTOP-HF is a prospective, multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial in ambulatory patients with advanced heart failure in which the safety and clinical effectiveness of a physician-directed patient self-management therapeutic strategy based on LAP measured twice daily by means of an implantable sensor will be compared with a control group receiving optimal medical therapy. The trial will enroll up to 730 patients with New York Heart Association functional class III symptoms and either a hospitalization for HF during the previous 12 months or an elevated B-type natriuretic peptide level, regardless of ejection fraction, at up to 75 investigational centers. Randomization to the treatment group or control group will be at a 1:1 ratio in 3 strata based on the ejection fraction (EF > or ≤35%) and the presence of a de novo CRT device indication. LAPTOP-HF will provide essential information about the role of implantable LAP monitoring in conjunction with a new HF treatment paradigm across the spectrum of HF patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Junctophilin-2 gene therapy rescues heart failure by normalizing RyR2-mediated Ca2+ release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Julia O; Quick, Ann P; Wang, Qiongling; Beavers, David L; Philippen, Leonne E; Showell, Jordan; Barreto-Torres, Giselle; Thuerauf, Donna J; Doroudgar, Shirin; Glembotski, Christopher C; Wehrens, Xander H T

    2016-12-15

    Junctophilin-2 (JPH2) is the primary structural protein for the coupling of transverse (T)-tubule associated cardiac L-type Ca channels and type-2 ryanodine receptors on the sarcoplasmic reticulum within junctional membrane complexes (JMCs) in cardiomyocytes. Effective signaling between these channels ensures adequate Ca-induced Ca release required for normal cardiac contractility. Disruption of JMC subcellular domains, a common feature of failing hearts, has been attributed to JPH2 downregulation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus type 9 (AAV9) mediated overexpression of JPH2 could halt the development of heart failure in a mouse model of transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Following TAC, a progressive decrease in ejection fraction was paralleled by a progressive decrease of cardiac JPH2 levels. AAV9-mediated expression of JPH2 rescued cardiac contractility in mice subjected to TAC. AAV9-JPH2 also preserved T-tubule structure. Moreover, the Ca2+ spark frequency was reduced and the Ca2+ transient amplitude was increased in AAV9-JPH2 mice following TAC, consistent with JPH2-mediated normalization of SR Ca2+ handling. This study demonstrates that AAV9-mediated JPH2 gene therapy maintained cardiac function in mice with early stage heart failure. Moreover, restoration of JPH2 levels prevented loss of T-tubules and suppressed abnormal SR Ca2+ leak associated with contractile failure following TAC. These findings suggest that targeting JPH2 might be an attractive therapeutic approach for treating pathological cardiac remodeling during heart failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimization of heart failure medication after cardiac resynchronization therapy and the impact on long-term survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, Christoffer Tobias; Kronborg, Mads Brix; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Treatment with evidence-based heart failure (HF) medication reduces morbidity and mortality, yet they remain underused and underdosed. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves haemodynamics, and might allow for optimization of HF medication. We analysed treatment with HF medication......HR 0.55 (0.38-0.80); P = 0.002). CONCLUSION: After CRT implantation, optimization of HF treatment is possible, and long-term adherence to HF medication remains high. Higher doses of BB and ACEi/ARB were associated with prolonged survival....

  16. Embodied Revelation: A Classic Grounded Theory of Heart Failure Patient Decision Making Surrounding Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Barton-Caro Ph.D.,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this classic grounded theory study was to explain the complex decision making process of heart failure (HF patients considering primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD therapy. Sudden cardiac death (SCD is the leading cause of death for people with HF as well as the primary cause of death in the United States (US. ICDs represent the standard of care as the only effective therapy for primary prevention of SCD. However, a significant proportion of qualifying HF patients declines this invasive, yet life-saving device. The grounded theory is of Embodied revelation. The threat of SCD for ICD candidates consists of four stages: living in conscious denial, heightening of awareness, sanctioning ICD therapy, and living in new assurance. The first stage ends abruptly with the critical juncture of grasping the threat of SCD. This grounded theory has implications for research, nursing and medical practice, as well as bioethical considerations.

  17. Effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillator implantation on health status in patients with mild versus moderate symptoms of heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteeg, Henneke; van den Broek, Krista C; Theuns, Dominic A M J

    2011-01-01

    Indications for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) have expanded to include patients with mild congestive heart failure (CHF) symptoms (New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class II) because of a demonstrated morbidity reduction in this subset of patients. However, little is known...

  18. Optimal Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Pacing Rate in Non-Ischemic Heart Failure Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghotbi, Adam Ali; Sander, Mikael; Køber, Lars

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal pacing rate during cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the impact of changing basal pacing frequencies on autonomic nerve function, cardiopulmonary exercise capacity and self-perceived quality of life (QoL). METHODS: Twelve CRT...... by microneurography (MSNA), peak oxygen consumption (pVO2), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (p-NT-proBNP), echocardiography and QoL. RESULTS: DDD-80 pacing for 3 months increased the mean heart rate from 77.3 to 86.1 (p = 0.001) and reduced sympathetic activity compared to DDD-60 (51±14 bursts/100 cardiac...

  19. Use of Early Inhaled Nitric Oxide Therapy in Fat Embolism Syndrome to Prevent Right Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeni Brotfain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fat embolism syndrome (FES is a life-threatening condition in which multiorgan dysfunction manifests 48–72 hours after long bone or pelvis fractures. Right ventricular (RV failure, especially in the setting of pulmonary hypertension, is a frequent feature of FES. We report our experience treating 2 young, previously healthy trauma patients who developed severe hypoxemia in the setting of FES. Neither patient had evidence of RV dysfunction on echocardiogram. The patients were treated with inhaled nitric oxide (NO, and their oxygenation significantly improved over the subsequent few days. Neither patient developed any cardiovascular compromise. Patients with FES that have severe hypoxemia and evidence of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS are likely at risk for developing RV failure. We recommend that these patients with FES and severe refractory hypoxemia should be treated with inhaled NO therapy prior to the onset of RV dysfunction.

  20. Obesity and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pergola, Giovanni; Nardecchia, Adele; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Triggiani, Vincenzo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Minischetti, Manuela Castiglione; Silvestris, Franco

    2013-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have recently shown that obesity, and abdominal obesity in particular, is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure (HF). Higher cardiac oxidative stress is the early stage of heart dysfunction due to obesity, and it is the result of insulin resistance, altered fatty acid and glucose metabolism, and impaired mitochondrial biogenesis. Extense myocyte hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis are early microscopic changes in patients with HF, whereas circumferential strain during the left ventricular (LV) systole, LV increase in both chamber size and wall thickness (LV hypertrophy), and LV dilatation are the early macroscopic and functional alterations in obese developing heart failure. LV hypertrophy leads to diastolic dysfunction and subendocardial ischemia in obesity, and pericardial fat has been shown to be significantly associated with LV diastolic dysfunction. Evolving abnormalities of diastolic dysfunction may include progressive hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction, and various degrees of eccentric and/or concentric LV hypertrophy may be present with time. Once HF is established, overweight and obese have a better prognosis than do their lean counterparts with the same level of cardiovascular disease, and this phenomenon is called "obesity paradox". It is mainly due to lower muscle protein degradation, brain natriuretic peptide circulating levels and cardio-respiratory fitness than normal weight patients with HF.

  1. The increasing importance of percutaneous mechanical circulatory assist device therapy in heart failure management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A Weis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Advances in medical and surgical care have made it possible for an increasing number of patients with Congenital Heart disease (CHD to live into adulthood. Transposition of the great vessels (TGV is the most common cyanotic congenital cardiac disease where the right ventricle serves as systemic ventricle. It is not uncommon for these patients to have systemic ventricular failure requiring transplantation. Study Design: Hemodynamic decompensation in these patients can be swift and difficult to manage. Increasingly percutaneous LVAD′s such as the Impella (Abiomed, Mass, USA are gaining popularity in these situations owing to their relative ease of placement, both in and outside of the operating room. Conclusion: In this paper we demonstrate that Impella (IMP CP placement through the axillary artery approach shows to be suitable option for short term cardiac support and improvement of end organ perfusion in anticipation of cardiac transplantation.

  2. The increasing importance of percutaneous mechanical circulatory assist device therapy in heart failure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Ricardo A; Devaleria, Patrick A; Koushik, Sarang; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Advances in medical and surgical care have made it possible for an increasing number of patients with Congenital Heart disease (CHD) to live into adulthood. Transposition of the great vessels (TGV) is the most common cyanotic congenital cardiac disease where the right ventricle serves as systemic ventricle. It is not uncommon for these patients to have systemic ventricular failure requiring transplantation. Hemodynamic decompensation in these patients can be swift and difficult to manage. Increasingly percutaneous LVAD's such as the Impella (Abiomed, Mass, USA) are gaining popularity in these situations owing to their relative ease of placement, both in and outside of the operating room. In this paper we demonstrate that Impella (IMP) CP placement through the axillary artery approach shows to be suitable option for short term cardiac support and improvement of end organ perfusion in anticipation of cardiac transplantation.

  3. Rehabilitation Therapy in Older Acute Heart Failure Patients (REHAB-HF) trial: Design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Gordon R; Whellan, David J; Duncan, Pamela; O'Connor, Christopher M; Pastva, Amy M; Eggebeen, Joel D; Hewston, Leigh Ann; Morgan, Timothy M; Reed, Shelby D; Rejeski, W Jack; Mentz, Robert J; Rosenberg, Paul B; Kitzman, Dalane W

    2017-03-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is a leading cause of hospitalization in older persons in the United States. Reduced physical function and frailty are major determinants of adverse outcomes in older patients with hospitalized ADHF. However, these are not addressed by current heart failure (HF) management strategies and there has been little study of exercise training in older, frail HF patients with recent ADHF. Targeting physical frailty with a multi-domain structured physical rehabilitation intervention will improve physical function and reduce adverse outcomes among older patients experiencing a HF hospitalization. REHAB-HF is a multi-center clinical trial in which 360 patients ≥60 years hospitalized with ADHF will be randomized either to a novel 12-week multi-domain physical rehabilitation intervention or to attention control. The goal of the intervention is to improve balance, mobility, strength and endurance utilizing reproducible, targeted exercises administered by a multi-disciplinary team with specific milestones for progression. The primary study aim is to assess the efficacy of the REHAB-HF intervention on physical function measured by total Short Physical Performance Battery score. The secondary outcome is 6-month all-cause rehospitalization. Additional outcome measures include quality of life and costs. REHAB-HF is the first randomized trial of a physical function intervention in older patients with hospitalized ADHF designed to determine if addressing deficits in balance, mobility, strength and endurance improves physical function and reduces rehospitalizations. It will address key evidence gaps concerning the role of physical rehabilitation in the care of older patients, those with ADHF, frailty, and multiple comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting the ACE2 and Apelin Pathways Are Novel Therapies for Heart Failure: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed M. R. Kazemi-Bajestani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2/Ang II/Ang 1–7 and the apelin/APJ are two important peptide systems which exert diverse effects on the cardiovascular system. ACE2 is a key negative regulator of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS where it metabolizes angiotensin (Ang II into Ang 1–7, an endogenous antagonist of Ang II. Both the prolonged activation of RAS and the loss of ACE2 can be detrimental as they lead to functional deterioration of the heart and progression of cardiac, renal, and vascular diseases. Recombinant human ACE2 in an animal model of ACE2 knockout mice lowers Ang II. These interactions neutralize the pressor and subpressor pathologic effects of Ang II by producing Ang 1–7 levels in vivo, that might be cardiovascular protective. ACE2 hydrolyzes apelin to Ang II and, therefore, is responsible for the degradation of both peptides. Apelin has emerged as a promising peptide biomarker of heart failure. The serum level of apelin in cardiovascular diseases tends to be decreased. Apelin is recognized as an imperative controller of systemic blood pressure and myocardium contractility. Dysregulation of the apelin/APJ system may be involved in the predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, and enhancing apelin action may have important therapeutic effects.

  5. The comparative effects of long-term carvedilol versus bisoprolol therapy on QT dispersion in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygul, Nazif; Ozdemir, Kurtulus; Duzenli, Mehmet Akif; Aygul, Meryem Ulku

    2009-01-01

    Carvedilol and bisoprolol reduce QT dispersion (QTD) in chronic heart failure (CHF). However, it is unclear whether there is a difference between the effects of the two drugs. The aim of the present study was to compare the long-term effects of carvedilol and bisoprolol on QTD in patients with CHF. Eighty-one patients with CHF with no previous beta-blocker therapy were included in this prospective study. The patients were randomly allocated to carvedilol or bisoprolol therapy. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), heart rate (HR), QTD, and corrected QTD (QTcD) were calculated at baseline and at the 6th month of therapy. In comparison to baseline values in both therapy groups, LVEF was significantly improved, and a statistically significant decrease was found in HR (carvedilol from 76 +/- 12 to 65 +/- 10 beats/min, p < 0.001; bisoprolol from 78 +/- 13 to 65 +/- 8 beats/min, p < 0.001) and QTcD (carvedilol from 85 +/- 28 to 65 +/- 22 ms, p < 0.001; bisoprolol from 83 +/- 22 to 61 +/- 20 ms, p < 0.001). In our study, carvedilol and bisoprolol were found to have similar effects on LVEF, HR, and QTcD. Carvedilol and bisoprolol decrease HR and QTcD in patients with CHF, and there is no meaningful difference between the two beta-blockers as regards their effects on these parameters. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Effect of extended follow-up in a specialized heart failure clinic on adherence to guideline recommended therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Gislason, Gunnar; Videbaek, Lars

    2014-01-01

    , LVEF was 30%, and 90% were in NYHA class II-III. The HF clinic intervention did not reduce time to a 90 day break in treatment with either an ACE inhibitor/ARB [hazard ratio (HR) 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34-1.97, P = 0.650], a BB (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.53-2.66, P = 0.820), or an MRA (HR 1.30......AIMS: The optimal duration of a public heart failure (HF) clinic programme is unknown. This substudy of the NT-proBNP stratified follow-up in outpatient heart failure clinics (NorthStar) trial was designed to evaluate the effect of extended follow-up in an outpatient HF clinic on long......-term adherence to guideline-based therapy. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with HF with reduced EF on optimal medical therapy (n = 921) were randomized to either extended follow-up in the HF clinic (n = 461) or discharge to primary care (n = 460) and followed for a median of 4.1 years (range: 13 months to 6...

  7. Aging, telomeres and heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, Liza S. M.; van der Harst, Pim; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Huzen, Jardi; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    During normal aging, the heart undergoes functional, morphological and cellular changes. Although aging per se does not lead to the expression of heart failure, it is likely that age-associated changes lower the threshold for the manifestation of signs and symptoms of heart failure. In patients, the

  8. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE OF ISCHEMIC GENESIS AND CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE: POSSIBILITIES OF COMBINATION THERAPY INCLUDING NEBIVOLOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Fedotov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the features of chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic genesis concurrent with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and to investigate the effect of the cardioselective β1-adrenoblocker (β1-AB nebivolol on the course of COPD and the parameters of the bronchopulmonary system in patients with CHF of ischemic genesis during treatment.Subjects and methods.The investigation enrolled 63 patients aged 40–70 years, including 43 patients with functional class (FC II–IV CHF with a Simpson left ventricular ejection fraction of  45 % concurrent with COPD (a study group and 20 patients with CHF and no bronchopulmonary pathology (a control group. The study group patients were randomly divided into 2 subgroups: 1 23 patients who received nebivolol in addition to background therapy; 2 20 patients in whom the therapy ruled out the use of β1-AB. The control patients were switched to nebivolol therapy. During 6-month follow-up, the authors made clinical examination, recorded the rate, duration, and severity of COPD exacerbations, performed a 6-minute walking test (6MWT, and used a clinical status scale modified by R. Cody, a dyspnea 0–10 category ratio (Borg scale, and a Medical Research Council Dyspnoea Scale (MRS scale. Besides, quality of life in patients was assessed using the specific Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. All the patients underwent echocardiography, bronchodilatation-induced external respiratory function test, peak flowmetry, and blood brain natriuretic peptide quantification. These studies were conducted at baseline and at 1 and 6 months of therapy.Results. During the investigation, the patients with CHF concurrent with COPD were found to have a high rate of hypertensive disease, prior myocardial infarctions, atrial fibrillations, and higher FC exertional angina. These patients also showed a delayed optimal result achievement during the combination therapy involving the use of β1-AB

  9. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE OF ISCHEMIC GENESIS AND CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE: POSSIBILITIES OF COMBINATION THERAPY INCLUDING NEBIVOLOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Fedotov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the features of chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic genesis concurrent with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and to investigate the effect of the cardioselective β1-adrenoblocker (β1-AB nebivolol on the course of COPD and the parameters of the bronchopulmonary system in patients with CHF of ischemic genesis during treatment.Subjects and methods.The investigation enrolled 63 patients aged 40–70 years, including 43 patients with functional class (FC II–IV CHF with a Simpson left ventricular ejection fraction of  45 % concurrent with COPD (a study group and 20 patients with CHF and no bronchopulmonary pathology (a control group. The study group patients were randomly divided into 2 subgroups: 1 23 patients who received nebivolol in addition to background therapy; 2 20 patients in whom the therapy ruled out the use of β1-AB. The control patients were switched to nebivolol therapy. During 6-month follow-up, the authors made clinical examination, recorded the rate, duration, and severity of COPD exacerbations, performed a 6-minute walking test (6MWT, and used a clinical status scale modified by R. Cody, a dyspnea 0–10 category ratio (Borg scale, and a Medical Research Council Dyspnoea Scale (MRS scale. Besides, quality of life in patients was assessed using the specific Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. All the patients underwent echocardiography, bronchodilatation-induced external respiratory function test, peak flowmetry, and blood brain natriuretic peptide quantification. These studies were conducted at baseline and at 1 and 6 months of therapy.Results. During the investigation, the patients with CHF concurrent with COPD were found to have a high rate of hypertensive disease, prior myocardial infarctions, atrial fibrillations, and higher FC exertional angina. These patients also showed a delayed optimal result achievement during the combination therapy involving the use of β1-AB

  10. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation : importance of new-onset atrial fibrillation and total atrial conduction time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, Sandra; Rienstra, Michiel; Maass, Alexander H.; Nieuwland, Wybe; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    AIMS: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established therapy for patients with heart failure and sinus rhythm (SR), but its value in atrial fibrillation (AF) remains unclear. Furthermore, response to CRT may be difficult to predict in these patients. The aim of our study was to

  11. Diuretics as pathogenetic treatment for heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglin, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Increased intracardiac filling pressure or congestion causes symptoms and leads to hospital admissions in patients with heart failure, regardless of their systolic function. A history of hospital admission, in turn, predicts further hospitalizations and morbidity, and a higher number of hospitalizations determine higher mortality. Congestion is therefore the driving force of the natural history of heart failure. Congestion is the syndrome shared by heart failure with preserved and reduced systolic function. These two conditions have almost identical morbidity, mortality, and survival because the outcomes are driven by congestion. A small difference in favor of heart failure with preserved systolic function comes from decreased ejection fraction and left ventricular remodeling which is only present in heart failure with decreased systolic function. The magnitude of this difference reflects the contribution of decreased systolic function and ventricular remodeling to the progression of heart failure. The only treatment available for congestion is fluid removal via diuretics, ultrafiltration, or dialysis. It is the only treatment that works equally well for heart failure with reduced and preserved systolic function because it affects congestion, the main pathogenetic feature of the disease. Diuretics are pathogenetic therapy for heart failure. PMID:21403798

  12. Determinants and consequences of renal function variations with aldosterone blocker therapy in heart failure patients after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossignol, Patrick; Cleland, John G F; Bhandari, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of the selective mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist eplerenone on renal function and the interaction between changes in renal function and subsequent cardiovascular outcomes in patients with heart failure and left ventricular systolic dysfunction after an acute myocardial...... infarction in the Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure Efficacy and Survival Study (EPHESUS)....

  13. Response and tolerance to oral vasodilator up-titration after intravenous vasodilator therapy in advanced decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugge, Frederik H; Dupont, Matthias; Finucan, Michael; Gabi, Alaa; Hawwa, Nael; Mullens, Wilfried; Taylor, David O; Young, James B; Starling, Randall C; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the haemodynamic response and tolerance to aggressive oral hydralazine/isosorbide dinitrate (HYD/ISDN) up-titration after intravenous vasodilator therapy in advanced decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Medical records of 147 consecutive ADHF patients who underwent placement of a pulmonary artery catheter and received intravenous vasodilator therapy were reviewed. Intravenous sodium nitroprusside and sodium nitroglycerin as first-line agent for those with preserved blood pressures were utilized in 143 and 32 patients, respectively. Sixty-one percent of patients were converted to oral HYD/ISDN combination therapy through a standardized conversion protocol. These patients had a significantly higher admission mean pulmonary arterial wedge pressure compared with patients not converted (28 ± 7 vs. 25 ± 8 mmHg, respectively; P-value 0.024). Beneficial haemodynamic response to decongestive therapy, defined as low cardiac filling pressures and cardiac index ≥2.20 L/min/m(2) without emergent hypotension, was achieved in 32% and 29% of patients who did or did not receive oral HYD/ISDN, respectively (P-value 0.762). HYD/ISDN dosing was progressively and consistently decreased up to the moment of hospital discharge and during outpatient follow-up, primarily due to incident hypotension. The use of a standardized haemodynamically guided up-titration protocol for conversion from intravenous to oral vasodilators may warrant subsequent dose reductions upon stabilization. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  14. Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Michelle W; Greenberg, Barry; Jaarsma, Tiny; Januzzi, James L; Lam, Carolyn S P; Maggioni, Aldo P; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Butler, Javed

    2017-08-24

    Heart failure is a global public health problem that affects more than 26 million people worldwide. The global burden of heart failure is growing and is expected to increase substantially with the ageing of the population. Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction accounts for approximately 50% of all cases of heart failure in the United States and is associated with substantial morbidity and reduced quality of life. Several diseases, such as myocardial infarction, certain infectious diseases and endocrine disorders, can initiate a primary pathophysiological process that can lead to reduced ventricular function and to heart failure. Initially, ventricular impairment is compensated for by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, but chronic activation of these pathways leads to worsening cardiac function. The symptoms of heart failure can be associated with other conditions and include dyspnoea, fatigue, limitations in exercise tolerance and fluid accumulation, which can make diagnosis difficult. Management strategies include the use of pharmacological therapies and implantable devices to regulate cardiac function. Despite these available treatments, heart failure remains incurable, and patients have a poor prognosis and high mortality rate. Consequently, the development of new therapies is imperative and requires further research.

  15. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  16. Renal failure following hospitalization for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the number of patients with heart failure readmitted for renal failure to IU Health Bloomington within 30 days of hospital discharge in 2010, and to determine whether there are factors that might have been identified before the original discharge that would have prevented the readmission. The goal of the research is to identify factors from previous admissions of patients with heart failure that would have possibly predicted a subsequent admission for renal failure, so that interventions can be developed to prevent such readmissions. The results from this study are applicable to all primary care settings. A retrospective descriptive design was employed. Subjects were patients diagnosed with heart failure in 2010 and subsequently readmitted with renal failure within 30 days of their previous hospital admission. A retrospective chart review was completed extracting the variables blood urea nitrogen levels upon patients' discharge and readmission, serum creatinine levels upon discharge and readmission, weight in kilograms upon discharge and readmission, total intake and output during the first hospitalization, diuretic medication dosage, history of renal failure, history of renal insufficiency, and death. Renal failure may be a predictable complication of heart failure. Although there are varying secondary pathophysiologies, which could account for readmission with renal failure and the severity of the renal failure, more attention should be paid to the variables identified in this study. Case managers can play a crucial role in identifying potential patients with renal failure and, where possible, collaborating with other health care providers to proactively preventing renal complications in patients with heart failure.

  17. Heart Failure in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Failure in Children and Adolescents Updated:May 8,2017 ... lives. This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  18. Mechanical circulatory treatment of advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Brian B; Vase, Henrik; Gjedsted, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. When patients cease to respond adequately to optimal medical therapy mechanical circulatory support has been promising. The advent of mechanical circulatory support devices has allowed significant improvements...... in patient survival and quality of life for those with advanced or end-stage heart failure. We provide a general overview of current mechanical circulatory support devices encompassing options for both short- and long-term ventricular support....

  19. Insomnia Self-Management in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-05

    Cardiac Failure; Heart Failure; Congestive Heart Failure; Heart Failure, Congestive; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Chronic Insomnia; Disorders of Initiating and Maintaining Sleep; Fatigue; Pain; Depressive Symptoms; Sleep Disorders; Anxiety

  20. Review Paper Heart Failure in Small Animals - Advances in Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rationale for the use of drugs and supportive therapy in the management of heart diseases (HDs) and heart failure (HF), is discussed in the light of contemporary concepts. The in-adequacy of the age-long therapy of heart failure with oxygen supplementation, cardiac glycosides, rest and the withholding of salt in food is ...

  1. Combined digoxin-molsidomine therapy in congestive heart failure following acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantelli, I; Parchi, C; Palmieri, M; Brunelli, A; Sangiorgio, P; Bracchetti, D

    1986-01-01

    The acute hemodynamic effects of combining administration of digoxin (DIG)(0.01 mg/kg intravenously) with molsidomine (MLS)(4 mg sublingually) were compared with those of DIG and MLS considered alone in 12 patients with congestive heart failure following acute myocardial infarction. The patients were classified into two subgroups, A (cardiac index [CI] less than or equal to 2.2 L/min/m2 and B (CI greater than 2.2 L/min/m2), to verify differences between the responses to the three drug regimens. MLS significantly reduced systolic blood pressure from 121.2 +/- 12.3 (mean +/- SD) to 111.7 +/- 10.9 mm Hg (p less than 0.01) after 60 min, mean right atrial pressure (RAP) from 6.2 +/- 3.6 to 2.4 +/- 2.1 mm Hg (p less than 0.0001), mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), left ventricular filling pressure (LVFP) from 20.6 +/- 2.1 to 12.2 +/- 2.8 mm Hg (p less than 0.0001), and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Left ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI) significantly increased after 60 min. DIG induced a significant reduction in heart rate, RAP, PAP, and LVFP from 20.1 +/- 2 to 14.3 +/- 2.7 mm Hg (p less than 0.0001) after 90 min. Stroke volume index (SVI) increased from 24.7 +/- 4.2 to 27.7 +/- 3.1 ml/beat/m2 (p less than 0.001) and LVSWI from 25.9 +/- 7.2 to 31.9 +/- 5.4 g X m/m2 (p less than 0.0001). The combination of DIG and MLS produced a reduction in RAP, PAP, and LVFP greater than that achieved with either agent alone, with a further shift of the ventricular function curve to the left, thereby leading to an improvement in cardiac performance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Effect of beta-blocker therapy on functional status in patients with heart failure--a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdulla, Jawdat; Køber, Lars; Christensen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Association (NYHA) classification and exercise tolerance in chronic heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: We selected 28 RCTs evaluating beta-blocker versus placebo in addition to ACE inhibitor therapy. Combined results of 23 RCTs showed that beta-blockers improved NYHA class by at least one class with odds...... ratio (OR) 1.80 (1.33-2.43) poxygen uptake and 9 RCTs evaluating 6-min walk distance showed that beta-blockers had no significant effect...... compared with placebo, p=0.484, and p=0.730, respectively. Combined results of the 23 RCTs showed significant reducing effect on all cause mortality with OR=0.69 (0.59-0.82) ptherapy improves dyspnoea and prolongs exercise...

  3. Could vitamin D supplements be a new therapy for heart failure? Possible pathogenic mechanisms from data of intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbeni, Andrea; Delva, Pietro; Minuz, Pietro

    2014-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency may play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic heart failure (HF), but whether giving patients supplements to raise vitamin D into the normal range improves their survival is not clear. It has been demonstrated that vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with HF, especially the elderly, in obese and in dark skinned people, and that low vitamin D levels are associated with adverse outcome. The epidemiological data have been confirmed by experimental data, which show that knockout mice for the vitamin D receptor developed myocardial hypertrophy and dysfunction. Data from interventional studies are scarce and discordant, and more research is urgently needed to confirm whether add-on supplementation therapy with vitamin D has a role in the management of patients with chronic HF.

  4. Comparison between ivabradine and low-dose digoxin in the therapy of diastolic heart failure with preserved left ventricular systolic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Cocco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Multicenter trials have demonstrated that in patients with sinus rhythm ivabradine is effective in the therapy of ischemic heart disease and of impaired left ventricular systolic function. Ivabradine is ineffective in atrial fibrillation. Many patients with symptomatic heart failure have diastolic dysfunction with preserved left ventricular systolic function, and many have asymptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Ivabradine is not indicated in these conditions, but it happens that it is erroneously used. Digoxin is now considered an outdated and potentially dangerous drug and while effective in the mentioned conditions, is rarely used. The aim of the study was to compare the therapeutic effects of ivabradine in diastolic heart failure with preserved left ventricular systolic function. Patients were assigned to ivabradine or digoxin according to a randomization cross-over design. Data were single-blind analyzed. The analysis was performed using an intention-to-treat method. Forty-two coronary patients were selected. In spite of maximally tolerated therapy with renin-antagonists, diuretics and ?-blockers, they had congestive diastolic heart failure with preserved systolic function. Both ivabradine and digoxin had positive effects on dyspnea, Nterminal natriuretic peptide, heart rate, duration of 6-min. walk-test and signs of diastolic dysfunction, but digoxin was high-statistically more effective. Side-effects were irrelevant. Data were obtained in a single-center and from 42 patients with ischemic etiology of heart failure. The number of patients is small and does not allow assessing mortality. In coronary patients with symptomatic diastolic heart failure with preserved systolic function low-dose digoxin was significantly more effective than ivabradine and is much cheaper. One should be more critical about ivabradine and low-dose digoxin in diastolic heart failure. To avoid possible negative effects on the cardiac function and a severe

  5. SERCA2a gene therapy restores microRNA-1 expression in heart failure via an Akt/FoxO3A-dependent pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Kumarswamy, R.; Lyon, AR; Volkmann, I.; Mills, AM; Bretthauer, J; Pahuja, A.; Geers-Knoerr, C.; Kraft, T.; Hajjar, RJ; Macleod, KT; Harding, SE; Thum, T.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Impaired myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a (SERCA2a) activity is a hallmark of failing hearts, and SERCA2a gene therapy improves cardiac function in animals and patients with heart failure (HF). Deregulation of microRNAs has been demonstrated in HF pathophysiology. We studied the effects of therapeutic AAV9.SERCA2a gene therapy on cardiac miRNome expression and focused on regulation, expression, and function of miR-1 in reverse remodelled failing hearts. Methods and res...

  6. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory for the ...

  7. Sex differences in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Sven

    2016-01-01

    This thesis examined differences between men and women with heart failure. First, it was shown that biological sex is a strong modulator in the clinical expression of various cardiomyopathies. In the general population it was shown that men are more likely to develop heart failure with reduced

  8. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. New echocardiographic techniques in optimal patient selection for cardiac resynchronization therapy in the treatment of chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Milan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT has important role in the contemporary treatment of heart failure, systolic dysfunction and mechanical disynchrony. Classical indications for CRT are severe heart failure (NYHA class III or IV, a broad QRS (more than 120 ms and left ejection fraction less than 35% despite optimal medical therapy. Several have studies demonstrated the important role of echocardiography in patient selection for CRT, follow up and estimation of CRT effects, as well as the optimization of biventricular pacemaker. Basically, there are three types of cardiac asynchrony: interventricular asynchrony, between the right and left ventricle, intraventricular asynchrony, between the myocardial segments within the left ventricle and atrioventricular asynchrony, between the atria and ventricles. Although many echocardiographic techniques are used in patient selection for CRT, no ideal approach has yet been found. There are several techniques and parameters used in the assessment of myocardial asynchrony: two dimensional (2D echocardiography, one dimensional echocardiography (M-mode, Doppler echocardiography, different modalities of tissue Doppler including Colour Coded Tissue Doppler Imaging - TDI, measurements of local tissue deformation indices (strain and strain rate, speckle tracking, 3D echocardiography, semiquantitative assessment of myocardial border, vector velocity imaging. Each of these techniques has advantages and limitations. A special accent in this revue is on the consensus report from the American Society of Echocardiography Dyssynchrony Writing group. According to this consensus report color coded tissue Doppler is the most appropriate technique for myocardial asynchrony estimation and patients selection for CRT. The same group recommended that definitive decision for CFT implantation should not be based only on echocardiographic analysis, but rather on the whole clinical aspect of the patient.

  10. Effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy on ventricular tachycardias in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Д. И. Лебедев

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to elucidate the effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT on ventricular tachycardias in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and to analyze the prospects of radionuclide diagnostic methods for prediction of life-threatening arrhythmias in the presence of therapy. The study included 70 patients (mean age 55 12 years aged 32 to 75 years with dilated cardiomyopathy, NYHA FC III heart failure, left ventricular (LV ejection fraction (EF of 30.1 3.8%, and end-diastolic volume (EDV of 220.7 50.9 mL. Group 1 comprised 35 patients (50% diagnosed with paroxysms of ventricular tachycardia, while Group 2 consisted of 35 patients (50% without episodes of ventricular tachycardia. After one year of CRT, positive clinical changes were documented in all patients: LV EF increased to 42.8 4.8% (p 0.001; functional class of heart failure decreased to II; LV EDV decreased to 197.9 47.8 mL (p 0.005. The patients whose EF increased by 14% and EDV decreased by 35 mL during one-year CRT had no episodes of ventricular tachycardia. The patients, whose paroxysms of ventricular tachycardia persisted during the entire period of the study, showed EF increase by 9% and EDV decrease by 13 mL. The second stage of the study consisted in evaluating the effects of myocardial metabolism defects (MMD. No ventricular tachycardia episodes were registered in patients whose MMD became less than 15% during CRT; if the size of DMM exceeded 15%, paroxysms of ventricular tachycardia were observed. Thus, efficacious CRT in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy results in a statistically significant reduction of the number of ventricular tachycardia episodes. The improvement of fatty acid metabolism contributes to a decrease in the number of ventricular tachycardia episodes in the course of CRT.

  11. Exercise training in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepoli, Massimo F

    2005-05-01

    The reduction of exercise capacity with early occurrence of fatigue and dyspnea is a hallmark of heart failure syndrome. There are objective similarities between heart failure and muscular deconditioning. Deficiencies in peripheral blood flow and skeletal muscle function, morphology, metabolism, and function are present. The protective effects of physical activity have been elucidated in many recent studies: training improves ventilatory control, skeletal muscle metabolism, autonomic nervous system, central and peripheral circulation, and heart function. These provide the physiologic basis to explain the benefits in terms of survival and freedom from hospitalization demonstrated by physical training also in heart failure.

  12. Bisoprolol for congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J.; Gustafsson, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: beta-Blockers are a cornerstone in the treatment of systolic heart failure treatment, but not all beta-blockers are effective or in this setting. Objective: To define the role of bisoprolol, a highly selective beta(1)-antagonist in congestive heart failure due to systolic dysfunction....... Methods: Using the keywords 'bisoprolol' and 'heart failure' PubMed and BIOSIS databases were searched for information regarding pharmacology and relevant randomised clinical trials. Supplementary publications were acquired by scrutinising reference lists of relevant papers. Additional information...... was obtained from the FDA website. Conclusion: Bisoprolol is an effective and well-tolerated first-line beta-blocker for patients with systolic heart failure. The knowledge is primarily based on study patients with moderate-to-severe heart failure from the three CIBIS trials Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  13. Diabetes Mellitus and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrke, Michael; Marx, Nikolaus

    2017-06-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical data from the last 2 decades have shown that the prevalence of heart failure in diabetes is very high, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure is worse in those with diabetes than in those without diabetes. Experimental data suggest that various mechanisms contribute to the impairment in systolic and diastolic function in patients with diabetes, and there is an increased recognition that these patients develop heart failure independent of the presence of coronary artery disease or its associated risk factors. In addition, current clinical data demonstrated that treatment with the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin reduced hospitalization for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk. This review article summarizes recent data on the prevalence, prognosis, pathophysiology, and therapeutic strategies to treat patients with diabetes and heart failure. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Depression and Self-Care in Heart Failure Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Carney, Robert M; Rich, Michael W; Steinmeyer, Brian C; Rubin, Eugene H

    2015-11-01

    Depression and inadequate self-care are common and interrelated problems that increase the risks of hospitalization and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). To determine the efficacy of an integrative cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention for depression and HF self-care. Randomized clinical trial with single-blind outcome assessments. Eligible patients were enrolled at Washington University Medical Center in St Louis between January 4, 2010, and June 28, 2013. The primary data analyses were conducted in February 2015. The participants were 158 outpatients in New York Heart Association Class I, II, and III heart failure with comorbid major depression. Cognitive behavior therapy delivered by experienced therapists plus usual care (UC), or UC alone. Usual care was enhanced in both groups with a structured HF education program delivered by a cardiac nurse. The primary outcome was severity of depression at 6 months as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory. The Self-Care of Heart Failure Index Confidence and Maintenance subscales were coprimary outcomes. Secondary outcomes included measures of anxiety, depression, physical functioning, fatigue, social roles and activities, and quality of life. Hospitalizations and deaths were exploratory outcomes. One hundred fifty-eight patients were randomized to UC (n = 79) or CBT (n = 79). Within each arm, 26 (33%) of the patients were taking an antidepressant at baseline. One hundred thirty-two (84%) of the participants completed the 6-month posttreatment assessments; 60 (76%) of the UC and 58 (73%) of the CBT participants completed every follow-up assessment (P = .88). Six-month depression scores were lower in the CBT than the UC arm on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) (12.8 [10.6] vs 17.3 [10.7]; P = .008). Remission rates differed on the BDI-II (46% vs 19%; number needed to treat [NNT] = 3.76; 95% CI, 3.62-3.90; P Beck Depression Inventory scores 6 months after randomization were lower in the CBT

  15. Avoiding Untimely Implantable Cardioverter/Defibrillator Implantation by Intensified Heart Failure Therapy Optimization Supported by the Wearable Cardioverter/Defibrillator-The PROLONG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, David; König, Thorben; Hohmann, Stephan; Bauersachs, Johann; Veltmann, Christian

    2017-01-17

    Optimal timing of implantation of an implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD) after newly diagnosed heart failure is unclear given that late reverse remodelling may occur. We aimed to analyze left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) after diagnosis of an LVEF ≤35% during optimization of heart failure drug therapy. One hundred fifty-six patients with newly diagnosed LVEF ≤35% receiving a wearable cardioverter/defibrillator (WCD) were analyzed. WCD was prescribed for 3 months until first re-evaluation. Indications for prolongation of WCD wearing period instead of ICD implantation were: (1) LVEF at 3-month visit 30% to 35%; (2) increase in LVEF of ≥5% compared to the last visit; and (3) nonoptimized heart failure medication. Mean LVEF was 24±7% at diagnosis and 39±11% at last follow-up (mean, 12±10 months). Whereas 88 patients presented a primary preventive ICD indication (LVEF ≤35%) at 3-month follow-up, only 58 showed a persistent primary preventive ICD indication at last follow-up. This delayed improvement in LVEF was related to nonischemic origin of cardiomyopathy, New York Heart Association functional class at baseline, heart rate, better LVEF after 3 months, and higher dosages of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist. Twelve appropriate WCD shocks for ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation occurred in 11 patients. Two patients suffered from ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation beyond 3 months after diagnosis. A relevant proportion of patients with newly diagnosed heart failure shows recovery of LVEF >35% beyond 3 months after initiation of heart failure therapy. To avoid untimely ICD implantation, prolongation of WCD period should be considered in these patients to prevent sudden cardiac death while allowing left ventricular reverse remodeling during intensified drug therapy. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. The total artificial heart for biventricular heart failure and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Tang, Daniel G; Katlaps, Gundars J; Shah, Keyur B

    2012-05-01

    Treatment options for late-stage biventricular heart failure are limited but include medical therapy with intravenous inotropes, biventricular assist devices (Bi-VADs) and the total artificial heart (TAH). In this manuscript, we review the indications, surgical techniques and outcomes for the TAH. The TAH offers biventricular replacement, rather than 'assistance', as the device is placed orthotopically after excision of the entire ventricular myocardium and all four native valves. In contrast to patients with Bi-VADs, patients with the TAH have no postoperative inotrope requirements, arrhythmias or inflow/outflow cannulae-related complications. Additionally, patients participate in rehabilitation early after device placement and the development of a portable drive may facilitate hospital discharge in the USA. Furthermore, total heart replacement may be ideal for heart failure associated with unique anatomical and mechanical complications. The TAH is an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of patients dying of heart failure who may not be suitable candidates for left ventricular assist devices.

  17. Can the Growth/Differentiation Factor-15 Be a Surrogate Target in Chronic Heart Failure Biomarker-Guided Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E. Berezin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF biomarker-guided therapy is a promising method, which directs to the improvement of clinical status, attenuation of admission/readmission to the hospital and reduction in mortality rate. Many biological markers, like inflammatory cytokines, are under consideration as a surrogate target for HF treatment, while there are known biomarkers with established predictive value, such as natriuretic peptides. However, discovery of new biomarkers reflecting various underlying mechanisms of HF and appearing to be surrogate targets for biomarker-guided therapy is fairly promising. Nowadays, growth/differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15 is suggested a target biomarker for HF treatment. Although elevated level of GDF-15 is associated with HF development, progression, and prognosis, there is no represented evidence regarding the direct comparison of this biomarker with other clinical risk predictors and biomarkers. Moreover, GDF-15 might serve as a contributor to endothelial progenitor cells (EPC dysfunction by inducing EPC death/autophagy and limiting their response to angiopoetic and reparative effects. The short communication was discussed whether GDF-15 is good molecular target for HF biomarker-guided therapy.

  18. Statin therapy reduces inappropriate shock in non-ischemic patients with mild heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Anne-Christine H.; Zareba, Wojciech; Jons, Christian

    2013-01-01

    therapy in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus was associated with lower risk of inappropriate therapy but higher risk of appropriate therapy. Appropriate and inappropriate ICD therapy was associated with increased mortality in diabetic patients. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL......: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. UNIQUE IDENTIFIER: NCT00947310....

  19. Unanswered Questions in Contemporary Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilstrap, Lauren G; Snipelisky, David; AbouEzzeddine, Omar; Vader, Justin; Cooper, Lauren; Kelley, Jacob; Perez, Antonio; Varian, Kenneth; Lala, Anuradha; Shah, Monica; Stevenson, Lynne W

    2017-10-01

    The epidemiology of heart failure (HF) is changing. This study aimed to describe questions that arise during the routine care of HF patients that are unanswered by the current literature and describe how the type and focus of these questions has changed over time. Investigators from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored Heart Failure Apprentice Network collected and categorized questions from 5 academic hospitals over 12 months. A total of 174 unanswered questions were collected and analyzed. Compared with 2004, there were more unanswered questions about "whether" to use therapies and fewer about "how" to use therapies. There were fewer questions about what therapeutic targets, therapy adjustment, and combination therapies. There were more questions about whether or how to stop therapies and how to add therapies back. Newly prominent topics, not observed in 2004, including novel therapeutics, refractory ventricular tachycardia, right heart failure, and nutrition/frailty, accounted for 24% of questions. Compared with 2004, there are fewer unanswered questions about how to use, adjust, and combine therapies. There were more unanswered questions about whether and how to stop therapies. Almost 25% of unanswered questions dealt with topics indicative of more advanced disease which were not observed in 2004. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prognostic effect of carbohydrate antigen 125-guided therapy in patients recently discharged for acute heart failure (CHANCE-HF). Study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Julio; Merlos, Pilar; Fácila, Lorenzo; Llàcer, Pau; Bosch, Maria José; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; García-Blas, Sergio; Montagud, Vicente; Pedrosa, Valle; Mendizábal, Andrea; Cordero, Alberto; Miñana, Gema; Sanchis, Juan; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-02-01

    Morbidity and mortality after admission for acute heart failure remain prohibitively high. In that setting, plasma levels of antigen carbohydrate 125 have shown to correlate with the severity of fluid overload and the risk of mortality and readmission. Preliminary data suggests a potential role of antigen carbohydrate 125 to guide therapy. The objective of this study is to evaluate the prognostic effect of an antigen carbohydrate 125-guided management strategy vs standard therapy in patients recently discharged for acute heart failure. This is a multicenter, randomized, single-blind, efficacy trial study of patients recently discharged from acute heart failure ( 35 U/ml. A randomization scheme was used to allocate participants (in a 1:1 ratio) to receive therapy guided by antigen carbohydrate 125 (aiming to keep normal values) or standard treatment. Mainly, antigen carbohydrate 125-guided therapy is focused on the frequency of monitoring and titration of decongestive therapies and statins. As of December 10, 2013, there were 383 patients enrolled. The primary outcome was the composite of 1-year all-cause mortality or rehospitalization for acute heart failure. Analysis was planned to be intention-to-treat. Discovering novel therapeutic strategies or finding better ways of optimizing established treatments have become a health care priority in heart failure. This study will add important knowledge about the potential of antigen carbohydrate 125 as a management tool for monitoring and titration of therapies where optimal utilization has not been well defined, such as diuretics and statins. ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02008110. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Beneficial effects of long-term intravenous iron therapy with ferric carboxymaltose in patients with symptomatic heart failure and iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponikowski, Piotr; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Comin-Colet, Josep; Ertl, Georg; Komajda, Michel; Mareev, Viacheslav; McDonagh, Theresa; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Tavazzi, Luigi; Levesque, Victoria; Mori, Claudio; Roubert, Bernard; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Ruschitzka, Frank; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits and safety of long-term i.v. iron therapy in iron-deficient patients with heart failure (HF). Methods and results CONFIRM-HF was a multi-centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that enrolled 304 ambulatory symptomatic HF patients with

  2. The effect of beta-blocker therapy on quality of life in heart failure patients : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; van Jaarsveld, Cornelia H. M.; deJongste, Mike J. L.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    Purpose To assess the impact of beta-blocker therapy on quality of life (QoL) in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients receiving optimal standard medication. Methods Randomised controlled trials (RCT) assessing QoL with a generic or disease specific instrument were identified by searching Medline,

  3. Rationale and Design of the First Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial with Allogeneic Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal Cell Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Ida

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemic heart failure (IHF) has a poor prognosis in spite of optimal therapy. We have established a new allogeneic Cardiology Stem Cell Centre adipose-derived stromal cell (CSCC_ASC) product from healthy donors. It is produced without animal products, in closed bioreactor systems...

  4. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Updated:May 9, ... you? This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  5. Heart Failure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Heart Failure Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... or maintain quality of life. Urinary Incontinence and Heart Failure If you have heart failure, you may experience ...

  6. Recent advances in the management of chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Haissam; Mielniczuk, Lisa; Davies, Ross A

    2012-03-01

    This review will provide an overview of the recent advances in the management of chronic heart failure, with special focus on major publications in the past 2 years, 2010-2011. In the past 1-2 years, there have been a number of publications that promise to make a major difference in patient management and outcome in heart failure. These include two clinical trials in patients with less symptomatic heart failure, namely the use of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and eplerinone, an aldosterone receptor antagonist, and another study using ivabradine, which belongs to a new class of If channel blocking drugs used for heart rate reduction in patients with moderate heart failure. The evolving role of telemedicine in remote management of patients with heart failure is reviewed. New data demonstrate the benefit of CRT and aldosterone antagonists in milder heart failure, the benefit of ivabradine in moderate heart failure with heart rate of 70 or more, and the potential role of telemedicine.

  7. EFFICACY OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE COMBINED THERAPY DURING PERLINDOL USAGE IN ELDERLY POST INFARCTION PATIENTS WITH PSYCHOSOMATIC DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Statsenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy and safety of reversible MAO inhibitor pirlindol (Pyrazidol in elderly post infarction patients with chronic heart failure (CHF and affective disorders.Material and methods. 60 patients with CHF of II-III NYHA class 3-4 weeks after myocardial infarction with and anxious and depressive disorders were involved into the study. The patients were randomized in two groups. Patients of the first group received standard therapy (bisoprolol, lizinopril, simvastatin, acetylsalicylic acid, nitrates and diuretcs as required in combination with pirlindol for 12 weeks. Patients of the second group received standard therapy alone. The follow-up period was 6 months. At baseline and after 12 and 24 weeks of therapy psychosomatic status was examined with the Beck questionnaire and HADS scale. Quality of life (QoL survey with the Minnesota, Seattle and MOS SF- 36 questionnaires were performed as well as ECG with assessment of heart rate variability (HRV and echocardiography.Results. Pirlindol improved QoL and was effective in correction of anxious and depressive disorders in CHF patients. At the end of the follow-up period normal Beck scores were registered in 90% and mild depression scores - in 10% of patients in pirlindol group. At the same time all patients of control group had depressive disorders of different intensity. Significant increase of left ventricular ejection fraction was observed in pirlindol group vs control group (20,9 vs -2,5%. Heart morphometric parameters improved in both groups, but left ventricle size reduction was more prominent in pirlindol group (-10,69 vs -5,34%. According to the spectral and time indexes of HRV, pirlindol treatment led to normalization of autonomic balance. Sympathetic overdrive was observed in patients of the control group.Conclusion. In elderly patients with CHF after myocardial infarction pirlindol taken additionally to the standard therapy is well tolerated, effectively eliminate

  8. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  9. NEW HORIZONS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneeta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Heart failure (HF is a global problem with an estimated prevalence of 38 million people worldwide; a number that is increasing with the ageing of the population. The heart failure is associated with high health expenditure, mostly because of cost of hospitalisations. The five year survival for individuals with heart failure is about 50%, and in advanced heart failure, the one year survival is as low as 22%, regardless of therapy. The modern history of therapy for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction began with the introduction of vasodilatation with hydralazine plus isosorbide dinitrate. Research about heart failure is now quite active worldwide and many areas are being explored e.g. gene therapy, modification of function of micro RNAs by antagomirs, stem cell therapy besides development of new pharmacological therapeutic agents.

  10. Association between β-blocker therapy and outcomes in patients hospitalised with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive lung disease with underlying ischaemic heart disease, heart failure or hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Mihaela S; Rothberg, Michael B; Priya, Aruna; Pekow, Penelope S; Au, David H; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2012-11-01

    β-Blocker therapy has been shown to improve survival among patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and congestive heart failure (CHF) and is underused among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Evidence regarding the optimal use of β-blocker therapy during an acute exacerbation of COPD is particularly weak. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients aged ≥40 years with IHD, CHF or hypertension who were hospitalised for an acute exacerbation of COPD from 1 January 2006 to 1 December 2007 at 404 acute care hospitals throughout the USA. We examined the association between β-blocker therapy and in-hospital mortality, initiation of mechanical ventilation after day 2 of hospitalisation, 30-day all-cause readmission and length of stay. Of 35 082 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 29% were treated with β blockers in the first two hospital days, including 22% with β1-selective and 7% with non-selective β blockers. In a propensity-matched analysis, there was no association between β-blocker therapy and in-hospital mortality (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.09), 30-day readmission (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.03) or late mechanical ventilation (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.24). However, when compared with β1 selective β blockers, receipt of non-selective β blockers was associated with an increased risk of 30-day readmission (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.44). Among patients with IHD, CHF or hypertension, continuing β1-selective β blockers during hospitalisation for COPD appears to be safe. Until additional evidence becomes available, β1-selective β blockers may be superior to treatment with a non-selective β blocker.

  11. NT-proBNP-Guided Therapy in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: The PRIMA II Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienen, Susan; Salah, Khibar; Moons, Arno H; Bakx, Adrianus L; van Pol, Petra; Kortz, Mikael; Ferreira, João Pedro; Marques, Irene; Schroeder-Tanka, Jutta M; Keijer, Jan T; Bayés-Genis, Antoni; Tijssen, Jan G P; Pinto, Yigal M; Kok, Wouter E

    2017-12-14

    Background -The concept of natriuretic peptide guidance has been extensively studied in chronic heart failure (HF) patients, with only limited success. The effect of NT-proBNP-guided therapy in acute decompensated HF (ADHF) patients using a relative NT-proBNP target has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to assess whether NT-proBNP-guided therapy of ADHF patients using a relative NT-proBNP target would lead to improved outcome compared with conventional therapy. Methods -We conducted a prospective randomized, controlled trial to study the impact of in-hospital guidance for ADHF treatment by a predefined NT-proBNP target (>30% reduction from admission to discharge) versus conventional treatment. ADHF patients with NT-proBNP levels of > 1700 ng/L were eligible. After achieving clinical stability, 405 patients were randomized to either NT-proBNP-guided or conventional treatment (1:1). The primary endpoint was dual, i.e. a composite of all-cause mortality and HF readmissions in 180 days, and the number of days alive out of the hospital in 180 days. Secondary endpoints were all-cause mortality within 180 days, HF readmissions within 180 days, and a composite of all-cause mortality and HF readmissions within 90 days. Results -Significantly more patients in the NT-proBNP-guided therapy group were discharged with an NT-proBNP reduction of >30% (80% versus 64%, P=0.001). Nonetheless, NT-proBNP-guided therapy did not significantly improve the combined event rate for all-cause mortality and HF readmissions (HR for NT-proBNP-guided therapy, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.72 to 1.37; P=0.99), or the median number of days alive outside of the hospital (178 vs. 179 days for NT-proBNP vs. conventional patients, P=0.39). Guided therapy also did not significantly improve any of the secondary endpoints. Conclusions -The PRIMA II demonstrates that that guidance of HF therapy to reach an NT-proBNP reduction of >30% after clinical stabilization did not improve 6-months outcome. Clinical

  12. Long-term statin therapy in patients with systolic heart failure and normal cholesterol: effects on elevated serum markers of collagen turnover, inflammation, and B-type natriuretic peptide.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abulhul, Esam

    2012-01-01

    The role of statin therapy in heart failure (HF) is unclear. The amino-terminal propeptide of procollagen type III (PIIINP) predicts outcome in HF, and yet there are conflicting reports of statin therapy effects on PIIINP.

  13. Hospitalized congestive heart failure patients with preserved versus abnormal left ventricular systolic function: clinical characteristics and drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, M M; Feinglass, J; Sy, J; Gheorghiade, M

    1995-12-01

    To compare clinical characteristics of and pharmacologic therapy for hospitalized patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction or normal left ventricular systolic function. Medical records were reviewed for all patients discharged with a principal diagnosis of CHF from a university hospital and a community hospital between September 1, 1991 and August 31, 1992. Pertinent medical history items and prescribed drug therapies at discharge were recorded for each patient's first calendar year admission. Patients were categorized as having either normal left ventricular systolic function or systolic dysfunction based on the results of echocardiography and radionuclide angiography or contrast ventriculogram. Of 298 patients with CHF, 92 (31%) had normal left ventricular systolic function. Patients with normal systolic function were older, were more often women, were less likely to have a history of coronary artery disease, and were more likely to have a history of hypothyroidism than patients with systolic dysfunction. However, the prevalence of clinical characteristics overlapped considerably between the two groups. Among patients with systolic dysfunction, 79% were discharged on a therapeutic regimen of digoxin, 65% on an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and 26% on either a beta-blocker or a calcium channel blocker. Among patients with normal systolic function, 50% were discharged on a regimen of a beta-blocker or a calcium channel blocker and 38% were discharged on digoxin. Twenty-six percent of patients with normal systolic function and without a history of atrial fibrillation were discharged on a digoxin regimen. Hospitalized CHF patients with normal left ventricular systolic function and those with diminished left ventricular systolic function share many clinical features. Since recommended drug therapy and prognosis differ, our data underscore the importance of diagnostic testing to assess left ventricular systolic

  14. Heart failure etiology impacts survival of patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecini, Redi; Møller, Daniel Vega; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of heart failure (HF) etiology on prognosis of HF is not well known. METHODS: 3078 patients (median age 75years, 61% male) hospitalized with HF were studied. Patients were classified into six etiology groups: hypertension (HTN, 13.9%), ischemic heart disease (IHD, 42...

  15. [Competence Network Heart Failure (CNHF). Together against heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Börste, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is one of the most urgent medical and socio-economic challenges of the 21(st) century. Up to three million people are affected in Germany; this means one in ten people over the age of 65  live with heart failure. The current demographic changes will accentuate the importance of this grave health problem. The care of patients with heart failure, as well as the associated research mandates a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach. The Competence Network Heart Failure (CNHF) pursues this objective. CNHF is a research alliance with 11 sites in Germany and was funded by the Federal Ministry of Research (BMBF) from 2003 through 2014. Since January 2015, the network has been an associate cooperating partner of the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK). During the 12-year funding period by the BMBF, scientists in the field of heart failure from 30 university hospitals, 5 research institutes, 7 heart centers, 17 cardiovascular clinics, over 200 general practitioners, 4 rehabilitation clinics, as well as numerous organizations and associations were involved in cooperative CNHF research. In the context of 22 projects, the CNHF covered basic, clinical, and health care research, and generated numerous groundbreaking insights into disease mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment of heart failure, which are documented in more than 350 publications. With its central study database and bank of biomaterials, the network has set up a Europe-wide unique research resource, which can be used in the future for national and international cooperations with the DZHK and other partners. Furthermore, the CNHF strongly promotes nation- and Europe-wide public relations and heart failure awareness activities.

  16. Comparison of the effects of combination diuretic therapy with oral hydrochlorothiazide or intravenous chlorothiazide in patients receiving intravenous furosemide therapy for the treatment of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissling, Kevin T; Pickworth, Kerry K

    2014-08-01

    To compare the effects of combination diuretic therapy with oral hydrochlorothiazide or intravenous chlorothiazide added to background intravenous loop diuretic therapy among patients hospitalized with heart failure. Single-center, retrospective review. Cardiovascular hospital within a university-affiliated teaching institution. Eighty-two patients hospitalized for heart failure between September 1, 2009, and August 31, 2011, who were receiving background intravenous furosemide therapy (total daily dose ≥ 160 mg); of those patients, 28 patients also received oral hydrochlorothiazide (median dose 25 mg [interquartile range 25-50 mg]), and 54 patients also received intravenous chlorothiazide (median dose 500 mg [interquartile range 250-750 mg]). The primary outcome was change in 24-hour urine output. Urine output was recorded from the 24 hours before and after the first administration of either oral hydrochlorothiazide or intravenous chlorothiazide. Baseline characteristics, with the exception of female sex (p=0.01) and home loop diuretic dose (p=0.03), were similar between groups. Twenty-four-hour urine output before administration of the thiazide diuretic was not significantly different between groups. After treatment, 24-hour urine output increased in both groups; however, urine output increased to a lesser extent with oral hydrochlorothiazide (from mean ± SD 2104 ± 830 ml to 3038 ± 917 ml) than with intravenous chlorothiazide (from 2342 ± 978 ml to 4128 ± 1755 ml) (p=0.005). Hypokalemia occurred frequently in both groups: 71.4% and 83.3% in the oral hydrochlorothiazide and intravenous chlorothiazide groups, respectively (p=0.21). Among hospitalized patients with heart failure receiving intravenous loop diuretics, the addition of either oral hydrochlorothiazide or intravenous chlorothiazide augmented diuresis. Urine output increased to a greater extent with intravenous chlorothiazide compared with oral hydrochlorothiazide. However

  17. Nutritional considerations in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne-Emerson, Heather; Lennie, Terry A

    2008-03-01

    There are a number of factors related to heart failure pathophysiology and treatment that influence nutrient requirements for patients. These include catabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, diuretic use, and presence of comorbidities. On the other hand, there is evidence that specific nutrients can alter heart failure pathophysiology. This article reviews the current evidence for nutritional recommendations regarding sodium and fluid restriction, macro- and micronutrient intake, and dietary changes required by the presence of common comorbidities.

  18. Neural modulation for hypertension and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S; Rossignol, P; Willis, S; Zannad, F; Mentz, R; Pocock, S; Bisognano, J; Nadim, Y; Geller, N; Ruble, S; Linde, C

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension (HTN) and heart failure (HF) have a significant global impact on health, and lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in pharmacologic and device therapy for these conditions, there is a need for additional treatment modalities. Patients with sub-optimally treated HTN have increased risk for stroke, renal failure and heart failure. The outcome of HF patients remains poor despite modern pharmacological therapy and with established device therapies such as CRT and ICDs. Therefore, the potential role of neuromodulation via renal denervation, baro-reflex modulation and vagal stimulation for the treatment of resistant HTN and HF is being explored. In this manuscript, we review current evidence for neuromodulation in relation to established drug and device therapies and how these therapies may be synergistic in achieving therapy goals in patients with treatment resistant HTN and heart failure. We describe lessons learned from recent neuromodulation trials and outline strategies to improve the potential for success in future trials. This review is based on discussions between scientists, clinical trialists, and regulatory representatives at the 11th annual CardioVascular Clinical Trialist Forum in Washington, DC on December 5-7, 2014. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Arrhythmias and sudden death in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, W G; Sweeney, M O

    1997-09-01

    Survival of patients with heart failure has improved over the past decade due to advances in medical therapy. Sudden death continues to cause 20 to 50% of deaths. Ventricular arrhythmias are common in patients with heart failure. Ventricular hypertrophy, scars from prior myocardial infarction, sympathetic activation, and electrolyte abnormalities contribute. Some sudden deaths are due to bradyarrhythmias and electromechanical dissociation rather than ventricular arrhythmias. The risks and benefits of antiarrhythmic therapies continue to be defined. Class I antiarrhythmic drugs should be avoided due to proarrhythmic and negative inotropic effects that may increase mortality. For patients resuscitated from sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) amiodarone or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) should be considered. ICDs markedly reduce sudden death in VT/VF survivors, but in advanced heart failure, this may not markedly extend survival. Catheter or surgical ablation can be considered for selected patients with bundle branch reentry VT or difficult to control monomorphic VT. For patients who have not had sustained VT/VF antiarrhythmic therapy should generally be avoided, but may benefit some high risk patients. Amiodarone may be beneficial in patients with advanced heart failure and rapid resting heart rates. ICDs may improve survival in selected survivors of myocardial infarction who have inducible VT.

  20. Comparison of Ambulatory, High-Dose, Intravenous Diuretic Therapy to Standard Hospitalization and Diuretic Therapy for Treatment of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Leo F; Seoane-Vazquez, Enrique; Cheng, Judy W M; Aldemerdash, Ahmed; Cooper, Irene M; Matta, Lina; Medina, Danika S; Mehra, Mandeep R; Navarro-Velez, Kristina; Shea, Elaine L; Weintraub, Joanne R; Stevenson, Lynne W; Desai, Akshay S

    2016-11-01

    Innovative treatment strategies for decompensated heart failure (HF) are required to achieve cost savings and improvements in outcomes. We developed a decision analytic model from a hospital perspective to compare 2 strategies for the treatment of decompensated HF, ambulatory diuretic infusion therapy, and hospitalization (standard care), with respect to total HF hospitalizations and costs. The ambulatory diuretic therapy strategy included outpatient treatment with high doses of intravenous loop diuretics in a specialized HF unit whereas standard care included hospitalization for intravenous loop diuretic therapy. Model probabilities were derived from the outcomes of patients who were treated for decompensated HF at Brigham and Women's Hospital (Boston, MA). Costs were based on Centers for Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement and the available reports. Based on a sample of patients treated at our institution, the ambulatory diuretic therapy strategy was estimated to achieve a significant reduction in total HF hospitalizations compared with standard care (relative reduction 58.3%). Under the base case assumptions, the total cost of the ambulatory diuretic therapy strategy was $6,078 per decompensation episode per 90 days compared with $12,175 per 90 days with standard care, for a savings of $6,097. The cost savings associated with the ambulatory diuretic strategy were robust against variation up to 50% in costs of ambulatory diuretic therapy and the likelihood of posttreatment hospitalization. An exploratory analysis suggests that ambulatory diuretic therapy is likely to remain cost saving over the long-term. In conclusion, this decision analytic model demonstrates that ambulatory diuretic therapy is likely to be cost saving compared with hospitalization for the treatment of decompensated HF from a hospital perspective. These results suggest that implementation of outpatient HF units that provide ambulatory diuretic therapy to well-selected subgroup of patients may

  1. Reassessing guidelines for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Drexler

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in the last few years in the management of heart failure. In particular, several trials have given significant results. It has become apparent that heart failure may be prevented in some patients by treatment of risk factors such as coronary artery disease.Experience with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors has shown that the survival and symptomatic benefits do last in the long term, and confirm that they are the first-line treatment in heart failure.The results of a number of trials using the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs candesartan, valsartan and losartan are presented and discussed. There is also some experience now in the use of candesartan for patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular systolic function.The COMET trial compared the β-blockers carvedilol and metoprolol tartrate, and suggests that there may be differences in clinical effect between β-blockers.The selective aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone was evaluated in the EPHESUS trial in post-MI patients with signs of heart failure.Based on these clinical trials, heart failure guidelines are now being updated.

  2. Reassessing guidelines for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Drexler

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in the last few years in the management of heart failure. In particular several trials have given significant results. It has become apparent that heart failure may be prevented in some patients by treatment of risk factors such as coronary artery disease. Experience with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors has shown that the survival and symptomatic benefits do last in the long term, and confirm that they are the first-line treatment in heart failure. The results of a number of trials using the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs candesartan, valsartan and losartan are presented and discussed. There is also some experience now in the use of candesartan for patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular systolic function. The COMET trial compared the β-blockers carvedilol and metoprolol tartrate, and suggests that there may be differences in clinical effect between β-blockers. The selective aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone was evaluated in the EPHESUS trial in post-MI patients with signs of heart failure. Based on these clinical trials, heart failure guidelines are now being updated.

  3. Use of glucagon to treat neonatal low-output congestive heart failure after maternal labetalol therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, T P; Guillet, R

    1995-07-01

    Labetalol is used to treat hypertensive crisis in women with preeclampsia. Glucagon was used as a nonselective beta-adrenergic agonist to treat a preterm infant with symptomatic beta-blockade caused by maternal labetalol therapy.

  4. Dopamine in heart failure and critical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, AJ

    Dopamine is widely used in critical care to prevent renal function loss. Nevertheless sufficient evidence is still lacking of reduction in end points like mortality or renal replacement therapy. Dopaminergic treatment in chronic heart failure (CHF) has provided an example of unexpected adverse

  5. Exercise Intolerance in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Exercise tolerance is affected in patients with heart failure (HF). Although the inability of the heart to pump blood to the working muscle has been the conventional mechanism proposed to explain the lowered capacity of patients with HF to exercise, evidence suggests that the pathophysiological...

  6. Childhood heart failure in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    respiratory tract infections (36%), intrinsic heart disease. (31%) and severe ... becomes unable to deliver an adequate cardiac output to meet ..... room setting. Nig. J paediat 1990; 17: 1 –6. Olowu AO. Studies on heart failure in Sagamu. Nig J Paediatr. 1993; 20: 29 – 34. Shann F, MacGregor D, Richens J et al. Cardiac ...

  7. Role of hypertension on new onset congestive heart failure in patients receiving trastuzumab therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Giulia; Cioffi, Giovanni; Gori, Stefania; Tuccia, Fausto; Boccardi, Lidia; Khoury, Georgette; Lestuzzi, Chiara; Maurea, Nicola; Oliva, Stefano; Faggiano, Pompilio; Tarantini, Luigi

    2014-02-01

    Adjuvant trastuzumab therapy improves survival of Human Epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive women with early breast cancer (EBC). Trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity is not uncommon. In the setting of community patients, the incidence, timing and phenotype of new onset congestive heart failure (CHF) is unknown. Forty hundred and ninety nine consecutive HER2-positive women (mean age 55 ± 11) with EBC treated with trastuzumab between January 2008 and June 2009 at 10 Italian institutions were followed-up for 1 year. We evaluated incidence, time of occurrence, clinical features associated with CHF. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was evaluated by echocardiography at baseline and 3, 6, 9and 12 months during trastuzumab therapy. CHF occurred in 16 patients (3.2%), who were older, more hypertensive and with a higher degree of hypertension in comparison with patients who did not have CHF. All CHF patients had a significant reduction in LVEF with a mean peak of -12 points % detected at 3-month follow-up. CHF occurred in seven patients (44%) within 3-month follow-up, in four patients (25%) between 3-6 months, in three patients (19%) between 6-9 months and in two patients (12%) between 9 and 12 months. Trastuzumab was discontinued in 10 of 16 patients and re-started in five after LVEF recovery and clinical improvement. New onset CHF was predicted by the presence of hypertension [OR 2.9 (CI 1.1-7.9]). New onset CHF occurs seldom in HER2-positive women with EBC, prevalently in the first 6 months of therapy. CHF is associated with a significant reduction in LVEF and is predicted by a history of hypertension.

  8. An approach to heart failure and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonarow, Gregg C

    2005-08-22

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic progressive disease that results in microvascular and macrovascular complications. Diabetes is a significant independent risk factor for heart failure, and there are a substantial number of patients with diabetes and heart failure. Neurohormonal activation plays an important pathophysiologic role in insulin resistance, diabetes, cardiovascular events, and progression of heart failure. Pharmacologic intervention in these neurohormonal systems (ie, angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibition, aldosterone antagonism, and beta-adrenergic blockade) has been shown to decrease the morbidity and mortality of diabetes and of heart failure. Despite this knowledge, ACE inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists, and beta-blockers are grossly underutilized, and deaths and hospitalizations due to heart failure have steadily increased. Guidelines for the management of heart failure recommend the use of ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers in patients with mild, moderate, and severe heart failure with or without diabetes. Aldosterone antagonists are recommended in severe heart failure and recent data also support their use in mild to moderate heart failure. Concerns about increased incidence of hypoglycemia, worsening dyslipidemia, and decreased insulin sensitivity with beta-blockers may be preventing physicians from prescribing these agents for their patients with diabetes who have heart failure. Beta-blockade, in conjunction with ACE inhibition and aldosterone antagonism, should be standard therapy for all patients with diabetes and heart failure. Furthermore, every effort should be made to ensure that eligible patients are treated with these evidence-based, guideline-recommended, life-prolonging therapies.

  9. Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia on Sleep-Related Cognitions Among Patients With Stable Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeker, Nancy S; Jeon, Sangchoon; Andrews, Laura; Cline, John; Mohsenin, Vahid; Jacoby, Daniel

    2017-07-26

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) improves insomnia and fatigue among chronic heart failure (HF) patients, but the extent to which sleep-related cognitions explain CBT-I outcomes in these patients is unknown. We examined the effects of CBT-I on sleep-related cognitions, associations between changes in sleep-related cognitions and changes in sleep and symptoms after CBT-I, and the extent to which cognitions mediated the effects of CBT-I. Stable New York Heart Association Class II-III HF patients (total n = 51; n = 26 or 51.0% women; M age = 59.1 ± 15.1 years). HF patients were randomized in groups to group CBT-I (n = 30) or attention control (HF self-management education, n = 21) and completed actigraphy, the Insomnia Severity Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep (DBAS) and Sleep Disturbance Questionnaires (SDQ), and self-reported fatigue, depression, anxiety, and sleepiness (baseline, immediately after treatment, six months). We used mixed-effects modeling, mediation analysis with a bootstrapping approach, and Pearson correlations. There was a statistically significant group × mult time effect on DBAS. DBAS mediated the effects of CBT-I on insomnia severity and partially mediated CBT-I effects on fatigue. Improvements in dysfunctional cognitions were associated with improved sleep quality, insomnia severity, sleep latency and decreased fatigue, depression, and anxiety, with sustained effects at six months. Improvement in dysfunctional sleep-related cognitions is an important mechanism for CBT-I effects among HF patients who are especially vulnerable to poor sleep and high symptom burden.

  10. Heart failure with mid-range ejection fraction: a distinct clinical entity? Insights from the Trial of Intensified versus standard Medical therapy in Elderly patients with Congestive Heart Failure (TIME-CHF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickenbacher, Peter; Kaufmann, Beat A; Maeder, Micha T; Bernheim, Alain; Goetschalckx, Kaatje; Pfister, Otmar; Pfisterer, Matthias; Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter

    2017-03-15

    While the conditions of heart failure (HF) with reduced (HFrEF, LVEF CHF) comprising a population with established HF including the whole spectrum of LVEF. Of the 622 patients, 108 (17%) were classified as having HFmrEF. This group was in general found to be 'intermediate' regarding clinical characteristics with a comparable and high burden of comorbidities and equally impaired quality of life but was more likely to have coronary artery disease as compared with the HFpEF group. During a median follow-up of 794 days, mortality was 39.7% without significant differences between groups. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP)-guided as compared with standard therapy resulted in improved survival free of HF hospitalizations in HFrEF and HFmrEF, but not in HFpEF. Although the 'intermediate' clinical profile of HFmrEF between HFrEF and HFpEF would support the conclusion that HFmrEF is a distinct clinical entity, we hypothesize that HFmrEF has to be categorized as HFrEF because of the high prevalence of coronary artery disease and the similar benefit of NT-proBNP-guided therapy in HFrEF and HFmrEF, in contrast to HFpEF. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  11. Vasopressin and Vasopressin Antagonists in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vishram-Nielsen, Julie K; Gustafsson, Finn

    2017-01-01

    Despite the introduction of multiple new pharmacological agents over the past three decades in the field of heart failure (HF), overall prognosis remains poor. Hyponatremia is prevalent in HF patients and has been suggested as a contributor to poor response to standard therapy. Elevated levels...... by the V2 receptors in the renal collecting tubules. The optimal use of VRAs is yet to be determined, especially in patients with congestive HF. Although long-term effects on improvement in mortality have not been shown in the Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonism in Heart Failure Outcome Study with Tolvaptan...

  12. Diuretics in heart failure: practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basraon, Jagroop; Deedwani, Prakash C

    2012-09-01

    This review discusses the role of diuretics in heart failure by focusing on different classifications and mechanisms of action. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of diuretics are elucidated. The predominant discussion highlights the use of loop diuretics, which are the most commonly used drugs in heart failure. Different methods of using this therapy in different settings along with a comprehensive review of the side-effect profile are highlighted. Special situations necessitating adjustment and the phenomenon of diuretic resistance are explained. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Understand Your Risk for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Causes and Risks for Heart Failure Updated:Feb 13,2018 Who Develops Heart Failure ( ... HF. This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  14. Effects of nocturnal oxygen therapy in patients with chronic heart failure and central sleep apnea: CHF-HOT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Yoko M; Ueshima, Kenji; Yasuno, Shinji; Sasayama, Shigetake

    2016-02-01

    It was previously reported that nocturnal home oxygen therapy (HOT) significantly improved not only sleep disordered breathing (SDB), but also quality of life (QOL) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in two trials. To strengthen the statistical reliability of the above efficacies of HOT and to assess the effects of 12-week nocturnal HOT on suppression of ventricular arrhythmias, we combined the two trials and undertook a post hoc analysis. Ninety-seven patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and central sleep apnea were assigned to receive HOT (45 patients) or not (52 patients). HOT resulted in greater reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (-11.4 ± 11.0 vs. -0.2 ± 7.6 events/h, p III and AHI >20 events/h, PVC was significantly improved by HOT with a marked reduction in AHI and a substantial increase in LVEF. In conclusion, among patients with CHF and CSA, HOT improves SDB, QOL, and cardiac function. The effectiveness of HOT for ventricular arrhythmias was not observed in the overall analysis, but only in a limited number of patients with severe CHF and SDB. To clarify the effects of HOT on ventricular arrhythmias in patients with CHF and SDB, a further study is needed.

  15. Advanced Interatrial Block Predicts New Onset Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Severe Heart Failure and Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq Ali, Fariha; Enriquez, Andres; Conde, Diego; Redfearn, Damian; Michael, Kevin; Simpson, Christopher; Abdollah, Hoshiar; Bayés de Luna, Antoni; Hopman, Wilma; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2015-11-01

    Advanced interatrial block (aIAB) on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG), defined as a P-wave duration ≥120 milliseconds with biphasic (±) morphology in inferior leads, is frequently associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). The aim of this study was to determine whether preoperative aIAB could predict new-onset AF in patients with severe congestive heart failure (CHF) requiring cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with CHF and no prior history of AF undergoing CRT for standard indications. A baseline 12-lead ECG was obtained prior to device implantation and analyzed for the presence of aIAB. ECGs were scanned at 300 DPI and maximized 8×. Semiautomatic calipers were used to determine P-wave onset and offset. The primary outcome was the occurrence of AF identified through analyses of intracardiac electrograms on routine device follow-up. Ninety-seven patients were included (74.2% male, left atrial diameter 45.5 ± 7.8 mm, 63% ischemic). Mean P-wave duration was 138.5 ± 18.5 milliseconds and 37 patients (38%) presented aIAB at baseline. Over a mean follow-up of 32 ± 18 months, AF was detected in 29 patients (30%) and the incidence was greater in patients with aIAB compared to those without it (62% vs 28%; P CHF undergoing CRT. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Impact of statin therapy on all-cause mortality and ICD interventions in heart failure patients - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazoukis, George; Papadatos, Stamatis S; Letsas, Konstantinos P; Pagkalidou, Eirini; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2017-10-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) have a unique role for the primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD). The aim of our systematic review is to present the existing data about the impact of statins on all-cause mortality and ICD interventions in heart failure (HF) patients who had an ICD implanted either for primary or for secondary prevention of SCD. We searched PubMed database and the reference list of the relevant studies for retrieving studies evaluating the effect of statins on all-cause mortality and ICD interventions in HF patients. We finally included 17 relevant studies in our systematic review. Of them, nine studies included data about the impact of statins on all-cause mortality, eight studies about the impact of statins on appropriate ICD interventions and three studies about the impact of statins on inappropriate ICD interventions in HF patients. These data showed that statins seem to have a beneficial role in the reduction of all-cause mortality and ICD interventions in HF patients. Statins seem to have a beneficial role in the reduction of all-cause mortality and ICD interventions in HF patients. However, further research about pleiotropic effects of statins is needed as well randomized control trials to elucidate the exact role of statin therapy in ICD outcomes.

  17. Image-guided left ventricular lead placement in cardiac resynchronization therapy for patients with heart failure: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Mao, Jia-Liang; He, Ben

    2015-05-10

    Heart failure (HF) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of people worldwide. One means of treating HF is cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Recently, several studies have examined the use of echocardiography (ECHO) in the optimization of left ventricular (LV) lead placement to increase the response to CRT. The objective of this study was to synthesize the available data on the comparative efficacy of image-guided and standard CRT. We searched the PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases through April 2014 with the following combinations of search terms: left ventricular lead placement, cardiac resynchronization therapy, image-guided, and echocardiography-guided. Studies meeting all of the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome measures were CRT response rate, change in LV ejection fraction (LVEF), and change in LV end systolic volume (LVESV). Secondary outcomes included the rates of all-cause mortality and HF-related hospitalization. Our search identified 103 articles, 3 of which were included in the analysis. In total, 270 patients were randomized to the image-guided CRT and 241, to the standard CRT. The pooled estimates showed a significant benefit for image-guided CRT (CRT response: OR, 2.098, 95 % CI, 1.432-3.072; LVEF: difference in means, 3.457, 95 % CI, 1.910-5.005; LVESV: difference in means, -20.36, 95 % CI, -27.819 - -12.902). Image-guided CRT produced significantly better clinical outcomes than the standard CRT. Additional trials are warranted to validate the use of imaging in the prospective optimization of CRT.

  18. Advanced heart failure and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddam, Krishna K; Yelamanchili, Pridhvi; Sedghi, Yabiz; Ventura, Hector O

    2009-01-01

    The global healthcare burden attributable to heart failure is ever increasing. Patients presenting with refractory heart failure should be evaluated for compliance with medical regimens and sodium and/or fluid restriction, and every attempt should be made to optimize conventional strategies. Reversible causes such as ischemia should be identified and revascularization considered in persistently symptomatic patients, particularly those with a viable myocardium. Carefully selected patients who continue to deteriorate clinically in spite of optimization of medical therapy may be considered for advanced treatment strategies, such as continuous inotropic infusions, mechanical circulatory support devices, cardiac transplantation, or referral to hospice care. We discuss the clinical presentation and management of patients with advanced/refractory (Stage D) heart failure.

  19. Mitochondrial function as a therapeutic target in heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David A.; Perry, Justin B.; Allen, Mitchell E.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Stauffer, Brian L.; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Cleland, John G. F.; Colucci, Wilson S.; Butler, Javed; Voors, Adriaan A.; Anker, Stefan D.; Pitt, Bertram; Pieske, Burkert; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Greene, Stephen J.; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure is a pressing worldwide public-health problem with millions of patients having worsening heart failure. Despite all the available therapies, the condition carries a very poor prognosis. Existing therapies provide symptomatic and clinical benefit, but do not fully address molecular abnormalities that occur in cardiomyocytes. This shortcoming is particularly important given that most patients with heart failure have viable dysfunctional myocardium, in which an improvement or normalization of function might be possible. Although the pathophysiology of heart failure is complex, mitochondrial dysfunction seems to be an important target for therapy to improve cardiac function directly. Mitochondrial abnormalities include impaired mitochondrial electron transport chain activity, increased formation of reactive oxygen species, shifted metabolic substrate utilization, aberrant mitochondrial dynamics, and altered ion homeostasis. In this Consensus Statement, insights into the mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure are presented, along with an overview of emerging treatments with the potential to improve the function of the failing heart by targeting mitochondria. PMID:28004807

  20. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  1. Targeted anticytokine therapy in patients with chronic heart failure: results of the Randomized Etanercept Worldwide Evaluation (RENEWAL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Douglas L; McMurray, John J V; Packer, Milton

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies in experimental models and preliminary clinical experience suggested a possible therapeutic role for the soluble tumor necrosis factor antagonist etanercept in heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with New York Heart Association class II to IV chronic heart failure...... and a left ventricular ejection fraction etanercept used. In RECOVER, patients received placebo (n=373) or subcutaneous etanercept in doses of 25 mg every week (n=375) or 25 mg twice per week (n=375). In RENAISSANCE, patients...... received placebo (n=309), etanercept 25 mg twice per week (n=308), or etanercept 25 mg 3 times per week (n=308). The primary end point of each individual trial was clinical status at 24 weeks. Analysis of the effect of the 2 higher doses of etanercept on the combined outcome of death or hospitalization due...

  2. Angiotensin inhibition in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John JV Mcmurray

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Survival in patients with heart failure remains very poor, and is worse than that for most common cancers, including bowel cancer in men and breast cancer in women. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is not completely blocked by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibition. Blockade of the RAAS at the AT1-receptor has the theoretical benefit of more effective blockade of the actions of angiotensin II. ACE inhibitors (ACE-Is prevent the breakdown of bradykinin: this has been blamed for some of the unwanted effects of ACE-Is although bradykinin may have advantageous effects in heart failure. Consequently, ACE-Is and ARBs might be complementary or even additive treatments; recent trials have tested these hypotheses. The Candesartan in Heart failure Assessment of Reduction in Mortality and morbidity (CHARM programme compared the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB candesartan (target dose 32 mg once daily to placebo in three distinct but complementary populations of patients with symptomatic heart failure. These were: patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF who were ACE-I-intolerant (CHARM-Alternative; patients with reduced LVEF who were being treated with ACE-Is (CHARM-Added; and patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function (CHARM-Preserved. There were substantial and statistically significant reductions in the primary composite end point (risk of cardiovascular death or hospital admission for heart failure in CHARM-Alternative. This was also the case in CHARM-Added, supporting and extending the findings of Val-HeFT. In CHARM-Preserved, the effect of candesartan on the primary end point did not reach conventional statistical significance though hospital admission for heart failure was reduced significantly with candesartan. In the CHARM-Overall programme there was a statistically borderline reduction in all-cause mortality with a clear reduction in cardiovascular mortality. All-cause mortality was

  3. Angiotensin inhibition in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John JV McMurray

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Survival in patients with heart failure remains very poor, and is worse than that for most common cancers, including bowel cancer in men and breast cancer in women. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is not completely blocked by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibition. Blockade of the RAAS at the AT1-receptor has the theoretical benefit of more effective blockade of the actions of angiotensin II. ACE inhibitors (ACE-Is prevent the breakdown of bradykinin: this has been blamed for some of the unwanted effects of ACE-Is although bradykinin may have advantageous effects in heart failure. Consequently, ACE-Is and ARBs might be complementary or even additive treatments; recent trials have tested these hypotheses.The Candesartan in Heart failure Assessment of Reduction in Mortality and morbidity (CHARM programme compared the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB candesartan (target dose 32 mg once daily to placebo in three distinct but complementary populations of patients with symptomatic heart failure. These were: patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF who were ACE-I-intolerant (CHARM-Alternative; patients with reduced LVEF who were being treated with ACE-Is (CHARM-Added; and patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function (CHARM-Preserved.There were substantial and statistically significant reductions in the primary composite end point (risk of cardiovascular death or hospital admission for heart failure in CHARM-Alternative. This was also the case in CHARM-Added, supporting and extending the findings of Val-HeFT. In CHARM-Preserved, the effect of candesartan on the primary end point did not reach conventional statistical significance though hospital admission for heart failure was reduced significantly with candesartan. In the CHARM-Overall programme there was a statistically borderline reduction in all-cause mortality with a clear reduction in cardiovascular mortality. All-cause mortality was

  4. Mechanisms of Heart Failure in Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Ebong, Imo A.; Goff, David C.; Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Chen, Haiying; Bertoni, Alain G.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and its prevalence continues to rise. Because obesity has been linked with heart failure, the increasing prevalence of obesity may presage further rise in heart failure in the future. Obesity-related factors are estimated to cause 11% of heart failure cases in men and 14% in women. Obesity may result in heart failure by inducing hemodynamic and myocardial changes that lead to cardiac dysfunction, or due to an increased predisposition...

  5. Heart failure etiology impacts survival of patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecini, Redi; Møller, Daniel Vega; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of heart failure (HF) etiology on prognosis of HF is not well known. METHODS: 3078 patients (median age 75years, 61% male) hospitalized with HF were studied. Patients were classified into six etiology groups: hypertension (HTN, 13.9%), ischemic heart disease (IHD, 42...... risk, HR 1.71 (CI: 1.3-2.2, p/=30% (HR 1.3, CI: 1.0-1.5, p=0.03), compared to the reference (p-value for interaction...

  6. A case of peripartum heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Vinci

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old woman was admitted in congestive heart failure (CHF 3 days after delivery. She had no history of cardiovascular disease and impaired left ventricular Ejection Fraction (EF 35%. She underwent complete heart catheterisation, selective coronary angiography and right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy (EMB.Coronary arteries were normal and EMB revealed active virus negative myocarditis. Serum was positive for anti-heart autoantibodies (AHA. Thus myocarditis was classified as autoimmune and the patient was treated with immunosuppressive therapy, with clinical and hemodynamic improvement. At 27 months follow-up EMB showed healed myocarditis. Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a rare disorder in which left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure occur in the peripartum period in previously healthy women. The etiology is still unknown but a sizable proportion of patients may have an underlying organ-specific autoimmune myocarditis.

  7. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E. Dale

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin resistant states such as type 2 diabetes and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead (FOXO) transcriptional signaling or glucose transport which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed. PMID:27034277

  8. Stromal Vascular Fraction Transplantation as an Alternative Therapy for Ischemic Heart Failure: Anti-inflammatory Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Xue

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were: (1 to show the feasibility of using adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF as an alternative to bone marrow mono nuclear cell (BM-MNC for cell transplantation into chronic ischemic myocardium; and (2 to explore underlying mechanisms with focus on anti-inflammation role of engrafted SVF and BM-MNC post chronic myocardial infarction (MI against left ventricular (LV remodelling and cardiac dysfunction. Methods Four weeks after left anterior descending coronary artery ligation, 32 Male Lewis rats with moderate MI were divided into 3 groups. SVF group (n = 12 had SVF cell transplantation (6 × 106 cells. BM-MNC group (n = 12 received BM-MNCs (6 × 106 and the control (n = 10 had culture medium. At 4 weeks, after the final echocardiography, histological sections were stained with Styrus red and immunohistochemical staining was performed for α-smooth muscle actin, von Willebrand factor, CD3, CD8 and CD20. Results At 4 weeks, in SVF and BM-MNC groups, LV diastolic dimension and LV systolic dimension were smaller and fractional shortening was increased in echocardiography, compared to control group. Histology revealed highest vascular density, CD3+ and CD20+ cells in SVF transplanted group. SVF transplantation decreased myocardial mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, MMP-1, TIMP-1 and inhibited collagen deposition. Conclusions Transplantation of adipose derived SVF cells might be a useful therapeutic option for angiogenesis in chronic ischemic heart disease. Anti-inflammation role for SVF and BM transplantation might partly benefit for the cardioprotective effect for chronic ischemic myocardium.

  9. Heart failure - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests to check how well your heart was working. What to Expect at Home Your energy will slowly return. You may need ... erection problems without checking first. Make sure your home is set up to be safe and easy ... appointments at your provider's office. You will likely need to have certain lab ...

  10. Epicardial catheter-based ventricular reconstruction: a novel therapy for ischaemic heart failure with anteroapical aneurysm†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanping; Aboodi, Michael S.; Wechsler, Andrew S.; Kaluza, Greg L.; Granada, Juan F.; Van Bladel, Kevin; Annest, Lon S.; Yi, Geng-Hua

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Surgical ventricular reconstruction has been used to treat ischaemic cardiomyopathy with large akinetic or dyskinetic areas. However, application of this approach requires a sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass and a left ventriculotomy. This study assessed the feasibility and efficacy of minimally invasive, off-pump, epicardial catheter-based ventricular reconstruction (ECVR) in an anteroapical aneurysm ovine model. METHODS Left ventricular (LV) anteroapical myocardial infarction was induced percutaneously by coil embolization of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Eight weeks after infarction, via mini left thoracotomy and without cardiopulmonary bypass, ECVR was performed in six sheep. The scar was excluded by placing anchor pairs on the LV epicardial anterior wall and the right ventricular side of the interventricular septum under fluoroscopic guidance. LV performance was evaluated before, immediately after device implantation and after 6 weeks by echocardiography. Terminal histopathology was performed. RESULTS ECVR was completed expeditiously in all animals without complications. Parameters obtained 6 weeks after device implantation were compared with baseline (pre-device). End-systolic volume was decreased by 38% (25.6 ± 6.1 ml vs baseline 41.2 ± 7.2 ml, P = 0.02) with preservation of stroke volume. Ejection fraction was significantly increased by 13% (48.5 ± 7% vs baseline 35.8 ± 7%, P = 0.02). The circumferential strain in the anterior septum (−7.67 ± 5.12% vs baseline −0.96 ± 2.22%, P = 0.03) and anterior wall (−9.01 ± 3.51% vs baseline −4.15 ± 1.36%, P = 0.01) were significantly improved. The longitudinal strain in apex was reversed (−3.08 ± 1.53% vs baseline 3.09 ± 3.39%, P = 0.01). Histopathology showed full endocardial healing over the anchors with appreciable reduction of the chronic infarct in the LV. CONCLUSIONS ECVR without cardiopulmonary bypass is a less invasive alternative to current standard therapies

  11. Epicardial catheter-based ventricular reconstruction: a novel therapy for ischaemic heart failure with anteroapical aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanping; Aboodi, Michael S; Wechsler, Andrew S; Kaluza, Greg L; Granada, Juan F; Van Bladel, Kevin; Annest, Lon S; Yi, Geng-Hua

    2013-12-01

    Surgical ventricular reconstruction has been used to treat ischaemic cardiomyopathy with large akinetic or dyskinetic areas. However, application of this approach requires a sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass and a left ventriculotomy. This study assessed the feasibility and efficacy of minimally invasive, off-pump, epicardial catheter-based ventricular reconstruction (ECVR) in an anteroapical aneurysm ovine model. Left ventricular (LV) anteroapical myocardial infarction was induced percutaneously by coil embolization of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Eight weeks after infarction, via mini left thoracotomy and without cardiopulmonary bypass, ECVR was performed in six sheep. The scar was excluded by placing anchor pairs on the LV epicardial anterior wall and the right ventricular side of the interventricular septum under fluoroscopic guidance. LV performance was evaluated before, immediately after device implantation and after 6 weeks by echocardiography. Terminal histopathology was performed. ECVR was completed expeditiously in all animals without complications. Parameters obtained 6 weeks after device implantation were compared with baseline (pre-device). End-systolic volume was decreased by 38% (25.6 ± 6.1 ml vs baseline 41.2 ± 7.2 ml, P = 0.02) with preservation of stroke volume. Ejection fraction was significantly increased by 13% (48.5 ± 7% vs baseline 35.8 ± 7%, P = 0.02). The circumferential strain in the anterior septum (-7.67 ± 5.12% vs baseline -0.96 ± 2.22%, P = 0.03) and anterior wall (-9.01 ± 3.51% vs baseline -4.15 ± 1.36%, P = 0.01) were significantly improved. The longitudinal strain in apex was reversed (-3.08 ± 1.53% vs baseline 3.09 ± 3.39%, P = 0.01). Histopathology showed full endocardial healing over the anchors with appreciable reduction of the chronic infarct in the LV. ECVR without cardiopulmonary bypass is a less invasive alternative to current standard therapies, reverses LV remodelling and improves cardiac

  12. [Clinical trials on heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosín Aguilar, J; Hernándiz Martínez, A

    2001-01-01

    n 1987 the results of the Consensus study were published, and showed that enalapril, an angiotensin convertor enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), was able to modify the clinical course of the heart failure syndrome thereby reducing mortality. Other ACEI later demonstrated the same effect on the different degrees of symptomatic heart failure, left ventricular dysfunction, myocardial infarction and more recently in diabetic patients. In 1996 studies on the betablockers carvedilol, bisoprolol and metoprolol showed their efficacy in reducing deaths due to progressive heart impairment and sudden death in chronic heart failure. The RALES study showed that small doses of spironolactone also improved the prognosis on this disease. Digital improves the quality of life but not the survival rate. Only amiodarone (among the antiarrhythmics) reduces sudden death. Other drugs and groups of drugs can not be considered for chronic outpatient treatment of heart failure. Multicenter trials make it possible to obtain scientific evidence for establishing rational treatments. Many groups of patients such as women, elderly people and the more severe cases of the disease are often not included in these trials. Occasionally, multicenter trials are badly designed (CIBIS and MCD), which in the case of betablockers, led to a substantial delay in their administration. Other times, as in the ELITE study, the results were badly interpreted. The knowledge obtained from these studies is slow in reaching patients, with few patients taking betablockers. It is known that most patients do not take the doses found to be effective in multicenter trials.

  13. Efeitos do tartarato de metoprolol em pacientes portadores de insuficiência cardíaca Effects of metoprolol tartrate therapy in patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Albuquerque de Figueiredo Neto

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar os efeitos do tartarato de metoprolol em pacientes portadores de insuficiência cardíaca. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados em estudo prospectivo, 50 pacientes (36 homens com insuficiência cardíaca, classe funcional II a IV, com 52±14,8 anos, e fração de ejeção do ventrículo esquerdo (FEVE 0,05. A freqüência cardíaca apresentou redução de 78,84±batimentos por minuto para 67,48±1,86 batimentos por minuto (pOBJECTIVE: To study the effects of metoprolol tartrate therapy in patients with heart failure. METHODS: Fifty patients (36 males aged 52±14.8 yrs, with functional class II to IV heart failure (HF and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVFE 0.05. Cardiac frequency decreased from 78.84±1.68 to 67.48±1.86 b.p.m. (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: The adding of metoprolol tartrate to the usual heart failure therapy is followed by an increase of ejection fraction, functional class improvement, and decrease of ventricular diameters and cardiac frequency. These results suggest anti-remodeling effects in patients with HF who utilize metoprolol tartrate in addition to the usual therapy.

  14. Risk of defibrillation threshold testing in severe heart failure patient: A case of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT-D with acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiko Nakai, MD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Defibrillation threshold (DFT testing is usually recommended after device implantation to confirm appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD/cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D function [1,2]. However, induction of ventricular fibrillation may result in hemodynamic compromise, and cardioversion itself may cause myocardial injury [3,4]. We report on a CRT-D patient with acute myocardial infarction who died due to multiple organ failure 1 day after DFT testing. Our case emphasizes the importance of deciding whether DFT testing should be performed for patients with very severe heart failure in the acute stage of myocardial infarction.

  15. Heart Failure in Pediatric Patients With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Robert B; Ware, Stephanie M

    2017-03-17

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome resulting from diverse primary and secondary causes and shared pathways of disease progression, correlating with substantial mortality, morbidity, and cost. HF in children is most commonly attributable to coexistent congenital heart disease, with different risks depending on the specific type of malformation. Current management and therapy for HF in children are extrapolated from treatment approaches in adults. This review discusses the causes, epidemiology, and manifestations of HF in children with congenital heart disease and presents the clinical, genetic, and molecular characteristics that are similar or distinct from adult HF. The objective of this review is to provide a framework for understanding rapidly increasing genetic and molecular information in the challenging context of detailed phenotyping. We review clinical and translational research studies of HF in congenital heart disease including at the genome, transcriptome, and epigenetic levels. Unresolved issues and directions for future study are presented. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Effect of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy on Myocardial Fibrosis and Relevant Cytokines in a Canine Model With Experimental Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingfeng; Gong, Xue; Chen, Haiyan; Qin, Shengmei; Zhou, Nianwei; Su, Yangang; Ge, Junbo

    2017-04-01

    Though cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has now proved to be effective on cardiac reverse remodeling, data on the underlying molecular changes are limited. The present study aims to investigate the expression of cytokines concerning myocardial fibrosis in dyssynchronous heart failure (HF) and the potential benefits of CRT. Left bundle branch ablation and rapid pacing was performed to induce a canine model of asynchronous HF. Animals were randomly divided into sham group, HF control group, and CRT group. Echocardiographic data including septum-to-posterior wall motion delay (SPWMD) and standard deviation of the time to peak systolic velocity (Ts-SD) were collected. Histologic samples from lateral left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) free wall were analyzed and compared among different groups. Serum concentrations of NT-proBNP, TGF-β1 , and osteopontin (OPN) were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Protein and mRNA expressions of TGF-β1 /Smad and OPN from myocardial tissues were also detected and compared. CRT improved cardiac function and corrected intraventricular dyssynchrony with increased LV ejection fraction (LVEF) and decreased SPWMD and Ts-SD (P < 0.05). Histological analysis showed that CRT restored cardiomyocyte diameter (from 4.50 to 6.08 μm) and collagen volume fraction (from 19.33% to 11.21%) of LV (P < 0.01), but had little effect on RV. Serum TGF-β1 and OPN level were also reversed toward normal level after CRT (P < 0.05). Compared with sham group, a significantly higher protein and mRNA expressions of TGF-β1 /Smad and OPN were observed in HF control group, which were significantly downregulated in CRT group (P < 0.01). By means of coordinating LV dyssynchrony, cellular and molecular reverse remodeling relevant to fibrosis inhibition could also be invoked by CRT. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Protocol-driven remote monitoring of cardiac resynchronization therapy as part of a heart failure disease management strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Christophe J P; Verbrugge, Frederik H; Vranken, Julie; Van der Auwera, Jo; Mullens, Wilfried; Dupont, Matthias; Grieten, Lars; De Cannière, Hélène; Lanssens, Dorien; Vandenberk, Thijs; Storms, Valerie; Thijs, Inge M; Vandervoort, Pieter

    2017-08-14

    Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is an established treatment for heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction. CRT devices are equipped with remote monitoring functions, which are pivotal in the detection of device problems, but may also facilitate disease management. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive overview of the clinical interventions taken based on remote monitoring. This is a single centre observational study of consecutive CRT patients (n = 192) participating in protocol-driven remote follow-up. Incoming technical- and disease-related alerts were analysed together with subsequently triggered interventions. During 34 ± 13 months of follow-up, 1372 alert-containing notifications were received (2.53 per patient-year of follow-up), comprising 1696 unique alerts (3.12 per patient-year of follow-up). In 60%, notifications resulted in a phone contact. Technical alerts constituted 8% of incoming alerts (0.23 per patient-year of follow-up). Rhythm (1.43 per patient-year of follow-up) and bioimpedance alerts (0.98 per patient-year of follow-up) were the most frequent disease-related alerts. Notifications included a rhythm alert in 39%, which triggered referral to the emergency room (4%), outpatient cardiology clinic (36%) or general practitioner (7%), or resulted in medication changes (13%). Sole bioimpedance notifications resulted in a telephone contact in 91%, which triggered outpatient evaluation in 8% versus medication changes in 10%. Clinical outcome was excellent with 97% 1-year survival. Remote CRT follow-up resulted in 0.23 technical- versus 2.64 disease-related alerts annually. Rhythm and bioimpedance notifications constituted the majority of incoming notifications which triggered an actual intervention in 22% and 15% of cases, respectively.

  18. Gender, underutilization of cardiac resynchronization therapy, and prognostic impact of QRS prolongation and left bundle branch block in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Cecilia; Ståhlberg, Marcus; Benson, Lina; Braunschweig, Frieder; Edner, Magnus; Dahlström, Ulf; Alehagen, Urban; Lund, Lars H

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is less utilized, dyssynchrony occurs at narrower QRS, and CRT is more beneficial in women compared with men. We tested the hypotheses that (i) CRT is more underutilized and (ii) QRS prolongation and left bundle branch block (LBBB) are more harmful in women. We studied 14 713 patients (28% women) with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <40% in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry. In women vs. men, CRT was present in 4 vs. 7% (P < 0.001) and was absent but with indication in 30 vs. 31% (P = 0.826). Next, among 13 782 patients (28% women) without CRT, 9% of women and 17% of men had non-specific intraventricular conduction delay (IVCD) and 27% of women and 24% of men had LBBB. One-year survival with narrow QRS was 85% in women and 88% in men, with IVCD 74 and 78%, and with LBBB 84 and 82%, respectively. Compared with narrow QRS, IVCD had a multivariable hazard ratio of 1.24 (95% CI 1.05-1.46, P = 0.011) in women and 1.30 (95% CI 1.19-1.42, P < 0.001) in men, and LBBB 1.03 (95% CI 0.91-1.16, P = 0.651) in women and 1.16 (95% CI 1.07-1.26, P < 0.001) in men, P for interaction between gender and QRS morphology, 0.241. While the proportion with CRT was lower in women, CRT was equally underutilized in both genders. QRS prolongation with or without LBBB was not more harmful in women than in men. Efforts to improve CRT implementation should be directed equally towards women and men. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Cardiac function after CPAP therapy in patients with chronic heart failure and sleep apnea: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Carlos J; Aizpuru, Felipe; Pinto, Jose A; Ayuela, Jose M; Ballester, Eugeni; Zamarrón, Carlos; Sojo, Agustín; Montserrat, Josep M; Barbe, Ferran; Alonso-Gomez, Angel Ma; Rubio, Ramon; Lobo, Jose L; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Zorrilla, Vanessa; Nuñez, Renny; Cortés, Julia; Jiménez, Antonio; Cifrián, Jose; Ortega, Mónica; Carpizo, Rosario; Sánchez, Antonio; Terán, Joaquin; Iglesias, Luis; Fernández, Carmen; Alonso, Mari Luz; Cordero, Jose; Roig, Eulalia; Pérez, Felix; Muxi, Africa; Gude, Francisco; Amaro, Antonio; Calvo, Uxio; Masa, Juan F; Utrabo, Isabel; Porras, Yolanda; Lanchas, Isabel; Sánchez, Esther

    2008-08-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective treatment for sleep apnea (SA), although the evidence for improving chronic heart failure (CHF) is inconclusive. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of CPAP treatment on the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) among other cardiological variables in a randomized, multicenter, placebo (sham-CPAP)-controlled study. After the selection procedure, 60 patients with CHF with LVEF10/h were evaluated at baseline, and after 3 months of treatment with optimal CPAP or sham-CPAP. The assessment was based on the LVEF, hypertension, daytime sleepiness (Epworth sleepiness scale [ESS]), quality of life (SF-36), New York Heart Scale (NYHA score), dyspnea (by using the Borg scale) and exercise tolerance (6-min walk test). The mean AHI was normalized in the optimal CPAP group but not in the sham-CPAP group. The LVEF showed a significant improvement in the group of patients treated with CPAP (2.5; 95% CI: 0.6 to 4.3), which was not observed in the sham-CPAP group (0.0; 95% CI: -2.1 to 2.1). However, the change in the LVEF from baseline to 3 months was not significantly greater in the whole group (obstructive and Cheyne-Stokes events) treated with CPAP than in the control group (p: 0.07). In patients with only obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), who account for 83% of the total population, there was a significant improvement in the LVEF in the group of patients treated with CPAP but no such improvement in the sham-CPAP group. In this OSA group, the change in the LVEF from baseline to 3 months was significantly greater in the group treated with CPAP than in the sham-CPAP group (p: 0.03). The other variables studied were not modified. When the patients were divided according to the severity of the LVEF (a LVEF cut-off of 30%), improvement was observed in those with a LVEF>30. No changes were found in the other cardiological variables. CPAP therapy proved to be useful in patients with associated sleep-disordered breathing and CHF

  20. CPAP in chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic Heart Failure (CHF represents worldwide a clinical condition with increasing prevalence, high social, economical and epidemiological impact. Even if new pharmacological and non-pharmacological approachs have been recently used, mortality remains high in general population and quality of life is poor in these patients. DISCUSSION The association between CHF and sleep disorders is frequent but still undervalued: sleep apnoeas in CHF produce negative effects on cardiovascular system and an aggravation of prognosis. CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure is commonly used to treat sleep apnoeas in patients without cardiac involvement and it is also used in first line treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema thanks to its hemodynamic and ventilatory effects. The addition of nightly CPAP to standard aggressive medical therapy in patients with CHF and sleep apnoeas reduces the number of apnoeas, reduces the blood pressure, and the respiratory and cardiac rate, reduces the activation of sympathetic nervous system, the left ventricular volume and the hospitalization rate; besides CPAP increases the left ventricular ejection fraction, amd the oxygenation, it improves quality of life, tolerance to exercise and seems to reduce mortality in patients with a higher apnoeas suppression. CONCLUSIONS These implications suggest to investigate sleep apnoeas in patients with CHF in order to consider a possible treatment with CPAP. Further studies need to be developed to confirm the use of CPAP in patients with CHF without sleep disorders.

  1. Effects of intravenous iron therapy in iron-deficient patients with systolic heart failure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Ewa A; Tkaczyszyn, Michał; Suchocki, Tomasz; Drozd, Marcin; von Haehling, Stephan; Doehner, Wolfram; Banasiak, Waldemar; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anker, Stefan D; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the net clinical and prognostic effects of intravenous (i.v.) iron therapy in patients with systolic heart failure (HF) and iron deficiency (ID). We performed an aggregate data meta-analysis (random effects model) of randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of i.v. iron therapy in iron-deficient patients with systolic HF. We searched electronic databases up to September 2014. We identified five trials which fulfilled the inclusion criteria (509 patients received i.v. iron therapy in comparison with 342 controls). Intravenous iron therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of the combined endpoint of all-cause death or cardiovascular hospitalization [odds ratio (OR) 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.30-0.64, P Intravenous iron therapy resulted in a reduction in NYHA class (data are reported as a mean net effect with 95% CIs for all continuous variables) (-0.54 class, 95% CI -0.87 to -0.21, P = 0.001); an increase in 6-min walking test distance (+31 m, 95% CI 18-43, P therapy in iron-deficient patients with systolic HF improves outcomes, exercise capacity, and quality of life, and alleviates HF symptoms. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2016 European Society of Cardiology.

  2. Cardiovascular Outcomes With Minute Ventilation-Targeted Adaptive Servo-Ventilation Therapy in Heart Failure: The CAT-HF Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Christopher M; Whellan, David J; Fiuzat, Mona; Punjabi, Naresh M; Tasissa, Gudaye; Anstrom, Kevin J; Benjafield, Adam V; Woehrle, Holger; Blase, Amy B; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Oldenberg, Olaf

    2017-03-28

    Sleep apnea is common in hospitalized heart failure (HF) patients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The CAT-HF (Cardiovascular Improvements With MV-ASV Therapy in Heart Failure) trial investigated whether minute ventilation (MV) adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) improved cardiovascular outcomes in hospitalized HF patients with moderate-to-severe sleep apnea. Eligible patients hospitalized with HF and moderate-to-severe sleep apnea were randomized to ASV plus optimized medical therapy (OMT) or OMT alone (control). The primary endpoint was a composite global rank score (hierarchy of death, cardiovascular hospitalizations, and percent changes in 6-min walk distance) at 6 months. 126 of 215 planned patients were randomized; enrollment was stopped early following release of the SERVE-HF (Adaptive Servo-Ventilation for Central Sleep Apnea in Systolic Heart Failure) trial results. Average device usage was 2.7 h/night. Mean number of events measured by the apnea-hypopnea index decreased from 35.7/h to 2.1/h at 6 months in the ASV group versus 35.1/h to 19.0/h in the control group (p HF with preserved ejection fraction (p = 0.036). In hospitalized HF patients with moderate-to-severe sleep apnea, adding ASV to OMT did not improve 6-month cardiovascular outcomes. Study power was limited for detection of safety signals and identifying differential effects of ASV in patients with HF with preserved ejection fraction, but additional studies are warranted in this population. (Cardiovascular Improvements With MV ASV Therapy in Heart Failure [CAT-HF]; NCT01953874). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rescue Therapy with Nifurtimox and Dipyridamole for Severe Acute Chagas Myocarditis with Congestive Heart Failure in NMRI Albino Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Aparicio, Daniela Yustiz; González-Hernández, María; Hernández-Forero, Greybis; Guédez-Ortiz, María; Santeliz, Sonia; Goncalves, Loredana; Cabarcas, Rafael Bonfante

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Chagas disease is a global health problem; therefore, the development of new therapeutic protocols is necessary. Our group recently demonstrated that nifurtimox associated with dipyridamole has curative effects in mice with acute Chagas disease. In this study, we assess the effect of this therapeutic protocol in chagasic mice with heart failure. Objective: To evaluate whether nifurtimox and dipyridamole are useful to rescue mice with severe acute chagasic myocarditis wi...

  4. Predicting survival in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pocock, Stuart J; Ariti, Cono A; McMurray, John J V

    2012-01-01

    AimsUsing a large international database from multiple cohort studies, the aim is to create a generalizable easily used risk score for mortality in patients with heart failure (HF).Methods and resultsThe MAGGIC meta-analysis includes individual data on 39 372 patients with HF, both reduced...

  5. Ventilatory disorders in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güder, G.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart failure (HF) or both syndromes are the most common reasons for dyspnea in the elderly. Currently there is no standard to diagnose COPD and multiple definitions (fixed ratio [GOLD], lower limit of normal [LLN]) are discussed. Further,

  6. Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor-1 Gene Therapy in a Swine Model of Nonischemic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shin; Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Fish, Kenneth; Oh, Jae Gyun; Motloch, Lukas J; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Lee, Philyoung; Xie, Chaoqin; Lee, Ahyoung; Liang, Lifan; Kho, Changwon; Leonardson, Lauren; McIntyre, Maritza; Wilson, Scott; Samulski, R Jude; Kranias, Evangelia G; Weber, Thomas; Akar, Fadi G; Hajjar, Roger J

    2017-10-03

    Increased protein phosphatase-1 in heart failure (HF) induces molecular changes deleterious to the cardiac cell. Inhibiting protein phosphatase-1 through the overexpression of a constitutively active inhibitor-1 (I-1c) has been shown to reverse cardiac dysfunction in a model of ischemic HF. This study sought to determine the therapeutic efficacy of a re-engineered adenoassociated viral vector carrying I-1c (BNP116.I-1c) in a preclinical model of nonischemic HF, and to assess thoroughly the safety of BNP116.I-1c gene therapy. Volume-overload HF was created in Yorkshire swine by inducing severe mitral regurgitation. One month after mitral regurgitation induction, pigs were randomized to intracoronary delivery of either BNP116.I-1c (n = 6) or saline (n = 7). Therapeutic efficacy and safety were evaluated 2 months after gene delivery. Additionally, 24 naive pigs received different doses of BNP116.I-1c for safety evaluation. At 1 month after mitral regurgitation induction, pigs developed HF as evidenced by increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and left ventricular volume indexes. Treatment with BNP116.I-1c resulted in improved left ventricular ejection fraction (-5.9 ± 4.2% vs. 5.5 ± 4.0%; p pigs also exhibited a significant increase in left atrial ejection fraction at 2 months after gene delivery (-4.3 ± 3.1% vs. 7.5 ± 3.1%; p = 0.02). In vitro I-1c gene transfer in isolated left atrial myocytes from both pigs and rats increased calcium transient amplitude, consistent with its positive impact on left atrial contraction. We found no evidence of adverse electrical remodeling, arrhythmogenicity, activation of a cellular immune response, or off-target organ damage by BNP116.I-1c gene therapy in pigs. Intracoronary delivery of BNP116.I-1c was safe and improved contractility of the left ventricle and atrium in a large animal model of nonischemic HF. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. Heart failure - what's new and what's changed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Paul D; Clark, Andrew L

    2016-12-01

    Physicians responsible for the care of patients with heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction have access to a broad range of evidence-based treatments that prolong life and reduce symptoms. In spite of the significant progress made over the last four decades, there is an ongoing need for novel therapies to treat a condition that is associated with stubbornly high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we discuss the findings of SERVE-HF, a randomised controlled trial of adaptive servo-ventilation in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, as well as EMPA-REG, a study of the effects of a novel diabetic agent that may be of greater interest to heart failure specialists than diabetologists. We also examine further analyses of the groundbreaking PARADIGM-HF trial, which attempt to answer some of the unresolved questions from the original study of the first combined angiotensin-receptor blocker and neprilysin inhibitor, sacubitril valsartan. The recently published National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines for the management of acute heart failure and plans to introduce best practice tariffs bring into focus the need for well-organised, multidisciplinary care. We discuss the challenges involved in developing and delivering a specialist service that meets the needs of a growing population of patients living with heart failure. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  8. Heart failure in children - home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for children; Cor pulmonale - home monitoring for children; Cardiomyopathy - heart failure home monitoring for children ... PF, Lougheed J, Dancea A, et al. Presentation, diagnosis, and medical management of heart failure in children: ...

  9. Management of heart failure in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Faisal; Chan, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is a major chronic illness with no definitive cure. With improving healthcare and with an aging population in many countries, heart failure has become a common disease of the elderly. Pharmacological management of heart failure in the elderly remains a challenge. The syndrome of heart failure cannot be isolated from other comorbidities, which are very common in this population. The purpose of this review is to assist practicing clinicians to more effectively make decisions about management of heart failure in the elderly. In this review, we will try to integrate recent research studies, recent guidelines, and new treatment modalities, and discuss some controversies. In general, the elderly patient with heart failure should be treated according to current heart failure guidelines; however, untailored heart failure management may cause untoward effects in this age group and may worsen clinical outcome.

  10. Fewer Americans Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_166896.html Fewer Americans Hospitalized for Heart Failure But blacks still face far greater odds than ... HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans hospitalized for heart failure has dropped substantially since 2002, but blacks still ...

  11. Heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, E L; Abrahamsen, B; Vestergaard, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates.......The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates....

  12. Management of Patients Admitted with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Selim R.; Campbell, Patrick T.; Desai, Sapna; Mandras, Stacy; Patel, Hamang; Eiswirth, Clement; Ventura, Hector O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital admission for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure is an unfortunate certainty in the vast majority of patients with heart failure. Regardless of the etiology, inpatient treatment for acute decompensated heart failure portends a worsening prognosis. Methods This review identifies patients with heart failure who need inpatient therapy and provides an overview of recommended therapies and management of these patients in the hospital setting. Results Inpatient therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure should be directed at decongestion and symptom improvement. Clinicians should also treat possible precipitating events, identify comorbid conditions that may exacerbate heart failure, evaluate and update current guideline-directed medical therapy, and perform risk stratification for all patients. Finally, efforts should be made to educate patients about the importance of restricting salt and fluid, monitoring daily weights, and adhering to a graded exercise program. Conclusion Early discharge follow-up and continued optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy are key to preventing future heart failure readmissions. PMID:26413005

  13. An updated review of cardiac devices in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C; Zafar, H; Sharif, F

    2017-11-01

    Heart failure has the highest rates of adult hospitalisations, the highest mortality rates and significant costs associated with its care. The cost of heart failure is expected continue to grow on a global scale, with $108 billion spent on heart failure in 2012. Mortality rates are high, with incident cases of heart failure resulting in 30% 1-year mortality, and in hospital mortality of acute heart failure, 28%. This article reviews the devices currently in use for the treatment of heart failure, as well as those that are under investigation. A review of the mechanism of action of devices, the literature supporting their application as therapy, and the cost effectiveness associated with their use are discussed. Conventional techniques discussed herein include the guideline-supported therapies of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) and cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT). Novel devices that are discussed include invasive physiological monitoring, neuromodulation, percutaneous ventricular assist devices (VADs) and cardiac contractility modulation (CCM). There has been advancement in mechanical circulatory support devices for the treatment of both acute and chronic heart failure. In addition to MCS, only CRT has resulted in reduced mortality. Due to the clinical and economic arguments, treatment of heart failure is said to be the biggest unmet need in cardiology today. The data reviewed herein support this statement.

  14. [Anaemia in chronic heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hradec, J

    2010-08-01

    Anaemia is a relatively frequent co-morbidity of chronic heart as well as chronic renal failure. In both conditions, it represents a strong and independent predictor of increased morbidity and mortality. Aetiology of this anaemia is multi-factorial. A number of various factors play a role in its development, e.g. inadequate erythropoietin production in the kidneys, bone marrow inhibition, iron deficiency as well as haemodilution associated with fluid retention. Treatment strategies aim at two directions. One is the stimulation of erythropoiesis with recombinant human erythropoietin or its analogues such as darbepoetin alpha. The other involves iron substitution, administered preferably intravenously for improved efficacy and tolerability. Clinical studies evaluating treatment of anaemia in chronic heart failure with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents conducted so far were ofa small scale, were not controlled with placebo and usually assessed proxy parameters. Their results suggested that effective treatment of anaemia in patients with chronic heart failure improves exertion tolerance, clinical status (NYHA class) as well as the quality of life and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Recently completed TREAT study was the first large morbidity and mortality study evaluating treatment of anaemia with an erythropoietin analogue compared to placebo. On a sample of more than 4000 patients with diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure and significant anaemia, this study has shown that effective treatment of anaemia with darbepoetin alpha did not affect at all the incidence of cardiovascular and renal events; on the other hand, it had lead to a nearly two-fold increase in the incidence of cerebrovascular events. Some doubts about the safety of treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents have occurred in the past based on the studies of anaemia treatment in patients with cancer and renal diseases. An answer to the question whether the treatment of anaemia

  15. Preservation of Skin Integrity in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİR BARUTCU, Canan

    2018-01-01

    Congestive heart failure is an international health problem with its high incidence, prevalence, morbidity and mortality rates. Congestive heart failure is the most common reason of hospitalization in patients older than 65 and it causes more than a million hospitalizations a year. Patients with congestive heart failure experience a number of complications due to physiopathologic reasons, side effects of drugs, accompanying comorbid diseases and limitations caused by congestive heart failure....

  16. Lipophilic versus hydrophilic statin therapy for heart failure: a protocol for an adjusted indirect comparison meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Statins are known to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in primary and secondary prevention studies. Subsequently, a number of nonrandomised studies have shown statins improve clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). Small randomised controlled trials (RCT) also show improved cardiac function, reduced inflammation and mortality with statins in HF. However, the findings of two large RCTs do not support the evidence provided by previous studies and suggest statins lack beneficial effects in HF. Two meta-analyses have shown statins do not improve survival, whereas two others showed improved cardiac function and reduced inflammation in HF. It appears lipophilic statins produce better survival and other outcome benefits compared to hydrophilic statins. But the two types have not been compared in direct comparison trials in HF. Methods/design We will conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of lipophilic and hydrophilic statin therapy in patients with HF. Our objectives are: 1. To determine the effects of lipophilic statins on (1) mortality, (2) hospitalisation for worsening HF, (3) cardiac function and (4) inflammation. 2. To determine the effects of hydrophilic statins on (1) mortality, (2) hospitalisation for worsening HF, (3) cardiac function and (4) inflammation. 3. To compare the efficacy of lipophilic and hydrophilic statins on HF outcomes with an adjusted indirect comparison meta-analysis. We will conduct an electronic search of databases for RCTs that evaluate statins in patients with HF. The reference lists of all identified studies will be reviewed. Two independent reviewers will conduct the search. The inclusion criteria include: 1. RCTs comparing statins with placebo or no statin in patients with symptomatic HF. 2. RCTs that employed the intention-to-treat (ITT) principle in data analysis. 3. Symptomatic HF patients of all aetiologies and on standard treatment. 4. Statin of any dose as intervention. 5. Placebo or no

  17. Impact of renal insufficiency on long-term clinical outcome in patients with heart failure treated by cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Junya; Ishikawa, Toshiyuki; Matsushita, Kohei; Matsumoto, Katsumi; Kimura, Yuichiro; Miyamoto, Mihoko; Ogawa, Hideyuki; Takamura, Takeshi; Sugano, Teruyasu; Ishigami, Tomoaki; Uchino, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kazuo; Umemura, Satoshi

    2012-10-01

    Renal insufficiency is recognized as a predictor of mortality and adverse outcome in heart failure (HF) patients. However, the long-term clinical outcome of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in Japanese HF patients with renal insufficiency remains uncertain. We evaluated 67 consecutive patients who underwent CRT at our hospital. The patients were divided into two groups according to a baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR) cut-off value of 50ml/min, which is defined as the time at which patients should be referred to a nephrologist, by the Japanese Society of Nephrology. Follow-up echocardiographic findings and renal function were examined at 3-6 months after CRT. Then, we compared long-term clinical outcomes between the two groups, and analyzed the effect of CRT on renal function, echocardiographic parameters and cardiac survival. During a mean follow-up period of 30.3 months, patients with advanced renal insufficiency (e-GFR50ml/min) had significant higher all-cause mortality (log-rank p=0.033) and higher cardiac mortality combined with HF hospitalization (log-rank p=0.017) than patients with e-GFR≥50ml/min. Multivariate analysis revealed that advanced renal insufficiency was an independent predictor of cardiac mortality combined with HF hospitalization (odds ratio=3.01, p=0.008). Subgroup analysis in the baseline advanced renal insufficiency group revealed that patients with preserved renal function by CRT (<10% reduction in e-GFR) had a higher rate of decrease of left ventricular end-systolic diameter (-14.0% vs. -0.8%, p=0.023) and lower cardiac mortality combined with HF hospitalization (log-rank p=0.029) compared with patients with deterioration of renal function (≥10% reduction in e-GFR). The present study suggests that advanced renal insufficiency is quite useful for the prediction of worsening clinical outcomes in HF patients treated by CRT. Preservation of renal function by CRT brings about better cardiac survival through

  18. Heart failure highlights in 2012-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Licette C. Y.; Damman, Kevin; Lipsic, Eric; Maass, Alexander H.; Rienstra, Michiel; Westenbrink, B. Daan

    Heart failure has become the cardiovascular epidemic of the century. The European Journal of Heart Failure is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge in the field of heart failure management. In 2012 and 2013, several pioneering scientific discoveries and paradigm-shifting clinical trials have

  19. Tolvaptan, hyponatremia, and heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zmily HD

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hammam D Zmily1, Suleiman Daifallah2, Jalal K Ghali31Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA; 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA; 3Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Tolvaptan is the first FDA-approved oral V2 receptor antagonist for the treatment of euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, in patients with conditions associated with free water excess such as heart failure, cirrhosis, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Tolvaptan inhibits the binding of arginine vasopressin to the V2 receptors on the collecting ducts of the kidneys resulting in aquaresis, the electrolytes sparing excretion of water. This article reviews the accumulated experience with tolvaptan and all the major clinical trials that were conducted to study its safety and efficacy and concludes by summarizing clinicians’ views of its current application in clinical practice.Keywords: arginine vasopressin antagonist, tolvaptan, heart failure, hyponatremia 

  20. Tolvaptan, hyponatremia, and heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Zmily HD; Daifallah S; Ghali JK

    2011-01-01

    Hammam D Zmily1, Suleiman Daifallah2, Jalal K Ghali31Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA; 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA; 3Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Tolvaptan is the first FDA-approved oral V2 receptor antagonist for the treatment of euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, in patients with conditions associated with free water excess such as heart failure, cirrhosis, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormon...

  1. Immune mechanisms in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Bauersachs, Johann; Langer, Harald F

    2017-09-11

    Elevated levels of circulating pro-inflammatory biomarkers in patients with both ischaemic and non-ischaemic heart failure (HF) correlate with disease severity and prognosis. Experimental studies have shown activation of immune response mechanisms in the heart to provoke cardiac adverse remodelling and cause left ventricular dysfunction. Consequently, most of the clinical trials targeting elements of the immune response in HF attempted to modulate the inflammatory response. Surprisingly, clinical studies targeting immune effectors were either neutral or even increased pre-specified clinical endpoints, and some studies resulted in worsening of HF. This review discusses immune mediators involved in the pathogenesis and progression of HF and potential therapeutic applications targeting inflammation in HF. Besides more obvious settings featuring immune activation such as inflammatory or ischaemic cardiomyopathy, the relevance of immune activation in acute or chronic HF of other origins, including volume overload or valvular heart disease, is highlighted. Understanding how cell-specific and molecular mechanisms of the immune response interfere with cardiac remodelling in HF may open new avenues to design biomarkers or druggable targets. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  2. Multiple myeloma presenting with high-output heart failure and improving with anti-angiogenesis therapy: two case reports and a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Jason

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Common manifestations of multiple myeloma include osteolytic lesions, cytopenias, hypercalcemia, and renal insufficiency. Patients may also exhibit heart failure which is often associated with either past therapy or cardiac amyloidosis. A less recognized mechanism is high-output heart failure. Diuretic therapy in this setting has little efficacy in treating the congested state. Furthermore, effective pharmacotherapy has not been established. We report two patients with multiple myeloma and high-output heart failure who failed diuretic therapy. The patients were given dexamethasone in conjunction with lenalidomide and thalidomide, respectively. Shortly thereafter, each patient demonstrated a significant improvement in symptoms. This is the first report of successful treatment of multiple myeloma-induced high-output failure via the utilization of these agents. Case presentation Two patients with multiple myeloma were evaluated for volume overload. The first was a 50-year-old man with refractory disease. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse marrow replacement throughout the pelvis. Cardiac catheterization conveyed elevated filling pressures and a cardiac output of 15 liters/minute. He quickly decompensated and required mechanical ventilation. The second patient was a 61-year-old man recently diagnosed with multiple myeloma and volume overload. Skeletal survey demonstrated numerous lytic lesions throughout the pelvis. His cardiac catheterization also conveyed elevated filling pressures and a cardiac output of 10 liters/minute. Neither patient responded to diuretic therapy and they were subsequently started on dexamethasone plus lenalidomide and thalidomide, respectively. The first patient's brisk diuresis allowed for extubation within 48 hours after the first dose. He had a net negative fluid balance of 15 liters over 10 days. The second patient also quickly diuresed and on repeat cardiac catheterization, his cardiac

  3. Sex, the heart, and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiowski, Wolfgang; Brunner, Hanspeter; Schalcher, Christoph

    2006-09-01

    In the modern era of pharmacologic treatment of erectile dysfunction, men with heart disease increasingly approach their physicians regarding the possibility of restoring sexual activity. At the same time, patients are also frequently aware of public figures that have reportedly died during coitus, often in the arms of their mistresses or prostitutes. Added to this is the perception of patients, and oftentimes their physicians, that coitus and orgasm are associated with a near maximal or even "supermaximal" cardiac workload and therefore may be hazardous for a diseased heart. Accordingly, knowledge of the cardiovascular effects of sexual activity, the risks of triggering a cardiovascular event, and the potential risks inherent in the use of drug therapy of male impotence is important to properly advise patients and their spouses regarding this sensitive issue.

  4. Benefit of cardiopoietic mesenchymal stem cell therapy on left ventricular remodelling: results from the Congestive Heart Failure Cardiopoietic Regenerative Therapy (CHART-1) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerlink, John R; Metra, Marco; Filippatos, Gerasimos S; Davison, Beth A; Bartunek, Jozef; Terzic, Andre; Gersh, Bernard J; Povsic, Thomas J; Henry, Timothy D; Alexandre, Bertrand; Homsy, Christian; Edwards, Christopher; Seron, Aymeric; Wijns, William; Cotter, Gad

    2017-11-01

    Left ventricular (LV) reverse remodelling is an important marker of improved outcomes in patients with advanced heart failure (HF). We examined the impact of the intramyocardial administration of bone-marrow-derived, lineage-directed, autologous cardiopoietic mesenchymal stem cells (C3BS-CQR-1) on LV remodelling in patients with advanced HF enrolled in the CHART-1 study. Patients (n=351) with symptomatic advanced HF secondary to ischaemic heart disease, and reduced LV ejection fraction (LVEF CHART-1, intramyocardial administration of cardiopoietic stem cells led to reverse remodelling as evidenced by significant progressive decreases in LVEDV and LVESV through the 52 weeks of follow-up. Further studies are needed to explore the dose response with regard to cell number and injected volume, and reverse remodelling. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  5. Cardiac resynchronization therapy for heart failure induced by left bundle branch block after transcatheter closure of ventricular septal defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rong-Zeng; Qian, Jun; Wu, Jun; Liang, Yi; Chen, Guang-Hua; Sun, Tao; Zhou, Ye; Zhao, Yang; Yan, Jin-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old female patient with congenital heart disease had a persistent complete left bundle branch block three months after closure by an Amplatzer ventricular septal defect occluder. Nine months later, the patient suffered from chest distress, palpitation, and sweating at daily activities, and her 6-min walk distance decreased significantly (155 m). Her echocardiography showed increased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter with left ventricular ejection fraction of 37%. Her symptoms reduced significantly one week after received cardiac resynchronization therapy. She had no symptoms at daily activities, and her echo showed left ventricular ejection fraction of 46% and 53%. Moreover, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter decreased 6 and 10 months after cardiac resynchronization therapy, and 6-min walk distance remarkably increased. This case demonstrated that persistent complete left bundle branch block for nine months after transcatheter closure with ventricular septal defect Amplatzer occluder could lead to left ventricular enlargement and a significant decrease in left ventricular systolic function. Cardiac resynchronization therapy decreased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter and increased left ventricular ejection fraction, thereby improving the patient's heart functions. PMID:25593586

  6. The effect of intermittent atrial tachyarrhythmia on heart failure or death in cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator versus implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Anne-Christine; Pietrasik, Grzegorz; Goldenberg, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the effect of both history of intermittent atrial tachyarrhythmias (IAT) and in-trial IAT on the risk of heart failure (HF) or death comparing cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD......, respectively, a history of IAT at baseline and time-dependent development of in-trial IAT during follow-up in 1,264 patients with LBBB enrolled in the MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) study. RESULTS: The overall beneficial effect of CRT...... of in-trial atrial tachyarrhythmias. (MADIT-CRT: Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy; NCT00180271)....

  7. Beneficial Effects of Ozone Therapy on Oxidative Stress, Cardiac Functions and Clinical Findings in Patients with Heart Failure Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuklu, Mutlu; Kandemir, Fatih Mehmet; Set, Turan; Bakırcı, Eftal Murat; Degirmenci, Husnu; Hamur, Hikmet; Topal, Ergun; Kucukler, Sefa; Turkmen, Kultigin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of study was to determine the effects of ozone therapy on the oxidative stress, cardiac functions and clinical findings in patients with heart failure reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). A total of 40 patients with New York Heart Association 2 and 3 HF with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ozone therapy of major and minor administrations along with conventional HF treatment for 5 weeks. Before and after ozone therapy, left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes (LVESV, LVEDV) and the 6 minute walk distance (6MWD) and blood levels of the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were measured. Ozone therapy significantly reduced the serum levels of NO and MDA (p Ozone therapy might be beneficial in terms of activating antioxidant system and merit further therapeutic potential to conventional HF treatment in patients with HFrEF.

  8. Chagas Heart Failure in Patients from Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B

    2016-11-01

    Physicians working in Europe and the United States should suspect Chagas heart failure in every patient coming from Latin America with chronic heart failure. Diagnosis should be confirmed by positive serology. Right bundle branch block and left anterior fascicular block on 12-lead electrocardiogram, enlarged cardiac silhouette with no pulmonary congestion on chest X-ray and left ventricular apical aneurysm on echocardiography are the distinctive features of this condition. The clinical course is poorer than that of non-Chagas heart failure; however, medical treatment is similar. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators are useful in the primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy can be given to patients on optimal medical therapy and with lengthened QRS complex. Heart transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage Chagas heart failure.

  9. A Comparison of three diuretic Regimens in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, F.; Eriksen, U.H.; Guul, S.-J.

    1993-01-01

    Farmakologi, bendroflumethiazide, diuretics, heart failure, bumethanide, ergometry plasma lactate......Farmakologi, bendroflumethiazide, diuretics, heart failure, bumethanide, ergometry plasma lactate...

  10. Etiological Peculiarities in Pediatric Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Angela, Butnariu; Gabriel, Samasca

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure in children presents important characteristic features different from adult congestive failure, from a pathophysiological and mostly from an etiopathogenic point of view. Heart failure in children is, in most cases, a consequence of congenital structural cardiac abnormalities that remained unoperated, underwent a palliative operation or presented post-surgery complications, or of cardiomyopathy. Based on the nature of the clinical presentation, new onset heart failure can be dif...

  11. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

  12. Tolvaptan for the treatment of hyponatremia and congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Cesare; Zimmer, Christopher A; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2006-11-01

    Tolvaptan is an oral, once-daily nonpeptide arginine vasopressin V(2)-receptor antagonist under development for the treatment of hyponatremia and congestive heart failure. In Phase II clinical trials, tolvaptan, in addition to standard therapy, increased fluid loss, resulting in decreased body weight and improved edema and serum sodium without affecting blood pressure, heart rate or renal function in patients with heart failure. The compound appeared to be well tolerated and dose-dependent adverse events were generally realated to its pharmacological activity, such as thirst and dry mouth. In patients with hyponatremia, tolvaptan appears to be more effective than fluid restriction at improving sodium levels without an increase in adverse events. An international Phase III outcome study; Efficacy of Vasopressin antagonism in hEaRt failurE outcome Study with Tolvaptan (EVEREST), evaluating the long-term efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in patients hospitalized with worsening heart failure, is currently ongoing.

  13. N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide-Guided Therapy in Chronic Heart Failure Reduces Repeated Hospitalizations-Results From TIME-CHF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarzani, Nasser; Sanders-van Wijk, Sandra; Karel, Joël; Maeder, Micha T; Leibundgut, Gregor; Gutmann, Marc; Pfisterer, Matthias E; Rickenbacher, Peter; Peeters, Ralf; Brunner-la Rocca, Hans-Peter

    2017-05-01

    Although heart failure (HF) patients are known to experience repeated hospitalizations, most studies evaluated only time to first event. N-Terminal B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP)-guided therapy has not convincingly been shown to improve HF-specific outcomes, and effects on recurrent all-cause hospitalization are uncertain. Therefore, we investigated the effect of NT-proBNP-guided therapy on recurrent events in HF with the use of a time-between-events approach in a hypothesis-generating analysis. The Trial of Intensified Versus Standard Medical Therapy in Elderly Patients With Congestive Heart Failure (TIME-CHF) randomized 499 HF patients, aged ≥60 years, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤45%, New York Heart Association functional class ≥I,I to NT-proBNP-guided versus symptom-guided therapy for 18 months, with further follow-up for 5.5 years. The effect of NT-proBNP-guided therapy on recurrent HF-related and all-cause hospitalizations and/or all-cause death was explored. One hundred four patients (49 NT-proBNP-guided, 55 symptom-guided) experienced 1 and 275 patients (133 NT-proBNP-guided, 142 symptom-guided) experienced ≥2 all-cause hospitalization events. Regarding HF hospitalization, 132 patients (57 NT-proBNP-guided, 75 symptom-guided) experienced 1 and 122 patients (57 NT-proBNP-guided, 65 symptom-guided) experienced ≥2 events. NT-proBNP-guided therapy was significant in preventing 2nd all-cause hospitalizations (hazard ratio [HR] 0.83; P = .01), in contrast to nonsignificant results in preventing 1st all-cause hospitalization events (HR 0.91; P = .35). This was not the case regarding HF hospitalization events (HR 0.85 [P = .14] vs HR 0.73 [P = .01]) The beneficial effect of NT-proBNP-guided therapy was seen only in patients aged <75 years, and not in those aged ≥75 years (interaction terms with P = .01 and P = .03 for all-cause hospitalization and HF hospitalization events, respectively). NT-proBNP-guided therapy

  14. The Adult Göttingen Minipig as a Model for Chronic Heart Failure After Myocardial Infarction: Focus on Cardiovascular Imaging and Regenerative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuleri, Karl H; Boyle, Andrew J; Centola, Marco; Amado, Luciano C; Evers, Robert; Zimmet, Jeffrey M; Evers, Kristine S; Ostbye, Katherine M; Scorpio, Diana G; Hare, Joshua M; Lardo, Albert C

    2008-01-01

    Porcine models have become increasingly popular in cardiovascular research. The standard farm pig rapidly increases in body weight and size, potentially confounding serial measurements of cardiac function and morphology. We developed an adult porcine model that does not show physiologic increases in heart mass during the study period and is suitable for long-term study. We compared adult minipigs with the commonly used adolescent Yorkshire swine. Myocardial infarction was induced in adult Göttingen minipigs and adolescent Yorkshire swine by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery followed by reperfusion. At 8 wk after infarction, the left ventricular ejection fraction was 34.1 ± 2.3% in minipigs and 30.7 ± 2.0% in Yorkshire swine. The left ventricular end-diastolic mass in Yorkshire pigs assessed by magnetic resonance imaging increased 17 ± 5 g, from 42.6 ± 4.3 g at week 1 after infarction to 52.8 ± 6.6 g at week 8, whereas it remained unchanged in minipigs. Cardiac anatomy and physiology in adult minipigs were evaluated invasively by angiography and noninvasively by Multidetector Computed Tomography and by Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 1.5 T and 3 T prior to myocardial infarction and during folow-up. This porcine heart failure model is reproducible, mimics the pathophysiology in patients who have experienced myocardial infarction, and is suitable for imaging studies. New heart failure therapies and devices can be tested preclinically in this adult animal model of chronic heart failure. PMID:19149414

  15. Management of elderly patients with congestive heart failure--design of the Trial of Intensified versus standard Medical therapy in Elderly patients with Congestive Heart Failure (TIME-CHF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner-La Rocca, Hans Peter; Buser, Peter Theo; Schindler, Ruth; Bernheim, Alain; Rickenbacher, Peter; Pfisterer, Matthias

    2006-05-01

    Little is known about the management of elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) although they represent the majority of the CHF population. Therefore, the TIME-CHF study was set up (1) to evaluate the medical management of very old patients (> or = 75 years) with CHF compared with younger patients (60-74 years), (2) to compare an intensified with a standard treatment approach, and (3) to differentiate between systolic and diastolic dysfunction (ejection fraction 45%). In a prospective single-blinded multicenter trial, 824 symptomatic patients, CHF hospitalization within the last year and elevated NT-BNP, are randomized to an intensified versus a standard medical therapy. Treatment strategies follow the published guidelines with the aim to reduce symptoms to NYHA class 45% in 26% and 10%, respectively. Significant comorbidities were present in 93% of patients. TIME-CHF will be the first prospective randomized trial to comprehensively study the management of elderly patients with CHF. It will provide unique information comparing two treatment strategies in two age groups irrespective of ejection fraction regarding prognosis, quality of life, as well as resource utilization and costs.

  16. Study protocol to investigate the effects of testosterone therapy as an adjunct to exercise rehabilitation in hypogonadal males with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathur Atish

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Testosterone deficiency is a common occurrence in men with chronic heart failure (CHF and may underpin features of advanced disease, including reduced skeletal muscle mass and fatigue. It is positively correlated with cardiac output and exercise capacity in patients with CHF, whereas a significant improvement in both these parameters has been observed following testosterone replacement therapy. Testosterone therapy has also been shown to reduce circulating levels of inflammatory markers, (TNF-α, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 in patients with established coronary artery disease and testosterone deficiency. This pilot study will assess the feasibility of a combined exercise rehabilitation and adjunctive testosterone therapy intervention for evoking improvements in exercise capacity, circulating inflammatory markers, cardiac and skeletal muscle function, indices of psychological health status and quality of life in hypogonadal males with chronic heart failure. Methods/design Following ethical approval, 36 patients will be randomly allocated to one of two groups: testosterone or placebo therapy during exercise rehabilitation. A combined programme of moderate intensity aerobic exercise and resistance (strength training will be used. The primary outcome measure is exercise capacity, assessed using an incremental shuttle walk test. Secondary outcome measures include measures of peak oxygen uptake, cardiac function, lower-limb skeletal muscle contractile function and oxygenation during exercise, circulating inflammatory markers, psychological health status and quality of life. Discussion Exercise rehabilitation can safely increase exercise capacity in stable CHF patients but there is a need for studies which are aimed at evaluating the long-term effects of physical training on functional status, morbidity and mortality. This pilot study will provide valuable preliminary data on the efficacy of testosterone therapy as an adjunct to exercise

  17. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Francesco Corno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION.Surgically induced, combined volume and pressure overload has been used in rabbits to create a simplified and reproducible model of acute left ventricular (LV failure.MATERIALS AND METHODS.New Zealand white male rabbits (n=24, mean weight 3.1±0.2kg were randomly assigned to either the Control group (n=10 or to the Heart Failure group (HF, n=14. Animals in the Control group underwent sham procedures. Animals in the HF group underwent procedures to induce LV volume overload by inducing severe aortic valve regurgitation with aortic cusp disruption and pressure overload using an occlusive silver clip positioned around the pre-renal abdominal aorta.RESULTS.Following Procedure-1 (volume overload echocardiography confirmed severe aortic regurgitation in all animals in the HF group, with increased mean pulse pressure difference from 18±3mmHg to 38±3mmHg (P

  18. Normalisation of haemodynamics in patients with end-stage heart failure with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sunil; Woldendorp, Kei; Muthiah, Kavitha; Robson, Desiree; Prichard, Roslyn; Macdonald, Peter S; Keogh, Anne M; Kotlyar, Eugene; Jabbour, Andrew; Dhital, Kumud; Granger, Emily; Spratt, Phillip; Jansz, Paul; Hayward, Christopher S

    2014-10-01

    New generation continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) utilise centrifugal pumps. Data concerning their effect on patient haemodynamics, ventricular function and tissue perfusion is limited. We aimed to document these parameters following HeartWare centrifugal continuous-flow LVAD (HVAD) implantation and to assess the impact of post-operative right heart failure (RHF). We reviewed 53 consecutive patients (mean age 49.5 ± 14.1 yrs) with HVAD implanted in the left ventricle, at St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, between January 2007 and August 2012. Available paired right heart catheterisation (n=35) and echocardiography (n=39) data was reviewed to assess response of invasive haemodynamics and ventricular function to LVAD support. A total of 28 patients (53%) were implanted from interim mechanical circulatory support. Seventeen patients (32%) required short-term post-implant veno-pulmonary artery extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. At 100 ± 61 days post-implant, mean pulmonary artery pressure and mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure decreased from 38.8 ± 7.7 to 22.9 ± 7.7 mmHg and 28.3 ± 6.4 to 13.4 ± 5.4 mmHg respectively (pRHF patients (72.2%, n=18) compared to those without (96.9%, n=35, p=0.01). HVAD support improves haemodynamics, LV dimensions and renal function. Following implantation with a centrifugal continuous-flow LVAD, RHF remains a significant risk with a tendency to worse outcomes in the short to medium term. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Heterogeneous response of cardiac sympathetic function to cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure documented by 11[C]-hydroxy-ephedrine and PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Selene; Nanni, Cristina; Marini, Cecilia; Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Martignani, Cristian; Dib, Bassam; Fuccio, Chiara; Boriani, Giuseppe; Picori, Lorena; Boschi, Stefano; Morbelli, Silvia; Fanti, Stefano; Sambuceti, Gianmario

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an accepted treatment in patients with end-stage heart failure. PET permits the absolute quantification of global and regional homogeneity in cardiac sympathetic innervation. We evaluated the variation of cardiac adrenergic activity in patients with idiopathic heart failure (IHF) disease (NYHA III-IV) after CRT using (11)C-hydroxyephedrine (HED) PET/CT. Ten IHF patients (mean age = 68; range = 55-81; average left ventricular ejection fraction 26 ± 4%) implanted with a resynchronization device underwent three HED PET/CT studies: PET 1 one week after inactive device implantation; PET 2, one week after PET 1 under stimulated rhythm; PET 3, at 3 months under active CRT. A dedicated software (PMOD 3.4 version) was used to estimate global and regional cardiac uptake of HED through 17 segment polar maps. At baseline, HED uptake was heterogeneously distributed throughout the left ventricle with a variation coefficient of 18 ± 5%. This variable markedly decreased after three months CRT (12 ± 5%, p cardiac sympathetic system to CRT and a systemic response involving remote tissues with rich adrenergic innervation. This work might contribute to identify imaging parameters that could predict the response to CRT therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adaptive servo-ventilation therapy using an innovative ventilator for patients with chronic heart failure: a real-world, multicenter, retrospective, observational study (SAVIOR-R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Seino, Yoshihiko; Kihara, Yasuki; Adachi, Hitoshi; Yasumura, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) therapy using an innovative ventilator-originally developed to treat sleep-disordered breathing (SDB)-is a novel modality of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation and is gaining acceptance among Japanese cardiologists in expectation of its applicability to treat patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) based on its acute beneficial hemodynamic effects. We conducted a multicenter, retrospective, real-world observational study in 115 Japanese patients with CHF, who had undergone home ASV therapy for the first time from January through December 2009, to examine their profile and the effects on their symptoms and hemodynamics. Medical records were used to investigate New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, echocardiographic parameters including left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and other variables. Most of the patients were categorized to NYHA classes II (44.4 %) and III (40.7 %). SDB severity was not determined in 44 patients, and SDB was not detected or was mild in 27 patients. In at least 71 patients (61.7 %), therefore, ASV therapy was not applied for the treatment of SDB. CHF was more severe, i.e., greater NYHA class, lower LVEF, and higher CTR, in 87 ASV-continued patients (75.7 %) than in 28 ASV-discontinued patients (24.3 %). However, SDB severity was not related to continuity of ASV. The combined proportion of NYHA classes III and IV (P = 0.012) and LVEF (P = 0.009) improved significantly after ASV therapy. CTR and BNP did not improve significantly after ASV therapy but showed significant beneficial changes in their time-course analysis (P < 0.05, respectively). Improvements in LVEF and NYHA class after ASV therapy were not influenced by SDB severity at onset. The present study suggests that ASV therapy would improve the symptoms and hemodynamics of CHF patients, regardless of SDB severity. A randomized clinical study to verify these effects is

  1. Combination of Urinary Sodium/Creatinine Ratio and Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide Level Predicts Successful Tolvaptan Therapy in Patients With Heart Failure and Volume Overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuichi; Dohi, Kaoru; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Tanimura, Muneyoshi; Takeuchi, Tetsushiro; Sugiura, Emiyo; Sugimoto, Tadafumi; Kumagai, Naoto; Ogura, Toru; Nakamori, Shiro; Fujimoto, Naoki; Yamada, Norikazu; Ito, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the short-term clinical and hemodynamic effects of tolvaptan therapy and to identify predictors of the therapeutic outcomes, we retrospectively recruited 60 consecutive hospitalized heart failure (HF) patients (70 ± 11 years) with volume overload. The subjects were divided into two groups on the basis of the changes in HF symptom scores and hemodynamic status assessed by right heart catheterization after tolvaptan therapy (median: 7 days). The majority of patients were successfully treated (group 1). However, 22% of patients (group 2) were unsuccessfully treated, in whom 1) the HF symptom score worsened or 2) there was a stationary HF symptom score ≥ 6 points, and mean PCWP > 18 mmHg and mean RAP > 10 mmHg, after tolvaptan therapy. HF symptom scores, hemodynamic parameters, and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level improved in group 1, but all of these parameters remained unchanged in group 2. Lower urine sodium/creatinine ratio (UNa/UCr) and higher BNP level at baseline were independently associated with unsuccessful tolvaptan therapy, and UNa/UCr best predicts unsuccessful tolvaptan therapy with a cut-off value of 46.5 mEq/g·Cr (AUC 0.847, 95% CI: 0.718-0.976, sensitivity 77%, specificity 81%, P 778 pg/mL predicted unsuccessful tolvaptan therapy with high diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 54%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 89%, and accuracy 90%). In summary, short-term tolvaptan therapy ameliorated HF symptoms and provided hemodynamic improvement in the majority of patients, and UNa/UCr and BNP level strongly predicted the therapeutic outcomes.

  2. Clinical characteristics of HIV-infected patients with adjudicated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steverson, Alexandra B; Pawlowski, Anna E; Schneider, Daniel; Nannapaneni, Prasanth; Sanders, Jes M; Achenbach, Chad J; Shah, Sanjiv J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Feinstein, Matthew J

    2017-11-01

    Aims HIV-infected persons may have elevated risks for heart failure, but factors associated with heart failure in the modern era of HIV therapy are insufficiently understood. Despite substantial disagreement between physician-adjudicated heart failure and heart failure diagnosis codes, few studies of HIV cohorts have evaluated adjudicated heart failure. We evaluated associations of HIV viremia, immunosuppression, and cardiovascular risk factors with physician-adjudicated heart failure. Methods and results We analyzed clinical characteristics associated with heart failure in a cohort of 5041 HIV-infected patients receiving care at an urban hospital system between 2000 and 2016. We also evaluated characteristics of HIV-infected patients who screened negative for heart failure, screened positive for possible heart failure but did not have heart failure after adjudication, and had adjudicated heart failure. HIV-infected patients with heart failure ( N = 216) were older and more likely to be black, hypertensive, and have diabetes than HIV-infected patients without heart failure; heart failure with reduced ejection fraction was more common than heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. In our primary analyses restricted to HIV-infected patients whose heart failure diagnoses did not precede their HIV diagnoses ( N = 149), peak HIV viral load ≥100,000 copies/mL (odds ratio (OR) 2.12, 1.28-3.52) and nadir CD4 T-cell count failure. Overall, 30.6% of patients with any diagnosis code of heart failure had adjudicated heart failure. Conclusion Higher peak HIV viremia and lower CD4 cell nadir are associated with significantly elevated odds of heart failure for HIV-infected persons. Physician adjudication of heart failure may be helpful in HIV cohorts.

  3. Heart failure in hypertension: prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki V; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P; Butler, Javed

    2012-07-09

    The heart failure epidemic calls for urgent prevention efforts. Hypertension is present in the majority of individuals who develop heart failure and carries the highest population-attributable risk for heart failure together with coronary heart disease. Therefore, hypertension is a natural prime target for prevention interventions. However, a substantial proportion of heart failure develops among individuals with a systolic BP (SBP) level below current therapeutic target recommendations (140 mmHg or 130 mmHg for high-risk groups), which are accepted as 'normal' levels, underlining the importance of prehypertension for heart failure development. Prevalence and incidence of both hypertension and prehypertension are high. Efforts to prevent or attenuate BP rise could lead to a substantial reduction of complications, including heart failure development. Lifestyle modifications play a crucial role in preventing elevation of BP levels and better control of high BP. Weight loss, control of sodium intake and diet, and physical activity are essential steps towards this direction. However, when medications are needed to reduce BP levels, the selection of the appropriate agent is important not only for effective control of BP but also to reduce hypertension-related complications. Diuretics and renin-angiotensin system modulators seem to be the most effective agents for heart failure prevention according to the existing evidence. Patients with heart failure and hypertension should be treated for hypertension based on the same principles, although medication selection should take into account concomitant medications, other risk factors and type of heart failure (reduced vs preserved left ventricular ejection fraction).

  4. Mechanisms of heart failure in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebong, Imo A; Goff, David C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Chen, Haiying; Bertoni, Alain G

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and its prevalence continues to rise. Because obesity has been linked with heart failure, the increasing prevalence of obesity may presage further rise in heart failure in the future. Obesity-related factors are estimated to cause 11% of heart failure cases in men and 14% in women. Obesity may result in heart failure by inducing haemodynamic and myocardial changes that lead to cardiac dysfunction, or due to an increased predisposition to other heart failure risk factors. Direct cardiac lipotoxicity has been described where lipid accumulation in the heart results in cardiac dysfunction inexplicable of other heart failure risk factors. In this overview, we discussed various pathophysiological mechanisms that could lead to heart failure in obesity, including the molecular mechanisms underlying cardiac lipotoxicity. We defined the obesity paradox and enumerated various premises for the paradoxical associations observed in the relationship between obesity and heart failure. Copyright © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hepcidin in anemia of chronic heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divakaran, Vijay; Mehta, Sachin; Yao, David; Hassan, Saamir; Simpson, Steven; Wiegerinck, Erwin; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Mann, Douglas L.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is a common finding among patients with chronic heart failure. Although co-morbidities, such as kidney failure, might contribute to the pathogenesis of anemia, many patients with heart failure do not have any other obvious etiology for their anemia. We investigated whether anemia in heart failure is associated with an elevation in hepcidin concentration. We used time-of-flight mass spectrometry to measure hepcidin concentration in urine and serum samples of patients with heart failure and in control subjects. We found that the concentration of hepcidin was lower in urine samples of patients with heart failure compared to those of control subjects. Serum hepcidin was also reduced in heart failure but was not significantly lower than that in controls. There were no significant differences between hepcidin levels in patients with heart failure and anemia compared to patients with heart failure and normal hemoglobin. We concluded that hepcidin probably does not play a major role in pathogenesis of anemia in patients with chronic heart failure. PMID:21080339

  6. Sympathoinhibitory effect of statins in chronic heart failure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, M.E.R.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Bellersen, L.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Smits, P.; Tack, C.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Increased (central) sympathetic activity is a key feature of heart failure and associated with worse prognosis. Animal studies suggest that statin therapy can reduce central sympathetic outflow. This study assessed statin effects on (central) sympathetic activity in human chronic heart

  7. Growth Hormone as Biomarker in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Alberto M; Bobbio, Emanuele; D'Assante, Roberta; Salzano, Andrea; Arcopinto, Michele; Bossone, Eduardo; Cittadini, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    The impairment of growth hormone (GH)/insulin growth factor-1(IGF-1) plays a crucial role in chronic heart failure (CHF). Several studies have shown that patients affected by this condition display a more aggressive disease, with impaired functional capacity and poor outcomes. Interestingly, GH replacement therapy represents a possible future therapeutic option in CHF. In this review, the authors focus on the assessment of the main abnormalities in GH/IGF-1 axis in CHF, the underlying molecular background, and their impact on disease progression and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypopituitarism presenting as congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Giri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sheehan's syndrome (SS develops as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage and is characterized by various degrees of hypopituitarism. Although the occurrence of SS is now rare, it should still be considered in any woman with a history of peripartum hemorrhage who develops manifestations of pituitary hormone deficiency any time following the event. Appropriate hormone replacement therapy results in marked clinical improvement. We present an unusual case of SS in a young lady who continued to have normal menstruation after the index event, had two spontaneous pregnancies, and was diagnosed only 11 years later when she presented to us with acute heart failure.

  9. Managing heart failure in 2013: Changing paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshyaya Kumar Pradhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF imposes huge morbidity and mortality on society. In recent times, HF with preserved ejection fraction (EF has emerged as the predominant form of HF syndromes. Natriuretic peptides (B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP] and N-terminal [NT] pro BNP have now emerged as preferred biomarkers for diagnosis and guiding further therapy in HF. Ivabradine and Eplerenone are now approved for HF patients who are symptomatic despite optimal therapy. Tolvaptan has been shown to improve hyopnatremia as well as dyspnea in patients of HF. Coronary bypass grafting has demonstrated a decrease in cardiovascular death and HF hospitalization in patients with of HF with angina. Cardiac resynchronization therapy has now consistently shown to decrease mortality in Mild HF.

  10. Availability of Heart Failure Medications in Hospice Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Hillary D; Horney, Carolyn; Koets, David; Kutner, Jean S; Matlock, Daniel D

    2016-12-01

    Availability of cardiac medications in hospice for acute symptom management of heart failure is unknown. This study explored hospice approaches to cardiac medications for patients with heart failure. Descriptive study using a quantitative survey of 46 US hospice agencies and clinician interviews. Of 31 hospices that provided standard home medication kits for acute symptom management, only 1 provided medication with cardiac indications (oral furosemide). Only 22% of the hospice agencies had a specific cardiac medication kit. Just over half (57%) of the agencies could provide intravenous inotropic therapy, often in multiple hospice settings. Clinicians described an individualized approach to cardiac medications for patients with heart failure. This study highlights opportunities for practice guidelines that inform medical therapy for hospice patients with heart failure. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. A perspective on diuretic resistance in chronic congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Niel; Madanieh, Raef; Alkan, Mehmet; Dogar, Muhammad U; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2017-10-01

    Chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) is a complex disorder characterized by inability of the heart to keep up the demands on it, followed by the progressive pump failure and fluid accumulation. Although the loop diuretics are widely used in heart failure (HF) patients, both pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic alterations are thought to be responsible for diuretic resistance in these patients. Strategies to overcome diuretic resistance include sodium intake restriction, changes in diuretic dose and route of administration and sequential nephron diuretic therapy. In this review, we discuss the definition, prevalence, mechanism of development and management strategies of diuretic resistance in HF patients.

  12. Creating interatrial shunts in heart failure and pulmonary hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Patients with elevated filling pressures are at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. Structural interventions to lower elevated either left or right atrial filling pressures are gaining attention. Studies in heart failure show that lowering left atrial pressure may reduce CV ev...... interatrial device shunt therapy a part of our armamentarium in patients with heart failure or pulmonary hypertension and increased filling pressure.......Patients with elevated filling pressures are at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. Structural interventions to lower elevated either left or right atrial filling pressures are gaining attention. Studies in heart failure show that lowering left atrial pressure may reduce CV...

  13. Levosimendan beyond inotropy and acute heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Alvarez, Julian; Gal, Tuvia Ben

    2016-01-01

    Levosimendan is a positive inotrope with vasodilating properties (inodilator) indicated for decompensated heart failure (HF) patients with low cardiac output. Accumulated evidence supports several pleiotropic effects of levosimendan beyond inotropy, the heart and decompensated HF. Those effects...

  14. Towards defining heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Aidan P; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2004-12-01

    Injury to the myocardium disrupts geometric integrity and results in changes to intracardiac pressure, wall stress and tension, and the pattern of blood flow through the heart. Significant disruption to pump function results in heart failure which is defined in terms of symptoms: breathlessness and fatigue, signs of salt and water retention, and neurohormonal activation. This syndrome most commonly occurs in the context of injury due to ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy but because patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are born with sometimes gross distortions of cardiac anatomy they too are subject to the forces that drive heart failure. This paper explores the available data relating to the clinical and neurohormonal manifestations of heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease and describes how, by additionally exploring events at a cellular level, we may be able to arrive at a definition of heart failure relevant to this population.

  15. A randomized controlled pilot study of outcomes of strict allowance of fluid therapy in hyponatremic heart failure (SALT-HF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nancy M; Nutter, Benjamin; Forney, Jennifer; Slifcak, Ellen; Tang, W H Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Currently, fluid restriction recommendations in heart failure (HF) are based on expert opinion. After implementing a 1,000-mL/d fluid restriction for 60 days after discharge, outcomes were examined. In a randomized controlled design, hyponatremic patients (serum sodium ≤137 mg/dL) received usual care (UC; n = 26) or 1,000 mL/d fluid restriction (n = 20) at discharge. Quality of life (QoL), thirst, difficulty following fluid recommendations, adherence to fluid restriction, HF emergency care, HF rehospitalization, and all-cause death were examined. Mean age was 62.8 ± 12.8 years; 46% were white. There were no differences by group in baseline demographics, comorbidities, and QoL, except that more UC patients had New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III/IV status (P = .019). Median [interquartile range] QoL scores were better in the 1,000 mL/d group for symptom burden (83.3 [68.8-91.7] vs 50 [29.2-79.2]; P = .018), total symptoms (77.1 [58.1-91.7] vs 54.2 [30.2-73.9]; P = .022), overall QoL summary (72.6 [52.2-86.3] vs 51.0 [37.7-68.5]; P = .038), and clinical QoL summary (75.5 [57.8-92.9] vs 59.1 [35.7-77.3]; P = .039). There were no group differences in thirst, difficulty adhering to fluid recommendations, adherence to fluid restriction, or health care consumption. The 1,000 mL/d fluid restriction led to improved QoL at 60 days after discharge. Future research in a larger more heterogeneous sample is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Heart Failure and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saour, Basil; Smith, Bryan; Yancy, Clyde W

    2017-12-01

    The Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention estimates that 5.7 million adults in the United States suffer from heart failure and 1 in 9 deaths in 2009 cited heart failure as a contributing cause. Almost 50% of patients who are diagnosed with heart failure die within 5 years of diagnosis. Cardiovascular disease is a public health burden. The prognosis of patients with heart failure has improved significantly. However, the risk for death remains high. Managing sudden death risk and intervening appropriately with primary or secondary prevention strategies are of paramount importance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of adding intravenous nicorandil to standard therapy on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and myocyte dysfunction in patients with acute decompensated heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, Shu [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan (Kitakanto Cardiovascular Hospital), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Toyama, Takuji; Funada, Ryuichi; Takama, Noriaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Ichikawa, Shuichi [Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan (Kitakanto Cardiovascular Hospital), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Naoya [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, Yuichi [Health Park Clinic, Department of Imaging, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, improves cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) in ischemic heart disease or chronic heart failure. However, its effects on CSNA and myocyte dysfunction in acute heart failure (AHF) remain unclear. We investigated the effects of adding intravenous nicorandil to standard therapy on CSNA and myocyte dysfunction in AHF. We selected 70 patients with mild to moderate nonischemic AHF who were treated with standard conventional therapy soon after admission. Thirty-five patients were assigned to additionally receive intravenous nicorandil (4-12 mg/h; group A), whereas the remaining patients continued their current drug regimen (group B). Delayed total defect score (TDS), delayed heart to mediastinum count (H/M) ratio, and washout rate (WR) were determined by {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy within 3 days of admission and 4 weeks later. High sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT) level was also measured at the same time points. After treatment, MIBG scintigraphic parameters significantly improved in both groups. However, the extent of the changes in these parameters in group A significantly exceeded the extent of the changes in group B [TDS -11.3 ± 4.3 in group A vs -4.0 ± 6.0 in group B (p < 0.01); H/M ratio 0.31 ± 0.16 vs 0.14 ± 0.16 (p < 0.01); WR -13.8 ± 7.8 % vs -6.1 ± 8.9 % (p < 0.01)]. The hs-TnT level decreased significantly from 0.052 ± 0.043 to 0.041 ± 0.033 ng/ml (p < 0.05) in group A, but showed no significant change in group B. Moreover, in both groups, no relationships between the extent of changes in MIBG parameters and hs-TnT level were observed. Adding intravenous nicorandil to standard therapy provides additional benefits for CSNA and myocyte dysfunction over conventional therapy alone in AHF patients. Furthermore, the mechanisms of improvement in CSNA and myocyte dysfunction after nicorandil treatment in AHF patients were distinct. (orig.)

  18. Functional and physical competition between phospholamban and its mutants provides insight into the molecular mechanism of gene therapy for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockamy, Elizabeth L; Cornea, Razvan L; Karim, Christine B; Thomas, David D

    2011-05-13

    We have used functional co-reconstitution of purified sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) with phospholamban (PLB), its inhibitor in the heart, to test the hypothesis that loss-of-function (LOF) PLB mutants (PLB(M)) can compete with wild-type PLB (PLB(W)) to relieve SERCA inhibition. Co-reconstitution at varying PLB-to-SERCA ratios was conducted using synthetic PLB(W), gain-of-function mutant I40A, or LOF mutants S16E (phosphorylation mimic) or L31A. Inhibitory potency was defined as the fractional increase in K(Ca), measured from the Ca(2+)-dependence of ATPase activity. At saturating PLB, the inhibitory potency of I40A was about three times that of PLB(W), while the potency of each of the LOF PLB(M) was about one third that of PLB(W). However, there was no significant variation in the apparent SERCA affinity for these four PLB variants. When SERCA was co-reconstituted with mixtures of PLB(W) and LOF PLB(M), inhibitory potency was reduced relative to that of PLB(W) alone. Furthermore, FRET between donor-labeled SERCA and acceptor-labeled PLB(W) was decreased by both (unlabeled) LOF PLB(M). These results show that LOF PLB(M) can compete both physically and functionally with PLB(W), provide a rational explanation for the partial success of S16E-based gene therapy in animal models of heart failure, and establish a powerful platform for designing and testing more effective PLB(M) targeted for gene therapy of heart failure in humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacotherapy of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaraba, Jade E; Barry, Arden R

    2015-04-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes ~50% of all heart failure diagnoses and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The treatment of HFpEF can be challenging due to a lack of evidence supporting the benefit of various drug therapies. In practice, treatment can be divided into acute and chronic management. Acute therapy for decompensated heart failure is similar for both HFpEF and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. The mainstay of treatment is diuretics to reduce volume overload and improve dyspnea. Patients with an acute exacerbation of HFpEF and rapid atrial fibrillation (AF) should be rate controlled with negative chronotropic agents. For chronic therapy, patients with HFpEF should not be treated like patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Chronic management of HFpEF can be simplified by using three strategies based on applicability: treat precipitating conditions (e.g., hypertension, AF), control symptoms by maintaining euvolemia with diuretics, and avoid therapies that have been shown not to be beneficial unless another compelling indication exists. Nondrug interventions for HFpEF include salt and fluid restriction, regular physical activity, and referral to a heart function clinic, if appropriate. © 2015 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  20. Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for patients with heart failure and depressive symptoms: A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Johan; Andersson, Gerhard; Dahlström, Örjan; Jaarsma, Tiny; Köhler, Anita Kärner; Johansson, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The aim was (1) to describe the development of a guided internet-based CBT (ICBT) program adapted to patients with heart failure (HF) and (2) to evaluate the feasibility of the ICBT program in regard to depressive symptoms, the time used by health care providers to give feedback, and participants' perceptions of the ICBT program. A multi-professional team developed the program and seven HF patients with depressive symptoms were recruited to the study. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating-Self-rating scale (MADRS-S) were used to measure depression, and patients were interviewed about their perceptions of the program. Based on research in HF and CBT, a nine-week program was developed. The median depression score decreased from baseline to the end of the study (PHQ-9: 11-8.5; MADRS-S: 25.5-16.5) and none of the depression scores worsened. Feedback from health care providers required approximately 3h per patient. Facilitating perceptions (e.g. freedom of time) and demanding perceptions (e.g. part of the program demanded a lot of work) were described by the patients. The program appears feasible and time-efficient. However, the program needs to be evaluated in a larger randomized study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Changes in Thirst Intensity During Optimization of Heart Failure Medical Therapy by Nurses at the Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldréus, Nana; Hahn, Robert G; Lyngå, Patrik; van der Wal, Martje H L; Hägglund, Ewa; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2016-01-01

    Thirst can be aggravated in patients with heart failure (HF), and optimization of HF medication can have positive impact on thirst. The aims of this study were to describe changes in thirst intensity and to determine factors associated with high thirst intensity during optimization of HF medication. Patients with HF (N = 66) who were referred to an HF clinic for up-titration of HF medication were included. Data were collected during the first visit to the clinic and at the end of the treatment program. Data were dichotomized by the median visual analog scale score for thirst, dividing patients into 2 groups: low thirst intensity (0-20 mm) and high thirst intensity (>20 mm on a visual analog scale of 0-100 mm). In total, 67% of the patients reported a higher thirst intensity after the HF up-titration program. There was no difference in thirst intensity between the patients who reached target doses and those who did not. Plasma urea level (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.65) and fluid restriction (odds ratio, 6.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.90-20.5) were independently associated with high thirst intensity in patients with HF. Thirst intensity increased in two-thirds of the patients during a time period of optimization of HF medication. Fluid restriction and plasma urea levels were associated with high thirst intensity.

  2. Critical Heart Failure and Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronicki, Ronald A; Taylor, Mary; Baden, Harris

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of this review are to discuss the clinical assessment, pathophysiology, and management of shock, with an emphasis on circulatory physiology, cardiopulmonary interactions, and pharmacologic strategies to optimize systemic oxygen delivery. These principles will then be applied to the clinical syndromes of heart failure and cardiogenic shock that are seen in children. MEDLINE, PubMed. An understanding of essential circulatory physiology and the pathophysiology of shock are necessary for managing patients at risk for or in a state of shock. A timely and accurate assessment of cardiac function, cardiac output, and tissue oxygenation and the means by which to enhance the relationship between oxygen delivery and consumption are essential in order to optimize outcomes.

  3. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure.

  4. Current use of guideline-based medical therapy in elderly patients admitted with acute heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and its impact on event-free survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Keitaro; Kohno, Takashi; Kohsaka, Shun; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Nagatomo, Yuji; Izumi, Yuki; Goda, Ayumi; Mizuno, Atsushi; Sawano, Mitsuaki; Inohara, Taku; Fukuda, Keiichi; Yoshikawa, Tsutomu

    2017-05-15

    Acute heart failure (HF) is a frequently encountered cardiac condition. Its prevalence increases exponentially with age. In spite of this, elderly patients are underrepresented in clinical trials and the implementation of guideline-based medical therapy (GBMT) in them is not well established. We investigated the current use of GBMT and its effects on mortality and HF rehospitalization among elderly patients with acute HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) using data obtained from a contemporary multi-center registry. We analyzed data from 1,441 consecutive acute HF patients registered in the West Tokyo Heart Failure (WET-HF) registry (mean age 73.2 ± 13.6 years). Reduced ejection fraction (elderly group). The prescription rate of GBMT (use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors and β-blockers at discharge) was significantly lower in the elderly than in the younger (aged elderly group (HR 1.41, 95% CI 0.68-2.92; and HR 1.54, 95% CI 0.76-3.13, respectively) CONCLUSIONS: GBMT implementation in elderly patients with HFrEF was found to be suboptimal. However, the underuse of GBMT did not appear to be responsible for poorer outcomes in elderly HFrEF patients. Further research is required to establish an ideal therapeutic approach for this population. URL: http://www.umin.ac.jp/icdr/index-j.html. Unique identifier: UMIN000001171. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thirst in chronic heart failure: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allida, Sabine M; Inglis, Sally C; Davidson, Patricia M; Lal, Sara; Hayward, Christopher S; Newton, Phillip J

    2015-04-01

    This review will (1) explore factors related to thirst in chronic heart failure and (2) describe interventions to alleviate thirst in chronic heart failure patients. Thirst is a common and troublesome symptom of chronic heart failure. Despite the burden and prevalence of this symptom, there are limited strategies to assist in its management. This is a review of literature on the burden of thirst, contributors to thirst and potential management strategies of thirst in patients with chronic heart failure. Medline, Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health, PubMed and Scopus were searched using the key words thirst, chronic heart failure, angiotensin II, fluid restriction and intervention. Of the 165 citations yielded, nine studies (n = 9) were included. The eligibility criteria included participants with confirmed diagnosis of chronic heart failure, randomised controlled studies or any studies with thirst as primary or secondary outcome, in humans and in English. There was no limit to the years searched. Factors related to thirst in chronic heart failure were condition; prolonged neurohormonal activation, treatment; pharmacological interventions and fluid restriction and emotion. No intervention studies were found in chronic heart failure patients. Interventions such as artificial saliva and chewing gum have been investigated for their effectiveness as a thirst reliever in haemodialysis patients. Thirst is a frequent and troublesome symptom for individuals with chronic heart failure. It is highly likely that this contributes to poor adherence with fluid restrictions. Chewing gum can help alleviate thirst, but investigation in people with heart failure is needed. Increasing awareness of thirst and interventions to relieve it in clinical practice is likely to improve the quality of care for people with chronic heart failure. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Novel Biomarkers of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic-Radojevic, A; Pljesa-Ercegovac, M; Matic, M; Simic, D; Radovanovic, S; Simic, T

    Although substantial improvements have been made in majority of cardiac disorders, heart failure (HF) remains a major health problem, with both increasing incidence and prevalence over the past decades. For that reason, the number of potential biomarkers that could contribute to diagnosis and treatment of HF patients is, almost exponentially, increasing over the recent years. The biomarkers that are, at the moment, more or less ready for use in everyday clinical practice, reflect different pathophysiological processes present in HF. In this review, seven groups of biomarkers associated to myocardial stretch (mid-regional proatrial natriuretic peptide, MR-proANP), myocyte injury (high-sensitive troponins, hs-cTn; heart-type fatty acid-binding protein, H-FABP; glutathione transferase P1, GSTP1), matrix remodeling (galectin-3; soluble isoform of suppression of tumorigenicity 2, sST2), inflammation (growth differentiation factor-15, GDF-15), renal dysfunction (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL; kidney injury molecule-1, KIM-1), neurohumoral activation (adrenomedullin, MR-proADM; copeptin), and oxidative stress (ceruloplasmin; myeloperoxidase, MPO; 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-OHdG; thioredoxin 1, Trx1) in HF will be overviewed. It is important to note that clinical value of individual biomarkers within the single time points in both diagnosis and outcome prediction in HF is limited. Hence, the future of biomarker application in HF lies in the multimarker panel strategy, which would include specific combination of biomarkers that reflect different pathophysiological processes underlying HF. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Heart failure patients utilizing an electric home monitor: What effects does heart failure have on their quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simuel, Gloria J.

    Heart Failure continues to be a major public health problem associated with high mortality and morbidity. Heart Failure is the leading cause of hospitalization for persons older than 65 years, has a poor prognosis and is associated with poor quality of life. More than 5.3 million American adults are living with heart failure. Despite maximum medical therapy and frequent hospitalizations to stabilize their condition, one in five heart failure patients die within the first year of diagnosis. Several disease-management programs have been proposed and tested to improve the quality of heart failure care. Studies have shown that hospital admissions and emergency room visits decrease with increased nursing interventions in the home and community setting. An alternative strategy for promoting self-management of heart failure is the use of electronic home monitoring. The purpose of this study was to examine what effects heart failure has on patient's quality of life that had been monitoring on an electronic home monitor longer than 2 months. Twenty-one questionnaires were given to patients utilizing an electronic home monitor by their home health agency nurse. Eleven patients completed the questionnaire. The findings showed that there is some deterioration in quality of life with more association with the physical aspects of life than with the emotional aspects of life, which probably was due to the small sample size. There was no significant difference in readmission rates in patients utilizing an electronic home monitor. Further research is needed with a larger population of patients with chronic heart failure and other chronic diseases which may provide more data, and address issues such as patient compliance with self-care, impact of heart failure on patient's quality of life, functional capacity, and heart failure patient's utilization of the emergency rooms and hospital. Telemonitoring holds promise for improving the self-care abilities of persons with HF.

  8. [Bidirectional impact of two chronic diseases: heart failure and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafur, José D; Ventura, Héctor O

    2016-12-27

    Heart failure remains a significant burden to healthcare systems. Even of the advances in medical therapy, heart failure morbidity and mortality have not been significantly reduced. Diabetes mellitus has shown to be a significant risk factor for the development and prognosis of heart failure. Traditionally, these two chronic illnesses have been managed in relative isolation. Clinicians should be more cognizant of the bidirectional impact between heart failure and diabetes.

  9. Sex Differences in Long-Term Outcomes With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Mild Heart Failure Patients With Left Bundle Branch Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biton, Yitschak; Zareba, Wojciech; Goldenberg, Ilan; Klein, Helmut; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Moss, Arthur J; Kutyifa, Valentina

    2015-06-29

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results regarding the benefit of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) by sex and QRS duration. In the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT), we evaluated long-term clinical outcome of heart failure (HF) or death, death, and HF alone by sex and QRS duration (dichotomized at 150 ms) in left bundle-branch block patients with CRT with defibrillator backup (CRT-D) versus implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) only. There were 394 women (31%) and 887 men with left bundle-branch block. During the median follow-up of 5.6 years, women derived greater clinical benefit from CRT-D compared with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator only, with a significant 71% reduction in HF or death (hazard ratio [HR] 0.29, P150 ms. During long-term follow-up of mild HF patients with left ventricular dysfunction and wide QRS, both women and men with left bundle-branch block derived sustained benefit from CRT-D versus implantable cardioverter-defibrillator only, with significant reduction in HF or death, HF alone, and all-cause mortality regardless of QRS duration. There is an incremental benefit with CRT-D in women for the end points of HF or death and HF alone. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifiers: NCT00180271, NCT01294449, and NCT02060110. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  10. Hippo pathway deficiency reverses systolic heart failure after infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, John P; Heallen, Todd; Zhang, Min; Rahmani, Mahdis; Morikawa, Yuka; Hill, Matthew C; Segura, Ana; Willerson, James T; Martin, James F

    2017-10-12

    Mammalian organs vary widely in regenerative capacity. Poorly regenerative organs, such as the heart are particularly vulnerable to organ failure. Once established, heart failure commonly results in mortality. The Hippo pathway, a kinase cascade that prevents adult cardiomyocyte proliferation and regeneration, is upregulated in human heart failure. Here we show that deletion of the Hippo pathway component Salvador (Salv) in mouse hearts with established ischaemic heart failure after myocardial infarction induces a reparative genetic program with increased scar border vascularity, reduced fibrosis, and recovery of pumping function compared with controls. Using translating ribosomal affinity purification, we isolate cardiomyocyte-specific translating messenger RNA. Hippo-deficient cardiomyocytes have increased expression of proliferative genes and stress response genes, such as the mitochondrial quality control gene, Park2. Genetic studies indicate that Park2 is essential for heart repair, suggesting a requirement for mitochondrial quality control in regenerating myocardium. Gene therapy with a virus encoding Salv short hairpin RNA improves heart function when delivered at the time of infarct or after ischaemic heart failure following myocardial infarction was established. Our findings indicate that the failing heart has a previously unrecognized reparative capacity involving more than cardiomyocyte renewal.

  11. Efficacy of carvedilol in pediatric heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Alex Hørby; Fatkin, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of: Huang M, Zhang X, Chen S et al. The effect of carvedilol treatment on chronic heart failure in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: a prospective, randomized-controlled study. Pediatr. Cardiol. 34, 680-685 (2013). A role for β-blockers in children with heart failure has...

  12. Liver disease and heart failure: Back and forth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Michele; Tarantino, Nicola; Petrucci, Rossella; Tricarico, Lucia; Laonigro, Irma; Di Biase, Matteo; Brunetti, Natale Daniele

    2017-10-31

    In their clinical practice, physicians can face heart diseases (chronic or acute heart failure) affecting the liver and liver diseases affecting the heart. Systemic diseases can also affect both heart and liver. Therefore, it is crucial in clinical practice to identify complex interactions between heart and liver, in order to provide the best treatment for both. In this review, we sought to summarize principal evidence explaining the mechanisms and supporting the existence of this complicate cross-talk between heart and liver. Hepatic involvement after heart failure, its pathophysiology, clinical presentation (congestive and ischemic hepatopathy), laboratory and echocardiographic prognostic markers are discussed; likewise, hepatic diseases influencing cardiac function (cirrhotic cardiomyopathy). Several clinical conditions (congenital, metabolic and infectious causes) possibly affecting simultaneously liver and heart have been also discussed. Cardiovascular drug therapy may present important side effects on the liver and hepato-biliary drug therapy on heart and vessels; post-transplantation immunosuppressive drugs may show reciprocal cardio-hepatotoxicity. A heart-liver axis is drafted by inflammatory reactants from the heart and the liver, and liver acts a source of energy substrates for the heart. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Education, income, and incident heart failure in post-menopausal women: the Women's Health Initiative Hormone Therapy Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rashmee U; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Van Horn, Linda; Phillips, Lawrence S; Eaton, Charles B; Martin, Lisa W; Rosal, Milagros C; Manson, Joann E; Ning, Hongyan; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Klein, Liviu

    2011-09-27

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the effect of education and income on incident heart failure (HF) hospitalization among post-menopausal women. Investigations of socioeconomic status have focused on outcomes after HF diagnosis, not associations with incident HF. We used data from the Women's Health Initiative Hormone Trials to examine the association between socioeconomic status levels and incident HF hospitalization. We included 26,160 healthy, post-menopausal women. Education and income were self-reported. Analysis of variance, chi-square tests, and proportional hazards models were used for statistical analysis, with adjustment for demographics, comorbid conditions, behavioral factors, and hormone and dietary modification assignments. Women with household incomes women with household incomes >$50,000 a year (16.7/10,000 person-years; p Women with less than a high school education had higher HF hospitalization incidence (51.2/10,000 person-years) than college graduates and above (25.5/10,000 person-years; p women with the lowest income levels had 56% higher risk (hazard ratio: 1.56, 95% confidence interval: 1.19 to 2.04) than the highest income women; women with the least amount of education had 21% higher risk for incident HF hospitalization (hazard ratio: 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 0.90 to 1.62) than the most educated women. Lower income is associated with an increased incidence of HF hospitalization among healthy, post-menopausal women, whereas multivariable adjustment attenuated the association of education with incident HF. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Initial Evaluation and Management of a Patient with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoosain, Jamael; Whittier, Jabar; Hasni, Farhan; Hankins, Shelley

    2017-09-06

    The goal of this review is to summarize and discuss a thorough and effective manner in the evaluation of the patient with heart failure. Heart failure is a prevalent disease worldwide and while the diagnosis of heart failure has remained relatively unchanged via a careful history and physical examination, identification of the etiology of the heart failure and treatment has made significant advances. Mechanical circulatory support (MCS), neprilysin inhibitors, and chronic resynchronization therapy (CRT) are just some of the relatively recent therapies afforded to assist heart failure patients. Heart failure is a complicated, multifactorial diagnosis that requires a careful history and physical for diagnosis with the support of laboratory tests. While the prognosis for heart failure patients remains poor in comparison to other cardiovascular disease and even certain cancers, new advancements in therapy have shown survival and quality of life improvement.

  15. CARDIORENAL RELATIONS AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE IN LONG TERM THERAPY WITH CARVEDILOL AND BISOPROLOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Statsenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare effects of long term therapy with сarvedilol and bisoprolol on heart and renal functions, heart rate variability (HRV and quality of life in elderly patients with chronic heart failure (CHF.Material and methods. We examined 40 patients aged 60-75 years on the 15-30 day after myocardial infarction complicated with CHF. All the patients taking basic therapy with enalapril, aspirin, simvastatin and diuretics were randomized to either bisoprolol (n=20 or сarvedilol (n=20 therapy group. The average daily doses were 5,7+0,8 mg for and 32,6+3,4 mg for carvedilol. The duration of the observation period was 12 months. Cardiac morphofunctional parameters, HRV, renal function and quality of life were determined at baseline, after 12 weeks and at the end of the study.Results. Complex therapy of CHF including both beta-blockers resulted in clinical improvement, increase in myocardial contractility. However, carvedilol group showed more pronounced increase in ejection fraction in comparison with bisoprolol group, 8,97% and 5,14%, respectively. Local contractility index decreased significantly only in carvedilol group by 29,9% (p<0,05. Carvedilol demonstrated more significant nephroprotective effects: glomerular filtration rate increased by 32,2%, renal functional reserve restored in 70% of patients. Tubular reabsorbtion, sodium clearance and excretion also increased in carvedilol group. After 12 month of treatment microalbuminuria reduced in both groups of patients, but more significant in carvedilol group. Carvedilol provided more strong blocking effect on sympathetic part of autonomic nervous system according to HRV data.Conclusion. In elderly patients with CHF long term therapy with both carvedilol and bisoprolol provided with improvement in clinical conditions and renal function, increased in HRV and was well tolerated. However, carvedilol compared with bisoprolol showed more significant beneficial effects on cardiac morphofunctional

  16. CARDIORENAL RELATIONS AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE IN LONG TERM THERAPY WITH CARVEDILOL AND BISOPROLOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Statsenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare effects of long term therapy with сarvedilol and bisoprolol on heart and renal functions, heart rate variability (HRV and quality of life in elderly patients with chronic heart failure (CHF.Material and methods. We examined 40 patients aged 60-75 years on the 15-30 day after myocardial infarction complicated with CHF. All the patients taking basic therapy with enalapril, aspirin, simvastatin and diuretics were randomized to either bisoprolol (n=20 or сarvedilol (n=20 therapy group. The average daily doses were 5,7+0,8 mg for and 32,6+3,4 mg for carvedilol. The duration of the observation period was 12 months. Cardiac morphofunctional parameters, HRV, renal function and quality of life were determined at baseline, after 12 weeks and at the end of the study.Results. Complex therapy of CHF including both beta-blockers resulted in clinical improvement, increase in myocardial contractility. However, carvedilol group showed more pronounced increase in ejection fraction in comparison with bisoprolol group, 8,97% and 5,14%, respectively. Local contractility index decreased significantly only in carvedilol group by 29,9% (p<0,05. Carvedilol demonstrated more significant nephroprotective effects: glomerular filtration rate increased by 32,2%, renal functional reserve restored in 70% of patients. Tubular reabsorbtion, sodium clearance and excretion also increased in carvedilol group. After 12 month of treatment microalbuminuria reduced in both groups of patients, but more significant in carvedilol group. Carvedilol provided more strong blocking effect on sympathetic part of autonomic nervous system according to HRV data.Conclusion. In elderly patients with CHF long term therapy with both carvedilol and bisoprolol provided with improvement in clinical conditions and renal function, increased in HRV and was well tolerated. However, carvedilol compared with bisoprolol showed more significant beneficial effects on cardiac morphofunctional

  17. Psychosocial risk factors and heart failure hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Andersen, Ingelise; Prescott, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Prospective studies on the role of psychosocial factors in heart failure development are virtually nonexistent. The authors aimed to address the effect of psychosocial factors on the risk of heart failure hospitalization in men and women free of cardiovascular disease. In 1991-1993, the 8......-fourth of the population reported some degree of vital exhaustion. The vital exhaustion score was associated with a higher risk of heart failure in a dose-response manner (P heart failure in both men (hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence...... interval: 1.20, 3.10) and women (hazard ratio = 2.56, 95% confidence interval: 1.80, 3.65). Contrary to expectation, major life events, social network, and sleeping medication did not play an individual role for heart failure hospitalization. Because of the high prevalence of vital exhaustion...

  18. Fluid removal in acute heart failure: diuretics versus devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Felker, G Michael

    2014-10-01

    Fluid removal and relief of congestion are central to treatment of acute heart failure. Diuretics have been the decongestive mainstay but their known limitations have led to the exploration of alternative strategies. This review compares diuretics with ultrafiltration and examines the recent evidence evaluating their use. Relevant recent studies are the Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation trial (of diuretics) and the Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (of ultrafiltration). The Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation study evaluated strategies of loop diuretic use during acute heart failure (continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus and high dose versus low dose). After 72  h, there was no significant difference with either comparison for the coprimary end points. Patients treated with a high-dose strategy tended to have greater diuresis and more decongestion compared with low-dose therapy, at the cost of transient changes in renal function. The Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure study showed that in acute heart failure patients with persistent congestion and worsening renal function, ultrafiltration, as compared with a medical therapy, was associated with similar weight loss but greater increase in serum creatinine and more adverse events. Decongestion remains a major challenge in acute heart failure. Although recent studies provide useful data to guide practice, the relatively poor outcomes point to the continued need to identify better strategies for safe and effective decongestion.

  19. A dynamic view of comorbid depression and generalized anxiety disorder symptom change in chronic heart failure: the discrete effects of cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise, and psychotropic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J; Selkow, Terina; Bengel, Jürgen; Rafanelli, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    No previous study has reported upon comorbid depression and anxiety disorders and their treatment in heart failure (HF), which the current study has sought to document. Total 29 HF patients under psychiatric management underwent primary depression cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT; n = 15) or primary generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) CBT (n = 14), and participated in a community exercise program and standard physician care. Repeated measures analysis of variance assessed Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and GAD-7 symptom change pre- and post-CBT treatment, and assessed the interaction effects of treatment type, exercise, anti-depressant and anxiolytic. There was a significant time and treatment interaction effect that favored the primary GAD CBT group for reduction in PHQ symptoms (F(1, 24) = 4.52, p = 0.04). Analysis of PHQ-somatic symptoms also showed a significant main effect for participation in the exercise program (F(1, 24) = 4.21, p = 0.05) and a significant time and anxiolytic interaction (F(1, 24) = 3.98, p = 0.05). The average number of cardiac hospital readmissions favored the primary GAD CBT group (p = 0.05). The findings support the use of multifaceted interventions in the rehabilitation of HF patients with comorbid psychiatric needs. Implications for Rehabilitation Comorbid depression and anxiety disorders are a clinical and research focus that deserves more attention in the treatment of heart failure patients. Cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise, and anxiolytic use was associated with significant changes in depression and anxiety though discrete effects were evident. Multifaceted interventions are most likely to be successful in the rehabilitation of HF patients with psychiatric needs.

  20. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuegel, Courtney; Bansal, Nisha

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the population of CKD patients with concurrent HF continues to grow. The accurate diagnosis of HF is challenging in patients with CKD in part due to a lack of validated imaging and biomarkers specifically in this population. The pathophysiology between the heart and the kidneys is complex and bidirectional. Patients with CKD have greater prevalence of traditional HF risk factors as well as unique kidney-specific risk factors including malnutrition, acid-base alterations, uraemic toxins, bone mineral changes, anemia and myocardial stunning. These risk factors also contribute to the decline of kidney function seen in patients with subclinical and clinical HF. More targeted HF therapies may improve outcomes in patients with kidney disease as current HF therapies are underutilised in this population. Further work is also needed to develop novel HF therapies for the CKD population. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Prognostic indices in childhood heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mia (28%), and congenital heart disease (25 %). There was a case-fatality rate of 24% among the study population. Poor prognostic indices identified were age below one year or above 5years, presence of underlying acute respiratory in- fections, rheumatic heart disease and renal disorders. Conclusion: Heart failure in ...

  2. Heart failure complicating tetralogy of Fallot

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), a cyanotic congenital heart disease comprising of right ventricular outflow tract obstruction (RVOTO), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), ventricular septal defect (VSD) and overriding of the aorta, constitutes about 10% of congenital heart diseases seen in. Nigeria.1 Congestive heart failure is not a ...

  3. Acute reverse annular remodeling during MitraClip® therapy predicts improved clinical outcome in heart failure patients: a 3D echocardiography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbrand, Theresa; Eschenhagen, Silke; Zeus, Tobias; Kehmeier, Eva; Hellhammer, Katharina; Veulemans, Verena; Kelm, Malte; Balzer, Jan

    2017-09-20

    Transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVR) has been shown to have acute effects on mitral valve geometry in patients with functional mitral regurgitation (FMR). This study investigates the impact of MitraClip® therapy-induced annular remodeling on clinical outcome and mitral regurgitation in heart failure patients. TMVR was performed successfully in 45 patients with FMR. In this study, mitral valve datasets were obtained before and directly after MitraClip® implantation using three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography, and were analyzed offline retrospectively using dedicated 3D reconstruction software. Patients underwent clinical and echocardiographic evaluation at baseline and after 6 months. At follow-up, the patients were allocated into two groups according to their improvement in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class: a Low Responder group with ΔNYHA <1.5 (n = 25); and a High Responder group with ΔNYHA ≥1.5 (n = 20). At 6-month follow-up, data analysis revealed that while mitral regurgitation was reduced significantly in both groups, only the High Responder group had experienced significant downsizing of the 3D circumference (137 ± 14 mm to 126 ± 13 mm; p < 0.01) and the anterior-to-posterior diameter (33 ± 5 mm to 29 ± 4 mm; p < 0.01) of the mitral annulus during the intervention. Furthermore, only the High Responder group with reverse annular remodeling as shown had substantial advances in quality of life (Minnesota living with heart failure questionnaire: 55 ± 10 to 34 ± 14 points; p < 0.01) and functional status (6-min walk distance: 290 ± 104 m to 462 ± 111 m; p = 0.07). Our study demonstrates that instantaneous left ventricular annular remodeling during MitraClip® implantation is associated with improved clinical outcome of heart failure patients with functional mitral regurgitation. Trial registration The study was approved by the local ethics committee (Study Number 4497R

  4. Clinical evaluation of combination therapy for biventricular pacing after cardiac surgery in patients with intractable heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Shigeru; Matsubara, Junichi; Nagayoshi, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa, Hisateru; Takeuchi, Katsunori; Nonaka, Toshimichi

    2005-12-01

    We examined the effectiveness of combination therapy for biventricular pacing after cardiac surgery. We performed biventricular pacing in seven patients until April 2003. The diagnosis of the patients was ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) in four patients and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in three patients. The implantation method of biventricular pacing was performed with a myocardial electrode through a median sternotomy. DDD-R and SSI-R were used to perform biventricular pacing. A Y-adapter was connected to a generator so that the 2 leads could be implanted in both the right ventricles (RV) and left ventricles (LV). The clinical symptoms were New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification of 3.7+/-0.3 preoperatively and 1.8+/-0.6 postoperatively, showing a significant improvement (p<0.001). The cardiac index (CI) was 1.9+/-0.2 L/min/m2 preoperatively and 3.0+/-0.6 L/min/m2 postoperatively (p<0.05). The pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) was 19.5+/-2.6 mmHg preoperatively and 13.6+/-2.0 mmHg postoperatively, showing a significant improvement (p<0.05). The intracardiac potential and threshold values were: left atrium 1.9+/-1.0 mV, threshold value (PW: 0.45 msec) 2.1+/-0.6 V, LV 4.9+/-4.23 mV, threshold value (PW: 0.45 msec) 2.2+/-1.51 V, and RV 3.6+/-0.9 V, threshold value (PW: 0.45 msec) 2.0+/-0.7 V. The LV and RV threshold values were high. The QRS interval improved from 158.4+/-18.0 msec preoperatively to 110+/-13.4 msec postoperatively, showing a significant reduction. This combination therapy when compared to the use of the biventricular pacing method used at the current time, does have the risks of cardiac surgery, but the clinical symptoms and hemodynamic performance improvement are great.

  5. Acute Heart Failure Exacerbation with Cardiogenic Shock and Elevated Systemic Vascular Resistance Treated with a Combination of Nicardipine and Dobutamine Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia E. Issac

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute heart failure is a common reason for hospital admission and is usually caused by decreased cardiac output either as a result of an intrinsic cardiac issue or as a result of severe hypertension with elevated afterload. We present a patient with a history of HFrEF who presented with acute heart failure, found to have hypotension requiring Dobutamine support and an elevated systemic vascular resistance requiring Nicardipine drip, with subsequent recovery of cardiac function.

  6. Assessing the potential of e-mail for communicating drug therapy recommendations to physicians in patients with heart failure and ventricular-assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekura, Jona; Tita, Cristina; Lanfear, David E; Williams, Celeste T; Jennings, Douglas L

    2014-10-01

    This project explores electronic mail (e-mail) as a potential medium for pharmacists to communicate pharmacotherapy interventions to prescribers. This retrospective descriptive analysis was conducted at an urban, academic teaching hospital. The pharmacist attempted a drug therapy intervention via e-mail when unable to make face-to-face contact with the attending physician. Eligible patients for this project were admitted to the advanced heart failure (HF) team between December 1, 2010, and July 31, 2011, and had at least 1 attempted e-mail intervention. The primary outcome was the number of accepted interventions, while the secondary end point was the time until a physician e-mail response. A total of 51 e-mail interventions were attempted on 29 patients (mean age = 53, 24% caucasian, 59% male, 69% left ventricular-assist device [VAD]). Overall, of the total 51 interventions,44 (86.3%) were accepted. The average time to a physician e-mail response was 41 minutes. Initiation of drug therapy and changing dose and route or frequency accounted for the most frequent intervention (33%). The most common drug classes involved in the e-mail interventions were angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (15.7%), loop diuretics (9.8%), and antiplatelet agents (7.8%). Clinical pharmacists with well-established physician relationships can effectively implement timely drug therapy recommendations using e-mail communications in patients with advanced HF or VADs. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. EFFECTS OF BETAHISTINE DIHYDROCHLORIDE AS ADJUVANT TO ENALAPRIL THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE CLASS II-II (NYHA SUFFERING FROM GIDDINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study adjuvant effect of betahistine dihydrochloride to ACE inhibitors in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF class II-III suffering from giddiness.Material and methods. 61 patients with CHF class II-III, ejection fraction ≤45% (Simpson suffering from giddiness were involved into randomized open parallel study. Patients were randomized to Betahistine dihydrochloride plus basic CHF therapy or only basic therapy groups. Enalapril dose titration was performed in all patients. Quality of life and giddiness severity evaluation, electrocardiogram was performed initially and after treatment. Clinical examination results, drug therapy and adverse event were registered at each visit.Results. The target ACE inhibitor dose (≥20 mg daily was reached in 97 % of patients. It led to significant reduction of dyspnea, edemas, CHF class reduction and life quality increase. Significant differences between investigated groups were not found. Reduction of giddiness severity was shown in both groups. There was a trend to more prominent improvement of life quality (р=0,08 and more frequent achievement of target ACE inhibitor dose in patients treated with betahistine dihydrochloride.Conclusion. The target ACE inhibitor dose can be achieved more than in 90% of patients with CHF class II-III without hypotension symptoms. Adjuvant usage of betahistine dihydrochloride is necessary in patients with CHF still suffering from giddiness after achievement of target ACE inhibitor dose.

  8. DDD pacemaker for severe heart failure-alternate to CRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamani, N C

    Patients with severe systolic Heart Failure continue to have poor quality of life and increased mortality in spite of optimal medical management. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy [CRT] is promising modality in patients with systolic heart failure and electrocardiographic [ECG] evidence of left bundle branch block [LBBB]. Cost issues continue to elude many deserving cases of this therapy in our society. Relatively cost effective Dual chamber pacing [DDD] with right atrial and isolated left ventricular pacing [RA-LV] can be a good alternative. Copyright © 2016 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated heart rate is an established marker of cardiovascular risk. Previous analyses have suggested that ivabradine, a heart-rate-reducing agent, may improve outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heart rate of 70 beats per...... minute or more. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ivabradine, added to standard background therapy, in 19,102 patients who had both stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure and a heart rate of 70 beats per minute or more (including 12...... without activity-limiting angina (P=0.02 for interaction). The incidence of bradycardia was higher with ivabradine than with placebo (18.0% vs. 2.3%, Pdisease without clinical heart failure, the addition of ivabradine to standard...

  10. Rehospitalization for heart failure: problems and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Fonarow, Gregg C; Bonow, Robert O

    2013-01-29

    With a prevalence of 5.8 million in the United States alone, heart failure (HF) is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditures. Close to 1 million hospitalizations for heart failure (HHF) occur annually, accounting for over 6.5 million hospital days and a substantial portion of the estimated $37.2 billion that is spent each year on HF in the United States. Although some progress has been made in reducing mortality in patients hospitalized with HF, rates of rehospitalization continue to rise, and approach 30% within 60 to 90 days of discharge. Approximately half of HHF patients have preserved or relatively preserved ejection fraction (EF). Their post-discharge event rate is similar to those with reduced EF. HF readmission is increasingly being used as a quality metric, a basis for hospital reimbursement, and an outcome measure in HF clinical trials. In order to effectively prevent HF readmissions and improve overall outcomes, it is important to have a complete and longitudinal characterization of HHF patients. This paper highlights management strategies that when properly implemented may help reduce HF rehospitalizations and include adopting a mechanistic approach to cardiac abnormalities, treating noncardiac comorbidities, increasing utilization of evidence-based therapies, and improving care transitions, monitoring, and disease management. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute Heart Failure: Definition, Classification and Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmani, Sameer; Squire, Iain

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the extent and scope of acute heart failure (AHF), place it within its clinical context and highlight some of the difficulties in defining it as a pathophysiological entity. A diagnosis of AHF is made when patients present acutely with signs and symptoms of heart failure, often with decompensation of pre-existing cardiomyopathy. The most current guidelines classify based on clinical features at initial presentation and are used to both risk stratify and guide the management of haemodynamic compromise. Despite this, AHF remains a diagnosis with a poor prognosis and there is no therapy proven to have long-term mortality benefits. We provide an introduction to AHF and discuss its definition, causes and precipitants. We also present epidemiological and demographic data to suggest that there is significant patient heterogeneity and that AHF is not a single pathology, but rather a range of pathophysiological entities. This poses a challenge when designing clinical trials and may, at least in part, explain why the results in this area have been largely disappointing.

  12. Diabetes-related heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Yasuko K; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2014-01-01

    As the link between heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus (DM) becomes unignorable, so the need is further increasing for pathological comprehension: What is "diabetic cardiomyopathy (DMC)?" In response to current concern, the most updated guidelines stated by the ACCF/AHA and by the ESC/EASD take one step further, including the definition of DMC, although it is a matter yet to be completed. For more than 40 years, coronary artery disease and hypertension have been considered as the main causes of diabetes-related cardiac dysfunction. HF was originally considered as a result of reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HF-REF); however, it has been recognized that HF symptoms are often observed in patients with preserved EF (HF-PEF). DMC includes HF with both reduced and preserved entities independent of coronary stenosis and hypertension. Cardiologists are thus facing a sort of chaos without clear guidelines for the "deadly intersection" of DM and HF. Today, the increasing interest and concern have caused DMC to be revisited and the first step in controlling the chaos around DMC is to organize and analyze all of the available evidence from preclinical and clinical studies. This review aims to illustrate the current concepts of DMC by shedding light on the new molecular mechanisms.  (Circ J 2014; 78: 576-583).

  13. Right ventricular failure secondary to chronic overload in congenital heart diseases: benefits of cell therapy using human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Virginie; Gouadon, Elodie; Capderou, André; Le Bret, Emmanuel; Ly, Mohamed; Dinanian, Sylvie; Renaud, Jean-Francois; Pucéat, Michel; Rücker-Martin, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Despite the increasing incidence of right ventricular (RV) failure in adult patients with congenital heart disease, current therapeutic options are still limited. By contrast to left-heart diseases, cell-based myocardial regeneration applied to the right ventricle is poorly studied, even though it may be a therapeutic solution. As human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitors seem to be good candidates owing to their proliferation capacity, our aim was to assess, in a large animal model of overloaded RV dysfunction, the feasibility and effects of such a cell therapy. Human MesP1(+)/SSEA-1(+) cardiogenic mesodermal cells were administered using multiple intramyocardial injections 4 months after a surgical procedure mimicking the repaired tetralogy of Fallot, and their effects were observed 3 months later on hemodynamic, rhythmic, and histologic parameters. All pigs (sham n = 6, treated n = 6) survived without complication, and cell therapy was clinically well tolerated. Although functional, contractility, and energetics parameters evolved similarly in both groups, benefits regarding arrhythmic susceptibility were observed in the treated group, associated with a significant decrease of peri-myocyte fibrosis (5.71% ± 2.49% vs 12.12% ± 1.85%; P cells could be detected within the myocardium. Cell therapy using intramyocardial injections of human MesP1(+)/SSEA-1(+) cardiogenic mesodermal cells seems to have benefits regarding overloaded RV tissue remodeling and arrhythmic susceptibility, but this mode of administration is not sufficient to obtain a significant improvement in RV function. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diastolic heart failure in anaesthesia and critical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pirracchio, R.; Cholley, B.; de Hert, S.; Solal, A. Cohen; Mebazaa, A.

    2007-01-01

    Diastolic heart failure is an underestimated pathology with a high risk of acute decompensation during the perioperative period. This article reviews the epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of diastolic heart failure. Although frequently underestimated, diastolic heart failure

  15. Comparable benefit of β-blocker therapy in heart failure across regions of the world: meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Saurav; Udell, Jacob A; Sardar, Partha; Lichstein, Edgar; Ryan, John J

    2014-08-01

    There is a concern about geographical region heterogeneity regarding clinical benefit of β-blocker (BB) therapy in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). This study sought to compare benefits of BB use within randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that enrolled patients with HFrEF from North America (NA) compared with other regions of the world (ROW). We conducted a meta-analysis using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Scopus (inceptions-December 2012) of BB RCTs stratified according to NA vs ROW. The primary end point was all-cause mortality and secondary end points were cardiovascular death, sudden death, death due to pump failure, and premature drug discontinuation. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each outcome were calculated with interaction terms for region. Two-sided P values were calculated with P analysis included 16 RCTs with 14,452 patients; 7 trials were conducted in NA and 9 trials in ROW with follow-up durations of 3-58 months. All-cause mortality was consistently reduced in NA (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71-0.96; P = 0.01) and ROW (OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.69-0.84; P < 0.001; P-interaction = 0.40). Overall and according to region, all secondary end points including premature drug discontinuation were also less with BB therapy (P-interactions all ≥ 0.10). For the regions represented in the included trials, there is no evidence to suggest that geographic region is a significant moderator of clinical outcomes with BB therapy in HFrEF patients. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of Inotropic Agents in Treatment of Systolic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Sohaib; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2015-12-04

    The most common use of inotropes is among hospitalized patients with acute decompensated heart failure, with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and with signs of end-organ dysfunction in the setting of a low cardiac output. Inotropes can be used in patients with severe systolic heart failure awaiting heart transplant to maintain hemodynamic stability or as a bridge to decision. In cases where patients are unable to be weaned off inotropes, these agents can be used until a definite or escalated supportive therapy is planned, which can include coronary revascularization or mechanical circulatory support (intra-aortic balloon pump, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, impella, left ventricular assist device, etc.). Use of inotropic drugs is associated with risks and adverse events. This review will discuss the use of the inotropes digoxin, dopamine, dobutamine, norepinephrine, milrinone, levosimendan, and omecamtiv mecarbil. Long-term inotropic therapy should be offered in selected patients. A detailed conversation with the patient and family shall be held, including a discussion on the risks and benefits of use of inotropes. Chronic heart failure patients awaiting heart transplants are candidates for intravenous inotropic support until the donor heart becomes available. This helps to maintain hemodynamic stability and keep the fluid status and pulmonary pressures optimized prior to the surgery. On the other hand, in patients with severe heart failure who are not candidates for advanced heart failure therapies, such as transplant and mechanical circulatory support, inotropic agents can be used for palliative therapy. Inotropes can help reduce frequency of hospitalizations and improve symptoms in these patients.

  17. Causes of hospital readmission with heart failure at Muhimbili ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Causes of hospital readmission with heart failure at Muhimbili National hospital: Tanzanian experience. ... Background: Readmission rates for patients discharged with heart failure approaches fifty percent within six months. ... cardiomyopathies, hypertensive heart disease, rheumatic heart disease and pericardial disease.

  18. Advanced Strategies for End-Stage Heart Failure : Combining Regenerative Approaches with LVAD, a New Horizon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tseng, Cheyenne C S; Ramjankhan, FZ; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Chamuleau, Steven A J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the improved treatment of cardiovascular diseases, the population with end-stage heart failure (HF) is progressively growing. The scarcity of the gold standard therapy, heart transplantation, demands novel therapeutic approaches. For patients awaiting transplantation, ventricular-assist

  19. Bio-artificial heart as ultimate treatment of end-stage heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Francis E; Dohmen, Pascal M

    2014-10-16

    End-stage heart failure is a major health problem, but implementation of guidelines and optimizing medical therapy for this devastating disease should decrease mortality. If optimal conservative therapy is no longer sufficient, a mechanical support system may be required as final destination therapy or as bridge-to-transplant. Since the first heart transplantation in 1967, this therapy has become the criterion standard for end-stage heart failure, but is limited due to organ shortage. Tissue engineering could help overcome this limitation and provide regeneration, remodeling, and growth potential. This so-called bio-artificial heart would be available, created by a decellularized extracellular matrix and seeded with in vitro proliferated autologous cardiovascular cells. Results of the first experimental studies have been promising, but numerous challenges must be met before this procedure will be available.

  20. Optimizing clinical risk stratification in acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demissei, Biniyam Gemechu

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure occurs when the heart is unable to pump sufficiently to maintain blood flow to meet the body's needs. Acute heart failure is defined as a rapid onset of signs and symptoms of heart failure resulting in the need for urgent medical treatment. Acute heart failure is associated with

  1. Clinical characteristics and causes of heart failure, adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical characteristics and causes of heart failure, adherence to treatment guidelines, and mortality of patients with acute heart failure: Experience at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa.

  2. Nutritional Deficiency in Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Sciatti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Although evidence-based treatments have substantially improved outcomes, prognosis remains poor with high costs for health care systems. In patients with HF, poor dietary behaviors are associated with unsatisfactory quality of life and adverse outcome. The HF guidelines have not recommended a specific nutritional strategy. Despite the role of micronutrient deficiency, it has been extensively studied, and data about the efficacy of supplementation therapy in HF are not supported by large randomized trials and there is limited evidence regarding the outcomes. The aim of the present review is to analyze the state-of-the-art of nutritional deficiencies in HF, focusing on the physiological role and the prognostic impact of micronutrient supplementation.

  3. Nutritional Deficiency in Patients with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciatti, Edoardo; Lombardi, Carlo; Ravera, Alice; Vizzardi, Enrico; Bonadei, Ivano; Carubelli, Valentina; Gorga, Elio; Metra, Marco

    2016-07-22

    Heart failure (HF) is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Although evidence-based treatments have substantially improved outcomes, prognosis remains poor with high costs for health care systems. In patients with HF, poor dietary behaviors are associated with unsatisfactory quality of life and adverse outcome. The HF guidelines have not recommended a specific nutritional strategy. Despite the role of micronutrient deficiency, it has been extensively studied, and data about the efficacy of supplementation therapy in HF are not supported by large randomized trials and there is limited evidence regarding the outcomes. The aim of the present review is to analyze the state-of-the-art of nutritional deficiencies in HF, focusing on the physiological role and the prognostic impact of micronutrient supplementation.

  4. Extracorporeal Ultrafiltration for Fluid Overload in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Ronco, Claudio; Abraham, William T.; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Barasch, Jonathan; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Gottlieb, Stephen S.; Jaski, Brian E.; Kazory, Amir; Levin, Allison P.; Levin, Howard R.; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Mullens, Wilfried; Negoianu, Dan; Redfield, Margaret M.; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Testani, Jeffrey M.; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2017-01-01

    More than 1 million heart failure hospitalizations occur annually, and congestion is the predominant cause. Rehospitalizations for recurrent congestion portend poor outcomes independently of age and renal function. Persistent congestion trumps serum creatinine increases in predicting adverse heart failure outcomes. No decongestive pharmacological therapy has reduced these harmful consequences. Simplified ultrafiltration devices permit fluid removal in lower-acuity hospital settings, but with conflicting results regarding safety and efficacy. Ultrafiltration performed at fixed rates after onset of therapy-induced increased serum creatinine was not superior to standard care and resulted in more complications. In contrast, compared with diuretic agents, some data suggest that adjustment of ultrafiltration rates to patients’ vital signs and renal function may be associated with more effective decongestion and fewer heart failure events. Essential aspects of ultrafiltration remain poorly defined. Further research is urgently needed, given the burden of congestion and data suggesting sustained benefits of early and adjustable ultrafiltration. PMID:28494980

  5. Ultrafiltration for congestive heart failure: the past and the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Kazory, Amir; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2015-01-08

    To provide an overview on the most recent evidence for the use of extracorporeal and peritoneal ultrafiltration in heart failure, focusing on the major publications from the last few years. There have been several studies investigating the possible use of extracorporeal and peritoneal ultrafiltration in the management of acute and chronic heart failure. These trials have investigated the potential benefits and advantages of ultrafiltration over conventional medical therapy, in terms of clinical outcomes. Although ultrafiltration remains an extremely appealing therapeutic option for patients with heart failure and congestion, with several theoretical beneficial effects, some of the most recent studies have reported inconsistent findings. Differences in the selection of the study population, heterogeneity of the indications for use of ultrafiltration, variation in the ultrafiltration protocols, and high variability in the pharmacologic therapy used for the control group could explain some of these conflicting findings.

  6. Adrenal adrenoceptors in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio ede Lucia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a chronic clinical syndrome characterized by the reduction in left ventricular (LV function and it represents one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite considerable advances in pharmacological treatment, HF represents a severe clinical and social burden. Sympathetic outflow, characterized by increased circulating catecholamines (CAs biosynthesis and secretion, is peculiar in HF and sympatholytic treatments (as β-blockers are presently being investigated for the treatment of this disease. Adrenal gland secretes Epinephrine (80% and Norepinephrine (20% in response to acetylcholine stimulation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors on the chromaffin cell membranes. This process is regulated by adrenergic receptors (ARs: α2ARs inhibit CA release through coupling to inhibitory Gi-proteins, and βARs (mainly β2ARs stimulate CA release through coupling to stimulatory Gs-proteins. All ARs are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and GPCR kinases (GRKs regulate their signaling and function. Adrenal GRK2-mediated α2AR desensitization and downregulation are increased in HF and seem to be a fundamental regulator of CA secretion from the adrenal gland. Consequently, restoration of adrenal a2AR signaling through the inhibition of GRK2 is a fascinating sympatholytic therapeutic strategy for chronic HF. This strategy could have several significant advantages over existing HF pharmacotherapies (antiadrenergic, such as bAR-blockers minimizing side-effects on extra-cardiac tissues and reducing the chronic activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone and endothelin systems.The role of adrenal ARs in regulation of sympathetic hyperactivity opens interesting perspectives in understanding pathophysiology of HF and identifying new potential therapeutic targets.

  7. Complete left bundle branch block and smaller left atrium are predictors of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Nitta, Daisuke; Komuro, Issei

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) is not an appropriate rescue strategy in patients with advanced heart failure (HF), especially those dependent on inotrope infusion, and instead early ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation should be considered. Predictors of response to CRT in such populations, however, remain uncertain. We studied 67 inpatients aged 10% at 6-month follow up. On logistic regression analysis, LA volume index (LAVI) bundle branch block (CLBBB; OR, 6.663; P=0.032) were significant predictors of response to CRT-D among the baseline variables. Patients with both predictors were associated with improvements in LVEF and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide compared with those with none of these predictors during the 6-month follow up period (P<0.05 for both). VAD-free survival rate was significantly higher in the responders compared with the non-responders during the 2-year study period (86% vs. 52%, P=0.044). CLBBB and smaller LAVI are novel predictors of response in patients with advanced HF receiving CRT-D in real-world practice. Such responders may be better candidates for CRT-D and delay of cardiac replacement therapy.

  8. Losartan improves heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence in heart failure due to ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Murat; Arslan, Uğur; Türkoğlu, Sedat; Balcioğlu, Serhat; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-12-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence are known to be disturbed and associated with excess mortality in heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate whether losartan, when added on top of beta-blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) therapy, could improve these indices in patients with systolic heart failure. Seventy-seven patients (mean age 60.4 +/- 8.0, 80.5% male) with ischemic cardiomyopathy (mean ejection fraction 34.5 +/- 4.4%) and New York Heart Association Class II-III heart failure symptoms, already receiving a beta-blocker and an ACEI, were randomly assigned to either open-label losartan (losartan group) or no additional drug (control group) in a 2:1 ratio and the patients were followed for 12 weeks. The HRV and heart rate turbulence indices were calculated from 24-hour Holter recordings both at the beginning and at the end of follow-up. The baseline clinical characteristics, HRV, and heart rate turbulence indices were similar in the 2 groups. At 12 weeks of follow-up, all HRV parameters except pNN50 increased (SDNN: 113.2 +/- 34.2 versus 127.8 +/- 24.1, P = .001; SDANN: 101.5 +/- 31.7 versus 115.2 +/- 22.0, P = .001; triangular index: 29.9 +/- 11.1 versus 34.2 +/- 7.9, P = .008; RMSSD: 29.1 +/- 20.2 versus 34.3 +/- 23.0, P = .009; NN50: 5015.3 +/- 5554.9 versus 6446.7 +/- 6101.1, P = .024; NN50: 5.65 +/- 6.41 versus 7.24 +/- 6.99, P = .089; SDNNi: 45.1 +/- 13.3 versus 50.3 +/- 14.5, P = .004), turbulence onset decreased (-0. 61 +/- 1.70 versus -1.24 +/- 1.31, P = .003) and turbulence slope increased (4.107 +/- 3.881 versus 5.940 +/- 4.281, P = .004) significantly in the losartan group as compared with controls. A 12-week-long losartan therapy significantly improved HRV and heart rate turbulence in patients with Class II-III heart failure and ischemic cardiomyopathy already on beta-blockers and ACEI.

  9. How Can I Live with Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More How Can I Live With Heart Failure? Updated:Dec 8, ... recover. Medicine Notes: Diet Notes: Exercise Notes: How can I learn more? Call 1-800-AHA-USA1 ( ...

  10. Psoriasis and risk of heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disease that is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction. Heart failure (HF) is independently associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and is a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality...

  11. Parallel paths to improve heart failure outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Nancy M.

    2013-01-01

    Gaps and disparities in delivery of heart failure education by nurses and performance in accomplishing self-care behaviors by patients with advanced heart failure may be factors in clinical decompensation and unplanned consumption of health care. Is nurse-led education effectively delivered before...... hospital discharge? Nurse leaders must understand the strength of nurses’ knowledge base related to self-care principles and important barriers to best practice. Nurses may not be comfortable teaching patients about dry weight, meal planning, heart failure medications, or progressive steps of activity...... and exercise. Further, clinical nurses may not have time to provide in-depth education to patients before discharge. Equally important, research is needed to learn about factors that enhance patients’ adherence to heart failure self-care behaviors, because adherence to recommendations of national, evidence...

  12. Obesity, Heart Failure, and Obesity Paradox

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nikoo Hamzeh; Fatemeh Ghadimi; Rojin Farzaneh; Seyed Kianoosh Hosseini

    2017-01-01

    .... The concept of the “obesity paradox” has been proposed by some previously published studies, in which the prognosis of obese patients with established cardiovascular diseases, especially heart failure, is better than that of their leaner counterparts...

  13. Heart failure and COPD: partners in crime?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannink, J.D.C.; Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and heart failure (HF) are both common diseases with major impact and seem to coexist more frequently than expected from their separate population prevalences. However, estimates of combined prevalence must be interpreted carefully because of

  14. Patient Experiences of Structured Heart Failure Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuala E. Tully

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Patient experiences of structured heart failure rehabilitation and their views on the important components of heart failure services were examined. Methods. Focus groups were conducted with fifteen participants (men, =12 attending one of two heart failure rehabilitation programmes. Sessions were guided by a semistructured interview schedule covering participants' experiences of the programme, maintenance, and GP role. Focus group transcripts were analysed qualitatively. Results. Participants indicated that rehabilitation programmes substantially met their needs. Supervised exercise sessions increased confidence to resume physical activity, while peer-group interaction and supportive medical staff improved morale. However, once the programme ended, some participants' self-care motivation lapsed, especially maintenance of an exercise routine. Patients doubted their GPs' ability to help them manage their condition. Conclusion. Structured rehabilitation programmes are effective in enabling patients to develop lifestyle skills to live with heart failure. However, postrehabilitation maintenance interventions are necessary to sustain patients' confidence in disease self-management.

  15. Advanced Heart Failure and Management Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Gaddam, Krishna K.; Yelamanchili, Pridhvi; Sedghi, Yabiz; Ventura, Hector O.

    2009-01-01

    The global healthcare burden attributable to heart failure is ever increasing. Patients presenting with refractory heart failure should be evaluated for compliance with medical regimens and sodium and/or fluid restriction, and every attempt should be made to optimize conventional strategies. Reversible causes such as ischemia should be identified and revascularization considered in persistently symptomatic patients, particularly those with a viable myocardium. Carefully selected patients who ...

  16. New Insights in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnetti, Giulio; Piepoli, Massimo F.; Siniscalchi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the US and in westernized countries with ischemic heart disease accounting for the majority of these deaths. Paradoxically, the improvements in the medical and surgical treatments of acute coronary syndrome are leading to an increasing number of “survivors” who are then developing heart failure. Despite considerable advances in its management, the gold standard for the treatment of end-stage heart failure patients remains heart transplantation. Nevertheless, this procedure can be offered only to a small percentage of patients who could benefit from a new heart due to the limited availability of donor organs. The aim of this review is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of innovative approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of patients refractory to standard medical therapy and excluded from cardiac transplantation lists. PMID:26634204

  17. New Insights in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Agnetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the US and in westernized countries with ischemic heart disease accounting for the majority of these deaths. Paradoxically, the improvements in the medical and surgical treatments of acute coronary syndrome are leading to an increasing number of “survivors” who are then developing heart failure. Despite considerable advances in its management, the gold standard for the treatment of end-stage heart failure patients remains heart transplantation. Nevertheless, this procedure can be offered only to a small percentage of patients who could benefit from a new heart due to the limited availability of donor organs. The aim of this review is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of innovative approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of patients refractory to standard medical therapy and excluded from cardiac transplantation lists.

  18. Cardiorenal syndrome in heart failure: a cardiologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peter P

    2008-07-01

    One of the most important comorbidities in heart failure is renal dysfunction. Diminished estimated glomerular filtration rate is a potent predictor of cardiovascular mortality and complications. On the other hand, worsening heart failure or acute decompensated heart failure can accelerate worsening of renal function--the so-called cardiorenal syndrome. Risk factors include hypertension, diabetes, elderly age, and prior history of heart or renal failure. The pathophysiology of the cardiorenal syndrome involves intrarenal hemodynamics, transrenal perfusion pressure and systemic neurohormonal factors. Clinical management of the patient with cardiorenal syndrome includes the challenge of diuretic resistance, which may involve correcting the underlying cause, combination diuretics or diuretic infusions. The key to improved outcome is the optimization of proven heart failure therapies. The use of vasodilator therapy is the current mainstay of treatment. Nesiritide, or recombinant B-type natriuretic peptide, has courted controversy regarding its role in cardiorenal syndrome. However, data are emerging that low doses appear to be renal-protective. Other more recent strategies include ultrafiltration, vasopressin antagonists and adenosine antagonists. All of these newer modalities promise more rapid volume removal, but their ultimate impact on survival or preservation of renal function is unknown at the present time. Because of the complex nature of these patients, and the compromised outcome, it is important that cardiologists, nephrologists and internists all work together toward the common goal of protecting the patient with cardiorenal syndrome, and use the best available evidence for management.

  19. Overview of emerging pharmacologic agents for acute heart failure syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Luca, Leonardo; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Parissis, John T.; Bohm, Michael; Voors, Adriaan A.; Nieminen, Markku; Zannad, Faiez; Rhodes, Andrew; El-Banayosy, Ali; Dickstein, Kenneth; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    Background: Several therapies commonly used for the treatment of acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) present some well-known limitations and have been associated with an early increase in the risk of death. There is, therefore, an unmet need for new pharmacologic agents for the early management of

  20. Daily Physical Activity in Stable Heart Failure Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dontje, Manon L.; van der Wal, M.H.L.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Brugemann, Johan; Jaarsma, Tiny; Wijtvliet, Petra E. P. J.; van der Schans, Cees P.; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical activity is the only nonpharmacological therapy that is proven to be effective in heart failure (HF) patients in reducing morbidity. To date, little is known about the levels of daily physical activity in HF patients and about related factors. Objective: The objectives of this

  1. The kidney in heart failure : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Testani, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Heart and kidney are closely related in the clinical syndrome of heart failure (HF). It is now sufficiently clear that renal dysfunction occurs frequently in all phenotypes of HF, and when present, it is associated with higher mortality and morbidity. While the pathophysiology is multifactorial, the

  2. Deranged Cardiac Metabolism and the Pathogenesis of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the neuro-hormonal system is a pathophysiological consequence of heart failure. Neuro-hormonal activation promotes metabolic changes, such as insulin resistance, and determines an increased use of non-carbohydrate substrates for energy production. Fasting blood ketone bodies as well as fat oxidation are increased in patients with heart failure, yielding a state of metabolic inefficiency. The net result is additional depletion of myocardial adenosine triphosphate, phosphocreatine and creatine kinase levels with further decreased efficiency of mechanical work. In this context, manipulation of cardiac energy metabolism by modification of substrate use by the failing heart has produced positive clinical results. The results of current research support the concept that shifting the energy substrate preference away from fatty acid metabolism and towards glucose metabolism could be an effective adjunctive treatment in patients with heart failure. The additional use of drugs able to partially inhibit fatty acids oxidation in patients with heart failure may therefore yield a significant protective effect for clinical symptoms and cardiac function improvement, and simultaneously ameliorate left ventricular remodelling. Certainly, to clarify the exact therapeutic role of metabolic therapy in heart failure, a large multicentre, randomised controlled trial should be performed. PMID:28785448

  3. Update on device technologies for monitoring heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bharat; Russell, Stuart D; Cheng, Alan

    2012-10-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) affects more than 5 million people in the United States and is one of the most common reasons for recurrent hospitalizations. Since the majority of admissions related to CHF are secondary to progressively worsening congestion, many clinicians are quick to initiate aggressive diuresis once early signs of impending heart failure develop. These signs are based in large measure on patient-reported symptoms. Unfortunately, recent trials have shown that traditional ambulatory monitoring of heart failure using patient symptoms or body weight do not reduce episodes of decompensated heart failure requiring hospitalization. This has led to great interest in developing monitoring systems that can detect impending episodes of CHF even prior to the development of symptoms. Some of the these systems utilize existing implantable cardioverter defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices to monitor electrophysiologic parameters including the presence of ventricular arrhythmias, heart rate variability and even transthoracic impedances. Other more recent developments have focused on more invasive hemodynamic monitoring systems that can measure pressures in the right ventricle, pulmonary arteries and the left atrium. The data on the utility of such systems is limited but encouraging. While none of these systems are currently FDA approved, they have been applied in a number of clinical trials. This paper highlights the currently available monitoring systems for heart failure and reviews the evidence supporting its use.

  4. Clinical trials update from Heart Rhythm 2008 and Heart Failure 2008: ATHENA, URGENT, INH study, HEART and CK-1827452.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Alison P; Cleland, John G F; Cullington, Damien; Clark, Andrew L

    2008-09-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at the Heart Rhythm Society meeting in San Francisco, USA and the Heart Failure Association meeting of the European Society of Cardiology which was held in Milan, Italy in June 2008. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. The ATHENA study showed that dronedarone reduced the incidence of the composite outcome of cardiovascular hospitalisation or death, in patients with atrial fibrillation or flutter, 29% of whom had a history of heart failure, compared with placebo. The URGENT study demonstrated that treatment of acute heart failure with standard therapy, including intravenous diuretics and nitrates, leads to a rapid resolution of breathlessness in the sitting position but that orthopnoea often persists. The INH study showed that a disease management programme could reduce mortality compared to usual care but not hospitalisation rates. The HEART study failed to recruit its planned number of patients, although it is the largest randomised trial of revascularisation in heart failure reported to date. At a median follow-up of 5 years no difference in mortality was observed but the study lacked power to provide a conclusive result. The selective myosin activator CK-1827452 produced a concentration dependent increase in systolic ejection time, stroke volume and fractional shortening in patients with heart failure compared to placebo.

  5. Carotid Baroreceptor Stimulation in Resistant Hypertension and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seravalle, Gino; Grassi, Guido

    2015-09-01

    A significant number of hypertensive subjects fail to achieve adequate blood pressure control despite adherence to maximal doses of several antihypertensive drugs. In the same way although medical and device therapies continue to improve the clinical course of heart failure patients, morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs remain high. Electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus is a new interesting approach for the treatment of resistant hypertension and heart failure. The purpose of this paper is to overview the argument starting from physiological background and evaluating the clinical results obtained with this approach in these pathophysiological conditions.

  6. Transcatheter Interatrial Shunt Device for the Treatment of Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldman, Ted; Komtebedde, Jan; Burkhoff, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a major public health problem with high morbidity and mortality rates, remains difficult to manage because of a lack of effective treatment options. Although HFpEF is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, elevated left atrial pressure...... the rationale for a therapeutic transcatheter interatrial shunt device in HFpEF, and we describe the design of REDUCE Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Heart Failure (REDUCE LAP-HF I), the first randomized controlled trial of a device-based therapy to reduce left atrial pressure in HFpEF. CLINICAL TRIAL...

  7. Benefit of exercise therapy for systolic heart failure in relation to disease severity and etiology-findings from the Heart Failure and A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whellan, David J; Nigam, Anil; Arnold, Malcolm; Starr, Aijing Z; Hill, James; Fletcher, Gerald; Ellis, Stephen J; Cooper, Lawton; Onwuanyi, Anekwe; Chandler, Bleakley; Keteyian, Steven J; Ewald, Greg; Kao, Andrew; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2011-12-01

    This post hoc analysis of the HF-ACTION cohort explores the primary and secondary results of the HF-ACTION study by etiology and severity of illness. HF-ACTION randomized stable outpatients with reduced left ventricular (LV) function and heart failure (HF) symptoms to either supervised exercise training plus usual care or to usual care alone. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality or all-cause hospitalization; secondary outcomes included all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization, and cardiovascular mortality or HF hospitalization. The interaction between treatment and risk variable, etiology or severity as determined by risk score, New York Heart Association class, and duration of cardiopulmonary exercise test was examined in a Cox proportional hazards model for all clinical end points. There was no interaction between etiology and treatment for the primary outcome (P = .73), cardiovascular (CV) mortality or CV hospitalization (P = .59), or CV mortality or HF hospitalization (P = .07). There was a significant interaction between etiology and treatment for the outcome of mortality (P = .03), but the interaction was no longer significant when adjusted for HF-ACTION adjustment model predictors (P = .08). There was no significant interaction between treatment effect and severity, except a significant interaction between cardiopulmonary exercise duration and training was identified for the primary outcome of all-cause mortality or all-cause hospitalization. Consideration of symptomatic (New York Heart Association classes II to IV) patients with HF with reduced LV function for participation in an exercise training program should be made independent of the cause of HF or the severity of the symptoms. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ACE inhibitors and calcium antagonists in the treatment of congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J F

    1995-01-01

    The increased mortality after myocardial infarction is related to the risk of reinfarction, sudden death, and the development and progression of heart failure; in congestive heart failure it is due to the progression of heart failure and sudden death. ACE inhibitors have been proven to prevent...... cardiovascular events, especially the progression of heart failure, in postinfarct patients with reduced ejection fraction and heart failure in the SAVE and AIRE trials. In patients with congestive heart failure, ACE inhibitor treatment has prevented cardiovascular death and reduced morbidity due to progressive...... by prevention of reinfarction and sudden death. Combination treatment with both verapamil, which has pronounced antiischemic properties and prevents sudden death and reinfarction, and an ACE inhibitor, which prevents the progression of heart failure, is a possibility for future cardiovascular therapy...

  9. A review of heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Dhaval R

    2011-01-01

    The nearly one-million estimated adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients in the United States now outnumber children with congenital heart disease (CHD). With continued improvement in survival due to surgical and medical management of patients born with CHD, there is an overall shift in the burden of care from childhood to adulthood. Due to this transitioning population, the probability of heart failure continues to increase with age and represents nearly one-quarter of all mortality in ACHD. Despite these sobering figures adult cardiologist and fellows continue to have limited exposure in the care of patients with congenital heart disease. The syndrome of heart failure represents a complex derangement of neurohormones, natriuretic peptides, and cytokines leading to progressive symptoms of exercise intolerance, dyspnea, and fatigue. Congenital heart patients represent a unique challenge in both categorization and protocol management of heart failure (HF). It remains unclear if the current four-stage ACC/AHA guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of HF in adults can serve as a meaningful framework for congenital heart patients. Additionally, widely used conventional HF therapy of beta-blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) have not demonstrated clear survival benefit in this population. Unfortunately, adequately powered and controlled randomized studies are grossly lacking and remain challenging to conduct. Nonetheless, a review of heart failure associated with ACHD is provided.

  10. [Therapy of Arterial Hypertension in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure and Signs of Chronic Kidney Disease With Fixed Perindopril/Amlodipine Combination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovkova, N Ju; Kuznecova, T E; Borovkov, N N; Kovaleva, G V

    2015-01-01

    to assess efficacy of a fixed combination of perindopril arginine and amlodipine besylate in the treatment of hypertensive patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and signs of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Persons with CKD (n = 53, age 64.5 ± 8.2 years) were selected from 118 patients with grade 2-3 essential hypertension with CHF. Presence of CKD was confirmed by elevated blood levels of cystatin C and lowered glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Used doses of fixed perindopril/amlodipine combination were 5/5, 5/10, 10/10 mg. Efficacy was assessed after 2 months of therapy on the basis of results of the examination which included clinical blood pressure (BP), BP monitoring, 6-min walk test. Blood levels of creatinine, urea, cystatin C and GFR were also measured. Target BP was achieved in 92.6% of patients. Clinical BP was significantly decreased. Daily average systolic BP decreased by 14.7%, diastolic BP--by 14.4%. Systolic and diastolic BP load also decreased. Clinical condition improved. Tolerance to physical work increased. Level of cystatin C significantly decreased while GFR increased. Fixed perindopril/amlodipine combination produced good therapeutic effect in hypertensive patients with CHF and CKD.

  11. Acute effects of low-level laser therapy irradiation on blood lactate and muscle fatigue perception in hospitalized patients with heart failure-a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Caroline; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; Ramos, Rodrigo Santin; Assis, Livia; Sellera, Carlos Alberto Cyrillo; Trimer, Renata; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Arena, Ross; Guizilini, Solange

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the acute effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on functional capacity, perceived exertion, and blood lactate in hospitalized patients with heart failure (HF). Patients diagnosed with systolic HF (left ventricular ejection fraction laser and active LLLT group (n = 10)-subjects who were submitted to active laser. The 6-min walk test (6MWT) was performed, and blood lactate was determined at rest (before LLLT application and 6MWT), immediately after the exercise test (time 0) and recovery (3, 6, and 30 min). A multi-diode LLLT cluster probe (DMC, São Carlos, Brazil) was used. Both groups increased 6MWT distance after active or placebo LLLT application compared to baseline values (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively); however, no difference was observed during intergroup comparison. The active LLLT group showed a significant reduction in the perceived exertion Borg (PEB) scale compared to the placebo LLLT group (p = 0.006). In addition, the group that received active LLLT showed no statistically significant difference for the blood lactate level through the times analyzed. The placebo LLLT group demonstrated a significant increase in blood lactate between the rest and recovery phase (p irradiation on skeletal musculature were not able to improve the functional capacity of hospitalized patients with HF, although it may favorably modulate blood lactate metabolism and reduce perceived muscle fatigue.

  12. Impact of pacing site on QRS duration and its relationship to hemodynamic response in cardiac resynchronization therapy for congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derval, Nicolas; Bordachar, Pierre; Lim, Han S; Sacher, Frederic; Ploux, Sylvain; Laborderie, Julien; Steendijk, Paul; Deplagne, Antoine; Ritter, Philippe; Garrigue, Stephane; Denis, Arnaud; Hocini, Mélèze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Clementy, Jacques; Jaïs, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that left ventricular (LV) pacing site is a critical parameter in optimizing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The present study evaluates the effect of pacing from different LV locations on QRS duration (QRSd) and their relationship to acute hemodynamic response in congestive heart failure patients. Thirty-five patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and left bundle branch block referred for CRT device implantation were studied. Eleven predetermined LV pacing sites were systematically assessed in random order: epicardial: coronary sinus (CS); endocardial: basal and mid-cavity (septal, anterior, lateral, and inferior), apex, and the endocardial site facing the CS pacing site. For each patient QRSd and +dP/dtmax during baseline (AAI) and DDD LV pacing at 2 atrioventricular delays were compared. Response to CRT was significantly better in patients with wider baseline QRSd (≥150 milliseconds). Hemodynamic response was inversely correlated to increase of QRSd during LV pacing (short atrioventricular [AV] delay: r = 0.44, P site of shortest QRSd significantly improved +dP/dtmax (+18 ± 25%, P response and that LV pacing location was a primary determinant of paced QRSd. Although QRSd did not predict the maximum hemodynamic response, our results confirm the link between electrical activation and hemodynamic response of the LV during CRT. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Tolvaptan: A Novel Diuretic in Heart Failure Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilman Zulkifli Amin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is still a major problem worldwide with high morbidity and mortality rates. The recently developed medication for HF is still incapable of reducing its morbidity and mortality, and clinical data supporting the efficacy and safety of its mainstay therapy remain insufficient. Arginine-vasopressin (AVP plays important roles in circulatory and water homeostasis, one of which is water retention through the V2 receptor. In patients with HF, there is an increased level of AVP, contributing to such symptoms as edema, dyspnea, and congestion. Tolvaptan as a selective V2 receptor antagonist, in addition to the conventional therapy, has been shown to cause an increase in net fluid loss, a decrease in body weight, and a reduction in the rate of HF exacerbation. Such evidence has been provided by the Acute and Chronic Therapeutic Impact of a Vasopressin Antagonist (ACTIV in Congestive Heart Failure (CHF, Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonism in Heart Failure Outcome Study With Tolvaptan (EVEREST, Acute Heart Failure Volume Control Multicenter Randomized (AVCMA, and Study of Ascending Levels of Tolvaptan in hyponatremia 1and 2 (SALT-1 and SALT-2 trials. Tolvaptan can be an alternative diuretic in conjunction with other standard therapies for HF and has already been proved to be able to decrease morbidity and mortality, especially in HF patients with hyponatremia.

  14. Self-Care Guide for the Heart Failure Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiology Patient Page Self-Care Guide for the Heart Failure Patient Maria Fe White , Joan Kirschner , Michele A. ... Vaccinations for pneumonia and influenza are recommended. Additional Heart Failure Treatments Your heart condition may remain stable long ...

  15. Management of congestive heart failure (CHF): a case report on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A case report on the management of Congestive Heart Failure is presented with emphasis on the use of DIGOXIN. Keywords: Congestive heart failure, Failing heart syndrome, Digoxin, Digoxin Toxicity ...

  16. Recognizing Advanced Heart Failure and Knowing Your Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Recognizing Advanced Heart Failure and Knowing Your Options Updated:May 9,2017 ... need in the future. Treatment Options for Advanced Heart Failure Major Interventions Open-heart surgery: For patients with ...

  17. Palliative care for the terminal heart failure patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Walter L; Long, R Craig; Geraci, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic disease afflicting millions of patients worldwide. Advances in treatment have allowed sufferers to enjoy overall prolonged survival and enhanced quality of life. Yet, a consequence of these therapeutic successes is that more patients survive to end-stage disease, with severe symptoms, poor quality of life, and no options available to prolong their survival reasonably. End-stage heart failure patients require a comprehensive palliative approach to care during their final months, with treatment goals focusing on symptom relief. Often, specific heart failure therapies can further this cause and should be administered when appropriate to alleviate specific symptoms, while other general palliative measures should also be considered as with other terminal patients. End-of-life palliative strategies must conform to accepted principles of ethical care. Constant communication with patients and families is essential to achieve best treatment goals for this growing segment of the population.

  18. Aliskiren, Enalapril, or Aliskiren and Enalapril in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, John J V; Krum, Henry; Abraham, William T

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among patients with chronic heart failure, angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce mortality and hospitalization, but the role of a renin inhibitor in such patients is unknown. We compared the ACE inhibitor enalapril with the renin inhibitor aliskiren (to test superiority...... or at least noninferiority) and with the combination of the two treatments (to test superiority) in patients with heart failure and a reduced ejection fraction. METHODS: After a single-blind run-in period, we assigned patients, in a double-blind fashion, to one of three groups: 2336 patients were assigned...... to receive enalapril at a dose of 5 or 10 mg twice daily, 2340 to receive aliskiren at a dose of 300 mg once daily, and 2340 to receive both treatments (combination therapy). The primary composite outcome was death from cardiovascular causes or hospitalization for heart failure. RESULTS: After a median...

  19. The cardiorenal syndrome in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Kevin; Voors, Adriaan A; Navis, Gerjan; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans L

    2011-01-01

    The frequently occurring condition of renal failure in heart failure (HF) has been termed the cardiorenal syndrome. However, the importance of renal insufficiency in HF has only been embraced in the last decade, and therefore, the pathophysiology of cardiorenal failure is still poorly understood. The main driving force of renal failure in HF is probably hemodynamic derangement, with both reduced renal perfusion and increased venous pressure as the most important driving forces. Different cardiorenal connectors may modulate this relationship. Furthermore, renal failure is not only limited to reduced filtration but also includes glomerular hypertension and tubulointerstitial hypoxia, leading to loss of glomerular integrity and tubular damage. Recognition of these key pathophysiologic pathways in the concept of the cardiorenal syndrome is needed to value the interrelationship and incremental contribution of different risk markers and possible new treatments to improve renal function and outcome in this complex and bidirectional interplay between the heart and the kidney. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of heart failure in primary care (the IMPROVEMENT of Heart Failure Programme) : an international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleland, JGF; Cohen-Solal, A; Aguilar, JC; Dietz, R; Eastaugh, J; Follath, F; Freemantle, N; Gavazzi, A; van Gilst, WH; Hobbs, FDR; Korewicki, J; Madeira, HC; Preda, [No Value; Swedberg, K; Widimsky, J

    2002-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a prevalent condition that is generally treated in primary care. The aim of this study was to assess how primary-care physicians think that heart failure should be managed, how they implement their knowledge, and whether differences exist in practice between countries.

  1. Inverse Relationship of Blood Pressure to Long-Term Outcomes and Benefit of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Patients With Mild Heart Failure: A Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Long-Term Follow-Up Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biton, Yitschak; Moss, Arthur J; Kutyifa, Valentina; Mathias, Andrew; Sherazi, Saadia; Zareba, Wojciech; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Barsheshet, Alon; Brown, Mary W; Goldenberg, Ilan

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that low blood pressure is associated with increased mortality and heart failure (HF) in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) was shown to increase systolic blood pressure (SBP). Therefore, we hypothesized that treatment with CRT would provide incremental benefit in patients with lower SBP values. The independent contribution of SBP to outcome was analyzed in 1267 patients with left bundle brunch block enrolled in Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT). SBP was assessed as continuous measures and further categorized into approximate quintiles. The risk of long-term HF or death and CRT with defibrillator versus implantable cardioverter defibrillator benefit was assessed in multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models. Multivariate analysis showed that in the implantable cardioverter defibrillator arm, each 10-mm Hg decrement of SBP was independently associated with a significant 21% (P2-fold risk-increase. CRT with defibrillator provided the greatest HF or mortality risk reduction in patients with SBPSBP≥136 mm Hg and hazard ratio of 0.94, P=0.808, with SBP>136 mm Hg (P for trend=0.001). In patients with mild HF, prolonged QRS, and left bundle brunch block, low SBP is related to higher risk of mortality or HF with implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy alone. Treatment with CRT is associated with incremental clinical benefits in patients with lower baseline SBP values. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00180271. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Clinical presentation at first heart failure hospitalization does not predict recurrent heart failure admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosztin, Annamaria; Costa, Jason; Moss, Arthur J; Biton, Yitschak; Nagy, Vivien Klaudia; Solomon, Scott D; Geller, Laszlo; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Merkely, Bela; Kutyifa, Valentina

    2017-06-17

    There are limited data on whether clinical presentation at first heart failure (HF) hospitalization predicts recurrent HF events. We aimed to assess predictors of recurrent HF hospitalizations in mild HF patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator. Data on HF hospitalizations were prospectively collected for patients enrolled in MADIT-CRT. Predictors of recurrent HF hospitalization (HF2) after the first HF hospitalization were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression models including baseline covariates and clinical presentation or management at first HF hospitalization. There were 193 patients with first HF hospitalization, and 156 patients with recurrent HF events. Recurrent HF rate after the first HF hospitalization was 43% at 1 year, 52% at 2 years, and 55% at 2.5 years. Clinical signs and symptoms, medical treatment, or clinical management of HF at first HF admission was not predictive for HF2. Baseline covariates predicting recurrent HF hospitalization included prior HF hospitalization (HR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.15-2.20, P = 0.005), digitalis therapy (HR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.13-2.20, P = 0.008), and left ventricular end-diastolic volume >240 mL (HR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.17-2.25, P = 0.004). Recurrent HF events are frequent following the first HF hospitalization in patients with implanted implantable cardioverter defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator. Neither clinical presentation nor clinical management during first HF admission was predictive of recurrent HF. Prior HF hospitalization, digitalis therapy, and left ventricular end-diastolic volume at enrolment predicted recurrent HF hospitalization, and these covariates could be used as surrogate markers for identifying a high-risk cohort. © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  3. Effectiveness of beta-blocker therapy in daily practice patients with advanced chronic heart failure; is there an effect-modification by age?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, D.; deJongste, M.J.L.; Lucas, C.; Cleuren, G.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Ranchor, A.V.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.

    Aims The effects of beta-blockers in daily practice patients with advanced chronic heart failure (CHF) and a broad range of ejection fraction (EF) are not well established. We aimed to assess, first, the association between beta-blocker prescription at discharge and mortality in a cohort of patients

  4. Effects of statin therapy according to plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration in the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in Heart Failure (CORONA): a retrospective analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, John J V; Kjekshus, John; Gullestad, Lars

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined whether the antiinflammatory action of statins may be of benefit in heart failure, a state characterized by inflammation in which low cholesterol is associated with worse outcomes. METHODS AND RESULTS: We compared 10 mg rosuvastatin daily with placebo in patients with isch...

  5. Management of atrial fibrillation in heart failure in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Nasr, Imad; Mansencal, Nicolas; Dubourg, Olivier

    2008-04-10

    In elderly patients, atrial fibrillation prevalence exceeds 10% and is commonly associated with heart failure rendering their management even more challenging. Therapies to be considered for heart failure related atrial fibrillation include appropriate treatment of underlying disease, prevention of thromboembolism, rate or rhythm control. The debate regarding rate versus rhythm control in the management of this group of patients has yet to be resolved. For old patients, the management requires an individual approach, which largely depends on comorbid conditions, underlying cardiac disease, and patient and physician preferences. Use of antiarrhythmic drug therapy for maintenance of sinus rhythm carries concerns of risk and limited efficacy. Catheter ablation for rhythm control is feasible for some patients, but further studies are needed to define the risks and benefits especially in older patients. Atrioventricular nodal ablation associated with pacing therapy is an effective non-pharmacological therapy in selected patients with medically refractory permanent high heart rate atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Several studies are ongoing and will provide more insight into the management of such patients.

  6. Management of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Shane; Kaye, David M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the clinical management of patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). For this critical review, electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed) were searched for relevant basic research studies and randomized clinical trials recently published or presented at major meetings. Details of in-progress or planned studies were obtained from the ClinicalTrials.gov website. The range of publication dates was the year 2000 to 2015. Search terms included HFPEF, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, HFPSF, heart failure with preserved systolic function, diastolic heart failure, diastolic dysfunction, HFNEF, heart failure with normal ejection fraction, treatment, management, therapy. Patients with HFPEF account for up to half of all patients with a clinical diagnosis of HF. Key contributing factors include hypertension, obesity, and atrial fibrillation, and other chronic diseases, including diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and anemia, frequently coexist. To date, large-scale clinical trials, particularly those focused on antagonism of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, have provided limited evidence of clinical benefit. The aggressive management of contributing factors, including hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and myocardial ischemia, is key in the management of HFPEF. New insights into the mechanisms and thus the identification of potential therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The heart failure epidemic: a UK perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R Cowie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is appropriately described as an epidemic, with 1–2% of health care expenditure being directed at its management. In England, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE has issued guidance on the best practice for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure. Echocardiography is key to the diagnosis of the underlying cardiac abnormalities, and access to this (with our without biochemical testing using natriuretic peptides is key to high-quality and speedy diagnosis. New models of care aim to speed up access to echocardiography, but a shortage of technically trained staff remains a limiting factor in improving standards of care. The NHS audits the quality of care and outcome for patients admitted to hospital with heart failure, and this continues to show wide variation in practice, particularly, where patients are not reviewed by the local heart failure multidisciplinary team. Recently, the All Party Parliamentary Group on Cardiac Disease issued 10 suggestions for improvement in care for patients with heart failure – access to echocardiography being one of the key suggestions. Time will tell as to whether this support from law makers will assist in the implementation of NICE-recommended standards of care consistently across the country.

  8. Prognostic Factors in Severe Chagasic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sandra de Araújo; Rassi, Salvador; Freitas, Elis Marra da Madeira; Gutierrez, Natália da Silva; Boaventura, Fabiana Miranda; Sampaio, Larissa Pereira da Costa; Silva, João Bastista Masson

    2017-03-01

    Prognostic factors are extensively studied in heart failure; however, their role in severe Chagasic heart failure have not been established. To identify the association of clinical and laboratory factors with the prognosis of severe Chagasic heart failure, as well as the association of these factors with mortality and survival in a 7.5-year follow-up. 60 patients with severe Chagasic heart failure were evaluated regarding the following variables: age, blood pressure, ejection fraction, serum sodium, creatinine, 6-minute walk test, non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, QRS width, indexed left atrial volume, and functional class. 53 (88.3%) patients died during follow-up, and 7 (11.7%) remained alive. Cumulative overall survival probability was approximately 11%. Non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (HR = 2.11; 95% CI: 1.04 - 4.31; p 72 mL/m2 are independent predictors of mortality in severe Chagasic heart failure, with cumulative survival probability of only 11% in 7.5 years.

  9. New pharmacological and technological management strategies in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhry SP

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sunit-Preet Chaudhry,1 Garrick C Stewart2 1Division of Cardiology, St Vincent Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, 2Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Center for Advanced Heart Disease, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Heart failure is a complex clinical syndrome resulting from impairment of ventricular filling or ejection of blood associated with symptoms of dyspnea, fatigue, as well as peripheral and/or pulmonary edema. This syndrome is progressive and characterized by worsening quality of life despite escalating levels of care, affecting 5.7 million Americans with an annual cost of over $30 billion US dollars. Treatment for this syndrome has evolved over three distinct eras: the nonpharmacological era, the pharmacological era, and the device era, with the focus shifting from symptomatic relief to decreasing morbidity and mortality. Over the past 10 years, the field has undergone a renaissance, with the development of new pharmacologic, hemodynamic monitoring, and device therapies proven to improve outcomes in patients with heart failure. This article will review several recent innovations in the management of patients with heart failure. Keywords: heart failure, heart-assist devices, disease management

  10. Anemia Is Associated With Blunted Response to β-Blocker Therapy Using Carvedilol - Insights From Japanese Chronic Heart Failure (J-CHF) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatomo, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Kitabatake, Akira; Hori, Masatsugu

    2017-09-07

    Anemia portends a poor clinical outcome in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). However, its mechanism remains unknown. We sought to elucidate the effect of anemia on patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) who receive carvedilol therapy.Methods and Results:J-CHF study was a prospective, randomized, multicenter trial that assigned 360 HFrEF patients to 2.5 mg/5 mg/20 mg carvedilol groups according to the target dose. At baseline 70 patients (19%) had anemia ([A]) defined as hemoglobin level (Hb) <13 g/dL (male) or <12 g/dL (female) and the remaining 290 did not ([N]). Allocated and achieved doses of carvedilol were similar. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level significantly improved in both groups over 56 weeks, but they were smaller in [A] than in [N] (LVEF, P=0.046; BNP, P<0.0001 by ANOVA). Baseline Hb was an independent predictor of absolute change in LVEF (β=0.13, P=0.047) and BNP (β=-0.10, P=0.01). Presence of chronic kidney disease defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)at baseline was not associated with differential response to carvedilol therapy. During 3.8±1.4 years follow-up, group [A] had a higher incidence of the composite endpoint of death, hospitalization for cardiovascular causes including HF compared with [N] (P=0.006). Baseline Hb was an independent predictor of the composite endpoint (hazard ratio 0.86, P=0.04), whereas baseline eGFR was not. Our data suggested that anemia was associated with a blunted response to carvedilol in HFrEF patients.

  11. [Usefulness of enalapril in congestive heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, J; Necoechea, J C; Navarro, J

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of vasodilating agents in congestive heart failure depends on their ability to diminish left ventricular afterload; this effect does not necessarily persist with long-term treatment. The present study reports the clinical response of 16 patients in heart failure; the trial was double blind with enalapril and/or placebo during 24 weeks. Diagnoses were dilated cardiomyopathy in six, rheumatic heart disease in five, ischemic heart disease in four und hypertensive heart disease in one. Two patients on enalapril died of non cardiac causes and one was withdrawn from the study due to pregnancy. In those patients treated with enalapril the NYHA functional class improved from 2.9/0.8 to 1.1/0.4 (p less than 0.001), and the effort capacity increased from 545/171 to 888/160 seconds (p less than 0.01). Left ventricular systolic function evaluated by echocardiogram and Tc 99 m ventriculogram, radiologic size of the heart and echocardiographic left ventricular diameters showed no significant changes. There were no adverse clinical effects nor laboratory abnormalities. It is concluded that in this study, enalapril produced sustained clinical improvement in patients with heart failure and it was well tolerated during long-term treatment.

  12. When the heart kills the liver: acute liver failure in congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saner FH

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congestive heart failure as a cause of acute liver failure is rarely documented with only a few cases. Although the pathophysiology is poorly understood, there is rising evidence, that low cardiac output with consecutive reduction in hepatic blood flow is a main causing factor, rather than hypotension. In the setting of acute liver failure due to congestive heart failure, clinical signs of the latter can be absent, which requires an appropriate diagnostic approach. As a reference center for acute liver failure and liver transplantation we recorded from May 2003 to December 2007 202 admissions with the primary diagnoses acute liver failure. 13/202 was due to congestive heart failure, which was associated with a mortality rate of 54%. Leading cause of death was the underlying heart failure. Asparagine transaminase (AST, bilirubin, and international normalized ratio (INR did not differ significantly in surviving and deceased patients at admission. Despite both groups had signs of cardiogenic shock, the cardiac index (CI was significantly higher in the survival group on admission as compared with non-survivors (2.1 L/min/m2 vs. 1.6 L/min/m2, p = 0.04. Central venous - and pulmonary wedge pressure did not differ significantly. Remarkable improvement of liver function was recorded in the group, who recovered from cardiogenic shock. In conclusion, patients with acute liver failure require an appropriate diagnostic approach. Congestive heart failure should always be considered as a possible cause of acute liver failure.

  13. De novo acute heart failure and acutely decompensated chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Astrid; Empe, Klausn; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B

    2015-04-24

    Heart failure is one of the most common diseases of adults in Europe, with an overall prevalence of 1-2%. Among persons aged 60 and above, its prevalence is above 10% in men and 8% in women. Acute heart failure has a poor prognosis; it is associated with a high rate of rehospitalization and a 1-year mortality of 20-30%. This review is based on pertinent literature, including guidelines, retrieved by a selective search in PubMed. There are different types of acute heart failure; the basic diagnostic assessment is performed at once and consists of ECG, echocardiography, and the measurement of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) and troponin levels. The most common causes of decompensation are arrhythmia, valvular dysfunction, and acute cardiac ischemia, each of which accounts for 30% of cases. The potential indication for immediate revascularization should be carefully considered in cases where acute heart failure is due to coronary heart disease. The basic treatment of acute heart failure is symptomatic, with the administration of oxygen, diuretics, and vasodilators. Ino-tropic agents, vasopressors, and temporary mechanical support for the circulatory system are only used to treat cardiogenic shock. The treatment of acute heart failure is markedly less evidence-based than that of chronic heart failure. Newer treatment approaches that are intended to improve outcomes still need to be tested in multicenter trials.

  14. Multimorbidity in Older Adults with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmarajan, Kumar; Dunlay, Shannon M

    2016-05-01

    Multimorbidity is common among older adults with heart failure and creates diagnostic and management challenges. Diagnosis of heart failure may be difficult, as many conditions commonly found in older persons produce dyspnea, exercise intolerance, fatigue, and weakness; no singular pathognomonic finding or diagnostic test differentiates them from one another. Treatment may also be complicated, as multimorbidity creates high potential for drug-disease and drug-drug interactions in settings of polypharmacy. The authors suggest that management of multimorbid older persons with heart failure be patient, rather than disease-focused, to best meet patients' unique health goals and minimize risk from excessive or poorly-coordinated treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Adults living with heart failure and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Sommer, Irene; Bjerrum, Merete

    Background Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms reported by patients with heart failure (HF). Fatigue negatively impacts on patients’ everyday life, prognosis and quality of life. No specific cure or effective interventions to alleviate fatigue are available. Over the past decade, qualitative...... studies have been performed to develop more coherent and effective interventions to support self-care among heart failure patients experiencing fatigue. The findings of qualitative research should be synthesised to optimise nurses' understanding of fatigue and develop recommendations for practice. Aim...... To synthesise the best available evidence related to the lived experiences and management of fatigue in everyday life in adult patients with stable heart failure to develop effective interventions to support self-care. Specific questions on the patients’ lived experiences included: • How do patients with HF...

  16. Laboratory assessment of anti-thrombotic therapy in heart failure, atrial fibrillation and coronary artery disease: insights using thrombelastography and a micro-titre plate assay of thrombogenesis and fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Y C; Xiong, Q; Ranjit, P; Lip, G Y H; Blann, A D

    2016-08-01

    As heart failure, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation all bring a risk of thrombosis, anti-thrombotic therapy is recommended. Despite such treatment, major cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke still occur, implying inadequate suppression of thrombus formation. Accordingly, identification of patients whose haemostasis remains unimpaired by treatment is valuable. We compared indices for assessing thrombogenesis and fibrinolysis by two different techniques in patients on different anti-thrombotic agents, i.e. aspirin or warfarin. We determined fibrin clot formation and fibrinolysis by a microplate assay and thromboelastography, and platelet marker soluble P selectin in 181 patients with acute or chronic heart failure, coronary artery disease who were taking either aspirin or warfarin. Five thromboelastograph indices and four microplate assay indices were different on aspirin versus warfarin (p fibrinolysis in cardiovascular disease, and the impact of antithrombotic therapy. Prospective studies are required to determine a role in predicting thrombotic risk.

  17. Procalcitonin: a marker of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbay, Alper; Celebi, Ozlem Ozcan; Celebi, Savas; Aydogdu, Sinan; Diker, Erdem

    2015-08-01

    Serum procalcitonin levels are associated with congestive heart failure, but are not established biomarkers of the disease. We evaluated the predictive value of serum procalcitonin levels for diagnosing heart failure and assessing its severity. This retrospective, case-control study involved 59 subjects (mean age 59.7-10.1 years; 38 males), including 21 outpa- tients and 19 inpatients with heart failure and left ventricular ejection fractions procalcitonin levels were measured and compared among the 3 groups. Procalcitonin levels were significantly higher among inpatients (median [interquartile range], 1.45 [0.25-5.801 ng/mL) than among the outpatients (0.35 [0.001.-1.70] ng/mL; Pprocalcitonin cut-off level of 0.09 ng/mL, 35 (87.5%) of the 40 inpatients and outpatients were procalcitonin-positive; all control individuals were procalcitonin-negative. Serum procalcitonin levels differentiated between heart failure patients and healthy controls (sensitivity, 88.9% [95% confidence interval, 75.9-96.2%]; specificity, 100% [82.2-100.0%]; positive predictive value, 100% [91.1-100.0%]; negative predictive value, 79.2% [57.8-92.8%]). Pro calcitonin levels were >0.53 ng/mL in 4/21 (19%) outpatients and in 16/19 (84.2%) inpatients. The sensitivity and specificity of serum procalcitonin levels for differentiating between inpatients and outpatients were 84.2% and 81.0%, respectively (positive predictive value 80% [95% confidence interval, 67.6-92.4%] and 85.0% [73.9-96.1%], respectively). Serum procalcitonin levels, showing high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing and assessing the severity of heart failure in this small study, might be considered ootential heart failure biomarkers.

  18. Renal function assessment in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Calvo, J I; Josa Laorden, C; Giménez López, I

    Renal function is one of the most consistent prognostic determinants in heart failure. The prognostic information it provides is independent of the ejection fraction and functional status. This article reviews the various renal function assessment measures, with special emphasis on the fact that the patient's clinical situation and response to the heart failure treatment should be considered for the correct interpretation of the results. Finally, we review the literature on the performance of tubular damage biomarkers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  19. Is fluid restriction needed in heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Gutiérrez, Victoria; Rada, Gabriel

    2017-01-09

    Fluid restriction is usually recommended in chronic heart failure. However, the evidence base to support this is not that clear. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases, we identified five systematic reviews evaluating 11 studies addressing the question of this article, including seven randomized trials. We extracted data, combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded fluid restriction probably decreases hospital readmission in chronic heart failure and might decrease mortality, but the certainty of the evidence for the latter is low.

  20. Newer treatments for decompensated heart failure: focus on levosimendan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Follath

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ferenc FollathUniversity Hospital Zürich, Steering Group Drug Therapy, Zürich, SwitzerlandAbstract: Acute heart failure (AHF is a major cause of hospitalizations. Severe dyspnea, pulmonary congestion and low cardiac output with peripheral vasoconstriction and renal hypoperfusion is a main form of clinical presentation. Most patients with acute worsening have a pre-existing decompensated chronic heart failure (ADCHF, but AHF may also occur as a first manifestation of a previously unknown heart disease. Myocardial ischemia, cardiac arrhythmias, non-compliance with medication and infections are frequent precipitating factors. Management of AHF depends on the underlying heart disease and cause of decompensation. In patients with ADCHF vasodilators and iv diuretics are first-line drugs for rapid reduction of dyspnea and congestion. In patients with signs of low cardiac output and oliguria, inotropic agents are also often administered to prevent further deterioration. Beta-adrenergic agents and phosphodiesterase inhibitors correct the hemodynamic disturbance, but may also induce arrhythmias and worsen myocardial ischemia. Inotropic therapy therefore remains controversial. A novel class of drugs, the calcium sensitizers, represent a new therapeutic option. Levosimendan was shown to improve myocardial contractility without increasing oxygen requirements and to produce peripheral and coronary vasodilation. Its therapeutic effects and tolerance have been tested in several trials. The present review focuses on the clinical pharmacology and therapeutic utility of levosimendan in patients with ADCHF.Keywords: acute heart failure, inotropic agents, calcium sensitizers, levosimendan

  1. Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Specialist Heart Failure Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Gardner, Roy S; Lainscak, Mitja

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that organized care of heart failure patients, including specialist management by cardiologists, improves patient outcomes. In response to this, other national training bodies (the UK and the USA) have developed heart failure subspecialty curricula within their Cardiology...... Training Curricula. In addition, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) subspecialty curricula exist for Interventional Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Management. The purpose of this heart failure curriculum is to provide a framework which can be used as a blueprint for training across Europe. This blueprint...... mirrors other ESC curricula. Each section has three components: the knowledge required, the skills which are necessary, and the professionalism (attitudes and behaviours) which should be attained. The programme is designed to last 2 years. The first year is devoted to the specialist heart failure module...

  2. Impact of drug therapy on long-term prognosis in patients with ischemic chronic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and renal dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Lashkul

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of the treatment of cardiovascular disease has led to an increase number of patients with chronic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF, but at the moment there is no differentiated approach based on the principles of evidence-based medicine. Aim. To investigate the effect of modern combined drug therapy for long-term prognosis in patients with ischemic HFpEF and renal dysfunction. Materials and methods. The study involved 243 patients (80.3% men with ischemic HFpEF with renal dysfunction (age 58.7±9.3 years. Therapy included: ACE inhibitors/ARBs (98.3 %, statins (95.9 %, antiplatelet agents (94.2 %, beta blockers (91.3 %, diuretics (53.5 %, trimetazidine (30.9 %, calcium antagonists (26.3 %, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (16.5 %, amiodarone (11.9 %. The follow-up period was 3 years. The cumulative survival curves were constructed by the Kaplan-Meier method using and groups were compared with the log-rank test. Results. It was found that the torasemide inclusion in the therapy of patients with ischemic HFpEF and renal dysfunction in comparison with furosemide was accompanied by a reduction in adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio (HR 4.92; 95% CI 1.47-16.4; p=0.009, ARB has a positive effect (HR 0.46; 95% CI 0.21-1.07; p=0.07, and the inclusion of amiodarone was accompanied by an increase number of adverse events (HR 3.27; 95% CI 1.38-7.74, p=0.006. Beta-blockers reduced the risk of sudden cardiac death (HR 0.09; 95% CI 0.01-0.58, p=0.01. It was found that amiodarone (HR 4.69; 95% CI 1.26-17.3; p=0.02 and AMR (HR 4.81; 95% CI 1.62-14.3; p=0.004 increased the risk of hospitalization. Conclusion. As a result of a three-year follow-up of patients with ischemic HFpEF and renal dysfunction it was found that among diuretics torasemide has preference over furosemide in respect of the impact on cumulative endpoint. Beta-blockers were effective in preventing sudden cardiac death, and angiotensin II receptor

  3. Renin Genetic Polymorphism in Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Dana; Sitar-Tăut, Adela-Viviana; Procopciuc, Lucia; Cebanu, Mirela; Zdrenghea, M; Zdrenghea, D

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphism of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system affects the pathogenesis of hypertension (HTN), ischemic heart disease (IHD) and heart failure (HF). The purpose of our study is to analyze A/G renin genetic polymorphism in heart failure patients. We investigated renin polymorphism in 83 subjects hospitalized in the Cardiology Department of the Rehabilitation Hospital Cluj-Napoca, using the PCR amplification method. 43 patients were diagnosed with heart failure [NYHA III-IV class], and 40 subjects without cardiovascular disease (control group). The NT-proBNP and the presence of cardiovascular risk factors were assessed. Heart failure etiology was IHD in 60.46% of patients. The average value of NT-pro BNP was 2991.24 ± 2034.6 pg/ml. As it was expected, HF patients presented low lipid levels: total cholesterol = 162.36 ± 38.28 mg/dl, LDL-Cholesterol = 104.88 ± 27.60 mg/dl, triglycerides= 109.12 ± 55.84 mg/dl, HDL-Co = 35.68 ± 9.55 mg/dl. A/G renin genetic polymorphism [with pathogenic potential] in heart failure patients was of 60.46% (homozygote 4.65% and heterozygote 55.81%). Conversely, pathogenic mutations were found only in 38.46% of hypertensive patients, but also in 55.88% and 22.22% patients with obesity/overweight and diabetes. The heterozygote form was found in only 37.5% of control subjects. This study showed no involvement of A/G renin polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of HF.

  4. Xamoterol in severe congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tangø, M; Lyngborg, K; Mehlsen, J

    1992-01-01

    Twelve patients in severe congestive heart failure were given placebo, 100 mg xamoterol (Corwin) twice daily and 200 mg xamoterol twice daily, respectively, in 3 two-week periods in a double-blind randomised study. At the end of each treatment period the patients were evaluated. No differences were...... found between placebo and xamoterol in the following parameters: New York Heart Association function group index, heart volume, body weight, exercise duration on bicycle and treadmill, heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressure at rest. However, during exercise we found significantly lower...... heart rate and rate-pressure product during xamoterol treatment. This reduction is probably indicating occupation of beta-adrenoreceptors with concomitant reduced oxygen consumption during exercise....

  5. MODELS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE AND HEART FAILURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Mauricio; Kohli, Smita; Sabbah, Hani N.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing and is associated with poor prognosis. In spite of the advances in therapy, HF remains a major health problem with high morbidity and mortality. When HF and diabetes coexist, clinical outcomes are significantly worse. The relationship between these two conditions has been studied in various experimental models. However, the mechanisms for this interrelationship are complex, incompletely understood, and have become a matter of considerable clinical and research interest. There are only few animal models that manifest both HF and diabetes. However, the translation of results from these models to human disease is limited and new models are needed to expand our current understanding of this clinical interaction. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of insulin signaling and insulin resistance, the clinical association between insulin resistance and HF and its proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms. Finally, we discuss available animal models of insulin resistance and HF and propose requirements for future new models. PMID:23456447

  6. Remodeling in heart failure: from the left ventricle to service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japp, Alan G; Pettit, Stephen J

    2013-03-01

    Over the past three decades, advances in our understanding of heart failure pathophysiology have spurred the development of effective therapies for patients with heart failure and led to improved clinical outcomes. Further progress now requires increased provision of existing evidence-based therapies together with continued exploration of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic targets. This was reflected at the 2012 Annual Autumn Meeting of the British Society for Heart Failure, attended by over 500 delegates from around the world with strong representation from all heart failure disciplines. The conference included a dedicated session on 'cardiac remodeling in left ventricular systolic dysfunction' as well as presentations on the latest evidence-based therapies in heart failure and aspects of service delivery within the UK.

  7. Systolic heart failure: a prothrombotic state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Peuter, Olav R; Kok, Wouter E M; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Systolic heart failure is a common syndrome whose incidence is expected to increase. Several treatment modalities, such as beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, improve survival. Whether antithrombotic treatment is effective remains to be elucidated, although observations su...

  8. Review Article Heart failure - an inflammatory paradigm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1999-02-01

    Feb 1, 1999 ... Heart failure - an inflammatory paradigm. E. Q. KLUG. TABLE I. CYTOKINES MEDIATING MYOCARDIAL. DEPRESSION certain characteristics. In general they mediate cell growth, inflammation, immunity, differentiation and repair. They are small to medium-sized peptides produced by a variety of different ...

  9. Body mass index in chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Heidi M.; Schou, Morten; Goetze, Jens P

    2013-01-01

    Low body mass index (BMI) is associated with a poor outcome in chronic heart failure (CHF). An inverse association between BMI and adiponectin and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) has been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether novel markers...

  10. Copeptin as a biomarker in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Increased neurohormonal activation is a key feature of heart failure (HF). Copeptin is a surrogate marker for proarginine vasopressin and the prognostic value of copeptin has been reported for multiple disease states of both nonvascular and cardiovascular etiology. Elevated plasma copeptin in HF...

  11. Living with heart failure : Partner perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttik, Marie Louise; Blaauwbroek, Arnarins; Dijker, Anton; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2007-01-01

    To preserve the supportive capabilities of partners of heart failure (HF) patients, it is necessary to gain insight in the experiences and potential needs of these partners. Thirteen partners of HF patients participated in semistructured interviews specifically focused on their experiences as a

  12. Heart Failure Care in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasing health care problem worldwide, and a multidisciplinary approach with a general practitioner (GP) in the health care team is considered optimal. HF management has improved substantially over the last two decades, mainly for patients with HF with a reduced ejection

  13. Clinical challenge of hyponatremia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptman, Paul J

    2012-04-01

    Hyponatremia is a significant and independent predictor of outcomes including rehospitalization and mortality in patients with both acute decompensated heart failure (HF) and chronic HF. Even modest degrees of hyponatremia are associated with a poorer prognosis. Treatment options include fluid restriction and the vaptan class ("aquaretics") in select patients. Copyright © 2012 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Nurse-coordinated collaborative disease management improves the quality of guideline-recommended heart failure therapy, patient-reported outcomes, and left ventricular remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güder, Gülmisal; Störk, Stefan; Gelbrich, Goetz; Brenner, Susanne; Deubner, Nikolas; Morbach, Caroline; Wallenborn, Julia; Berliner, Dominik; Ertl, Georg; Angermann, Christiane E

    2015-04-01

    Heart failure (HF) pharmacotherapy is often not prescribed according to guidelines. This longitudinal study investigated prescription rates and dosages of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEi/ARB), beta-blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRA), and concomitant changes of symptoms, echocardiographic parameters of left ventricular (LV) function and morphology and results of the Short Form-36 (SF-36) Health Survey in participants of the Interdisciplinary Network Heart Failure (INH) programme. The INH study evaluated a nurse-coordinated management, HeartNetCare-HF(TM) (HNC), against Usual Care (UC) in patients hospitalized for decompensated HF [LV ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤40% before discharge). A total of 706 subjects surviving >18 months (363 UC, 343 HNC) were examined 6-monthly. At baseline, 92% received ACEi/ARB, (HNC/UC 91/93%, P = 0.28), 86% received beta-blockers (86/86%, P = 0.83), and 44% received MRA (42/47%, P = 0.07). After 18 months, beta-blocker use had increased only in HNC (+7.6%, P change +17/+14%, P = 0.010), LV end-diastolic diameter (59 ± 9 vs. 61 ± 9.6 mm, P = 0.024, change -2.3/-1.4 mm, P = 0.13), New York Heart Association class (1.9 ± 0.7 vs. 2.1 ± 0.7, P = 0.001, change -0.44/-0.25, P = 0.002) and SF-36 physical component summary score (41.6 ± 11.2 vs. 38.5 ± 11.8, P = 0.004, change +3.3 vs. +1.1 score points, P changes after 18 months. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  15. Mitochondria in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) frequently is the unfavorable outcome of pathological heart hypertrophy. In contrast to physiological cardiac hypertrophy, which occurs in response to exercise and leads to full adaptation of contractility to the increased wall stress, pathological hypertrophy occurs in response to volume or pressure overload, ultimately leading to contractile dysfunction and HF. Because cardiac hypertrophy impairs the relationship between ATP demand and production, mitochondrial bioenergetics must keep up with the cardiac hypertrophic phenotype. We review data regarding the mitochondrial proteomic and energetic remodeling in cardiac hypertrophy, as well as the temporal and causal relationship between mitochondrial failure to match the increased energy demand and progression to cardiac decompensation. We suggest that the maladaptive effect of sustained neuroendocrine signals on mitochondria leads to bioenergetic fading which contributes to the progression from cardiac hypertrophy to failure. PMID:22982369

  16. The Role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterzan, Mark A; Rider, Oliver J

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular imaging is key for the assessment of patients with heart failure. Today, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an established role in the assessment of patients with suspected and confirmed heart failure syndromes, in particular identifying aetiology. Its role in informing prognosis and guiding decisions around therapy are evolving. Key strengths include its accuracy; reproducibility; unrestricted field of view; lack of radiation; multiple abilities to characterise myocardial tissue, thrombus and scar; as well as unparalleled assessment of left and right ventricular volumes. T2* has an established role in the assessment and follow-up of iron overload cardiomyopathy and a role for T1 in specific therapies for cardiac amyloid and Anderson–Fabry disease is emerging. PMID:28785465

  17. The Role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterzan, Mark A; Rider, Oliver J; Anderson, Lisa J

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular imaging is key for the assessment of patients with heart failure. Today, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an established role in the assessment of patients with suspected and confirmed heart failure syndromes, in particular identifying aetiology. Its role in informing prognosis and guiding decisions around therapy are evolving. Key strengths include its accuracy; reproducibility; unrestricted field of view; lack of radiation; multiple abilities to characterise myocardial tissue, thrombus and scar; as well as unparalleled assessment of left and right ventricular volumes. T2* has an established role in the assessment and follow-up of iron overload cardiomyopathy and a role for T1 in specific therapies for cardiac amyloid and Anderson-Fabry disease is emerging.

  18. Aldosterone and aldosterone receptor antagonists in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Jean M; Sieg, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone synthesized by the adrenal glands that has several regulatory functions to help the body maintain normal volume status and electrolyte balance. Studies have shown significantly higher levels of aldosterone secretion in patients with congestive heart failure compared with normal patients. Elevated levels of aldosterone have been shown to elevate blood pressure, cause left ventricular hypertrophy, and promote cardiac fibrosis. An appreciation of the true role of aldosterone in patients with chronic heart failure did not become apparent until the publication of the Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study. Until recently, the use of aldosterone receptor antagonists has been limited to patients with severe heart failure and patients with heart failure following myocardial infarction. The Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization and Survival Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF) study added additional evidence to support the expanded use of aldosterone receptor antagonists in heart failure patients. The results of the EMPHASIS-HF trial showed that patients with mild-to-moderate (New York Heart Association Class II) heart failure had reductions in mortality and hospitalizations from the addition of eplerenone to optimal medical therapy. Evidence remains elusive about the exact mechanism by which aldosterone receptor antagonists improve heart failure morbidity and mortality. The benefits of aldosterone receptor antagonist use in heart failure must be weighed against the potential risk of complications, ie, hyperkalemia and, in the case of spironolactone, possible endocrine abnormalities, in particular gynecomastia. With appropriate monitoring, these risks can be minimized. We now have evidence that patients with mild-to-severe symptoms associated with systolic heart failure will benefit from the addition of an aldosterone receptor antagonist to the standard therapies of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta

  19. QRS axis and the benefit of cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with mildly symptomatic heart failure enrolled in MADIT-CRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenyo, Andrew; Rao, Mohan; Barsheshet, Alon; Cannom, David; Quesada, Aurelio; McNitt, Scott; Huang, David T; Moss, Arthur J; Zareba, Wojciech

    2013-04-01

    Mildly symptomatic heart failure (HF) patients derive substantial clinical benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) as shown in MADIT-CRT. The presence of QRS axis deviation may influence response to CRT-D. The objective of this study was to determine whether QRS axis deviation will be associated with differential benefit from CRT-D. Baseline electrocardiograms of 1,820 patients from MADIT-CRT were evaluated for left axis deviation (LAD: quantitative QRS axis -30 to -90) or right axis deviation (RAD: QRS axis 90-180) in left bundle branch block (LBBB), right bundle branch block (RBBB), and nonspecific interventricular conduction delay QRS morphologies. The primary endpoints were the first occurrence of a HF event or death and the separate occurrence of all-cause mortality as in MADIT-CRT. Among LBBB patients, those with LAD had a higher risk of primary events at 2 years than non-LAD patients (20% vs 16%; P = 0.024). The same was observed among RBBB patients (20% vs 10%; P = 0.05) but not in IVCD patients (22% vs 23%; P = NS). RAD did not convey any increased risk of the primary combined endpoint in any QRS morphology subgroup. When analyzing the benefit of CRT-D in the non-LBBB subgroups, there was no significant difference in hazard ratios for CRT-D versus ICD for either LAD or RAD. However, LBBB patients without LAD showed a trend toward greater benefit from CRT therapy than LBBB patients with LAD (HR for no LAD: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.26-0.53 and with LAD: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.36-0.79; P value for interaction = 0.18). LAD in non-LBBB patients (RBBB or IVCD) is not associated with an increased benefit from CRT. In LBBB patients, those without LAD seem to benefit more from CRT-D than those with LAD. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Stratification of the Risk of Sudden Death in Nonischemic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Pimentel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant therapeutic advancements, heart failure remains a highly prevalent clinical condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In 30%-40% patients, the etiology of heart failure is nonischemic. The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD is capable of preventing sudden death and decreasing total mortality in patients with nonischemic heart failure. However, a significant number of patients receiving ICD do not receive any kind of therapy during follow-up. Moreover, considering the situation in Brazil and several other countries, ICD cannot be implanted in all patients with nonischemic heart failure. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify patients at an increased risk of sudden death because these would benefit more than patients at a lower risk, despite the presence of heart failure in both risk groups. In this study, the authors review the primary available methods for the stratification of the risk of sudden death in patients with nonischemic heart failure.

  1. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes of Acute Heart Failure Patients: Observations from the Oman Acute Heart Failure Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alazzawi, Aouf AbdlRahman; Abraham, Abraham; Singh, Prit Pal; Narayan, Narayan Anantha; Rajarao, Mamatha Punjee; Khdir, Mohammed Ahmed; Abdlraheem, Mohamad; Siddiqui, Aftab Ahmed; Soliman, Hisham; Elkadi, Osama Abdellatif; Bichu, Ruchir Kumar; Al Lawati, Kumayl Hasan

    2016-05-01

    We sought to describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of patients in Oman with acute heart failure (AHF) as part of the Gulf aCute heArt failuRe rEgistry (CARE) project. Data were analyzed from 988 consecutive patients admitted with AHF to 12 hospitals in Oman between 14 February and 14 November 2012. The mean age of our patients was 63±12 years. Over half (57%) were male and 95% were Omani citizens. Fifty-seven percent of patients presented with acute decompensated chronic heart failure (ADCHF) while 43% had new-onset AHF. The primary comorbid conditions were hypertension (72%), coronary artery disease (55%), and diabetes mellitus (53%). Ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypertensive heart disease, and idiopathic cardiomyopathy were the most common etiologies of AHF in Oman. The median left ventricular ejection fraction of the cohort was 36% (27-45%) with 56% of the patients having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (medications were the most common precipitating factors. At discharge, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers were prescribed adequately, but aldosterone antagonists were under prescribed. Within 12-months follow-up, one in two patients were rehospitalized for AHF. In-hospital mortality was 7.1%, which doubled to 15.7% at three months and reached 26.4% at one-year post discharge. Oman CARE was the first prospective multicenter registry of AHF in Oman and showed that heart failure (HF) patients present at a younger age with recurrent ADCHF and HF with reduced ejection fraction. IHD was the most common etiology of HF with a low prevalence of AHF, but a high prevalence of acute coronary syndrome and non-compliance with medications precipitating HF. A quarter of patients died at one-year follow-up even though at discharge medical therapy was nearly optimal. Our study indicates an urgent need for prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of AHF in Oman.

  2. Right heart dysfunction in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenovsky, Vojtech; Hwang, Seok-Jae; Lin, Grace; Redfield, Margaret M.; Borlaug, Barry A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Right heart function is not well characterized in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The goal of this study was to examine the haemodynamic, clinical, and prognostic correlates of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in HFpEF. Methods and results Heart failure and preserved ejection fraction patients (n = 96) and controls (n = 46) underwent right heart catheterization, echocardiographic assessment, and follow-up. Right and left heart filling pressures, pulmonary artery (PA) pressures, and right-sided chamber dimensions were higher in HFpEF compared with controls, while left ventricular size and EF were similar. Right ventricular dysfunction (defined by RV fractional area change, FAC Right ventricular function was impaired in HFpEF compared with controls using both load-dependent (FAC: 40 ± 10 vs. 53 ± 7%, P Right heart dysfunction is common in HFpEF and is caused by both RV contractile impairment and afterload mismatch from pulmonary hypertension. Right ventricular dysfunction in HFpEF develops with increasing PA pressures, atrial fibrillation, male sex, and left ventricular dysfunction, and may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:24875795

  3. The effect of intermittent atrial tachyarrhythmia on heart failure or death in cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator versus implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients: a MADIT-CRT substudy (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwald, Anne-Christine; Pietrasik, Grzegorz; Goldenberg, Ilan; Kutyifa, Valentina; Daubert, James P; Ruwald, Martin H; Jons, Christian; McNitt, Scott; Wang, Paul; Zareba, Wojciech; Moss, Arthur J

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of both history of intermittent atrial tachyarrhythmias (IAT) and in-trial IAT on the risk of heart failure (HF) or death comparing cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) treatment in mildly symptomatic HF patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). Limited data exist regarding the benefit of CRT-D in patients with IAT. The benefit of CRT-D in reducing the risk of HF/death was evaluated using multivariate Cox models incorporating the presence of, respectively, a history of IAT at baseline and time-dependent development of in-trial IAT during follow-up in 1,264 patients with LBBB enrolled in the MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) study. The overall beneficial effect of CRT-D versus ICD on the risk of HF/death was not significantly different between LBBB patients with or without history of IAT (HR: 0.50, p = 0.028, and HR: 0.46, p Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy; NCT00180271). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment of ventricular arrhythmias in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, W G; Sweeney, M O

    1997-05-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias are common in patients with heart failure. The risk and benefits of antiarrhythmic therapies continue to be defined. Class I antiarrhythmic drugs should be avoided due to proarrhythmic and negative inotropic effects that may be responsible for increased mortality in some trials. For patients resuscitated from sustained ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation, amiodarone or an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator should be considered. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators markedly reduce sudden death in ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation survivors, but in advanced heart failure, this may not markedly extend survival. Catheter or surgical ablation can be considered for selected patients with bundle branch reentry ventricular tachycardia or difficult to control monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. For patients who have not had sustained ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation antiarrhythmic therapy should generally be avoided, but may benefit some high risk patients. Amiodarone may be beneficial in patients with advanced heart failure and rapid resting heart rates. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators may improve survival in selected patients with depressed ventricular function after myocardial infarction, who also have nonsustained and inducible ventricular tachycardia.

  5. The Effect of Guided Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Patients With Depressive Symptoms and Heart Failure: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Johan Gustav; Dahlström, Örjan; Andersson, Gerhard; Jaarsma, Tiny; Kärner Köhler, Anita; Johansson, Peter

    2016-08-03

    Depressive symptoms, and the associated coexistence of symptoms of anxiety and decreased quality of life (QoL), are common in patients with heart failure (HF). However, treatment strategies for depressive symptoms in patients with HF still remain to be established. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT), as guided self-help CBT programs, has shown good effects in the treatment of depression. Until now, ICBT has not been evaluated in patients with HF with depressive symptoms. The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the effect of a 9-week guided ICBT program on depressive symptoms in patients with HF; (2) investigate the effect of the ICBT program on cardiac anxiety and QoL; and (3) assess factors associated with the change in depressive symptoms. Fifty participants were randomized into 2 treatment arms: ICBT or a Web-based moderated discussion forum (DF). The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 was used to measure depressive symptoms, the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire (CAQ) was used to measure cardiac-related anxiety, and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire was used to measure QoL. Data were collected at baseline and at follow-up at the end of the 9-week intervention. Intention-to-treat analysis was used, and missing data were imputed by the Expectation-Maximization method. Between-group differences were determined by analysis of covariance with control for baseline score and regression to the mean. No significant difference in depressive symptoms between the ICBT and the DF group at the follow-up was found, [F(1,47)=1.63, P=.21] and Cohen´s d=0.26. Secondary within-group analysis of depressive symptoms showed that such symptoms decreased significantly in the ICBT group from baseline to the follow-up (baseline M=10.8, standard deviation [SD]=5.7 vs follow-up M=8.6, SD=4.6, t(24)=2.6, P=.02, Cohen´s d=0.43), whereas in the DF group, there was no significant change (baseline M=10.6, SD=5.0, vs follow-up M=9.8, SD=4.3, t(24)=0.93, P=.36

  6. [Effects of long term therapy with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor quinapril, antagonist of receptors to angiotensin II valsartan, and combination of quinapril and valsartan in patients with moderate chronic heart failure. Main results of the SADKO-CHF study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, A A; Nasonova, S N; Sychev, A V; Orlova, Ia A; Baklanova, N A; Masenko, V P; Mareev, V Iu; Belenkov, Iu N

    2006-01-01

    To compare effects of therapy with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor quinapril (Q), angiotensin II receptor antagonist valsartan (V), and their combination in patients with stable moderate chronic heart failure (CHF). Patients (n=80) with NYHA class II-III CHF due to ischemic heart disease, dilated cardiomyopathy or decompensated hypertensive heart and ejection fraction ECG monitoring with measurements of parameters of heart rate variability (HRV), and determination of neurohormones in peripheral blood. Examinations and measurements were made at baseline, in 3 and 6 months. Six months therapy with Q, V and their combination resulted in improvement of clinical and functional state of patients. More pronounced augmentation of exercise tolerance and lowering of CHF functional class were observed in group Q. Combined use of Q and V had no significant advantages over monotherapy with Q and V when effect on parameters of left ventricular remodeling were concerned. Therapy with Q was associated with "escape" of blockade of aldosterone synthesis and "reactivation" of angiotensin II formation after 6 months. The use of V and combination of V+Q allowed to achieve more stable but incomplete control of aldosterone activity. The use of Q appears to be the preferential regimen to influence activity of sympathoadrenal system and parameters of 24 hour HRV compared with V and Q+V. Long term therapy with V does not improve main parameters of 24 hour HRV.

  7. [The German National Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbrenner, S; Langer, T; Scherer, M; Störk, S; Ertl, G; Muth, Ch; Hoppe, U C; Kopp, I; Ollenschläger, G

    2012-02-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is an illness mostly affecting elderly people. In Germany CHF is one of the most common causes of death and at the same time one of the most common diagnosis in inpatient care. Due to the expected increase in life expectancy in the next few years experts predict a further step-up of the incidence. Against this background development of a national guideline on chronic heart failure was prioritised and accordingly the National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure was developed by a multi- and interdisciplinary group. The guideline group comprised experts from all relevant scientific medical societies as well as a patient expert. The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) on Chronic Heart Failure aims at supporting patients and health care providers with respect to decisions on a specific health care problem by giving recommendations for actions. Recommendations are informed by the best available scientific evidence on this topic.Patients with CHF often suffer from multiple conditions. Due to this fact and the old age patients do have very complex and demanding health care needs. Thus accounting for co-morbidities is paramount in planning and providing health care for theses patients and communication between doctor and patient but also between all health care providers is crucial.Basic treatment strategies in chronic heart failure comprise management of risk factors and prognostic factors as well as appropriate consideration of co-morbidities accompanied by measures empowering patients in establishing a healthy life style and a self-dependant management of their illness.Psycho-social aspects have a very strong influence on patients' acceptance of the disease and their self-management. In addition they have a strong influence on therapy management of the treating physician thus they have to be addressed adequately during the consultation.The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure (CHF

  8. HEART FAILURE, DIABETES, BETA-BLOCKERS AND RISK OF HYPOGLYCEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Aleksandrov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate an influence of carvedilol on risk of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes type 2 (D2 and chronic heart failure (CHF treated with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors.Material and methods. 13 patients (10 men, 3 women; aged 59,8±6,7 y.o. with D2 and CHF caused by ischemic heart disease were included in the study. Before inclusion all patients were treated with ACE inhibitors and various beta-blockers (atenolol, metoprolol, bisoprolol. These beta-blockers were changed for carvedilol. Heart ultrasonography, blood pressure control, glycemia monitoring, HbA1c level determination were performed before, during and after carvedilol therapy.Results. Carvedilol reduces frequency and duration of hypoglycaemia episodes. There were not episodes of severe hypoglycaemia during carvedilol therapy.Conclusion. Carvedilol reduces risk of hypoglycemia when it is used in combination with ACE inhiditors in diabetic patients with CHF.

  9. Fewer Heart Failure Patients Dying of Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167058.html Fewer Heart Failure Patients Dying of Cardiac Arrest Researchers chock it ... 6, 2017 THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure patients are much less likely now to die ...

  10. Iron Pills No Help for Certain Type of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Iron Pills No Help for Certain Type of Heart Failure High-dose supplements failed to improve exercise capacity, ... iron-deficient patients with a certain type of heart failure, a new study finds. Iron deficiency affects about ...

  11. Timing of Menopause May Affect Heart Failure Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_165588.html Timing of Menopause May Affect Heart Failure Risk Women whose periods end early and those ... gave birth might have an increased risk of heart failure, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from ...

  12. Patient's Guide to Living Confidently with Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient’s Guide to Living Confidently With Chronic Heart Failure Samuel F. Sears , Lawrence Woodrow , Katherine Cutitta , Jessica ... References Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Introduction Chronic heart failure (CHF) refers to the ongoing condition of your ...

  13. Heart failure guidelines and prescribing in primary care across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, HB; van Gilst, WH; Swedberg, K; Hobbs, FDR; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM

    2005-01-01

    Background: Major international differences in heart failure treatment have been repeatedly described, but the reasons for these differences remain unclear. National guideline recommendations might be a relevant factor. This study, therefore, explored variation of heart failure guideline

  14. Treatment of heart failure with decreased left ventricular ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2006-01-01

    Class I recommendations for treating patients with current or prior symptoms of heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) include using diuretics and salt restriction in individuals with fluid retention. Use angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta blockers, and angiotensin II receptor blockers if intolerant to ACE inhibitors because of cough or angioneurotic edema. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, most antiarrhythmic drugs, and calcium channel blockers should be avoided or withdrawn. Exercise training is recommended. Implant cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is recommended in individuals with a history of cardiac arrest, ventricular fibrillation, or hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia. ICD is indicated in patients with ischemic heart disease for at least 40 d post-myocardial infarction or nonischemic cardiomyopathy, an LVEF of 30% or less, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II or III symptoms on optimal medical therapy, and an expectation of survival of at least 1 yr. Cardiac resynchronization therapy should be used in individuals with an LVEF of 35% or below, NYHA class III or IV symptoms despite optimal therapy, and a QRS duration greater than 120 ms. An aldosterone antagonist can be added in selected patients with moderately severe to severe symptoms of heart failure who can be carefully monitored for renal function and potassium concentration (serum creatinine should be

  15. Stem cell therapy to treat heart ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali Qayyum, Abbas; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Kastrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    (CABG), morbidity and mortality is still high in patients with CAD. Along with PCI and CABG or in patients without options for revascularization, stem cell regenerative therapy in controlled trials is a possibility. Stem cells are believed to exert their actions by angiogenesis and regeneration...... of cardiomyocytes. Recently published clinical trials and meta-analysis of stem cell studies have shown encouraging results with increased left ventricle ejection fraction and reduced symptoms in patients with CAD and heart failure. There is some evidence of mesenchymal stem cell being more effective compared...... to other cell types and cell therapy may be more effective in patients with known diabetes mellitus. However, further investigations are warranted....

  16. Treatment of anemia with darbepoetin alfa in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B; Anand, Inder S

    2013-01-01

    Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia.......Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia....

  17. Risk following hospitalization in stable chronic systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Putte; Swedberg, Karl; Borer, Jeffrey S

    2013-01-01

    We explored the impact of being hospitalized due to worsening heart failure (WHF) or a myocardial infarction (MI) on subsequent mortality in a large contemporary data set of patients with stable chronic systolic heart failure (HF).......We explored the impact of being hospitalized due to worsening heart failure (WHF) or a myocardial infarction (MI) on subsequent mortality in a large contemporary data set of patients with stable chronic systolic heart failure (HF)....

  18. Heart Failure Complicating Acute Mtyocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2017-07-01

    Factors predisposing the older person with acute myocardial infarction (MI) to develop heart failure (HF) include an increased prevalence of MI, multivessel coronary artery disease, decreased left ventricular (LV) contractile reserve, impairment of LV diastolic relaxation, increased hypertension, LV hypertrophy, diabetes mellitus, valvular heart disease, and renal insufficiency. HF associated with acute MI should be treated with a loop diuretic. The use of nitrates, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, aldosterone antagonists, beta-blockers, digoxin, and positive inotropic drugs; treatment of arrhythmias and mechanical complications; and indications for use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arterial hypertension in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Hypertensive heart disease (HHD) has been considered the adaptive hypertrophy of the left ventricle wall to increased blood pressure. Recent findings in hypertensive animals and patients now challenge this paradigm by showing that HHD also results from pathologic structural remodeling of the myocardium in response to hemodynamic and nonhemodynamic factors that are altered in arterial hypertension. The possibility that hypertensive patients predisposed to develop heart failure may be detected before the appearance of clinical manifestations provides a new way to prevent this major arterial complication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural Bases of Postresuscitative Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Dolgikh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment on 106 non-inbred male albino rats undergone 4-minute clinical death from acute blood loss has revealed that the first three days after resuscitation are marked by a concomitance of vascular disorders and cardiomyocytic dystrophic changes, the leading role being played by sludge, stasis, thrombosis, increased vascular permeability, perivascular edema, and hemorrhages. Cardiomyocytic destruction (various contractures, block-like myofibrillolysis, myocytoly-sis is a structural basis of postresuscitative heart failure. Three days later the heart displayed concomitant processes of recovery and damage. Three types of cardiac morphological changes have been identified in relation to the ratio of these processes.

  1. Albuminuria in heart failure : what do we really know?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; Nimade, Sandeep; de Zeeuw, Dick

    Purpose of the review To describe the role of albuminuria as a risk marker for heart failure and a predictor for treatment effect on heart failure prognosis. Recent findings The level of albumin in the urine is a predictor of heart failure in the general population and in patients with

  2. Chronic heart failure | Ker | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heart failure is a global problem. It is estimated that approximately 38 million people worldwide experience heart failure, and this number is growing because of the ageing of nations' populations, but also because patients are rescued from death during an acute myocardial infarction, and later develop heart failure.

  3. Prognostic indices in childhood heart failure | Omokhodion | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate the short term prognosis of childhood heart failure and highlight the factors that affect outcome among cases of heart failure admitted into the paediatric wards, University College Hospital, Ibadan. Background: Childhood heart failure remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing ...

  4. Does Evidence Drive Fluid Volume Restriction in Chronic Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin K; Thornton, Nathaniel

    2017-06-01

    Chronic heart failure is a chronic condition that is associated with increased health care expenditures and high rates of morbidity and mortality. Mainstay in heart failure management has been the prescription of a fluid restriction. The purpose of this article is to review the available evidence for fluid restriction in chronic heart failure patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Pentoxifylline for heart failure: a systematic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    heart failure, but published trials are too small to provide conclusive evidence. There is a need for large, placebo- controlled trials of pentoxifylline in heart failure, involving a diverse group of patients with regard to cause and severity of heart failure. S Afr Med l 2005; 95: 171-175. Recent research findings have suggested ...

  6. Rationale and Design of the "Safety and Efficacy of the Combination of Loop with Thiazide-type Diuretics in Patients with Decompensated Heart Failure (CLOROTIC) Trial:" A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study to Determine the Effect of Combined Diuretic Therapy (Loop Diuretics With Thiazide-Type Diuretics) Among Patients With Decompensated Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luís; Casado, Jesús; Freitas Ramírez, Adriana; Manzano, Luís; Formiga, Francesc

    2016-07-01

    Fluid overload refractory to loop diuretic therapy can complicate acute or chronic heart failure (HF) management. The Safety and Efficacy of the Combination of Loop with Thiazide-type Diuretics in Patients with Decompensated Heart Failure (CLOROTIC) trial (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01647932) will test the hypothesis that blocking distal tubule sodium reabsorption with hydrochlorothiazide can antagonize the renal adaptation to chronic loop diuretic therapy and improve diuretic resistance. CLOROTIC is a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter study. Three hundred and four patients with decompensated HF will be randomly assigned to receive hydrochlorothiazide or placebo in addition to a furosemide regimen. The main inclusion criteria are: age ≥18 years, history of chronic HF (irrespective of etiology and/or ejection fraction), admission for acute decompensation, and previous treatment with an oral loop diuretic for at least 1 month before randomization. The 2 coprimary endpoints are changes in body weight and changes in patient-reported dyspnea during hospital admission. Morbidity, mortality, and safety aspects will also be addressed. CLOROTIC is the first large-scale trial to evaluate whether the addition of a thiazide diuretic (hydrochlorothiazide) to a loop diuretic (furosemide) is a safe and effective strategy for improving congestive symptoms resulting from HF. This trial will provide important information and will therefore have a major impact on treatment strategies and future trials in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Outpatient management program of patients with chronic heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, G; Menichelli, M; Albi, F; De Lio, L; Boccanelli, A

    1998-10-01

    Hospitalization of patients with heart failure is often caused by poor adherence to drug therapy, by suboptimal utilization of ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers, and by the lack of systematic monitoring of patients after discharge. The aim of the study is to verify the impact of an outpatient management program on the hospitalization rate and functional status of patients with chronic heart failure. Over a five-year period, 435 patients entered our outpatient management program, which includes adjustment in medical therapy, patient education and visits timed according to the patient's status. Fifty-six percent of the patients were in New York Heart functional class I-II; 74% were male; mean age was 62 +/- 11 years. Heart failure was due to coronary heart disease in 42%, dilated cardiomyopathy in 35%, hypertensive heart disease in 13%, other etiologies in 10%. The following changes in medical therapy were made compared to the period before referral: ACE inhibitors in 88% of the patients vs 70% (p < 0.05), mean dose of enalapril and captopril respectively 18 +/- 6 mg vs 11 +/- 4 mg (p < 0.05) and 89 +/- 28 mg vs 61 +/- 34 mg (p < 0.05); digoxin in 71 vs 70% (NS); furosemide in 90 vs 87%; beta-blockers in 16 vs 6% (p < 0.05); amiodarone in 24 vs 16% (p < 0.05); oral anticoagulants in 22 vs 12% (p < 0.05); calcium channel blockers in 10 vs 16% (p < 0.05). During the follow-up period (35 +/- 11 months), there were 111 hospital admissions compared to 518 during the year before recruitment (p < 0.05). Seventy-two patients died (65 for cardiac causes) and four patients underwent cardiac transplantation. Functional status improved (301 patients in I-II functional class and 56 in III-IV after referral compared to 225 and 132 before referral, respectively). Our results were obtained through adjustment in pharmacological therapy, intensive patient education and therapeutic continuity made possible by our outpatient heart-failure clinic organization. It is likely that the

  8. A novel needleless liquid jet injection methodology for improving direct cardiac gene delivery: An optimization of parameters, AAV mediated therapy and investigation of host responses in ischemic heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargnoli, Anthony Samuel

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with 22 million new patients diagnosed annually. Essentially, all present therapies have significant cost burden to the healthcare system, yet fail to increase survival rates. One key employed strategy is the genetic reprogramming of cells to increase contractility via gene therapy, which has advanced to Phase IIb Clinical Trials for advanced heart failure patients. It has been argued that the most significant barrier preventing FDA approval are resolving problems with safe, efficient myocardial delivery, whereby direct injection in the infarct and remote tissue areas is not clinically feasible. Here, we aim to: (1) Improve direct cardiac gene delivery through the development of a novel liquid jet device approach (2) Compare the new method against traditional IM injection with two different vector constructions and evaluate outcome (3) Evaluate the host response resulting from both modes of direct cardiac injection, then advance a drug/gene combination with controlled release nanoparticle formulations.

  9. Influence of Androgen Deprivation Therapy on All-Cause Mortality in Men With High-Risk Prostate Cancer and a History of Congestive Heart Failure or Myocardial Infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Paul L., E-mail: pnguyen@LROC.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Beckman, Joshua A. [Department of Cardiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J.; Martin, Neil E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Choueiri, Toni K. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Hu, Jim C. [Division of Urologic Surgery, Brigham and Women' s/Faulkner Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dosoretz, Daniel E. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL (United States); Salenius, Sharon A. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Braccioforte, Michelle H. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL (United States); Kantoff, Philip W. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); D' Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Ennis, Ronald D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s-Roosevelt and Beth Israel Hospitals, Continuum Cancer Centers of New York, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY (Israel)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: It is unknown whether the excess risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) observed when androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is added to radiation for men with prostate cancer and a history of congestive heart failure (CHF) or myocardial infarction (MI) also applies to those with high-risk disease. Methods and Materials: Of 14,594 men with cT1c-T3aN0M0 prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy-based radiation from 1991 through 2006, 1,378 (9.4%) with a history of CHF or MI comprised the study cohort. Of these, 22.6% received supplemental external beam radiation, and 42.9% received a median of 4 months of neoadjuvant ADT. Median age was 71.8 years. Median follow-up was 4.3 years. Cox multivariable analysis tested for an association between ADT use and ACM within risk groups, after adjusting for treatment factors, prognostic factors, and propensity score for ADT. Results: ADT was associated with significantly increased ACM (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32-2.34; p = 0.0001), with 5-year estimates of 22.71% with ADT and 11.62% without ADT. The impact of ADT on ACM by risk group was as follows: high-risk AHR = 2.57; 95% CI, 1.17-5.67; p = 0.019; intermediate-risk AHR = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.13-2.73; p = 0.012; low-risk AHR = 1.52; 95% CI, 0.96-2.43; p = 0.075). Conclusions: Among patients with a history of CHF or MI treated with brachytherapy-based radiation, ADT was associated with increased all-cause mortality, even for patients with high-risk disease. Although ADT has been shown in Phase III studies to improve overall survival in high-risk disease, the small subgroup of high-risk patients with a history of CHF or MI, who represented about 9% of the patients, may be harmed by ADT.

  10. Heart failure-complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2007-10-01

    This article addresses issues related to acute myocardial infarction (MI) complicated by heart failure, particularly in elderly patients. Findings have shown that acute MI complicated by congestive heart failure (CHF) is associated with a high mortality, and that women with acute MI are more likely to be older and to develop CHF than men with acute MI. In general, management of CHF complicating acute MI is similar in older and younger patients. Actions discussed include hemodynamic monitoring; the administration of oxygen; and the use of morphine, diuretics, nitroglycerin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, spironolactone, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, magnesium, digoxin, and positive inotropic drugs. The article also discusses measures for treating arrhythmias and for diagnosing mechanical complications.

  11. Heart-failure-complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2007-02-01

    This article addresses issues related to acute myocardial infarction(MI) complicated by heart failure, particularly in elderly patients. Findings have shown that acute MI complicated by congestive heart failure (CHF) is associated with a high mortality, and that women with acute MI are more likely to be older and to develop CHF than men with acute MI. In general, management of CHF-complicating acute MI is similar in older and younger patients. Actions discussed include hemodynamic monitoring; the administration of oxygen; and the use of morphine, diuretics, nitroglycerin,angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, spironolactone, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, magnesium, digoxin, and positive inotropic drugs. The article also discusses measures for treating arrhythmias and for diagnosing mechanical complications.

  12. [Cardiac insufficiency: acute right heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetsch, Wolfgang A; Lahm, Tim; Hinkelbein, Jochen; Happel, Christoph M; Padosch, Stephan A

    2011-11-01

    Acute right heart failure (RHF) is a frequent and severe complication during perioperative and intensive care treatment in intensive care units (ICUs). The most common causes are pulmonary hypertension, left heart failure, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, acute lung injury (ALI) and thoracosurgical procedures. Acute RHF is not only a major contributor to morbidity and mortality; it also influences efficacy and outcome of routinely performed procedures, such as vasopressors, in critically ill patients. In contrast to the left ventricle, the right ventricle's physiology and pathophysiology are understudied, and the diagnosis of acute RHF is frequently challenging. Although many drugs are available for the treatment of RHF, randomized trials for this setting are still missing. This article gives an overview of aetiology and pathogenesis of RHF and reviews the diagnostic and therapeutic interventions currently available for providers in anaesthesiology and critical care. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Epidemiological Study of Heart Failure in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Guo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a complex clinical syndrome that results from any structural or functional impairment of ventricular filling or ejection of blood. HF is one of the most important and severe end stages of many cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiological studies of HF have focused mainly on the prevalence, incidence, mortality, fatality, and distribution and temporal trends of these indicators among different populations. This review highlights important epidemiological studies of HF in China.

  14. Obesity, Heart Failure, and Obesity Paradox

    OpenAIRE

    Nikoo Hamzeh; Fatemeh Ghadimi; Rojin Farzaneh; Seyed Kianoosh Hosseini

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of obesity are fast increasing worldwide. Various indices have been used to measure and assess obesity. The body mass index (BMI) is the most common and practical of these indices. Overweight and obesity exert considerable adverse effects on the cardiovascular system. These effects are mediated through various neurohormonal and cytokine pathways, most of which are inflammatory mediators. Systolic and / or diastolic heart failure is more prevalent among obese and o...

  15. [Cardiac rehabilitation for heart failure patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agard, Odile; Cristobal, Laurent; Caffray, Maxime

    2013-04-01

    The benefits of cardiac rehabilitation for patients with heart failure are well documented: greater capacity during physical effort and improved quality of life, a reduction in comorbidities and in the number and duration of hospitalisations, etc. Physiotherapy is one of the tools of this specific and multidisciplinary care which is governed by protocols and which can be offered on an outpatient basis or during hospitalisation.

  16. Effect of Selective Heart Rate Slowing in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Nikhil; Sivaswamy, Nadiya; Mahmod, Masliza; Yavari, Arash; Rudd, Amelia; Singh, Satnam; Dawson, Dana K; Francis, Jane M; Dwight, Jeremy S; Watkins, Hugh; Neubauer, Stefan; Frenneaux, Michael; Ashrafian, Houman

    2015-11-03

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality but is currently refractory to therapy. Despite limited evidence, heart rate reduction has been advocated, on the basis of physiological considerations, as a therapeutic strategy in HFpEF. We tested the hypothesis that heart rate reduction improves exercise capacity in HFpEF. We conducted a randomized, crossover study comparing selective heart rate reduction with the If blocker ivabradine at 7.5 mg twice daily versus placebo for 2 weeks each in 22 symptomatic patients with HFpEF who had objective evidence of exercise limitation (peak oxygen consumption at maximal exercise [o2 peak] heart rate compared with placebo in the HFpEF (107 versus 129 bpm; Pheart rate reduction with ivabradine for improving symptoms in a HFpEF population characterized by exercise limitation. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02354573. © 2015 The Authors.

  17. Inflammation as a therapeutic target in heart failure? A scientific statement from the Translational Research Committee of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Heymans, Stephane; Hirsch, Emilio; Anker, Stefan D.; Aukrust, Pal; Balligand, Jean-Luc; Cohen-Tervaert, Jan W.; Drexler, Helmut; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Felix, Stephan B.; Gullestad, Lars; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Janssens, Stefan; Latini, Roberto; Neubauer, Gitte; Paulus, Walter J.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of heart failure poses enormous challenges for health care systems worldwide. Despite effective medical interventions that target neurohumoral activation, mortality and morbidity remain substantial. Evidence for inflammatory activation as an important pathway in disease progression in chronic heart failure has emerged in the last two decades. However, clinical trials of ‘anti-inflammatory’ therapies (such as anti-tumor necrosis factor-α approaches) have to date faile...

  18. "ACUTE LIVER FAILURE" : THE HEART MAY BE THE MATTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, K.; van der Horst, I. C. C.; van der Berg, A. P.; Ligtenberg, J. J. M.; Tulleken, J. E.; Zijlstra, J. G.; Meertens, John H. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxic hepatitis secondary to heart failure is a known and treatable cause of liver failure. The diagnosis may be difficult, especially when symptoms of heart failure are absent. We present two patients who were transferred to our hospital with the diagnosis of acute liver failure to be screened

  19. Are there long-term benefits in following stable heart failure patients in a heart failure clinic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leetmaa, Tina; Villadsen, Henrik; Mikkelsen, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Objectives and Design. This study describes the long-term outcome of 163 patients with stable mild to moderate heart failure (NYHA II-III), who already were enrolled in a heart failure clinic and now were randomized to continued follow-up in the heart failure (HF) clinic or else to usual care (UC...

  20. Congestive heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poskurica Mileta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent cause of death (46-60% among patients with advanced chronic renal failure (CRF, and on dialysis treatment. Uremic cardiomyopathy is the basic pathophysiologic substrate, whereas ischemic heart disease (IHD and anemia are the most important contributing factors. Associated with well-know risk factors and specific disorders for terminal kidney failure and dialysis, the aforementioned factors instigate congestive heart failure (CHF. Suspected CHF is based on the anamnesis, clinical examination and ECG, while it is confirmed and defined more precisely on the basis of echocardiography and radiology examination. Biohumoral data (BNP, NT-proBNP are not sufficiently reliable because of specific volemic fluctuation and reduced natural clearance. Therapy approach is similar to the one for the general population: ACEI, ARBs, β-blockers, inotropic drugs and diuretics. Hypervolemia and most of the related symptoms can be kept under control effectively by the isolated or ultrafiltation, in conjunction with dialysis, during the standard bicarbonate hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration. In the same respect peritoneal dialysis is efficient for the control of hypervolemia symptoms, mainly during the first years of its application and in case of the lower NYHA class (II°/III°. In general, heart support therapy, surgical interventions of the myocardium and valve replacement are rarely used in patients on dialysis, whereas revascularization procedures are beneficial for associated IHD. In selected cases the application of cardiac resynchronization and/or implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator are advisable.

  1. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure: Revisiting Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Julio; Miñana, Gema; Santas, Enrique; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney. Worsening renal function that occurs in patients with acute heart failure has been classified as cardiorenal syndrome type 1. In this setting, worsening renal function is a common finding and is due to complex, multifactorial, and not fully understood processes involving hemodynamic (renal arterial hypoperfusion and renal venous congestion) and nonhemodynamic factors. Traditionally, worsening renal function has been associated with worse outcomes, but recent findings have revealed mixed and heterogeneous results, perhaps suggesting that the same phenotype represents a diversity of pathophysiological and clinical situations. Interpreting the magnitude and chronology of renal changes together with baseline renal function, fluid overload status, and clinical response to therapy might help clinicians to unravel the clinical meaning of renal function changes that occur during an episode of heart failure decompensation. In this article, we critically review the contemporary evidence on the pathophysiology and clinical aspects of worsening renal function in acute heart failure. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Management and monitoring of haemodynamic complications in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspromonte, Nadia; Cruz, Dinna N; Valle, Roberto; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-11-01

    The pathophysiology of acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS), defined as a change or worsening in heart failure symptoms and signs, is complex. The variety of adverse neurohormonal adaptations includes increased levels of plasma renin, aldosterone and angiotensin II, all responsible for cardio-renal dysfunction. In fact, such alterations result in an array of clinical changes that include abnormal haemodynamics, altered ventricular filling pressures, pathological neurohormonal responses, leading to fluid overload, congestion and ultimately heart failure symptoms. Clinical pictures can be various: in spite of a usual improvement in dyspnoea, little weight change and significant morbidity are generally observed during hospitalization. Short-term outcomes are characterized by a high 60-day re-hospitalization and high mortality rates; apparently, both can be predicted from pre-discharge characteristics. The most frequently used treatments for AHF care include diuretics, inotropic agents, and vasodilator/vasoactive agents; however, the final therapeutic strategy is often individualized. Diuretics are currently the most used agents, but resistance to diuretic therapy is common. In addition, several studies have demonstrated that aggressive diuresis can contribute to reduced renal function, and high doses of diuretics have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Many patients with AHFS also suffer from acute or from chronic renal dysfunction (cardio-renal syndromes type 1 and 2, respectively), which further complicate the outcomes and treatment strategies. A personalized patient evaluation of the combined heart and kidney functions is advised to implement the best possible multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  3. Silent disease progression in clinically stable heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbah, Hani N

    2017-04-01

    Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is a progressive disorder whereby cardiac structure and function continue to deteriorate, often despite the absence of clinically apparent signs and symptoms of a worsening disease state. This silent yet progressive nature of HFrEF can contribute to the increased risk of death-even in patients who are 'clinically stable', or who are asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic-because it often goes undetected and/or undertreated. Current therapies are aimed at improving clinical symptoms, and several agents more directly target the underlying causes of disease; however, new therapies are needed that can more fully address factors responsible for underlying progressive cardiac dysfunction. In this review, mechanisms that drive HFrEF, including ongoing cardiomyocyte loss, mitochondrial abnormalities, impaired calcium cycling, elevated LV wall stress, reactive interstitial fibrosis, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, are discussed. Additionally, limitations of current HF therapies are reviewed, with a focus on how these therapies are designed to counteract the deleterious effects of compensatory neurohumoral activation but do not fully prevent disease progression. Finally, new investigational therapies that may improve the underlying molecular, cellular, and structural abnormalities associated with HF progression are reviewed. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  4. Renal Hemodynamic Effects of Serelaxin in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, Adriaan A.; Dahlke, Marion; Meyer, Sven; Stepinska, Janina; Gottlieb, Stephen S.; Jones, Andrew; Zhang, Yiming; Laurent, Didier; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Navis, Gerjan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background-Serelaxin is a promising therapy for acute heart failure. The renal hemodynamic effects of serelaxin in patients with chronic heart failure are unknown. Methods and Results-In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter study, patients with New York Heart Association

  5. Left Ventricular global longitudinal strain predicts heart failure readmission in acute decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Simone; Mansour, Ibrahim N; Kansal, Mayank; Gheith, Hana; Dowdy, Zachary; Dickens, Carolyn A; Buto-Colletti, Cassandra; Chae, June M; Saleh, Hussam H; Stamos, Thomas D

    2017-03-15

    The goal of this study was to determine if left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS) predicts heart failure (HF) readmission in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Two hundred ninety one patients were enrolled at the time of admission for acute decompensated heart failure between January 2011 and September 2013. Left ventricle global longitudinal strain (LV GLS) by velocity vector imaging averaged from 2, 3 and 4-chamber views could be assessed in 204 out of 291 (70%) patients. Mean age was 63.8 ± 15.2 years, 42% of the patients were males and 78% were African American or Hispanic. Patients were followed until the first HF hospital readmission up to 44 months. Patients were grouped into quartiles on the basis of LV GLS. Kaplan-Meier curves showed significantly higher readmission rates in patients with worse LV GLS (log-rank p heart disease, dementia, New York Heart Association class, LV ejection fraction, use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, systolic and diastolic blood pressure on admission and sodium level on admission, worse LV GLS was the strongest predictor of recurrent HF readmission (p heart failure with a higher risk of readmission in case of progressive worsening of LV GLS, independent of the ejection fraction.

  6. Accuracy of a heart failure diagnosis in administrative registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Thomas; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Kirk, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of heart failure is frequently reported using hospital discharge diagnoses. The specificity of a diagnosis has been shown to be high but the sensitivity of a reported diagnosis is unknown. PURPOSE: To study the accuracy of a heart failure diagnosis reported to the Danish......, performed an echocardiogram and evaluated whether clinical symptoms of heart failure were present. Heart failure was defined in accordance with current ESC guidelines as symptoms of heart failure and evidence of cardiac dysfunction. RESULTS: A registered diagnosis of heart failure (n=126) carried...... a specificity of 99% and a sensitivity of 29% for all patients. The positive predictive value was 81%, the negative predictive value 90%. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of Heart Failure in the Danish National Registers is underreported, but very specific....

  7. Practical guide on home health in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaarsma, T.; Larsen, Torben; Stromberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic heart failure is a common condition affecting up to 15 million people in the extended Europe. Heart failure is burdensome and costly for patients in terms of decreased quality of life and poor prognosis, and it is also costly for society. Better integrated care is warranted...... in this population and specialised heart failure care can save costs and improve the quality of care. However, only a few European countries have implemented specialised home care and offered this to a larger number of patients with heart failure. Method: We developed a guide on Home Health in Heart Failure patients...... from a literature review, a survey of heart failure management programs, the opinion of researchers and practitioners, data from clinical trials and a reflection of an international expert meeting. Results: In integrated home care for heart failure patients, it is advised to consider the following...

  8. Mortality and morbidity remain high despite captopril and/or Valsartan therapy in elderly patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, heart failure, or both after acute myocardial infarction: results from the Valsartan in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial (VALIANT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harvey D; Aylward, Philip E G; Huang, Zhen; Dalby, Anthony J; Weaver, W Douglas; Barvik, Ståle; Marin-Neto, José Antonio; Murin, Jan; Nordlander, Rolf O; van Gilst, Wiek H; Zannad, Faiez; McMurray, John J V; Califf, Robert M; Pfeffer, Marc A

    2005-11-29

    The elderly constitute an increasing proportion of acute myocardial infarction patients and have disproportionately high mortality and morbidity. Those with heart failure or impaired left ventricular left ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction have high complication and mortality rates. Little is known about outcomes with contemporary therapies in these patients. The Valsartan in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial (VALIANT) randomized 14,703 patients with heart failure and/or left ventricular ejection fraction or =85 (n=383) years. With increasing age, 3-year mortality almost quadrupled (13.4%, 26.3%, 36.0%, and 52.1%, respectively), composite end-point events more than doubled (25.2%, 41.0%, 52.3%, and 66.8%), and hospital admissions for heart failure almost tripled (12.0%, 23.1%, 31.3%, and 35.4%). Outcomes did not differ between the 3 study treatments in any age group. Adverse events associated with captopril and valsartan were more common in the elderly and in patients receiving combination therapy. With increasing age, use of aspirin, beta-blockers, and statins declined, and use of digoxin, calcium-channel blockers, and non-potassium-sparing diuretics increased. On 3-year multivariable analysis, each 10-year age increase was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.49 (95% CI, 1.426 to 1.557; Pmyocardial infarction, although most received beta-blockers and all received an ACE inhibitor and/or an angiotensin receptor blocker. Better therapies and increased use of aspirin, beta-blockers, and statins are needed in this important and increasing patient group.

  9. Retrospective application of Program to Access and Review Trending iNformation and Evaluate coRrelation to Symptoms in patients with Heart Failure criteria for the remote management of patients with cardiac resynchronisation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasca, Francesco Ma; Franzetti, Jessica; Rella, Valeria; Malfatto, Gabriella; Brambilla, Roberto; Facchini, Mario; Parati, Gianfranco; Perego, Giovanni B

    2017-05-01

    Aim The Program to Access and Review Trending iNformation and Evaluate coRrelation to Symptoms in patients with Heart Failure (PARTNERS HF) trial elaborated a multiparametric model for prediction of acute decompensation in advanced heart failure patients, based on periodical in office data download from cardiac resynchronisation devices. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the PARTNERS HF criteria to detect initial decompensation in a population of moderate heart failure patients under remote monitoring. Methods We retrospectively applied the PARTNERS HF criteria to 1860 transmissions from 104 patients (median follow up 21 months; range 1-67 months), who were enrolled in our programme of telemedicine after cardiac resynchronisation therapy. We tested the ability of a score based on these criteria to predict any acute clinical decompensation occurring in the 15 days following a transmission. Results In 441 cases, acute heart failure was diagnosed after the index transmission. The area under the curve (AUC) of the score for the diagnosis of acute decompensation was 0.752 (confidence interval (CI) 95% 0.728-0.777). The best score cut-off was consistent with the results of PARTNERS HF: with a score ≥2, sensitivity was 75% and specificity 68%. The odds ratio for events was 6.24 (CI 95% 4.90-7.95; p < 0.001). Conclusions When retrospectively applied to remote monitoring transmissions and arranged in a score, PARTNERS HF criteria could identify HF patients who subsequently developed acute decompensation. These results warrant prospective studies applying PARTNERS HF criteria to remote monitoring.

  10. Congestive heart failure in children with pneumonia and respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimdet, Kachaporn; Techakehakij, Win

    2017-03-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is one of the most common cardiac complications of pneumonia in adulthood leading to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Little is known, however, of CHF and pneumonia in children. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the characteristics and factors associated with CHF in under-5 children with pneumonia and respiratory failure. A retrospective cohort was conducted in hospitalized patients aged 2-59 months with community-acquired pneumonia and respiratory failure from June 2011 to June 2014 at Suratthani Hospital, Thailand. The characteristics, therapeutic strategy, and clinical outcomes of CHF were reviewed. Baseline characteristics and basic laboratory investigations on admission were compared between the CHF and non-CHF groups. Of 135 patients, 14 (10%) had CHF. Compared with patients without CHF, the CHF group had prolonged intubation and hospital stay and high rates of associated complications such as ventilator-associated pneumonia, sepsis, shock, and 30 day mortality. CHF was significantly associated with certain characteristics, including male sex and bacterial pneumonia. Pneumonia with respiratory failure is associated with CHF even in healthy children without cardiac risks. The awareness and early recognition of CHF, particularly in male, and bacterial pneumonia, is important in order to provide immediate treatment to reduce complications. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. Clinicopathological profiles of progressive heart failure in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Melacini, Paola; Basso, Cristina; Angelini, Annalisa; Calore, Chiara; Bobbo, Fabiana; Tokajuk, Barbara; Bellini, Nicoletta; Smaniotto, Gessica; Zucchetto, Mauro; Iliceto, Sabino; Thiene, Gaetano; Maron, Barry J.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an important cause of heart failure-related disability over a wide range of ages. Profiles of severe progressive heart failure symptoms and death, or heart transplantation deserve more complete definition within large patient cohorts. Methods and results Clinical and morphological features of heart failure were assessed in 293 consecutive HCM patients over a median follow-up of 6 (inter-quartile range 2?11) years. Gross and histopathological features ...

  12. Pharmacologic strategies to preserve renal function in acute decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sachin; Taylor, David O

    2015-02-01

    Over a million patients get hospitalized with the diagnosis of acute decompensated heart failure which poses an insurmountable financial burden on the health care system. Heart failure alone incurs over 30 billion dollars with half the cost spent towards acute hospitalizations. Majority of the treatment strategies have focused towards decongesting patients which often comes with the cost of worsening renal function. Renal dysfunction in the setting of acute decompensated heart failure portends worse morbidity and mortality. Recently, there has been a change in the focus with shift towards therapies attempting to conserve renal function. In the past decade, we have witnessed several large randomized controlled trials testing the established as well as emerging therapies in this subset of population with mixed results. This review intends to provide a comprehensive overview of the pharmacologic therapies commonly utilized in the management of acute decompensated heart failure and the body of evidence supporting these strategies.

  13. Heart failure as an endpoint in heart failure and non-heart failure cardiovascular clinical trials: the need for a consensus definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zannad, F.; Stough, W.G.; Pitt, B.

    2008-01-01

    Specific criteria have been established to define the occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in cardiovascular clinical trials, but there is not a consistent definition for heart failure. Heart failure events appear to occur at a rate that is similar to stroke and MI in trials...... of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, yet a consistent approach to defining heart failure events has not yet been realized. The wide range of definitions used in clinical trials makes it difficult to interpret new data in the context of existing literature. This inconsistency has...... led to challenges in determining the incidence of heart failure in cardiovascular studies and the effects of interventions on these endpoints. This paper examines issues related to defining heart failure events in cardiovascular clinical trials and presents a definition to formally address this issue...

  14. Relation of QRS Duration to Clinical Benefit of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Mild Heart Failure Patients Without Left Bundle Branch Block: The Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial with Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biton, Yitschak; Kutyifa, Valentina; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Goldenberg, Ilan; Klein, Helmut; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Ruwald, Anne Christine; Ruwald, Martin H; Moss, Arthur J; Zareba, Wojciech

    2016-02-01

    There are conflicting data regarding the efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with heart failure (HF) and without left bundle branch block. We evaluated the long-term clinical outcomes of 537 non-left bundle branch block patients with mild HF enrolled in the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial with Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT) study by QRS duration or morphology further stratified by PR interval. At 7 years of follow-up, the cumulative probability of HF hospitalization or death was 45% versus 56% among patients randomized to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and CRT with defibrillator (CRT-D), respectively (P=0.209). Multivariable-adjusted subgroup analysis by QRS duration showed that patients from the lower quartile QRS duration group (≤ 134 ms) experienced 2.4-fold (P=0.015) increased risk for HF hospitalization or death with CRT-D versus implantable cardioverter-defibrillator only therapy, whereas the effect of CRT-D in patients from the upper quartiles group (QRS>134 ms) was neutral (hazard ratio [HR] =0.97, P=0.86; P value for interaction =0.024). In a second analysis incorporating PR interval, patients with prolonged QRS (>134 ms) and prolonged PR (>230 ms) were protected with CRT-D (HR=0.31, P=0.003), whereas the association was neutral with prolonged QRS (>134 ms) and shorter PR (≤ 230 ms;, HR=1.19, P=0.386; P value for interaction =0.002). The effect was neutral, regardless of morphology, right bundle branch block (HR=1.01, P=0.975), and intraventricular conduction delay (HR=1.31, P=0.172). Overall, patients with mild HF but without left bundle branch block morphology did not derive clinical benefit with CRT-D during long-term follow-up. Relatively shorter QRS was associated with a significantly increased risk with CRT-D relative to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator -only. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT00180271, NCT01294449, and NCT02060110. © 2016

  15. Pathophysiological and therapeutic implications in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohendanner, Felix; Heinzel, F R; Blaschke, F; Pieske, B M; Haverkamp, W; Boldt, H L; Parwani, A S

    2017-10-16

    Heart failure and atrial fibrillation are common and responsible for significant mortality of patients. Both share the same risk factors like hypertension, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, obesity, arteriosclerosis, and age. A variety of microscopic and macroscopic changes favor the genesis of atrial fibrillation in patients with preexisting heart failure, altered subcellular Ca(2+) homeostasis leading to increased cellular automaticity as well as concomitant fibrosis that are induced by pressure/volume overload and altered neurohumoral states. Atrial fibrillation itself promotes clinical deterioration of patients with preexisting heart failure as atrial contraction significantly contributes to ventricular filling. In addition, atrial fibrillation induced tachycardia can even further compromise ventricular function by inducing tachycardiomyopathy. Even though evidence has been provided that atrial functions significantly and independently of confounding ventricular pathologies, correlate with mortality of heart failure patients, rate and rhythm controls have been shown to be of equal effectiveness in improving mortality. Yet, it also has been shown that cohorts of patients with heart failure benefit from a rhythm control concept regarding symptom control and hospitalization. To date, amiodarone is the most feasible approach to restore sinus rhythm, yet its use is limited by its extensive side-effect profile. In addition, other therapies like catheter-based pulmonary vein isolation are of increasing importance. A wide range of heart failure-specific therapies are available with mixed impact on new onset or perpetuation of atrial fibrillation. This review highlights pathophysiological concepts and possible therapeutic approaches to treat patients with heart failure at risk for or with atrial fibrillation.

  16. Current strategies for preventing renal dysfunction in patients with heart failure: a heart failure stage approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Victor Sarli; Andrade, Lúcia; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common during episodes of acute decompensated heart failure, and historical data indicate that the mean creatinine level at admission has risen in recent decades. Different mechanisms underlying this change over time have been proposed, such as demographic changes, hemodynamic and neurohumoral derangements and medical interventions. In this setting, various strategies have been proposed for the prevention of renal dysfunction with heterogeneous results. In the present article, we review and discuss the main aspects of renal dysfunction prevention according to the different stages of heart failure. PMID:23644863

  17. Therapeutic options in chronic heart failure. Findings on chest X-ray; Nicht medikamentoese Therapieoptionen der chronischen Herzinsuffizienz. Befunde in der Projektionsradiografie des Thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granitz, M.R.; Meissnitzer, T.; Meissnitzer, M.W.; Hergan, K.; Altenberger, J.; Granitz, C. [Uniklinikum Salzburg - Landeskrankenhaus (Austria)

    2016-05-15

    The contribution covers drugless therapeutic options for chronic heart failure: the implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD), the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), the interventional catheter treatment of functional mitral insufficiency, and mechanical heart supporting systems and heart transplantation.

  18. Coenzyme Q10 for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madmani, Mohammed E; Yusuf Solaiman, Ahmad; Tamr Agha, Khalil; Madmani, Yasser; Shahrour, Yasser; Essali, Adib; Kadro, Waleed

    2014-06-02

    Coenzyme Q10, or ubiquinone, is a non-prescription nutritional supplement. It is a fat-soluble molecule that acts as an electron carrier in mitochondria and as a coenzyme for mitochondrial enzymes. Coenzyme Q10 deficiency may be associated with a multitude of diseases including heart failure. The severity of heart failure correlates with the severity of coenzyme Q10 deficiency. Emerging data suggest that the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species are increased in patients with heart failure and coenzyme Q10 may help to reduce these toxic effects because of its antioxidant activity. Coenzyme Q10 may also have a role in stabilising myocardial calcium-dependent ion channels and preventing the consumption of metabolites essential for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Coenzyme Q10, although not a primary recommended treatment, could be beneficial to patients with heart failure. Several randomised controlled trials have compared coenzyme Q10 to other therapeutic modalities, but no systematic review of existing randomised trials has been conducted. To review the safety and efficacy of coenzyme Q10 in heart failure. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 12); MEDLINE OVID (1950 to January Week 3 2013) and EMBASE OVID (1980 to 2013 Week 03) on 24 January 2013; Web of Science with Conference Proceedings (1970 to January 2013) and CINAHL Plus (1981 to January 2013) on 25 January 2013; and AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine) (1985 to January 2013) on 28 January 2013. We applied no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials of either parallel or cross-over design that assessed the beneficial and harmful effects of coenzyme Q10 in patients with heart failure. When cross-over studies were identified, we considered data only from the first phase. Two authors independently extracted data from the included studies onto a pre-designed data extraction form. We then entered the data into Review

  19. Cardiohepatic Interactions: Implications for Management in Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendyal, Akshay; Gelow, Jill M

    2016-07-01

    Liver disease is a common sequela of heart failure and can range from mild reversible liver injury to hepatic fibrosis and, in its most severe form, cardiac cirrhosis. Hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis due to chronic heart failure have important implications for prognosis, medication management, mechanical circulatory support, and heart transplantation. This article reviews the current understanding of liver disease in heart failure and provides a framework for approaching liver disease in the advanced heart failure population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuroimmune mechanisms of depression in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Jessica A; Mills, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major and costly public health concern, and its prognosis is grim-with high hospitalization and mortality rates. It is well documented that HF patients experience disproportionately high rates of depression and that depressed HF patients have worse clinical outcomes than their non-depressed counterparts. The purpose of this chapter is to introduce the reader to the study of depression in HF, and how psychoneuroimmunologic principals have been applied to further elucidate the mechanisms (i.e., neurohormonal and cytokine activation) linking these co-morbid disorders.