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Sample records for heart failure role

  1. Role and Value of Clinical Pharmacy in Heart Failure Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, W G; Patterson, J H

    2017-08-01

    Effectively managing heart failure requires a multidisciplinary, holistic approach attuned to many factors: diagnosis of structural and functional cardiac abnormalities; medication, device, or surgical management; concomitant treatment of comorbidities; physical rehabilitation; dietary considerations; and social factors. This practice paper highlights the pharmacist's role in the management of patients with heart failure, the evidence supporting their functions, and steps to ensure the pharmacist resource is available to the broad population of patients with heart failure. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  2. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  3. Prognostic Role of Hypothyroidism in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ning; Gao, Dengfeng; Triggiani, Vincenzo; Iacoviello, Massimo; Mitchell, Judith E.; Ma, Rui; Zhang, Yan; Kou, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hypothyroidism is a risk factor of heart failure (HF) in the general population. However, the relationship between hypothyroidism and clinical outcomes in patients with established HF is still inconclusive. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify the association of hypothyroidism and all-cause mortality as well as cardiac death and/or hospitalization in patients with HF. We searched MEDLINE via PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases for studies of hypothyroidism and clinical outcomes in patients with HF published up to the end of January 2015. Random-effects models were used to estimate summary relative risk (RR) statistics. We included 13 articles that reported RR estimates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for hypothyroidism with outcomes in patients with HF. For the association of hypothyroidism with all-cause mortality and with cardiac death and/or hospitalization, the pooled RR was 1.44 (95% CI: 1.29–1.61) and 1.37 (95% CI: 1.22–1.55), respectively. However, the association disappeared on adjustment for B-type natriuretic protein level (RR 1.17, 95% CI: 0.90–1.52) and in studies of patients with mean age hypothyroidism associated with increased all-cause mortality as well as cardiac death and/or hospitalization in patients with HF. Further diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for hypothyroidism may be needed for patients with HF. PMID:26222845

  4. The Role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterzan, Mark A; Rider, Oliver J; Anderson, Lisa J

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular imaging is key for the assessment of patients with heart failure. Today, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an established role in the assessment of patients with suspected and confirmed heart failure syndromes, in particular identifying aetiology. Its role in informing prognosis and guiding decisions around therapy are evolving. Key strengths include its accuracy; reproducibility; unrestricted field of view; lack of radiation; multiple abilities to characterise myocardial tissue, thrombus and scar; as well as unparalleled assessment of left and right ventricular volumes. T2* has an established role in the assessment and follow-up of iron overload cardiomyopathy and a role for T1 in specific therapies for cardiac amyloid and Anderson-Fabry disease is emerging.

  5. Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    McMurray, John; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure.

  6. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other diseases. Chronic diseases — such as diabetes, HIV, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or a buildup of iron (hemochromatosis) or ... transplantation or support with a ventricular assist device. Prevention The key to preventing heart failure is to ...

  7. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Introduction Types of Heart Failure Classes of Heart Failure Heart Failure in Children Advanced Heart Failure • Causes and ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  8. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Introduction Types of Heart Failure Classes of Heart Failure Heart Failure in Children Advanced Heart Failure • Causes and ... and Advanced HF • Tools and Resources • Personal Stories Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  9. [Chronic heart failure and cachexia: role of endocrine system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dei Cas, A; Muoio, A; Zavaroni, I

    2011-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a major health problem that carries a devastating prognosis. The prognosis worsens considerably once cardiac cachexia has been diagnosed. Neurohormonal, metabolic, hemodynamic and immunological alterations are involved in the initiation and progression of cardiac cachexia. Cachexia is characterized by a hypothalamic inappropriate response to the mechanisms controlling energy homeostasis. Levels of the anorexigenic hormone leptin are decreased whereas the orexigenic gherlin hormone levels are normal or elevated. Nevertheless, energy intake is not increased as expected due to a persistent activation of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) system (anorexigenic) paralleled by a decreased activity of the neuropeptide Y (NPY, orexigenic) neurons. Cachexia is also characterized by an imbalance in anabolic (impairment in the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I axis, insulin resistance) and catabolic (increased levels of catecholamines, increased cortisol/dehydroepiandrosterone ratio and activation of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleuchin-6, interleuchin-1') at the basis of the wasting process. This review discusses the complex role of the endocrine system in modulating energy balance, appetite and metabolism in patients with chronic heart failure. A joint multidisciplinary effort of the cardiologists, immunologists and endocrinologists might be useful to identify the precise mechanisms involved in the neuroendocrine alteration and to develop therapeutic strategies able to improve the prognosis of CHF patients.

  10. Chronic heart failure: Role of the GP in management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Piterman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The commonest cause of chronic heat failure in China is ischemic heart disease, followed by hypertension and valvular heart disease. Echocardiography is essential in establishing a diagnosis as well as helping to identify a cause and to monitor progress. Management includes nonpharmacological as well as pharmacological treatment, and self-care with careful monitoring of salt and fluid intake as well as regular weight measurement. Care planning and team-based care are essential in managing patients with chronic heart failure, who often have concurrent multimorbidity and are receiving polypharmacy.

  11. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  12. Role of Peritoneal Ultrafiltration in Heart Failure Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Elif Şenel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS is a general term that can reflect different clinical conditions in which cardiac and renal dysfunctions coexist. The main pathogenetic mechanisms playing a role in heart failure (HF and CRS are neurohumoral adaptation, right ventricular dilatation and dysfunction and systemic inflammation. Persistence of these factors cause focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis in the renal parenchyma. Diuretics, beta blockers, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors, and vasodilators are the main medical treatments besides conventional approach, such as salt and water restriction and quitting smoking, in HF treatment. Diuretic resistance is the main problem emerging during diuretic treatments. Two renal replacement treatments have become prominent for removal of excess fluids via ultrafiltration in HF patients with diuretic resistance extracorporeal ultrafiltration with hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis (PD. Herein, the role of these two ultrafiltration modalities, especially peritoneal ultrafiltration (PUF in the treatment of HF is discussed. The main studies and advantages of PUF in HF treatment were discussed. Moreover, effects of PD on glomerular filtration rate, hospitalization and mortality were investigated. In conclusion, PD is an alternative cheap, practical and convenient therapy in reducing cardiac volume burden in HF patients who do not respond well to standard treatments and/or require frequent hospitalization.

  13. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on ... your high blood pressure Fast food tips Heart failure - discharge Heart failure - fluids and diuretics Heart failure - what to ...

  14. The role of exercise testing in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedberg, K; Gundersen, T

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of exercise testing in congestive heart failure (CHF) may be summarized as follows: (a) detect impaired cardiac performance, (b) grade severity of cardiac failure and classify functional capability, and (c) assess effects of interventions. Several different methods are available to make these assessments, and we have to ask ourselves how well exercise testing achieves these objectives. It has to be kept in mind that the power generated by the exercising muscles is dependent on the oxygen delivery to the skeletal muscles. Oxygen uptake is the result of an integrated performance of the lungs, heart, and peripheral circulation. In patients, as well as in normal subjects, oxygen uptake is related to hemodynamic indices such as cardiac output, stroke volume, or exercise duration when a stepwise regulated maximal exercise protocol is used. However, there are major differences in the concept of a true maximum in normal subjects versus heart failure patients. Fit-normal subjects will achieve a real maximal oxygen uptake, whereas patients may stop testing before a maximum is reached because of symptoms such as dyspnea or leg fatigue. Therefore, it is better if the actual oxygen uptake can be measured. "Peak" rather than true maximal oxygen uptake has been suggested for the classification of the severity of heart failure. Peripheral factors modify the cardiac output through such factors as vascular resistance, organ function, and hormonal release. Maximal exercise will stress the cardiovascular system to a point where the weakest chain will impose a limiting effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Neurohumoral activation in heart failure: the role of adrenergic receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia C. Brum

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a common endpoint for many forms of cardiovascular disease and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The development of end-stage HF often involves an initial insult to the myocardium that reduces cardiac output and leads to a compensatory increase in sympathetic nervous system activity. Acutely, the sympathetic hyperactivity through the activation of beta-adrenergic receptors increases heart rate and cardiac contractility, which compensate for decreased cardiac output. However, chronic exposure of the heart to elevated levels of catecholamines released from sympathetic nerve terminals and the adrenal gland may lead to further pathologic changes in the heart, resulting in continued elevation of sympathetic tone and a progressive deterioration in cardiac function. On a molecular level, altered beta-adrenergic receptor signaling plays a pivotal role in the genesis and progression of HF. beta-adrenergic receptor number and function are decreased, and downstream mechanisms are altered. In this review we will present an overview of the normal beta-adrenergic receptor pathway in the heart and the consequences of sustained adrenergic activation in HF. The myopathic potential of individual components of the adrenergic signaling will be discussed through the results of research performed in genetic modified animals. Finally, we will discuss the potential clinical impact of beta-adrenergic receptor gene polymorphisms for better understanding the progression of HF.A insuficiência cardíaca (IC é a via final comum da maioria das doenças cardiovasculares e uma das maiores causas de morbi-mortalidade. O desenvolvimento do estágio final da IC freqüentemente envolve um insulto inicial do miocárdio, reduzindo o débito cardíaco e levando ao aumento compensatório da atividade do sistema nervoso simpático (SNS. Existem evidências de que apesar da exposição aguda ser benéfica, exposições crônicas a elevadas concentra

  16. [The role of natriuretic peptides in heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancona, R; Limongelli, G; Pacileo, G; Miele, T; Rea, A; Roselli, T; Masarone, D; Messina, S; Palmieri, R; Golia, E; Iacomino, M; Gala, S; Calabrò, P; Di Salvo, G; Calabrò, R

    2007-10-01

    Over the last decades, there has been a significant increase in incidence and prevalence of heart failure, a major cause of cardiac morbidity and mortality. Measurements of neurohormones, in particular B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), can significantly improve diagnostic accuracy, and also correlate with long-term morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic heart failure presenting to the emergency department. BNP is secreted by cardiac ventricles mainly in response to wall stress and neurohormonal factors like the sympathetic nervous system, endothelins, and the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. BNP increases myocardial relaxation and oppose the vasoconstrictive, sodium retaining, and natriuretic effects caused by vasoconstrictive factors. BNP is the first biomarker to prove its clinical value for the diagnosis of left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction but also for the right ventricular dysfunction, guiding prognosis and therapy management. Emerging clinical data will help further refine biomarker-guided therapeutic and monitoring strategies involving BNP.

  17. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  18. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure ... problem may cause heart failure or make heart failure worse. Heart valve surgery may be needed to repair or ...

  19. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... Making This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  20. Role of SGLT2 Inhibitors in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugge, Frederik H

    2017-08-01

    This review aims to summarize the evidence on cardiovascular risks and benefits of glucose-lowering drugs in diabetic patients, with a particular focus on the role of sodium-glucose transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors and their promising potential as a heart failure treatment. The SGLT-2 inhibitor empagliflozin has emerged as the first glucose-lowering drug to lower cardiovascular mortality in diabetes with an unprecedented 38% relative risk reduction. In addition, empagliflozin significantly reduced the rate of heart failure admissions with 35% when compared to placebo in diabetic patients with established atherosclerosis. SGLT-2 inhibitors should be considered as a first-line drug to achieve glycemic control in diabetic patients at high risk for cardiovascular diseases and heart failure in particular. As SGLT-2 inhibitors target different pathophysiological pathways in heart failure, they might even be considered in the broader population without diabetes, but this remains the topic of further study.

  1. CMR in Heart Failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Sado, D. M.; Hasleton, J. M.; Herrey, A. S.; Moon, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is a common syndrome with multiple causes. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a medical imaging technique with significant advantages, allowing the understanding of aetiology and pathophysiology of HF in the individual patient, permitting specific therapy to be administered and predicting prognosis. This paper discusses the diverse role of CMR in HF.

  2. Chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper, Ingrid; Easton, Kellie

    2017-01-01

    1. The common symptoms and signs of chronic heart failure are dyspnoea, ankle swelling, raised jugular venous pressure and basal crepitations. Other conditions may be confused with chronic heart failure, including dependent oedema or oedema due to renal or hepatic disease. Shortness of breath may be due to respiratory disease or severe anaemia. Heart failure secondary to lung disease (cor pulmonale) should be distinguished from congestive cardiac failure. Heart failure may also present with l...

  3. Vitamin D and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall Brinkley, D; Ali, Omair M; Zalawadiya, Sandip K; Wang, Thomas J

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D is principally known for its role in calcium homeostasis, but preclinical studies implicate multiple pathways through which vitamin D may affect cardiovascular function and influence risk for heart failure. Many adults with cardiovascular disease have low vitamin D status, making it a potential therapeutic target. We review the rationale and potential role of vitamin D supplementation in the prevention and treatment of chronic heart failure. Substantial observational evidence has associated low vitamin D status with the risk of heart failure, ventricular remodeling, and clinical outcomes in heart failure, including mortality. However, trials assessing the influence of vitamin D supplementation on surrogate markers and clinical outcomes in heart failure have generally been small and inconclusive. There are insufficient data to recommend routine assessment or supplementation of vitamin D for the prevention or treatment of chronic heart failure. Prospective trials powered for clinical outcomes are warranted.

  4. New Role for Interleukin-13 Receptor α1 in Myocardial Homeostasis and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Uri; Kain, David; Wagner, Allon; Sahu, Avinash; Nevo-Caspi, Yael; Gonen, Nir; Molotski, Natali; Konfino, Tal; Landa, Natalie; Naftali-Shani, Nili; Blum, Galia; Merquiol, Emmanuelle; Karo-Atar, Danielle; Kanfi, Yariv; Paret, Gidi; Munitz, Ariel; Cohen, Haim Y; Ruppin, Eytan; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Leor, Jonathan

    2017-05-20

    The immune system plays a pivotal role in myocardial homeostasis and response to injury. Interleukins-4 and -13 are anti-inflammatory type-2 cytokines, signaling via the common interleukin-13 receptor α1 chain and the type-2 interleukin-4 receptor. The role of interleukin-13 receptor α1 in the heart is unknown. We analyzed myocardial samples from human donors (n=136) and patients with end-stage heart failure (n=177). We found that the interleukin-13 receptor α1 is present in the myocardium and, together with the complementary type-2 interleukin-4 receptor chain Il4ra , is significantly downregulated in the hearts of patients with heart failure. Next, we showed that Il13ra1 -deficient mice develop severe myocardial dysfunction and dyssynchrony compared to wild-type mice (left ventricular ejection fraction 29.7±9.9 versus 45.0±8.0; P =0.004, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter 4.2±0.2 versus 3.92±0.3; P =0.03). A bioinformatic analysis of mouse hearts indicated that interleukin-13 receptor α1 regulates critical pathways in the heart other than the immune system, such as extracellular matrix (normalized enrichment score=1.90; false discovery rate q=0.005) and glucose metabolism (normalized enrichment score=-2.36; false discovery rate q=0). Deficiency of Il13ra1 was associated with reduced collagen deposition under normal and pressure-overload conditions. The results of our studies in humans and mice indicate, for the first time, a role of interleukin-13 receptor α1 in myocardial homeostasis and heart failure and suggests a new therapeutic target to treat heart disease. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  5. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Heart Failure Module 6: Managing Feelings About Heart Failure Download Module Order Hardcopy Heart failure can cause ... professional help for emotional problems. Common Feelings About Heart Failure It is common for people to feel depressed ...

  6. Emerging role of liver X receptors in cardiac pathophysiology and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Megan V; van Gilst, Wiek H; de Boer, Rudolf A

    2016-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are master regulators of metabolism and have been studied for their pharmacological potential in vascular and metabolic disease. Besides their established role in metabolic homeostasis and disease, there is mounting evidence to suggest that LXRs may exert direct beneficial effects in the heart. Here, we aim to provide a conceptual framework to explain the broad mode of action of LXRs and how LXR signaling may be an important local and systemic target for the treatment of heart failure. We discuss the potential role of LXRs in systemic conditions associated with heart failure, such as hypertension, diabetes, and renal and vascular disease. Further, we expound on recent data that implicate a direct role for LXR activation in the heart, for its impact on cardiomyocyte damage and loss due to ischemia, and effects on cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and myocardial metabolism. Taken together, the accumulating evidence supports the notion that LXRs may represent a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of heart failure.

  7. [Elderly heart failure patients and the role of beta-blocker therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeljans-Tijssen, C.W.; Jansen, R.W.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this article different aspects of chronic heart failure in old age are described. We mainly focus on the place of beta-blocker therapy in chronic heart failure. Beta-blockers are recommended for the treatment of stable chronic heart failure with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. There is

  8. Heart Failure in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Biykem; Khalaf, Shaden

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in women, and they tend to develop it at an older age compared to men. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is more common in women than in men and accounts for at least half the cases of heart failure in women. When comparing men and women who have heart failure and a low left ventricular ejection fraction, the women are more symptomatic and have a similarly poor outcome. Overall recommendations for guideline-directed medical therapies show no differences in treatment approaches between men and women. Overall, women are generally underrepresented in clinical trials for heart failure. Further studies are needed to shed light into different mechanisms, causes, and targeted therapies of heart failure in women. PMID:29744014

  9. Bisoprolol for congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J.; Gustafsson, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: beta-Blockers are a cornerstone in the treatment of systolic heart failure treatment, but not all beta-blockers are effective or in this setting. Objective: To define the role of bisoprolol, a highly selective beta(1)-antagonist in congestive heart failure due to systolic dysfunction....... Methods: Using the keywords 'bisoprolol' and 'heart failure' PubMed and BIOSIS databases were searched for information regarding pharmacology and relevant randomised clinical trials. Supplementary publications were acquired by scrutinising reference lists of relevant papers. Additional information...... was obtained from the FDA website. Conclusion: Bisoprolol is an effective and well-tolerated first-line beta-blocker for patients with systolic heart failure. The knowledge is primarily based on study patients with moderate-to-severe heart failure from the three CIBIS trials Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  10. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Unger

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is increased in patients with heart failure, and its maladaptive mechanisms may lead to adverse effects such as cardiac remodelling and sympathetic activation. Elevated renin activity has been demonstrated in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. (Third-generation synthetic non-peptide renin inhibitors, with more favourable properties than earlier renin inhibitors, lower ambulatory blood pressure and may have a role to play in other cardiovascular disease. Chymase, a protease inhibitor stored in mast cells that generates angiotensin II (Ang II (in addition to angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE], has been linked to extracellular matrix remodelling in heart failure. Again, chymase inhibitors have been developed to investigate its functions in vitro and in vivo. Bradykinin is thought to contribute to the cardioprotective effect of ACE inhibition through modification of nitric oxide release, calcium handling and collagen accumulation. Ang II is believed to influence a number of molecular and structural changes in the heart, mostly mediated through the AT1-receptor. The importance of the RAAS in heart failure is shown by the survival benefit conferred by treatment with ACE inhibitors.

  12. Nutrition in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Reci Meseri

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is defined as decreased ability of heart due to various reasons. It%u2019s seen 2-3% but the prevalence increases sharply after the age of seventy. The objectives of nutrition therapy in heart failure are to prevent from water retention and edema, to avoid from hard digestion and to offer a balanced diet. In order to avoid fluid retention and edema, daily sodium and fluid intake must be monitored carefully. Main dilemma of the heart failure patients is the obesity-cachexia dilem...

  13. [Role of outpatient heart failure clinics and primary care physicians in the tailored follow-up of heart failure patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maria, Renata; Misuraca, Gianfranco; Milli, Massimo; Filippi, Alessandro

    2010-05-01

    Continuity of care is pivotal to appropriately manage patients affected by heart failure (HF). HF is a chronic disease with frequent exacerbations that requires long-term care at different complexity levels. The lack of adequate communication between hospital cardiologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) is the main pitfall in continuity of care for HF patients. To overcome this problem, all dedicated outpatient HF clinics should organize together with PCPs in the community educational and auditing initiatives, based on locally derived performance measures to assess the appropriateness and effectiveness of integrated care pathways. The primary task of PCPs is to follow up stable HF patients and focus assessment on patient empowerment, adjustment of drug therapy, assessment of clinical stability and the early identification of worsening signs and symptoms. The progress of information technology should help in achieving adequate communication between hospital professionals and PCPs; outpatient clinical records should in any case comply with qualitative standards of discharge summaries for all patients taken in charge by PCPs. Systematic assessment of shared care between hospital cardiologists and PCPs will be a main objective of the outpatient HF clinic network in the near future.

  14. The role of micronutrients and macronutrients in patients hospitalized for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippel, Tobias D; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan

    2013-07-01

    The detrimental pathophysiology of heart failure (HF) leaves room for physiologic and metabolomic concepts that include supplementation of micronutrients and macronutrients in these patients. Hence myocardial energetics and nutrient metabolism may represent relevant treatment targets in HF. This review focuses on the role of nutritive compounds such as lipids, amino acids, antioxidants, and other trace elements in the setting of HF. Supplementation of ferric carboxymaltose improves iron status, functional capacity, and quality of life in HF patients. To close the current gap in evidence further interventional studies investigating the role of micro- and macronutrients are needed in this setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prognostic incremental role of right ventricular function in acute decompensation of advanced chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frea, Simone; Pidello, Stefano; Bovolo, Virginia; Iacovino, Cristina; Franco, Erica; Pinneri, Francesco; Galluzzo, Alessandro; Volpe, Alessandra; Visconti, Massimiliano; Peirone, Andrea; Morello, Mara; Bergerone, Serena; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the additional prognostic value of echocardiography in acute decompensation of advanced chronic heart failure (CHF), focusing on right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and its interaction with loading conditions. Few data are available on the prognostic role of echocardiography in acute HF and on the significance of pulmonary hypertension in patients with severe RV failure. A total of 265 NYHA IV patients admitted for acute decompensation of advanced CHF (EF 22 ± 7%, systolic blood pressure 107 ± 20 mmHg) were prospectively enrolled. Fifty-nine patients met the primary composite endpoint of cardiac death, urgent heart transplantation, and urgent mechanical circulatory support implantation at 90 days. Pulmonary hypertension failed to predict events, while patients with a low transtricuspid systolic gradient (TR gradient statistic from 0.59 to 0.73 (P advanced CHF, pulmonary hypertension failed to predict events. The in-hospital and short-term prognosis can be better predicted by eRAP and RVCPI. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2016 European Society of Cardiology.

  16. Cell Death and Heart Failure in Obesity: Role of Uncoupling Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Ruiz-Ramírez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes are often characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in mitochondrial respiratory complexes, associated with fat accumulation in cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, and hepatocytes. Several rodents studies showed that lipid accumulation in cardiac myocytes produces lipotoxicity that causes apoptosis and leads to heart failure, a dynamic pathological process. Meanwhile, several tissues including cardiac tissue develop an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress and lipotoxicity by overexpressing uncoupling proteins (UCPs, specific mitochondrial membrane proteins. In heart from rodent and human with obesity, UCP2 and UCP3 may protect cardiomyocytes from death and from a state progressing to heart failure by downregulating programmed cell death. UCP activation may affect cytochrome c and proapoptotic protein release from mitochondria by reducing ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Therefore the aim of this review is to discuss recent findings regarding the role that UCPs play in cardiomyocyte survival by protecting against ROS generation and maintaining bioenergetic metabolism homeostasis to promote heart protection.

  17. Advances in the management of heart failure: the role of ivabradine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller-Werdan U

    2016-11-01

    . In this review, we discuss the proven role of ivabradine in the validated indication “HF with reduced EF” together with interesting preliminary findings, and the potential role of ivabradine in further, specific forms of HF. Keywords: heart failure, endotoxin, If inhibitor, ivabradine, pacemaker current inhibitor, heart rate, heart rate variability

  18. The role of levosimendan in acute heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieminen, Markku S; Buerke, M.; Cohen-Solal, A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure and/or cardiogenic shock are frequently triggered by ischemic coronary events. Yet, there is a paucity of randomized data on the management of patients with heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome, as acute coronary syndrome and cardiogenic shock have frequently bee...

  19. Acute heart failure syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the classical syndrome of chronic persistent heart failure develops. The vast ... Flash pulmonary oedema: This is a severely elevated blood pressure with an .... (CPAP or bilevelNPPV) for cardiogenic pulmonary edema (review). Cochrane.

  20. Acute heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Sénior Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Gándara Ricardo, Jairo Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinical case of a 26 year-old woman who came to Hospital Universitario San Vicente Fundación (Medellín, Colombia) with symptoms and signs of acute heart failure. She had been previously diagnosed with chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction without clear origin, pulmonary thromboembolism and ischemic stroke, without optimal neurohormonal modulation. She was admitted with clinical findings of fluid overload and low tissue perfusion, with inotropic support requirem...

  1. Oxidative Stress in Dog with Heart Failure: The Role of Dietary Fatty Acids and Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Sagols

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In dogs with heart failure, cell oxygenation and cellular metabolism do not work properly, leading to the production of a large amount of free radicals. In the organism, these free radicals are responsible of major cellular damages: this is oxidative stress. However, a suitable food intake plays an important role in limiting this phenomenon: on the one hand, the presence of essential fatty acids in the composition of membranes decreases sensitivity of cells to free radicals and constitutes a first protection against the oxidative stress; on the other hand, coenzyme Q10, vitamin E, and polyphenols are antioxidant molecules which can help cells to neutralize these free radicals.

  2. Stem cell therapy for end-stage heart failure : indispensable role for the cell?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijsen, K. R.; Chamuleau, S. A. J.; Noort, W. A.; Doevendans, P. A.; Sluijter, J. P. G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review For heart failure patients, the urgent need for heart transplantation exceeds the availability of donor hearts. Therefore, cell transplantation has emerged as an interesting and potential solution. This review will focus on the capability of different types of stem cells to

  3. The role of erythropoietin stimulating agents in anemic patients with heart failure: solved and unresolved questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palazzuoli A

    2014-08-01

    underlying mechanism of anemia in CHF, and the potential role of ESA in this setting.Keywords: anemia, iron metabolism, heart failure

  4. Nutrition in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reci Meseri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is defined as decreased ability of heart due to various reasons. It%u2019s seen 2-3% but the prevalence increases sharply after the age of seventy. The objectives of nutrition therapy in heart failure are to prevent from water retention and edema, to avoid from hard digestion and to offer a balanced diet. In order to avoid fluid retention and edema, daily sodium and fluid intake must be monitored carefully. Main dilemma of the heart failure patients is the obesity-cachexia dilemma. Since one of the main reasons of heart failure is cardiovascular diseases, in first phase, the patient may be obese. In the later phases, cachexia may show up. It was shown that cachexia is associated with mortality. Within this period, patients should not be over-fed and the patient should pass from catabolic state to anabolic state slowly. If the gastrointestinal track is functional oral/enteral feeding must be preferred. Multi vitamin and mineral supportsmay be beneficial, which may replace the increased loss, increase anti-inflammatory response and be anti-oxidants. Large, controlled and well-designed studies must be conducted in order to evaluate the benefits of nutritional practices such as nutritional assessment, enteral feeding and nutrient supports in heart failure patients.

  5. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000112.htm Heart failure - fluids and diuretics To use the sharing features ... to Expect at Home When you have heart failure, your heart does not pump out enough blood. This causes ...

  6. Glycosylated Chromogranin A: Potential Role in the Pathogenesis of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottesen, Anett H; Christensen, Geir; Omland, Torbjørn; Røsjø, Helge

    2017-12-01

    Endocrine and paracrine factors influence the cardiovascular system and the heart by a number of different mechanisms. The chromogranin-secretogranin (granin) proteins seem to represent a new family of proteins that exerts both direct and indirect effects on cardiac and vascular functions. The granin proteins are produced in multiple tissues, including cardiac cells, and circulating granin protein concentrations provide incremental prognostic information to established risk indices in patients with myocardial dysfunction. In this review, we provide recent data for the granin proteins in relation with cardiovascular disease, and with a special focus on chromogranin A and heart failure. Chromogranin A is the most studied member of the granin protein family, and shorter, functionally active peptide fragments of chromogranin A exert protective effects on myocardial cell death, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and cardiomyocyte Ca 2+ handling. Granin peptides have also been found to induce angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. Protein glycosylation is an important post-translational regulatory mechanism, and we recently found chromogranin A molecules to be hyperglycosylated in the failing myocardium. Chromogranin A hyperglycosylation impaired processing of full-length chromogranin A molecules into physiologically active chromogranin A peptides, and patients with acute heart failure and low rate of chromogranin A processing had increased mortality compared to other acute heart failure patients. Other studies have also demonstrated that circulating granin protein concentrations increase in parallel with heart failure disease stage. The granin protein family seems to influence heart failure pathophysiology, and chromogranin A hyperglycosylation could directly be implicated in heart failure disease progression.

  7. Novel protective role of endogenous cardiac myocyte P2X4 receptors in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tiehong; Shen, Jian-bing; Yang, Ronghua; Redden, John; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Grady, James; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Liang, Bruce T

    2014-05-01

    Heart failure (HF), despite continuing progress, remains a leading cause of mortality and morbidity. P2X4 receptors (P2X4R) have emerged as potentially important molecules in regulating cardiac function and as potential targets for HF therapy. Transgenic P2X4R overexpression can protect against HF, but this does not explain the role of native cardiac P2X4R. Our goal is to define the physiological role of endogenous cardiac myocyte P2X4R under basal conditions and during HF induced by myocardial infarction or pressure overload. Mice established with conditional cardiac-specific P2X4R knockout were subjected to left anterior descending coronary artery ligation-induced postinfarct or transverse aorta constriction-induced pressure overload HF. Knockout cardiac myocytes did not show P2X4R by immunoblotting or by any response to the P2X4R-specific allosteric enhancer ivermectin. Knockout hearts showed normal basal cardiac function but depressed contractile performance in postinfarct and pressure overload models of HF by in vivo echocardiography and ex vivo isolated working heart parameters. P2X4R coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized with nitric oxide synthase 3 (eNOS) in wild-type cardiac myocytes. Mice with cardiac-specific P2X4R overexpression had increased S-nitrosylation, cyclic GMP, NO formation, and were protected from postinfarct and pressure overload HF. Inhibitor of eNOS, L-N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)ornithine hydrochloride, blocked the salutary effect of cardiac P2X4R overexpression in postinfarct and pressure overload HF as did eNOS knockout. This study establishes a new protective role for endogenous cardiac myocyte P2X4R in HF and is the first to demonstrate a physical interaction between the myocyte receptor and eNOS, a mediator of HF protection. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Rethinking Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    F?rstenwerth, Hauke

    2012-01-01

    An increasing body of clinical observations and experimental evidence suggests that cardiac dysfunction results from autonomic dysregulation of the contractile output of the heart. Excessive activation of the sympathetic nervous system and a decrease in parasympathetic tone are associated with increased mortality. Elevated levels of circulating catecholamines closely correlate with the severity and poor prognosis in heart failure. Sympathetic over-stimulation causes increased levels of catech...

  9. Echo and heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modin, Daniel; Andersen, Ditte Madsen; Biering-Sørensen, Tor

    2018-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a threat to public health. Heterogeneities in aetiology and phenotype complicate the diagnosis and management of HF. This is especially true when considering HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which makes up 50% of HF cases. Natriuretic peptides may aid in establis......Heart failure (HF) is a threat to public health. Heterogeneities in aetiology and phenotype complicate the diagnosis and management of HF. This is especially true when considering HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which makes up 50% of HF cases. Natriuretic peptides may aid...

  10. Copeptin in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and mortality in the modern Western world and an increasing proportion of the population will be affected by HF in the future. Although HF management has improved quality of life and prognosis, mortality remains very high...

  11. [Definition of acute heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metra, Marco; Carbone, Giorgio; Lombardi, Carlo; Borghi, Claudio; Vescovo, Giorgio

    2014-02-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a potentially life-threatening condition that may arise as a deterioration of a previous heart failure or may be the first presentation of heart failure. Several causes or precipitating factors have been listed, as well as different mechanisms have been described, thus leading to a broad spectrum of clinical presentations. Symptoms and signs of AHF have a strong clinical and prognostic significance and are kept into consideration to guide disease management. In particular, a higher clinical severity or a worse prognosis are associated with lower blood pressure levels, fluid overload, evidence of myocardial ischemia or renal impairment. Putatively, interventions addressed to restore these factors may play a role in the management of AHF.

  12. Diuretics for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Rajaa F; Flather, Marcus; Purcell, Henry; Poole-Wilson, Philip A; Coats, Andrew J S

    2012-02-15

    Chronic heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diuretics are regarded as the first-line treatment for patients with congestive heart failure since they provide symptomatic relief. The effects of diuretics on disease progression and survival remain unclear. To assess the harms and benefits of diuretics for chronic heart failure Updated searches were run in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL Issue 1 of 4, 2011), MEDLINE (1966 to 22 February 2011), EMBASE (1980 to 2011 Week 07) and HERDIN database (1990 to February 2011). We hand searched pertinent journals and reference lists of papers were inspected. We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field. No language restrictions were applied. Double-blinded randomised controlled trials of diuretic therapy comparing one diuretic with placebo, or one diuretic with another active agent (e.g. ACE inhibitors, digoxin) in patients with chronic heart failure. Two authors independently abstracted the data and assessed the eligibility and methodological quality of each trial. Extracted data were analysed by determining the odds ratio for dichotomous data, and difference in means for continuous data, of the treated group compared with controls. The likelihood of heterogeneity of the study population was assessed by the Chi-square test. If there was no evidence of statistical heterogeneity and pooling of results was clinically appropriate, a combined estimate was obtained using the fixed-effects model. This update has not identified any new studies for inclusion. The review includes 14 trials (525 participants), 7 were placebo-controlled, and 7 compared diuretics against other agents such as ACE inhibitors or digoxin. We analysed the data for mortality and for worsening heart failure. Mortality data were available in 3 of the placebo-controlled trials (202 participants). Mortality was lower for participants treated with diuretics than for

  13. Valvular Heart Disease in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe MC Rosano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural valvular heart disease may be the cause of heart failure or may worsen the clinical status of patients with heart failure. Heart failure may also develop in patients treated with valve surgery. Patients with heart failure with valvular heart disease are at increased risk of events including sudden cardiac death. Before considering intervention (surgical or percutaneous all patients should receive appropriate medical and device therapy taking into account that vasodilators must be used with caution in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Numerous percutaneous and/or hybrid procedures have been introduced in the past few years and they are changing the management of valvular heart disease. In patients with heart failure and valvular heart disease, either primary or functional, the whole process of decision-making should be staged through a comprehensive evaluation of the risk– benefit ratio of different treatment strategies and should be made by a multidisciplinary ‘heart team’ with a particular expertise in valvular heart disease. The heart team should include heart failure cardiologists, cardiac surgeons/structural valve interventionists, imaging specialists, anaesthetists, geriatricians and intensive care specialists. This article will review recent developments and distill practical guidance in the management of this important heart failure co-morbidity.

  14. The pharmacists' role in improving guideline compliance for thyroid function testing in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziman, Melanie E; Bui, Hien T; Smith, Craig S; Tsukiji, Lori A; Asmatey, Veda M; Chu, Steven B; Miano, John S

    2012-04-01

    This single-center retrospective pilot program's objective was to utilize outpatient pharmacists to improve laboratory test adherence in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients overdue for thyroid function testing, thereby demonstrating the value of the outpatient pharmacist and justifying possible clinical role expansion. Thyroid disorders may contribute to CHF development, progression, and exacerbation. Testing is the standard of care in CHF patients per American Heart Association's 2009 Guidelines. Delinquency was defined as labs not conducted within 1 year in patients with euthyroid history, within 6 months in patients with thyroid dysfunction, abnormal labs at any time without follow-up, or lab absence after thyroid medication initiation, adjustment, or discontinuation. Targeted 80 nonpregnant adult CHF patients with delinquent thyroid function tests were counseled to get thyroid labs at point of sale, via telephone, e-mail, or letter. In collaboration with physicians, pharmacists ordered thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free T4 (FT4) labs. For patients with abnormal laboratory results, pharmacists coordinated drug therapy and follow-up labs. Data were collected from November 1, 2009 to March 30, 2010. Seventy-two patients (90%) previously delinquent for thyroid function testing received relevant thyroid labs. Ten patients (12.5%) with abnormal thyroid function tests not on prior drug therapy received treatment.

  15. Heart Failure Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MACRA Resource Portal The Heart Failure Society of America, Inc. (HFSA) represents the first organized effort by heart failure experts from the Americas to provide a forum for all those interested ...

  16. Heart Failure in the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Cost (Bernard)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractHeart failure is a clinical syndrome with various causes for which no universally accepted definition exists. Packer's definition of heart failure "representing a complex clinical syndrome characterised by abnonnalities of left ventricular function and neurohumoral regulation. which are

  17. Molecular and clinical roles of incretin-based drugs in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orabi, Bassant; Kaddoura, Rasha; Omar, Amr S; Carr, Cornelia; Alkhulaifi, Abdulaziz

    2018-05-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors produce some beneficial and deleterious effects in diabetic patients not mediated by their glycemic lowering effects, and there is a need for better understanding of the molecular basis of these effects. They possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects with some direct vasodilatory action (animal and human trial data) that may indirectly influence heart failure (HF). Unlike GLP-1R agonists, signaling for HF adverse effects was observed with two DPP-4 inhibitors, saxagliptin and alogliptin. Accordingly, these drugs should be used with caution in heart failure patients.

  18. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:May 9,2017 Patients with ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  19. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 An important part of ... Care This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  20. Diastolic Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wake, Ryotaro; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Primary diastolic failure is typically seen in patients with hypertensive or valvular heart disease as well as in hypertrophic or restrictive cardiomyopathy but can also occur in a variety of clinical disorders, especially tachycardia and ischemia. Diastolic dysfunction has a particularly high prevalence in elderly patients and is generally associated, with low mortality but high morbidity. The pathophysiology of diastolic dysfunction includes delayed relaxation, impaired LV filling and/or in...

  1. Coping with adverse drug events in patients with heart failure : Exploring the role of medication beliefs and perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Smedt, R. H.; Jaarsma, T.; Ranchor, A. V.; van der Meer, K.; Groenier, K. H.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F. M.; Denig, P.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes coping strategies that patients with heart failure (HF) use to manage adverse drug events (ADEs). The included coping strategies were social support seeking, information seeking, non-adherence and taking alleviating medication. The role of beliefs about medication and ADE

  2. Role of long-term mechanical circulatory support in patients with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, M B; Bergin, P; McGiffin, D

    2016-05-01

    Advanced heart failure represents a small proportion of patients with heart failure that possess high-risk features associated with high hospital readmission rates, significant functional impairment and mortality. Identification of those who have progressed to, or are near a state of advanced heart failure should prompt referral to a service that offers therapies in mechanical circulatory support (MCS) and cardiac transplantation. MCS has grown as a management strategy in the care of these patients, most commonly as a bridge to cardiac transplantation. The predominant utilisation of MCS is implantation of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD), which have evolved significantly in their technology and application over the past 15-20 years. The technology has evolved to such an extent that Destination Therapy is now being utilised as a strategy in management of advanced heart failure in appropriately selected patients. Complication rates have decreased with VAD implantation, but remain a significant consideration in the decision to implant a device, and in the follow up of these patients. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  3. Psychosocial risk factors and heart failure hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Andersen, Ingelise; Prescott, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Prospective studies on the role of psychosocial factors in heart failure development are virtually nonexistent. The authors aimed to address the effect of psychosocial factors on the risk of heart failure hospitalization in men and women free of cardiovascular disease. In 1991-1993, the 8......-fourth of the population reported some degree of vital exhaustion. The vital exhaustion score was associated with a higher risk of heart failure in a dose-response manner (P risk of heart failure in both men (hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence...... in the population, even a modestly higher risk of heart failure associated with vital exhaustion may be of importance in the planning of future preventive strategies for heart failure....

  4. Efficacy of carvedilol in pediatric heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Alex Hørby; Fatkin, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of: Huang M, Zhang X, Chen S et al. The effect of carvedilol treatment on chronic heart failure in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: a prospective, randomized-controlled study. Pediatr. Cardiol. 34, 680-685 (2013). A role for β-blockers in children with heart failure has...

  5. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibres in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsea C Booth

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibres. In heart failure (HF there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity, which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibres, afferent renal nerve fibres, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF.

  6. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  7. Heart Failure and Exercise: A Narrative Review of the Role of Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Francis J; Hare, David L; Cameron, James D; Toukhsati, Samia R

    2018-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a common, debilitating condition associated with significant health and economic burden. CHF management is multidisciplinary, however, achieving better health relies on a collaborative effort and patient engagement in self-care. Despite the importance of self-care in CHF, many patients have poor adherence to their medical and lifestyle regimens, in particular with regards to engaging in physical exercise. The patient's confidence in their ability, otherwise known as self-efficacy, is an important determinant of CHF health outcomes, most likely due to its effect on the uptake of CHF self-care activities especially exercise initiation and maintenance. Self-efficacy is responsive to experience such as exercise training, however the critical components of exercise interventions to improve self-efficacy have yet to be determined. This narrative review provides an overview of the role of self-efficacy in exercise adherence in CHF. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease and iron deficiency; the role of iron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cases Amenós, Aleix; Ojeda López, Raquel; Portolés Pérez, José María

    Chronic kidney disease and anaemia are common in heart failure (HF) and are associated with a worse prognosis in these patients. Iron deficiency is also common in patients with HF and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality, regardless of the presence or absence of anaemia. While the treatment of anaemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in patients with HF have failed to show a benefit in terms of morbidity and mortality, treatment with IV iron in patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction and iron deficiency is associated with clinical improvement. In a posthoc analysis of a clinical trial, iron therapy improved kidney function in patients with HF and iron deficiency. In fact, the European Society of Cardiology's recent clinical guidelines on HF suggest that in symptomatic patients with reduced ejection fraction and iron deficiency, treatment with IV ferric carboxymaltose should be considered to improve symptoms, the ability to exercise and quality of life. Iron plays a key role in oxygen storage (myoglobin) and in energy metabolism, and there are pathophysiological bases that explain the beneficial effect of IV iron therapy in patients with HF. All these aspects are reviewed in this article. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The Role of Gratitude in Spiritual Well-being in Asymptomatic Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Paul J; Redwine, Laura; Wilson, Kathleen; Pung, Meredith A; Chinh, Kelly; Greenberg, Barry H; Lunde, Ottar; Maisel, Alan; Raisinghani, Ajit; Wood, Alex; Chopra, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Spirituality and gratitude are associated with wellbeing. Few if any studies have examined the role of gratitude in heart failure (HF) patients or whether it is a mechanism through which spirituality may exert its beneficial effects on physical and mental health in this clinical population. This study examined associations bet ween gratitude, spiritual wellbeing, sleep, mood, fatigue, cardiac-specific self-efficacy, and inflammation in 186 men and women with Stage B asymptomatic HF (age 66.5 years ±10). In correlational analysis, gratitude was associated with better sleep (r=-.25, pgratitude also had lower levels of inflammatory biomarkers (r=-.17, pgratitude. We found that gratitude fully mediated the relationship between spiritual wellbeing and sleep quality (z=-2.35, SE=.03, p=.02) and also the relationship between spiritual wellbeing and depressed mood (z=-4.00, SE=.075, pGratitude also partially mediated the relationships between spiritual wellbeing and fatigue (z=-3.85, SE=.18, pgratitude and spiritual wellbeing are related to better mood and sleep, less fatigue, and more self-efficacy, and that gratitude fully or partially mediates the beneficial effects of spiritual wellbeing on these endpoints. Efforts to increase gratitude may be a treatment for improving wellbeing in HF patients' lives and be of potential clinical value.

  10. The role of B vitamins in the management of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi-Namini, Parastoo; Ahmed, Mavra; Yan, Andrew T; Keith, Mary

    2012-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries, creating a significant burden on both the healthcare system and quality of life. Research efforts continue to explore new pharmaceutical or surgically based approaches to HF management, but the role of nutrition as an adjunct therapy has been largely ignored. Elderly age, anorexia, malabsorption, premature satiety, and disease severity are among the factors identified as contributing to reduced nutrient intakes in patients with HF. These factors suggest that patients with HF are at increased risk of multiple-nutrient deficiencies, including B vitamins. B vitamins may be of particular therapeutic interest because of their key roles as cofactors in energy-producing pathways. Recently, impaired stores of high-energy compounds have been linked with myocardial dysfunction and prognosis in patients with HF. Therefore, deficiencies of B vitamins might contribute to reduced energy stores and disease progression. This review summarizes the existing literature both with respect to the prevalence of B vitamin deficiency as well as evidence from supplementation trials in patients with HF. The findings suggest that most of the literature in this area has focused on thiamin deficiency in patients with HF, whereas other B vitamins remain largely unstudied. Although few sporadic trials suggest a role for B vitamins in the management of HF, none are conclusive. Therefore, there is a need for larger, more robust trials to assist in defining the B vitamin requirements as well as the impact of supplementation on both morbidity and mortality in patients with HF.

  11. The obesity paradox in men with coronary heart disease and heart failure: the role of muscle mass and leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannamethee, S Goya; Shaper, A Gerald; Whincup, Peter H; Lennon, Lucy; Papacosta, Olia; Sattar, Naveed

    2014-01-15

    We have investigated the role of muscle mass, natriuretic peptides and adipokines in explaining the obesity paradox. The obesity paradox relates to the association between obesity and increased survival in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) or heart failure (HF). Prospective study of 4046 men aged 60-79 years followed up for a mean period of 11 years, during which 1340 deaths occurred. The men were divided according to the presence of doctor diagnosed CHD and HF: (i) no CHD or HF ii), with CHD (no HF) and (iii) with HF. Overweight (BMI 25-9.9 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) were associated with lower mortality risk compared to men with normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)) in those with CHD [hazards ratio (HR) 0.71 (0.56,0.91) and 0.77 (0.57,1.04); p=0.04 for trend] and in those with HF [HR 0.57 (0.28,1.16) and 0.41 (0.16,1.09; p=0.04 for trend). Adjustment for muscle mass and NT-proBNP attenuated the inverse association in those with CHD (no HF) [HR 0.78 (0.61,1.01) and 0.96 (0.68,1.36) p=0.60 for trend) but made minor differences to those with HF [p=0.05]. Leptin related positively to mortality in men without HF but inversely to mortality in those with HF; adjustment for leptin abolished the BMI mortality association in men with HF [HR 0.82 (0.31,2.20) and 0.99 (0.27,3.71); p=0.98 for trend]. The lower mortality risk associated with excess weight in men with CHD without HF may be due to higher muscle mass. In men with HF, leptin (possibly reflecting cachexia) explain the inverse association. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Biological variation of the natriuretic peptides and their role in monitoring patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Alan H B; Smith, Andrew

    2004-03-15

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the inactive metabolite NT-proBNP are proven tests for diagnosis and staging of severity for patients with heart failure. However, the utility of these biomarkers for monitoring the success of drug therapy remains to be determined. Results of longitudinal studies on serial blood testing must be linked to overall patient morbidity and mortality outcomes. We previously determined the 8-week biological variability (BV) of BNP and NT-proBNP assays in healthy subjects and the 1-day BV for BNP alone in patients with compensated and stable heart failure. From these studies, the percent statistical change in serial samples of approximately 100% difference was estimated (95% confidence). We applied the biological variability concepts to the serial results of BNP and NT-proBNP collected from patients with heart failure and compared the performance of these two markers. While there are minor differences in the results between the assays from one time period to another, the overall interpretation of results are essentially identical. Moreover, the majority of individual serial time points are not significantly different from the previous value. Frequent testing (e.g. daily) for BNP and NT-proBNP to monitor therapy for patients with CHF is not indicated, as overall changes require several days to become evident.

  13. Drp1-Dependent Mitochondrial Autophagy Plays a Protective Role Against Pressure Overload-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakabe, Akihiro; Zhai, Peiyong; Ikeda, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Toshiro; Maejima, Yasuhiro; Hsu, Chiao-Po; Nomura, Masatoshi; Egashira, Kensuke; Levine, Beth; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2016-03-29

    Mitochondrial autophagy is an important mediator of mitochondrial quality control in cardiomyocytes. The occurrence of mitochondrial autophagy and its significance during cardiac hypertrophy are not well understood. Mice were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and observed at multiple time points up to 30 days. Cardiac hypertrophy developed after 5 days, the ejection fraction was reduced after 14 days, and heart failure was observed 30 days after TAC. General autophagy was upregulated between 1 and 12 hours after TAC but was downregulated below physiological levels 5 days after TAC. Mitochondrial autophagy, evaluated by electron microscopy, mitochondrial content, and Keima with mitochondrial localization signal, was transiently activated at ≈3 to 7 days post-TAC, coinciding with mitochondrial translocation of Drp1. However, it was downregulated thereafter, followed by mitochondrial dysfunction. Haploinsufficiency of Drp1 abolished mitochondrial autophagy and exacerbated the development of both mitochondrial dysfunction and heart failure after TAC. Injection of Tat-Beclin 1, a potent inducer of autophagy, but not control peptide, on day 7 after TAC, partially rescued mitochondrial autophagy and attenuated mitochondrial dysfunction and heart failure induced by overload. Haploinsufficiency of either drp1 or beclin 1 prevented the rescue by Tat-Beclin 1, suggesting that its effect is mediated in part through autophagy, including mitochondrial autophagy. Mitochondrial autophagy is transiently activated and then downregulated in the mouse heart in response to pressure overload. Downregulation of mitochondrial autophagy plays an important role in mediating the development of mitochondrial dysfunction and heart failure, whereas restoration of mitochondrial autophagy attenuates dysfunction in the heart during pressure overload. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Simulation and mechanistic investigation of the arrhythmogenic role of the late sodium current in human heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Trenor

    Full Text Available Heart failure constitutes a major public health problem worldwide. The electrophysiological remodeling of failing hearts sets the stage for malignant arrhythmias, in which the role of the late Na(+ current (I(NaL is relevant and is currently under investigation. In this study we examined the role of I(NaL in the electrophysiological phenotype of ventricular myocytes, and its proarrhythmic effects in the failing heart. A model for cellular heart failure was proposed using a modified version of Grandi et al. model for human ventricular action potential that incorporates the formulation of I(NaL. A sensitivity analysis of the model was performed and simulations of the pathological electrical activity of the cell were conducted. The proposed model for the human I(NaL and the electrophysiological remodeling of myocytes from failing hearts accurately reproduce experimental observations. The sensitivity analysis of the modulation of electrophysiological parameters of myocytes from failing hearts due to ion channels remodeling, revealed a role for I(NaL in the prolongation of action potential duration (APD, triangulation of the shape of the AP, and changes in Ca(2+ transient. A mechanistic investigation of intracellular Na(+ accumulation and APD shortening with increasing frequency of stimulation of failing myocytes revealed a role for the Na(+/K(+ pump, the Na(+/Ca(2+ exchanger and I(NaL. The results of the simulations also showed that in failing myocytes, the enhancement of I(NaL increased the reverse rate-dependent APD prolongation and the probability of initiating early afterdepolarizations. The electrophysiological remodeling of failing hearts and especially the enhancement of the I(NaL prolong APD and alter Ca(2+ transient facilitating the development of early afterdepolarizations. An enhanced I(NaL appears to be an important contributor to the electrophysiological phenotype and to the dysregulation of [Ca(2+](i homeostasis of failing myocytes.

  15. Warning Signs of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the two terms are used interchangeably. View an animation of heart failure . If you have been diagnosed ... resources here Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  16. Hypertrophy of Neurons Within Cardiac Ganglia in Human, Canine, and Rat Heart Failure: The Potential Role of Nerve Growth Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Sanjay; Sayers, Scott; Walter, James S.; Thomas, Donald; Dieter, Robert S.; Nee, Lisa M.; Wurster, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Autonomic imbalances including parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity are cardinal features of heart failure regardless of etiology; however, mechanisms underlying these imbalances remain unknown. Animal model studies of heart and visceral organ hypertrophy predict that nerve growth factor levels should be elevated in heart failure; whether this is so in human heart failure, though, remains unclear. We tested the hypotheses that neurons in cardiac ganglia are hyper...

  17. The predictive value of plasma biomarkers in discharged heart failure patients: role of plasma NT-proBNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leto, Laura; Testa, Marzia; Feola, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) have demonstrated their value to support clinical diagnosis of heart failure (HF); furthermore they are also studied for their prognostic role using them to guide appropriate management strategies. The present review gathers available evidence on prognostic role of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients hospitalized for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). We searched Medline for English-language studies with the sequent key-words: "acute heart failure/acute decompensated heart failure", "NT-proBNP/N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide" and "prognosis/mortality/readmission". Almost 30 studies were included. NT-proBNP plasma levels at admission are strongly associated with all-cause short-term mortality (2-3 months), mid-term (6-11 months) or long- term mortality (more than one year) of follow-up. Regarding the prognostic power on cardiac death fewer data are available with uncertain results. NT-proBNP at discharge demonstrated its prognostic role for all-cause mortality at mid and long-term follow-up. The relation between NT-proBNP at discharge and cardiovascular mortality or composite end-point is under investigation. A decrease in NT-proBNP values during hospitalization provided prognostic prospects mainly for cardiovascular mortality and HF readmission. A 30% variation in NT-proBNP levels during in-hospital stay seemed to be an optimal cut-off for prognostic role. SNT-proBNP plasma levels proved to have a strong correlation with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, morbidity and composite outcomes in patients discharged after an ADHF. A better definition of the correct time of serial measurements and the cut-off values might be the challenge for the future investigations.

  18. Insomnia Self-Management in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-05

    Cardiac Failure; Heart Failure; Congestive Heart Failure; Heart Failure, Congestive; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Chronic Insomnia; Disorders of Initiating and Maintaining Sleep; Fatigue; Pain; Depressive Symptoms; Sleep Disorders; Anxiety

  19. Nuclear cardiology and heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco; Milan, Elisa; Mut, Fernando; Dondi, Maurizio; Metra, Marco; Rodella, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure in the adult population is increasing. It varies between 1% and 2%, although it mainly affects elderly people (6-10% of people over the age of 65 years will develop heart failure). The syndrome of heart failure arises as a consequence of an abnormality in cardiac structure, function, rhythm, or conduction. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of heart failure and it accounts for this disorder in 60-70% of all patients affected. Nuclear techniques provide unique information on left ventricular function and perfusion by gated-single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Myocardial viability can be assessed by both SPECT and PET imaging. Finally, autonomic dysfunction has been shown to increase the risk of death in patients with heart disease and this may be applicable to all patients with cardiac disease regardless of aetiology. MIBG scanning has a very promising prognostic value in patients with heart failure. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear cardiology and heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco [University of Brescia, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brescia (Italy); Milan, Elisa [Ospedale Di Castelfranco Veneto, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Castelfranco Veneto (Italy); Mut, Fernando; Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); Metra, Marco [University of Brescia, Department of Cardiology, Brescia (Italy); Rodella, Carlo [Health Physics Department, Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The prevalence of heart failure in the adult population is increasing. It varies between 1% and 2%, although it mainly affects elderly people (6-10% of people over the age of 65 years will develop heart failure). The syndrome of heart failure arises as a consequence of an abnormality in cardiac structure, function, rhythm, or conduction. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of heart failure and it accounts for this disorder in 60-70% of all patients affected. Nuclear techniques provide unique information on left ventricular function and perfusion by gated-single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Myocardial viability can be assessed by both SPECT and PET imaging. Finally, autonomic dysfunction has been shown to increase the risk of death in patients with heart disease and this may be applicable to all patients with cardiac disease regardless of aetiology. MIBG scanning has a very promising prognostic value in patients with heart failure. (orig.)

  1. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease and iron deficiency: The role of iron therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleix Cases Amenós

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease and anaemia are common in heart failure (HF and are associated with a worse prognosis in these patients. Iron deficiency is also common in patients with HF and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality, regardless of the presence or absence of anaemia. While the treatment of anaemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in patients with HF have failed to show a benefit in terms of morbidity and mortality, treatment with IV iron in patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction and iron deficiency is associated with clinical improvement. In a post hoc analysis of a clinical trial, iron therapy improved kidney function in patients with HF and iron deficiency. In fact, the European Society of Cardiology's recent clinical guidelines on HF suggest that in symptomatic patients with reduced ejection fraction and iron deficiency, treatment with IV ferric carboxymaltose should be considered to improve symptoms, the ability to exercise and quality of life. Iron plays a key role in oxygen storage (myoglobin and in energy metabolism, and there are pathophysiological bases that explain the beneficial effect of IV iron therapy in patients with HF. All these aspects are reviewed in this article. Resumen: La enfermedad renal crónica y la anemia son frecuentes en la insuficiencia cardíaca (IC y su presencia se asocia con un peor pronóstico en estos pacientes. La ferropenia es frecuente en pacientes con IC y aumenta el riesgo de morbimortalidad, independientemente de la presencia o no de anemia. Mientras el tratamiento de la anemia con agentes estimuladores de la eritropoyesis en pacientes con IC no ha demostrado un beneficio sobre la morbimortalidad, el tratamiento con hierro intravenoso (iv en pacientes con IC y fracción de eyección disminuida y déficit de hierro se asocia con una mejoría clínica. Además, en un análisis post hoc de un ensayo clínico, la ferroterapia mejoró la función renal en pacientes con IC y

  2. New Medications for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Jonathan S.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is common and results in substantial morbidity and mortality. Current guideline-based therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, including beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and aldosterone antagonists aim to interrupt deleterious neurohormonal pathways and have shown significant success in reducing morbidity and mortality associated with heart failure. Continued efforts to further improve outcomes in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction have led to the first new-in-class medications approved for heart failure since 2005, ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Ivabradine targets the If channels in the sinoatrial node of the heart, decreasing heart rate. Sacubitril/valsartan combines a neprilysin inhibitor that increases levels of beneficial vasodilatory peptides with an angiotensin receptor antagonist. On a background of previously approved, guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure, these medications have shown improved clinical outcomes ranging from decreased hospitalizations in a select group of patients to a reduction in all-cause mortality across all pre-specified subgroups. In this review, we will discuss the previously established guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, the translational research that led to the development of these new therapies, and the results from the major clinical trials of ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. PMID:27038558

  3. Bisoprolol for congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J.; Gustafsson, F.

    2008-01-01

    was obtained from the FDA website. Conclusion: Bisoprolol is an effective and well-tolerated first-line beta-blocker for patients with systolic heart failure. The knowledge is primarily based on study patients with moderate-to-severe heart failure from the three CIBIS trials Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  4. Diabetes Mellitus and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrke, Michael; Marx, Nikolaus

    2017-06-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical data from the last 2 decades have shown that the prevalence of heart failure in diabetes is very high, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure is worse in those with diabetes than in those without diabetes. Experimental data suggest that various mechanisms contribute to the impairment in systolic and diastolic function in patients with diabetes, and there is an increased recognition that these patients develop heart failure independent of the presence of coronary artery disease or its associated risk factors. In addition, current clinical data demonstrated that treatment with the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin reduced hospitalization for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk. This review article summarizes recent data on the prevalence, prognosis, pathophysiology, and therapeutic strategies to treat patients with diabetes and heart failure. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biofeedback in the treatment of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael G; Moravec, Christine S

    2010-07-01

    Biofeedback training can be used to reduce activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and increase activation of the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS). It is well established that hyperactivation of the SNS contributes to disease progression in chronic heart failure. It has been postulated that underactivation of the PNS may also play a role in heart failure pathophysiology. In addition to autonomic imbalance, a chronic inflammatory process is now recognized as being involved in heart failure progression, and recent work has established that activation of the inflammatory process may be attenuated by vagal nerve stimulation. By interfering with both autonomic imbalance and the inflammatory process, biofeedback-assisted stress management may be an effective treatment for patients with heart failure by improving clinical status and quality of life. Recent studies have suggested that biofeedback and stress management have a positive impact in patients with chronic heart failure, and patients with higher perceived control over their disease have been shown to have better quality of life. Our ongoing study of biofeedback-assisted stress management in the treatment of end-stage heart failure will also examine biologic end points in treated patients at the time of heart transplant, in order to assess the effects of biofeedback training on the cellular and molecular components of the failing heart. We hypothesize that the effects of biofeedback training will extend to remodeling the failing human heart, in addition to improving quality of life.

  6. Role of Biomarkers for the Prevention, Assessment, and Management of Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Sheryl L; Maisel, Alan S; Anand, Inder; Bozkurt, Biykem; de Boer, Rudolf A; Felker, G Michael; Fonarow, Gregg C; Greenberg, Barry; Januzzi, James L; Kiernan, Michael S; Liu, Peter P; Wang, Thomas J; Yancy, Clyde W; Zile, Michael R

    2017-05-30

    Natriuretic peptides have led the way as a diagnostic and prognostic tool for the diagnosis and management of heart failure (HF). More recent evidence suggests that natriuretic peptides along with the next generation of biomarkers may provide added value to medical management, which could potentially lower risk of mortality and readmissions. The purpose of this scientific statement is to summarize the existing literature and to provide guidance for the utility of currently available biomarkers. The writing group used systematic literature reviews, published translational and clinical studies, clinical practice guidelines, and expert opinion/statements to summarize existing evidence and to identify areas of inadequacy requiring future research. The panel reviewed the most relevant adult medical literature excluding routine laboratory tests using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science through December 2016. The document is organized and classified according to the American Heart Association to provide specific suggestions, considerations, or contemporary clinical practice recommendations. A number of biomarkers associated with HF are well recognized, and measuring their concentrations in circulation can be a convenient and noninvasive approach to provide important information about disease severity and helps in the detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and management of HF. These include natriuretic peptides, soluble suppressor of tumorgenicity 2, highly sensitive troponin, galectin-3, midregional proadrenomedullin, cystatin-C, interleukin-6, procalcitonin, and others. There is a need to further evaluate existing and novel markers for guiding therapy and to summarize their data in a standardized format to improve communication among researchers and practitioners. HF is a complex syndrome involving diverse pathways and pathological processes that can manifest in circulation as biomarkers. A number of such biomarkers are now clinically available, and monitoring their

  7. Heart failure report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamila Dua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advancements in diagnosis and pharmacotherapy, heart failure (HF remains as a major health problem. The prevalence in the general population is estimated to range from 0.3% to 2.0%, increases considerably with age, and approximately doubles with every additional decade of life. In the last two decades, hospital admission rates for HF have increased steadily. The prevalence of HF can be estimated at 1–2% in the Western world and the incidence approaches 5–10/1000 persons/year. Estimates of the occurrence of HF in the developing world are largely absent. In a recent US population-based study, the prevalence of HF was 2.2% (95 confidence interval 1.6–2.8%, increasing from 0.7% in persons aged 45 through 54 years to 8.4% for those aged 75 years or older. In this article, we look at the major papers published in HF in the past 1 year.

  8. Nemaline myopathy and heart failure: role of ivabradine; a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarullo, Filippo M; Vitale, Giuseppe; Di Franco, Antonino; Sarullo, Silvia; Salerno, Ylenia; Vassallo, Laura; Baviera, Emanuela Petrona; Marazia, Stefania; Mandalà, Giorgio; Lanza, Gaetano A

    2015-01-19

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by muscle weakness, hypotonia and the presence in muscle fibers of inclusions known as nemaline bodies and a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes, ranging from severe forms with neonatal onset to asymptomatic forms. The adult-onset form is heterogeneous in terms of clinical presentation and disease progression. Cardiac involvement occurs in the minority of cases and little is known about medical management in this subgroup of NM patients. We report a rare case of heart failure (HF) in a patient with adult-onset NM in whom ivabradine proved to be able to dramatically improve the clinical picture. We report a case of a 37-year-old man with adult-onset NM, presenting with weakness and hypotonia of the proximal limb muscles and shoulder girdle, severely limiting daily activities. He developed progressive HF over a period of 6 months while attending a rehabilitation program, with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF = 20%), manifested by dyspnea and signs of systemic congestion. The patient was started HF therapy with enalapril, carvedilol, spironolactone and loop diuretics. Target HF doses of these drugs (including carvedilol) were not reached because of symptomatic hypotension causing a high resting heart rate (HR) ≥70 beats per minute (bpm). Further deterioration of the clinical picture occurred with several life-threatening arrhythmic episodes requiring external defibrillation. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) was then implanted. Persistent high resting HR was successfully treated with ivabradine with HR lowering from 90 bpm to 55 bpm at 1 month follow up, LVEF rising to 50% at 3 month follow up and to 54% at 2,5 year follow up. To date no more hospitalizations for heart failure occurred. A single hospitalization due to aspiration pneumonia required insertion of a tracheostomy tube to protect airways from further aspiration. At present, the patient is attending

  9. Capillary/myocyte mismatch in the heart in renal failure--a role for erythropoietin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, K; Buzello, M; Simonaviciene, A; Miltenberger-Miltenyi, G; Koch, A; Nabokov, A; Gross, M L; Gless, B; Mall, G; Ritz, E

    2000-07-01

    Chronic renal failure is characterized by remodeling of the heart with left ventricular hypertrophy (increasing oxygen demand) and capillary deficit leading to capillary/myocyte mismatch (decreasing oxygen supply). Erythropoietin (Epo) has known angiogenic properties causing endothelial cell activation, migration and sprouting, mediated at least in part via the JAK/STAT (Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription) pathway. In uraemic cardiac hypertrophy the presence of diminished capillary supply implies that capillary growth does not keep pace with development of hypertrophy. To investigate whether this was due to a deficit of the angiogenic hormone Epo we examined whether Epo levels are altered and whether an increase in haematocrit by administration of rhEpo influences capillary supply, i.e. capillary/myocyte mismatch in experimental renal failure. Male Spraque-Dawley rats were either subjected to partial renal ablation or sham operation. Only modest amounts of renal tissue were removed so that the rats were not anemic. Subgroups of rats received either human (rh)Epo alone or in combination with unspecific antihypertensive treatment (dihydralazine plus furosemide) in order to control the Epo induced rise in blood pressure. Capillary supply was measured stereologically as capillary length per volume myocardium using the orientator method. Capillary length density was reduced by approximately 25% after partial renal ablation (3237+/-601 vs 4293+/-501 mm/mm(3) in controls). It was not statistically different in animals with partial renal ablation+rhEpo+antihypertensive treatment (3620+/-828 mm/mm(3)) compared to partial ablation alone. The study shows that lack of Epo does not cause, or contribute to, the deficit of capillary growth in the hypertrophied left ventricle of rats with renal failure. In addition, a rise in haematocrit is not accompanied by beneficial effects on alterations of cardiovascular structure in experimental renal failure.

  10. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  11. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Updated:May 9, ... you? This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  12. The Role of Nrf2-Mediated Pathway in Cardiac Remodeling and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is frequently the consequence of sustained, abnormal neurohormonal, and mechanical stress and remains a leading cause of death worldwide. The key pathophysiological process leading to HF is cardiac remodeling, a term referring to maladaptation to cardiac stress at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ levels. HF and many of the conditions that predispose one to HF are associated with oxidative stress. Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the heart can directly lead to increased necrosis and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes which subsequently induce cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. Nuclear factor-erythroid-2- (NF-E2- related factor 2 (Nrf2 is a transcription factor that controls the basal and inducible expression of a battery of antioxidant genes and other cytoprotective phase II detoxifying enzymes that are ubiquitously expressed in the cardiovascular system. Emerging evidence has revealed that Nrf2 and its target genes are critical regulators of cardiovascular homeostasis via the suppression of oxidative stress, which is the key player in the development and progression of HF. The purpose of this review is to summarize evidence that activation of Nrf2 enhances endogenous antioxidant defenses and counteracts oxidative stress-associated cardiac remodeling and HF.

  13. Heart failure etiology impacts survival of patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecini, Redi; Møller, Daniel Vega; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of heart failure (HF) etiology on prognosis of HF is not well known. METHODS: 3078 patients (median age 75years, 61% male) hospitalized with HF were studied. Patients were classified into six etiology groups: hypertension (HTN, 13.9%), ischemic heart disease (IHD, 42...

  14. Albuminuria in heart failure : what do we really know?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; Nimade, Sandeep; de Zeeuw, Dick

    Purpose of the review To describe the role of albuminuria as a risk marker for heart failure and a predictor for treatment effect on heart failure prognosis. Recent findings The level of albumin in the urine is a predictor of heart failure in the general population and in patients with

  15. Palliative Care in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Mert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is an important health problem since its incidence and prevalence is increasing year by year. Since symptom burden and mortality are high in heart failure, supportive and palliative care should be provided. However, very few patients are referred to palliative care services. In comparison with cancer patients, it is difficult to identify end of life care for patients with heart failure, because these patients are hospitalized when the signs of acute decompensation appear, and their symptoms decrease and functional status improve before they are discharged. Therefore, palliative care, which is a holistic approach aiming to improve patients’ quality of life, to detect and treat the attacks of the disease before they become severe, and to deal with patients’ physical, psychological, social, and mental health altogether during their care, should be integrated into heart failure patients’ care. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 217-222

  16. INTEGRATION OF BIOMARKERS INTO THE PRACTICE OF TREATING PATIENTS WITH HEART FAILURE: THE ROLE OF DETERMINING THE BLOOD LEVEL OF NATRIURETIC PEPTIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Gilyarevskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinical role of biomarkers (especially, natriuretic peptides is discussed in the article. The most important evidences of clinical effectiveness of using biomarkers in patients with suspected heart failure and in patients with confirmed diagnose of heart failure are reviewed. The need to use natriuretic peptides in patients with takotsubo syndrome is discussed. Limited diagnostic value of using natriuretic peptides in renal dysfunction, as well as in other diseases in which the concentration of natriuretic peptides may increase in the absence of heart failure, is also discussed.

  17. Heart Failure in North America

    OpenAIRE

    Blair, John E. A; Huffman, Mark; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem that affects patients and healthcare systems worldwide. Within the continent of North America, differences in economic development, genetic susceptibility, cultural practices, and trends in risk factors and treatment all contribute to both inter-continental and within-continent differences in heart failure. The United States and Canada represent industrialized countries with similar culture, geography, and advanced economies and infrastructure. During t...

  18. Reassessing guidelines for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Drexler

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in the last few years in the management of heart failure. In particular several trials have given significant results. It has become apparent that heart failure may be prevented in some patients by treatment of risk factors such as coronary artery disease. Experience with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors has shown that the survival and symptomatic benefits do last in the long term, and confirm that they are the first-line treatment in heart failure. The results of a number of trials using the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs candesartan, valsartan and losartan are presented and discussed. There is also some experience now in the use of candesartan for patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular systolic function. The COMET trial compared the β-blockers carvedilol and metoprolol tartrate, and suggests that there may be differences in clinical effect between β-blockers. The selective aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone was evaluated in the EPHESUS trial in post-MI patients with signs of heart failure. Based on these clinical trials, heart failure guidelines are now being updated.

  19. Exercise Intolerance in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Exercise tolerance is affected in patients with heart failure (HF). Although the inability of the heart to pump blood to the working muscle has been the conventional mechanism proposed to explain the lowered capacity of patients with HF to exercise, evidence suggests that the pathophysiological...

  20. Childhood heart failure in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Childhood heart failure in Ibadan. I. A. Lagunju and S. I. Omokhodion*. Department of Paediatrics. University College Hospital, Ibadan. Summary. One hundred consecutive admissions of children with a diagnosis of congestive cardiac failure to the paediatric department of the University College Hospital, Ibadan were.

  1. The pathophysiology of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Clinton D; Conte, John V

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that results when the heart is unable to provide sufficient blood flow to meet metabolic requirements or accommodate systemic venous return. This common condition affects over 5 million people in the United States at a cost of $10-38 billion per year. Heart failure results from injury to the myocardium from a variety of causes including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Less common etiologies include cardiomyopathies, valvular disease, myocarditis, infections, systemic toxins, and cardiotoxic drugs. As the heart fails, patients develop symptoms which include dyspnea from pulmonary congestion, and peripheral edema and ascites from impaired venous return. Constitutional symptoms such as nausea, lack of appetite, and fatigue are also common. There are several compensatory mechanisms that occur as the failing heart attempts to maintain adequate function. These include increasing cardiac output via the Frank-Starling mechanism, increasing ventricular volume and wall thickness through ventricular remodeling, and maintaining tissue perfusion with augmented mean arterial pressure through activation of neurohormonal systems. Although initially beneficial in the early stages of heart failure, all of these compensatory mechanisms eventually lead to a vicious cycle of worsening heart failure. Treatment strategies have been developed based upon the understanding of these compensatory mechanisms. Medical therapy includes diuresis, suppression of the overactive neurohormonal systems, and augmentation of contractility. Surgical options include ventricular resynchronization therapy, surgical ventricular remodeling, ventricular assist device implantation, and heart transplantation. Despite significant understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in heart failure, this disease causes significant morbidity and carries a 50% 5-year mortality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prognostic Role of Hypothyroidism in Heart Failure: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ning; Gao, Dengfeng; Triggiani, Vincenzo; Iacoviello, Massimo; Mitchell, Judith E; Ma, Rui; Zhang, Yan; Kou, Huijuan

    2015-07-01

    Hypothyroidism is a risk factor of heart failure (HF) in the general population. However, the relationship between hypothyroidism and clinical outcomes in patients with established HF is still inconclusive.We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify the association of hypothyroidism and all-cause mortality as well as cardiac death and/or hospitalization in patients with HF. We searched MEDLINE via PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases for studies of hypothyroidism and clinical outcomes in patients with HF published up to the end of January 2015. Random-effects models were used to estimate summary relative risk (RR) statistics. We included 13 articles that reported RR estimates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for hypothyroidism with outcomes in patients with HF. For the association of hypothyroidism with all-cause mortality and with cardiac death and/or hospitalization, the pooled RR was 1.44 (95% CI: 1.29-1.61) and 1.37 (95% CI: 1.22-1.55), respectively. However, the association disappeared on adjustment for B-type natriuretic protein level (RR 1.17, 95% CI: 0.90-1.52) and in studies of patients with mean age hypothyroidism associated with increased all-cause mortality as well as cardiac death and/or hospitalization in patients with HF. Further diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for hypothyroidism may be needed for patients with HF.

  3. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory......: The main variables recorded in the DHFR are related to the indicators for quality of care in patients with incident HF: performance of echocardiography, functional capacity (New York Heart Association functional classification), pharmacological therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme/angiotensin II...

  4. Heart failure overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bicycle. Your provider can provide a safe and effective exercise plan for you. DO NOT exercise on days ... changing your lifestyle . Get enough rest, including after exercise, ... as your health care team directed. These medicines: Help the heart ...

  5. Heart failure - palliative care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is available as a pill, liquid, or tablet that dissolves under the tongue. Your provider will ... RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  6. Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Mohamed S; Dishmon, Dwight A; Garg, Nadish; Weber, Karl T

    2017-10-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a well-known pathophysiologic feature of chronic renal failure. In recent years, SHPT has become recognized as a complication of the aldosteronism associated with congestive heart failure and where excretory Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ wasting results in plasma-ionized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia. Elevations in plasma parathyroid hormone have adverse systemic consequences, including intracellular Ca 2+ overloading of myocytes and vascular smooth muscle with the induction of oxidative stress. Herein, we briefly review the presence and adverse outcomes of SHPT in persons with heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Diuretic therapy in heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luís; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-02-20

    Many of the primary clinical manifestations of heart failure (HF) are due to fluid retention, and treatments targeting congestion play a central role in HF management. Diuretic therapy remains the cornerstone of congestion treatment, and diuretics are prescribed to the majority of HF patients. Despite this ubiquitous use, there is limited evidence from prospective randomized studies to guide the use of diuretics. With the chronic use of diuretic and usually in advanced stages of HF, diuretics may fail to control salt and water retention. This review describes the mechanism of action of available diuretic classes, reviews their clinical use based on scientific evidence and discusses strategies to overcome diuretic resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Vagal stimulation in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ferrari, Gaetano M

    2014-04-01

    Heart failure (HF) is accompanied by an autonomic imbalance that is almost always characterized by both increased sympathetic activity and withdrawal of vagal activity. Experimentally, vagal stimulation has been shown to exert profound antiarrhythmic activity and to improve cardiac function and survival in HF models. A open-label pilot clinical study in 32 patients with chronic HF has shown safety and tolerability of chronic vagal stimulation associated with subjective (improved quality of life and 6-min walk test) and objective improvements (reduced left ventricular systolic volumes and improved left ventricular ejection fraction). Three larger clinical studies, including a phase III trial are currently ongoing and will evaluate the clinical role of this new approach.

  9. Nurses' decision making in heart failure management based on heart failure certification status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nancy M; Bena, James F; Buxbaum, Denise; Martensen, Linda; Morrison, Shannon L; Prasun, Marilyn A; Stamp, Kelly D

    Research findings on the value of nurse certification were based on subjective perceptions or biased by correlations of certification status and global clinical factors. In heart failure, the value of certification is unknown. Examine the value of certification based nurses' decision-making. Cross-sectional study of nurses who completed heart failure clinical vignettes that reflected decision-making in clinical heart failure scenarios. Statistical tests included multivariable linear, logistic and proportional odds logistic regression models. Of nurses (N = 605), 29.1% were heart failure certified, 35.0% were certified in another specialty/job role and 35.9% were not certified. In multivariable modeling, nurses certified in heart failure (versus not heart failure certified) had higher clinical vignette scores (p = 0.002), reflecting higher evidence-based decision making; nurses with another specialty/role certification (versus no certification) did not (p = 0.62). Heart failure certification, but not in other specialty/job roles was associated with decisions that reflected delivery of high-quality care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Is There a Role for Ivabradine in the Contemporary Management of Patients with Chronic Heart Failure in Academic and Community Heart Failure Clinics in Canada?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Sherryn; Fernando, Carlos; Azeem, Sadia; Moe, Gordon W

    2017-06-01

    In patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced ejection fraction, increased heart rate (HR) is an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes. In systolic HF treatment with the If inhibitor ivabradine trial (SHIFT), Ivabradine improved survival when added to conventional treatment including β-blockers. However, the extent of benefit in the real world is unclear. We examined the characteristics of patients on guideline-directed therapy and determined who had SHIFT-like characteristics. A total of 1096 patients with chronic HF were reviewed from June 2014 to April 2015 in two HF clinics in Toronto: an academic institution (AI), and a community hospital (CH) clinic. SHIFT-like characteristics [left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤35%; sinus rhythm; and HR ≥ 70 bpm] were described. For all patients, mean age was 75 ± 13 years, overall LVEF was 44 ± 15%, AI less than CH (41.9 ± 14.0% vs. 45.7 ± 15.0%; p < 0.0001). More than two-thirds of patients in both groups were on β-blockers; with less than one-third at target dose. The proportion of patients with SHIFT-like characteristics was 8.4% AI and 11.7% CH, respectively (p = 0.0658). In HF clinics from both academic and community hospitals in Toronto, up-titration in the dose of β-blockers and other guideline therapy can be improved on. A small proportion of patients with HF and SHIFT-like characteristics may potentially benefit from the addition of Ivabradine, just approved in Canada; this number will be further reduced if target dosage for β-blockers is achieved. Servier Inc.

  11. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E. Dale

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin resistant states such as type 2 diabetes and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead (FOXO) transcriptional signaling or glucose transport which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed. PMID:27034277

  12. Heart failure - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body. Lots of foods that DO NOT taste salty, or that you DO NOT add salt to, still contain a lot of salt. You may need to take a diuretic, or water pill. DO NOT drink alcohol. Alcohol makes it harder for your heart muscles ...

  13. Hypertrophy of neurons within cardiac ganglia in human, canine, and rat heart failure: the potential role of nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Sayers, Scott; Walter, James S; Thomas, Donald; Dieter, Robert S; Nee, Lisa M; Wurster, Robert D

    2013-08-19

    Autonomic imbalances including parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity are cardinal features of heart failure regardless of etiology; however, mechanisms underlying these imbalances remain unknown. Animal model studies of heart and visceral organ hypertrophy predict that nerve growth factor levels should be elevated in heart failure; whether this is so in human heart failure, though, remains unclear. We tested the hypotheses that neurons in cardiac ganglia are hypertrophied in human, canine, and rat heart failure and that nerve growth factor, which we hypothesize is elevated in the failing heart, contributes to this neuronal hypertrophy. Somal morphology of neurons from human (579.54±14.34 versus 327.45±9.17 μm(2); Phearts (767.80±18.37 versus 650.23±9.84 μm(2); Pneurons from spontaneously hypertensive rat hearts (327.98±3.15 versus 271.29±2.79 μm(2); Pneurons in cardiac ganglia compared with controls. Western blot analysis shows that nerve growth factor levels in the explanted, failing human heart are 250% greater than levels in healthy donor hearts. Neurons from cardiac ganglia cultured with nerve growth factor are significantly larger and have greater dendritic arborization than neurons in control cultures. Hypertrophied neurons are significantly less excitable than smaller ones; thus, hypertrophy of vagal postganglionic neurons in cardiac ganglia would help to explain the parasympathetic withdrawal that accompanies heart failure. Furthermore, our observations suggest that nerve growth factor, which is elevated in the failing human heart, causes hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia.

  14. German disease management guidelines: surgical therapies for chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindermann, J R; Klotz, S; Rahbar, K; Hoffmeier, A; Drees, G

    2010-02-01

    The German Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure" intends to guide physicians working in the field of diagnosis and treatment of heart failure. The guideline provides a tool on the background of evidence based medicine. The following short review wants to give insights into the role of some surgical treatment options to improve heart failure, such as revascularization, ventricular reconstruction and aneurysmectomy, mitral valve reconstruction, ventricular assist devices and heart transplantation. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  15. THE ROLE OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE FORMATION OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE WITH PRESERVED EJECTION FRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Kurkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the combination and contribution of risk factors (age, hypertension (HT, obesity, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease (CKD, length of illness leading to the formation of chronic heart failure (CHF with preserved ejection fraction (EF.Material and methods. The study included 100 hypertensive patients (aged 40 to 80 years with concomitant obesity or diabetes or CKD. Patients were divided into 4 groups depending on the presence of one major and/or several concomitant diseases. Echocardiography, assessment of large arterial vessels stiffness indices (SI m/s, CAVI m/s, and determination of small muscle arteries tonus (RI% were performed in all patients.Results. Remodeling of the left ventricle (LV and left atrial (LA was observed in all patients with comorbid status, as well as reduction in diastolic function. The LV myocardial mass index in the first group was 117.2±31.4 g/m2, in the second one – 125.9±27.4 g/m2, in the third group – 121.5±15.6 g/m2 and in the fourth one – 126.1±11.5 g/m2. A significant increase in the LA volume index was founded in the first group  – 33.4±3.9 ml/m2, in the second one – 39.6±9.1 ml/m2, in the third group – 38.1±5.2 ml/m2 and in the fourth one – 39.8±6.6 ml/m2 (р<0.05. The parameters reflecting the rigidity of large arterial vessels (SI m/s, CAVI m/s also exceeded the threshold values in each group; significant differences SI were between the first and fourth, second  and fourth groups  (р<0.05, CAVI between the first and third groups  (р<0.05. A significant correlation was found between CAVI and age (r=0.63, which indicated an increase in arterial stiffness with age.Conclusions. In the formation of CHF with preserved EF, additional factors enhance the changes associated with LV remodeling and LA overload. These changes occur with a progressive decrease in LV diastolic function and increase in myocardial stiffness. HT and obesity are the main contributors to the

  16. Secondary hyperparathyroidism prevalence and prognostic role in elderly males with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncar, G; Bozic, B; Cvetinovic, N; Dungen, H-D; Lainscak, M; von Haehling, S; Doehner, W; Radojicic, Z; Putnikovic, B; Trippel, T; Popovic, V

    2017-03-01

    Evaluation of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) and its prognostic impact on all-cause mortality in elderly males with heart failure (HF). Seventy three males (67 ± 7 years old) with systolic HF were included. Baseline PTH was measured. Patients were grouped according to PTH cut-off levels of 65 pg/ml (>65 pg/ml = SHPT vs. normal PTH). All-cause mortality was evaluated at 6-year follow-up. SHPT was diagnosed in 43 (59 %) patients. They were more severe compared to the patients with normal PTH regarding NYHA functional class (2.4 ± 0.5 vs. 2.1 ± 0.2, p = 0.001), quality of life score (34 ± 14 vs. 24 ± 12, p = 0.005), 6-min walking distance (378 ± 79 vs. 446 ± 73 m, p < 0.0001), left ventricular ejection fraction (27 ± 8 vs. 31 ± 7 %, p = 0.019), and NT-proBNP [2452 (3399) vs. 918 (1372) pg/ml, p < 0.0001]. No differences in age, vitamin D status, and renal function were noted between studied groups. A total of 41 (56 %) patients died within 6 years of follow-up. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed impaired long-term survival in patients with SHPT versus patients with normal PTH (p = 0.009). The rate of death was highest (75 %) in the group of patients with SHPT and NT-proBNP levels above median value (p = 0.003). Cox regression analysis demonstrated that NT-proBNP was the single independent predictor of all-cause mortality at 6-year follow-up [HR 3.698 (1.927-7.095), p < 0.0001]. SHPT was highly prevalent in elderly males with HF and was associated with impaired survival. HF patients with SHPT had more severe disease compared to the patients with normal serum PTH. Determination of serum PTH levels provided additional value to NT-proBNP for risk stratification in these patients.

  17. The Role of Device Diagnostic Algorithms in the Assessment and Management of Patients with Systolic Heart Failure: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. T. Ha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospitalization due to heart failure (HF exacerbation represents a major burden in health care and portends a poor long-term prognosis for patients. As a result, there is considerable interest to develop novel tools and strategies to better detect onset of volume overload, as HF hospitalizations may be reduced if appropriate interventions can be promptly delivered. One such innovation is the use of device-based diagnostic parameters in HF patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD and/or cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT devices. These diagnostic algorithms can effectively monitor and detect changes in patients' HF status, as well as predict one's risk of HF hospitalization. This paper will review the role of these device diagnostics parameters in the assessment and management of HF patients in ambulatory settings. In addition, the integration of these novel algorithms in existing HF disease management models will be discussed.

  18. Diuretics in heart failure: practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basraon, Jagroop; Deedwani, Prakash C

    2012-09-01

    This review discusses the role of diuretics in heart failure by focusing on different classifications and mechanisms of action. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of diuretics are elucidated. The predominant discussion highlights the use of loop diuretics, which are the most commonly used drugs in heart failure. Different methods of using this therapy in different settings along with a comprehensive review of the side-effect profile are highlighted. Special situations necessitating adjustment and the phenomenon of diuretic resistance are explained. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Predicting survival in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pocock, Stuart J; Ariti, Cono A; McMurray, John J V

    2012-01-01

    AimsUsing a large international database from multiple cohort studies, the aim is to create a generalizable easily used risk score for mortality in patients with heart failure (HF).Methods and resultsThe MAGGIC meta-analysis includes individual data on 39 372 patients with HF, both reduced...

  20. Ventilatory disorders in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güder, G.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart failure (HF) or both syndromes are the most common reasons for dyspnea in the elderly. Currently there is no standard to diagnose COPD and multiple definitions (fixed ratio [GOLD], lower limit of normal [LLN]) are discussed. Further,

  1. Lay Consultations in Heart Failure Symptom Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Katherine M; Sims, Jessica L; Ercole, Patrick M; Shetty, Shivan S; Wallendorf, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Lay consultations can facilitate or impede healthcare. However, little is known about how lay consultations for symptom evaluation affect treatment decision-making. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of lay consultations in symptom evaluation prior to hospitalization among patients with heart failure. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 60 patients hospitalized for acute decompensated heart failure. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests, along with logistic regression were used to characterize lay consultations in this sample. A large proportion of patients engaged in lay consultations for symptom evaluation and decision-making before hospitalization. Lay consultants provided attributions and advice and helped make the decision to seek medical care. Men consulted more often with their spouse than women, while women more often consulted with adult children. Findings have implications for optimizing heart failure self-management interventions, improving outcomes, and reducing hospital readmissions.

  2. A crucial role of activin A-mediated growth hormone suppression in mouse and human heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritoshi Fukushima

    Full Text Available Infusion of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMNC has been reported to ameliorate cardiac dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction. In this study, we investigated whether infusion of BMMNC is also effective for non-ischemic heart failure model mice and the underlying mechanisms. Intravenous infusion of BMMNC showed transient cardioprotective effects on animal models with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM without their engraftment in heart, suggesting that BMMNC infusion improves cardiac function via humoral factors rather than their differentiation into cardiomyocytes. Using conditioned media from sorted BMMNC, we found that the cardioprotective effects were mediated by growth hormone (GH secreted from myeloid (Gr-1(+ cells and the effects was partially mediated by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in cardiomyocytes. On the other hand, the GH expression in Gr-1(+ cells was significantly downregulated in DCM mice compared with that in healthy control, suggesting that the environmental cue in heart failure might suppress the Gr-1(+ cells function. Activin A was upregulated in the serum of DCM models and induced downregulation of GH levels in Gr-1(+ cells and serum. Furthermore, humoral factors upregulated in heart failure including angiotensin II upregulated activin A in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC via activation of NFκB. Similarly, serum activin A levels were also significantly higher in DCM patients with heart failure than in healthy subjects and the GH levels in conditioned medium from PBMNC of DCM patients were lower than that in healthy subjects. Inhibition of activin A increased serum GH levels and improved cardiac function of DCM model mice. These results suggest that activin A causes heart failure by suppressing GH activity and that inhibition of activin A might become a novel strategy for the treatment of heart failure.

  3. Heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, E L; Abrahamsen, B; Vestergaard, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates.......The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates....

  4. Preservation of Skin Integrity in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİR BARUTCU, Canan

    2018-01-01

    Congestive heart failure is an international health problem with its high incidence, prevalence, morbidity and mortality rates. Congestive heart failure is the most common reason of hospitalization in patients older than 65 and it causes more than a million hospitalizations a year. Patients with congestive heart failure experience a number of complications due to physiopathologic reasons, side effects of drugs, accompanying comorbid diseases and limitations caused by congestive heart failure....

  5. Genetically Modified Mouse Models Used for Studying the Role of the AT2 Receptor in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Avila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The actions of Angiotensin II have been implicated in many cardiovascular conditions. It is widely accepted that the cardiovascular effects of Angiotensin II are mediated by different subtypes of receptors: AT1 and AT2. These membrane-bound receptors share a part of their nucleic acid but seem to have different distribution and pathophysiological actions. AT1 mediates most of the Angiotensin II actions since it is ubiquitously expressed in the cardiovascular system of the normal adult. Moreover AT2 is highly expressed in the developing fetus but its expression in the cardiovascular system is low and declines after birth. However the expression of AT2 appears to be modulated by pathological states such as hypertension, myocardial infarction or any pathology associated to tissue remodeling or inflammation. The specific role of this receptor is still unclear and different studies involving in vivo and in vitro experiments have shown conflicting data. It is essential to clarify the role of the AT2 receptor in the different pathological states as it is a potential site for an effective therapeutic regimen that targets the Angiotensin II system. We will review the different genetically modified mouse models used to study the AT2 receptor and its association with cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide in patients with heart failure and chronic atrial fibrillation : Role of duration of at atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Berg, MP; Crijns, HJGM; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Van Gelder, IC; De Kam, PJ; Lie, KI

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the determinants of atrial natriuretic peptide level in patients with congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation. In particular, the duration of atrial fibrillation was analyzed because atrial fibrillation per se might have a specific effect on atrial

  7. Parallel paths to improve heart failure outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Nancy M.

    2013-01-01

    -based, heart failure guidelines improves clinical outcomes. Thus, nurses and patients are on parallel paths related to setting the foundation for improved self-care adherence in advanced heart failure. Through research, we found that nurses were not adequately prepared as heart failure educators...... and that patients did not believe they were able to control heart failure. In 2 educational intervention studies that aimed to help patients understand that they could control fluid management and follow a strict daily fluid limit, patients had improved clinical outcomes. Thus, misperceptions about heart failure......Gaps and disparities in delivery of heart failure education by nurses and performance in accomplishing self-care behaviors by patients with advanced heart failure may be factors in clinical decompensation and unplanned consumption of health care. Is nurse-led education effectively delivered before...

  8. Becoming a patient with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, D E; Starling, R; Haas, G; Young, J B

    1999-01-01

    abstract or general) categories. The process of becoming a patient with heart failure involves a gradual process of taking on a new identity. Five distinct phases of this process of identity formation emerged from the data: a crisis event, the diagnosis, the patient's and family's response to the diagnosis, their acceptance and adjustment to life with this condition, and making the decision to get on with life. Most research on heart failure has focused on patients or their families farther along in the trajectory of this condition. We know little about the psychosocial experience of the early phases of this condition. Becoming a patient with heart failure is a process of searching for a meaning to this condition (what is it? what does it mean for the future?) and a process of taking on a new identity and appropriate role behaviors. This process takes place over a period of time. This suggests that the formation of individual identities evolve as new information becomes available, as meanings are attached to the new circumstances, and as a process of negotiating new roles among family members (and among patient, family members, and clinicians) takes place. The findings of this study suggest possible interventions that may positively affect the patient's condition and the quality of family life.

  9. The role of renin angiotensin system intervention in stage B heart failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collier, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    This article outlines the link between the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) and various forms of cardiomyopathy, and also reviews the understanding of the effectiveness of RAAS intervention in this phase of ventricular dysfunction. The authors focus their discussion predominantly on patients who have had previous myocardial infarction or those who have left ventricular hypertrophy and also briefly discuss the role of RAAS activation and intervention in patients with alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

  10. Structural Bases of Postresuscitative Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Dolgikh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment on 106 non-inbred male albino rats undergone 4-minute clinical death from acute blood loss has revealed that the first three days after resuscitation are marked by a concomitance of vascular disorders and cardiomyocytic dystrophic changes, the leading role being played by sludge, stasis, thrombosis, increased vascular permeability, perivascular edema, and hemorrhages. Cardiomyocytic destruction (various contractures, block-like myofibrillolysis, myocytoly-sis is a structural basis of postresuscitative heart failure. Three days later the heart displayed concomitant processes of recovery and damage. Three types of cardiac morphological changes have been identified in relation to the ratio of these processes.

  11. A Comparison of three diuretic Regimens in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, F.; Eriksen, U.H.; Guul, S.-J.

    1993-01-01

    Farmakologi, bendroflumethiazide, diuretics, heart failure, bumethanide, ergometry plasma lactate......Farmakologi, bendroflumethiazide, diuretics, heart failure, bumethanide, ergometry plasma lactate...

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gustav Smith, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is the end-stage of all heart disease and arguably constitutes the greatest unmet therapeutic need in cardiovascular medicine today. Classic epidemiological studies have established clinical risk factors for HF, but the cause remains poorly understood in many cases. Biochemical analyses of small case-control series and animal models have described a plethora of molecular characteristics of HF, but a single unifying pathogenic theory is lacking. Heart failure appears to result not only from cardiac overload or injury but also from a complex interplay among genetic, neurohormonal, metabolic, inflammatory, and other biochemical factors acting on the heart. Recent development of robust, high-throughput tools in molecular biology provides opportunity for deep molecular characterization of population-representative cohorts and HF cases (molecular epidemiology, including genome sequencing, profiling of myocardial gene expression and chromatin modifications, plasma composition of proteins and metabolites, and microbiomes. The integration of such detailed information holds promise for improving understanding of HF pathophysiology in humans, identification of therapeutic targets, and definition of disease subgroups beyond the current classification based on ejection fraction which may benefit from improved individual tailoring of therapy. Challenges include: 1 the need for large cohorts with deep, uniform phenotyping; 2 access to the relevant tissues, ideally with repeated sampling to capture dynamic processes; and 3 analytical issues related to integration and analysis of complex datasets. International research consortia have formed to address these challenges and combine datasets, and cohorts with up to 1 million participants are being collected. This paper describes the molecular epidemiology of HF and provides an overview of methods and tissue types and examples of published and ongoing efforts to systematically evaluate molecular

  13. The role of levosimendan in acute heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome: A review and expert consensus opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Markku S; Buerke, Michael; Cohen-Solál, Alain; Costa, Susana; Édes, István; Erlikh, Alexey; Franco, Fatima; Gibson, Charles; Gorjup, Vojka; Guarracino, Fabio; Gustafsson, Finn; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Husebye, Trygve; Karason, Kristjan; Katsytadze, Igor; Kaul, Sundeep; Kivikko, Matti; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Masip, Josep; Matskeplishvili, Simon; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Møller, Jacob E; Nessler, Jadwiga; Nessler, Bohdan; Ntalianis, Argyrios; Oliva, Fabrizio; Pichler-Cetin, Emel; Põder, Pentti; Recio-Mayoral, Alejandro; Rex, Steffen; Rokyta, Richard; Strasser, Ruth H; Zima, Endre; Pollesello, Piero

    2016-09-01

    Acute heart failure and/or cardiogenic shock are frequently triggered by ischemic coronary events. Yet, there is a paucity of randomized data on the management of patients with heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome, as acute coronary syndrome and cardiogenic shock have frequently been defined as exclusion criteria in trials and registries. As a consequence, guideline recommendations are mostly driven by observational studies, even though these patients have a particularly poor prognosis compared to heart failure patients without signs of coronary artery disease. In acute heart failure, and especially in cardiogenic shock related to ischemic conditions, vasopressors and inotropes are used. However, both pathophysiological considerations and available clinical data suggest that these treatments may have disadvantageous effects. The inodilator levosimendan offers potential benefits due to a range of distinct effects including positive inotropy, restoration of ventriculo-arterial coupling, increases in tissue perfusion, and anti-stunning and anti-inflammatory effects. In clinical trials levosimendan improves symptoms, cardiac function, hemodynamics, and end-organ function. Adverse effects are generally less common than with other inotropic and vasoactive therapies, with the notable exception of hypotension. The decision to use levosimendan, in terms of timing and dosing, is influenced by the presence of pulmonary congestion, and blood pressure measurements. Levosimendan should be preferred over adrenergic inotropes as a first line therapy for all ACS-AHF patients who are under beta-blockade and/or when urinary output is insufficient after diuretics. Levosimendan can be used alone or in combination with other inotropic or vasopressor agents, but requires monitoring due to the risk of hypotension. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of ventricular assist therapy for patients with heart failure and restrictive physiology: Improving outcomes for a lethal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupper, Avishay; Park, Soon J; Pereira, Naveen L; Schettle, Sarah D; Gerber, Yariv; Topilsky, Yan; Edwards, Brooks S; Daly, Richard C; Stulak, John M; Joyce, Lyle D; Kushwaha, Sudhir S

    2015-08-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) patients have poor prognosis due to progressive heart failure characterized by impaired ventricular filling of either or both ventricles. The goal of this study was to evaluate the outcome of end-stage RCM patients after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation and to determine factors that may be associated with improved survival. This investigation is a retrospective study of prospectively collected data that include 28 consecutive patients with end-stage RCM who received continuous-flow LVADs at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Outcome was assessed by survival with LVAD support until heart transplantation or all-cause mortality. The mean follow-up time post-LVAD implantation was 448 ± 425 days. The mean hospitalization time was 29 ± 19 days and was complicated mainly by post-operative right ventricular (RV) failure requiring short-term medical support. The short-term in-hospital mortality was 14%. Ten patients underwent heart transplantation with 100% survival post-transplant during the follow-up period. One-year survival for patients with LVADs without transplantation was 64%, and was not significantly different between amyloidosis and non-amyloidosis patients. Larger left ventricle (LV) end-diastolic and end-systolic dimensions were significantly associated with improved survival rates (RR = 0.94 and 0.95, p < 0.05, respectively), and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD) ≤46 mm was associated with increased mortality post-LVAD implantation. LVAD is a feasible, life-saving therapy for end-stage heart failure related to RCM, especially as a bridge to transplant and in patients with larger LV dimensions. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Physical training in patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Fletcher, RN, MN, FAAN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a primary health concern in North and South America, with hospitalizations for heart failure as the primary diagnosis continuing to rise. There is a positive relationship between the prevalence of heart failure and age. However, mortality from heart failure is on the decline due to medical advancements, pharmacotherapy and nonpharmacological interventions. One of these nonpharmacological interventions is physical training or exercise. Physical training or exercise is becoming widely accepted by the medical community as a viable option in the medical management of stable heart failure patients. Both aerobic and resistance type exercise have been shown to be efficacious in stable heart failure patients. Evidence now exists not only supporting exercise to improve or maintain physical function in heart failure patients, but also quality of life. Many studies have shown that utilizing exercise in this population improves mood and overall self-reported well being. While the myocardial benefits from exercise may be minimal in heart failure patients, the peripheral benefits leading to improved physical function and preservation of independence are indispensible. Based on the research that has been conducted in the area of exercise and heart failure to this point, clinicians working with this population have the data necessary to prescribe evidence-based exercise prescriptions that can be utilized as part of a comprehensive medical management approach. Currently, several medical position statements endorse exercise as a safe and effective modality in heart failure patients.

  16. Management of Sleep Disordered Breathing in Patients with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Connor P; Ananthram, Manjula; Gottlieb, Stephen S

    2018-04-03

    This paper reviews treatment options for sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in patients with heart failure. We sought to identify therapies for SDB with the best evidence for long-term use in patients with heart failure and to minimize uncertainties in clinical practice by examining frequently discussed questions: what is the role of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with heart failure? Is adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) safe in patients with heart failure? To what extent is SDB a modifiable risk factor? Consistent evidence has demonstrated that the development of SDB in patients with heart failure is a poor prognostic indicator and a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality. However, despite numerous available interventions for obstructive sleep apnea and central sleep apnea, it remains unclear what effect these therapies have on patients with heart failure. To date, all major randomized clinical trials have failed to demonstrate a survival benefit with SDB therapy and one major study investigating the use of adaptive servo-ventilation demonstrated harm. Significant questions persist regarding the management of SDB in patients with heart failure. Until appropriately powered trials identify a treatment modality that increases cardiovascular survival in patients with SDB and heart failure, a patient's heart failure management should remain the priority of medical care.

  17. Heart Failure as an Aging-Related Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hiroyuki; Komuro, Issei

    2018-01-27

    The molecular pathophysiology of heart failure, which is one of the leading causes of mortality, is not yet fully understood. Heart failure can be regarded as a systemic syndrome of aging-related phenotypes. Wnt/β-catenin signaling and the p53 pathway, both of which are key regulators of aging, have been demonstrated to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Circulating C1q was identified as a novel activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, promoting systemic aging-related phenotypes including sarcopenia and heart failure. On the other hand, p53 induces the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in the failing heart. In these molecular mechanisms, the cross-talk between cardiomyocytes and non-cardiomyocytes (e,g,. endothelial cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, macrophages) deserves mentioning. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the molecular pathophysiology underlying heart failure, focusing on Wnt/β-catenin signaling and the p53 pathway.

  18. Role of aminophylline in refractory heart failure: a comparison to the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside, the old and the new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBianco, R; Rosenfeld, S P; Katz, R J; Simpson, A G; Fletcher, R D; Singh, S

    1980-08-01

    Aminophylline [(theophylline ethylene diamine (TED)] reportedly improved cardiac hemodynamics by lowering vascular resistances and increasing contractility. TED as used clinically has not been compared to the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (NP). To assess the relative hemodynamic effects of these two commonly used agents, the following comparison was made. Ten patients with congestive cardiomyopathy in chronic refractory heart failure [New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV] were studied. All patients demonstrated cardiomegaly by chest x ray and echocardiography (LVd = 6.3 +/- 0.7 cm) and markedly abnormal hemodynamics during baseline observations (see Table I). Hemodynamic measurements at baseline were compared after TED infusion (mean blood level = 16 +/- 12 micrograms/m/TED) and during intravenous NP. No significant changes in heart rate occurred during either therapeutic intervention; a fall in mean arterial pressure of 10 mmHg (p TED. Theophylline ethylene diamine demonstrated no detectable cardiac hemodynamic effects 60--90 min post infusion despite proven blood levels, whereas NP exhibited distinctly beneficial effects in this patient group. Previous studies demonstrating improved hemodynamics occurring with TED have been limited to the time of infusion or within the following 40 min, a time when TED blood levels are maximum and therefore closest to toxicity. The results of this study suggest that TED demonstrates no beneficial hemodynamic effects in refractory heart failure as early as 1 h after infusion despite blood levels in the therapeutic range.

  19. Role of heat shock transcription factor 1(HSF1)-upregulated macrophage in ameliorating pressure overload-induced heart failure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Peizhao; Chang, Yaowei; Dai, Fangjie; Wei, Chunyan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Jiming

    2018-08-15

    In order to explore the role of macrophages in HSF1-mediated alleviation of heart failure, mice model of pressure overload-induced heart failure was established using transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Changes in cardiac function and morphology were studied in TAC and SHAM groups using ultrasonic device, tissue staining, electron microscopy, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-QPCR), and Western blotting. We found that mice in the TAC group showed evidence of impaired cardiac function and aggravation of fibrosis on ultrasonic and histopathological examination when compared to those in the SHAM group. The expressions of HSF1, LC3II/LC3I, Becline-1 and HIF-1, as well as autophagosome formation in TAC group were greater than that in SHAM group. On sub-group analyses in the TAC group, improved cardiac function and alleviation of fibrosis was observed in the HSF1 TG subgroup as compared to that in the wild type subgroup. Expressions of LC3II/LC3I, Becline-1 and HIF-1, too showed an obvious increase; and increased autophagosome formation was observed on electron microscopy. Opposite results were observed in the HSF1 KO subgroup. These results collectively suggest that in the pressure overload heart failure model, HSF1 promoted formation of macrophages by inducing upregulation of HIF-1 expression, through which heart failure was ameliorated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Translational aspects of cell therapy for heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Nasseri, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This cumulative “habilitation” thesis focuses on myocardial regeneration by means of cell therapy and on experimental and clinical approaches. To supplement the articles published by the author the work gives an overview of the pathogenesis of heart failure and remodeling of the heart, taking into account the role of nitric oxide and statins. Further, the treatment of ischemic heart failure including organ transplantation and mechanical circulatory support is discussed. Different approaches t...

  1. Managing patients with heart failure: a qualitative study of multidisciplinary teams with specialist heart failure nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogowska, Margaret; Simmonds, Rosemary; McLachlan, Sarah; Cramer, Helen; Sanders, Tom; Johnson, Rachel; Kadam, Umesh T; Lasserson, Daniel S; Purdy, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of health care clinicians working in multidisciplinary teams that include specialist heart failure nurses when caring for the management of heart failure patients. We used a qualitative in-depth interview study nested in a broader ethnographic study of unplanned admissions in heart failure patients (HoldFAST). We interviewed 24 clinicians across primary, secondary, and community care in 3 locations in the Midlands, South Central, and South West of England. Within a framework of the role and contribution of the heart failure specialist nurse, our study identified 2 thematic areas that the clinicians agreed still represent particular challenges when working with heart failure patients. The first was communication with patients, in particular explaining the diagnosis and helping patients to understand the condition. The participants recognized that such communication was most effective when they had a long-term relationship with patients and families and that the specialist nurse played an important part in achieving this relationship. The second was communication within the team. Multidisciplinary input was especially needed because of the complexity of many patients and issues around medications, and the participants believed the specialist nurse may facilitate team communication. The study highlights the role of specialist heart failure nurses in delivering education tailored to patients and facilitating better liaison among all clinicians, particularly when dealing with the management of comorbidities and drug regimens. The way in which specialist nurses were able to be caseworkers for their patients was perceived as a method of ensuring coordination and continuity of care. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  2. Iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Altay, Hakan; Çetiner, Mustafa; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Temizhan, Ahmet; Ural, Dilek; Yeşilbursa, Dilek; Yıldırım, Nesligül; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is an important community health problem. Prevalence and incidence of heart failure have continued to rise over the years. Despite recent advances in heart failure therapy, prognosis is still poor, rehospitalization rate is very high, and quality of life is worse. Co-morbidities in heart failure have negative impact on clinical course of the disease, further impair prognosis, and add difficulties to treatment of clinical picture. Therefore, successful management of co-morbidities is strongly recommended in addition to conventional therapy for heart failure. One of the most common co-morbidities in heart failure is presence of iron deficiency and anemia. Current evidence suggests that iron deficiency and anemia are more prevalent in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, as well as those with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, iron deficiency and anemia are referred to as independent predictors for poor prognosis in heart failure. There is strong relationship between iron deficiency or anemia and severity of clinical status of heart failure. Over the last two decades, many clinical investigations have been conducted on clinical effectiveness of treatment of iron deficiency or anemia with oral iron, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin therapies. Studies with oral iron and erythropoietin therapies did not provide any clinical benefit and, in fact, these therapies have been shown to be associated with increase in adverse clinical outcomes. However, clinical trials in patients with iron deficiency in the presence or absence of anemia have demonstrated considerable clinical benefits of intravenous iron therapy, and based on these positive outcomes, iron deficiency has become target of therapy in management of heart failure. The present report assesses current approaches to iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure in light of recent evidence.

  3. Sacubitril/Valsartanstive Heart Failure: Cardiogenic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Rawal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sacubitril/valsartan is a combination drug described as a new class of dual-acting angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi for heart failure. We present a case of a patient with NYHA class IV systolic heart failure who was refractory to all other classes of heart failure medications and was started on this new medication. On sacubitril/valsartan, he developed cardiogenic shock. This led us to reevaluate the use and risks of this medication in the class IV heart failure population.

  4. Sacubitril/Valsartanstive Heart Failure: Cardiogenic Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Rawal, H. A.; Kocheril, A. G.

    2018-01-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan is a combination drug described as a new class of dual-acting angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) for heart failure. We present a case of a patient with NYHA class IV systolic heart failure who was refractory to all other classes of heart failure medications and was started on this new medication. On sacubitril/valsartan, he developed cardiogenic shock. This led us to reevaluate the use and risks of this medication in the class IV heart failure population.

  5. Influence of diabetes mellitus on heart failure risk and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Belle Eric

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our aim is to summarize and discuss the recent literature linking diabetes mellitus with heart failure, and to address the issue of the optimal treatment for diabetic patients with heart failure. The studies linking diabetes mellitus (DM with heart failure (HF The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in heart failure populations is close to 20% compared with 4 to 6% in control populations. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an increased risk of heart failure in diabetics; moreover, in diabetic populations, poor glycemic control has been associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Various mechanisms may link diabetes mellitus to heart failure: firstly, associated comorbidities such as hypertension may play a role; secondly, diabetes accelerates the development of coronary atherosclerosis; thirdly, experimental and clinical studies support the existence of a specific diabetic cardiomyopathy related to microangiopathy, metabolic factors or myocardial fibrosis. Subgroup analyses of randomized trials demonstrate that diabetes is also an important prognostic factor in heart failure. In addition, it has been suggested that the deleterious impact of diabetes may be especially marked in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. Treatment of heart failure in diabetic patients The knowledge of the diabetic status may help to define the optimal therapeutic strategy for heart failure patients. Cornerstone treatments such as ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers appear to be uniformly beneficial in diabetic and non diabetic populations. However, in ischemic cardiomyopathy, the choice of the revascularization technique may differ according to diabetic status. Finally, clinical studies are needed to determine whether improved metabolic control might favorably influence the outcome of diabetic heart failure patients.

  6. Heart failure: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of heart failure in diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Jorsal, Anders; Wiggers, Henrik; McMurray, John J.V.

    2018-01-01

    This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint.

  7. THE ROLE OF BETABLOCKERS IN LOWERING THE RISK OF CHEMOTHERAPY-INDUCED HEART FAILURE IN BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Tase

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Anthracyclines and molecular targeted therapy, pharmacologic agents currently used in breast cancer, are potentially cardiotoxic, leading to cardiac dysfunction, and even to overt heart failure. This paper reviews the art of protecting the heart in breast cancer recipients of chemotherapy with betablockers. The main mechanism of anthracycline induced cardiotoxicity is the oxydative stress, occurring in mitochondrial arena. Recent trials supporting β-blockers cardioprotection in this particular population of patients are discussed. As a result of these studies, betablockers are, along with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone antagonists, statins, and dexrazoxane, the most cardioprotective drugs. The paper also covers some methods (biomarkers, imaging, integrating the sphere of prevention with those of monitoring and treatment. The trials outcomes are illustrated by curves, plots, histograms, tables, etc.

  8. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure.

  9. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Insulin resistance and exercise tolerance in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoer, Martin; Monk-Hansen, Tea; Olsen, Rasmus Huan

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been linked to exercise intolerance in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of coronary flow reserve (CFR), endothelial function and arterial stiffness in explaining this linkage.......Insulin resistance has been linked to exercise intolerance in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of coronary flow reserve (CFR), endothelial function and arterial stiffness in explaining this linkage....

  11. Diuretics as pathogenetic treatment for heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglin, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Increased intracardiac filling pressure or congestion causes symptoms and leads to hospital admissions in patients with heart failure, regardless of their systolic function. A history of hospital admission, in turn, predicts further hospitalizations and morbidity, and a higher number of hospitalizations determine higher mortality. Congestion is therefore the driving force of the natural history of heart failure. Congestion is the syndrome shared by heart failure with preserved and reduced systolic function. These two conditions have almost identical morbidity, mortality, and survival because the outcomes are driven by congestion. A small difference in favor of heart failure with preserved systolic function comes from decreased ejection fraction and left ventricular remodeling which is only present in heart failure with decreased systolic function. The magnitude of this difference reflects the contribution of decreased systolic function and ventricular remodeling to the progression of heart failure. The only treatment available for congestion is fluid removal via diuretics, ultrafiltration, or dialysis. It is the only treatment that works equally well for heart failure with reduced and preserved systolic function because it affects congestion, the main pathogenetic feature of the disease. Diuretics are pathogenetic therapy for heart failure. PMID:21403798

  12. Heart Failure Management - Evolution Over The Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KV Sahasranam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The simplest definition of heart failure is "A condition in which the heart fails to discharge its contents adequately". Even though the prevalence is quoted at 4 - 20 / 1000 population, in the elderly above 65 years, the figures may exceed 100/1000. After the age of 45, it is found that the relative incidence of heart failure which is approximately 1 - 5 /1000, double for each decade of life. As modernization increases and healthcare improves over the years, the prevalence of heart failure also increases due to the increase in longevity of individuals.

  13. Remote monitoring of heart failure: benefits for therapeutic decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Mihran; Caliskan, Kadir; Theuns, Dominic A M J; Szili-Torok, Tamas

    2017-07-01

    Chronic heart failure is a cardiovascular disorder with high prevalence and incidence worldwide. The course of heart failure is characterized by periods of stability and instability. Decompensation of heart failure is associated with frequent and prolonged hospitalizations and it worsens the prognosis for the disease and increases cardiovascular mortality among affected patients. It is therefore important to monitor these patients carefully to reveal changes in their condition. Remote monitoring has been designed to facilitate an early detection of adverse events and to minimize regular follow-up visits for heart failure patients. Several new devices have been developed and introduced to the daily practice of cardiology departments worldwide. Areas covered: Currently, special tools and techniques are available to perform remote monitoring. Concurrently there are a number of modern cardiac implantable electronic devices that incorporate a remote monitoring function. All the techniques that have a remote monitoring function are discussed in this paper in detail. All the major studies on this subject have been selected for review of the recent data on remote monitoring of HF patients and demonstrate the role of remote monitoring in the therapeutic decision making for heart failure patients. Expert commentary: Remote monitoring represents a novel intensified follow-up strategy of heart failure management. Overall, theoretically, remote monitoring may play a crucial role in the early detection of heart failure progression and may improve the outcome of patients.

  14. Cognitive Impairment in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthimios Dardiotis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment (CI is increasingly recognized as a common adverse consequence of heart failure (HF. Although the exact mechanisms remain unclear, microembolism, chronic or intermittent cerebral hypoperfusion, and/or impaired cerebral vessel reactivity that lead to cerebral hypoxia and ischemic brain damage seem to underlie the development of CI in HF. Cognitive decline in HF is characterized by deficits in one or more cognition domains, including attention, memory, executive function, and psychomotor speed. These deficits may affect patients’ decision-making capacity and interfere with their ability to comply with treatment requirements, recognize and self-manage disease worsening symptoms. CI may have fluctuations in severity over time, improve with effective HF treatment or progress to dementia. CI is independently associated with disability, mortality, and decreased quality of life of HF patients. It is essential therefore for health professionals in their routine evaluations of HF patients to become familiar with assessment of cognitive performance using standardized screening instruments. Future studies should focus on elucidating the mechanisms that underlie CI in HF and establishing preventive strategies and treatment approaches.

  15. CPAP in chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic Heart Failure (CHF represents worldwide a clinical condition with increasing prevalence, high social, economical and epidemiological impact. Even if new pharmacological and non-pharmacological approachs have been recently used, mortality remains high in general population and quality of life is poor in these patients. DISCUSSION The association between CHF and sleep disorders is frequent but still undervalued: sleep apnoeas in CHF produce negative effects on cardiovascular system and an aggravation of prognosis. CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure is commonly used to treat sleep apnoeas in patients without cardiac involvement and it is also used in first line treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema thanks to its hemodynamic and ventilatory effects. The addition of nightly CPAP to standard aggressive medical therapy in patients with CHF and sleep apnoeas reduces the number of apnoeas, reduces the blood pressure, and the respiratory and cardiac rate, reduces the activation of sympathetic nervous system, the left ventricular volume and the hospitalization rate; besides CPAP increases the left ventricular ejection fraction, amd the oxygenation, it improves quality of life, tolerance to exercise and seems to reduce mortality in patients with a higher apnoeas suppression. CONCLUSIONS These implications suggest to investigate sleep apnoeas in patients with CHF in order to consider a possible treatment with CPAP. Further studies need to be developed to confirm the use of CPAP in patients with CHF without sleep disorders.

  16. Exercise training in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, Mark

    2018-05-04

    Exercise training (ET) in heart failure (HF) has long been established as an important part of HF care. ET is known to improve quality of life and functional capacity in a number of ways. Despite its proposed benefits, evidence supporting its routine inclusion in standard rehabilitation programme is at times conflicting, partly because of the significant heterogeneity present in available randomised controlled trials. There is lack of evidence with regard to the duration of the overall benefit, the optimal exercise regimen and whether certain types of HF aetiologies benefit more than others. The aim of this review is to provide an update to date literature review of the positive and negative evidence surrounding ET in HF, while proposing an efficient novel in-hospital exercise-based rehabilitation programme for patients with HF in addition to a pre-existing HF clinic. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Psychological distress and mortality in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelle, Aline J; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Schiffer, Angélique A

    2010-01-01

    Depression, anxiety, and type D ("distressed") personality (tendency to experience negative emotions paired with social inhibition) have been associated with poor prognosis in coronary heart disease, but little is known about their role in chronic heart failure. Therefore, we investigated whether...

  18. Role of Myocardial Collagen in Severe Aortic Stenosis With Preserved Ejection Fraction and Symptoms of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echegaray, Kattalin; Andreu, Ion; Lazkano, Ane; Villanueva, Iñaki; Sáenz, Alberto; Elizalde, María Reyes; Echeverría, Tomás; López, Begoña; Garro, Asier; González, Arantxa; Zubillaga, Elena; Solla, Itziar; Sanz, Iñaki; González, Jesús; Elósegui-Artola, Alberto; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Díez, Javier; Ravassa, Susana; Querejeta, Ramón

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the anatomical localization, biomechanical properties, and molecular phenotype of myocardial collagen tissue in 40 patients with severe aortic stenosis with preserved ejection fraction and symptoms of heart failure. Two transmural biopsies were taken from the left ventricular free wall. Mysial and nonmysial regions of the collagen network were analyzed. Myocardial collagen volume fraction (CVF) was measured by picrosirius red staining. Young's elastic modulus (YEM) was measured by atomic force microscopy in decellularized slices to assess stiffness. Collagen types I and III were measured as C I VF and C III VF, respectively, by confocal microscopy in areas with YEM evaluation. Compared with controls, patients exhibited increased mysial and nonmysial CVF and nonmysial:mysial CVF ratio (P < .05). In patients, nonmysial CVF (r = 0.330; P = .046) and the nonmysial:mysial CVF ratio (r = 0.419; P = .012) were directly correlated with the ratio of maximal early transmitral flow velocity in diastole to early mitral annulus velocity in diastole. Both the C I VF:C III VF ratio and YEM were increased (P ≤ .001) in nonmysial regions compared with mysial regions in patients, with a direct correlation (r = 0.895; P < .001) between them. These findings suggest that, in patients with severe aortic stenosis with preserved ejection fraction and symptoms of heart failure, diastolic dysfunction is associated with increased nonmysial deposition of collagen, predominantly type I, resulting in increased extracellular matrix stiffness. Therefore, the characteristics of collagen tissue may contribute to diastolic dysfunction in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Definition and Classification of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Lainscak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the definition and classification of heart failure, updated since the recent 2016 European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure. Heart failure is defined by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC as a clinical syndrome characterised by symptoms such as shortness of breath, persistent coughing or wheezing, ankle swelling and fatigue, that may be accompanied by the following signs: jugular venous pressure, pulmonary crackles, increased heart rate and peripheral oedema. However, these signs may not be present in the early stages and in patients treated with diuretics. When apparent, they are due to a structural and/or functional cardiac abnormality, leading to systolic and/or diastolic ventricular dysfunction, resulting in a reduced cardiac output and/or elevated intra- cardiac pressures at rest or during stress. According to the most recent ESC guidelines the initial evaluation of patients with suspected heart failure should include a clinical history and physical examination, laboratory assessment, chest radiography, and electrocardiography. Echocardiography can confirm the diagnosis. Beyond detecting myocardial abnormality, other impairments such as abnormalities of the valves, pericardium, endocardium, heart rhythm, and conduction may be found. The identification of the underlying aetiology is pivotal for the diagnosis of heart failure and its treatment. The authors review the definitions and classifications of heart failure.

  20. Biomarker Guided Therapy in Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Sema

    2015-01-01

    This review article addresses the question of whether biomarker-guided therapy is ready for clinical implementation in chronic heart failure. The most well-known biomarkers in heart failure are natriuretic peptides, namely B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-BNP. They are well-established in the diagnostic process of acute heart failure and prediction of disease prognosis. They may also be helpful in screening patients at risk of developing heart failure. Although studied by 11 small- to medium-scale trials resulting in several positive meta-analyses, it is less well-established whether natriuretic peptides are also helpful for guiding chronic heart failure therapy. This uncertainty is expressed by differences in European and American guideline recommendations. In addition to reviewing the evidence surrounding the use of natriuretic peptides to guide chronic heart failure therapy, this article gives an overview of the shortcomings of the trials, how the results may be interpreted and the future directions necessary to fill the current gaps in knowledge. Therapy guidance in chronic heart failure using other biomarkers has not been prospectively tested to date. Emerging biomarkers, such as galectin-3 and soluble ST2, might be useful in this regard, as suggested by several post-hoc analyses. PMID:28785440

  1. Surgery of congestive heart failure - the role of computed tomography in the pre- and postsurgical diagnostic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembcke, A.; Kivelitz, D.E.; Rogalla, P.; Dewey, M.; Klessen, C.; Hamm, B.; Enzweiler, C.N.H.; Dohmen, P.M.; Konertz, W.F.; Wiese, T.H.

    2005-01-01

    The treatment of advanced, drug resistant congestive heart failure gains in importance in the field of cardiac surgery. Cardiac imaging for preoperative assessment and follow-up focuses on the determination of ventricular volumes and function as well as on the detection of postoperative complications. Computed tomography (CT) is highly accurate irrespective of the individual patient's anatomic situation, has a low examiner dependence and short examination time, does not require an arterial vascular access and can be performed in patients with metal implants. CT is the modality of choice in the follow-up of heart transplants to detect extracardiac and cardiac complications including coronary calcifications as an early sign of transplant vasculopathy. In addition, CT visualizes the elements of mechanical assist devices and can identify their possible local cardiac and mediastinal complications CT can detect fibrolipomatous involution of the mobilized muscle flap in dynamic cardiomyoplasty and can depict fibrous reactions along the epicardial mesh implant in passive cardiac containment. Further indications include assessment of typical local postoperative complications, such as intrathoracic infection and mediastinal bleeding, intracardiac thrombus formation or pericardial effusion. CT is routinely used for evaluating bypass patency but is limited in assessing associated valve defects since it does not visualize flow. (orig.)

  2. Comprehensive Approach to Heart Failure: an Urgent Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanier Coll Muñoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure leads to the activation of a neurohormonal response that interacts with the hemodynamic changes, which are joined by functional and structural myocardial abnormalities, that may exist. This paper addresses the role of the renin-angiotensin system in the pathophysiology of heart failure and the use of non-invasive complementary methods that provide additional information necessary for the assessment and comprehensive management of patients, without losing the essential connection between the doctor and the patient.

  3. Heart Failure: From Research to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul

    2018-01-01

    "Heart failure: from research to clinical practice", a collection of selected reviews, which comes out also as a book, covers essentially all important aspects of heart failure, including the pathogenesis, clinical features, biomarkers, imaging techniques, medical treatment and surgical treatments, use of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, and palliative care. The reviews include essential background information, state of the art, critical and in-depth analysis, and directions for future researches for elucidation of the unresolved issues. Everyone interested in heart failure is expected to find this compilation helpful for a deeper understanding of some of the complex issues.

  4. Modern treatment methods for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Vrtovec

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Chronic heart failure is a clinical syndrome that can result from many cardiac diseases, the most common being cardiomyopathies and coronary artery disease. According to recent epidemiological data, heart failure is the only cardiologic entity whose prevalence is actually increasing and is present in 2–5 % of general population and in 10 % of people older than 65 years. The scope of this paper includes algorithms of initial heart failure diagnostic work-up , medical management and contemporary non-medical treatment options.

  5. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  6. Nutritional Deficiency in Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Sciatti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Although evidence-based treatments have substantially improved outcomes, prognosis remains poor with high costs for health care systems. In patients with HF, poor dietary behaviors are associated with unsatisfactory quality of life and adverse outcome. The HF guidelines have not recommended a specific nutritional strategy. Despite the role of micronutrient deficiency, it has been extensively studied, and data about the efficacy of supplementation therapy in HF are not supported by large randomized trials and there is limited evidence regarding the outcomes. The aim of the present review is to analyze the state-of-the-art of nutritional deficiencies in HF, focusing on the physiological role and the prognostic impact of micronutrient supplementation.

  7. Heart Failure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Z › Heart Failure › Unique to Older Adults Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Unique ... will suffer from depression at some point. This type of severe depression is more serious than the ...

  8. ACTIVE CYCLE BREATHING TECHNIQUES IN HEART FAILURE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RICHY

    Pulmonary Function Responses to Active Cycle. Breathing ... Key Words: Heart Failure, Active Cycle of Breathing ... cough, fatigue, reduced respiratory muscle mass, and. [5] ... an amount of exercise which is said to lower disease. [9].

  9. Psoriasis and risk of heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disease that is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction. Heart failure (HF) is independently associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and is a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality...

  10. Predicting short-term mortality in advanced decompensated heart failure - role of the updated acute decompensated heart failure/N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic Peptide risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrutinio, Domenico; Ammirati, Enrico; Passantino, Andrea; Guida, Pietro; D'Angelo, Luciana; Oliva, Fabrizio; Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Iacoviello, Massimo; Dentamaro, Ilaria; Santoro, Daniela; Lagioia, Rocco; Sarzi Braga, Simona; Guzzetti, Daniela; Frigerio, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The first few months after admission are the most vulnerable period in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). We assessed the association of the updated ADHF/N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) risk score with 90-day and in-hospital mortality in 701 patients admitted with advanced ADHF, defined as severe symptoms of worsening HF, severely depressed left ventricular ejection fraction, and the need for i.v. diuretic and/or inotropic drugs. A total of 15.7% of the patients died within 90 days of admission and 5.2% underwent ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation or urgent heart transplantation (UHT). The C-statistic of the ADHF/NT-proBNP risk score for 90-day mortality was 0.810 (95% CI: 0.769-0.852). Predicted and observed mortality rates were in close agreement. When the composite outcome of death/VAD/UHT at 90 days was considered, the C-statistic decreased to 0.741. During hospitalization, 7.6% of the patients died. The C-statistic for in-hospital mortality was 0.815 (95% CI: 0.761-0.868) and Hosmer-Lemeshow χ(2)=3.71 (P=0.716). The updated ADHF/NT-proBNP risk score outperformed the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry, the Organized Program to Initiate Lifesaving Treatment in Patients Hospitalized for Heart Failure, and the American Heart Association Get with the Guidelines Program predictive models. Updated ADHF/NT-proBNP risk score is a valuable tool for predicting short-term mortality in severe ADHF, outperforming existing inpatient predictive models.

  11. Heart failure and atrial fibrillation: current concepts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, M. P.; Tuinenburg, A. E.; Crijns, H. J.; Van Gelder, I. C.; Gosselink, A. T.; Lie, K. I.

    1997-01-01

    Heart failure and atrial fibrillation are very common, particularly in the elderly. Owing to common risk factors both disorders are often present in the same patient. In addition, there is increasing evidence of a complex, reciprocal relation between heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Thus heart failure may cause atrial fibrillation, with electromechanical feedback and neurohumoral activation playing an important mediating role. In addition, atrial fibrillation may promote heart failure; in particular, when there is an uncontrolled ventricular rate, tachycardiomyopathy may develop and thereby heart failure. Eventually, a vicious circle between heart failure and atrial fibrillation may form, in which neurohumoral activation and subtle derangement of rate control are involved. Treatment should aim at unloading of the heart, adequate control of ventricular rate, and correction of neurohumoral activation. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may help to achieve these goals. Treatment should also include an attempt to restore sinus rhythm through electrical cardioversion, though appropriate timing of cardioversion is difficult. His bundle ablation may be used to achieve adequate rate control in drug refractory cases. PMID:9155607

  12. Mechanical circulatory treatment of advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Brian B; Vase, Henrik; Gjedsted, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. When patients cease to respond adequately to optimal medical therapy mechanical circulatory support has been promising. The advent of mechanical circulatory support devices has allowed significant improvements...... in patient survival and quality of life for those with advanced or end-stage heart failure. We provide a general overview of current mechanical circulatory support devices encompassing options for both short- and long-term ventricular support....

  13. Intensive symptom control of opioid-refractory dyspnea in congestive heart failure: Role of milrinone in the palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Julio; Montoya, Maria; Bruera, Eduardo; Elsayem, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    We describe an exemplary case of congestive heart failure (CHF) symptoms controlled with milrinone. We also analyze the benefits and risks of milrinone administration in an unmonitored setting. We describe the case of a patient with refractory leukemia and end-stage CHF who developed severe dyspnea after discontinuation of milrinone. At that point, despite starting opioids, she had been severely dyspneic and anxious, requiring admission to the palliative care unit (PCU) for symptom control. After negotiation with hospital administrators, milrinone was administered in an unmonitored setting such as the PCU. A multidisciplinary team approach was also provided. Milrinone produced a dramatic improvement in the patient's symptom scores and performance status. The patient was eventually discharged to home hospice on a milrinone infusion with excellent symptom control. This case suggests that milrinone may be of benefit for short-term inpatient administration for dyspnea management, even in unmonitored settings and consequently during hospice in do-not-resuscitate (DNR) patients. This strategy may reduce costs and readmissions to the hospital related to end-stage CHF.

  14. Obesity and risk of incident heart failure in older men with and without pre-existing coronary heart disease: does leptin have a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannamethee, S Goya; Shaper, A Gerald; Whincup, Peter H; Lennon, Lucy; Sattar, Naveed

    2011-10-25

    We examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and incident HF in men with and without pre-existing coronary heart disease (CHD) and assessed the contribution of plasma leptin concentration to these associations. Leptin has been proposed as a potential link between obesity and heart failure (HF). This was a prospective study of 4,080 men age 60 to 79 years with no diagnosed HF followed for a mean period of 9 years, in whom there were 228 incident HF cases. Increased BMI was associated with significantly increased risk of HF in men with and without pre-existing CHD (myocardial infarction or angina) after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors including C-reactive protein. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) associated with a 1-SD increase in BMI were 1.37 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09 to 1.72) and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.00 to 1.39) in men with and without CHD, respectively. Increased leptin was significantly associated with an increased risk of HF in men without pre-existing CHD, independent of BMI and potential mediators (adjusted HR for a 1-SD increase in log leptin: 1.30 [95% CI: 1.06 to 1.61]; p = 0.01). However, no association was seen in those with pre-existing CHD (corresponding HR: 1.06 [95% CI: 0.77 to 1.45]; p = 0.72). Adjustment for leptin abolished the association between BMI and HF in men with no CHD; in those with CHD, the association between BMI and HF remained significant (p = 0.03). Similar patterns were seen for waist circumference. In the absence of established CHD, the association between obesity and HF may be mediated by plasma leptin. In those with CHD, obesity appears to increase the risk of HF independent of leptin. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Influenza infection and heart failure-vaccination may change heart failure prognosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoglou, Nikolaos P E; Bracke, Frank; Simmers, Tim; Tsiodras, Sotirios; Parissis, John

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of influenza infection with the pathogenesis of acute heart failure (AHF) and the worsening of chronic heart failure (CHF) is rather complex. The deleterious effects of influenza infection on AHF/CHF can be attenuated by specific immunization. Our review aimed to summarize the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and dosage of anti-influenza vaccination in HF. In this literature review, we searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 1st 1966 to December 31st, 2016, for studies examining the association between AHF/CHF, influenza infections, and anti-influenza immunizations. We used broad criteria to increase the sensitivity of the search. HF was a prerequisite for our search. The search fields used included "heart failure," "vaccination," "influenza," "immunization" along with variants of these terms. No restrictions on the type of study design were applied. The most common clinical scenario is exacerbation of pre-existing CHF by influenza infection. Scarce evidence supports a potential positive association of influenza infection with AHF. Vaccinated patients with pre-existing CHF have reduced all-cause morbidity and mortality, but effects are not consistently documented. Immunization with higher antigen quantity may confer additional protection, but such aggressive approach has not been generally advocated. Further studies are needed to delineate the role of influenza infection on AHF/CHF pathogenesis and maintenance. Annual anti-influenza vaccination appears to be an effective measure for secondary prevention in HF. Better immunization strategies and more efficacious vaccines are urgently necessary.

  16. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Summary Coverdell Program 2012-2015 State Summaries Data & Statistics Fact Sheets Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheets ... Roadmap for State Planning Other Data Resources Other Statistic Resources Grantee Information Cross-Program Information Online Tools ...

  17. Effect of mibefradil on heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J; de Kam, PJ; Haaksma, J; Crijns, HJGM; van Veldhuisen, DJ

    2000-01-01

    Background: Mibefradil was recently withdrawn from the market because of an unfavorable clinical profile in patients with chronic heart failure. Although drug interactions appear to play a role, other mechanisms such as proarrhythmia and autonomic deterioration could also be relevant. Chronic heart

  18. Organ protection possibilities in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M; Morales-Rull, J L

    2016-04-01

    Unlike chronic heart failure (HF), the treatment for acute HF has not changed over the last decade. The drugs employed have shown their ability to control symptoms but have not achieved organ protection or managed to reduce medium to long-term morbidity and mortality. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute HF suggest that treatment should be directed not only towards correcting the haemodynamic disorders and achieving symptomatic relief but also towards preventing organ damage, thereby counteracting myocardial remodelling and cardiac and extracardiac disorders. Compounds that exert vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory action in the acute phase of HF and can stop cell death, thereby boosting repair mechanisms, could have an essential role in organ protection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of chronic heart failure with aldosterone-blocking agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Swedberg, Karl

    Three large randomized trials in advanced heart failure (RALES), in heart failure after myocardial infarction (EPHESUS), and most recently mild heart failure (EMPHASIS-HF) have firmly established the place of aldosterone-blocking agents in patients with heart failure. In this paper we will shortly

  20. Stem Cell Therapy for Congestive Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunduz E

    2011-01-01

    engraft in sufficient numbers to differentiate to the cardiac myocytes and restore functionality in these akinetic areas. Hematopoietic stem cells consist can differentiate to skeletal and myocardial cells when cultured under appropriate conditions [4]. Strauer et al [5] reported that intracoronary bone marrow stem cell therapy improves ventricular performance, quality of life and survival in patients with chronic heart failure. Hamano et al [6] showed in 5 patients that autologous bone marrow cells can be injected safely during a by-pass operation into areas of ischemic myocardium. Brehm et al [7] have treated 23 patients with acute cardiac infarction using autologous mononuclear bone marrow cells. Ozbaran et al [8] transplanted peripheral blood stem cells into areas of injury with open-heart surgery in six patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. There are also meta-analysis on ongoing clinical trials performed. Abdel-Latif et al [9] described a statistically significant improvement in ejection fraction, reduction in infarct size and left ventricular end-systolic volume in 18 patients treated with either unseparated bone marrow cells, bone marrow mesenchymal and mobilized peripheral blood cells. Martin-Rendon et al ­­ focused on 13 randomized studies encompassing 811 participants on bone marrow therapy for post acute infarction. Improvement in LVEF, decrease in left ventricular and systolic and end diastolic volumes and infarct size were observed. The reason for choice of intravenous route was being the standard way of giving hematopoietic stem cells by hematologists. We tried to decide the availibility of this route for indications other than hematological diseases. Although trapping of stem cells in the pulmonary vascular bed is a drawback of intravenous route and the question of whether the patient would have been more benefited by intracoronary or intramyocardial route remains unanswered, we think intravenous route may still have some role according to our own

  1. HE4 Serum Levels Are Associated with Heart Failure Severity in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, Arnold; Meijers, Wouter C.; Schroten, Nicolas F.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Sillje, Herman H. W.

    Background: The novel biomarker human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) shows prognostic value in acute heart failure (HF) patients. We measured HE4 levels in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and correlated them to HF severity, kidney function, and HF biomarkers, and determined its predictive

  2. Geographic differences in heart failure trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João Pedro; Girerd, Nicolas; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez

    2015-09-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are essential to develop advances in heart failure (HF). The need for increasing numbers of patients (without substantial cost increase) and generalization of results led to the disappearance of international boundaries in large RCTs. The significant geographic differences in patients' characteristics, outcomes, and, most importantly, treatment effect observed in HF trials have recently been highlighted. Whether the observed regional discrepancies in HF trials are due to trial-specific issues, patient heterogeneity, structural differences in countries, or a complex interaction between factors are the questions we propose to debate in this review. To do so, we will analyse and review data from HF trials conducted in different world regions, from heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF), heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF), and acute heart failure (AHF). Finally, we will suggest objective and actionable measures in order to mitigate regional discrepancies in future trials, particularly in HF-PEF where prognostic modifying treatments are urgently needed and in which trials are more prone to selection bias, due to a larger patient heterogeneity. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  3. Epidemiology and Prognosis of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Spoletini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the state of the art of prevalence, incidence and prognosis of heart failure is discussed. Prevalence and incidence are two measures of disease occurrence. Briefly, prevalence is the proportion of the population affected by the disease at a certain point in time. Incidence indicates the number of new cases within a given time period in a population at risk for the disease (for example, elderly people. A related, prognostic measure is mortality, i.e. the incidence of death from the disease occurring in a period of time. In the case of chronic, steady- state disease such as heart failure, disease duration is directly affected by mortality, and prevalence may correspond to the incidence of disease multiplied by the average duration of disease . Prevalence rates of heart failure may, therefore, vary across studies depending on the variability in incidence as well as in survival between population samples. Also, given that heart failure is a complex syndrome with different phenotypes (see article 1, each with specific clinical characteristics and associated risk factors, prevalence and incidence rates may vary according to the definition of the heart failure subtype. Finally, rates may vary on the basis of the method of collecting data and the criterion for defining left ventricular systolic dysfunction that is applied in the study.

  4. [Comorbidities of heart failure: sleep apnea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehrle, H; Oldenburg, O; Stadler, S; Arzt, M

    2018-05-01

    Since sleep apnea often occurs in heart failure, physicians regularly need to decide whether further diagnostic procedures and/or treatment are required. Which types of sleep apnea occur in heart failure patients? When is treatment needed? Which treatments and treatment goals are appropriate? Clinical trials and guidelines as well as their implementation in clinical practice are discussed. At least 40% of patients with heart failure, both with reduced and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF and HFpEF, respectively), suffer from relevant sleep apnea. In heart failure patients both obstructive and central sleep apnea are associated with increased mortality. In HFrEF as well as in HFpEF patients with obstructive sleep apnea, treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) achieves symptomatic and functional improvements. In patients with HFpEF, positive airway pressure treatment of central sleep apnea may be beneficial. In patients with HFrEF and left ventricular ejection fraction ≤45%, adaptive servoventilation is contraindicated. Sleep apnea is highly prevalent in heart failure patients and its treatment in specific patient groups can improve symptoms and functional outcomes. Thus, testing for sleep apnea is recommended.

  5. Deranged Cardiac Metabolism and the Pathogenesis of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the neuro-hormonal system is a pathophysiological consequence of heart failure. Neuro-hormonal activation promotes metabolic changes, such as insulin resistance, and determines an increased use of non-carbohydrate substrates for energy production. Fasting blood ketone bodies as well as fat oxidation are increased in patients with heart failure, yielding a state of metabolic inefficiency. The net result is additional depletion of myocardial adenosine triphosphate, phosphocreatine and creatine kinase levels with further decreased efficiency of mechanical work. In this context, manipulation of cardiac energy metabolism by modification of substrate use by the failing heart has produced positive clinical results. The results of current research support the concept that shifting the energy substrate preference away from fatty acid metabolism and towards glucose metabolism could be an effective adjunctive treatment in patients with heart failure. The additional use of drugs able to partially inhibit fatty acids oxidation in patients with heart failure may therefore yield a significant protective effect for clinical symptoms and cardiac function improvement, and simultaneously ameliorate left ventricular remodelling. Certainly, to clarify the exact therapeutic role of metabolic therapy in heart failure, a large multicentre, randomised controlled trial should be performed. PMID:28785448

  6. Adults living with heart failure and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Sommer, Irene; Bjerrum, Merete

    studies have been performed to develop more coherent and effective interventions to support self-care among heart failure patients experiencing fatigue. The findings of qualitative research should be synthesised to optimise nurses' understanding of fatigue and develop recommendations for practice. Aim......Background Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms reported by patients with heart failure (HF). Fatigue negatively impacts on patients’ everyday life, prognosis and quality of life. No specific cure or effective interventions to alleviate fatigue are available. Over the past decade, qualitative...... To synthesise the best available evidence related to the lived experiences and management of fatigue in everyday life in adult patients with stable heart failure to develop effective interventions to support self-care. Specific questions on the patients’ lived experiences included: • How do patients with HF...

  7. [Holistic therapy of chronic heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, C; Ertl, G; Angermann, C E

    2014-06-01

    The rising prevalence and increasing disease-related costs render chronic heart failure a rapidly growing socioeconomic challenge. The concerted action of guideline-adjusted therapy and holistic patient care is essential to achieve improvements in mortality, morbidity, functional status and quality of life of patients with symptomatic heart failure. Holistic care strategies comprise consideration of comorbidities and individual needs, lifestyle recommendations and multidisciplinary management programs for high-risk symptomatic patients in addition to basic medication and surgical therapies. For optimal patient care and coaching, seamless interaction is required between in-hospital treatment and outpatient facilities. Moreover, the palliative needs of heart failure patients need to be considered, a topic that is currently not receiving enough attention.

  8. Can complexity decrease in congestive heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sayan; Palit, Sanjay Kumar; Banerjee, Santo; Ariffin, M. R. K.; Rondoni, Lamberto; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The complexity of a signal can be measured by the Recurrence period density entropy (RPDE) from the reconstructed phase space. We have chosen a window based RPDE method for the classification of signals, as RPDE is an average entropic measure of the whole phase space. We have observed the changes in the complexity in cardiac signals of normal healthy person (NHP) and congestive heart failure patients (CHFP). The results show that the cardiac dynamics of a healthy subject is more complex and random compare to the same for a heart failure patient, whose dynamics is more deterministic. We have constructed a general threshold to distinguish the border line between a healthy and a congestive heart failure dynamics. The results may be useful for wide range for physiological and biomedical analysis.

  9. When the heart kills the liver: acute liver failure in congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saner FH

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congestive heart failure as a cause of acute liver failure is rarely documented with only a few cases. Although the pathophysiology is poorly understood, there is rising evidence, that low cardiac output with consecutive reduction in hepatic blood flow is a main causing factor, rather than hypotension. In the setting of acute liver failure due to congestive heart failure, clinical signs of the latter can be absent, which requires an appropriate diagnostic approach. As a reference center for acute liver failure and liver transplantation we recorded from May 2003 to December 2007 202 admissions with the primary diagnoses acute liver failure. 13/202 was due to congestive heart failure, which was associated with a mortality rate of 54%. Leading cause of death was the underlying heart failure. Asparagine transaminase (AST, bilirubin, and international normalized ratio (INR did not differ significantly in surviving and deceased patients at admission. Despite both groups had signs of cardiogenic shock, the cardiac index (CI was significantly higher in the survival group on admission as compared with non-survivors (2.1 L/min/m2 vs. 1.6 L/min/m2, p = 0.04. Central venous - and pulmonary wedge pressure did not differ significantly. Remarkable improvement of liver function was recorded in the group, who recovered from cardiogenic shock. In conclusion, patients with acute liver failure require an appropriate diagnostic approach. Congestive heart failure should always be considered as a possible cause of acute liver failure.

  10. A case of peripartum heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Vinci

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old woman was admitted in congestive heart failure (CHF 3 days after delivery. She had no history of cardiovascular disease and impaired left ventricular Ejection Fraction (EF 35%. She underwent complete heart catheterisation, selective coronary angiography and right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy (EMB.Coronary arteries were normal and EMB revealed active virus negative myocarditis. Serum was positive for anti-heart autoantibodies (AHA. Thus myocarditis was classified as autoimmune and the patient was treated with immunosuppressive therapy, with clinical and hemodynamic improvement. At 27 months follow-up EMB showed healed myocarditis. Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a rare disorder in which left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure occur in the peripartum period in previously healthy women. The etiology is still unknown but a sizable proportion of patients may have an underlying organ-specific autoimmune myocarditis.

  11. ▼ Sacubitril valsartan for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    ▼ Sacubitril valsartan (Entresto-Novartis) is a new oral drug licensed for the treatment of symptomatic chronic heart failure in adults with reduced ejection fraction.(1) It is described as an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor and contains the neprilysin inhibitor, sacubitril and the angiotensin II receptor antagonist, valsartan.(1-3) Here, we review the evidence for sacubitril valsartan and consider its place in the management of heart failure. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Renal function assessment in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Calvo, J I; Josa Laorden, C; Giménez López, I

    Renal function is one of the most consistent prognostic determinants in heart failure. The prognostic information it provides is independent of the ejection fraction and functional status. This article reviews the various renal function assessment measures, with special emphasis on the fact that the patient's clinical situation and response to the heart failure treatment should be considered for the correct interpretation of the results. Finally, we review the literature on the performance of tubular damage biomarkers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  13. Congestive Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Scott A; Owens, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is among the most common causes of admission to hospitals in the United States, especially in those over age 65. Few data exist regarding the prevalence CHF of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) owing to congestive heart failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). Nevertheless, CSR is expected to be highly prevalent among those with CHF. Treatment should focus on the underlying mechanisms by which CHF increases loop gain and promotes unstable breathing. Few data are available to determine prevalence of CSR in the ICU, or how CSR might affect clinical management and weaning from mechanical ventilation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Vasopressin and Vasopressin Antagonists in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vishram-Nielsen, Julie K; Gustafsson, Finn

    2017-01-01

    Despite the introduction of multiple new pharmacological agents over the past three decades in the field of heart failure (HF), overall prognosis remains poor. Hyponatremia is prevalent in HF patients and has been suggested as a contributor to poor response to standard therapy. Elevated levels...... by the V2 receptors in the renal collecting tubules. The optimal use of VRAs is yet to be determined, especially in patients with congestive HF. Although long-term effects on improvement in mortality have not been shown in the Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonism in Heart Failure Outcome Study with Tolvaptan...

  15. Metaiodobenzylguanidine and heart rate variability in heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Chinori; Shouda, Sakae; Mikami, Tadashi; Uehara, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Keiko; Tawarahara, Kei; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Matoh, Fumitaka; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    1998-01-01

    It is assumed that the low-frequency power (LF) of heart rate variability (HRV) increases with progress of congestive heart failure (CHF), therefore positively correlating with cardiac 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) washout. It is demonstrated here that HRV, including normalized LF, correlated inversely with MIBG washout and positively with the ratio of heart-to-mediastinum MIBG activity in controls and CHF patients, whereas these correlations were not observed within CHF patients. Thus MIBG washout may increase and HRV including normalized LF may decrease with CHF, although the HRV and MIBG measures may not similarly change in proportion to the severity of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in CHF. (author)

  16. Metaiodobenzylguanidine and heart rate variability in heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurata, Chinori; Shouda, Sakae; Mikami, Tadashi; Uehara, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Keiko [Hamamatsu Univ., Shizuoka (Japan). School of Medicine; Tawarahara, Kei; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Matoh, Fumitaka; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    1998-10-01

    It is assumed that the low-frequency power (LF) of heart rate variability (HRV) increases with progress of congestive heart failure (CHF), therefore positively correlating with cardiac {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) washout. It is demonstrated here that HRV, including normalized LF, correlated inversely with MIBG washout and positively with the ratio of heart-to-mediastinum MIBG activity in controls and CHF patients, whereas these correlations were not observed within CHF patients. Thus MIBG washout may increase and HRV including normalized LF may decrease with CHF, although the HRV and MIBG measures may not similarly change in proportion to the severity of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in CHF. (author)

  17. Xamoterol in severe congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tangø, M; Lyngborg, K; Mehlsen, J

    1992-01-01

    Twelve patients in severe congestive heart failure were given placebo, 100 mg xamoterol (Corwin) twice daily and 200 mg xamoterol twice daily, respectively, in 3 two-week periods in a double-blind randomised study. At the end of each treatment period the patients were evaluated. No differences were...... found between placebo and xamoterol in the following parameters: New York Heart Association function group index, heart volume, body weight, exercise duration on bicycle and treadmill, heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressure at rest. However, during exercise we found significantly lower...... heart rate and rate-pressure product during xamoterol treatment. This reduction is probably indicating occupation of beta-adrenoreceptors with concomitant reduced oxygen consumption during exercise....

  18. Nebivolol in chronic heart failure : current evidence and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipsic, Erik; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    Areas covered in the review: We describe the role of the sympathetic nervous system, beta-blockers and specifically nebivolol in chronic heart failure. What the reader will gain: Nebivolol is a third-generation beta-blocker, with high beta(1)/beta(2) selectivity. Moreover, it has important

  19. Inspiratory muscle load and capacity in chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, N; Kearney, M T; Pride, N B; Green, M; Lofaso, F; Shah, A M; Moxham, J; Polkey, M I

    2004-01-01

    Background: Although breathlessness is common in chronic heart failure (CHF), the role of inspiratory muscle dysfunction remains unclear. We hypothesised that inspiratory muscle endurance, expressed as a function of endurance time (Tlim) adjusted for inspiratory muscle load and inspiratory muscle capacity, would be reduced in CHF.

  20. The clinical value of cardiac sympathetic imaging in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Emil; Kjaer, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the pathology of heart failure. The single-photon emission computed tomography tracer iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123) I-MIBG) can be used to investigate the activity of the predominant neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous...

  1. Review Article Heart failure - an inflammatory paradigm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1999-02-01

    Feb 1, 1999 ... Together with the growing clinical problem of heart failure, new information at a .... nificantly raised in the prevention as well as the treatment arms when .... tricular dysfunction and pulmonary oedema in humans; experimentally ... adenine dinucleotide (reduced) and the rate-limiting amino acid (L-arginine).

  2. Selecting heart failure patients for metabolic interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, Harmen G.; Koning, Anne M.; van Goor, Harry; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Westenbrink, B. Daan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Heart failure (HF) has become the cardiovascular epidemic of the century and now imposes an immense burden on health care systems. While our understanding of the pathophysiology of HF has increased dramatically, the translation of knowledge into clinical practice has been

  3. The management of acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milo-Cotter, O.; Bettari, L.; Kleijn, L.; Bugatti, S.; Lombardi, C.; Rund, M.; Metra, M.; Voors, A. A.; Cotter, G.; Kaluski, E.; Weatherley, B. D.

    Hospitalization for acute heart failure (AHF) is one of the burdensome aspects of 21(st) century medicine, leading to significant debilitating symptoms, high morbidity and mortality and consuming significant portion of the health care budget. Management of AHF is thought-provoking given the

  4. Copeptin as a biomarker in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Increased neurohormonal activation is a key feature of heart failure (HF). Copeptin is a surrogate marker for proarginine vasopressin and the prognostic value of copeptin has been reported for multiple disease states of both nonvascular and cardiovascular etiology. Elevated plasma copeptin in HF...

  5. Heart failure in children - home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000940.htm Heart failure in children - home care To use the sharing features on this page, ... to write down the results of your child's home checks so that you can share them with your child's health care provider. You may need to keep a chart, ...

  6. Dopamine in heart failure and critical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, AJ

    Dopamine is widely used in critical care to prevent renal function loss. Nevertheless sufficient evidence is still lacking of reduction in end points like mortality or renal replacement therapy. Dopaminergic treatment in chronic heart failure (CHF) has provided an example of unexpected adverse

  7. Heart Failure Care in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasing health care problem worldwide, and a multidisciplinary approach with a general practitioner (GP) in the health care team is considered optimal. HF management has improved substantially over the last two decades, mainly for patients with HF with a reduced ejection

  8. Circulating cells in heart and renal failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jie, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of combined chronic heart failure and chronic kidney disease, i.e. the cardiorenal syndrome (CRS), is a rising problem with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In CRS, disease progression in both organs is amplified. In this thesis, we aimed to gain insight into

  9. Right ventricular myxoma with heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuri, M.M.H.; Naseem, A.; Raza, A.; Ahmad, W.; Raja, M.K.; Ahmad, A.; Rasheed, A.; Gohar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac myxomas are histologically benign tumors but they may be lethal because of their strategic position. These are mostly located in the left atrium and uncommonly in the right atrium. We report a case of a large right ventricular myxoma presenting with heart failure. (author)

  10. Body mass index in chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Heidi M.; Schou, Morten; Goetze, Jens P

    2013-01-01

    Low body mass index (BMI) is associated with a poor outcome in chronic heart failure (CHF). An inverse association between BMI and adiponectin and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) has been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether novel markers...

  11. Update in cardiomyopathies and congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Heart Hospital, London, UK and Monaldi Hospital, Naples, Italy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This abstract book contains four reports and all abstracts presented to the Joint Meeting: Update in cardiomyopathies and congestive heart failure, 22-23 September 2011 - Naples, Italy, endorsed by the Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases (WG 21 of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC.

  12. Leptin-Aldosterone-Neprilysin Axis: Identification of Its Distinctive Role in the Pathogenesis of the Three Phenotypes of Heart Failure in People With Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Milton

    2018-04-10

    Obesity (especially visceral adiposity) can be associated with 3 different phenotypes of heart failure: heart failure with a reduced ejection fraction, heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction, and high-output heart failure. All 3 phenotypes are characterized by an excessive secretion of aldosterone and sodium retention. In addition, obesity is accompanied by increased signaling through the leptin receptor, which can promote activation of both the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system and can directly stimulate the secretion of aldosterone. The deleterious interaction of leptin and aldosterone is potentiated by the simultaneous action of adiposity and the renal sympathetic nerves to cause overactivity of neprilysin; the loss of the counterbalancing effects of natriuretic peptides is exacerbated by an additional effect of both obesity and heart failure to interfere with adiponectin signaling. This intricate neurohormonal interplay leads to plasma volume expansion as well as to adverse ventricular remodeling and cardiac fibrosis. Furthermore, the activity of aldosterone and neprilysin is not only enhanced by obesity, but these mechanisms can also promote adipogenesis and adipocyte dysfunction, thereby enhancing the positive feedback loop. Last, in elderly obese women, changes in quantity and biology of epicardial adipose tissue further enhances the release of leptin and other proinflammatory adipokines, thereby leading to cardiac and systemic inflammation, end-organ fibrosis, and multiple comorbidities. Regardless of the phenotypic expression, activation of the leptin-aldosterone-neprilysin axis appears to contribute importantly to the evolution and progression of heart failure in people with obesity. Efforts to interfere with the detrimental interactions of this distinctive neurohormonal ecosystem with existing or novel therapeutic agents are likely to yield unique clinical benefits. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Combination stem cell therapy for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichim Thomas E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with congestive heart failure (CHF that are not eligible for transplantation have limited therapeutic options. Stem cell therapy such as autologous bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, or purified cells thereof has been used clinically since 2001. To date over 1000 patients have received cellular therapy as part of randomized trials, with the general consensus being that a moderate but statistically significant benefit occurs. Therefore, one of the important next steps in the field is optimization. In this paper we discuss three ways to approach this issue: a increasing stem cell migration to the heart; b augmenting stem cell activity; and c combining existing stem cell therapies to recapitulate a "therapeutic niche". We conclude by describing a case report of a heart failure patient treated with a combination stem cell protocol in an attempt to augment beneficial aspects of cord blood CD34 cells and mesenchymal-like stem cells.

  14. The role of cerebral hyperperfusion in postoperative neurologic dysfunction after left ventricular assist device implantation for end-stage heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietz, Katherine; Brown, Kevin; Ali, Syed S; Colvin-Adams, Monica; Boyle, Andrew J; Anderson, David; Weinberg, Alan D; Miller, Leslie W; Park, Soon; John, Ranjit; Lazar, Ronald M

    2009-04-01

    Cerebral hyperperfusion is a life-threatening syndrome that can occur in patients with chronically hypoperfused cerebral vasculature whose normal cerebral circulation was re-established after carotid endarterectomy or angioplasty. We sought to determine whether the abrupt restoration of perfusion to the brain after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation produced similar syndromes. We studied the role of increased systemic flow after LVAD implantation on neurologic dysfunction in 69 consecutive HeartMate XVE LVAD (Thoratec, Pleasanton, Calif) recipients from October 2001 through June 2006. Neurologic dysfunction was defined as postoperative permanent or transient central change in neurologic status, including confusion, focal neurologic deficits, visual changes, seizures, or coma for more than 24 hours within 30 days after LVAD implantation. We found that 19 (27.5%) patients had neurologic dysfunction, including encephalopathy (n = 11), coma (n = 3), and other complications (n = 5). The multivariate analysis showed that an increase in cardiac index from the preoperative baseline value (relative risk, 1.33 per 25% cardiac index increase; P = .01) and a previous coronary bypass operation (relative risk, 4.53; P = .02) were the only independent predictors of neurologic dysfunction. Reduction of left ventricular assist device flow in 16 of the 19 symptomatic patients led to improvement of symptoms in 14 (87%) patients. Our findings showed that normal flow might overwhelm cerebral autoregulation in patients with severe heart failure, suggesting that cerebral hyperperfusion is possible in recipients of mechanical circulatory support with neurologic dysfunction.

  15. Machines versus medication for biventricular heart failure: focus on the total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabia, Francisco A; Moriguchi, Jaime D

    2014-09-01

    The medical/surgical management of advanced heart failure has evolved rapidly over the last few decades. With better understanding of heart failure pathophysiology, new pharmacological agents have been introduced that have resulted in improvements in survival. For those patients that fail to improve, mechanical circulatory support with left ventricular assist devices and total artificial hearts (TAHs) have served as a beneficial bridge to transplantation. The TAH has continued to play a significant role as a bridge to transplantation in patients with biventricular failure and more selected indications that could not be completely helped with left ventricular assist devices. Improved survival with the TAH has resulted in more patients benefiting from this technology. Improvements will eventually lead to a totally implantable device that will permanently replace the failing human heart.

  16. Pathophysiological relationships between heart failure and depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Deborah W; Akintade, Bimbola; Son, Heesook; Woltz, Patricia; Hunt, Dennis; Friedmann, Erika; Hartung, Mary Kay; Thomas, Sue Ann

    2014-04-01

    Depression and anxiety are common comorbid conditions in patients with heart failure. Patients with heart failure and depression have increased mortality. The association of anxiety with increased mortality in patients with heart failure is not established. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the similarities of the underlying pathophysiology of heart failure, depression, and anxiety by using the Biopsychosocial Holistic Model of Cardiovascular Health. Depression and anxiety affect biological processes of cardiovascular function in patients with heart failure by altering neurohormonal function via activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic dysregulation, and activation of cytokine cascades and platelets. Patients with heart failure and depression or anxiety may exhibit a continued cycle of heart failure progression, increased depression, and increased anxiety. Understanding the underlying pathophysiological relationships in patients with heart failure who experience comorbid depression and/or anxiety is critical in order to implement appropriate treatments, educate patients and caregivers, and educate other health professionals.

  17. Management of atrial fibrillation in the setting of heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crijns, HJGM; VandenBerg, MP; VanGelder, IC; VanVeldhuisen, DJ

    Heart failure is often complicated by atrial fibrillation. Once atrial fibrillation has started it further enhances heart failure due to uncontrolled rate with shortened filling time and provocation of tachycardiomyopathy. Absent atrial kick and irregularity of the ventricular rhythm also

  18. High affinity complexes of pannexin channels and L-type calcium channel splice-variants in human lung: Possible role in clevidipine-induced dyspnea relief in acute heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard P. Dahl

    2016-08-01

    Research in Context: Clevidipine lowers blood pressure by inhibiting calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle. In patients with acute heart failure, clevidipine was shown to relieve breathing problems. This was only partially related to the blood pressure lowering actions of clevidipine and not conferred by another calcium channel inhibitor. We here found calcium channel variants in human lung that are more selectively inhibited by clevidipine, especially when associated with pannexin channels. This study gives a possible mechanism for clevidipine's relief of breathing problems and supports future clinical trials testing the role of clevidipine in the treatment of acute heart failure.

  19. Strategies to improve self-management in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toback, Mehnosh; Clark, Nancy

    2017-02-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of hospitalization, hospital readmission and death. Patients with heart failure have many complications, with multiple co-existing diagnoses which result in polypharmacy. Following instructions provided by many physicians, medication adjustments based on changes in their symptoms are required. Behavioral adjustments concerning diet and exercise regime are recommended. Therefore, the patient plays a crucial role in the management of heart failure. To review the available studies on heart failure self-management, and investigate educational, behavioral and psychosocial strategies that plays an important role to improve patient self-management. A literature review was conducted based upon the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidance. The articles identified through an extensive search using PubMed and UpToDate from 1999 to 2016. Improved self-management will increase compliance, promote patient quality-of-life, advance clinical outcomes, reduce hospital re-admission and will decrease hospitalization costs.

  20. Treatment of anemia with darbepoetin alfa in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B; Anand, Inder S

    2013-01-01

    Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia.......Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia....

  1. Risk following hospitalization in stable chronic systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Putte; Swedberg, Karl; Borer, Jeffrey S

    2013-01-01

    We explored the impact of being hospitalized due to worsening heart failure (WHF) or a myocardial infarction (MI) on subsequent mortality in a large contemporary data set of patients with stable chronic systolic heart failure (HF).......We explored the impact of being hospitalized due to worsening heart failure (WHF) or a myocardial infarction (MI) on subsequent mortality in a large contemporary data set of patients with stable chronic systolic heart failure (HF)....

  2. Severe right heart failure in a patient with Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenopoulos, N P; Braden, G A; Applegate, R J

    1996-11-01

    This brief report presents a patient with isolated right heart failure and two rare underlying causes, hyperthyroidism and dysplastic tricuspid valve. Repair of the tricuspid valve and treatment of the hyperthyroidism were both essential for successful treatment of the right heart failure. Most important, recrudescence of hyperthyroidism in this patient was associated with reappearance of florid right heart failure. This report provides further information about a potential linkage of hyperthyroidism and severe right heart failure.

  3. The Role of Serum Adiponectin for Outcome Prediction in Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Advanced Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaida Baltrūnienė

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical interpretation of patients’ plasma adiponectin (APN remains challenging; its value as biomarker in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is equivocal. We evaluated whether circulating APN level is an independent predictor of composite outcome: death, left ventricle assist device (LVAD implantation, and heart transplantation (HT in patients with nonischemic DCM. 57 patients with nonischemic DCM (average LV diastolic diameter 6.85 cm, LV ejection fraction 26.63%, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure 22.06  mmHg were enrolled. Patients underwent echocardiography, right heart catheterization, and endomyocardial biopsy. During a mean follow-up of 33.42 months, 15 (26% patients died, 12 (21% patients underwent HT, and 8 (14% patients were implanted with LVAD. APN level was significantly higher in patients who experienced study endpoints (23.4 versus 10.9 ug/ml, p=0.01. APN was associated with worse outcome in univariate Cox proportional hazards model (HR 1.04, CI 1.02–1.07, p=0.001 but lost significance adjusting for other covariates. Average global strain (AGS is an independent outcome predictor (HR 1.42, CI 1.081–1.866, p=0.012. Increased circulating APN level was associated with higher mortality and may be an additive prognostic marker in DCM with advanced HF. Combination of serum (APN, BNP, TNF-α and echocardiographic (AGS markers may increase the HF predicting power for the nonischemic DCM patients.

  4. Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Specialist Heart Failure Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Gardner, Roy S; Lainscak, Mitja

    2014-01-01

    Training Curricula. In addition, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) subspecialty curricula exist for Interventional Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Management. The purpose of this heart failure curriculum is to provide a framework which can be used as a blueprint for training across Europe. This blueprint...... mirrors other ESC curricula. Each section has three components: the knowledge required, the skills which are necessary, and the professionalism (attitudes and behaviours) which should be attained. The programme is designed to last 2 years. The first year is devoted to the specialist heart failure module...

  5. American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7: Avoiding Heart Failure and Preserving Cardiac Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, Aaron R; Shah, Amil M; Lutsey, Pamela L; Roetker, Nicholas S; Alonso, Alvaro; Avery, Christy L; Miedema, Michael D; Konety, Suma; Chang, Patricia P; Solomon, Scott D

    2015-09-01

    Many people may underappreciate the role of lifestyle in avoiding heart failure. We estimated whether greater adherence in middle age to American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 guidelines—on smoking, body mass, physical activity, diet, cholesterol, blood pressure, and glucose—is associated with lower lifetime risk of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function in old age. We studied the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study cohort of 13,462 adults ages 45-64 years in 1987-1989. From the 1987-1989 risk factor measurements, we created a Life's Simple 7 score (range 0-14, giving 2 points for ideal, 1 point for intermediate, and 0 points for poor components). We identified 2218 incident heart failure events using surveillance of hospital discharge and death codes through 2011. In addition, in 4855 participants free of clinical cardiovascular disease in 2011-2013, we performed echocardiography from which we quantified left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. One in four participants (25.5%) developed heart failure through age 85 years. Yet, this lifetime heart failure risk was 14.4% for those with a middle-age Life's Simple 7 score of 10-14 (optimal), 26.8% for a score of 5-9 (average), and 48.6% for a score of 0-4 (inadequate). Among those with no clinical cardiovascular event, the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in late life was approximately 40% as common, and diastolic dysfunction was approximately 60% as common, among those with an optimal middle-age Life's Simple 7 score, compared with an inadequate score. Greater achievement of American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 in middle age is associated with a lower lifetime occurrence of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Heart failure due to severe myocardial calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shouichi; Maida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Shigeo

    1993-01-01

    A 28-year-old female who had had irradiation on the chest wall at the age of 5 as a remedy for keloid granulation after burn, recently developed congestive heart failure. Severe tricuspid regurgitation was demonstrated by echocardiography with a certain calcification in the cardiac shadow on chest radiogram. Calcified right ventricle and ventricular septum were noticed operatively, which disturbed ventricular motion and also caused tricuspid valve deformity. These calcified myocardium apparently corresponded with the irradiation field. After tricuspid valve replacement, she regained physical activity satisfactorily without congestive heart failure. Because she had no other known causes of cardiac calcification such as hypercalcemia, myocarditis, myocardial infarction or renal diseases, irradiation on the chest wall could be responsible for the severe myocardial calcification. (author)

  7. Prognostic indices in childhood heart failure | Omokhodion | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate the short term prognosis of childhood heart failure and highlight the factors that affect outcome among cases of heart failure admitted into the paediatric wards, University College Hospital, Ibadan. Background: Childhood heart failure remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing ...

  8. Epidemiological Study of Heart Failure in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Guo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a complex clinical syndrome that results from any structural or functional impairment of ventricular filling or ejection of blood. HF is one of the most important and severe end stages of many cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiological studies of HF have focused mainly on the prevalence, incidence, mortality, fatality, and distribution and temporal trends of these indicators among different populations. This review highlights important epidemiological studies of HF in China.

  9. Liver failure in total artificial heart therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, Alexandros Merkourios; Dapunt, Otto; Knez, Igor; Wasler, Andrae; Oberwalder, Peter; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero; Spiliopoulos, Sotirios

    2016-07-01

    Congestive hepatopathy (CH) and acute liver failure (ALF) are common among biventricular heart failure patients. We sought to evaluate the impact of total artificial heart (TAH) therapy on hepatic function and associated clinical outcomes. A total of 31 patients received a Syncardia Total Artificial Heart. Preoperatively 17 patients exhibited normal liver function or mild hepatic derangements that were clinically insignificant and did not qualify as acute or chronic liver failure, 5 patients exhibited ALF and 9 various hepatic derangements owing to CH. Liver associated mortality and postoperative course of liver values were prospectively documented and retrospectively analyzed. Liver associated mortality in normal liver function, ALF and CH cases was 0%, 20% (P=0.03) and 44.4% (P=0.0008) respectively. 1/17 (5.8%) patients with a normal liver function developed an ALF, 4/5 (80%) patients with an ALF experienced a markedly improvement of hepatic function and 6/9 (66.6%) patients with CH a significant deterioration. TAH therapy results in recovery of hepatic function in ALF cases. Patients with CH prior to surgery form a high risk group with increased liver associated mortality.

  10. Are there long-term benefits in following stable heart failure patients in a heart failure clinic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leetmaa, Tina; Villadsen, Henrik; Mikkelsen, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Objectives and Design. This study describes the long-term outcome of 163 patients with stable mild to moderate heart failure (NYHA II-III), who already were enrolled in a heart failure clinic and now were randomized to continued follow-up in the heart failure (HF) clinic or else to usual care (UC...

  11. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in heart failure: where the alphabet begins!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljizeeri, Ahmed; Sulaiman, Abdulbaset; Alhulaimi, Naji; Alsaileek, Ahmed; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2017-07-01

    Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging has become a cornerstone in the evaluation of heart failure. It provides a comprehensive evaluation by answering all the pertinent clinical questions across the full pathological spectrum of heart failure. Nowadays, CMR is considered the gold standard in evaluation of ventricular volumes, wall motion and systolic function. Through its unique ability of tissue characterization, it provides incremental diagnostic and prognostic information and thus has emerged as a comprehensive imaging modality in heart failure. This review outlines the role of main conventional CMR sequences in the evaluation of heart failure and their impact in the management and prognosis.

  12. Exercise training normalizes renal blood flow responses to acute hypoxia in experimental heart failure: role of the α1-adrenergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pügge, Carolin; Mediratta, Jai; Marcus, Noah J; Schultz, Harold D; Schiller, Alicia M; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-02-01

    Recent data suggest that exercise training (ExT) is beneficial in chronic heart failure (CHF) because it improves autonomic and peripheral vascular function. In this study, we hypothesized that ExT in the CHF state ameliorates the renal vasoconstrictor responses to hypoxia and that this beneficial effect is mediated by changes in α1-adrenergic receptor activation. CHF was induced in rabbits. Renal blood flow (RBF) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) responses to 6 min of 5% isocapnic hypoxia were assessed in the conscious state in sedentary (SED) and ExT rabbits with CHF with and without α1-adrenergic blockade. α1-adrenergic receptor expression in the kidney cortex was also evaluated. A significant decline in baseline RBF and RVC and an exaggerated renal vasoconstriction during acute hypoxia occurred in CHF-SED rabbits compared with the prepaced state (P renal denervation (DnX) blocked the hypoxia-induced renal vasoconstriction in CHF-SED rabbits. α1-adrenergic protein in the renal cortex of animals with CHF was increased in SED animals and normalized after ExT. These data provide evidence that the acute decline in RBF during hypoxia is caused entirely by the renal nerves but is only partially mediated by α1-adrenergic receptors. Nonetheless, α1-adrenergic receptors play an important role in the beneficial effects of ExT in the kidney. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Heart failure as an endpoint in heart failure and non-heart failure cardiovascular clinical trials: the need for a consensus definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zannad, F.; Stough, W.G.; Pitt, B.

    2008-01-01

    Specific criteria have been established to define the occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in cardiovascular clinical trials, but there is not a consistent definition for heart failure. Heart failure events appear to occur at a rate that is similar to stroke and MI in trials...... of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, yet a consistent approach to defining heart failure events has not yet been realized. The wide range of definitions used in clinical trials makes it difficult to interpret new data in the context of existing literature. This inconsistency has...... led to challenges in determining the incidence of heart failure in cardiovascular studies and the effects of interventions on these endpoints. This paper examines issues related to defining heart failure events in cardiovascular clinical trials and presents a definition to formally address this issue...

  14. Highlights from the British Society for Heart Failure 20th Annual Autumn Meeting: three decades of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Alexandra AI

    2018-05-16

    The 20th Annual Autumn Meeting of the British Society for Heart Failure took place on the 23-24 November 2017 at the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London, UK. Over 800 delegates were in attendance: a multidisciplinary league of professionals who treat patients with heart failure, including specialist nurses, trainees, cardiologists, geriatricians, pharmacists and general practitioners. The theme of the conference was 'three decades of heart failure' and celebrated the success of modern heart failure management. This report highlights the 'three decades' session, the clinical trials update, and the main discussion points from heart failure question time.

  15. Antithrombin III is associated with acute liver failure in patients with end-stage heart failure undergoing mechanical circulatory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Judith; Ulmer, Hanno; Kilo, Juliane; Margreiter, Raimund; Grimm, Michael; Mair, Peter; Ruttmann, Elfriede

    2017-06-01

    There are few data on the role of liver dysfunction in patients with end-stage heart failure supported by mechanical circulatory support. The aim of our study was to investigate predictors for acute liver failure in patients with end-stage heart failure undergoing mechanical circulatory support. A consecutive 164 patients with heart failure with New York Heart Association class IV undergoing mechanical circulatory support were investigated for acute liver failure using the King's College criteria. Clinical characteristics of heart failure together with hemodynamic and laboratory values were analyzed by logistic regression. A total of 45 patients (27.4%) with heart failure developed subsequent acute liver failure with a hospital mortality of 88.9%. Duration of heart failure, cause, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of vasopressors, central venous pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, pulmonary pulsatility index, cardiac index, and transaminases were not significantly associated with acute liver failure. Repeated decompensation, atrial fibrillation (P failure in univariate analysis only. In multivariable analysis, decreased antithrombin III was the strongest single measurement indicating acute liver failure (relative risk per %, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-0.93; P = .001) and remained an independent predictor when adjustment for the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score was performed (relative risk per %, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.99; P = .031). Antithrombin III less than 59.5% was identified as a cutoff value to predict acute liver failure with a corresponding sensitivity of 81% and specificity of 87%. In addition to the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, decreased antithrombin III activity tends to be superior in predicting acute liver failure compared with traditionally thought predictors. Antithrombin III measurement may help to identify patients more precisely who are developing acute liver failure during mechanical

  16. Brain Metabolites in Autonomic Regulatory Insular Sites in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Mary A.; Yadav, Santosh K.; Macey, Paul M.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Harper, Ronald M.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Autonomic, pain, and neuropsychologic comorbidities appear in heart failure (HF), likely resulting from brain changes, indicated as loss of structural integrity and functional deficits. Among affected brain sites, the anterior insulae are prominent in serving major regulatory roles in many of the disrupted functions commonly seen in HF. Metabolite levels, including N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), choline (Cho), and myo-inositol (MI), could ind...

  17. Validation of the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) in Heart Failure Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.; Kayani, A.M.; Munir, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) in a Pakistani systolic heart failure cohort in predicting mortality in this population. Study Design: Cohort study. Place and Duration of Study: The Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology - National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from March 2011 to March 2012. Methodology: One hundred and eighteen patients with heart failure (HF) from the registry were followed for one year. Their 1-year mortality was calculated using the SHFM software on their enrollment into the registry. After 1-year predicted 1-year mortality was compared with the actual 1-year mortality of these patients. Results: The mean age was 41.6 +- 14.9 years (16 - 78 years). There were 73.7% males and 26.3% females. One hundred and fifteen patients were in NYHA class III or IV. Mean ejection fraction in these patients was 23 +- 9.3%. Mean brain natriuretic peptide levels were 1230 A+- 1214 pg/mL. Sensitivity of the model was 89.3% with 71.1% specificity, 49% positive predictive value and 95.5% negative predictive value. The accuracy of the model was 75.4%. In Roc analysis, AUC for the SHFM was 0.802 (p<0.001). conclusion: SHFM was found to be reliable in predicting one year mortality among patients with heart failure in the pakistan patients. (author)

  18. Current strategies for preventing renal dysfunction in patients with heart failure: a heart failure stage approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Victor Sarli; Andrade, Lúcia; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common during episodes of acute decompensated heart failure, and historical data indicate that the mean creatinine level at admission has risen in recent decades. Different mechanisms underlying this change over time have been proposed, such as demographic changes, hemodynamic and neurohumoral derangements and medical interventions. In this setting, various strategies have been proposed for the prevention of renal dysfunction with heterogeneous results. In the present article, we review and discuss the main aspects of renal dysfunction prevention according to the different stages of heart failure. PMID:23644863

  19. Difficult cases in heart failure: the challenge of neurocognitive dysfunction in severe heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Sumadeep S; Uber, Patricia A; Park, Myung H; Scott, Robert L; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2002-01-01

    Often ignored, neurocognitive dysfunction in chronic heart failure represents a daunting morbidity progressing to loss of self-reliance. Although the precise mechanisms arbitrating the development of this disorder remain elusive, microembolization and cerebral hypoperfusion are implicated. Other causes of cognitive decline may include prior cardiac surgery, chronic hypertension, sleep disordered breathing, hyperhomocysteinemia, dementia of aging, and more traditional causes such as Alzheimer's disease. The discovery of neurocognitive defects in heart failure must prompt a well-constructed diagnostic evaluation to search for the underlying causes since this process may be at least partially reversible in many cases. Copyright 2002 CHF, Inc

  20. What Is New in Heart Failure Management in 2017? Update on ACC/AHA Heart Failure Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Biykem

    2018-04-17

    The goal of this paper is to provide a summary of the new recommendations in the most recent 2017 ACC/AHA/HFSA Focused Update of the 2013 ACCF/AHA Guideline for the Management of Heart Failure: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Heart Failure Society of America. The intent is to provide the background and the supporting evidence for the recommendations and to provide practical guidance for management strategies in treatment of heart failure patients. In the 2017 ACC/AHA/HFSA Focused Update of HF guidelines, important additions include new information on biomarkers, specifically on the topics of the diagnostic, prognostic role of natriuretic peptides in heart failure, and the role of natriuretic peptides in screening in patients high risk for HF and prevention of HF. There are important recommendations for treatment of patients with HF with reduced EF (HFrEF), including the beneficial role of angiotensin receptor blocker and neprilysin inhibition (ARNI) treatment in reducing outcomes including mortality, ivabradine in reducing heart failure hospitalizations in stable HFrEF patients with sinus rhythm and heart rate ≥ 70 bpm despite β-blockers. In patients with HF with preserved EF (HFpEF), though there are no studies demonstrating survival benefit, potential benefit with aldosterone antagonism in reducing HF hospitalizations is noted. In treatment of comorbidities, optimization of blood pressure control to less than 130 mmHg is recommended in hypertensive patients to prevent HF or in patients with hypertension and HFrEF or HFpEF. In addition to recognition on the potential role of treatment of iron deficiency anemia to improve symptoms and functional capacity, caution against use of adaptive servo-ventilation in patients with HFrEF and central sleep apnea and against use of erythropoietin stimulating agents in patients with HFrEF is provided. There are new treatment

  1. Diagnosis and management of acute heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Dilek; Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Eren, Mehmet; Karaüzüm, Kurtuluş; Temizhan, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Ramassubu, Kumudha; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a life threatening clinical syndrome with a progressively increasing incidence in general population. Turkey is a country with a high cardiovascular mortality and recent national statistics show that the population structure has turned to an ‘aged’ population. As a consequence, AHF has become one of the main reasons of admission to cardiology clinics. This consensus report summarizes clinical and prognostic classification of AHF, its worldwide and national epidemiology, diagnostic work-up, principles of approach in emergency department, intensive care unit and ward, treatment in different clinical scenarios and approach in special conditions and how to plan hospital discharge. PMID:26574757

  2. Hypopituitarism presenting as congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Giri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sheehan's syndrome (SS develops as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage and is characterized by various degrees of hypopituitarism. Although the occurrence of SS is now rare, it should still be considered in any woman with a history of peripartum hemorrhage who develops manifestations of pituitary hormone deficiency any time following the event. Appropriate hormone replacement therapy results in marked clinical improvement. We present an unusual case of SS in a young lady who continued to have normal menstruation after the index event, had two spontaneous pregnancies, and was diagnosed only 11 years later when she presented to us with acute heart failure.

  3. β-Blocker pharmacogenetics in heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaekyu

    2009-01-01

    β-Blockers (metoprolol, bisoprolol, and carvedilol) are a cornerstone of heart failure (HF) treatment. However, it is well recognized that responses to a β-blocker are variable among patients with HF. Numerous studies now suggest that genetic polymorphisms may contribute to variability in responses to a β-blocker, including left ventricular ejection fraction improvement, survival, and hospitalization due to HF exacerbation. This review summarizes the pharmacogenetic data for β-blockers in patients with HF and discusses the potential implications of β-blocker pharmacogenetics for HF patients. PMID:18437562

  4. Sleep and breathing in congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, David; Roux, Francoise Joelle; Shah, Neomi

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the most prevalent and costly diseases in the United States. Sleep apnea is now recognized as a common, yet underdiagnosed, comorbidity of HF. This article discusses the unique qualities that sleep apnea has when it occurs in HF and explains the underlying pathophysiology that illuminates why sleep apnea and HF frequently occur together. The authors provide an overview of the treatment options for sleep apnea in HF and discuss the relative efficacies of these treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pig models for the human heart failure syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Ingrid; Terzic, Dijana; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Human heart failure remains a challenging illness despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of heart failure patients. There is a need for further improvement of our understanding of the failing myocardium and its molecular deterioration. Porcine models provide an important research tool...... in this respect as molecular changes can be examined in detail, which is simply not feasible in human patients. However, the human heart failure syndrome is based on symptoms and signs, where pig models mostly mimic the myocardial damage, but without decisive data on clinical presentation and, therefore, a heart...... to elucidate the human heart failure syndrome....

  6. Comprehensive in-hospital monitoring in acute heart failure: applications for clinical practice and future directions for research. A statement from the Acute Heart Failure Committee of the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Parissis, John; Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter; Čelutkienė, Jelena; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Collins, Sean P; De Backer, Daniel; Filippatos, Gerasimos S; Gayat, Etienne; Hill, Loreena; Lainscak, Mitja; Lassus, Johan; Masip, Josep; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Miró, Òscar; Mortara, Andrea; Mueller, Christian; Mullens, Wilfried; Nieminen, Markku S; Rudiger, Alain; Ruschitzka, Frank; Seferovic, Petar M; Sionis, Alessandro; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Weinstein, Jean Marc; de Boer, Rudolf A; Crespo Leiro, Maria G; Piepoli, Massimo; Riley, Jillian P

    2018-04-30

    This paper provides a practical clinical application of guideline recommendations relating to the inpatient monitoring of patients with acute heart failure, through the evaluation of various clinical, biomarker, imaging, invasive and non-invasive approaches. Comprehensive inpatient monitoring is crucial to the optimal management of acute heart failure patients. The European Society of Cardiology heart failure guidelines provide recommendations for the inpatient monitoring of acute heart failure, but the level of evidence underpinning most recommendations is limited. Many tools are available for the in-hospital monitoring of patients with acute heart failure, and each plays a role at various points throughout the patient's treatment course, including the emergency department, intensive care or coronary care unit, and the general ward. Clinical judgment is the preeminent factor guiding application of inpatient monitoring tools, as the various techniques have different patient population targets. When applied appropriately, these techniques enable decision making. However, there is limited evidence demonstrating that implementation of these tools improves patient outcome. Research priorities are identified to address these gaps in evidence. Future research initiatives should aim to identify the optimal in-hospital monitoring strategies that decrease morbidity and prolong survival in patients with acute heart failure. © 2018 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2018 European Society of Cardiology.

  7. BAG3: a new player in the heart failure paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Tijana; Myers, Valerie D; Gordon, Jennifer; Tilley, Douglas G; Sharp, Thomas E; Wang, JuFang; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y; Feldman, Arthur M

    2015-07-01

    BAG3 is a cellular protein that is expressed predominantly in skeletal and cardiac muscle but can also be found in the brain and in the peripheral nervous system. BAG3 functions in the cell include: serving as a co-chaperone with members of the heat-shock protein family of proteins to facilitate the removal of misfolded and degraded proteins, inhibiting apoptosis by interacting with Bcl2 and maintaining the structural integrity of the Z-disk in muscle by binding with CapZ. The importance of BAG3 in the homeostasis of myocytes and its role in the development of heart failure was evidenced by the finding that single allelic mutations in BAG3 were associated with familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, significant decreases in the level of BAG3 have been found in end-stage failing human heart and in animal models of heart failure including mice with heart failure secondary to trans-aortic banding and in pigs after myocardial infarction. Thus, it becomes relevant to understand the cellular biology and molecular regulation of BAG3 expression in order to design new therapies for the treatment of patients with both hereditary and non-hereditary forms of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  8. Management of congestive heart failure (CHF): a case report on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case report on the management of Congestive Heart Failure is presented with emphasis on the use of DIGOXIN. Keywords: Congestive heart failure, Failing heart syndrome, Digoxin, Digoxin Toxicity. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  9. Review Paper Heart Failure in Small Animals - Advances in Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rationale for the use of drugs and supportive therapy in the management of heart diseases (HDs) and heart failure (HF), is discussed in the light of contemporary concepts. The in-adequacy of the age-long therapy of heart failure with oxygen supplementation, cardiac glycosides, rest and the withholding of salt in food is ...

  10. Developing New Treatments for Heart Failure: Focus on the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Larson, Christopher J; Shah, Sanjiv J; Greene, Stephen J; Cleland, John G F; Colucci, Wilson S; Dunnmon, Preston; Epstein, Stephen E; Kim, Raymond J; Parsey, Ramin V; Stockbridge, Norman; Carr, James; Dinh, Wilfried; Krahn, Thomas; Kramer, Frank; Wahlander, Karin; Deckelbaum, Lawrence I; Crandall, David; Okada, Shunichiro; Senni, Michele; Sikora, Sergey; Sabbah, Hani N; Butler, Javed

    2016-05-01

    Compared with heart failure (HF) care 20 to 30 years ago, there has been tremendous advancement in therapy for ambulatory HF with reduced ejection fraction with the use of agents that block maladaptive neurohormonal pathways. However, during the past decade, with few notable exceptions, the frequency of successful drug development programs has fallen as most novel therapies have failed to offer incremental benefit or raised safety concerns (ie, hypotension). Moreover, no therapy has been approved specifically for HF with preserved ejection fraction or for worsening chronic HF (including acutely decompensated HF). Across the spectrum of HF, preliminary results from many phase II trials have been promising but are frequently followed by unsuccessful phase III studies, highlighting a disconnect in the translational process between basic science discovery, early drug development, and definitive clinical testing in pivotal trials. A major unmet need in HF drug development is the ability to identify homogeneous subsets of patients whose underlying disease is driven by a specific mechanism that can be targeted using a new therapeutic agent. Drug development strategies should increasingly consider therapies that facilitate reverse remodeling by directly targeting the heart itself rather than strictly focusing on agents that unload the heart or target systemic neurohormones. Advancements in cardiac imaging may allow for more focused and direct assessment of drug effects on the heart early in the drug development process. To better understand and address the array of challenges facing current HF drug development, so that future efforts may have a better chance for success, the Food and Drug Administration facilitated a meeting on February 17, 2015, which was attended by clinicians, researchers, regulators, and industry representatives. The following discussion summarizes the key takeaway dialogue from this meeting. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Renal sympathetic denervation for treatment of patients with heart failure: summary of the available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammas, Wail; Koistinen, Juhani; Paana, Tuomas; Karjalainen, Pasi P

    2017-08-01

    Heart failure syndrome results from compensatory mechanisms that operate to restore - back to normal - the systemic perfusion pressure. Sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in heart failure; norepinephrine contributes to maintenance of the systemic blood pressure and increasing preload. Cardiac norepinephrine spillover increases in patients with heart failure; norepinephrine exerts direct toxicity on cardiac myocytes resulting in a decrease of synthetic activity and/or viability. Importantly, cardiac norepinephrine spillover is a powerful predictor of mortality in patients with moderate to severe HF. This provided the rationale for trials that demonstrated survival benefit associated with the use of beta adrenergic blockers in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Nevertheless, the MOXCON trial demonstrated that rapid uptitration of moxonidine (inhibitor of central sympathetic outflow) in patients with heart failure was associated with excess mortality and morbidity, despite reduction of plasma norepinephrine. Interestingly, renal norepinephrine spillover was the only independent predictor of adverse outcome in patients with heart failure, in multivariable analysis. Recently, renal sympathetic denervation has emerged as a novel approach for control of blood pressure in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. This article summarizes the available evidence for the effect of renal sympathetic denervation in the setting of heart failure. Key messages Experimental studies supported a beneficial effect of renal sympathetic denervation in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Clinical studies demonstrated improvement of symptoms, and left ventricular function. In heart failure and preserved ejection fraction, renal sympathetic denervation is associated with improvement of surrogate endpoints.

  12. TNF Receptor 1/2 Predict Heart Failure Risk in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Zhang; Aiqun, Ma; Jiwu, Li; Liang, Shao

    2017-04-06

    Inflammation plays an important role in heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Traditional serum markers have limited predictive value in heart failure and diabetes. TNFR1 and TNFR2 (TNFR1/2) have been proven to be strongly associated with heart failure and diabetes complications. This study aimed to assess the association of sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 levels and incidental HF risk in diabetes patients.We detected the mRNA, protein, and serum expression of TNFR1/2, their downstream signaling pathway protein NF-kB, and JNK expression and some traditional serum inflammatory markers in a heart failure group without diabetes mellitus or abnormal glucose tolerance (n = 84), a diabetes mellitus group without heart failure (n = 86), and a heart failure with diabetes mellitus group (n = 86).TNFR1/2 were significantly higher in patients with heart failure and diabetes mellitus based on mRNA expression to protein expression and serum expression. However, there were no differences in mRNA, protein, and serum levels of TNFR1/2 between the HF group and DM group. Furthermore, there were no differences between the groups in some traditional serum inflammatory markers.This study demonstrated higher expressions of TNFR, NF-kB, and JNK in patients with heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Compared with traditional serum markers, TNFR1 and TNFR2 are associated with heart failure risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  13. Turning Failure into Success: Trials of the Heart Failure Clinical Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Emer; Givertz, Michael M

    2016-12-01

    The Heart Failure Clinical Research Network (HFN) was established in 2008 on behalf of the NIH National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, with the primary goal of improving outcomes in heart failure (HF) by designing and conducting high-quality concurrent clinical trials testing interventions across the spectrum of HF. Completed HFN trials have answered several important and relevant clinical questions concerning the safety and efficacy of different decongestive and adjunctive vasodilator therapies in hospitalized acute HF, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition and nitrate therapies in HF with preserved ejection fraction, and the role of xanthine oxidase inhibition in hyperuricemic HF. These successes, independent of the "positive" or "negative" result of each individual trial, have helped to shape the current clinical care of HF patients and serve as a platform to inform future research directions and trial designs.

  14. Reasons for readmission in heart failure : Perspectives of patients, caregivers, cardiologists, and heart failure nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annema, Coby; Luttik, Marie-Louise; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite efforts to improve outcomes in heart failure (HF), readmission rates remain relatively high. Reasons for readmission from different perspectives (patient, caregiver, health care providers) may help to optimize the future management of patients with HF. The aims of this study are

  15. European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association Standards for delivering heart failure care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDonagh, Theresa A.; Blue, Lynda; Clark, Andrew L.; Dahlstroem, Ulf; Ekman, Inger; Lainscak, Mitja; McDonald, Kenneth; Ryder, Mary; Stroemberg, Anna; Jaarsma, Tiny

    The management of heart failure (HF) is complex. As a consequence, most cardiology society guidelines now state that HF care should be delivered in a multiprofessional manner. The evidence base for this approach now means that the establishment of HF management programmes is a priority. This

  16. [Diuretic therapy in acute heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luis; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-03-01

    Diuretics are widely recommended in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Unfortunately, despite their widespread use, limited data are available from randomized clinical trials to guide clinicians on the appropriate management of diuretic therapy. Loop diuretics are considered the first-line diuretic therapy, especially intravenous furosemide, but the best mode of administration (high-dose versus low-dose and continuous infusion versus bolus) is unclear. When diuretic resistance develops, different therapeutic strategies can be adopted, including combined diuretic therapy with thiazide diuretics and/or aldosterone antagonists. Low or "non-diuretic" doses (25-50mg QD) of aldosterone antagonists have been demonstrated to confer a survival benefit in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction and consequently should be prescribed in all such patients, unless contraindicated by potassium and/or renal function values. There is less evidence on the use of aldosterone antagonists at higher or "diuretic" doses (≥ 100mg QD) but these drugs could be useful in relieving congestive symptoms in combination with furosemide. Thiazide diuretics can also be helpful as they have synergic effects with loop diuretics by inhibiting sodium reabsorption in distal parts of the nephron. The effect of diuretic therapy in AHF should be monitored with careful observation of clinical signs and symptoms of congestion. Serum electrolytes and kidney function should also be monitored during the use of intravenous diuretics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Heart Failure with Recovered EF and Heart Failure with Mid-Range EF: Current Recommendations and Controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkovic, Peter; Basuray, Anupam

    2018-04-03

    This review explores key features and potential management controversies in two emerging populations in heart failure: heart failure with recovered ejection fraction (HF-recovered EF) and heart failure with mid-range ejection fraction (HFmrEF). While HF-recovered EF patients have better outcomes than heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), they continue to have symptoms, persistent biomarker elevations, and abnormal outcomes suggesting a continued disease process. HFmrEF patients appear to have features of HFrEF and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), but have a high prevalence of ischemic heart disease and may represent a transitory phase between the HFrEF and HFpEF. Management strategies have insufficient data to warrant standardization at this time. HF-recovered EF and HFmrEF represent new populations with unmet needs and expose the pitfalls of an EF basis for heart failure classification.

  18. Reassessing Phase II Heart Failure Clinical Trials: Consensus Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Javed; Hamo, Carine E.; Udelson, James E.; O’Connor, Christopher; Sabbah, Hani N.; Metra, Marco; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Kitzman, Dalane W.; Teerlink, John; Bernstein, Harold S.; Brooks, Gabriel; Depre, Christophe; DeSouza, Mary M.; Dinh, Wilfried; Donovan, Mark; Frische-Danielson, Regina; Frost, Robert J.; Garza, Dahlia; Gohring, Udo-Michael; Hellawell, Jennifer; Hsia, Judith; Ishihara, Shiro; Kay-Mugford, Patricia; Koglin, Joerg; Kozinn, Marc; Larson, Christopher J.; Mayo, Martha; Gan, Li-Ming; Mugnier, Pierrre; Mushonga, Sekayi; Roessig, Lothar; Russo, Cesare; Salsali, Afshin; Satler, Carol; Shi, Victor; Ticho, Barry; van der Laan, Michael; Yancy, Clyde; Stockbridge, Norman; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2017-01-01

    The increasing burden and the continued suboptimal outcomes for patients with heart failure underlines the importance of continued research to develop novel therapeutics for this disorder. This can only be accomplished with successful translation of basic science discoveries into direct human application through effective clinical trial design and execution that results in a substantially improved clinical course and outcomes. In this respect, phase II clinical trials play a pivotal role in determining which of the multitude of potential basic science discoveries should move to the large and expansive registration trials in humans. A critical examination of the phase II trials in heart failure reveals multiple shortcomings in their concept, design, execution, and interpretation. To further a dialogue regarding the challenges and potential for improvement and the role of phase II trials in patients with heart failure, the Food and Drug Administration facilitated a meeting on October 17th 2016 represented by clinicians, researchers, industry members, and regulators. This document summarizes the discussion from this meeting and provides key recommendations for future directions. PMID:28356300

  19. Targeting Cardiomyocyte Ca2+ Homeostasis in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røe, Åsmund T.; Frisk, Michael; Louch, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Improved treatments for heart failure patients will require the development of novel therapeutic strategies that target basal disease mechanisms. Disrupted cardiomyocyte Ca2+ homeostasis is recognized as a major contributor to the heart failure phenotype, as it plays a key role in systolic and diastolic dysfunction, arrhythmogenesis, and hypertrophy and apoptosis signaling. In this review, we outline existing knowledge of the involvement of Ca2+ homeostasis in these deficits, and identify four promising targets for therapeutic intervention: the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase, the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, the ryanodine receptor, and t-tubule structure. We discuss experimental data indicating the applicability of these targets that has led to recent and ongoing clinical trials, and suggest future therapeutic approaches. PMID:25483944

  20. Potential of resveratrol in the treatment of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Pema; Louis, Xavier Lieben; Thandapilly, Sijo Joseph; Movahed, Ali; Zieroth, Shelley; Netticadan, Thomas

    2014-01-30

    The concept of food has expanded beyond its traditional role of survival and hunger satisfaction, to include a role in the prevention and treatment of disease. Polyphenols are classes of compounds that are synthesized by plants to serve a wide variety of functions including growth pollination and defense. These compounds have recently received increased attention in medical research. In this group, one of the most studied has been resveratrol (3,5,4,-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenol, which is found predominantly in grapes and berries. Over the past two decades, researchers have studied the ability of resveratrol to prevent or reverse the development of abnormalities in heart structure and function in animal models of heart disease and heart failure. The results from animal studies have been promising, and very recently, this knowledge has been translated into examining the efficacy of resveratrol in humans with heart disease/failure. In this review we will discuss the current status of resveratrol research on cardioprotection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Heart failure patterns in Djibouti: epidemiologic transition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoure, P L; Roche, N C; Lamblin, G; Topin, F; Dehan, C; Kaiser, E; Fourcade, L

    2013-05-01

    The features of heart failure (HF) in Djibouti have not been well described. We sought to document the current patterns of HF here. We prospectively included Djiboutian adults hospitalized for HF in the French Military Hospital (Djibouti) from August 2008 through December 2010. Of 1688 adults hospitalized in the medical department, 45 (2.7%) had symptomatic HF: 38 (84%) men, mean age 55.8 years (range 27-75). Twenty-five (56%) patients were initially hospitalized for acute pulmonary edema. The underlying diseases included coronary artery disease (CAD) (62%), hypertensive heart disease (18%), rheumatic valvular disease (13%), and primary dilated cardiomyopathy (7%). Their cardiovascular risk factors included tobacco use (53%), hypertension (69%), diabetes (47%), and hypercholesterolemia (51%). Patients in the CAD group were older, and had diabetes more often (p<0.01). All khat chewers (53%) were males and smokers. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 39 ± 14%. During follow-up (14.4 ± 9 months), 8 (18%) patients died, 9 (20%) were again hospitalized for HF, and 3 (7%) had ischemic strokes. One month after discharge, the New York Heart Association (NYHA) class was II for 40%, III for 44%, and IV for 16%. Higher NYHA classes and dilated cardiomyopathy were both associated with poorer outcomes (p<0.03). In hospitalized Djiboutians, most HF patterns are similar to those in industrialized countries. CAD is more prevalent than previously reported in African patients with HF.

  2. Khat Use: History and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman El-Menyar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports suggest that 20 million people worldwide are regularly using khat as a stimulant, even though the habit of chewing khat is known to cause serious health issues. Historical evidence suggests khat use has existed since the 13th century in Ethiopia and the southwestern Arabian regions even before the cultivation and use of coffee. In the past three decades, its availability and use spread all over the world including the United States and Europe. Most of the consumers in the Western world are immigrant groups from Eastern Africa or the Middle East. The global transport and availability of khat has been enhanced by the development of synthetic forms of its active component. The World Health Organization considers khat a drug of abuse since it causes a range of health problems. However, it remains lawful in some countries. Khat use has long been a part of Yemeni culture and is used in virtually every social occasion. The main component of khat is cathinone, which is structurally and functionally similar to amphetamine and cocaine. Several studies have demonstrated that khat chewing has unfavorable cardiovascular effects. The effect on the myocardium could be explained by its effect on the heart rate, blood pressure, its vasomotor effect on the coronary vessels, and its amphetamine–like effects. However, its direct effect on the myocardium needs further elaboration. To date, there are few articles that contribute death among khat chewers to khat-induced heart failure. Further studies are needed to address the risk factors in khat chewers that may explain khat-induced cardiotoxicity, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure.

  3. Pulse pressure as a haemodynamic variable in systolic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrie, Colin James

    2016-01-01

    In patients with heart failure, the heart is unable to pump enough blood to satisfy the requirements of the body. Explanations for this include heart muscle damage after a heart attack. This could be very recently, or in the past, sometimes dating back many years. In other cases the explanation for

  4. The Hriday Card: A checklist for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Seth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of a simple checklist can drastically lower the likelihood of heart failure patient readmission and improve quality of life. The Hriday Card is a simple 4 page booklet which combines patient education material teaching the patient about heart failure, how to tackle daily emergencies, how to look after their fluid balance with appropriate use of diuretics. It also contains medication and daily weight charts for the patient and a heart failure checklist for the heart failure nurse or doctor which covers points like vaccination, presence of LBBB or Atrial fibrillation and use or lack of use of ACE inhibitors and beta blockers and many other points related to heart failure. This checklist can be filled in less than a minute. It is a simple tool to enhance heart failure care and medication adherence.

  5. Practical guide on home health in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaarsma, T.; Larsen, Torben; Stromberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    in this population and specialised heart failure care can save costs and improve the quality of care. However, only a few European countries have implemented specialised home care and offered this to a larger number of patients with heart failure. Method: We developed a guide on Home Health in Heart Failure patients...... from a literature review, a survey of heart failure management programs, the opinion of researchers and practitioners, data from clinical trials and a reflection of an international expert meeting. Results: In integrated home care for heart failure patients, it is advised to consider the following...... components: integrated multidisciplinary care, patient and partner participation, care plans with clear goals of care, patient education, self-care management, appropriate access to care and optimised treatment. Discussion: We summarised the state of the art of home-based care for heart failure patients...

  6. Association of heart failure severity with risk of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Malene N; Gislason, Gunnar H; Køber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Heart failure has been suggested to increase the risk of developing diabetes. We investigated the relation between heart failure severity, defined by loop-diuretic dosage, and the risk of developing diabetes in a nationwide cohort of patients with heart failure. METHODS: We...... followed all Danish patients discharged from hospitalisation for first-time heart failure in 1997-2010, without prior use of hypoglycaemic agents, until a claimed prescription for hypoglycaemic agents, death or 31 December 2010. The association of loop-diuretic dosage (furosemide equivalents) 90 days after.......32), 2.28 (2.01, 2.59), 2.88 (2.52, 3.30) and 3.02 (2.66, 3.43) without RASi treatment. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: In a nationwide cohort of patients with heart failure, severity of heart failure was associated with a stepwise increased risk of developing diabetes. Increased awareness of risk...

  7. [Role of controlled physical activity as a method of therapy in patients with heart failure after invasive treatment of angina pectoris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irzmański, Robert; Kapusta, Joanna; Kowalski, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Due to the aging of the population is an increase in the incidence of heart failure. According to the current guidelines for conduct in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, rehabilitation is introduced in the first treatment period. Individually matched to the severity of illness of each patient, increases the quality of life of patients and reduces mortality in this group of patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of controlled exercise on left ventricular systolic function of heart and change the level of concentration of natriuretic peptide NT-pro-BNP in patients with heart failure after invasive treatment of angina pectoris. The study group consisted of 87 patients, men and women aged 35 to 85 years (mean age 65.6 +/- 10.4) with a diagnosis of heart failure. Patients were divided into 3 groups. I group numbering 19 patients (67.3 +/- 7.8) were subjected to two-week cardiac rehabilitation program, representing 46. Group II patients (59.4 +/- 10.9) was qualified for the 4-week program. The basis for rehabilitation of patients accounted for interval training was performed using a bicycle ergometer. Group III--control, representing 22 patients (68.1 +/- 9.2) were excluded from the training groups because of the high risk. Used with them individually tailored program of cardiac rehabilitation. All patients were performed: submaximal exercise test, echocardiography and examined the concentration of NT-pro-BNP (N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide). After a period of 6 months from the end of the second phase of cardiac rehabilitation in 32 patients who agreed repeated the scope of clinical trials. In groups where physical training was conducted controlled noticed an improvement in EF and reduction of NT pro-BNP. It was also a significant, negative correlation between the degree of damage to the left ventricle (EF), and the level of NT pro-BNP. After a period of 6 months from the end of the second stage of rehabilitation, the analysis showed

  8. Understand Your Risk for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart.org Arrhythmia About Arrhythmia Why Arrhythmia Matters Understand Your Risk for Arrhythmia Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of ... Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & Diagnosis ...

  9. [The heart failure patient: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alconero-Camarero, Ana Rosa; Arozamena-Pérez, Jorge; García-Garrido, Lluïsa

    2014-01-01

    Given its prevalence, high mortality rate, morbidity, chronicity and use of resources, heart failure (HF) is a priority issue from a social and health standpoint, due to the ageing population and to lack of adherence to and the complexity of treatment. For these reasons, an individualized care plan needs to be established to meet the real and potential needs of the patient diagnosed with HF. A clinical case is presented of a patient admitted to the Cardiology Critical Care (CCC) unit of a tertiary hospital. A patient care plan was prepared following the steps of the scientific method and relying on the NANDA taxonomy, and the NOC and NIC to design goals and nursing interventions, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Remote patient monitoring in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Mishkin, Aaron; Aronow, Wilbert S; Kalra, Ankur; Frishman, William H

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) poses a significant economic burden on our health-care resources with very high readmission rates. Remote monitoring has a substantial potential to improve the management and outcome of patients with HF. Readmission for decompensated HF is often preceded by a stage of subclinical hemodynamic decompensation, where therapeutic interventions would prevent subsequent clinical decompensation and hospitalization. Various methods of remote patient monitoring include structured telephone support, advanced telemonitoring technologies, remote monitoring of patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators, and implantable hemodynamic monitors. Current data examining the efficacy of remote monitoring technologies in improving outcomes have shown inconsistent results. Various medicolegal and financial issues need to be addressed before widespread implementation of this exciting technology can take place.

  11. Renal function and acute heart failure outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llauger, Lluís; Jacob, Javier; Miró, Òscar

    2018-06-05

    The interaction between acute heart failure (AHF) and renal dysfunction is complex. Several studies have evaluated the prognostic value of this syndrome. The aim of this systematic review, which includes non-selected samples, was to investigate the impact of different renal function variables on the AHF prognosis. The categories included in the studies reviewed included: creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), the BUN/creatinine quotient, chronic kidney disease, the formula to estimate the glomerular filtration rate, criteria of acute renal injury and new biomarkers of renal damage such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL and cystatin c). The basal alterations of the renal function, as well as the acute alterations, transient or not, are related to a worse prognosis in AHF, it is therefore necessary to always have baseline, acute and evolutive renal function parameters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Cognitive impairment in heart failure patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leto, Laura; Feola, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive damage in heart failure (HF) involves different domains thus interfering with the ability for single patient to self-care and to cope with treatment regimens, modifying symptoms and health behaviours. Many cerebral and functional changes were detected in brain imaging, involving areas of both grey and white matter deputed to cognition. Although various instruments are available to explore cognition, no consensus was obtained on better tools to be used in HF population. Reduction in cerebral blood flow, decreased cardiac output, alterations of cerebrovascular reactivity and modification of blood pressure levels are the main features involved in the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of cognitive deficit. Several cardiac variables, laboratory parameters, demographic and clinical elements were studied for their possible relation with cognition and should be properly evaluated to define patients at increased risk of impairment. The present review gathers available data pointing out assured information and discussing possible areas of research development. PMID:25593581

  13. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  14. Plasma urocortin in human systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Leong L; Loke, Ian W; O'Brien, Russell J; Squire, Iain B; Davies, Joan E

    2004-04-01

    Urocortin (UCN), a member of the corticotrophin-releasing factor family, is expressed in heart, brain and gut. UCN has potent cardiostimulatory, cardioprotective, vasodilator and diuretic/natriuretic effects, and cardiac UCN expression is increased in heart failure (HF). In the present study, we investigated plasma levels of UCN in 119 patients with HF and 212 age- and gender-matched controls to clarify its relationship with gender and disease severity. UCN was elevated in HF [normal males, 19.5 (3.9-68.8) pmol/l and HF males, 50.2 (6.9-108.2) pmol/l, P fall in UCN levels with increasing NYHA class was reinforced by a significant correlation between UCN and ejection fraction ( r(s) = 0.45, P < 0.0005) in HF patients. Although receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for diagnosis of all HF cases yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.76, ROC AUCs for patients with early HF (NYHA class I and II) were better (0.91). ROC AUCs for logistic models incorporating N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (N-BNP) and UCN were better than either peptide alone. In conclusion, plasma UCN is elevated in HF, especially in its early stages. Its decline with increasing HF severity may expedite disease progression due to diminished cardioprotective/anti-inflammatory effects. UCN measurement may also complement N-BNP in the diagnosis of early HF.

  15. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuegel, Courtney; Bansal, Nisha

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the population of CKD patients with concurrent HF continues to grow. The accurate diagnosis of HF is challenging in patients with CKD in part due to a lack of validated imaging and biomarkers specifically in this population. The pathophysiology between the heart and the kidneys is complex and bidirectional. Patients with CKD have greater prevalence of traditional HF risk factors as well as unique kidney-specific risk factors including malnutrition, acid-base alterations, uraemic toxins, bone mineral changes, anemia and myocardial stunning. These risk factors also contribute to the decline of kidney function seen in patients with subclinical and clinical HF. More targeted HF therapies may improve outcomes in patients with kidney disease as current HF therapies are underutilised in this population. Further work is also needed to develop novel HF therapies for the CKD population. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Paraoxonase 2 prevents the development of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Kennedy, David; Shao, Zhili; Wang, Xi; Kamdar, Andre Klaassen; Weber, Malory; Mislick, Kayla; Kiefer, Kathryn; Morales, Rommel; Agatisa-Boyle, Brendan; Shih, Diana M; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Moravec, Christine S; Tang, W H Wilson

    2018-05-02

    Mitochondrial oxidation is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in development of heart failure (HF). Paraoxonase 2 deficient (PON2-def) mitochondria are impaired in function. In this study, we tested whether PON2-def aggravates HF progression. Using qPCR, immunoblotting and lactonase activity assay, we demonstrate that PON2 activity was significantly decreased in failing hearts despite increased PON2 expression. To determine the cardiac-specific function of PON2, we performed heart transplantations in which PON2-def and wild type (WT) donor hearts were implanted into WT recipient mice. Beating scores of the donor hearts, assessed at 4 weeks post-transplantation, were significantly decreased in PON2-def hearts when compared to WT donor hearts. By using a transverse aortic constriction (TAC) model, we found PON2 deficiency significantly exacerbated left ventricular remodeling and cardiac fibrosis post-TAC. We further demonstrated PON2 deficiency significantly enhanced ROS generation in heart tissues post-TAC. ROS generation was measured through dihydroethidium (DHE) using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a fluorescent detector. By using neonatal cardiomyocytes treated with CoCl 2 to mimic hypoxia, we found PON2 deficiency dramatically increased ROS generation in the cardiomyocytes upon CoCl 2 treatment. In response to a short CoCl 2 exposure, cell viability and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity assessed by MTT assay were significantly diminished in PON2-def cardiomyocytes compared to those in WT cardiomyocytes. PON2-def cardiomyocytes also had lower baseline SDH activity. By using adult mouse cardiomyocytes and mitochondrial ToxGlo assay, we found impaired cellular ATP generation in PON2-def cells compared to that in WT cells, suggesting that PON2 is necessary for proper mitochondrial function. Our study suggests a cardioprotective role for PON2 in both experimental and human heart

  17. Editor's Choice-The role of the emergency department in the management of acute heart failure: An international perspective on education and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Peter S; Collins, Sean P; Miró, Òscar; Bueno, Hector; Diercks, Deborah B; Di Somma, Salvatore; Gray, Alasdair; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Hollander, Judd E; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Levy, Phillip D; Papa, AnnMarie; Möckel, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Emergency departments are a major entry point for the initial management of acute heart failure (AHF) patients throughout the world. The initial diagnosis, management and disposition - the decision to admit or discharge - of AHF patients in the emergency department has significant downstream implications. Misdiagnosis, under or overtreatment, or inappropriate admission may place patients at increased risk for adverse events, and add costs to the healthcare system. Despite the critical importance of initial management, data are sparse regarding the impact of early AHF treatment delivered in the emergency department compared to inpatient or chronic heart failure management. Unfortunately, outcomes remain poor, with nearly a third of patients dying or re-hospitalised within 3 months post-discharge. In the absence of robust research evidence, consensus is an important source of guidance for AHF care. Thus, we convened an international group of practising emergency physicians, cardiologists and advanced practice nurses with the following goals to improve outcomes for AHF patients who present to the emergency department or other acute care setting through: (a) a better understanding of the pathophysiology, presentation and management of the initial phase of AHF care; (b) improving initial management by addressing knowledge gaps between best practices and current practice through education and research; and (c) to establish a framework for future emergency department-based international education and research.

  18. Clinical use of nuclear cardiology in the assessment of heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lei; Shi Hongcheng

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is the most commonly performed non-invasive cardiac imaging test in patients with heart failure, and it plays an important role in their assessment and management. Quantitative gated single positron emission computed tomography is used to assess quantitatively cardiac volume, left ventricular ejection fraction, stroke volume, and cardiac diastolic function. Resting and stress myocardial perfusion imaging can not only identify nonischemic heart failure and ischemic heart failure, but also demonstrate myocardial viability. Diastolic heart failure also termed as heart failure with a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction is readily identified by nuclear cardiology techniques and can accurately be estimated by peak filling rate and time to peak filling rate. With newer techniques such as three-dimensional, quantitative gated single positron emission computed tomography can assess movement of the left ventricle, and wall thickening evaluation aids its assessment. Myocardial perfusion imaging is also commonly used to identify candidates for implantable cardiac defibrillator and cardiac resynchronization therapies. Neurotransmitter imaging using 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine offers prognostic information in patients with heart failure. Metabolism and function in the heart are closely related, and energy substrate metabolism is a potential target of medical therapies to improve cardiac function in patients with heart failure. Cardiac metabolic imaging using 123 I-15-(p-iodophenyl) 3-R, S-methylpentadecacoic acid is a commonly used tracer in clinical studies to diagnose metabolic heart failure. Nuclear cardiology tests, including neurotransmitter imaging and metabolic imaging, are now easily preformed with new tracers to improve heart failure diagnosis. Nuclear cardiology techniques contribute significantly to identifying patients with heart failure and to guiding their management decisions. (authors)

  19. Exercise training in older patients with systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Eva; Hjardem-Hansen, Rasmus; Dela, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    Training improves exercise capacity in patients with heart failure (CHF) but most evidence is on selected younger patients with systolic CHF.......Training improves exercise capacity in patients with heart failure (CHF) but most evidence is on selected younger patients with systolic CHF....

  20. Risk calculation for hyperkalaemia in heart failure patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vereijken, T.L.; Bellersen, L.; Groenewoud, J.M.M.; Knubben, L.; Baltussen, L.; Kramers, C.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to develop a model to estimate the risk of hyperkalaemia in patients treated for heart failure in a tertiary reference hospital and to identify precipitating factors. METHODS: 125 congestive heart failure (CHF) patients were studied retrospectively. Thirty of these patients

  1. The Significance Mild Renal Dysfunction in Chronic Heart Failure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure is a major public health concern. Prediction models in heart failure have employed echocardiography and other advanced laboratory parameters in predicting the risk of mortality.However, most of the patients in the resource poor economies still do not have easy access to these advanced ...

  2. Right ventricular strain in heart failure: Clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Marijana; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Cuspidi, Cesare; Morris, Daniel A; Burkhardt, Franziska; Baudisch, Ana; Haßfeld, Sabine; Tschöpe, Carsten; Pieske, Burket

    2017-10-01

    The number of studies demonstrating the importance of right ventricular remodelling in a wide range of cardiovascular diseases has increased in the past two decades. Speckle-tracking imaging provides new variables that give comprehensive information about right ventricular function and mechanics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of right ventricular mechanics in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and preserved ejection fraction. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid and Embase databases for studies published from January 2000 to December 2016 in the English language using the following keywords: "right ventricle"; "strain"; "speckle tracking"; "heart failure with reduced ejection fraction"; and "heart failure with preserved ejection fraction". Investigations showed that right ventricular dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular and overall mortality in patients with heart failure, irrespective of ejection fraction. The number of studies investigating right ventricular strain in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is constantly increasing, whereas data on right ventricular mechanics in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction are limited. Given the high feasibility, accuracy and clinical implications of right ventricular strain in the population with heart failure, it is of great importance to try to include the evaluation of right ventricular strain as a regular part of each echocardiographic examination in patients with heart failure. However, further investigations are necessary to establish right ventricular strain as a standard variable for decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. A Zebrafish Heart Failure Model for Assessing Therapeutic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Si-Qi; Guo, Sheng-Ya; Yang, Hua; Xia, Bo; Li, Ping; Li, Chun-Qi

    2018-03-20

    Heart failure is a leading cause of death and the development of effective and safe therapeutic agents for heart failure has been proven challenging. In this study, taking advantage of larval zebrafish, we developed a zebrafish heart failure model for drug screening and efficacy assessment. Zebrafish at 2 dpf (days postfertilization) were treated with verapamil at a concentration of 200 μM for 30 min, which were determined as optimum conditions for model development. Tested drugs were administered into zebrafish either by direct soaking or circulation microinjection. After treatment, zebrafish were randomly selected and subjected to either visual observation and image acquisition or record videos under a Zebralab Blood Flow System. The therapeutic effects of drugs on zebrafish heart failure were quantified by calculating the efficiency of heart dilatation, venous congestion, cardiac output, and blood flow dynamics. All 8 human heart failure therapeutic drugs (LCZ696, digoxin, irbesartan, metoprolol, qiliqiangxin capsule, enalapril, shenmai injection, and hydrochlorothiazide) showed significant preventive and therapeutic effects on zebrafish heart failure (p failure model developed and validated in this study could be used for in vivo heart failure studies and for rapid screening and efficacy assessment of preventive and therapeutic drugs.

  4. Epidemiology of childhood heart failure in Port Harcourt, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Heart failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome that complicates a variety of childhood illnesses. Recent studies in various parts of Nigeria show a prevalence rate of 5.8-15.5%. There is relatively scant data on heart failure in children in the south-south geo-political region of the country, necessitating this study. Aim: To ...

  5. Program Description: Physical Therapy in a Heart Failure Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Knocke, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic exercise and resistance training have been proven to be beneficial for patients with heart failure. Current reimbursement guidelines exclude these patients from our traditional cardiac rehabilitation program, so at Newton Wellesley Hospital a clinic model was developed for the disease management and exercise of heart failure patients.

  6. Predicting mortality in patients with heart failure : a pragmatic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvy, ML; Heerdink, ER; Leufkens, HGM; Hoes, AW

    Objective: To develop a comprehensive and easily applicable prognostic model predicting mortality risk in patients with moderate to severe heart failure. Design: Prospective follow up study. Setting: Seven general hospitals in the Netherlands. Patients: 152 outpatients with heart failure or patients

  7. The puzzle of kidney dysfunction in heart failure : an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metra, Marco; Voors, Adriaan A.

    Heart failure and kidney disease often coexist, and each of the two conditions may lead to progression of the other. Kidney dysfunction is an independent prognostic factor in patients with either acute or chronic heart failure. Worsening renal function may be related with poorer outcomes as well.

  8. Anemia in chronic heart failure : etiology and treatment options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, B. Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    Purpose of review Anemia is common in patients with chronic heart failure, and is related to increased morbidity and mortality. The etiology of anemia in heart failure is complex and still not fully resolved. The review will describe current advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of

  9. Creating interatrial shunts in heart failure and pulmonary hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Patients with elevated filling pressures are at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. Structural interventions to lower elevated either left or right atrial filling pressures are gaining attention. Studies in heart failure show that lowering left atrial pressure may reduce CV...... interatrial device shunt therapy a part of our armamentarium in patients with heart failure or pulmonary hypertension and increased filling pressure....

  10. High mortality among heart failure patients treated with antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veien, Karsten Tang; Videbæk, Lars; Schou, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to assess whether pharmacologically treated depression was associated with increased mortality risk in systolic heart failure (SHF) patients.......This study was designed to assess whether pharmacologically treated depression was associated with increased mortality risk in systolic heart failure (SHF) patients....

  11. Emerging hemodynamic signatures of the right heart (Third International Right Heart Failure Summit, part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Bradley A

    2014-12-01

    Despite the importance of preserved right ventricular structure and function with respect to outcome across the spectrum of lung, cardiac, and pulmonary vascular diseases, only recently have organized efforts developed to consider the pulmonary vascular-right ventricular apparatus as a specific unit within the larger context of cardiopulmonary pathophysiology. The Third International Right Heart Failure Summit (Boston, MA) was a multidisciplinary event dedicated to promoting a dialogue about the scientific and clinical basis of right heart disease. The current review provides a synopsis of key discussions presented during the section of the summit titled "Emerging Hemodynamic Signatures of the Right Heart." Specifically, topics emphasized in this element of the symposium included (1) the effects of pulmonary vascular dysfunction at rest or provoked by exercise on the right ventricular pressure-volume relationship, (2) the role of pressure-volume loop analysis as a method to characterize right ventricular inefficiency and predict right heart failure, and (3) the importance of a systems biology approach to identifying novel factors that contribute to pathophenotypes associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension and/or right ventricular dysfunction. Collectively, these concepts frame a forward-thinking paradigm shift in the approach to right heart disease by emphasizing factors that regulate the transition from adaptive to maladaptive right ventricular-pulmonary vascular (patho)physiology.

  12. Renal Denervation for Chronic Heart Failure: Background and Pathophysiological Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael; Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2017-01-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations and death in heart failure. Renal denervation has been shown to effectively reduce sympathetic overdrive in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Pilot trials investigating renal denervation as a potential treatment approach for heart failure were initiated. Heart failure comorbidities like obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome and arrhythmias could also be targets for renal denervation, because these occurrences are also mediated by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, renal denervation in heart failure is worthy of further investigation, although its effectiveness still has to be proven. Herein, we describe the pathophysiological rationale and the effect of renal denervation on surrogates of the heart failure syndrome.

  13. Renal Denervation for Chronic Heart Failure: Background and Pathophysiological Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2017-01-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations and death in heart failure. Renal denervation has been shown to effectively reduce sympathetic overdrive in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Pilot trials investigating renal denervation as a potential treatment approach for heart failure were initiated. Heart failure comorbidities like obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome and arrhythmias could also be targets for renal denervation, because these occurrences are also mediated by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, renal denervation in heart failure is worthy of further investigation, although its effectiveness still has to be proven. Herein, we describe the pathophysiological rationale and the effect of renal denervation on surrogates of the heart failure syndrome. PMID:28154583

  14. Left ventricular heart failure and pulmonary hypertension†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Stephan; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Wachter, Rolf; De Marco, Teresa; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In patients with left ventricular heart failure (HF), the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and right ventricular (RV) dysfunction are frequent and have important impact on disease progression, morbidity, and mortality, and therefore warrant clinical attention. Pulmonary hypertension related to left heart disease (LHD) by far represents the most common form of PH, accounting for 65–80% of cases. The proper distinction between pulmonary arterial hypertension and PH-LHD may be challenging, yet it has direct therapeutic consequences. Despite recent advances in the pathophysiological understanding and clinical assessment, and adjustments in the haemodynamic definitions and classification of PH-LHD, the haemodynamic interrelations in combined post- and pre-capillary PH are complex, definitions and prognostic significance of haemodynamic variables characterizing the degree of pre-capillary PH in LHD remain suboptimal, and there are currently no evidence-based recommendations for the management of PH-LHD. Here, we highlight the prevalence and significance of PH and RV dysfunction in patients with both HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and provide insights into the complex pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary interaction in LHD, which may lead to the evolution from a ‘left ventricular phenotype’ to a ‘right ventricular phenotype’ across the natural history of HF. Furthermore, we propose to better define the individual phenotype of PH by integrating the clinical context, non-invasive assessment, and invasive haemodynamic variables in a structured diagnostic work-up. Finally, we challenge current definitions and diagnostic short falls, and discuss gaps in evidence, therapeutic options and the necessity for future developments in this context. PMID:26508169

  15. Heart Failure Virtual Consultation: bridging the gap of heart failure care in the community - A mixed-methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Joseph; James, Stephanie; Keane, Ciara; Fitzgerald, Annie; Travers, Bronagh; Quigley, Etain; Hecht, Christina; Zhou, Shuaiwei; Watson, Chris; Ledwidge, Mark; McDonald, Kenneth

    2017-08-01

    We undertook a mixed-methods evaluation of a Web-based conferencing service (virtual consult) between general practitioners (GPs) and cardiologists in managing patients with heart failure in the community to determine its effect on use of specialist heart failure services and acceptability to GPs. All cases from June 2015 to October 2016 were recorded using a standardized recording template, which recorded patient demographics, medical history, medications, and outcome of the virtual consult for each case. Quantitative surveys and qualitative interviewing of 17 participating GPs were also undertaken. During this time, 142 cases were discussed-68 relating to a new diagnosis of heart failure, 53 relating to emerging deterioration in a known heart failure patient, and 21 relating to therapeutic issues. Only 17% required review in outpatient department following the virtual consultation. GPs reported increased confidence in heart failure management, a broadening of their knowledge base, and a perception of overall better patient outcomes. These data from an initial experience with Heart Failure Virtual Consultation present a very positive impact of this strategy on the provision of heart failure care in the community and acceptability to users. Further research on the implementation and expansion of this strategy is warranted. © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  16. A holistic approach to managing a patient with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Alison; Cunnington, Colin

    2013-03-01

    Despite varied and complex therapeutic strategies for managing patients with heart failure, the prognosis may remain poor in certain groups. Recognition that patients with heart failure frequently require input from many care groups formed the basis of The British Society of Heart Failure Annual Autumn Meeting in London (UK), in November 2012, entitled: 'Heart failure: a multidisciplinary approach'. Experts in cardiology, cardiac surgery, general practice, care of the elderly, palliative care and cardiac imaging shared their knowledge and expertise. The 2-day symposium was attended by over 500 participants from the UK, Europe and North America, and hosted physicians, nurses, scientists, trainees and representatives from the industry, as well as patient and community groups. The symposium, accredited by the Royal College of Physicians and the Royal College of Nursing, focused on the multidisciplinary approach to heart failure, in particular, current therapeutic advances, cardiac remodeling, palliative care, atrial fibrillation, heart rate-lowering therapies, management of acute heart failure and the management of patients with mitral regurgitation and heart failure.

  17. Spironolactone in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, C; Mendoza-Ruiz de Zuazu, H F; Formiga, F; Manzano, L; Ceresuela, L M; Carrera-Izquierdo, M; González Franco, Á; Epelde-Gonzalo, F; Cerqueiro-González, J M; Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone inhibitors have been shown to be beneficial for patients with systolic heart failure. However, the evidence from patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is limited. We evaluated the role of spironolactone in the prognosis of a cohort of patients with HFPEF. We analyzed the outcomes of patients hospitalized for HFPEF in 52 departments of internal medicine of the Spanish RICA registry according to those who did and did not take spironolactone. We recorded the posthospital mortality rate and readmissions at 1 year and performed a multivariate survival analysis. We included 1212 patients with HFPEF, with a mean age of 79 years (standard deviation, 7.9), (64.1% women), the majority of whom had hypertensive heart disease (50.7%). The patients treated with spironolactone, compared with those who were not treated with this diuretic, had a more advanced functional class, a higher number of readmissions (44.3 vs. 29.1%; p<0.001) and a higher rate in the combined variable of readmissions/mortality (39.0 vs. 29.0%; p=0.001). In the multivariate analysis, the administration of spironolactone was associated with an increase in readmissions (RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.16-1.78; p=0.001). For patients with HFPEF, the administration of spironolactone was associated with an increase in all-cause readmission, perhaps due to the higher rate of hyperpotassemia. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  18. [Organ damage and cardiorenal syndrome in acute heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado Cerrada, Jesús; Pérez Calvo, Juan Ignacio

    2014-03-01

    Heart failure is a complex syndrome that affects almost all organs and systems of the body. Signs and symptoms of organ dysfunction, in particular kidney dysfunction, may be accentuated or become evident for the first time during acute decompensation of heart failure. Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney, regardless of which of the two organs may have suffered the initial damage and regardless also of their previous functional status. Research into the mechanisms regulating the complex relationship between the two organs is prompting the search for new biomarkers to help physicians detect renal damage in subclinical stages. Hence, a preventive approach to renal dysfunction may be adopted in the clinical setting in the near future. This article provides a general overview of cardiorenal syndrome and an update of the physiopathological mechanisms involved. Special emphasis is placed on the role of visceral congestion as an emergent mechanism in this syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic determinants of heart failure: facts and numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czepluch, Frauke S; Wollnik, Bernd; Hasenfuß, Gerd

    2018-06-01

    The relevance of gene mutations leading to heart diseases and hence heart failure has become evident. The risk for and the course of heart failure depends on genomic variants and mutations underlying the so-called genetic predisposition. Genetic contribution to heart failure is highly heterogenous and complex. For any patient with a likely inherited heart failure syndrome, genetic counselling is recommended and important. In the last few years, novel sequencing technologies (named next-generation sequencing - NGS) have dramatically improved the availability of molecular testing, the efficiency of genetic analyses, and moreover reduced the cost for genetic testing. Due to this development, genetic testing has become increasingly accessible and NGS-based sequencing is now applied in clinical routine diagnostics. One of the most common reasons of heart failure are cardiomyopathies such as the dilated or the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Nearly 100 disease-associated genes have been identified for cardiomyopathies. The knowledge of a pathogenic mutation can be used for genetic counselling, risk and prognosis determination, therapy guidance and hence for a more effective treatment. Besides, family cascade screening for a known familial, pathogenic mutation can lead to an early diagnosis in affected individuals. At that timepoint, a preventative intervention could be used to avoid or delay disease onset or delay disease progression. Understanding the cellular basis of genetic heart failure syndromes in more detail may provide new insights into the molecular biology of physiological and impaired cardiac (cell) function. As our understanding of the molecular and genetic pathophysiology of heart failure will increase, this might help to identify novel therapeutic targets and may lead to the development of new and specific treatment options in patients with heart failure. © 2018 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European

  20. MODELS OF INSULIN RESISTANCE AND HEART FAILURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Mauricio; Kohli, Smita; Sabbah, Hani N.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing and is associated with poor prognosis. In spite of the advances in therapy, HF remains a major health problem with high morbidity and mortality. When HF and diabetes coexist, clinical outcomes are significantly worse. The relationship between these two conditions has been studied in various experimental models. However, the mechanisms for this interrelationship are complex, incompletely understood, and have become a matter of considerable clinical and research interest. There are only few animal models that manifest both HF and diabetes. However, the translation of results from these models to human disease is limited and new models are needed to expand our current understanding of this clinical interaction. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of insulin signaling and insulin resistance, the clinical association between insulin resistance and HF and its proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms. Finally, we discuss available animal models of insulin resistance and HF and propose requirements for future new models. PMID:23456447

  1. [Right heart failure after pacemaker implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego Galiana, Juan; López Castellanos, Genoveva; Gioia, Francesca; Ruiz Ortega, Raúl Antonio; Cobo Reinoso, Maria Eugenia; Manzano Espinosa, Luis

    2015-06-22

    Severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR) secondary to interference pacemaker (PM) cable is a rare cause of progressive right heart failure (HF), which can worsen patient outcomes. We present 3 clinical cases of right HF secondary to TR after PM implantation. In these patients the clinic is right HF, which can appear early, as in our second patient, or after years of implementation of the PM, as in the first and third patients. The diagnosis is confirmed by echocardiography, the most accurate 3D, followed by transesophageal. The 2D transthoracic can not detect it, because it has low sensitivity for TR associated with PM. Medical treatment is always the first choice, since any other procedure carries significant morbidity and mortality. Probably this is a condition that we will diagnose with increasing frequency, because there are more and more patients with devices and, at the same time, the diagnostic tools are improving. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. GPCR-autoantibodies in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin-Jahns, Valerie; Jahns, Roland

    2018-06-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a syndrome characterized by shortness of breath, fluid retention, and a progressive reduction in cardiac function. More than 60% of the cases are ischemic in origin (i.e., due to myo-cardial infarction) and about 30% are caused by non-ischemic myocardial damage (i.e., due to genetic or non-genetic causes like myocardial inflammation). Because of alterations in both cellular and humoral immunity patients with non-ischemic CHF often develop abnormal or misled immune responses, including cross-reacting antibodies and/or autoantibodies to various cardiac anti-gens. Non-ischemic myo-cardial damage was found to progress to CHF particularly, when associated (a) with the generation of autoantibodies directed against distinct myocyte membrane proteins critically involved in cardiac function - like G-protein coup-led membrane receptors (GPCRs), or (b) with virus persistence in the myocardium. This article will review current knowledge on the pathophysiological relevance of GPCR-autoreactivity in CHF by giving an overview on the so far available evidence from pre-clinical, clinical and epidemiological studies on the CHF-inducing potential of GPCR-autoantibodies and thereon based novel therapeutic approaches in GPCR autoantibody-associated CHF.

  3. [Diuretics in heart failure and Karl Popper's turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cice, Gennaro

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure and renal failure often coexist in the same patient. This condition is commonly referred to as cardiorenal syndrome. When this occurs, patient survival worsens significantly with increasing degree of renal dysfunction. Management of this complex patient poses treatment challenges because of unstable hemodynamics (the problem is to reduce congestion without affecting organ perfusion) and very high mid-term in-hospital mortality. Congestion is a typical feature of this syndrome, and use of diuretics is mandatory. Loop diuretics should be administered first. However, poor attention to pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of loop diuretics may contribute to the development of diuretic resistance leading to iatrogenic hyponatremia. Accordingly, emphasis is given to the importance of sequential nephron blockade to reduce the number of non-responder patients to diuretics and to recognize a possible role for acquaretics.

  4. Cardiac Ablation of Rheb1 Induces Impaired Heart Growth, Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Apoptosis and Heart Failure in Infant Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yunshan; Tao, Lichan; Shen, Shutong; Xiao, Junjie; Wu, Hang; Li, Beibei; Wu, Xiangqi; Luo, Wen; Xiao, Qi; Hu, Xiaoshan; Liu, Hailang; Nie, Junwei; Lu, Shuangshuang; Yuan, Baiyin; Han, Zhonglin; Xiao, Bo; Yang, Zhongzhou; Li, Xinli

    2013-01-01

    Ras homologue enriched in brain 1 (Rheb1) plays an important role in a variety of cellular processes. In this study, we investigate the role of Rheb1 in the post-natal heart. We found that deletion of the gene responsible for production of Rheb1 from cardiomyocytes of post-natal mice resulted in malignant arrhythmias, heart failure, and premature death of these mice. In addition, heart growth impairment, aberrant metabolism relative gene expression, and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis were observed in Rheb1-knockout mice prior to the development of heart failure and arrhythmias. Also, protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) signaling was enhanced in Rheb1-knockout mice, and removal of phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) significantly prolonged the survival of Rheb1-knockouts. Furthermore, signaling via the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) was abolished and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and phosphorylation levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) were increased in Rheb1 mutant mice. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Rheb1 is important for maintaining cardiac function in post-natal mice via regulation of mTORC1 activity and stress on the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, activation of Akt signaling helps to improve the survival of mice with advanced heart failure. Thus, this study provides direct evidence that Rheb1 performs multiple important functions in the heart of the post-natal mouse. Enhancing Akt activity improves the survival of infant mice with advanced heart failure. PMID:24351823

  5. Defibrillator Implantation in Patients with Nonischemic Systolic Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, Lars; Thune, Jens J; Nielsen, Jens C

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefit of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) in patients with symptomatic systolic heart failure caused by coronary artery disease has been well documented. However, the evidence for a benefit of prophylactic ICDs in patients with systolic heart failure that is not due...... to coronary artery disease has been based primarily on subgroup analyses. The management of heart failure has improved since the landmark ICD trials, and many patients now receive cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods In a randomized, controlled trial, 556 patients with symptomatic systolic heart.......6%) in the control group (P=0.29). Conclusions In this trial, prophylactic ICD implantation in patients with symptomatic systolic heart failure not caused by coronary artery disease was not associated with a significantly lower long-term rate of death from any cause than was usual clinical care. (Funded by Medtronic...

  6. Oxidative Stress and Heart Failure in Altered Thyroid States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased or reduced action of thyroid hormone on certain molecular pathways in the heart and vasculature causes relevant cardiovascular derangements. It is well established that hyperthyroidism induces a hyperdynamic cardiovascular state, which is associated with a faster heart rate, enhanced left ventricular systolic and diastolic function whereas hypothyroidism is characterized by the opposite changes. Hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism represent opposite clinical conditions, albeit not mirror images. Recent experimental and clinical studies have suggested the involvement of ROS tissue damage under altered thyroid status. Altered-thyroid state-linked changes in heart modify their susceptibility to oxidants and the extent of the oxidative damage they suffer following oxidative challenge. Chronic increase in the cellular levels of ROS can lead to a catastrophic cycle of DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, further ROS generation and cellular injury. Thus, these cellular events might play an important role in the development and progression of myocardial remodeling and heart failure in altered thyroid states (hypo- and hyper-thyroidism. The present review aims at elucidating the various signaling pathways mediated via ROS and their modulation under altered thyroid state and the possibility of antioxidant therapy.

  7. Atrial natriuretic factor binding sites in experimental congestive heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, C.; Thibault, G.; Wrobel-Konrad, E.; De Lean, A.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M.

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative in vitro autoradiographic study was performed on the aorta, renal glomeruli, and adrenal cortex of cardiomyopathic hamsters in various stages of heart failure and correlated, in some instances, with in vivo autoradiography. The results indicate virtually no correlation between the degree of congestive heart failure and the density of 125I-labeled atrial natriuretic factor [(Ser99, Tyr126)ANF] binding sites (Bmax) in the tissues examined. Whereas the Bmax was increased in the thoracic aorta in moderate and severe heart failure, there were no significant changes in the zona glomerulosa. The renal glomeruli Bmax was lower in mild and moderate heart failure compared with control and severe heart failure. The proportion of ANF B- and C-receptors was also evaluated in sections of the aorta, adrenal, and kidney of control and cardiomyopathic hamsters with severe heart failure. (Arg102, Cys121)ANF [des-(Gln113, Ser114, Gly115, Leu116, Gly117) NH2] (C-ANF) at 10(-6) M displaced approximately 505 of (Ser99, Tyr126)125I-ANF bound in the aorta and renal glomeruli and approximately 20% in the adrenal zona glomerulosa in both series of animals. These results suggest that ANF may exert a buffering effect on the vasoconstriction of heart failure and to a certain extent may inhibit aldosterone secretion. The impairment of renal sodium excretion does not appear to be related to glomerular ANF binding sites at any stage of the disease

  8. Hippo pathway deficiency reverses systolic heart failure after infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, John P; Heallen, Todd; Zhang, Min; Rahmani, Mahdis; Morikawa, Yuka; Hill, Matthew C; Segura, Ana; Willerson, James T; Martin, James F

    2017-10-12

    Mammalian organs vary widely in regenerative capacity. Poorly regenerative organs, such as the heart are particularly vulnerable to organ failure. Once established, heart failure commonly results in mortality. The Hippo pathway, a kinase cascade that prevents adult cardiomyocyte proliferation and regeneration, is upregulated in human heart failure. Here we show that deletion of the Hippo pathway component Salvador (Salv) in mouse hearts with established ischaemic heart failure after myocardial infarction induces a reparative genetic program with increased scar border vascularity, reduced fibrosis, and recovery of pumping function compared with controls. Using translating ribosomal affinity purification, we isolate cardiomyocyte-specific translating messenger RNA. Hippo-deficient cardiomyocytes have increased expression of proliferative genes and stress response genes, such as the mitochondrial quality control gene, Park2. Genetic studies indicate that Park2 is essential for heart repair, suggesting a requirement for mitochondrial quality control in regenerating myocardium. Gene therapy with a virus encoding Salv short hairpin RNA improves heart function when delivered at the time of infarct or after ischaemic heart failure following myocardial infarction was established. Our findings indicate that the failing heart has a previously unrecognized reparative capacity involving more than cardiomyocyte renewal.

  9. Heart Failure in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lungs where oxygen is added. Watch an animation of blood flow in the heart All the ... resources here Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  10. Heart failure among Indigenous Australians: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods John A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular diseases contribute substantially to the poor health and reduced life expectancy of Indigenous Australians. Heart failure is a common, disabling, progressive and costly complication of these disorders. The epidemiology of heart failure and the adequacy of relevant health service provision in Indigenous Australians are not well delineated. Methods A systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cinahl Plus, Informit and Google Scholar was undertaken in April 2012 for peer-reviewed journal articles relevant to the topic of heart failure in Indigenous Australians. Additionally, a website search was done to identify other pertinent publications, particularly government reports. Results There was a paucity of relevant peer-reviewed research, and government reports dominated the results. Ten journal articles, 1 published conference abstract and 10 reports were eligible for inclusion. Indigenous Australians reportedly have higher morbidity and mortality from heart failure than their non-Indigenous counterparts (age-standardised prevalence ratio 1.7; age-standardised hospital separation ratio ≥3; crude per capita hospital expenditure ratio 1.58; age-adjusted mortality ratio >2. Despite the evident disproportionate burden of heart failure in Indigenous Australians, the accuracy of estimation from administrative data is limited by poor indigenous identification, inadequate case ascertainment and exclusion of younger subjects from mortality statistics. A recent journal article specifically documented a high prevalence of heart failure in Central Australian Aboriginal adults (5.3%, noting frequent undiagnosed disease. One study examined barriers to health service provision for Indigenous Australians in the context of heart failure. Conclusions Despite the shortcomings of available published data, it is clear that Indigenous Australians have an excess burden of heart failure. Emerging data

  11. BMI change during puberty and the risk of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindblom, J M; Bygdell, M; Sondén, A; Célind, J; Rosengren, A; Ohlsson, C

    2018-03-12

    Hospitalization for heart failure amongst younger men has increased. The reason for this is unknown but it coincides with the obesity epidemic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between childhood BMI (Body Mass Index) and BMI change during puberty for risk of adult heart failure in men. Using the BMI Epidemiology Study (BEST), a population-based study in Gothenburg, Sweden, we collected information on childhood BMI at age 8 years and BMI change during puberty (BMI at age 20 - BMI at 8) for men born 1945-1961, followed until December 2013 (n = 37 670). BMI was collected from paediatric growth charts and mandatory military conscription tests. Information on heart failure was retrieved from high-quality national registers (342 first hospitalizations for heart failure). BMI change during puberty was independently of childhood BMI associated with risk of heart failure in a nonlinear J-shaped manner. Subjects in the upper quartile of BMI change during puberty (Q4) had more than twofold increased risk of heart failure compared with subjects in Q1 [HR (Hazard Ratio) = 2.29, 95% CI (Confidence Interval) 1.68-3.12]. Childhood BMI was not independently associated with risk of heart failure. Boys developing overweight during puberty (HR 3.14; 95% CI 2.25-4.38) but not boys with childhood overweight that normalized during puberty (HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.63-2.00) had increased risk of heart failure compared with boys without childhood or young adult overweight. BMI change during puberty is a novel risk factor for adult heart failure in men. © 2018 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  12. Air pollution and heart failure: Relationship with the ejection fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Abreu-Afonso, Javier; Rodríguez, Sergio; Juarez-Prera, Ruben A; Arroyo-Ucar, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Yenny; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Avanzas, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the concentrations of particulate matter in ambient air are associated with hospital admission due to heart failure in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and reduced ejection fraction. METHODS: We studied 353 consecutive patients admitted into a tertiary care hospital with a diagnosis of heart failure. Patients with ejection fraction of ≥ 45% were classified as having heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and those with an ejection fraction of < 45% were classified as having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. We determined the average concentrations of different sizes of particulate matter (< 10, < 2.5, and < 1 μm) and the concentrations of gaseous pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and ozone) from 1 d up to 7 d prior to admission. RESULTS: The heart failure with preserved ejection fraction population was exposed to higher nitrogen dioxide concentrations compared to the heart failure with reduced ejection fraction population (12.95 ± 8.22 μg/m3 vs 4.50 ± 2.34 μg/m3, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that nitrogen dioxide was a significant predictor of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (odds ratio ranging from (1.403, 95%CI: 1.003-2.007, P = 0.04) to (1.669, 95%CI: 1.043-2.671, P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that short-term nitrogen dioxide exposure is independently associated with admission in the heart failure with preserved ejection fraction population. PMID:23538391

  13. Nurses' attitudes toward family importance in heart failure care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusdal, Annelie K; Josefsson, Karin; Thors Adolfsson, Eva; Martin, Lene

    2017-03-01

    Support from the family positively affects self-management, patient outcomes and the incidence of hospitalizations among patients with heart failure. To involve family members in heart failure care is thus valuable for the patients. Registered nurses frequently meet family members of patients with heart failure and the quality of these encounters is likely to be influenced by the attitudes registered nurses hold toward families. To explore registered nurses' attitudes toward the importance of families' involvement in heart failure nursing care and to identify factors that predict the most supportive attitudes. Cross-sectional, multicentre web-survey study. A sample of 303 registered nurses from 47 hospitals and 30 primary health care centres completed the instrument Families' Importance in Nursing Care - Nurses' Attitudes. Overall, registered nurses were supportive of families' involvement. Nonetheless, attitudes toward inviting families to actively take part in heart failure nursing care and involve families in planning of care were less supportive. Factors predicting the most supportive attitudes were to work in a primary health care centre, a heart failure clinic, a workplace with a general approach toward families, to have a postgraduate specialization, education in cardiac and/or heart failure nursing care, and a competence to work with families. Experienced registered nurses in heart failure nursing care can be encouraged to mentor their younger and less experienced colleagues to strengthen their supportive attitudes toward families. Registered nurses who have designated consultation time with patients and families, as in a nurse-led heart failure clinic, may have the most favourable condition for implementing a more supportive approach to families.

  14. Value of Serial Heart Rate Variability Measurement for Prediction of Appropriate ICD Discharge in Patients with Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Sande, Judith N.; Damman, Peter; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; de Groot, Joris R.; Knops, Reinoud E.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; van Dessel, Pascal F. H. M.

    2014-01-01

    HRV and Appropriate ICD Shock in Heart Failure Introduction Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with adverse outcomes in patients with heart failure. Our objective was to examine whether decreased HRV predicts appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. Methods

  15. When should we use nitrates in congestive heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizzardi, Enrico; Bonadei, Ivano; Rovetta, Riccardo; D'Aloia, Antonio; Quinzani, Filippo; Curnis, Antonio; Dei Cas, Livio

    2013-02-01

    Organic nitrates remain among the oldest and most commonly employed drugs in cardiology. Although, in most cases, their use in acute and chronic heart failure is based on clinical practice, only a few clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate their use in acute and chronic heart failure, most of which compare them with other drugs to evaluate differing endpoints. The purpose of this review is to examine the various trials that have evaluated the use of nitrates in acute and chronic heart failure. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Accuracy of a heart failure diagnosis in administrative registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Thomas; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Kirk, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of heart failure is frequently reported using hospital discharge diagnoses. The specificity of a diagnosis has been shown to be high but the sensitivity of a reported diagnosis is unknown. PURPOSE: To study the accuracy of a heart failure diagnosis reported to the Danish...... a specificity of 99% and a sensitivity of 29% for all patients. The positive predictive value was 81%, the negative predictive value 90%. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of Heart Failure in the Danish National Registers is underreported, but very specific....

  17. Hypertension as a risk factor for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Arun; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2014-07-01

    Hypertension remains a significant risk factor for development of congestive heart failure CHF), with various mechanisms contributing to both systolic and diastolic dysfunction. The pathogenesis of myocardial changes includes structural remodeling, left ventricular hypertrophy, and fibrosis. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin system is a key contributing factor of hypertension, and thus interventions that antagonize these systems promote regression of hypertrophy and heart failure. Control of blood pressure is of paramount importance in improving the prognosis of patients with heart failure.

  18. Acute decompensated heart failure: new strategies for improving outcomes [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer Fisher, Emily; Burns, Boyd; Kim, Jeremy

    2017-05-22

    Acute decompensated heart failure is a common emergency department presentation with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Heart failure accounts for more than 1 million hospitalizations annually, with a steadily increasing incidence as our population ages. This issue reviews recent literature regarding appropriate management of emergency department presentations of acute decompensated heart failure, with special attention to newer medication options. Emergency department management and appropriate interventions are discussed, along with critical decision-making points in resuscitation for both hypertensive and hypotensive patients. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  19. Summary of the 2015 International Paediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Quintessenza, James A; Karl, Tom R; Asante-Korang, Alfred; Everett, Allen D; Collins, Susan B; Ramirez-Correa, Genaro A; Burns, Kristin M; Cohen, Mitchell; Colan, Steven D; Costello, John M; Daly, Kevin P; Franklin, Rodney C G; Fraser, Charles D; Hill, Kevin D; Huhta, James C; Kaushal, Sunjay; Law, Yuk M; Lipshultz, Steven E; Murphy, Anne M; Pasquali, Sara K; Payne, Mark R; Rossano, Joseph; Shirali, Girish; Ware, Stephanie M; Xu, Mingguo; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2015-08-01

    In the United States alone, ∼14,000 children are hospitalised annually with acute heart failure. The science and art of caring for these patients continues to evolve. The International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute was held on February 4 and 5, 2015. The 2015 International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute was funded through the Andrews/Daicoff Cardiovascular Program Endowment, a philanthropic collaboration between All Children's Hospital and the Morsani College of Medicine at the University of South Florida (USF). Sponsored by All Children's Hospital Andrews/Daicoff Cardiovascular Program, the International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit assembled leaders in clinical and scientific disciplines related to paediatric heart failure and created a multi-disciplinary "think-tank". The purpose of this manuscript is to summarise the lessons from the 2015 International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute, to describe the "state of the art" of the treatment of paediatric cardiac failure, and to discuss future directions for research in the domain of paediatric cardiac failure.

  20. 'Hearts and minds': association, causation and implication of cognitive impairment in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jane A; McMurray, John Jv; Quinn, Terry J

    2015-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of heart failure is one of the leading causes of hospitalisation and mortality in older adults. An association between cognitive impairment and heart failure is well described but our understanding of the relationship between the two conditions remains limited. In this review we provide a synthesis of available evidence, focussing on epidemiology, the potential pathogenesis, and treatment implications of cognitive decline in heart failure. Most evidence available relates to heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and the syndromes of chronic cognitive decline or dementia. These conditions are only part of a complex heart failure-cognition paradigm. Associations between cognition and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and between acute delirium and heart failure also seem evident and where data are available we will discuss these syndromes. Many questions remain unanswered regarding heart failure and cognition. Much of the observational evidence on the association is confounded by study design, comorbidity and insensitive cognitive assessment tools. If a causal link exists, there are several potential pathophysiological explanations. Plausible underlying mechanisms relating to cerebral hypoperfusion or occult cerebrovascular disease have been described and it seems likely that these may coexist and exert synergistic effects. Despite the prevalence of the two conditions, when cognitive impairment coexists with heart failure there is no specific guidance on treatment. Institution of evidence-based heart failure therapies that reduce mortality and hospitalisations seems intuitive and there is no signal that these interventions have an adverse effect on cognition. However, cognitive impairment will present a further barrier to the often complex medication self-management that is required in contemporary heart failure treatment.

  1. Estimating fat mass in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippel, Tobias Daniel; Lenk, Julian; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Doehner, Wolfram; von Haehling, Stephan; Loncar, Goran; Edelmann, Frank; Pieske, Burkert; Stahn, Alexander; Duengen, Hans-Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Body composition (BC) assessments in heart failure (HF) patients are mainly based on body weight, body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio. The present study compares BC assessments by basic anthropometry, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS), and air displacement plethysmography (ADP) for the estimation of fat (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) in a HF population. In this single-centre, observational pilot study we enrolled 52 patients with HF (33 HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), 19 HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF); mean age was 67.7 ±9.9 years, 41 male) and 20 healthy controls. DXA was used as a reference standard for the measurement of FM and FFM. In the HF population, linear regression for DXA-FM and waist-to-hip ratio ( r = -0.05, 95% CI: (-0.32)-0.23), body mass index ( r = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.23-0.669), and body density ( r = -0.87, 95% CI: (-0.93)-(-0.87)) was obtained. In HF, Lin's concordance correlation coefficient of DXA-FM (%) with ADP-FM (%) was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.64-0.85) and DXA-FFM [kg] with DXA-ADP [kg] was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.88-0.96). DXA-FM (%) for BIS-FM (%) was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.54-0.80) and 0.73 (95% CI: 0.60-0.82) for DXA-FFM [kg] and BIS-FFM [kg]. Body density is a useful surrogate for FM. ADP was found suitable for estimating FM (%) and FFM [kg] in HF patients. BIS showed acceptable results for the estimation of FM (%) in HFrEF and for FFM [kg] in HFpEF patients. We encourage selecting a suitable method for BC assessment according to the compartment of interest in the HF population.

  2. Mitral valve-sparing procedures and prosthetic heart valve failure: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasir A; Butany, Jagdish; Leong, Shaun W; Rao, Vivek; Cusimano, Robert J; Ross, Heather J

    2009-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve dysfunction due to thrombus or pannus formation can be a life-threatening complication. The present report describes a 47-year-old woman who developed valvular cardiomyopathy after chorda-sparing mitral valve replacement, and subsequently underwent heart transplantation for progressive heart failure. The explanted mitral valve prosthesis showed significant thrombus and pannus leading to reduced leaflet mobility and valvular stenosis. The present report illustrates the role of the subvalvular apparatus and pannus in prosthesis dysfunction. PMID:19279993

  3. Atrial fibrillation, ischaemic heart disease, and the risk of death in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Søndergaard, Peter; Nielsen, Tonny

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a risk factor for death in patients with a myocardial infarction, but highly variable results are reported in patients with heart failure. We studied the prognostic impact of AF in heart failure patients with and without ischaemic heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS......), 1.02-1.23, P=0.018]. There was a significant interaction between the importance of AF and the presence of ischaemic heart disease (P=0.034). In patients with AF at the time of discharge and ischaemic heart disease, HR was 1.25 (95% CI: 1.09-1.42) and P... and without ischaemic heart disease, HR was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.88-1.16) and P=0.88. CONCLUSION: AF is associated with increased risk of death only in patients with ischaemic heart disease. This finding may explain the variable results of studies of the prognosis associated with AF in heart failure....

  4. Use of biomarkers to guide outpatient therapy of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBeradinis, Benedetta; Januzzi, James L

    2012-11-01

    Among patients with heart failure, concentrations of natriuretic peptides are strongly linked to the presence and severity of structural heart disease and are strongly prognostic in this setting. Additionally, favorable reduction in the concentration of either B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or B-type natriuretic peptide and its amino-terminal cleavage fragment (NT-proBNP) may be seen during treatment of heart failure, with parallel improvement in prognosis. This has led to the hypothesis that intensified treatment directed at reducing natriuretic peptide concentrations may improve outcomes in heart failure. In chronic heart failure, studies suggest that a strategy of standard-of-care management together with a goal to suppress BNP or NT-proBNP concentrations leads to greater application of guideline-derived medical therapy and is well tolerated. In certain studies of this BNP or NT-proBNP 'guided' approach, patients treated with biomarker-guided care had superior outcomes when compared with standard heart failure management alone, particularly in younger study populations, in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and particularly when substantial reductions in natriuretic peptides were achieved in association with biomarker-guided care. Natriuretic peptide 'guided' management appears promising in patients suffering from chronic heart failure. Large-scale pivotal trials to confirm the approach are planned.

  5. Women-specific risk factors for heart failure: A genetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kemp, Jet; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte

    2018-03-01

    Heart failure is a complex disease, which is presented differently by men and women. Several studies have shown that reproductive factors, such as age at natural menopause, parity and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), may play a role in the development of heart failure. Shared genetics may provide clues to underlying mechanisms; however, this has never been examined. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to explore whether any reproductive factor is potentially related to heart failure in women, based on genetic similarities. Conducting a systematic literature review, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with reproductive factors, heart failure and its risk factors were extracted from recent genome-wide association studies. We tested whether there was any overlap between the SNPs and their proxies of reproductive risk factors with those known for heart failure or its risk factors. In total, 520 genetic variants were found that are associated with reproductive factors, namely age at menarche, age at natural menopause, menstrual cycle length, PCOS, preeclampsia, preterm delivery and spontaneous dizygotic twinning. For heart failure and associated phenotypes, 25 variants were found. Genetic variants for reproductive factors did not overlap with those for heart failure. However, age at menarche, gestational diabetes and PCOS were found to be genetically linked to risk factors for heart failure, such as atrial fibrillation, diabetes and smoking. Corresponding implicated genes, such as TNNI3K, ErbB3, MKL2, MTNR1B and PRKD1, may explain the associations between reproductive factors and heart failure. Exact effector mechanisms of these genes remain to be investigated further. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Aldosterone and aldosterone receptor antagonists in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nappi J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jean M Nappi, Adam SiegClinical Pharmacy and Outcome Sciences, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Medical University of South Carolina Campus, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone synthesized by the adrenal glands that has several regulatory functions to help the body maintain normal volume status and electrolyte balance. Studies have shown significantly higher levels of aldosterone secretion in patients with congestive heart failure compared with normal patients. Elevated levels of aldosterone have been shown to elevate blood pressure, cause left ventricular hypertrophy, and promote cardiac fibrosis. An appreciation of the true role of aldosterone in patients with chronic heart failure did not become apparent until the publication of the Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study. Until recently, the use of aldosterone receptor antagonists has been limited to patients with severe heart failure and patients with heart failure following myocardial infarction. The Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization and Survival Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF study added additional evidence to support the expanded use of aldosterone receptor antagonists in heart failure patients. The results of the EMPHASIS-HF trial showed that patients with mild-to-moderate (New York Heart Association Class II heart failure had reductions in mortality and hospitalizations from the addition of eplerenone to optimal medical therapy. Evidence remains elusive about the exact mechanism by which aldosterone receptor antagonists improve heart failure morbidity and mortality. The benefits of aldosterone receptor antagonist use in heart failure must be weighed against the potential risk of complications, ie, hyperkalemia and, in the case of spironolactone, possible endocrine abnormalities, in particular gynecomastia. With appropriate monitoring, these risks can be minimized. We now have evidence that patients with mild-to-severe symptoms

  7. Mortality Risk Among Heart Failure Patients With Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelborg, Kasper; Schmidt, Morten; Sundbøll, Jens

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of depression is 4- to 5-fold higher in heart failure patients than in the general population. We examined the influence of depression on all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using Danish medical registries, this nationwide population...... by left ventricular ejection fraction, with adjusted mortality rate ratios of 1.17 (95% CI, 1.05-1.31) for ≤35%, 0.98 (95% CI 0.81-1.18) for 36% to 49%, and 0.96 (95% CI 0.74-1.25) for ≥50%. Results were consistent after adjustment for alcohol abuse and smoking. CONCLUSIONS: A history of depression...... was an adverse prognostic factor for all-cause mortality in heart failure patients with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35% but not for other heart failure patients....

  8. PATIENT WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE. RATIONAL CHOICE OF THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of chronic hyperactivation of neurohormonal systems, in particular, sympathoadrenal and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone, is the basis of modern concepts of the pathogenesis of heart failure. The medicinal blocking of these two systems has proved to be effective in the treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (<40%. Antagonists of mineralocorticoid receptors, along with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers, are neurohumoral modulators. They are used to treat patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. The prescription of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in clinical practice remains insufficient despite their high efficacy. Demonstration of the site of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in the complex treatment of a patient with chronic heart failure and diabetes type 2 is the goal of this article.

  9. Renal dysfunction in African patients with acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sani, Mahmoud U.; Davison, Beth A.; Cotter, Gad; Sliwa, Karen; Edwards, Christopher; Liu, Licette; Damasceno, Albertino; Mayosi, Bongani M.; Ogah, Okechukwu S.; Mondo, Charles; Dzudie, Anastase; Ojji, Dike B.; Voors, Adrian A.

    Aims In Western countries with typically elderly ischaemic acute heart failure patients, predictors and clinical outcome of renal dysfunction and worsening renal function are well described. However, the prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome of renal dysfunction in younger, mainly hypertensive

  10. Rational use of inotropic therapy in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker, G M; O'Connor, C M

    2001-03-01

    Despite their theoretic appeal, agents that increase cardiac contractility (positive inotropes) have consistently been shown to increase mortality when given chronically to patients with heart failure. The routine use of inotropes as heart failure therapy in either the acute or the chronic setting is not supported by the available data. Some appropriate uses of inotropes are as temporary treatment of diuretic-refractory acute heart failure decompensations, or as a bridge to definitive treatment such as revascularization or cardiac transplantation. Although controversial, the use of inotropes as a palliative measure in the small subset of patients with truly end-stage heart failure may be appropriate. An understanding of the appropriate goals of therapy is important for both patients and physicians if rational decisions about the use of inotropes are to be made.

  11. Management of Heart Failure in Advancing CKD: Core Curriculum 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Andrew A

    2018-02-23

    Heart failure and chronic kidney disease have increasing incidence and prevalence owing in part to the aging population and increasing rates of hypertension, diabetes, and other cardiovascular and kidney disease risk factors. The presence of one condition also has a strong influence on the other, leading to greater risks for hospitalization, morbidity, and death, as well as very high health care costs. Despite the frequent coexistence of heart failure and chronic kidney disease, many of the pivotal randomized trials that guide the management of heart failure have excluded patients with more advanced stages of chronic kidney disease. In this Core Curriculum article, management of a challenging, yet not unusual, case of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction in a patient with stage 4 chronic kidney disease provides an opportunity to review the relevant literature and highlight gaps in our knowledge. Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (HVBP) – Heart Failure Scores

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospitals participating in the Hospital VBP Program and their performance rates and scores for the Clinical Process of Care Heart Failure measures.

  13. Patient's Guide to Living Confidently with Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1. ↵ Riegel B , Dickson VV . A situation-specific theory of heart failure self-care. J Cardiovasc Nurs . ... Information for: Advertisers Subscribers Subscriber Help Institutions / Librarians Institutional Subscriptions FAQ International Users National Center 7272 Greenville ...

  14. Galen's vein aneurysm as cause of heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverria, Claudia; Cassalett, Gabriel; Franco, Jaime; Carrillo, Gustavo

    2005-01-01

    We present the case of a newborn admitted to the intensive care unit with a heart failure of difficult medical management. A large ductus arteriosus was found. It was surgically corrected, but the heart failure persisted and did not improve with medical treatment. Incidentally, a big Galen's vein aneurysm was found. Galen's vein aneurysm is a rare congenital pathology, originated by a fusion defect of the internal cerebral veins. Due to its low resistance, it produces a picture of high-output heart failure. Large defects may contain 50% to 60% of cardiac output. An aneurysm may be suspected in each newborn or infant with clinical picture of heart failure and right cardiac chamber dilation without any evidence of structural cardiac anomaly

  15. Associations of serumpotassiumlevels with mortality in chronic heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahl, Mette; Caroline Jensen, Anne Sofie; Davidsen, Line

    2017-01-01

    Aims Medication prescribed to patients suffering from chronic heart failure carries an increased risk of impaired potassium homeostasis. We examined the relation between different levels of serum potassium and mortality among patients with chronic heart failure. Methods and results From Danish...... National registries, we identified 19 549 patients with a chronic heart failure diagnosis who had a measurement of potassium within minimum 90 days after initiated medical treatment with loop diuretics and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers. All-cause mortality......-cause mortality. Conclusion Levels within the lower and upper levels of the normal serum potassium range (3.5-4.1 mmol/L and 4.8-5.0 mmol/ L, respectively) were associated with a significant increased short-term risk of death in chronic heart failure patients. Likewise, potassium below 3.5 mmol/L and above 5...

  16. Exercise Hemodynamics in Chronic Heart Failure : Physiological and Clinical Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, R.F.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic heart failure is intrinsically associated with exercise intolerance. Understanding the pathophysiological background of exercise intolerance is essential for optimizing the response to current and future therapies aiming at an improvement of exercise capacity. Each step in the oxygen

  17. The less familiar side of heart failure: symptomatic diastolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Spencer A; Van Swol, Mark; Udani, Bela

    2005-06-01

    Arrange for echocardiography or radionuclide angiography within 72 hours of a heart failure exacerbation. An ejection fraction >50% in the presence of signs and symptoms of heart failure makes the diagnosis of diastolic heart failure probable. To treat associated hypertension, use angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, or diuretics to achieve a blood pressure goal of <130/80 mm Hg. When using beta-blockers to control heart rate, titrate doses more aggressively than would be done for systolic failure, to reach a goal of 60 to 70 bpm. Use ACE inhibitors/ARBs to decrease hospitalizations, decrease symptoms, and prevent left ventricular remodeling.

  18. Seasonal variation in admission for heart failure, hypertension and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seasonal variation in admission for heart failure, hypertension and stroke. ... Background: Seasonal variation in hospitalization for cardiovascular disease has been ... hypertension and hypertension – related stroke (Cerebrovascular accident) ...

  19. [Heart failure mortality in Spain: is there an andalusian paradox?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Navarro, M; Gómez-Doblas, J; Molero, E; Galván, E de Teresa

    2006-06-01

    Congestive heart failure has a high mortality, as reflected in different clinical trials and observational studies. Spain, as other countries around the Mediterranean basin, have a relatively low rate of coronary deaths, attributed to the so-called Mediterranean lifestyle. Andalusia, in the southern most part of Spain, constitutes the paradigm of Mediterranean lifestyle. However, different reports show that the prevalence of ischemic heart disease is higher in Andalusia than in other zones of Spain. Thus the mortality rate due to heart failure in Spain in the year 2000 per 100,000 inhabitants was 27.3 in men and 28.88 in women and each one of the eight Andalusia provinces had greater rates than the national mean in both men and woman. Even in countries with a relatively low prevalence of coronary heart disease as is the case in Spain, heart failure mortality seems to be parallel to local differences in IHD prevalence.

  20. Extracellular matrix remodeling in patients with ischemic chronic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Syvolap

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To identify features, relationships between parameters of the extracellular matrix and renal function in 110 patients with ischemic chronic heart failure the activity of collagen metabolism markers (MMP-9, TIMP-1, PICP, cystatin C, structural and functional parameters of the heart were studied using ELISA, echocardiography. Results. It was established that imbalance in the system MMP/TIMP in ischemic heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction leads to disruption of the extracellular matrix structural functional sufficiency, increases functional failure and is associated with impaired renal function. Conclusion. Correlation analysis showed significant relationships between MMP/TIMP and GFR, cystatin C, indicating that the significant role of extracellular matrix imbalance in the development of renal dysfunction in patients with ischemic chronic heart failure.

  1. Cellular Therapeutics for Heart Failure: Focus on Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitabh C. Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resulting from a various etiologies, the most notable remains ischemia; heart failure (HF manifests as the common end pathway of many cardiovascular processes and remains among the top causes for hospitalization and a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current pharmacologic treatment for HF utilizes pharmacologic agents to control symptoms and slow further deterioration; however, on a cellular level, in a patient with progressive disease, fibrosis and cardiac remodeling can continue leading to end-stage heart failure. Cellular therapeutics have risen as the new hope for an improvement in the treatment of HF. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have gained popularity given their propensity of promoting endogenous cellular repair of a myriad of disease processes via paracrine signaling through expression of various cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules resulting in activation of signal transduction pathways. While the exact mechanism remains to be completely elucidated, this remains the primary mechanism identified to date. Recently, MSCs have been incorporated as the central focus in clinical trials investigating the role how MSCs can play in the treatment of HF. In this review, we focus on the characteristics of MSCs that give them a distinct edge as cellular therapeutics and present results of clinical trials investigating MSCs in the setting of ischemic HF.

  2. Observation unit management of acute decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Jon W; Emerman, Charles L

    2009-01-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is a common illness presenting to the emergency department (ED) that is amenable to observation unit (OU) treatment. As the number of baby boomers continues to grow and the incidence of heart failure increases, the financial implications of ADHF treatment will become more prominent. Obtaining institutional support and developing a good working relationship with cardiology colleagues is vital to creating workable ADHF protocols for whichever type of OU an institution decides to use.

  3. Relationship between serum thyroid hormones levels and heart failure in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Fuman; Liu Tongmei; Wang Weimin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between serum thyroid hormones levels and severity of heart failure in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: Serum thyroid hormones (FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH) levels were measured with RIA in 38 patients with CHD but no cardiac failure, 40 CHD patients with heat failure and 37 controls. Results: The serum FT 3 levels in patients with heart failure were significantly lower than those in the other two groups (P 4 and TSH in all these three groups of subjects. Moreover, the serum FT 3 levels in the patients with heart fail- ure were significantly positively correlated with the ejection fractions (EF) in these patients. Conclusion: Serum FT 3 levels dropped markedly in CHD patients with heart failure and the magnitude of decrease was positively correlated with the severity of the disease. (authors)

  4. Combining aspirin with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in heart failure: how safe is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, H; Mahajan, A; Bansal, N; Vaidya, S; Pathak, L

    1998-11-01

    The above discussion on the interaction of aspirin and ACE inhibitors seems to suggest that aspirin in high doses may have adverse interaction with ACE inhibitors in patients with heart failure but the data obtained is not sufficient or conclusive to recommended omission of aspirin in patients with heart failure. This raises a query in the mind of the physician whether to use a combination or not? The role of aspirin in the early period after myocardial infarction is well established so is the role of ACE inhibitors. Hence in patients with myocardial infarction and preserved left ventricular function it would not be wrong to administer combination of ACE inhibitors and aspirin. Albeit at a lower dose. In patients with large myocardial infarction or heart failure, warfarin may be an option but still needs to be documented in large trials. As suggested long term use of aspirin after infarction is still ambiguous and may be harmful in patients with heart failure with its anticedent side effects. But long term benefits of ACE inhibitors in heart failure are well documented. Hence if a choice has to be made whether to discontinue either of the two drugs it would be preferable to stop the aspirin. To answer the issue of use of aspirin in patients with heart failure it would be essential to conduct a double blind randomized trial comparing known anti-thrombotic treatment, aspirin and anti-coagulants on mortality in patients with heart failure, especially caused by coronary artery disease. Such a trial is underway at the present and till the results are available it should be left to clinical judgement of the physician whether to administer aspirin in patients with heart failure after weighing the benefits versus risk.

  5. Heart rate awareness in patients with chronic stable heart failure. A multi-center observational study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, D

    2014-08-23

    We assessed adherence to European Society of Cardiology heart rate guidelines (i.e. heart rates less than 70bpm) in patients with chronic stable heart failure. We also investigated the percent of patients on target doses of rate controlling drugs.

  6. Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure - Cause or Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Sandeep; Voskoboinik, Aleksandr; Kaye, David M; Kistler, Peter M

    2017-09-01

    There are emerging epidemics of atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure in most developed countries, with a significant health burden. Due to many shared pathophysiological mechanisms, which facilitate the maintenance of each condition, AF and heart failure co-exist in up to 30% of patients. In the circumstance where known structural causes of heart failure (such as myocardial infarction) are absent, patients presenting with both conditions present a unique challenge, particularly as the temporal relationship of each condition can often remain elusive from the clinical history. The question of whether the AF is driving, or significantly contributing to the left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, rather than merely a consequence of heart failure, has become ever more pertinent, especially as catheter ablation now offers a significant advancement over existing rhythm control strategies. This paper will review the inter-related physiological drivers of AF and heart failure before considering the implications from the outcomes of recent clinical trials in patients with AF and heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluid removal in acute heart failure: diuretics versus devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Felker, G Michael

    2014-10-01

    Fluid removal and relief of congestion are central to treatment of acute heart failure. Diuretics have been the decongestive mainstay but their known limitations have led to the exploration of alternative strategies. This review compares diuretics with ultrafiltration and examines the recent evidence evaluating their use. Relevant recent studies are the Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation trial (of diuretics) and the Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (of ultrafiltration). The Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation study evaluated strategies of loop diuretic use during acute heart failure (continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus and high dose versus low dose). After 72  h, there was no significant difference with either comparison for the coprimary end points. Patients treated with a high-dose strategy tended to have greater diuresis and more decongestion compared with low-dose therapy, at the cost of transient changes in renal function. The Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure study showed that in acute heart failure patients with persistent congestion and worsening renal function, ultrafiltration, as compared with a medical therapy, was associated with similar weight loss but greater increase in serum creatinine and more adverse events. Decongestion remains a major challenge in acute heart failure. Although recent studies provide useful data to guide practice, the relatively poor outcomes point to the continued need to identify better strategies for safe and effective decongestion.

  8. Prognostic relevance of metabolic approach in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, P; Barsotti, A

    2009-01-01

    Progressions in acute cardiac care have improved survival after acute myocardial infarction, but in contraposition with this, there has been an increase in mortality because of heart failure. For this reason congestive heart failure is an increasingly widespread, costly and deadly disease, frequently named as epidemic of the XXI century. Despite advancement in modern treatment, mortality rate in heart failure patients remains high. In these patients more importance was attributed in the management of the left ventricle dysfunction. In fact, the heart failure patients have still a poor prognosis due to the ineluctable progression of contractile dysfunction and ventricular remodeling. The classical management of left ventricle dysfunction includes the pharmacological treatment with beta-blockers, ACE-inhibitors and aldosterone antagonists, and various surgical or electrophysiological interventions. Emerging evidence suggests that myocardium dysfunction is also due to substrate metabolism alterations. In particular, there is evidence that, in the failing heart, shifting metabolism away from a preference for fatty acids towards more carbohydrate oxidation could recover contractile function. Trimetazidine has been shown to improve symptoms and ventricular function and to have a beneficial effect on the inflammatory profile and endothelial function in these patients. Recently, it has been suggested that trimetazidine could also reduce ventricular remodeling, slowing down the progression of pump failure, and improve prognosis. These results suggest that trimetazidine is a useful adjunct to our current armamentarium for the treatment of heart failure patients.

  9. Prognostic importance of pulmonary hypertension in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Akkan, Dilek; Iversen, Kasper Karmark

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a well-known complication in heart failure, but its prognostic importance is less well established. This study assessed the risk associated with pulmonary hypertension in patients with heart failure with preserved or reduced left ventricular (LV) ejection fractions. Pati...... obstructive lung disease, heart failure, and impaired renal function. In conclusion, pulmonary hypertension is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality in patients with reduced LV ejection fractions and also in patients with preserved LV ejection fractions.......Pulmonary hypertension is a well-known complication in heart failure, but its prognostic importance is less well established. This study assessed the risk associated with pulmonary hypertension in patients with heart failure with preserved or reduced left ventricular (LV) ejection fractions....... Patients with known or presumed heart failure (n = 388) underwent the echocardiographic assessment of pulmonary systolic pressure and LV ejection fraction. Patients were followed for up to 5.5 years. Increased pulmonary pressure was associated with increased short- and long-term mortality (p

  10. [Sleep apnea and heart failure: pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monda, Cinzia; Scala, Oriana; Paolillo, Stefania; Savarese, Gianluigi; Cecere, Milena; D'Amore, Carmen; Parente, Antonio; Musella, Francesca; Mosca, Susanna; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone

    2010-11-01

    Sleep apnea, defined as a pathologic pause in breathing during sleep >10 s, promotes the progression of chronic heart failure and may be a predictor of poor prognosis. It causes, in fact, several mechanical, hemodynamic, chemical and inflammatory changes that negatively compromise cardiovascular homeostasis of heart failure patients. Sleep apnea is recognized as sleep apnea syndrome when specific symptoms, such as sleepiness and headache during the daytime and snoring, are present and is diagnosed with an overnight test called polysomnography. There are two different forms of sleep apnea, central and obstructive. Breathing is interrupted by the loss of respiratory drive and the lack of respiratory effort in the central form, which affects about 40-60% of heart failure patients. In obstructive sleep apnea, breathing stops when throat muscles relax, despite respiratory effort. This form affects about 3% of the general population, while it is present in at least 30% of heart failure patients. The diagnosis of sleep disorders in heart failure becomes very important to help patients adopting lifestyle changes and starting specific therapies to improve quality of life and retard the progression of chronic heart failure.

  11. [A rare cause of heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutersohn, Andreas; Oestmann, Andreas

    2014-12-10

    We report the case of a 52 years old patient with dilated cardiomyopathy. Ischemic heart disease was excluded by coronary angiography. However, bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy was present on plain chest radiography. Transbronchial biopsy showed non-necrotizing, epitheloid cell granulomas and thus sarcoidosis was diagnosed. A MRI of the heart confirmed the cardiac involvement by the sarcoidosis with corresponding structural changes.

  12. Medications Used to Treat Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Live Our Interactive Cardiovascular Library has detailed animations and illustrations to help you learn about conditions, treatments and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  13. Psychosocial risk factors and heart failure hospitalization: a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Andersen, Ingelise; Prescott, Eva

    2011-01-01

    ,670 participants of the Copenhagen City Heart Study (Denmark) were asked comprehensive questions on major life events, work-related stress, social network, vital exhaustion, and sleep medication and were followed in nationwide registries until 2007, with less than 0.2% loss to follow-up. Almost one......Prospective studies on the role of psychosocial factors in heart failure development are virtually nonexistent. The authors aimed to address the effect of psychosocial factors on the risk of heart failure hospitalization in men and women free of cardiovascular disease. In 1991-1993, the 8...... interval: 1.20, 3.10) and women (hazard ratio = 2.56, 95% confidence interval: 1.80, 3.65). Contrary to expectation, major life events, social network, and sleeping medication did not play an individual role for heart failure hospitalization. Because of the high prevalence of vital exhaustion...

  14. American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7: Avoiding Heart Failure and Preserving Cardiac Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, Aaron R.; Shah, Amil M.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Roetker, Nicholas S.; Alonso, Alvaro; Avery, Christy L.; Miedema, Michael D.; Konety, Suma; Chang, Patricia P.; Solomon, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many people may underappreciate the role of lifestyle in avoiding heart failure. We estimated whether greater adherence in middle age to American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 guidelines -- on smoking, body mass, physical activity, diet, cholesterol, blood pressure, and glucose -- is associated with lower lifetime risk of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function in old age. METHODS We studied the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study cohort of 13,462 adults aged 45-64 years in 1987-89. From the 1987-89 risk factor measurements, we created a Life’s Simple 7 score (range 0-14, giving 2 points for ideal, 1 point for intermediate, and 0 points for poor components). We identified 2,218 incident heart failure events using surveillance of hospital discharge and death codes through 2011. In addition, in 4,855 participants free of clinical cardiovascular disease in 2011-13, we performed echocardiography from which we quantified left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. RESULTS One in four participants (25.5%) developed heart failure through age 85. Yet, this lifetime heart failure risk was 14.4% for those with a middle-age Life’s Simple 7 score of 10-14 (optimal), 26.8% for a score of 5-9 (average), and 48.6% for a score of 0-4 (inadequate). Among those with no clinical cardiovascular event, the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in late life was approximately 40% as common, and diastolic dysfunction was approximately 60% as common, among those with an optimal middle-age Life’s Simple 7 score compared with an inadequate score. CONCLUSIONS Greater achievement of American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 in middle-age is associated with a lower lifetime occurrence of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function. PMID:25908393

  15. A case of congestive heart failure induced by therapeutic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushigami, Motohiko; Suruda, Hidetoshi; Mizukoshi, Masato; Umemoto, Masaaki; Fujiwara, Setsuko; Yamamoto, Katsuhiro; Ueno, Yuji; Nishio, Ichiro; Masuyama, Yoshiaki

    1985-01-01

    Valvular insufficiency in radiation-induced heart disease is very rare. We described a patient, 53 years old woman, who developed congestive heart failure 2.5 years later following radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. The findings on examinations including cardiac catheterization revealed pericarditis with effusion, mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency and pulmonary infarction. (author)

  16. Case of congestive heart failure induced by therapeutic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushigami, Motohiko; Suruda, Hidetoshi; Mizukoshi, Masato; Umemoto, Masaaki; Fujiwara, Setsuko; Yamamoto, Katsuhiro; Ueno, Yuji; Nishio, Ichiro; Masuyama, Yoshiaki

    1985-02-01

    Valvular insufficiency in radiation-induced heart disease is very rare. We described a patient, 53 years old woman, who developed congestive heart failure 2.5 years later following radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. The findings on examinations including cardiac catheterization revealed pericarditis with effusion, mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency and pulmonary infarction. (author).

  17. Repetitive use of levosimendan in advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poelzl, Gerhard; Altenberger, Johann; Baholli, Loant

    2017-01-01

    Patients in the latest stages of heart failure are severely compromised, with poor quality of life and frequent hospitalizations. Heart transplantation and left ventricular assist device implantation are viable options only for a minority, and intermittent or continuous infusions of positive...

  18. Diuretic response and renal function in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, Jozine Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    In patients with heart failure fluid overload is a frequently occurring problem, which is among others caused by an impaired function of the heart. This fluid overload may lead to severe dyspnea warranting an acute hospitalization. The first choice treatment of this fluid overload is administration

  19. Left ventricular assist device therapy in advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Rogers, Joseph G

    2017-01-01

    Despite improvements in pharmacological therapy and pacing, prognosis in advanced heart failure (HF) remains poor, with a 1-year mortality of 25-50%. While heart transplantation provides excellent survival and quality of life for eligible patients, only a few can be offered this treatment due...

  20. Paediatric heart failure from the eyes of the cardiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Paolo Bassareo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The causes of heart failure (HF in children differ substantially from those found in the adult population. They comprise cardiac and noncardiac causes. Today, with the near-disappearance of rheumatic fever, the most common cause of pediatric HF are congenital heart diseases, whilst cardiomyopathies are the most common cause of HF in children with a structurally normal heart. Signs and symptoms of pediatric HF are often not specific, most of all in newborns (difficulties in breastfeeding, excessive sweating, growth retardation and poor weight gain. The aim of the therapy is to clinically control HF through general measures as well as drugs administration. In this respect, due to the lack of large interventional trials, the HF in newborns and children is often extrapolated from adult large trials. Cardiac transplantation is currently the treatment option with good outcome and long-term survival in pediatric patients with end-stage or refractory HF.  Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  1. Left atrial leiomyosarcoma as cause of heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes Martin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The case of a 26 year-old patient with diagnosis of heart failure and presence of a mobile echogenic mass without calcification attached to the posterolateral area of the left atrium was reported. She underwent surgery and tissue examination evidenced a high-grade heart leiomyosarcoma. Postoperative course was satisfactory and her clinical state was rigorously monitored by oncology and heart specialists in the institution

  2. Role of strain imaging in right heart disease: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Arun; Poongkunran, Chithra; Jayaraj, Mahendran; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2014-10-01

    Advances in the imaging techniques of the heart have fueled the interest in understanding of right heart pathology. Recently, speckle tracking echocardiography has shown to aid in understanding various right heart diseases and better management. Its role is well established in diagnosing right heart failure, pulmonary artery hypertension, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and congenital heart disease. We review the basic mechanics of speckle tracking and analyze its role in various right heart conditions.

  3. Predictors of incident heart failure in patients after an acute coronary syndrome: The LIPID heart failure risk-prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Andrea; Barnes, Elizabeth H; Blankenberg, Stefan; Colquhoun, David M; Hunt, David; Nestel, Paul J; Stewart, Ralph A; West, Malcolm J; White, Harvey D; Simes, John; Tonkin, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    Coronary heart disease is a major cause of heart failure. Availability of risk-prediction models that include both clinical parameters and biomarkers is limited. We aimed to develop such a model for prediction of incident heart failure. A multivariable risk-factor model was developed for prediction of first occurrence of heart failure death or hospitalization. A simplified risk score was derived that enabled subjects to be grouped into categories of 5-year risk varying from 20%. Among 7101 patients from the LIPID study (84% male), with median age 61years (interquartile range 55-67years), 558 (8%) died or were hospitalized because of heart failure. Older age, history of claudication or diabetes mellitus, body mass index>30kg/m 2 , LDL-cholesterol >2.5mmol/L, heart rate>70 beats/min, white blood cell count, and the nature of the qualifying acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction or unstable angina) were associated with an increase in heart failure events. Coronary revascularization was associated with a lower event rate. Incident heart failure increased with higher concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide >50ng/L, cystatin C>0.93nmol/L, D-dimer >273nmol/L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein >4.8nmol/L, and sensitive troponin I>0.018μg/L. Addition of biomarkers to the clinical risk model improved the model's C statistic from 0.73 to 0.77. The net reclassification improvement incorporating biomarkers into the clinical model using categories of 5-year risk was 23%. Adding a multibiomarker panel to conventional parameters markedly improved discrimination and risk classification for future heart failure events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitrates for acute heart failure syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Abel; McCabe, Aileen; Kidney, Rachel; Brooks, Steven C; Seupaul, Rawle A; Diercks, Deborah B; Salter, Nigel; Fermann, Gregory J; Pospisil, Caroline

    2013-08-06

    Current drug therapy for acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) consists mainly of diuretics supplemented by vasodilators or inotropes. Nitrates have been used as vasodilators in AHFS for many years and have been shown to improve some aspects of AHFS in some small studies. The aim of this review was to determine the clinical efficacy and safety of nitrate vasodilators in AHFS. To quantify the effect of different nitrate preparations (isosorbide dinitrate and nitroglycerin) and the effect of route of administration of nitrates on clinical outcome, and to evaluate the safety and tolerability of nitrates in the management of AHFS. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1950 to July week 2 2011) and EMBASE (1980 to week 28 2011). We searched the Current Controlled Trials MetaRegister of Clinical Trials (compiled by Current Science) (July 2011). We checked the reference lists of trials and contacted trial authors. We imposed no language restriction. Randomised controlled trials comparing nitrates (isosorbide dinitrate and nitroglycerin) with alternative interventions (frusemide and morphine, frusemide alone, hydralazine, prenalterol, intravenous nesiritide and placebo) in the management of AHFS in adults aged 18 and over. Two authors independently performed data extraction. Two authors performed trial quality assessment. We used mean difference (MD), odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to measure effect sizes. Two authors independently assessed and rated the methodological quality of each trial using the Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias. Four studies (634 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Two of the included studies included only patients with AHFS following acute myocardial infarction (AMI); one study excluded patients with overt AMI; and one study included participants with AHFS with and without acute coronary syndromes.Based on a single study

  5. Heart failure complicating tetralogy of Fallot | Ogunkunle | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Heart failure is considered to be an unusual complication of uncorrected tetralogy of Fallot. Patients and method: Three adolescents with tetralogy of Fallot, presenting in congestive cardiac failure are presented. Two died. Myocardial infarction was found in the only patient that underwent autopsy, and is thought ...

  6. [Management of heart failure in cardiology and primary care (MICCAP) program: Improving the management of patients with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, V; Escobar, C; Pallares, V; Egocheaga, M I; Lobos, J M; Bover, R; Gómez Doblas, J J; Cosín, J

    2018-03-26

    Despite current treatments, morbidity and mortality of patients with heart failure remain high. The late diagnosis of heart failure, the insufficient heart failure treatment (i.e. not using the appropriate drugs, prescribing lower doses of drugs than recommended, etc.), and a poor coordination between different health care levels, may explain, at least in part, these figures. The Management of Heart Failure in Cardiology and Primary Care (MICCAP) program has been developed with the aim of optimising the integrated management of patients with heart failure between Primary Care and Cardiology, through the improvement of coordination between both health care levels. This includes continuous medical education to reinforce the diagnostic and therapeutic skills of general practitioners in the field of heart failure. The rationale and objectives of the MICCAP program are summarised in this article. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Determining 30-day readmission risk for heart failure patients: the Readmission After Heart Failure scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Ronald S; Sond, Jaswinder; Mahendraraj, Krishnaraj; Lau, Christine Sm; Siracuse, Brianna L

    2018-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF), which affects >5 million Americans, accounts for >1 million hospitalizations annually. As a part of the Hospital Readmission Reduction Program, the Affordable Care Act requires that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services reduce payments to hospitals with excess readmissions. This study sought to develop a scale that reliably predicts readmission rates among patients with CHF. The State Inpatient Database (2006-2011) was utilized, and discharge data including demographic and clinical characteristics on 642,448 patients with CHF from California and New York (derivation cohort) and 365,359 patients with CHF from Florida and Washington (validation cohort) were extracted. The Readmission After Heart Failure (RAHF) scale was developed to predict readmission risk. The 30-day readmission rates were 9.42 and 9.17% (derivation and validation cohorts, respectively). Age readmission risk after hospitalization for CHF. The RAHF scale was created and explained the 95% of readmission variability within the validation cohort. The RAHF scale was then used to define the following three levels of risk for readmission: low (RAHF score readmission rate), moderate (RAHF score 12-15; 9.78% readmission rate), and high (RAHF score >15; 12.04% readmission rate). The relative risk of readmission was 1.67 for the high-risk group compared with the low-risk group. The RAHF scale reliably predicts a patient's 30-day CHF readmission risk based on demographic and clinical factors present upon initial admission. By risk-stratifying patients, using models such as the RAHF scale, strategies tailored to each patient can be implemented to improve patient outcomes and reduce health care costs.

  8. Clinical presentation at first heart failure hospitalization does not predict recurrent heart failure admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosztin, Annamaria; Costa, Jason; Moss, Arthur J; Biton, Yitschak; Nagy, Vivien Klaudia; Solomon, Scott D; Geller, Laszlo; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Merkely, Bela; Kutyifa, Valentina

    2017-11-01

    There are limited data on whether clinical presentation at first heart failure (HF) hospitalization predicts recurrent HF events. We aimed to assess predictors of recurrent HF hospitalizations in mild HF patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator. Data on HF hospitalizations were prospectively collected for patients enrolled in MADIT-CRT. Predictors of recurrent HF hospitalization (HF2) after the first HF hospitalization were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression models including baseline covariates and clinical presentation or management at first HF hospitalization. There were 193 patients with first HF hospitalization, and 156 patients with recurrent HF events. Recurrent HF rate after the first HF hospitalization was 43% at 1 year, 52% at 2 years, and 55% at 2.5 years. Clinical signs and symptoms, medical treatment, or clinical management of HF at first HF admission was not predictive for HF2. Baseline covariates predicting recurrent HF hospitalization included prior HF hospitalization (HR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.15-2.20, P = 0.005), digitalis therapy (HR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.13-2.20, P = 0.008), and left ventricular end-diastolic volume >240 mL (HR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.17-2.25, P = 0.004). Recurrent HF events are frequent following the first HF hospitalization in patients with implanted implantable cardioverter defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator. Neither clinical presentation nor clinical management during first HF admission was predictive of recurrent HF. Prior HF hospitalization, digitalis therapy, and left ventricular end-diastolic volume at enrolment predicted recurrent HF hospitalization, and these covariates could be used as surrogate markers for identifying a high-risk cohort. © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  9. Utility of the Seattle Heart Failure Model in patients with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P; Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki V; Giamouzis, Grigorios; Smith, Andrew L; Agha, Syed A; Waheed, Sana; Laskar, Sonjoy; Puskas, John; Dunbar, Sandra; Vega, David; Levy, Wayne C; Butler, Javed

    2009-01-27

    The aim of this study was to validate the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) in patients with advanced heart failure (HF). The SHFM was developed primarily from clinical trial databases and extrapolated the benefit of interventions from published data. We evaluated the discrimination and calibration of SHFM in 445 advanced HF patients (age 52 +/- 12 years, 68.5% male, 52.4% white, ejection fraction 18 +/- 8%) referred for cardiac transplantation. The primary end point was death (n = 92), urgent transplantation (n = 14), or left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation (n = 3); a secondary analysis was performed on mortality alone. Patients were receiving optimal therapy (angiotensin-II modulation 92.8%, beta-blockers 91.5%, aldosterone antagonists 46.3%), and 71.0% had an implantable device (defibrillator 30.4%, biventricular pacemaker 3.4%, combined 37.3%). During a median follow-up of 21 months, 109 patients (24.5%) had an event. Although discrimination was adequate (c-statistic >0.7), the SHFM overall underestimated absolute risk (observed vs. predicted event rate: 11.0% vs. 9.2%, 21.0% vs. 16.6%, and 27.9% vs. 22.8% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively). Risk underprediction was more prominent in patients with an implantable device. The SHFM had different calibration properties in white versus black patients, leading to net underestimation of absolute risk in blacks. Race-specific recalibration improved the accuracy of predictions. When analysis was restricted to mortality, the SHFM exhibited better performance. In patients with advanced HF, the SHFM offers adequate discrimination, but absolute risk is underestimated, especially in blacks and in patients with devices. This is more prominent when including transplantation and LVAD implantation as an end point.

  10. Surgical approach to end-stage heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Stefan; Scheld, Hans H

    2011-02-01

    End-stage heart failure is a challenging disease with growing incidence. With decreasing heart transplant rates worldwide organ preserving therapies become, again, of interest. The purpose of the present review is to examine the potential challenges of surgical therapies in patients with end-stage heart failure. The gold-standard for end-stage heart failure is and will be cardiac transplantation. However, due to organ shortage this therapy is limited to a few patients. Therefore implantation of ventricular assist devices (VADs) or long-term minimal-invasive partial support devices will increase. Improvements in device design with smaller devices, easier implantation techniques, and modified anticoagulation outcome and long-term success will likely improve. In addition, good quality of life as destination therapy is almost available. Organ conservation surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting and surgical ventricular restoration or surgical repair of mitral valve regurgitation) in end-stage heart failure patients could not prove the expected results. Transcatheter or minimal-invasive approaches of these therapies might become routine in the near future. Due to the overwhelming outcome rates, cardiac transplantation is the most established surgical therapy for end-stage heart failure. VAD therapy is increasing and minimized VADs might further open the market for destination therapy/permanent support.

  11. Management of Mechanical Ventilation in Decompensated Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooks T. Kuhn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation (MV is a life-saving intervention for respiratory failure, including decompensated congestive heart failure. MV can reduce ventricular preload and afterload, decrease extra-vascular lung water, and decrease the work of breathing in heart failure. The advantages of positive pressure ventilation must be balanced with potential harm from MV: volutrauma, hyperoxia-induced injury, and difficulty assessing readiness for liberation. In this review, we will focus on cardiac, pulmonary, and broader effects of MV on patients with decompensated HF, focusing on practical considerations for management and supporting evidence.

  12. Endovascular retrieval of a CardioMEMS heart failure system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Reghunathan, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available As the creation and utilization of new implantable devices increases, so does the need for interventionalists to devise unique retrieval mechanisms. This report describes the first endovascular retrieval of a CardioMEMS heart failure monitoring device. A 20-mm gooseneck snare was utilized in conjunction with a 9-French sheath and Envoy catheter for retrieval. The patient suffered no immediate postprocedural complications but died 5 days after the procedure from multiorgan failure secondary to sepsis. Keywords: CardioMEMS heart failure system, Endovascular retrieval

  13. Microarray Expression Profile of Circular RNAs in Heart Tissue of Mice with Myocardial Infarction-Induced Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Jin Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Myocardial infarction (MI is a serious complication of atherosclerosis associated with increasing mortality attributable to heart failure. This study is aimed to assess the global changes in and characteristics of the transcriptome of circular RNAs (circRNAs in heart tissue during MI induced heart failure (HF. Methods: Using a post-myocardial infarction (MI model of HF in mice, we applied microarray assay to examine the transcriptome of circRNAs deregulated in the heart during HF. We confirmed the changes in circRNAs by quantitative PCR. Results: We revealed and confirmed a number of circRNAs that were deregulated during HF, which suggests a potential role of circRNAs in HF. Conclusions: The distinct expression patterns of circulatory circRNAs during HF indicate that circRNAs may actively respond to stress and thus serve as biomarkers of HF diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Understanding the heterogeneity in volume overload and fluid distribution in decompensated heart failure is key to optimal volume management: role for blood volume quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Wayne L; Mullan, Brian P

    2014-06-01

    This study sought to quantitate total blood volume (TBV) in patients hospitalized for decompensated chronic heart failure (DCHF) and to determine the extent of volume overload, and the magnitude and distribution of blood volume and body water changes following diuretic therapy. The accurate assessment and management of volume overload in patients with DCHF remains problematic. TBV was measured by a radiolabeled-albumin dilution technique with intravascular volume, pre-to-post-diuretic therapy, evaluated at hospital admission and at discharge. Change in body weight in relation to quantitated TBV was used to determine interstitial volume contribution to total fluid loss. Twenty-six patients were prospectively evaluated. Two patients had normal TBV at admission. Twenty-four patients were hypervolemic with TBV (7.4 ± 1.6 liters) increased by +39 ± 22% (range, +9.5% to +107%) above the expected normal volume. With diuresis, TBV decreased marginally (+30 ± 16%). Body weight declined by 6.9 ± 5.2 kg, and fluid intake/fluid output was a net negative 8.4 ± 5.2 liters. Interstitial compartment fluid loss was calculated at 6.2 ± 4.0 liters, accounting for 85 ± 15% of the total fluid reduction. TBV analysis demonstrated a wide range in the extent of intravascular overload. Dismissal measurements revealed marginally reduced intravascular volume post-diuretic therapy despite large reductions in body weight. Mobilization of interstitial fluid to the intravascular compartment with diuresis accounted for this disparity. Intravascular volume, however, remained increased at dismissal. The extent, composition, and distribution of volume overload are highly variable in DCHF, and this variability needs to be taken into account in the approach to individualized therapy. TBV quantitation, particularly serial measurements, can facilitate informed volume management with respect to a goal of treating to euvolemia. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published

  15. Personalizing protocol-driven care: the case of specialist heart failure nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Tom; Harrison, Stephen; Checkland, Katherine

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to explore how specialist heart failure nurses negotiate treatment advice with patients, in the context of an increasing expectation that clinical staff in the National Health Services will follow guidelines in their daily work. The development of specialist nurse roles has given rise to questions about their compatibility with patient-centred care. However, research has revealed little about how specialist nurses balance clinical guidelines with traditional caring tasks. Semi-structured interviews (n = 10) were conducted with specialist heart failure nurses in northern England recruited from a heart failure specialist nursing contact list. In addition, non-participant observations were carried out on nurse-patient consultations (n = 16) in one regional nurse-led heart failure clinic. Data were collected between 2003 and 2005, and analysed using a variation of grounded theory. Heart failure nurses sought to combine traditional caring work with the wider goal of improving patient outcomes by 'personalizing' their advice to patients and presenting their heart failure as 'typical'. They accommodated protocol-driven care into their daily routines, and perceived no disjuncture between evidence-based practice and patient-centredness. However, their approach allowed little space for the exploration of each patient's own priorities about their illness. There is a need both to re-examine the appropriateness of traditional caring concepts, and to reflect on the need to incorporate patients' own values into the consultation process.

  16. Construct validity of the Heart Failure Screening Tool (Heart-FaST) to identify heart failure patients at risk of poor self-care: Rasch analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Nicholas A; Ski, Chantal F; McEvedy, Samantha M; Thompson, David R; Cameron, Jan

    2018-02-14

    The aim of this study was to psychometrically evaluate the Heart Failure Screening Tool (Heart-FaST) via: (1) examination of internal construct validity; (2) testing of scale function in accordance with design; and (3) recommendation for change/s, if items are not well adjusted, to improve psychometric credential. Self-care is vital to the management of heart failure. The Heart-FaST may provide a prospective assessment of risk, regarding the likelihood that patients with heart failure will engage in self-care. Psychometric validation of the Heart-FaST using Rasch analysis. The Heart-FaST was administered to 135 patients (median age = 68, IQR = 59-78 years; 105 males) enrolled in a multidisciplinary heart failure management program. The Heart-FaST is a nurse-administered tool for screening patients with HF at risk of poor self-care. A Rasch analysis of responses was conducted which tested data against Rasch model expectations, including whether items serve as unbiased, non-redundant indicators of risk and measure a single construct and that rating scales operate as intended. The results showed that data met Rasch model expectations after rescoring or deleting items due to poor discrimination, disordered thresholds, differential item functioning, or response dependence. There was no evidence of multidimensionality which supports the use of total scores from Heart-FaST as indicators of risk. Aggregate scores from this modified screening tool rank heart failure patients according to their "risk of poor self-care" demonstrating that the Heart-FaST items constitute a meaningful scale to identify heart failure patients at risk of poor engagement in heart failure self-care. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Problems experienced by informal caregivers of individuals with heart failure: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Joan S; Graven, Lucinda J

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine and synthesize recent literature regarding problems experienced by informal caregivers when providing care for individuals with heart failure in the home. Integrative literature review. A review of current empirical literature was conducted utilizing PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Sociological Abstracts, Social Sciences Full Text, PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, and Cochrane computerized databases. 19 qualitative, 16 quantitative, and 2 mixed methods studies met the inclusion criteria for review. Computerized databases were searched for a combination of subject terms (i.e., MeSH) and keywords related to informal caregivers, problems, and heart failure. The title and abstract of identified articles and reference lists were reviewed. Studies were included if they were published in English between January 2000 and December 2016 and examined problems experienced by informal caregivers in providing care for individuals with heart failure in the home. Studies were excluded if not written in English or if elements of caregiving in heart failure were not present in the title, abstract, or text. Unpublished and duplicate empirical literature as well as articles related to specific end-stage heart failure populations also were excluded. Methodology described by Cooper and others for integrative reviews of quantitative and qualitative research was used. Quality appraisal of the included studies was evaluated using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal tools for cross-sectional quantitative and qualitative studies. Informal caregivers experienced four key problems when providing care for individuals with heart failure in the home, including performing multifaceted activities and roles that evolve around daily heart failure demands; maintaining caregiver physical, emotional, social, spiritual, and financial well-being; having insufficient caregiver support; and performing caregiving with uncertainty

  18. Consensus statement on management of chronic heart failure in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Seth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary of the Consensus Statement: This statement has been prepared keeping Indian heart failure patients in mind. Optimal management of CHF improves quality of life, reduces hospitalization rates and prolongs survival for people with this condition. Echocardiography is the single most useful test in the evaluation of heart failure, and is necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Plasma B-natriuretic peptide (BNP measurements may be useful in excluding CHF but not mandatory in India. Educate people with CHF about lifestyle changes (e.g., increase physical activity levels, reduce salt intake and manage weight. Educate people with CHF about CHF symptoms and how to manage fluid load. Avoid prescribing drugs that exacerbate CHF. Prescribe angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI at effective doses for people with all grades of systolic heart failure, and titrate to the highest recommended dose tolerated. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA may be used as alternatives in people who cannot tolerate ACEIs. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs should also be used. For people with stabilised systolic heart failure, prescribe beta-blockers that have been shown to improve outcome in heart failure (e.g., bisoprolol, carvedilol, extended release metoprolol or nebivolol. Titrate to the highest recommended dose tolerated. Prescribe diuretics, digoxin and nitrates for people already using ACEIs and beta-blockers to manage symptoms as indicated. For people who have systolic heart failure (New York Heart Association (NYHA Class II-IV despite appropriate doses of ACEIs and diuretics, consider prescribing spironolactone. Eplerenone can be considered in certain setting especially post myocardial infarction though it is more expensive. Consider direct sinus node inhibition with ivabradine for people with CHF who have impaired systolic function, have had a recent heart failure hospitalisation and are in sinus rhythm with a heart rate >70 bpm despite

  19. Bidirectional Cardio-Respiratory Interactions in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola N. Radovanović

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated cardio-respiratory coupling in patients with heart failure by quantification of bidirectional interactions between cardiac (RR intervals and respiratory signals with complementary measures of time series analysis. Heart failure patients were divided into three groups of twenty, age and gender matched, subjects: with sinus rhythm (HF-Sin, with sinus rhythm and ventricular extrasystoles (HF-VES, and with permanent atrial fibrillation (HF-AF. We included patients with indication for implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy device. ECG and respiratory signals were simultaneously acquired during 20 min in supine position at spontaneous breathing frequency in 20 healthy control subjects and in patients before device implantation. We used coherence, Granger causality and cross-sample entropy analysis as complementary measures of bidirectional interactions between RR intervals and respiratory rhythm. In heart failure patients with arrhythmias (HF-VES and HF-AF there is no coherence between signals (p < 0.01, while in HF-Sin it is reduced (p < 0.05, compared with control subjects. In all heart failure groups causality between signals is diminished, but with significantly stronger causality of RR signal in respiratory signal in HF-VES. Cross-sample entropy analysis revealed the strongest synchrony between respiratory and RR signal in HF-VES group. Beside respiratory sinus arrhythmia there is another type of cardio-respiratory interaction based on the synchrony between cardiac and respiratory rhythm. Both of them are altered in heart failure patients. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is reduced in HF-Sin patients and vanished in heart failure patients with arrhythmias. Contrary, in HF-Sin and HF-VES groups, synchrony increased, probably as consequence of some dominant neural compensatory mechanisms. The coupling of cardiac and respiratory rhythm in heart failure patients varies depending on the

  20. Metformin and thiazolidinedione use in Medicare patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Frederick A; Wang, Yongfei; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Setaro, John F; Havranek, Edward P; Foody, JoAnne M; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2003-07-02

    According to package inserts, metformin is contraindicated in diabetic patients receiving drug treatment for heart failure therapy, and thiazolidinediones are not recommended in diabetic patients with symptoms of advanced heart failure. Little is known about patterns of use of these antihyperglycemic drugs in diabetic patients with heart failure. To determine the proportions of patients hospitalized with heart failure and concomitant diabetes treated with metformin or thiazolidinediones. Serial cross-sectional measurements using data from retrospective medical record abstraction. Nongovernmental acute care hospitals in the United States. Two nationally representative samples of Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized with the primary diagnosis of heart failure and concomitant diabetes between April 1998 and March 1999 and between July 2000 and June 2001. The prescription of either metformin or a thiazolidinedione at hospital discharge. In the 1998-1999 sample (n = 12 505), 7.1% of patients were discharged with a prescription for metformin, 7.2% with a prescription for a thiazolidinedione, and 13.5% with a prescription for either drug. In the 2000-2001 sample (n = 13 158), metformin use increased to 11.2%, thiazolidinedione use to 16.1%, and use of either drug to 24.4% (Puse of metformin and thiazolidinediones is common and has increased rapidly in Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes and heart failure in direct contrast with explicit warnings against this practice by the Food and Drug Administration. Further studies to establish the safety and effectiveness of this practice are needed to ensure optimal care of patients with diabetes and heart failure.

  1. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE) genotypes in heart failure: relation to etiology and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Daniel Vega; Pecini, Redi; Gustafsson, Finn

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF) and ischemia). Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role...... and the prognostic significance of HFE genotypes....

  2. Renal dysfunction prevalence and clinical impact in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palazzuoli A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Palazzuoli, Susanna Benincasa, Stefanie Grothgar, Pasquale Di Sipio, Giovanni Paganini, Marco Pellegrini, Ranuccio NutiDepartment of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Cardiology Section, Le Scotte Hospital, University of Siena, ItalyAbstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with a significant increase in death and cardiovascular mortality. However the exact mechanism by which CKD impairs the cardiovascular outcome is not well established. Some reasons may lie in the association of CKD with several other cardiovascular and noncardiovascular disorders including accelerated systemic atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, increased levels of inflammatory factors, anemic status, bone mineral dysfunction, electrolyte imbalance, and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS activation. Therefore several risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, lipid disorders, and older age are common in both conditions. In patients affected with heart failure (HF a key role is represented by the neurohormonal activation. This condition causes fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, as well as increased congestion and cardiac workload. Moreover, HF during the decompensated phases is often associated with a worsening renal function that leads to further RAAS activation, microvascular damage, and intrarenal flow redistribution. In order to clarify the interactions between these factors, several questions need to be answered: the universal definition of “worsening renal function,” the identification of the best laboratory parameters to investigate renal function in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and a better definition of the comorbidities’ role in the determination of the outcome, especially in patients with chronic HF. A clarification of these key points could lead to the individualization of new specific therapeutic targets and to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with HF and

  3. Is there a role for upper-extremity intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation as a bridge-to-recovery or a bridge-to-transplant in the treatment of end-stage heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaejike, Nnamdi; Son, Andre Y; Milano, Carmelo A; Daneshmand, Mani A

    2017-10-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: Is there a role for upper-extremity intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation (UE-IABP) in the treatment of end-stage heart failure? Altogether 230 papers were found using the reported search, of which 6 papers represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Of the 163 bridge-to-transplantation (BTT) patients, 141 (86.5%) were successfully transplanted and of the 9 bridge-to-recovery (BTR) patients, 6 (66.7%) were successfully weaned from the device. Length of support ranged from 3 to 152 days, and the most frequent complications were device malfunction or migration necessitating exchange or repositioning, occurring at a collective rate of 37.3%. UE-IABP is a minimally invasive and cost-effective strategy that provides haemodynamic support while preserving both the mediastinum and the functional status in BTR and BTT patients who may not tolerate more invasive modes of mechanical circulatory support. We conclude that UE-IABP can be used as a bridge-to-recovery (BTR) or transplant (BTT) in patients with end-stage heart failure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. HEART FAILURE – KEEPING STEP WITH THE PROGRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Diaconu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure continues to represent a major problem for the healthcare systems worldwide, because of high prevalence and impact on patients’ quality of life. Between May 25-28, 2018, in Vienna, Austria, took place the European Congress of Heart Failure and the World Congress on Acute Heart Failure, organized by the European Society of Cardiology. The congress was a forum of exchanging expertise in diagnosis and treatment of heart failure, and also an opportunity to present the latest progresses regarding the management of this pathology. It seems that an integrated, multidisciplinary team approach is the future for heart failure management. This team should include internists, cardiologists, general practitioners, and nurses. The new President of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology is from a Balkan country, Prof. Petar M. Seferovic, from the Belgrade University Medical Center, Serbia. In one of his presentations, Prof. Seferovic highlighted that the treatment of chronic heart failure should explore new frontiers. Recently, there is much interest in established antidiabetic drugs to treat cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Introduction of sodium-glucose transport protein 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors in the late 1990s was a major breakthrough in the treatment of diabetes complications. These drugs are the only antidiabetic drugs with good results in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, demonstrated by several large randomized controlled trials, such as EMPA-REG (the first study to demonstrate a significant reduction in both cardiovascular mortality and heart failure-related hospitalization in patients treated with empaglifozin, a SGLT2 inhibitor. SGLT2 inhibitors are now recommended by some guidelines for the prevention of heart failure and associated mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. The international registry REPORT HF, presented in Vienna, enrolled more than 18,000 patients from 44

  5. Factors Influencing the Predictive Power of Models for Predicting Mortality and/or Heart Failure Hospitalization in Patients With Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwerkerk, Wouter; Voors, Adriaan A.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper systematically reviews and compares existing prediction models in order to establish the strongest variables, models, and model characteristics in patients with heart failure predicting outcome. To improve decision making accurately predicting mortality and heart-failure

  6. [Refractory heart failure. Models of hospital, ambulatory, and home management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Fabrizio; Alunni, Gianfranco

    2002-08-01

    Chronic heart failure is an enormous and growing public health problem and is reaching epidemic proportions. Its economic impact is dramatic; two thirds of expenses are for hospitalizations and relatively little is being spent for medications and outpatient visits. Most of the hospitalizations, deaths and costs are incurred by a relatively small minority of patients who may be described as having "complex", "advanced", "refractory" or "end-stage" heart failure; however, in essence they are patients who have severe symptoms and/or recurrent hospitalizations and/or emergency department visits despite maximal oral therapy. Many of the recommendations regarding the management of these patients are based more on experience than on evidence from controlled trials. This, because such patients require an individualized therapy which limits their inclusion in large trials and because support is less easily available when testing specific strategies than when testing specific agents. Improving the treatment of this group of patients by optimizing their medical regimen, aggressive monitoring and providing early intervention to avert heart failure can reduce their morbidity, mortality and costs of care. Refractory heart failure is not a single disease and it is extremely unlikely that all patients should be treated in a similar manner; before selecting the appropriate therapy, the clinician must categorize and profile the patient. The first step should be a re-evaluation of the previous treatment because many patients are treated suboptimally. It is also important to identify reversible or precipitating factors. For patients with advanced heart failure, the initial goal of therapy is to improve symptoms; the next goal is to maintain the improvement and to prevent later deterioration. The appropriate treatment plan will reflect the presence of comorbidities, the patients' history regarding previous responses to therapy, their own expectations with regard to daily life. The most

  7. Ejection fraction and outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Amitava; Taillandier, Sophie; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) increases the risk of stroke and thrombo-embolism (TE) in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), and is incorporated in stroke risk stratification scores. We aimed to establish the role of ejection fraction (EF) in risk prediction in patients with NVAF and HF.......Heart failure (HF) increases the risk of stroke and thrombo-embolism (TE) in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), and is incorporated in stroke risk stratification scores. We aimed to establish the role of ejection fraction (EF) in risk prediction in patients with NVAF and HF....

  8. New pharmacological and technological management strategies in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhry SP

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sunit-Preet Chaudhry,1 Garrick C Stewart2 1Division of Cardiology, St Vincent Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, 2Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Center for Advanced Heart Disease, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Heart failure is a complex clinical syndrome resulting from impairment of ventricular filling or ejection of blood associated with symptoms of dyspnea, fatigue, as well as peripheral and/or pulmonary edema. This syndrome is progressive and characterized by worsening quality of life despite escalating levels of care, affecting 5.7 million Americans with an annual cost of over $30 billion US dollars. Treatment for this syndrome has evolved over three distinct eras: the nonpharmacological era, the pharmacological era, and the device era, with the focus shifting from symptomatic relief to decreasing morbidity and mortality. Over the past 10 years, the field has undergone a renaissance, with the development of new pharmacologic, hemodynamic monitoring, and device therapies proven to improve outcomes in patients with heart failure. This article will review several recent innovations in the management of patients with heart failure. Keywords: heart failure, heart-assist devices, disease management

  9. Inotropes do not increase mortality in advanced heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglin M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maya Guglin, Marc KaufmanUniversity of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Inotrope use is one of the most controversial topics in the management of heart failure. While the heart failure community utilizes them and recognizes the state of inotrope dependency, retrospective analyses and registry data have overwhelmingly suggested high mortality, which is logically to be expected given the advanced disease states of those requiring their use. Currently, there is a relative paucity of randomized control trials due to the ethical dilemma of creating control groups by withholding inotropes from patients who require them. Nonetheless, results of such trials have been mixed. Many were also performed with agents no longer in use, on patients without an indication for inotropes, or at a time before automatic cardio-defibrillators were recommended for primary prevention. Thus, their results may not be generalizable to current clinical practice. In this review, we discuss current indications for inotrope use, specifically dobutamine and milrinone, depicting their mechanisms of action, delineating their patterns of use in clinical practice, defining the state of inotrope dependency, and ultimately examining the literature to ascertain whether evidence is sufficient to support the current view that these agents increase mortality in patients with heart failure. Our conclusion is that the evidence is insufficient to link inotropes and increased mortality in low output heart failure.Keywords: inotropes, dobutamine, milrinone, heart failure

  10. Impaired chronotropic response to physical activities in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hong; Zhao, Jianrong; Zhou, Xiaohong; Li, Jingbo; Wan, Qing; Huang, Jing; Li, Hui; Wu, Liqun; Yang, Shungang; Wang, Ping

    2017-05-25

    While exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation has a beneficial effect on heart failure hospitalization and mortality, it is limited by the presence of chronotropic incompetence (CI) in some patients. This study explored the feasibility of using wearable devices to assess impaired chronotropic response in heart failure patients. Forty patients with heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction, LVEF: 44.6 ± 5.8; age: 54.4 ± 11.7) received ECG Holter and accelerometer to monitor heart rate (HR) and physical activities during symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing, 6-min hall walk (6MHW), and 24-h daily living. CI was defined as maximal HR during peak exercise testing failing to reach 70% of age-predicted maximal HR (APMHR, 220 - age). The correlation between HR and physical activities in Holter-accelerometer recording was analyzed. Of 40 enrolled patients, 26 were able to perform treadmill exercise testing. Based on exercise test reports, 13 (50%) of 26 patients did not achieve at least 70% of APMHR (CI patients). CI patients achieved a lower % APMHR (62.0 ± 6.3%) than non-CI patients who achieved 72.0 ± 1.2% of APMHR (P failure patients who took treadmill exercise testing. The wearable Holter-accelerometer recording could help to identify impaired chronotropic response to physical activities in heart failure patients. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT02358603 . Registered 16 May 2014.

  11. Quality and Health Literacy Demand of Online Heart Failure Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajita, Maan Isabella; Rodney, Tamar; Xu, Jingzhi; Hladek, Melissa; Han, Hae-Ra

    The ubiquity of the Internet is changing the way people obtain their health information. Although there is an abundance of heart failure information online, the quality and health literacy demand of these information are still unknown. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the quality and health literacy demand (readability, understandability, and actionability) of the heart failure information found online. Google, Yahoo, Bing, Ask.com, and DuckDuckGo were searched for relevant heart failure Web sites. Two independent raters then assessed the quality and health literacy demand of the included Web sites. The quality of the heart failure information was assessed using the DISCERN instrument. Readability was assessed using 7 established readability tests. Finally, understandability and actionability were assessed using the Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool for Print Materials. A total of 46 Web sites were included in this analysis. The overall mean quality rating was 46.0 ± 8.9 and the mean readability score was 12.6 grade reading level. The overall mean understandability score was 56.3% ± 16.2%. Finally, the overall mean actionability score was 34.7% ± 28.7%. The heart failure information found online was of fair quality but required a relatively high health literacy level. Web content authors need to consider not just the quality but also the health literacy demand of the information found in their Web sites. This is especially important considering that low health literacy is likely prevalent among the usual audience.

  12. GRAVES’ DISEASE INDUCED REVERSIBLE SEVERE RIGHT HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathyayani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A middle aged man presented with evidence of right - sided heart failure in atrial fibrillation (AF and was found to have severe Tricuspid Regurgitation (TR with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH, with normal left ventricular function. The common possible seconda ry causes of PAH were ruled out, but during investigation he was found to have elevated thyroid function tests compatible with the diagnosis of Graves’ disease. The treatment of Graves’ disease was started with anti - thyroid drugs and associated with a sign ificant reduction in the pulmonary arterial pressure. This case report is presented to highlight one of the rare and underdiagnosed presentations of Graves’ disease. Thyrotoxicosis can present with profound cardiovascular complications. In recent times, th ere have been few reports of secondary PAH with TR in patients with hyperthyroidism. Previously asymptomatic Graves’ disease having the signs and symptoms of right heart failure is a rare presentation and the association could be easily missed. This case p resentation emphasizes that the diagnosis of thyroid heart disease with heart failure secondary to Graves’ disease should be considered in any patient regardless of age, gender with clinical features of heart failure of unknown etiology and timely initiation of anti - thyroid drugs is necessary to treat these reversible cardiac failures.

  13. Use of Inotropic Agents in Treatment of Systolic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaib Tariq

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The most common use of inotropes is among hospitalized patients with acute decompensated heart failure, with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and with signs of end-organ dysfunction in the setting of a low cardiac output. Inotropes can be used in patients with severe systolic heart failure awaiting heart transplant to maintain hemodynamic stability or as a bridge to decision. In cases where patients are unable to be weaned off inotropes, these agents can be used until a definite or escalated supportive therapy is planned, which can include coronary revascularization or mechanical circulatory support (intra-aortic balloon pump, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, impella, left ventricular assist device, etc.. Use of inotropic drugs is associated with risks and adverse events. This review will discuss the use of the inotropes digoxin, dopamine, dobutamine, norepinephrine, milrinone, levosimendan, and omecamtiv mecarbil. Long-term inotropic therapy should be offered in selected patients. A detailed conversation with the patient and family shall be held, including a discussion on the risks and benefits of use of inotropes. Chronic heart failure patients awaiting heart transplants are candidates for intravenous inotropic support until the donor heart becomes available. This helps to maintain hemodynamic stability and keep the fluid status and pulmonary pressures optimized prior to the surgery. On the other hand, in patients with severe heart failure who are not candidates for advanced heart failure therapies, such as transplant and mechanical circulatory support, inotropic agents can be used for palliative therapy. Inotropes can help reduce frequency of hospitalizations and improve symptoms in these patients.

  14. Use of Inotropic Agents in Treatment of Systolic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Sohaib; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2015-12-04

    The most common use of inotropes is among hospitalized patients with acute decompensated heart failure, with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and with signs of end-organ dysfunction in the setting of a low cardiac output. Inotropes can be used in patients with severe systolic heart failure awaiting heart transplant to maintain hemodynamic stability or as a bridge to decision. In cases where patients are unable to be weaned off inotropes, these agents can be used until a definite or escalated supportive therapy is planned, which can include coronary revascularization or mechanical circulatory support (intra-aortic balloon pump, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, impella, left ventricular assist device, etc.). Use of inotropic drugs is associated with risks and adverse events. This review will discuss the use of the inotropes digoxin, dopamine, dobutamine, norepinephrine, milrinone, levosimendan, and omecamtiv mecarbil. Long-term inotropic therapy should be offered in selected patients. A detailed conversation with the patient and family shall be held, including a discussion on the risks and benefits of use of inotropes. Chronic heart failure patients awaiting heart transplants are candidates for intravenous inotropic support until the donor heart becomes available. This helps to maintain hemodynamic stability and keep the fluid status and pulmonary pressures optimized prior to the surgery. On the other hand, in patients with severe heart failure who are not candidates for advanced heart failure therapies, such as transplant and mechanical circulatory support, inotropic agents can be used for palliative therapy. Inotropes can help reduce frequency of hospitalizations and improve symptoms in these patients.

  15. Spirituality and well being among elders: differences between elders with heart failure and those without heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T Quinn Griffin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mary T Quinn Griffin1, Yi-Hui Lee2, Ali Salman1, Yaewon Seo1, Patricia A Marin3, Randall C Starling3, Joyce J Fitzpatrick11Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH; 2College of Nursing and Health Wright State University Dayton, OH; 3Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OhioAbstract: Heart failure is a chronic debilitating disease that affects all aspects of a person’s life, including physical, mental and spiritual dimensions. The associations among these dimensions, and the relationship to overall health status, have not been clearly identified. The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive study was to explore differences between spirituality, depressive symptoms, and quality of life among elders with and without heart failure. A total of 44 elders with heart failure and 40 non-heart failure elders completed several questionnaires including: The Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (DSES, Spirituality Index of Well-Being (SIWB, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, and SF-12™ Health Survey. There were significant differences in the groups on gender and ethnicity; thus these variables were controlled in the analyses related to the dependent variables. After controlling for gender and ethnicity, there were significant differences in the physical component of quality of life and spiritual well-being. The heart failure patients had significantly lower physical quality of life but more spiritual well-being than the non-heart failure patients. There were no significant differences in daily spiritual experiences, mental component of quality of life, and depressive symptoms between the two groups.Keywords: spiritual experience, spiritual well-being, heart failure, depressive symptoms, quality of life, elders

  16. Economic impact of heart failure according to the effects of kidney failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicras Mainar, Antoni; Navarro Artieda, Ruth; Ibáñez Nolla, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the use of health care resources and their cost according to the effects of kidney failure in heart failure patients during 2-year follow-up in a population setting. Observational retrospective study based on a review of medical records. The study included patients ≥ 45 years treated for heart failure from 2008 to 2010. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the presence/absence of KF. Main outcome variables were comorbidity, clinical status (functional class, etiology), metabolic syndrome, costs, and new cases of cardiovascular events and kidney failure. The cost model included direct and indirect health care costs. Statistical analysis included multiple regression models. The study recruited 1600 patients (prevalence, 4.0%; mean age 72.4 years; women, 59.7%). Of these patients, 70.1% had hypertension, 47.1% had dyslipidemia, and 36.2% had diabetes mellitus. We analyzed 433 patients (27.1%) with kidney failure and 1167 (72.9%) without kidney failure. Patients with kidney failure were associated with functional class III-IV (54.1% vs 40.8%) and metabolic syndrome (65.3% vs 51.9%, P<.01). The average unit cost was €10,711.40. The corrected cost in the presence of kidney failure was €14,868.20 vs €9,364.50 (P=.001). During follow-up, 11.7% patients developed ischemic heart disease, 18.8% developed kidney failure, and 36.1% developed heart failure exacerbation. Comorbidity associated with heart failure is high. The presence of kidney failure increases the use of health resources and leads to higher costs within the National Health System. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Progressive nature of heart failure and systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Louridas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The progressive nature of heart failure (HF is the predominant cause for the clinical course that the HF syndrome is taking. Systems biology methodology is of the utmost importance to explain and comprehend the built-in mechanisms of adverse clinical progression. Various heart diseases produce myocardial damage with subsequent left ventricular remodeling which is the principal underlying pathophysiological mechanism for the clinical progression of HF. The self-organized positive feedback stabilization mechanisms of left ventricular remodeling, adrenergic stimulation and activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and natriuretic peptide systems, are hierarchical adaptive processes. These adaptive processes are responsible for further left ventricular remodeling with subsequent clinical deterioration and for the emergence of clinical phenotypes. These mechanisms are counteracted with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers and β-blockers in an attempt to improve the adverse clinical phenomena of HF progression in a new but clinically worse stabilization level. In this review our intention is to underline the progressive nature of the HF syndrome and to demonstrate the significance of ventricular remodeling and the role of self-organized positive feedback adaptive processes.

  18. Pathophysiology of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure: signaling pathways and novel therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Yow Keat; Bernardo, Bianca C; Ooi, Jenny Y Y; Weeks, Kate L; McMullen, Julie R

    2015-09-01

    The onset of heart failure is typically preceded by cardiac hypertrophy, a response of the heart to increased workload, a cardiac insult such as a heart attack or genetic mutation. Cardiac hypertrophy is usually characterized by an increase in cardiomyocyte size and thickening of ventricular walls. Initially, such growth is an adaptive response to maintain cardiac function; however, in settings of sustained stress and as time progresses, these changes become maladaptive and the heart ultimately fails. In this review, we discuss the key features of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and the numerous mediators that have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy affecting gene transcription, calcium handling, protein synthesis, metabolism, autophagy, oxidative stress and inflammation. We also discuss new mediators including signaling proteins, microRNAs, long noncoding RNAs and new findings related to the role of calcineurin and calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. We also highlight mediators and processes which contribute to the transition from adaptive cardiac remodeling to maladaptive remodeling and heart failure. Treatment strategies for heart failure commonly include diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers and β-blockers; however, mortality rates remain high. Here, we discuss new therapeutic approaches (e.g., RNA-based therapies, dietary supplementation, small molecules) either entering clinical trials or in preclinical development. Finally, we address the challenges that remain in translating these discoveries to new and approved therapies for heart failure.

  19. Value of Telemonitoring and Telemedicine in Heart Failure Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderighi, Camilla; Rasoini, Raffaele; Mazzanti, Marco; Casolo, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    The use of telemonitoring and telemedicine is a relatively new but quickly developing area in medicine. As new digital tools and applications are being created and used to manage medical conditions such as heart failure, many implications require close consideration and further study, including the effectiveness and safety of these telemonitoring tools in diagnosing, treating and managing heart failure compared to traditional face-to-face doctor–patient interaction. When compared to multidisciplinary intervention programs which are frequently hindered by economic, geographic and bureaucratic barriers, non-invasive remote monitoring could be a solution to support and promote the care of patients over time. Therefore it is crucial to identify the most relevant biological parameters to monitor, which heart failure sub-populations may gain real benefits from telehealth interventions and in which specific healthcare subsets these interventions should be implemented in order to maximise value. PMID:29387464

  20. Self-care in Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Céu Mendes Pinto Marques

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To adapt the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index V6.2 to Portuguese and analyze self-care capability in maintenance, management and self-confidence in patients with heart failure attending nursing care services at two Portuguese hospitals. Method: Exploratory study, sample of 110 patients who attended the nursing care service for patients with heart failure at two Portuguese hospitals, carried out over a six-month period. Descriptive statistics and psychometric tests were used. Results: Internal consistency similar to the original scale. The patients consisted mostly of older adults with low self-care literacy, low values associated with physical activity and salt control in meals taken outside the home, and inadequate control of signs and symptoms. Conclusion: Patients present difficulties in maintenance and management of the disease, and are self-confident regarding it. This instrument enables individualized assessment leading to decision-making and adjusted action.

  1. Orexin: a Missing Link Between Sleep Disorders and Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Stephen; Cabral, Carolina S; Ashley, Euan A; Perez, Marco V

    2017-04-01

    Sleep disorders represent a significant comorbidity in the heart failure population, and there is mounting evidence that treatment of sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea can significantly improve cardiac function. However, the link between these two disorders is still not entirely clear. Recently, a novel neurohormonal pathway has been elucidated involving signaling molecules now collectively known as the orexins, which have been implicated in regulating autonomic function during sleep/wake cycles. Further evidence has mounted that orexin signaling is deeply perturbed in the setting of sleep disorders, and furthermore that abnormal orexin signaling may be implicated in the pathology of heart failure. The orexin signaling pathway represents an enticing novel target for both the treatment of sleep disorders as well as heart failure, and may represent one facet of the "missing link" between these two prevalent and often comorbid diseases.

  2. Involvement of systemic venous congestion in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Gracia, J; Sánchez Marteles, M; Pérez Calvo, J I

    2017-04-01

    Systemic venous congestion has gained significant importance in the interpretation of the pathophysiology of acute heart failure, especially in the development of renal function impairment during exacerbations. In this study, we review the concept, clinical characterisation and identification of venous congestion. We update current knowledge on its importance in the pathophysiology of acute heart failure and its involvement in the prognosis. We pay special attention to the relationship between abdominal congestion, the pulmonary interstitium as filtering membrane, inflammatory phenomena and renal function impairment in acute heart failure. Lastly, we review decongestion as a new therapeutic objective and the measures available for its assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  3. Patient Characteristics Predicting Readmission Among Individuals Hospitalized for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Melissa; Murtaugh, Christopher M; Shah, Shivani; Barrón-Vaya, Yolanda; Bowles, Kathryn H; Peng, Timothy R; Zhu, Carolyn W; Feldman, Penny H

    2016-02-01

    Heart failure is difficult to manage and increasingly common with many individuals experiencing frequent hospitalizations. Little is known about patient factors consistently associated with hospital readmission. A literature review was conducted to identify heart failure patient characteristics, measured before discharge, that contribute to variation in hospital readmission rates. Database searches yielded 950 potential articles, of which 34 studies met inclusion criteria. Patient characteristics generally have a very modest effect on all-cause or heart failure-related readmission within 7 to 180 days of index hospital discharge. A range of cardiac diseases and other comorbidities only minimally increase readmission rates. No single patient characteristic stands out as a key contributor across multiple studies underscoring the challenge of developing successful interventions to reduce readmissions. Interventions may need to be general in design with the specific intervention depending on each patient's unique clinical profile. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Machine learning in heart failure: ready for prime time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Saqib Ejaz; Sohel, Ferdous; Sanfilippo, Frank Mario; Bennamoun, Mohammed; Dwivedi, Girish

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this review is to present an up-to-date overview of the application of machine learning methods in heart failure including diagnosis, classification, readmissions and medication adherence. Recent studies have shown that the application of machine learning techniques may have the potential to improve heart failure outcomes and management, including cost savings by improving existing diagnostic and treatment support systems. Recently developed deep learning methods are expected to yield even better performance than traditional machine learning techniques in performing complex tasks by learning the intricate patterns hidden in big medical data. The review summarizes the recent developments in the application of machine and deep learning methods in heart failure management.

  5. Increased mortality after dronedarone therapy for severe heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; McMurray, John J V

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dronedarone is a novel antiarrhythmic drug with electrophysiological properties that are similar to those of amiodarone, but it does not contain iodine and thus does not cause iodine-related adverse reactions. Therefore, it may be of value in the treatment of patients with heart failure....... METHODS: In a multicenter study with a double-blind design, we planned to randomly assign 1000 patients who were hospitalized with symptomatic heart failure and severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction to receive 400 mg of dronedarone twice a day or placebo. The primary end point was the composite...... of death from any cause or hospitalization for heart failure. RESULTS: After inclusion of 627 patients (310 in the dronedarone group and 317 in the placebo group), the trial was prematurely terminated for safety reasons, at the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, in accordance...

  6. Bidirectional Cardio-Respiratory Interactions in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanović, Nikola N; Pavlović, Siniša U; Milašinović, Goran; Kirćanski, Bratislav; Platiša, Mirjana M

    2018-01-01

    We investigated cardio-respiratory coupling in patients with heart failure by quantification of bidirectional interactions between cardiac (RR intervals) and respiratory signals with complementary measures of time series analysis. Heart failure patients were divided into three groups of twenty, age and gender matched, subjects: with sinus rhythm (HF-Sin), with sinus rhythm and ventricular extrasystoles (HF-VES), and with permanent atrial fibrillation (HF-AF). We included patients with indication for implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy device. ECG and respiratory signals were simultaneously acquired during 20 min in supine position at spontaneous breathing frequency in 20 healthy control subjects and in patients before device implantation. We used coherence, Granger causality and cross-sample entropy analysis as complementary measures of bidirectional interactions between RR intervals and respiratory rhythm. In heart failure patients with arrhythmias (HF-VES and HF-AF) there is no coherence between signals ( p respiratory signal in HF-VES. Cross-sample entropy analysis revealed the strongest synchrony between respiratory and RR signal in HF-VES group. Beside respiratory sinus arrhythmia there is another type of cardio-respiratory interaction based on the synchrony between cardiac and respiratory rhythm. Both of them are altered in heart failure patients. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is reduced in HF-Sin patients and vanished in heart failure patients with arrhythmias. Contrary, in HF-Sin and HF-VES groups, synchrony increased, probably as consequence of some dominant neural compensatory mechanisms. The coupling of cardiac and respiratory rhythm in heart failure patients varies depending on the presence of atrial/ventricular arrhythmias and it could be revealed by complementary methods of time series analysis.

  7. Renal Denervation to Modify Hypertension and the Heart Failure State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ming; Kim, Luke K; Swaminathan, Rajesh V; Feldman, Dmitriy N

    2017-07-01

    Sympathetic overactivation of renal afferent and efferent nerves have been implicated in the development and maintenance of several cardiovascular disease states, including resistant hypertension and heart failure with both reduced and preserved systolic function. With the development of minimally invasive catheter-based techniques, percutaneous renal denervation has become a safe and effective method of attenuating sympathetic overactivation. Percutaneous renal denervation, therefore, has the potential to modify and treat hypertension and congestive heart failure. Although future randomized controlled studies are needed to definitively prove its efficacy, renal denervation has the potential to change the way we view and treat cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Epidemiology of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is a common condition, and the prevalence is projected to increase further. Studies differ in the reported incidence and mortality associated with this condition, although there is agreement that between a third and one-half of all patients...... with heart failure have HFPEF. Although several consensus statements and guidelines have been published, some recent randomized clinical trials have reported low mortality, raising doubts about whether all patients diagnosed with HFPEF have HFPEF or whether the condition is heterogeneous in its cause...

  9. Heart failure re-admission: measuring the ever shortening gap between repeat heart failure hospitalizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Bakal

    Full Text Available Many quality-of-care and risk prediction metrics rely on time to first rehospitalization even though heart failure (HF patients may undergo several repeat hospitalizations. The aim of this study is to compare repeat hospitalization models. Using a population-based cohort of 40,667 patients, we examined both HF and all cause re-hospitalizations using up to five years of follow-up. Two models were examined: the gap-time model which estimates the adjusted time between hospitalizations and a multistate model which considered patients to be in one of four states; community-dwelling, in hospital for HF, in hospital for any reason, or dead. The transition probabilities and times were then modeled using patient characteristics and number of repeat hospitalizations. We found that during the five years of follow-up roughly half of the patients returned for a subsequent hospitalization for each repeat hospitalization. Additionally, we noted that the unadjusted time between hospitalizations was reduced ∼40% between each successive hospitalization. After adjustment each additional hospitalization was associated with a 28 day (95% CI: 22-35 reduction in time spent out of hospital. A similar pattern was seen when considering the four state model. A large proportion of patients had multiple repeat hospitalizations. Extending the gap between hospitalizations should be an important goal of treatment evaluation.

  10. Distribution side of pleural effusion in heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol Kyu; Park, Young Ha; Jung, Se Young; Park, Seog Hee; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1988-01-01

    The interrelationship between the etiology of pleural effusion and the side of its occurrence has been a subject of clinical interest for many years. It has often been stated that pleural effusion caused by congestive heart failure tends to occur on the right side. However, some authors contended that such a side proclivity is not reliable. In the present study, the authors investigated the laterally of effusion caused by various cardiovascular diseases complicated by heart failure. We reviewed the chest X-ray films and clinical records of 68 patients with proven pleural effusion resulted from heart failure. 1. There were 34 men and 34 women with the age ranging from 10 to 84 years with the mean of 59. 2. The diagnoses were rheumatic heart disease (2 patients), coronary heart disease (10 patients), hypertensive heart disease (8 patients), mitral valvular disease (18 patients), aortic valvular disease (3 patients), and miscellaneous (27 patients). 3. 34 patients had unilateral pleural effusion, 25 and 9, right and left, respectively. Of the 34 patients with bilateral effusion, 13 patients had predominantly right-sided effusion, 5 patients had predominantly left-sided effusion and 16 patients had evenly distributed bilateral effusion. Thus, 55.8% of effusion was right-sided

  11. Prerenal azotemia in congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Etienne; Mehta, Ravindra

    2010-01-01

    Prerenal failure is used to designate a reversible form of acute renal dysfunction. However, the terminology encompasses different conditions that vary considerably. The Acute Kidney Injury Network group has recently standardized the acute kidney injury (AKI) definition and classification system; however, these criteria have not determined specific diagnostic criteria to classify prerenal conditions. The difference in the pathophysiology and manifestations of prerenal failure suggests that our current approach needs to be revaluated. Several mechanisms are recognized as contributory to development of a prerenal state associated with cardiac failure. Because of the broad differences in patients' reserve capacity and functional status, prerenal states may be triggered at different time points during the course of the disease. Prerenal state needs to be classified depending on the underlying capacity for compensation, the nature, timing of the insult and the adaptation to chronic comorbidities. Current diagnosis of prerenal conditions is relatively insensitive and would benefit from additional research to define and classify the condition. Identification of high-risk states and high-risk processes associated with the use of new biomarkers for AKI will provide new tools to distinguish between the prerenal and established AKI. Achieving a consensus definition for prerenal syndrome will allow physicians to describe treatments and interventions as well as conduct and compare epidemiological studies in order to better describe the implications of this syndrome. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Phosphoproteomic profiling of human myocardial tissues distinguishes ischemic from non-ischemic end stage heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Schechter

    Full Text Available The molecular differences between ischemic (IF and non-ischemic (NIF heart failure are poorly defined. A better understanding of the molecular differences between these two heart failure etiologies may lead to the development of more effective heart failure therapeutics. In this study extensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of myocardial tissue from patients diagnosed with IF or NIF were assembled and compared. Proteins extracted from left ventricular sections were proteolyzed and phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide resin. Gel- and label-free nanoscale capillary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution accuracy mass tandem mass spectrometry allowed for the quantification of 4,436 peptides (corresponding to 450 proteins and 823 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 400 proteins from the unenriched and phospho-enriched fractions, respectively. Protein abundance did not distinguish NIF from IF. In contrast, 37 peptides (corresponding to 26 proteins exhibited a ≥ 2-fold alteration in phosphorylation state (p<0.05 when comparing IF and NIF. The degree of protein phosphorylation at these 37 sites was specifically dependent upon the heart failure etiology examined. Proteins exhibiting phosphorylation alterations were grouped into functional categories: transcriptional activation/RNA processing; cytoskeleton structure/function; molecular chaperones; cell adhesion/signaling; apoptosis; and energetic/metabolism. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated profound post-translational differences in proteins that are involved in multiple cellular processes between different heart failure phenotypes. Understanding the roles these phosphorylation alterations play in the development of NIF and IF has the potential to generate etiology-specific heart failure therapeutics, which could be more effective than current therapeutics in addressing the growing concern of heart failure.

  13. Complement activation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, M.; Kistorp, C.; Hansen, T.K.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have an exaggerated immune response, endothelial damage/dysfunction, and increased risk of diabetes mellitus (DM). The inter-relationship(s) between indices of complement activation (soluble membrane attack complex, sMAC), inflammation (hs...... to ischemic heart disease (IHD) as compared with CHF patients with non-ischemic ethiology (p = 0.02), but were not predictive of survival or progression of CHF. A moderate strong relation between sMAC and sEsel levels was found beta = 0.33 (p ... damaging of the heart tissue...

  14. Recurrent infective endocarditis causing heart valve failure: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria McIntyre, BASc Chemical Engineering (2018 candidate

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is an infection that does not usually respond rapidly to treatment, often because its early symptoms are non-specific. The diseased valves (native or bioprosthetic may be calcified and the thrombotic vegetations on them typically friable and embolize easily. Left untreated IE leads to damage to the infected valve and to congestive heart failure (CHF. Its treatment usually requires heart valve replacement. Our 69-year-old patient had IE, and underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR with a bioprosthesis. This case stresses the complications of IE and its tendency to recur in patients with bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV who previously had IE.

  15. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Nagib Gaui

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. Objective: To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast, from 1996 to 2011. Methods: Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Results: Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Conclusions: Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  16. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de; Klein, Carlos Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes

  17. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib, E-mail: engaui@cardiol.br; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Klein, Carlos Henrique [Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sérgio Arouca da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-06-15

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  18. Clinical phenotypes and outcome of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure: the ESC Heart Failure Long-Term Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chioncel, Ovidiu; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Coats, Andrew J; Piepoli, Massimo Francesco; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Laroche, Cecile; Seferovic, Petar M; Anker, Stefan D; Ferrari, Roberto; Ruschitzka, Frank; Lopez-Fernandez, Silvia; Miani, Daniela; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Maggioni, Aldo P

    2017-10-01

    To identify differences in clinical epidemiology, in-hospital management and 1-year outcomes among patients hospitalized for acute heart failure (AHF) and enrolled in the European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Long-Term (ESC-HF-LT) Registry, stratified by clinical profile at admission. The ESC-HF-LT Registry is a prospective, observational study collecting hospitalization and 1-year follow-up data from 6629 AHF patients. Among AHF patients enrolled in the registry, 13.2% presented with pulmonary oedema (PO), 2.9% with cardiogenic shock (CS), 61.1% with decompensated heart failure (DHF), 4.8% with hypertensive heart failure (HT-HF), 3.5% with right heart failure (RHF) and 14.4% with AHF and associated acute coronary syndromes (ACS-HF). The 1-year mortality rate was 28.1% in PO, 54.0% in CS, 27.2% in DHF, 12.8% in HT-HF, 34.0% in RHF and 20.6% in ACS-HF patients. When patients were classified by systolic blood pressure (SBP) at initial presentation, 1-year mortality was 34.8% in patients with SBP 140 mmHg. These differences tended to diminish in the months post-discharge, and 1-year mortality for the patients who survived at least 6 months post-discharge did not vary significantly by either clinical profile or SBP classification. Rates of adverse outcomes in AHF remain high, and substantial differences have been found when patients were stratified by clinical profile or SBP. However, patients who survived at least 6 months post-discharge represent a more homogeneous group and their 1-year outcome is less influenced by clinical profile or SBP at admission. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  19. Individual Prediction of Heart Failure Among Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Eric J.; Chen, Yan; Kremer, Leontien C.; Breslow, Norman E.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Border, William L.; Feijen, Elizabeth A.M.; Green, Daniel M.; Meacham, Lillian R.; Meeske, Kathleen A.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Sklar, Charles A.; Stovall, Marilyn; van der Pal, Helena J.; Weathers, Rita E.; Robison, Leslie L.; Yasui, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To create clinically useful models that incorporate readily available demographic and cancer treatment characteristics to predict individual risk of heart failure among 5-year survivors of childhood cancer. Patients and Methods Survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) free of significant cardiovascular disease 5 years after cancer diagnosis (n = 13,060) were observed through age 40 years for the development of heart failure (ie, requiring medications or heart transplantation or leading to death). Siblings (n = 4,023) established the baseline population risk. An additional 3,421 survivors from Emma Children's Hospital (Amsterdam, the Netherlands), the National Wilms Tumor Study, and the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study were used to validate the CCSS prediction models. Results Heart failure occurred in 285 CCSS participants. Risk scores based on selected exposures (sex, age at cancer diagnosis, and anthracycline and chest radiotherapy doses) achieved an area under the curve of 0.74 and concordance statistic of 0.76 at or through age 40 years. Validation cohort estimates ranged from 0.68 to 0.82. Risk scores were collapsed to form statistically distinct low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, corresponding to cumulative incidences of heart failure at age 40 years of 0.5% (95% CI, 0.2% to 0.8%), 2.4% (95% CI, 1.8% to 3.0%), and 11.7% (95% CI, 8.8% to 14.5%), respectively. In comparison, siblings had a cumulative incidence of 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%). Conclusion Using information available to clinicians soon after completion of childhood cancer therapy, individual risk for subsequent heart failure can be predicted with reasonable accuracy and discrimination. These validated models provide a framework on which to base future screening strategies and interventions. PMID:25287823

  20. Optimal medical therapy in chronic heart failure-an audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.; Kayani, A.M.; Munir, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Systolic heart failure is a chronic condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Evidence based optimal medical therapy (OMT) has been shown to reduce mortality. Underuse of OMT due to multiple reasons has been a consistent problem. The study objective was to audit the use of OMT in patients with heart Failure. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of study: This audit was carried out in AFIC-NIHD from April 2011- February 2012. Material and Methods: Seventy consecutive stage D heart failure patients were included in the study. The patients were assessed clinically by a cardiologist and all previous documentations, referral letters, prescriptions, and purchase receipts were reviewed. To identify any other medication patients might have been taking (which did not appear on the prescriptions) patients were asked to identify common medicine packs. The patients underwent a detailed clinical evaluation including history, physical examination. Relevant investigations were done. ACCF/AHA (American College of Cardiology Foundation / American Heart Association) and ESC (European Society of Cardiology) guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure were taken as standard of care. Results: In our audit we found that a large proportion of patients who were at high risk as per the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) were not on OMT, only 4.3% of the patients were on beta blockers that have been shown to improve mortality in the large randomized clinical trials, 64.3% were not taking any beta blockers where as 55.7% were not on ACE inhibitors and adding the OMT greatly reduced their mortality risk. Conclusions: We concluded that a large proportion of patients were not on OMT despite not having any contraindication to such therapy. This deprives them of significant survival benefit. (author)

  1. Increased walking variability in elderly persons with congestive heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Forman, D. E.; Ladin, Z.; Goldberger, A. L.; Rigney, D. R.; Wei, J. Y.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of congestive heart failure on a person's ability to walk at a steady pace while ambulating at a self-determined rate. SETTING: Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, a primary and tertiary teaching hospital, and a social activity center for elderly adults living in the community. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven elderly subjects (aged 70-93 years) with well compensated congestive heart failure (NY Heart Association class I or II), seven elderly subjects (aged 70-79 years) without congestive heart failure, and 10 healthy young adult subjects (aged 20-30 years). MEASUREMENTS: Subjects walked for 8 minutes on level ground at their own selected walking rate. Footswitches were used to measure the time between steps. Step rate (steps/minute) and step rate variability were calculated for the entire walking period, for 30 seconds during the first minute of the walk, for 30 seconds during the last minute of the walk, and for the 30-second period when each subject's step rate variability was minimal. Group means and 5% and 95% confidence intervals were computed. MAIN RESULTS: All measures of walking variability were significantly increased in the elderly subjects with congestive heart failure, intermediate in the elderly controls, and lowest in the young subjects. There was no overlap between the three groups using the minimal 30-second variability (elderly CHF vs elderly controls: P young: P < 0.001), and no overlap between elderly subjects with and without congestive heart failure when using the overall variability. For all four measures, there was no overlap in any of the confidence intervals, and all group means were significantly different (P < 0.05).

  2. Embryonic stem cell therapy of heart failure in genetic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre

    2008-10-01

    Pathogenic causes underlying nonischemic cardiomyopathies are increasingly being resolved, yet repair therapies for these commonly heritable forms of heart failure are lacking. A case in point is human dilated cardiomyopathy 10 (CMD10; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man #608569), a progressive organ dysfunction syndrome refractory to conventional therapies and linked to mutations in cardiac ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel subunits. Embryonic stem cell therapy demonstrates benefit in ischemic heart disease, but the reparative capacity of this allogeneic regenerative cell source has not been tested in inherited cardiomyopathy. Here, in a Kir6.2-knockout model lacking functional K(ATP) channels, we recapitulated under the imposed stress of pressure overload the gene-environment substrate of CMD10. Salient features of the human malignant heart failure phenotype were reproduced, including compromised contractility, ventricular dilatation, and poor survival. Embryonic stem cells were delivered through the epicardial route into the left ventricular wall of cardiomyopathic stressed Kir6.2-null mutants. At 1 month of therapy, transplantation of 200,000 cells per heart achieved teratoma-free reversal of systolic dysfunction and electrical synchronization and halted maladaptive remodeling, thereby preventing end-stage organ failure. Tracked using the lacZ reporter transgene, stem cells engrafted into host heart. Beyond formation of cardiac tissue positive for Kir6.2, transplantation induced cell cycle activation and halved fibrotic zones, normalizing sarcomeric and gap junction organization within remuscularized hearts. Improved systemic function induced by stem cell therapy translated into increased stamina, absence of anasarca, and benefit to overall survivorship. Embryonic stem cells thus achieve functional repair in nonischemic genetic cardiomyopathy, expanding indications to the therapy of heritable heart failure. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is

  3. Heart failure: when form fails to follow function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Arnold M; Rolett, Ellis L

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac performance is normally determined by architectural, cellular, and molecular structures that determine the heart's form, and by physiological and biochemical mechanisms that regulate the function of these structures. Impaired adaptation of form to function in failing hearts contributes to two syndromes initially called systolic heart failure (SHF) and diastolic heart failure (DHF). In SHF, characterized by high end-diastolic volume (EDV), the left ventricle (LV) cannot eject a normal stroke volume (SV); in DHF, with normal or low EDV, the LV cannot accept a normal venous return. These syndromes are now generally defined in terms of ejection fraction (EF): SHF became 'heart failure with reduced ejection fraction' (HFrEF) while DHF became 'heart failure with normal or preserved ejection fraction' (HFnEF or HFpEF). However, EF is a chimeric index because it is the ratio between SV--which measures function, and EDV--which measures form. In SHF the LV dilates when sarcomere addition in series increases cardiac myocyte length, whereas sarcomere addition in parallel can cause concentric hypertrophy in DHF by increasing myocyte thickness. Although dilatation in SHF allows the LV to accept a greater venous return, it increases the energy cost of ejection and initiates a vicious cycle that contributes to progressive dilatation. In contrast, concentric hypertrophy in DHF facilitates ejection but impairs filling and can cause heart muscle to deteriorate. Differences in the molecular signals that initiate dilatation and concentric hypertrophy can explain why many drugs that improve prognosis in SHF have little if any benefit in DHF. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Echocardiographic evaluation of right ventricular stroke work index in advanced heart failure: a new index?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frea, Simone; Bovolo, Virginia; Bergerone, Serena; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Antolini, Marina; Capriolo, Michele; Canavosio, Federico Giovanni; Morello, Mara; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2012-12-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function plays a pivotal role in advanced heart failure patients, especially for screening those who may benefit from left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. We introduce RV contraction pressure index (RVCPI) as a new echo-Doppler parameter of RV function. The accuracy of RVCPI in detecting RV failure was compared with the criterion standard, the RV stroke work index (RVSWI) obtained through right heart catheterization in advanced heart failure patients referred for heart transplantation or LVAD implantation. Right heart catheterization and echo-Doppler were simultaneously performed in 94 consecutive patients referred to our center for advanced heart failure (ejection fraction (EF) 24 ± 8.8%, 40% NYHA functional class IV). RV stroke volume and invasive pulmonary pressures were used to obtain RVSWI. Simplified RVCPI (sRVCPI) was derived as TAPSE × (RV - right atrial pressure gradient). Close positive correlation between sRVCPI and RVSWI was found (r = 0.68; P rights reserved.

  5. Galectin-3 in heart failure : From biomarker to target for therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, Allart Rogier

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes the role of galectin-3 in heart failure. Galectin-3 is a protein that is secreted in our body during inflammation and tissue damage. It becomes released into the blood stream and can be measured with a blood test. As a biomarker, galectin-3 can be used for risk stratification

  6. Health-related quality of life and anemia in hospitalized patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraai, I. H.; Luttik, M. L. A.; Johansson, P.; De Jong, R. M.; Van Veldhuisen, D. J.; Hillege, H. L.; Jaarsma, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Anemia is a serious and highly prevalent co-morbidity in chronic heart failure (HF) patients. Its influence on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) has rarely been studied, and no data is available regarding the role it plays in hospitalized HF patients. Methods: Baseline data from

  7. Health-related quality of life and anemia in hospitalized patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraai, Imke H.; Luttik, Marie Louise; Johansson, P.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Hillege, Hans L.; de Jong, Remco; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anemia is a serious and highly prevalent co-morbidity in chronic heart failure (HF) patients. Its influence on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) has rarely been studied, and no data is available regarding the role it plays in hospitalized HF patients. METHODS: Baseline data from

  8. The Impact of Family Functioning on Caregiver Burden among Caregivers of Veterans with Congestive Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Crystal Dea

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of 76 family caregivers of older veterans with congestive heart failure utilized the McMaster model of family functioning to examine the impact of family functioning variables (problem solving, communication, roles, affective responsiveness, and affective involvement) on caregiver burden dimensions (relationship burden,…

  9. Factors associated with quality of life in Arab patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaloul, Fawwaz; AbuRuz, Mohannad E; Moser, Debra K; Hall, Lynne A; Al-Sadi, Ahmad

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships of demographic characteristics, medical variables and perceived social support with quality of life (QOL) in Arab patients with heart failure. A cross-sectional study was conducted to identify factors associated with QOL in Arab patients with heart failure. Participants with heart failure (N = 99) were enrolled from a nonprofit hospital and an educational hospital. Data were collected on QOL using the Short Form-36 survey. Perceived social support was measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey. The majority of the patients reported significant impairment in QOL as evidenced by subscale scored. Left ventricular ejection fraction was the strongest correlate of most QOL domains. Tangible support was significantly associated with most QOL domains. Other social support dimensions were not significantly related to QOL domains. Most patients with heart failure had significant disrupting pain and limitations in performing activities which interfered with their usual role. Due to the importance of understanding QOL and its determinants within the context of culture, the outcomes of this study may provide valuable guidance to healthcare providers in Arabic countries as well as Western society in caring for these patients. Further studies are needed to explore the relationship between social support and QOL among patients with heart failure in the Arabic culture. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. MicroRNAs in Heart Failure, Cardiac Transplantation, and Myocardial Recovery: Biomarkers with Therapeutic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Palak; Bristow, Michael R; Port, J David

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure is increasing in prevalence with a lack of recently developed therapies that produce major beneficial effects on its associated mortality. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression, are differentially regulated in heart failure, and are found in the circulation serving as a biomarker of heart failure. Data suggests that microRNAs may be used to detect allograft rejection in cardiac transplantation and may predict the degree of myocardial recovery in patients with a left ventricular assist device or treated with beta-blocker therapy. Given their role in regulating cellular function, microRNAs are an intriguing target for oligonucleotide therapeutics, designed to mimic or antagonize (antagomir) their biological effects. We review the current state of microRNAs as biomarkers of heart failure and associated conditions, the mechanisms by which microRNAs control cellular function, and how specific microRNAs may be targeted with novel therapeutics designed to treat heart failure.

  11. Heart Failure in Young Adults Is Associated With High Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Chih M; Hawkins, Nathaniel M; Ezekowitz, Justin A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on young patients with heart failure (HF) are sparse. We examined the characteristics, health care use, and survival of younger vs older patients with HF. METHODS: We performed an analysis of linked administrative databases in Alberta, Canada. We identified 34,548 patients who had...... years, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Although young patients, especially those 10% dying within a year....

  12. Current and novel renal biomarkers in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Voors, Adriaan A.; Navis, Gerjan; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Hillege, Hans L.

    Renal function is the most important predictor of clinical outcome in heart failure (HF). It is therefore essential to have accurate and reliable measurement of renal function and early specific markers of renal impairment in patients with HF. Several renal functional entities exist, including

  13. Iron deficiency in chronic heart failure : An international pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klip, IJsbrand T.; Comin-Colet, Josep; Voors, Adriaan A.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Enjuanes, Cristina; Banasiak, Waldemar; Lok, Dirk J.; Rosentryt, Piotr; Torrens, Ainhoa; Polonski, Lech; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Meer, Peter; Jankowska, Ewa A.

    Background Iron deficiency (ID) is an emerging problem in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and can be a potential therapeutic target. However, not much is known about the prevalence, predictors, and prognosis of ID in patients with chronic HF. Methods In an international pooled cohort

  14. Individual Prediction of Heart Failure Among Childhood Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chow, Eric J.; Chen, Yan; Kremer, Leontien C.; Breslow, Norman E.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Border, William L.; Feijen, Elizabeth A. M.; Green, Daniel M.; Meacham, Lillian R.; Meeske, Kathleen A.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Sklar, Charles A.; Stovall, Marilyn; van der Pal, Helena J.; Weathers, Rita E.; Robison, Leslie L.; Yasui, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To create clinically useful models that incorporate readily available demographic and cancer treatment characteristics to predict individual risk of heart failure among 5-year survivors of childhood cancer. Patients and Methods Survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) free of

  15. Mechanisms and management of heart failure in active rheumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fulminating active rheumatic carditis has been observed for over three decades in this environment with no recent alteration in either the incidence or the pattern of presentation. Heart failure (in this context defined as 'an inadequate circulation at rest together with a raised pulmonary venous pressure, with or without an ...

  16. Cheyne-stokes respiration in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlDabal, Laila; BaHammam, Ahmed S

    2010-01-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) is a form of central sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in which there are cyclical fluctuations in breathing that lead to periods of central apneas/hypopnea, which alternate with periods of hyperpnea. The crescendo-decrescendo pattern of respiration in CSR is a compensation for the changing levels of blood oxygen and carbon dioxide. Severe congestive heart failure seems to be the most important risk factor for the development of CSR. A number of pathophysiologic changes, such as sleep disruption, arousals, hypoxemia-reoxygenation, hypercapnia/hypocapnia, and changes in intrathoracic pressure have harmful effects on the cardiovascular system, and the presence of CSR is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in subjects with variable degrees of heart failure. The management of CSR involves optimal control of underlying heart failure, oxygen therapy, and positive airway pressure support. In this review, we initially define and describe the epidemiology of central sleep apnea (CSA) and CSR, its pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic methods, and then discuss the recent developments in the management in patients with heart failure.

  17. TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE: FOCUS ON METOPROLOL SUCCINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Ostroumova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Advantages of metoprolol succinate in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF are covered. Results of MERIT-HF study are taken as the main evidences. Patterns of the metoprolol succinate use in the treatment of different categories of patients with CHF (women, the elderly , severe CHF forms, CHF with concomitant hypertension or diabetes are considered.

  18. TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE: FOCUS ON METOPROLOL SUCCINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Ostroumova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Advantages of metoprolol succinate in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF are covered. Results of MERIT-HF study are taken as the main evidences. Patterns of the metoprolol succinate use in the treatment of different categories of patients with CHF (women, the elderly , severe CHF forms, CHF with concomitant hypertension or diabetes are considered.

  19. Heart Failure in Zambia: Evidence for Improving Clinical Practice.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    reducing mortality, but also on improving quality of life. ... Heart Failure in Zambia: Evidence for Improving ... likely to be a result of “informed guess work” with ... balance. The study reported that a high serum urea and high creatinine were ...

  20. Challenges in the management of hypertension and heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeftink, MMA

    2017-01-01

    The research described in this thesis addresses several challenges in the management of hypertension and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). It mainly focusses on the influence of antihypertensive medication on the diagnostic work-up strategy of hypertension, the shortcomings of

  1. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann Dorthe Olsen; Norten, RJ; Dean, SG

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for heart failure compared to either usual medical care (i.e. no CR) or centre-based CR on mortality, morbidity, exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, drop out, adherence rates, and costs. METHODS: Randomised...

  2. Sexual concerns and sexual counseling in heart failure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medina, M.; Walker, C.; Steinke, E.E.; Wright, D.W.; Mosack, V.; Farhoud, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) face significant challenges in maintaining quality of life (QOL), particularly for sexual intimacy. Although recommended for all cardiac patients, it has been suggested that few HF patients receive sexual counseling. This study explored sexual counseling needs,

  3. Heart failure in geriatric outpatients: diagnosis, prognosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudejans-Mooijaart, I.

    2012-01-01

    The ageing of the population and improved survival following acute cardiac events have led to an increased prevalence of heart failure (HF), especially in the elderly. Establishing the presence of HF based only on signs and symptoms is often inaccurate. Additional investigations (e.g.

  4. The case for statin therapy in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, Pim; Boehm, Michael; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    Both primary and secondary prevention studies have provided a wealth of evidence that statin therapy effectively reduces cardiovascular events. However, this general statement on the efficacy and safety of statin treatment has not been validated in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF).

  5. Invasive hemodynamic characterization of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Jønsson; Borlaug, Barry A

    2014-01-01

    Recent hemodynamic studies have advanced our understanding of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Despite improved pathophysiologic insight, clinical trials have failed to identify an effective treatment for HFpEF. Invasive hemodynamic assessment can diagnose or exclude HFp...

  6. Incident Heart Failure in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Egeberg, Alexander; Ahlehoff, Ole

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with a wide range of comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, but its association with heart failure (HF) is not fully clear. We investigated the risk of incident HF in a nationwide cohort of patients with RA...

  7. Bone marrow dysfunction in chronic heart failure patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, B. Daan; Voors, Adriaan A.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Schuringa, Jan J.; Klinkenberg, Theo; van der Harst, Pim; Vellenga, Edo; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.

    To investigate whether chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with a general dysfunction of the haematopoietic compartment. Bone marrow was obtained during coronary artery bypass graft surgery from 20 patients with CHF (age 67 +/- 6 years, 75% NYHA class >= III, LVEF 32 +/- 6%), and 20 age- and

  8. Transcatheter Interatrial Shunt Device for the Treatment of Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldman, Ted; Komtebedde, Jan; Burkhoff, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a major public health problem with high morbidity and mortality rates, remains difficult to manage because of a lack of effective treatment options. Although HFpEF is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, elevated left atrial pressu...

  9. Incidence of cancer in patients with chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banke, Ann; Schou, Morten; Videbaek, Lars

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: With improvement in survival of chronic heart failure (HF), the clinical importance of co-morbidity is increasing. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and risk of cancer and all-cause mortality in a large Danish HF cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 9307 outpatients...

  10. Psychosocial Correlates of Subjects with Heart Failure in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with high morbidity and mortality most especially in developing countries including Nigeria. In the country, most patients present late for treatment and with attendant high treatment default. Thus, the study set out to examine the psychosocial correlates of subjects with HF. It was a ...

  11. Effect of Nesiritide in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Connor, C. M.; Starling, R. C.; Hernandez, A. F.; Armstrong, P. W.; Dickstein, K.; Hasselblad, V.; Heizer, G. M.; Komajda, M.; Massie, B. M.; McMurray, J. J. V.; Nieminen, M. S.; Reist, C. J.; Rouleau, J. L.; Swedberg, K.; Adams, K. F.; Anker, S. D.; Atar, D.; Battler, A.; Botero, R.; Bohidar, N. R.; Butler, J.; Clausell, N.; Corbalan, R.; Costanzo, M. R.; Dahlstrom, U.; Deckelbaum, L. I.; Diaz, R.; Dunlap, M. E.; Ezekowitz, J. A.; Feldman, D.; Felker, G. M.; Fonarow, G. C.; Gennevois, D.; Gottlieb, S. S.; Hollander, J. E.; Howlett, J. G.; Hudson, M. P.; Kociol, R. D.; Krum, H.; Laucevicius, A.; Levy, W. C.; Mendez, G. F.; Metra, M.; Mittal, S.; Oh, B. -H.; Pereira, N. L.; Ponikowski, P.; Wilson, W. H.; Tanomsup, S.; Teerlink, J. R.; Triposkiadis, F.; Troughton, R. W.; Voors, A. A.; Whellan, D. J.; Zannad, F.; Califf, R. M.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nesiritide is approved in the United States for early relief of dyspnea in patients with acute heart failure. Previous meta-analyses have raised questions regarding renal toxicity and the mortality associated with this agent. Methods We randomly assigned 7141 patients who were

  12. Gender and survival in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Doughty, Robert N; Poppe, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gender and survival of patients with heart failure, using data from both randomized trials and observational studies, and the relative contribution of age, left ventricular systolic function, aetiology, and diabetes to differences...

  13. Higher Heart Failure Risk Seen in Some Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some people treated for breast cancer or lymphoma have a higher risk of developing congestive heart failure than people who haven’t had cancer, a new study shows. As this Cancer Currents blog post reports, the risk persisted for at least 20 years.

  14. Effect of contraindicated drugs for heart failure on hospitalization among seniors with heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girouard, Catherine; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre; Poirier, Paul; Moisan, Jocelyne

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), thiazolidinediones (TZDs), nifedipine and nondihydropyridine calcium channel blockers (CCBs) usage on the risk of all-cause hospitalization among seniors with heart failure (HF). We assessed the risk of all-cause hospitalization associated with exposure to each of these drug classes, in a population of seniors with HF. Using the Quebec provincial databases, we conducted a nested case-control study in a population of individuals aged ≥65 with a first HF diagnosis between 2000 and 2009. Patients were considered users of a potentially inappropriate drug class if their date of hospital admission occurred in the interval between the date of the last drug claim and the end date of its days’ supply. The risks of hospitalization were estimated using multivariate conditional logistic regression. Of the 128,853 individuals included in the study population, 101,273 (78.6%) were hospitalized. When compared to nonusers, users of NSAIDs (adjusted odds ratio: 1.16; 95% confidence interval: 1.13–1.20), TZD (1.09; 1.04–1.14), and CCBs (1.03; 1.01–1.05) had an increased risk of all-cause hospitalization, but not the users of nifedipine (1.00; 0.97–1.03). Seniors with HF exposed to a potentially inappropriate drug class are at increased risk of worse health outcomes. Treatment alternatives should be considered, as they are available. PMID:28248890

  15. [The German National Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbrenner, S; Langer, T; Scherer, M; Störk, S; Ertl, G; Muth, Ch; Hoppe, U C; Kopp, I; Ollenschläger, G

    2012-02-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is an illness mostly affecting elderly people. In Germany CHF is one of the most common causes of death and at the same time one of the most common diagnosis in inpatient care. Due to the expected increase in life expectancy in the next few years experts predict a further step-up of the incidence. Against this background development of a national guideline on chronic heart failure was prioritised and accordingly the National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure was developed by a multi- and interdisciplinary group. The guideline group comprised experts from all relevant scientific medical societies as well as a patient expert. The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) on Chronic Heart Failure aims at supporting patients and health care providers with respect to decisions on a specific health care problem by giving recommendations for actions. Recommendations are informed by the best available scientific evidence on this topic.Patients with CHF often suffer from multiple conditions. Due to this fact and the old age patients do have very complex and demanding health care needs. Thus accounting for co-morbidities is paramount in planning and providing health care for theses patients and communication between doctor and patient but also between all health care providers is crucial.Basic treatment strategies in chronic heart failure comprise management of risk factors and prognostic factors as well as appropriate consideration of co-morbidities accompanied by measures empowering patients in establishing a healthy life style and a self-dependant management of their illness.Psycho-social aspects have a very strong influence on patients' acceptance of the disease and their self-management. In addition they have a strong influence on therapy management of the treating physician thus they have to be addressed adequately during the consultation.The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure (CHF

  16. Patient Characteristics Predicting Readmission Among Individuals Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Melissa; Murtaugh, Christopher M.; Shah, Shivani; Barrón-Vaya, Yolanda; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Peng, Timothy R.; Zhu, Carolyn W.; Feldman, Penny H.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is difficult to manage and increasingly common with many individuals experiencing frequent hospitalizations. Little is known about patient factors consistently associated with hospital readmission. A literature review was conducted to identify heart failure patient characteristics, measured before discharge, that contribute to variation in hospital readmission rates. Database searches yielded 950 potential articles, of which 34 studies met inclusion criteria. Patient characteristics generally have a very modest effect on all-cause or heart failure–related readmission within 7 to 180 days of index hospital discharge. A range of cardiac diseases and other comorbidities only minimally increase readmission rates. No single patient characteristic stands out as a key contributor across multiple studies underscoring the challenge of developing successful interventions to reduce readmissions. Interventions may need to be general in design with the specific intervention depending on each patient's unique clinical profile. PMID:26180045

  17. Improving Decision Making for Advanced Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvennan, Colleen K

    2017-04-01

    In this month's Magnet® Perspectives column, Colleen K. McIlvennan, DNP, ANP, lead nurse practitioner, Advanced Heart Failure and Transplantation at the University of Colorado, discusses her groundbreaking research encompassing patients' and caregivers' emotional, rational, and fundamental beliefs when considering a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Results have led to the development of 2 innovative decision aids that are currently in use by LVAD programs across the United States and Canada. Dr McIlvennan's efforts led to a $2 million grant from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, as well as national recognition from the American Heart Association and the Heart Failure Society of America. Last year, she received the 2016 National Magnet Nurse of the Year® Award in the Empirical Outcomes category. In addition to sharing her findings, Dr McIlvennan examines the value of performing research in a Magnet-recognized organization.

  18. The effects of heart failure on renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Suneel M; Koyner, Jay L

    2010-08-01

    Heart-kidney interactions have been increasingly recognized by clinicians and researchers who study and treat heart failure and kidney disease. A classification system has been developed to categorize the different manifestations of cardiac and renal dysfunction. Work has highlighted the significant negative prognostic effect of worsening renal function on outcomes for individuals with heart failure. The etiology of concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunction remains unclear; however, evidence supports alternatives to the established theory of underfilling, including effects of venous congestion and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. Conventional therapy focuses on blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with expanding use of direct renin and aldosterone antagonists. Novel therapeutic interventions using extracorporeal therapy and antagonists of the adenosine pathway show promise and require further investigation. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Calcium-dependent arrhythmias in transgenic mice with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Barry; Baker, Linda C; Lee, Joon S; Shusterman, Vladimir; Choi, Bum-Rak; Kubota, Toru; McTiernan, Charles F; Feldman, Arthur M; Salama, Guy

    2003-02-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha (TNF-alpha mice) in the heart develop a progressive heart failure syndrome characterized by biventricular dilatation, decreased ejection fraction, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias on ambulatory telemetry monitoring, and decreased survival compared with nontransgenic littermates. Programmed stimulation in vitro with single extra beats elicits reentrant ventricular arrhythmias in TNF-alpha (n = 12 of 13 hearts) but not in control hearts. We performed optical mapping of voltage and Ca(2+) in isolated perfused ventricles of TNF-alpha mice to study the mechanisms that lead to the initiation and maintenance of the arrhythmias. When compared with controls, hearts from TNF-alpha mice have prolonged of action potential durations (action potential duration at 90% repolarization: 23 +/- 2 ms, n = 7, vs. 18 +/- 1 ms, n = 5; P < 0.05), no increased dispersion of refractoriness between apex and base, elevated diastolic and depressed systolic [Ca(2+)], and prolonged Ca(2+) transients (72 +/- 6 ms, n = 10, vs. 54 +/- 5 ms, n = 8; P < 0.01). Premature beats have diminished action potential amplitudes and conduct in a slow, heterogeneous manner. Lowering extracellular [Ca(2+)] normalizes conduction and prevents inducible arrhythmias. Thus both action potential prolongation and abnormal Ca(2+) handling may contribute to the initiation of reentrant arrhythmias in this heart failure model by mechanisms distinct from enhanced dispersion of refractoriness or triggered activity.

  20. Intravenous Milrinone in Treatment of Advanced Congestive Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zewail, Aly M.; Nawar, Mohammad; Vrtovec, Bojan; Eastwood, Cathy; Kar, Biswajit; Delgado, Reynolds M.

    2003-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as milrinone can relieve symptoms and improve hemodynamics in patients with advanced congestive heart failure. We retrospectively evaluated the hemodynamic and clinical outcomes of long-term combination therapy with intravenous milrinone and oral β-blockers in 65 patients with severe congestive heart failure (New York Heart Association class IV function and ejection fraction milrinone. Oral medical therapy was maximized when possible. The mean duration of milrinone treatment in this combination-treatment group was 269 days (range, 14–1,026 days). Functional class improved from IV to II–III with milrinone therapy. Twenty-four such patients tolerated β-blocker up-titration and were successfully weaned from milrinone. Sixteen patients (31%) died while receiving combination therapy; one died of sudden cardiac death (on treatment day 116); the other 15 died of progressive heart failure or other complications. Hospital admissions during the previous 6 months and admissions within 6 months after milrinone initiation stayed the same. Meanwhile, the total number of hospital days decreased from 450 to 380 (a 15.6% reduction), and the mean length of stay decreased by 1.4 days (a 14.7% reduction). We conclude that 1) milrinone plus β-blocker combination therapy is an effective treatment for heart failure even with β-blocker up-titration, 2) weaning from milrinone may be possible once medications are maximized, 3) patients' functional status improves on the combination regimen, and 4) treatment-related sudden death is relatively infrequent during the combination regimen. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:109–13) PMID:12809251

  1. Exercise training restores cardiac protein quality control in heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane C Campos

    Full Text Available Exercise training is a well-known coadjuvant in heart failure treatment; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects remain elusive. Despite the primary cause, heart failure is often preceded by two distinct phenomena: mitochondria dysfunction and cytosolic protein quality control disruption. The objective of the study was to determine the contribution of exercise training in regulating cardiac mitochondria metabolism and cytosolic protein quality control in a post-myocardial infarction-induced heart failure (MI-HF animal model. Our data demonstrated that isolated cardiac mitochondria from MI-HF rats displayed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced maximum calcium uptake and elevated H₂O₂ release. These changes were accompanied by exacerbated cardiac oxidative stress and proteasomal insufficiency. Declined proteasomal activity contributes to cardiac protein quality control disruption in our MI-HF model. Using cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, we showed that either antimycin A or H₂O₂ resulted in inactivation of proteasomal peptidase activity, accumulation of oxidized proteins and cell death, recapitulating our in vivo model. Of interest, eight weeks of exercise training improved cardiac function, peak oxygen uptake and exercise tolerance in MI-HF rats. Moreover, exercise training restored mitochondrial oxygen consumption, increased Ca²⁺-induced permeability transition and reduced H₂O₂ release in MI-HF rats. These changes were followed by reduced oxidative stress and better cardiac protein quality control. Taken together, our findings uncover the potential contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction and cytosolic protein quality control disruption to heart failure and highlight the positive effects of exercise training in re-establishing cardiac mitochondrial physiology and protein quality control, reinforcing the importance of this intervention as a non-pharmacological tool for heart failure therapy.

  2. Medication regimen complexity in ambulatory older adults with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobretti MR

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Cobretti,1 Robert L Page II,2 Sunny A Linnebur,2 Kimberly M Deininger,1 Amrut V Ambardekar,3 JoAnn Lindenfeld,4 Christina L Aquilante1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, 3Division of Cardiology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, 4Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplant Program, Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute, Nashville, TN, USA Purpose: Heart failure prevalence is increasing in older adults, and polypharmacy is a major problem in this population. We compared medication regimen complexity using the validated patient-level Medication Regimen Complexity Index (pMRCI tool in “young-old” (60–74 years versus “old-old” (75–89 years patients with heart failure. We also compared pMRCI between patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ISCM versus nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NISCM.Patients and methods: Medication lists were retrospectively abstracted from the electronic medical records of ambulatory patients aged 60–89 years with heart failure. Medications were categorized into three types – heart failure prescription medications, other prescription medications, and over-the-counter (OTC medications – and scored using the pMRCI tool.Results: The study evaluated 145 patients (n=80 young-old, n=65 old-old, n=85 ISCM, n=60 NISCM, mean age 73±7 years, 64% men, 81% Caucasian. Mean total pMRCI scores (32.1±14.4, range 3–84 and total medication counts (13.3±4.8, range 2–30 were high for the entire cohort, of which 72% of patients were taking eleven or more total medications. Total and subtype pMRCI scores and medication counts did not differ significantly between the young-old and old-old groups, with the exception of OTC medication pMRCI score (6.2±4 young-old versus 7.8±5.8 old-old, P=0.04. With regard to heart failure etiology, total pMRCI scores and medication

  3. Accurate diagnoses, evidence based drugs, and new devices (3 Ds in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang B. Siswanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure becomes main problem in cardiology because of increasing of heart failure patients, rehospitalization rate, morbidity, and mortality rate. The main causes of increasing heart failure problems are: (1 Successful treatment of acute myocardial infarction can be life saving, but its sequelae can cause heart failure. (2 Increasing life expectancy rate grows along with incidences of ageing related heart failure. (3 High prevalence of infection in Indonesia can cause rheumatic heart disease post Streptococcal beta hemolyticus infection, viral myocarditis, infective endocartitis, and tuberculoid pericarditis. (4 Many risk factors for coronary heart disease are often found in heart failure patients, for examples smoking, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and obesity. Indonesia joined international multicentered registry in 2006. Acute Decompensated HEart failure REgistry is a web based international registry to record patient with acute decompensated heart failure treated in emergency room. It was found that heart failure patients in 5 big hospitals in Java and Bali island that joined this registry are younger, sicker and late to seek treatment. The median hospital length of stay was 7 days and in hospital mortality rate was 6.7%. The aim of this article is to give summary about essential things in diagnosing and treating heart failure patients. 3D (accurate diagnoses, evidence based drugs, and new devices are the most important but what to do and what not to do in dealing with heart failure is also useful for your daily practice. (Med J Indones 2012;21:52-8Keywords: Devices, diagnostic, drugs, heart failure

  4. Artificial muscle for end-stage heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Michalis, Alexandre; Hayoz, Daniel; Locca, Didier; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2012-01-01

    We describe a device made of artificial muscle for the treatment of end-stage heart failure as an alternative to current heart assist devices. The key component is a matrix of nitinol wires and aramidic fibers called Biometal muscle (BM). When heated electrically, it produces a motorless, smooth, and lifelike motion. The BM is connected to a carbon fiber scaffold, tightening the heart and providing simultaneous assistance to the left and right ventricles. A pacemaker-like microprocessor drives the contraction of the BM. We tested the device in a dedicated bench model of diseased heart. It generated a systolic pressure of 75 mm Hg and ejected a maximum of 330 ml/min, with an ejection fraction of 12%. The device required a power supply of 6 V, 250 mA. This could be the beginning of an era in which BMs integrate or replace the mechanical function of natural muscles.

  5. Desmin loss and mitochondrial damage precede left ventricular systolic failure in volume overload heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Jason L; Rogowski, Michael; Agnetti, Giulio; Fu, Lianwu; Powell, Pamela; Wei, Chih-Chang; Collawn, James; Dell'Italia, Louis J

    2017-07-01

    Heart failure due to chronic volume overload (VO) in rats and humans is characterized by disorganization of the cardiomyocyte desmin/mitochondrial network. Here, we tested the hypothesis that desmin breakdown is an early and continuous process throughout VO. Male Sprague-Dawley rats had aortocaval fistula (ACF) or sham surgery and were examined 24 h and 4 and 12 wk later. Desmin/mitochondrial ultrastructure was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Protein and kinome analysis were performed in isolated cardiomyocytes, and desmin cleavage was assessed by mass spectrometry in left ventricular (LV) tissue. Echocardiography demonstrated a 40% decrease in the LV mass-to-volume ratio with spherical remodeling at 4 wk with ACF and LV systolic dysfunction at 12 wk. Starting at 24 h and continuing to 4 and 12 wk, with ACF there is TEM evidence of extensive mitochondrial clustering, IHC evidence of disorganization associated with desmin breakdown, and desmin protein cleavage verified by Western blot analysis and mass spectrometry. IHC results revealed that ACF cardiomyocytes at 4 and 12 wk had perinuclear translocation of αB-crystallin from the Z disk with increased α, β-unsaturated aldehyde 4-hydroxynonelal. Use of protein markers with verification by TUNEL staining and kinome analysis revealed an absence of cardiomyocyte apoptosis at 4 and 12 wk of ACF. Significant increases in protein indicators of mitophagy were countered by a sixfold increase in p62/sequestosome-1, which is indicative of an inability to complete autophagy. An early and continuous disruption of the desmin/mitochondrial architecture, accompanied by oxidative stress and inhibition of apoptosis and mitophagy, suggests its causal role in LV dilatation and systolic dysfunction in VO. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study provides new evidence of early onset (24 h) and continuous (4-12 wk) desmin misarrangement and disruption of the normal sarcomeric and mitochondrial

  6. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sarraf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cardiac function leads to activation of the neurohumoral axis, sodium and water retention, congestion and ultimately impaired kidney function. This sequence of events has been termed the Cardiorenal Syndrome. This is different from the increase in cardiovascular complications which occur with primary kidney disease, that is, the so-called Renocardiac Syndrome. The present review discusses the pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome followed by the benefits and potential deleterious effects of pharmacological agents that have been used in this setting. The agents discussed are diuretics, aquaretics, natriuretic peptides, vasodilators, inotropes and adenosine α1 receptor antagonists. The potential role of ultrafiltration is also briefly discussed.

  7. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure: Revisiting Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Julio; Miñana, Gema; Santas, Enrique; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney. Worsening renal function that occurs in patients with acute heart failure has been classified as cardiorenal syndrome type 1. In this setting, worsening renal function is a common finding and is due to complex, multifactorial, and not fully understood processes involving hemodynamic (renal arterial hypoperfusion and renal venous congestion) and nonhemodynamic factors. Traditionally, worsening renal function has been associated with worse outcomes, but recent findings have revealed mixed and heterogeneous results, perhaps suggesting that the same phenotype represents a diversity of pathophysiological and clinical situations. Interpreting the magnitude and chronology of renal changes together with baseline renal function, fluid overload status, and clinical response to therapy might help clinicians to unravel the clinical meaning of renal function changes that occur during an episode of heart failure decompensation. In this article, we critically review the contemporary evidence on the pathophysiology and clinical aspects of worsening renal function in acute heart failure. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Congestive Heart Failure Cardiopoietic Regenerative Therapy (CHART-1) trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartunek, Jozef; Davison, Beth; Sherman, Warren; Povsic, Thomas; Henry, Timothy D; Gersh, Bernard; Metra, Marco; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Hajjar, Roger; Behfar, Atta; Homsy, Christian; Cotter, Gad; Wijns, William; Tendera, Michal; Terzic, Andre

    2016-02-01

    Cardiopoiesis is a conditioning programme that aims to upgrade the cardioregenerative aptitude of patient-derived stem cells through lineage specification. Cardiopoietic stem cells tested initially for feasibility and safety exhibited signs of clinical benefit in patients with ischaemic heart failure (HF) warranting definitive evaluation. Accordingly, CHART-1 is designed as a large randomized, sham-controlled multicentre study aimed to validate cardiopoietic stem cell therapy. Patients (n = 240) with chronic HF secondary to ischaemic heart disease, reduced LVEF (Heart Failure Questionnaire score, 6 min walk test, LV end-systolic volume, and LVEF at 9 months. The secondary efficacy endpoint is the time to cardiovascular death or worsening HF at 12 months. Safety endpoints include mortality, readmissions, aborted sudden deaths, and serious adverse events at 12 and 24 months. The CHART-1 clinical trial is powered to examine the therapeutic impact of lineage-directed stem cells as a strategy to achieve cardiac regeneration in HF populations. On completion, CHART-1 will offer a definitive evaluation of the efficacy and safety of cardiopoietic stem cells in the treatment of chronic ischaemic HF. NCT01768702. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  9. Medical costs in patients with heart failure after acute heart failure events: one-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Kwon, Hye-Young; Baek, Sang Hong; Lee, Haeyoung; Yoo, Byung-Su; Kang, Seok-Min; Ahn, Youngkeun; Yang, Bong-Min

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated annual medical costs using real-world data focusing on acute heart failure. The data were retrospectively collected from six tertiary hospitals in South Korea. Overall, 330 patients who were hospitalized for acute heart failure between January 2011 and July 2012 were selected. Data were collected on their follow-up medical visits for 1 year, including medical costs incurred toward treatment. Those who died within the observational period or who had no records of follow-up visits were excluded. Annual per patient medical costs were estimated according to the type of medical services, and factors contributing to the costs using Gamma Generalized Linear Models (GLM) with log link were analyzed. On average, total annual medical costs for each patient were USD 6,199 (±9,675), with hospitalization accounting for 95% of the total expenses. Hospitalization cost USD 5,904 (±9,666) per patient. Those who are re-admitted have 88.5% higher medical expenditure than those who have not been re-admitted in 1 year, and patients using intensive care units have 19.6% higher expenditure than those who do not. When the number of hospital days increased by 1 day, medical expenses increased by 6.7%. Outpatient drug costs were not included. There is a possibility that medical expenses for AHF may have been under-estimated. It was found that hospitalization resulted in substantial costs for treatment of heart failure in South Korea, especially in patients with an acute heart failure event. Prevention strategies and appropriate management programs that would reduce both frequency of hospitalization and length of stay for patients with the underlying risk of heart failure are needed.

  10. Therapeutical considerations in associated atrial fibrillation and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitu, O; Mitu, F; Constantin, S; Cojocaru, Elena; Leon, Maria-Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a supraventricular tachyarrhythmia very common in medical practice, often associated with heart failure. Pathophysiological relationship between atrial fibrillation and heart failure is in the attention of numerous case studies, being incomplete elucidated. We made a retrospective study on patients with both diseases, hospitalized in Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Hospital, Iasi, during 01.01.2013 - 31.12.2013. The obtained data allowed the classification of patients according to gender distribution, age groups, area of origin, clinical aspects, and association with other diseases, instituted treatment and appreciation of CHADS2 score. Data interpretation was performed with appropriate statistical methods. We found a higher frequency of the disease among male patients, male: female ratio being 2:1; the most of the patients lived in urban area. The pick of diseases incidence was in patients over 65 years with a total percentage of 70.84% of cases. We noted that the most common symptoms were exertional dyspnea (in all patients), palpitations, dizziness, headache, fatigue, asthenia, dyspnea at rest and pain/chest pressure. In our study, the majority of patients received the beta-blocker--digoxin combination (46 patients, 40 patients respectively). The coexistence of the two disorders could be explained by identifying common risk factors. Beta blockers should be the first therapeutic option in patients with chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation because they have the effect of controlling heart rate and improve survival in patients with these disorders. Meanwhile, digoxin is a drug, only certain conditions of high accuracy monitoring; whose major clinical indications are heart failure and atrial rhythm disturbances.

  11. Skeletal muscle proton T 2 in chronic heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morvan, D.; Richard, B.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the interest of proton T 2 measurement of skeletal muscle at rest and with exercise in patients with chronic heart failure, we performed associated measurements of proton T 2 using magnetic resonance imaging, of external work using ergometry, and of intra-cellular pH (pH) using magnetic resonance 31 P-spectroscopy, in skeletal muscle of the leg anterior compartment, in 37 patients with chronic heart failure. Sixteen patients were in New York Heart Association class II (NYHA II, moderate cardiac failure) and 21 in NYHA classes III-IV (severe cardiac failure). Rest T 2 was significantly increased in NYHA III-IV patients (30.9 ± 2.2 versus 32.8 ± 209 ms, p i variations were of -8 ± 4 versus -9 ± 5%, p =3D NS. The ratio of relative T 2 variations to W was significantly increased in NYPH III-IV patients (0.24 ± 0.12 versus 0.60 ± 0.41%/J, p i with exercise were coupled with external work, only in group NYHA II. T 2 variations negatively correlated with those of pH i in both groups (r=3D -0.78, p i variations with exercise which seems to depend on the exercise intensity level. (authors). 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  12. [Use of microRNAs in heart failure management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Sosa, Luis Alejandro

    Heart failure (HF) is a high impact disease that affects all human populations, demanding the development of new strategies and methods to manage this pathology. That's why microRNAs, small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression, appear as an important option in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of this disease. MiRNAs seems to have a future on HF handling, because can be isolated from body fluids such as blood, and changes in its levels can be associated with the presence, stage and specific disease features, which makes them an interesting option as biomarkers. Also, due to the important role of these molecules on regulation of gene expression and cell homeostasis, it has been explored its potential use as a therapeutic method to prevent or treat HF. That is why this review seeks to show the importance of biomedical research involving the use of miRNAs as a method to approach the HF, showing the impact of disease in the world, aspects of miRNAs biology, and their use as biomarkers and as important therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-Care Among Older Adults With Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumayya Attaallah MSN, RN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is estimated that 5.7 million Americans are living with heart failure (HF today. Despite the fact that HF is one of the most common reasons people aged 65 years and older are admitted into the hospital, few studies describe the self-care in this older adult population. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to review the current literature on self-care in this population to better understand the influence of selected factors on self-care and health outcomes. Methods: A literature search was completed and resulted in including 28 studies. Results: Multiple factors have been reported as barriers to self-care including depression and presence of peripheral arterial disease. Factors having a positive effect on self-care are male gender, number of cardiologist referrals, and self-efficacy. There were few studies that described the association between cognitive functioning and self-care. There is a lack of strong evidence to support the association between self-care and health outcomes such as readmission rate, but recent studies suggest that a 30-day readmission is not a valid predictor of health outcomes. Implications: The assessment of the psychological factors and health care resource utilization patterns that may influence self-care is recommended. More research that addresses the role of cognitive factors in influencing self-care is needed.

  14. Prolonged signal-averaged P wave duration as a prognostic marker for morbidity and mortality in patients with congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dixen, Ulrik; Wallevik, Laura; Hansen, Maja

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic roles of prolonged signal-averaged P wave duration (SAPWD), raised levels of natriuretic peptides, and clinical characteristics in patients with stable congestive heart failure (CHF).......To evaluate the prognostic roles of prolonged signal-averaged P wave duration (SAPWD), raised levels of natriuretic peptides, and clinical characteristics in patients with stable congestive heart failure (CHF)....

  15. Effect of Progressive Heart Failure on Cerebral Hemodynamics and Monoamine Metabolism in CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalyga, M L; Mamalyga, L M

    2017-07-01

    Compensated and decompensated heart failure are characterized by different associations of disorders in the brain and heart. In compensated heart failure, the blood flow in the common carotid and basilar arteries does not change. Exacerbation of heart failure leads to severe decompensation and is accompanied by a decrease in blood flow in the carotid and basilar arteries. Changes in monoamine content occurring in the brain at different stages of heart failure are determined by various factors. The functional exercise test showed unequal monoamine-synthesizing capacities of the brain in compensated and decompensated heart failure. Reduced capacity of the monoaminergic systems in decompensated heart failure probably leads to overstrain of the central regulatory mechanisms, their gradual exhaustion, and failure of the compensatory mechanisms, which contributes to progression of heart failure.

  16. Development of heart failure in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Brian B.; Ellingsen, Torkell; Pedersen, Alma B.

    2018-01-01

    Background: To investigate the incidence of heart failure (HF) and ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in different time spans following incident rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and, furthermore, to investigate the impact of IHD on the development of HF and the impact of different treatment era of RA...... risk of percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting within 10 years following the RA diagnosis was observed. HR for new onset of HF in RA without IHD was 1.23, while the HR for new onset of HF in patients with RA and IHD was 2.06. Conclusions: Rheumatoid arthritis patients...

  17. Dilated cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure. An update for pediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviedes Bottner, Paola; Córdova Fernández, Tamara; Larraín Valenzuela, Marcos; Cruces Romero Presentación de Casos Clínicos, Pablo

    2018-06-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is the main cause of heart failure leading to heart transplant. Its prognosis is variable and depends on the etiology, the patient's age at onset, and the severity. The management of dilated cardiomyopathy is aimed at minimizing symptoms and preventing disease progression; it requires a comprehensive screening for comorbidities and the prevention of complications to improve the overall status of these children and mitigate their prognosis. Here we present a review oriented at the multidisciplinary management that pediatricians should consider when seeing these patients. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  18. The complex nature of informal care in home-based heart failure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alexander M; Reid, Margaret E; Morrison, Caroline E; Capewell, Simon; Murdoch, David L; McMurray, John J

    2008-02-01

    This paper is a report of a study to examine the complexities of informal caregiving for people with chronic heart failure. Little is known of the activities involved and underlying informal care. Heart failure is a common and burdensome condition in which carers play an important management role. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 30 informal carers nominated by patients with mild-to-moderate heart failure (24 spouses, four children, one sibling and one neighbour). Interviews examined knowledge of heart failure, its effects, reported management practices and concerns, decision making and support. The data were collected in 2001. The management of heart failure was a shared and ongoing responsibility between the carer and patient. Carers' clinical knowledge of the condition and management was often limited, but they developed extensive knowledge of its personal effects on the patient. Invisible care activities included monitoring signs of symptom exacerbation and energy boundaries against perceived current and future demands and priorities. Visible care activities included medication management, dressing, bathing and help-seeking. Carers responded to patients' capacities, and adopted philosophies that sought to foster independence while facilitating as normal a life for the patient as was possible and safe. Interventions for informal carers around effective chronic heart failure management should address both visible and invisible informal caring. Future research is needed to develop interventions with carers to improve quality of care, reduce costs and improve patient quality of life. More research is needed to explore the complexities of lay caregiving and to explore the invisible dimensions of informal care further.

  19. Neonate With Severe Heart Failure Related to Vein of Galen Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Yu Chen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a full-term female neonate who presented with respiratory distress and severe heart failure soon after birth. Heart failure secondary to perinatal infection was initially suspected. Subsequent echocardiography revealed aortic runoff, which led to consideration of an intracranial vascular abnormality. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain confirmed a diagnosis of vein of Galen aneurismal malformation (VGAM. Endovascular coil embolization of the vascular anomaly was performed, resulting in improvement of heart failure. VGAM should be considered in the differential diagnosis of neonatal congestive heart failure with a structurally normal heart. Urgent endovascular embolization and aggressive medical treatment of heart failure improve prognosis in neonatal VGAM.

  20. Dioxin inhibition of swim bladder development in zebrafish: is it secondary to heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Monica S; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    2015-05-01

    The swim bladder is a gas-filled organ that is used for regulating buoyancy and is essential for survival in most teleost species. In zebrafish, swim bladder development begins during embryogenesis and inflation occurs within 5 days post fertilization (dpf). Embryos exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) before 96 h post fertilization (hpf) developed swim bladders normally until the growth/elongation phase, at which point growth was arrested. It is known that TCDD exposure causes heart malformations that lead to heart failure in zebrafish larvae, and that blood circulation is a key factor in normal development of the swim bladder. The adverse effects of TCDD exposure on the heart occur during the same period of time that swim bladder development and growth occurs. Based on this coincident timing, and the dependence of swim bladder development on proper circulatory development, we hypothesized that the adverse effects of TCDD on swim bladder development were secondary to heart failure. We compared swim bladder development in TCDD-exposed embryos to: (1) silent heart morphants, which lack cardiac contractility, and (2) transiently transgenic cmlc2:caAHR-2AtRFP embryos, which mimic TCDD-induced heart failure via heart-specific, constitutive activation of AHR signaling. Both of these treatment groups, which were not exposed to TCDD, developed hypoplastic swim bladders of comparable size and morphology to those found in TCDD-exposed embryos. Furthermore, in all treatment groups swim bladder development was arrested during the growth/elongation phase. Together, these findings support a potential role for heart failure in the inhibition of swim bladder development caused by TCDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. EFFECT OF MITRAL REGURGITATION ON CHRONIC HEART FAILURE COURSE AND STRUCTURE-FUNCTIONAL HEART STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Larina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate chronic heart failure (CHF course, functional and structural heart changes in patients with functional mitral regurgitation (MR of various degrees.Material and methods. A total of 104 outpatients (60-85 y. o. with CHF of functional class II-IV by NYHA and functional MR of I-II degrees and MR of III-IV degrees were included into the study groups.Results: Patients in both groups were comparable in sex, age, CHF duration, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, clinical state by the clinical state scale, quality of life, anxious and depressive status. The majority of patients with MR III had significant left ventricle (LV systolic dysfunction (p=0,029, severe CHF course (p=0,034, received furosemide (p=0.004 and digoxin (p=0,004. They had significant increase in end-diastolic dimension (p<0,001, end-systolic dimension (p<0,001, left atrium (p=0,004, end-diastolic volume (p<0,001, end-systolic volume (p<0,001, pulmonary artery pressure (p<0,001, decrease in LV relative wall thickness (p=0,021 and LV ejection fraction (p<0,001. Patients of this group were hospitalized because of CHF decompensation and ischemic heart disease exacerbation more often (p=0,045.Conclusion. MR can be considered as one of sensitive predictors of LV geometry and function alteration in CHF patients and play an important role in symptoms development.

  2. EFFECT OF MITRAL REGURGITATION ON CHRONIC HEART FAILURE COURSE AND STRUCTURE-FUNCTIONAL HEART STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Larina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate chronic heart failure (CHF course, functional and structural heart changes in patients with functional mitral regurgitation (MR of various degrees.Material and methods. A total of 104 outpatients (60-85 y. o. with CHF of functional class II-IV by NYHA and functional MR of I-II degrees and MR of III-IV degrees were included into the study groups.Results: Patients in both groups were comparable in sex, age, CHF duration, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, clinical state by the clinical state scale, quality of life, anxious and depressive status. The majority of patients with MR III had significant left ventricle (LV systolic dysfunction (p=0,029, severe CHF course (p=0,034, received furosemide (p=0.004 and digoxin (p=0,004. They had significant increase in end-diastolic dimension (p<0,001, end-systolic dimension (p<0,001, left atrium (p=0,004, end-diastolic volume (p<0,001, end-systolic volume (p<0,001, pulmonary artery pressure (p<0,001, decrease in LV relative wall thickness (p=0,021 and LV ejection fraction (p<0,001. Patients of this group were hospitalized because of CHF decompensation and ischemic heart disease exacerbation more often (p=0,045.Conclusion. MR can be considered as one of sensitive predictors of LV geometry and function alteration in CHF patients and play an important role in symptoms development.

  3. Noncardiac Comorbidities in Heart Failure With Reduced Versus Preserved Ejection Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentz, Robert J.; Kelly, Jacob P.; von Lueder, Thomas G.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Lam, Carolyn S. P.; Cowie, Martin R.; Kjeldsen, Keld; Jankowska, Ewa A.; Atar, Dan; Butler, Javed; Fiuzat, Mona; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram; O’Connor, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure patients are classified by ejection fraction (EF) into distinct groups: heart failure with preserved EF (HFpEF) or heart failure with reduced EF (HFrEF). Although patients with heart failure commonly have multiple comorbidities that complicate management and may adversely affect outcomes, their role in the HFpEF and HFrEF groups is not well-characterized. This review summarizes the role of noncardiac comorbidities in patients with HFpEF versus HFrEF, emphasizing prevalence, underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, and outcomes. Pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, anemia, and obesity tend to be more prevalent in HFpEF patients, but renal disease and sleep-disordered breathing burdens are similar. These comorbidities similarly increase morbidity and mortality risk in HFpEF and HFrEF patients. Common pathophysiologic mechanisms include systemic and endomyocardial inflammation with fibrosis. We also discuss implications for clinical care and future HF clinical trial design. The basis for this review was discussions between scientists, clinical trialists, and regulatory representatives at the 10th Global CardioVascular Clinical Trialists Forum. PMID:25456761

  4. Clinical Utility of Exercise Training in Heart Failure with Reduced and Preserved Ejection Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrar Ul Haq, Muhammad; Goh, Cheng Yee; Levinger, Itamar; Wong, Chiew; Hare, David L

    2015-01-01

    Reduced exercise tolerance is an independent predictor of hospital readmission and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). Exercise training for HF patients is well established as an adjunct therapy, and there is sufficient evidence to support the favorable role of exercise training programs for HF patients over and above the optimal medical therapy. Some of the documented benefits include improved functional capacity, quality of life (QoL), fatigue, and dyspnea. Major trials to assess exercise training in HF have, however, focused on heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF). At least half of the patients presenting with HF have heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) and experience similar symptoms of exercise intolerance, dyspnea, and early fatigue, and similar mortality risk and rehospitalization rates. The role of exercise training in the management of HFPEF remains less clear. This article provides a brief overview of pathophysiology of reduced exercise tolerance in HFREF and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), and summarizes the evidence and mechanisms by which exercise training can improve symptoms and HF. Clinical and practical aspects of exercise training prescription are also discussed. PMID:25698883

  5. Obesity and Heart Failure as a Mediator of the Cerebrorenal Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Jindal, Ankur; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is contributing substantially to the burden of cardiovascular disease including heart disease and congestive heart failure, in the United States and the rest of the world. Overnutrition as a driver of obesity, promotes alterations in fatty acid, lipid, and glucose metabolism that influence myocardial function and progression of heart failure from diastolic to systolic failure. The association of progressive heart failure and progressive chronic kidney disease is well docu...

  6. The survival of patients with heart failure with preserved or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesgaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Previous studies have reported mixed results whether survival is similar to those patients with heart failure and reduced EF (HF-REF).......A substantial proportion of patients with heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HF-PEF). Previous studies have reported mixed results whether survival is similar to those patients with heart failure and reduced EF (HF-REF)....

  7. Influence of N-acetylcysteine on oxidative stress in slow-twitch soleus muscle of heart failure rats

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Paula Felippe [UNESP; Bonomo, Camila [UNESP; Guizoni, Daniele Mendes [UNESP; Oliveira Junior, Silvio Assis [UNESP; Damatto, Ricardo Luiz [UNESP; Cezar, Marcelo Diarcadia Mariano [UNESP; Lima, Aline Regina Ruiz [UNESP; Pagan, Luana Urbano [UNESP; Seiva, Fabio Rodrigues; Fernandes, Denise Castro; Laurindo, Francisco Rafael Martins; Novelli, Ethel Lourenzi Barbosa [UNESP; Matsubara, Luiz Shiguero [UNESP; Zornoff, Leonardo Antonio Mamede [UNESP; Okoshi, Katashi [UNESP

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic heart failure is characterized by decreased exercise capacity with early exacerbation of fatigue and dyspnea. Intrinsic skeletal muscle abnormalities can play a role in exercise intolerance. Causal or contributing factors responsible for muscle alterations have not been completely defined. This study evaluated skeletal muscle oxidative stress and NADPH oxidase activity in rats with myocardial infarction (MI) induced heart failure. Methods and Results: Four months after MI,...

  8. Generation of Antigen Microarrays to Screen for Autoantibodies in Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Chruscinski

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies directed against endogenous proteins including contractile proteins and endothelial antigens are frequently detected in patients with heart failure and after heart transplantation. There is evidence that these autoantibodies contribute to cardiac dysfunction and correlate with clinical outcomes. Currently, autoantibodies are detected in patient sera using individual ELISA assays (one for each antigen. Thus, screening for many individual autoantibodies is laborious and consumes a large amount of patient sample. To better capture the broad-scale antibody reactivities that occur in heart failure and post-transplant, we developed a custom antigen microarray technique that can simultaneously measure IgM and IgG reactivities against 64 unique antigens using just five microliters of patient serum. We first demonstrated that our antigen microarray technique displayed enhanced sensitivity to detect autoantibodies compared to the traditional ELISA method. We then piloted this technique using two sets of samples that were obtained at our institution. In the first retrospective study, we profiled pre-transplant sera from 24 heart failure patients who subsequently received heart transplants. We identified 8 antibody reactivities that were higher in patients who developed cellular rejection (2 or more episodes of grade 2R rejection in first year after transplant as defined by revised criteria from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation compared with those who did have not have rejection episodes. In a second retrospective study with 31 patients, we identified 7 IgM reactivities that were higher in heart transplant recipients who developed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR compared with control recipients, and in time course studies, these reactivities appeared prior to overt graft dysfunction. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the autoantibody microarray technique outperforms traditional ELISAs as it uses less patient

  9. Therapeutic options in chronic heart failure. Findings on chest X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granitz, M.R.; Meissnitzer, T.; Meissnitzer, M.W.; Hergan, K.; Altenberger, J.; Granitz, C.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution covers drugless therapeutic options for chronic heart failure: the implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD), the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), the interventional catheter treatment of functional mitral insufficiency, and mechanical heart supporting systems and heart transplantation.

  10. Assessment of congestive heart failure in chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksson, L.; Sundin, A.; Smedby, Oe.; Albrektsson, P.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of observer variations and film-screen quality on the diagnosis of congestive heart failure based on chest radiographs was studied in 27 patients. For each patient, two films were exposed, one with the Kodak Lanex Medium system and one with the Agfa MR 400 system. The films were presented to three observers who assessed the presence of congestive heart failure on a three-graded scale. The results showed no significant difference between the two systems but large systematic differences between the observers. There were also differences between the two ratings by the same observer that could not be explained by the film-screen factor. It is concluded that the choice between these two systems is of little importance in view of the interobserver and intraobserver variability that can exist within the same department. (orig.)

  11. [Sacubitril / Valsartan in patients with diabetes and heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Vincent Matthias; Rocca, Hans-Peter Brunner-La; Marx, Nikolaus

    2016-10-01

    Sacubitril / Valsartan proofed to be an effective treatment compared to enalapril in reducing heart failure hospitalisations and mortality in patients with severe "Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction" (HFREF). Recent European cardiology guidelines attributed a class IB recommendation for Sacubitril / Valsartan in HFREF patients who remain symptomatic despite optimal treatment with ACE-I, a beta-blocker, and a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist. There is a significant overlap between diabetic and HFREF patients and thus, efficacy assessment of Sacubitril / Valsartan is a clinically meaningful issue in the large subgroup of HFREF patients with diabetes. We discuss the present evidence why local authorities speculated about a potential interaction between the two diseases decreasing the efficacy of sacubitril/valsartan in terms of reducing relevant end-points in this cohort. Overall, Sacubitril / Valsartan is obviously a treatment option in diabetics with HFREF. However, diabetic cardiomyopathy needs to be recognised as a specific disease condition. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Per3 VNTR polymorphism and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkova, Jolana; Bienertova-Vasku, Julie Anna; Spinarova, Lenka; Bienert, Petr; Hlavna, Marian; Pavkova Goldbergova, Monika; Parenica, Jiri; Spinar, Jindrich; Vasku, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gene Period3 (Per3) variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism and chronic heart failure (CHF). The study subjects (372 patients of Caucasian origin with CHF and 332 healthy controls) were genotyped for Per3 VNTR polymorphism using an allele-specific PCR. No significant differences in genotype or Per3 VNTR allele frequencies were found between CHF cases and controls (Pg=0.30, Pa=0.52). No significant differences were uncovered either between CHF cases according to etiology (DCMP vs. IHD; Pg=0.87, Pa=0.91). In the multivariate regression modeling, no predictive function of VNTR Per3 polymorphism on ejection fraction or NYHA class, hyperlipidaemia or type II diabetes risk was found. Per3 VNTR polymorphism is not a major risk factor for chronic heart failure or a factor modulating the severity of the CHF in this population.

  13. Heart failure as a general pandemic in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Miura, Masanobu; Nochioka, Kotaro; Sakata, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an epidemic in healthcare worldwide, including Asia. It appears that HF will become more serious in the near future, with the epidemiological transition and ageing of the population. However, in contrast to Western countries, information on HF epidemiology is still limited in Asia, particularly in South Asia. In this review, we will briefly summarize available information regarding the current and future burden of HF in Asia, which indicates the importance of both primary prevention of underlying diseases of HF and secondary prevention, including management of ischaemic HF, HF with preserved EF, and HF in the elderly. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  14. Cardiac Depression Scale: Mokken scaling in heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ski Chantal F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a high prevalence of depression in patients with heart failure (HF that is associated with worsening prognosis. The value of using a reliable and valid instrument to measure depression in this population is therefore essential. We validated the Cardiac Depression Scale (CDS in heart failure patients using a model of ordinal unidimensional measurement known as Mokken scaling. Findings We administered in face-to-face interviews the CDS to 603 patients with HF. Data were analysed using Mokken scale analysis. Items of the CDS formed a statistically significant unidimensional Mokken scale of low strength (H0.8. Conclusions The CDS has a hierarchy of items which can be interpreted in terms of the increasingly serious effects of depression occurring as a result of HF. Identifying an appropriate instrument to measure depression in patients with HF allows for early identification and better medical management.

  15. Prevalence of heart failure in nursing homes : a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daamen, Marielle A. M. J.; Schols, Jos M. G. A.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hamers, Jan P. H.

    Introduction: Heart failure is an important problem in western countries. In nursing home residents heart failure is expected to be highly prevalent. However, accurate diagnosis of heart failure in these patients is often hampered due to atypical findings and concomitant co-morbidity. In order to

  16. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 9 Reduces Cardiac Fibrosis and Improves Cardiac Function in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morine, Kevin J; Qiao, Xiaoying; York, Sam; Natov, Peter S; Paruchuri, Vikram; Zhang, Yali; Aronovitz, Mark J; Karas, Richard H; Kapur, Navin K

    2018-02-27

    levels of pSmad1, not pSmad3. Conclusions -Our results identify a novel functional role for BMP9 as an endogenous inhibitor of cardiac fibrosis due to LV pressure overload and further show that treatment with either recombinant BMP9 or disruption of endoglin activity promotes BMP9 activity and limits cardiac fibrosis in heart failure, thereby providing potentially novel therapeutic approaches for patients with heart failure.

  17. Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khder, Yasser; Shi, Victor; McMurray, John J V; Lefkowitz, Martin P

    2017-01-01

    It has been known since the 1990s that long-term morbidity and mortality is improved in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) by treatments that target the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). It has also long been thought that enhancement of the activity of natriuretic peptides (NPs) could potentially benefit patients with HFrEF, but multiple attempts to realize this benefit had failed over the years - until 2014, when a large, phase III, randomized, controlled clinical trial (PARADIGM-HF) was completed comparing sacubitril/valsartan with enalapril, a well-established treatment for HFrEF. Sacubitril/valsartan (formerly known as LCZ696) is a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) that simultaneously suppresses RAAS activation through blockade of angiotensin II type 1 receptors and enhances vasoactive peptides including NPs through inhibition of neprilysin, the enzyme responsible for their degradation. In PARADIGM-HF, patients with HFrEF treated with sacubitril/valsartan had 20% less risk for cardiovascular death or hospitalization for heart failure (the primary endpoint), 20% less risk for cardiovascular death, 21% less risk for first hospitalization for heart failure, and 16% less risk for death from any cause, compared with enalapril (all p sacubitril/valsartan group had higher proportions of patients with hypotension and nonserious angioedema but lower proportions with renal impairment, hyperkalemia, and cough, compared with the enalapril group. The use of sacubitril/valsartan has been endorsed by the latest heart failure treatment guidelines in Europe and the USA. This chapter reviews the discoveries, scientific reasoning, and clinical evidence that led to the development of sacubitril/valsartan, the first novel therapy in a new drug class to improve survival in HFrEF in the last 15 years.

  18. Bisoprolol in the treatment of chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal de Groote; Pierre-Vladimir Ennezat; Fréderic Mouquet

    2007-01-01

    Pascal de Groote1, Pierre-Vladimir Ennezat2, Fréderic Mouquet11Service de Cardiologie C, 2Service des soins intensifs cardiologiques, Hôpital Cardiologique, Centre Hospitalier Régional et Universitaire de Lille, FranceAbstract: Bisoprolol fumarate is a highly selective beta-1 receptor blocker. Bisoprolol has been extensively studied in three large mortality trials in stable chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. The CIBIS trial enrolled 641 patients and demonstrated the goo...

  19. Hyperthyroidism: Presenting as Isolated Tricuspid Regurgitation and Right Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Whitner, Tanya E.; Hudson, Christopher J.; Smith, Timothy D.; Littmann, Laszlo

    2005-01-01

    Although hyperthyroidism has many signs and symptoms, right heart failure can occasionally be the main presenting symptom. We describe the case of a previously healthy 42-year-old woman whose chief complaint was progressive bilateral lower extremity edema. The echocardiogram revealed right atrial dilatation and moderate-to-severe tricuspid regurgitation. Results of laboratory studies were consistent with hyperthyroidism. Thyroid ablation resulted in permanent resolution of symptoms and resolu...

  20. Embryonic Stem Cell Therapy of Heart Failure in Genetic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J.; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J.; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic causes underlying nonischemic cardiomyopathies are increasingly being resolved, yet repair therapies for these commonly heritable forms of heart failure are lacking. A case in point is human dilated cardiomyopathy 10 (CMD10; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man #608569), a progressive organ dysfunction syndrome refractory to conventional therapies and linked to mutations in cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel sub-units. Embryonic stem cell therapy demonstrates benefit in ischemi...