WorldWideScience

Sample records for heart disease cellular

  1. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease ... can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias) A ...

  2. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... daily aspirin to prevent heart attack? Does taking birth control pills increase my risk for heart disease? Does using ... tells you to. Return to top Does taking birth control pills increase my risk for heart disease? Taking birth ...

  3. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  4. Cellular and molecular basis of RV hypertrophy in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobazzi, D; Suleiman, M-S; Ghorbel, M; George, S J; Caputo, M; Tulloh, R M

    2016-01-01

    RV hypertrophy (RVH) is one of the triggers of RV failure in congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, improving our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of this pathology will help in developing strategic therapeutic interventions to enhance patient benefit in the future. This review describes the potential mechanisms that underlie the transition from RVH to RV failure. In particular, it addresses structural and functional remodelling that encompass contractile dysfunction, metabolic changes, shifts in gene expression and extracellular matrix remodelling. Both ischaemic stress and reactive oxygen species production are implicated in triggering these changes and will be discussed. Finally, RV remodelling in response to various CHDs as well as the potential role of biomarkers will be addressed.

  5. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Atherosclerosis is also the most common cause of cardiovascular disease. It can be caused by correctable problems, such as an unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, being overweight and smoking. Causes of heart arrhythmia ...

  6. Cellular modifications and interventions for the damaged heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explore cellular modification processes associated with heart disease, as well as harnessing its potential for treatment and prevention of detrimental electrophysiological consequences of heart disease. For regenerative cell replacement therapies, optimal differentiatio

  7. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  8. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... slow down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...

  9. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Heart Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Heart Disease Print A A ... chest pain, heart attacks, and strokes . What Is Heart Disease? The heart is the center of the cardiovascular ...

  10. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk factors. ...

  11. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  12. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular heartbeats, called ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  13. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke Heart Disease Risk Factors Recommend ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke File Formats Help: How do ...

  14. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001114.htm Congenital heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure ...

  15. Cyanotic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001104.htm Cyanotic heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cyanotic heart disease refers to a group of many different heart ...

  16. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  17. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Oct 12,2016 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  18. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often DO NOT consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  19. What Causes Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Disease? Research suggests that coronary heart disease (CHD) begins with damage to the lining and ... causing coronary microvascular disease (MVD). Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects the heart's tiny arteries. The cause ...

  20. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Heart diseases that affect women more than men include Coronary ...

  1. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  2. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  3. Heart Diseases--Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you have a close family member who had heart disease at an early age. Fortunately, there are many things you can do reduce your chances of getting heart disease. You should Know your blood pressure and keep ...

  4. Valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gelson, E; Gatzoulis, M; Johnson, M.

    2007-01-01

    Valvular disease may be unmasked in pregnancy when physiological changes increase demands on the heart. Women with valvular heart disease require close follow-up during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum

  5. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Balance › Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English ... nervous system, body temperature, and weight. What is hypothyroidism and what are its symptoms? Hypothyroidism, also called ...

  6. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000092.htm Aspirin and heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... healthy people who are at low risk for heart disease. You provider will consider your overall medical condition ...

  7. Living with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Disease If you have coronary heart disease (CHD), you can take steps to control its ... the section of this article titled "How Is Heart Disease Treated?" You also can visit the Health Topics ...

  8. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  9. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  10. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease Updated:May 17,2017 Most illegal drugs can ... www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml Alcohol and Heart Disease Caffeine and Heart Disease Tobacco and Heart Disease ...

  11. Women and Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹国如

    2005-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading killer of Americans. But it kills more women than men. The American Heart Association says heart disease and other cardiovascular (心血管的) disorders kill about five hundred thousand women a year. That is more than the next seven causes of death combined.

  12. Towards defining heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Aidan P; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2004-12-01

    Injury to the myocardium disrupts geometric integrity and results in changes to intracardiac pressure, wall stress and tension, and the pattern of blood flow through the heart. Significant disruption to pump function results in heart failure which is defined in terms of symptoms: breathlessness and fatigue, signs of salt and water retention, and neurohormonal activation. This syndrome most commonly occurs in the context of injury due to ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy but because patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are born with sometimes gross distortions of cardiac anatomy they too are subject to the forces that drive heart failure. This paper explores the available data relating to the clinical and neurohormonal manifestations of heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease and describes how, by additionally exploring events at a cellular level, we may be able to arrive at a definition of heart failure relevant to this population.

  13. Heart Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and African Americans Although African American adults are ... were 30 percent more likely to die from heart disease than non-Hispanic whites. African American women are ...

  14. Living with Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Coronary Heart Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) can cause serious complications. However, if you ... changes and medicines, go to "How Is Coronary Heart Disease Treated?" Work closely with your doctor to control ...

  15. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic heart disease (DHD) increases the likelihood of earlier and more ... also tend to have less success from certain heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and ...

  16. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dehydration. Caffeine is in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate and some nuts. Whether high caffeine intake increases ... and Heart Disease Healthy Eating • Healthy Eating Home • Nutrition AHA Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations Making Healthy Choices ...

  17. Heart disease. Third edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunwald, E.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 62 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiological and Angiographic Examination of the Heart; Newer Cardiac Imaging Techniques: Digital Subtraction Angiography, Computerized Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Nuclear Cardiology; and Genetics and Cardiovascular Disease.

  18. [Ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Megumi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2009-04-01

    It has been reported that antihypertensive therapy reduces the risk of ischemic heart disease. Except for the antihypertensive effects, the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are proved to be very effective in primary and secondary event onset prophylaxis by many clinical trials. The angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs) used briskly in recent years inhibits angiotensin II type 1 receptor alternatively. Although ARBs protect organs, especially blood vessel, heart, brain and kidney in sites of pharmacology, ARBs are still not much as effective results as ACE inhibitors for the patients with ischemic heart disease, by many clinical trials.

  19. Human interstitial cellular model in therapeutics of heart valve calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Caimei; Tang, Hai; Mei, Zijian; Li, Nichujie; Zeng, Zhi; Darko, Kwame Oteng; Yin, Yulong; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Yang, Xiaoping

    2017-05-23

    Calcific aortic valve disease is a common, severe heart condition that is currently with no proven, effective drug treatment and requires a surgical valve replacement or an entire heart explanation. Thus, developing novel, targeted therapeutic approaches becomes a major goal for cardiovascular disease research. To achieve this goal, isolated heart valve interstitial cells could be an advanced model to explore molecular mechanisms and measure drug efficacy. Based on this progress, molecular mechanisms that harbor components of  inflammation and fibrosis coupled with proteins, for example, BMP-2, TLRs, RANKL, Osteoprotegerin, have been proposed. Small molecules or antibodies targeting these proteins have shown promising efficacy for either reversing or slowing down calcification development in vitro. In this review, we summarize these potential therapeutics with some highlights of interstitial cellular models.

  20. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease and stroke prevention Related information Learn more about healthy eating and ... top More information on Heart disease and stroke prevention Read more from womenshealth.gov A Lifetime of ...

  1. Carcinoid heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Saamir A; Banchs, Jose; Iliescu, Cezar; Dasari, Arvind; Lopez-Mattei, Juan; Yusuf, Syed Wamique

    2017-10-01

    Rare neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) that most commonly arise in the gastrointestinal tract can lead to carcinoid syndrome and carcinoid heart disease. Patients with carcinoid syndrome present with vasomotor changes, hypermotility of the gastrointestinal system, hypotension and bronchospasm. Medical therapy for carcinoid syndrome, typically with somatostatin analogues, can help control symptoms, inhibit tumour progression and prolong survival. Carcinoid heart disease occurs in more than 50% of these patients and is the initial presentation of carcinoid syndrome in up to 20% of patients. Carcinoid heart disease has characteristic findings of plaque-like deposits composed of smooth muscle cells, myofibroblasts, extracellular matrix and an overlying endothelial layer which can lead to valve dysfunction. Valvular dysfunction can lead to oedema, ascites and right-sided heart failure. Medical therapy of carcinoid heart disease is limited to symptom control and palliation. Valve surgery for carcinoid heart disease should be considered for symptomatic patients with controlled metastatic carcinoid syndrome. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to guide optimal management. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Cellular Mechanisms of Drosophila Heart Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Vogler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many of the major discoveries in the fields of genetics and developmental biology have been made using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. With regard to heart development, the conserved network of core cardiac transcription factors that underlies cardiogenesis has been studied in great detail in the fly, and the importance of several signaling pathways that regulate heart morphogenesis, such as Slit/Robo, was first shown in the fly model. Recent technological advances have led to a large increase in the genomic data available from patients with congenital heart disease (CHD. This has highlighted a number of candidate genes and gene networks that are potentially involved in CHD. To validate genes and genetic interactions among candidate CHD-causing alleles and to better understand heart formation in general are major tasks. The specific limitations of the various cardiac model systems currently employed (mammalian and fish models provide a niche for the fly model, despite its evolutionary distance to vertebrates and humans. Here, we review recent advances made using the Drosophila embryo that identify factors relevant for heart formation. These underline how this model organism still is invaluable for a better understanding of CHD.

  3. Heart Disease and Stroke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    In this podcast, Dr. Tom Frieden, CDC Director, discusses the number one killer in the United States - heart disease and stroke.  Created: 9/3/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/6/2014.

  4. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes happen every year in the United States. You ... some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of your risks ...

  5. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  6. Cellular models for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenburger, Björn H; Saridaki, Theodora; Dinter, Elisabeth

    2016-10-01

    Developing new therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease requires cellular models. Current models reproduce the two most salient changes found in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease: The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the existence of protein aggregates consisting mainly of α-synuclein. Cultured cells offer many advantages over studying Parkinson's disease directly in patients or in animal models. At the same time, the choice of a specific cellular model entails the requirement to focus on one aspect of the disease while ignoring others. This article is intended for researchers planning to use cellular models for their studies. It describes for commonly used cell types the aspects of Parkinson's disease they model along with technical advantages and disadvantages. It might also be helpful for researchers from other fields consulting literature on cellular models of Parkinson's disease. Important models for the study of dopaminergic neuron degeneration include Lund human mesencephalic cells and primary neurons, and a case is made for the use of non-dopaminergic cells to model pathogenesis of non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. With regard to α-synuclein aggregates, this article describes strategies to induce and measure aggregates with a focus on fluorescent techniques. Cellular models reproduce the two most salient changes of Parkinson's disease, the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the existence of α-synuclein aggregates. This article is intended for researchers planning to use cellular models for their studies. It describes for commonly used cell types and treatments the aspects of Parkinson's disease they model along with technical advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this article describes strategies to induce and measure aggregates with a focus on fluorescent techniques. This article is part of a special issue on Parkinson disease.

  7. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media for Heart.org Heart and Stroke Association Statistics Banner 1 - Stats white banner Each year, the ... health and disease in the population. Heart & Stroke Statistics FAQs What is Prevalence? Prevalence is an estimate ...

  8. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a heart attack or injury to the heart. Rheumatic Fever Untreated strep throat or other infections with strep bacteria that progress to rheumatic fever can cause heart valve disease. When the body ...

  9. Data and Statistics: Women and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Women and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Atlas of Heart Disease Facts on Women and Heart Disease Heart disease is the leading cause of death ...

  10. Cellular basis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Jitin; Halima, Saoussen Ben; Felmy, Boas; Goodger, Zoe; Zurbriggen, Sebastian; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2010-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease. A characteristic feature of the disease is the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) which either in its soluble oligomeric form or in the plaque-associated form is causally linked to neurodegeneration. Aβ peptide is liberated from the membrane-spanning -amyloid precursor protein by sequential proteolytic processing employing β- and γ-secretases. All these proteins involved in the production of Aβ peptide are membrane associated and hence, membrane trafficking and cellular compartmentalization play important roles. In this review, we summarize the key cellular events that lead to the progression of AD.

  11. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop DHD. The higher a person's blood sugar level is, the higher his or her risk of DHD. Diabetes affects heart disease risk in three major ways. ... is that many lifestyle changes help control multiple risk factors. For example, ... treatment plan for diabetes and see your doctor for ongoing care. If ...

  12. Hypertensive Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypertensive heart disease is prevalent and during the last decade it has been determined that patients with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy have increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, many have doubted the effectiveness of LV mass assessment because it is difficult...

  13. Congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970296 Evaluating the degree of pulmonary vascularlesions in congenital heart disease with selective pul-monary angiography. PAN Shiwei(潘世伟), et al.Fuwai Hosp, CAMS & PUMC, Beijing, 100037. Chin JCardiol 1997; 25(1): 39-41. Objective: To evaluate the degree of pulmonary vas-

  14. What Is Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Coronary Heart Disease? Español Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a disease in which a waxy ... medical procedures can help prevent or treat coronary heart disease. These treatments may reduce the risk of related ...

  15. Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 Heart disease is the No. 1 killer for all Americans and stroke is the fifth leading cause of death. Hispanics ...

  16. FastStats: Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Heart Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... the U.S. Morbidity Number of adults with diagnosed heart disease: 28.4 million Percent of adults with diagnosed ...

  17. Chelation for Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... V W X Y Z Chelation for Coronary Heart Disease Share: © AHA Coronary heart disease is a leading cause of death among both ... health approach . The use of disodium EDTA for heart disease has not been approved by the U.S. Food ...

  18. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise Houlberg; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...... to the relevant ward. Of these patients, 40,0% had their preliminary diagnosis of IHD confirmed. 14,1% of all patients admitted to the hospital were diagnosed with nonheart conditions. Preliminary diagnoses of STEMI had an accuracy of 87,5%. Conclusions. The preliminary IHD diagnoses assigned by the MECU...... physicians were acceptable. In case of STEMI patients the diagnostic accuracy was excellent. In this study there was an apparent overtriage....

  19. Travel and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  20. Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008277 Relationship between pulse wave velocity and the NYHA classification of coronary insufficiency.SUN Weiping(孙卫平),et al.Dept Cardiol,Tongji Hosp Tongji Univ,Shanghai 200065.Chin J Intern Med 2008;47(5):382-384.Objective To investigate the relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity(baPWV)and different stage of cardiac dysfunction.Methods 253 consecutive patients with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease

  1. Pathophysiology of valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y I; Sun, Rongrong; Li, Xianchi; Liu, Min; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Peiying

    2016-04-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is caused by either damage or defect in one of the four heart valves, aortic, mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary. Defects in these valves can be congenital or acquired. Age, gender, tobacco use, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and type II diabetes contribute to the risk of disease. VHD is an escalating health issue with a prevalence of 2.5% in the United States alone. Considering the likely increase of the aging population worldwide, the incidence of acquired VHD is expected to increase. Technological advances are instrumental in identifying congenital heart defects in infants, thereby adding to the growing VHD population. Almost one-third of elderly individuals have echocardiographic or radiological evidence of calcific aortic valve (CAV) sclerosis, an early and subclinical form of CAV disease (CAVD). Of individuals ages >60, ~2% suffer from disease progression to its most severe form, calcific aortic stenosis. Surgical intervention is therefore required in these patients as no effective pharmacotherapies exist. Valvular calcium load and valve biomineralization are orchestrated by the concerted action of diverse cell-dependent mechanisms. Signaling pathways important in skeletal morphogenesis are also involved in the regulation of cardiac valve morphogenesis, CAVD and the pathobiology of cardiovascular calcification. CAVD usually occurs without any obvious symptoms in early stages over a long period of time and symptoms are identified at advanced stages of the disease, leading to a high rate of mortality. Aortic valve replacement is the only primary treatment of choice. Biomarkers such as asymmetric dimethylarginine, fetuin-A, calcium phosphate product, natriuretic peptides and osteopontin have been useful in improving outcomes among various disease states. This review, highlights the current understanding of the biology of VHD, with particular reference to molecular and cellular aspects of its regulation. Current clinical questions

  2. Heart Disease Affects Far More Than the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163584.html Heart Disease Affects Far More Than the Heart Blocked arteries ... 14, 2017 TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease affects more than just the heart. It also ...

  3. Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents ... to view a larger version of the image Symptoms It is very important to learn the signs ...

  4. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Depression and Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    There are exciting findings in the field of depression and coronary heart disease. Whether diagnosed or simply self-reported, depression continues to mark very high risk for a recurrent acute coronary syndrome or for death in patients with coronary heart disease. Many intriguing mechanisms have been posited to be implicated in the association between depression and heart disease, and randomized controlled trials of depression treatment are beginning to delineate the types of depression manage...

  6. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Join The Heart Truth Community Past Issues / Winter ... introduced as the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness in 2002 by the NHLBI. The Red ...

  7. Women and Heart Disease: Sharing Advice from the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women and Heart Disease Sharing Advice From The Heart Past Issues / Spring ... gowns in an effort to raise awareness that heart disease is the leading cause of death among women. ...

  8. Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages Past Issues / Winter ... weeks of a heart attack. For Women with Heart Disease: About 6 million American women have coronary heart ...

  9. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  10. Biofeedback in the treatment of heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Christine S; McKee, Michael G

    2011-08-01

    Biofeedback is a method of training subjects to regulate their own physiology using feedback from physiologic sensors connected to an output display. Biofeedback-assisted stress management (BFSM) incorporates the physiologic signals with instructions on stress management. The goal of BFSM training is to give subjects the tools to control their own mental and physiologic reactions, leading to improved health and wellness. In cardiovascular disease, overactivation of the sympathetic component of the autonomic nervous system and psychologic stress together negatively affect quality of life and clinical status. BFSM targets both areas. We hypothesize that this intervention can be used in cardiovascular disease to improve clinical status and quality of life, as well as interfere with disease progression. We are conducting trials of BFSM in heart failure and stable coronary artery disease. Preliminary data suggest that use of BFSM by heart failure patients may actually cause cellular and molecular remodeling of the failing heart in the direction of normal. We are comparing the effects of BFSM with usual care in patients with stable coronary artery disease, testing the hypothesis that the intervention will decrease both sympathetic hyperarousal and activation of the inflammatory cascade. Since heart rate variability is abnormal in both cardiovascular disease and depression, and since BFSM has been successfully used to change heart rate variability, we also expect this intervention to have a positive impact on the depression that often accompanies cardiovascular disease.

  11. Genetics of valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, Stephanie; Lincoln, Joy; Garg, Vidu

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and often the result of congenital malformations. However, the prevalence is increasing in adults not only because of the growing aging population, but also because of improvements in the medical and surgical care of children with congenital heart valve defects. The success of the Human Genome Project and major advances in genetic technologies, in combination with our increased understanding of heart valve development, has led to the discovery of numerous genetic contributors to heart valve disease. These have been uncovered using a variety of approaches including the examination of familial valve disease and genome-wide association studies to investigate sporadic cases. This review will discuss these findings and their implications in the treatment of valvular heart disease.

  12. Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders Overall, Asian American ... are less likely than white adults to have heart disease and they are less likely to die from ...

  13. Living with heart disease and angina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000576.htm Living with heart disease and angina To use the sharing features on ... pain and reduce your risks from heart disease. Heart Disease and Angina CHD is a narrowing of the ...

  14. How Does Heart Disease Affect Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Does Heart Disease Affect Women? Español In the United States, 1 ... about coronary MVD and broken heart syndrome. Coronary Heart Disease CHD is a disease in which plaque (plak) ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions critical congenital heart disease critical congenital heart disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a term that refers to a ...

  16. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Treated? Diabetic heart disease (DHD) is treated with lifestyle changes, medicines, and ... treating DHD include: Controlling diabetes and any other heart disease risk factors you have, such as unhealthy blood ...

  17. Heart disease and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liver, and prepared meats such as sausage, hot dogs, and high-fat lunch meats. Adults should eat ... risk: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ...

  18. Cellular systems biology profiling applied to cellular models of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Kenneth A; Premkumar, Daniel R; Strock, Christopher J; Johnston, Patricia; Taylor, Lansing

    2009-11-01

    Building cellular models of disease based on the approach of Cellular Systems Biology (CSB) has the potential to improve the process of creating drugs as part of the continuum from early drug discovery through drug development and clinical trials and diagnostics. This paper focuses on the application of CSB to early drug discovery. We discuss the integration of protein-protein interaction biosensors with other multiplexed, functional biomarkers as an example in using CSB to optimize the identification of quality lead series compounds.

  19. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Mar 14,2017 Plain old snoring can ... and is associated with high blood pressure , arrhythmia , stroke and heart failure . Heart disease is the leading ...

  20. Celebrities Gather to Fight Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Celebrities Gather to Fight Heart Disease Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Kit to offer community education programs on women's heart disease. Organize heart-health screening events and health fairs ...

  1. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. How to Prevent Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of fat in the blood. High levels of triglycerides may also raise the risk of coronary artery disease, especially in women. Stay at a healthy weight. ... mostly because they are linked to other heart disease risk factors, ... triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Controlling your ...

  3. Valvular heart disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windram, Jonathan D; Colman, Jack M; Wald, Rachel M; Udell, Jacob A; Siu, Samuel C; Silversides, Candice K

    2014-05-01

    In women with valvular heart disease, pregnancy-associated cardiovascular changes can contribute to maternal, foetal and neonatal complications. Ideally, a woman with valvular heart disease should receive preconception assessment and counselling from a cardiologist with expertise in pregnancy. For women with moderate- and high-risk valve lesions, appropriate risk stratification and management during pregnancy will optimise outcomes. Pregnancy in women with high-risk lesions, such as severe aortic stenosis, severe mitral stenosis and those with mechanical valves, requires careful planning and coordination of antenatal care by a multidisciplinary team. The purpose of this overview is to describe the expected haemodynamic changes in pregnancy, review pregnancy risks for women with valvular heart disease and discuss strategies for management.

  4. Being active when you have heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - activity; CAD - activity; Coronary artery disease - activity; Angina - activity ... Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is ... It may also help you be more active without chest pain or other ...

  5. Heart Disease the No. 1 Killer Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165667.html Heart Disease the No. 1 Killer Worldwide Low-cost, effective ... deaths around the world are the result of heart disease and stroke, making cardiovascular disease the number one ...

  6. Ischemic heart disease in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Iraklianou

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease has long been recognized as the leading cause of death among middle-aged men and an equally important cause of death and disability among older women. Women with acute ischemic syndromes tend to be older than men with such syndromes. This is considered to be attributed to the protective effects of female ovarian sex hormones. Estrogen express an antiatherogenic profile via mechanisms that cause favorable modifications of lipoprotein levels, coagulation and fibrolytic system and alterations in the wall of vessels that cause vasodilation. Women are susceptible to coronary heart disease because of differences in the anatomy and physiology of their vessels. Women's coronary arteries are smaller and have more diffuse disease than men's. Ischemia can be induced in women without flow limiting stenosis because of endothelial dysfunction or coronary spasm. Usually, the way of manifestation of the disease and ECG abnormalities are not typical in women. Female patients usually delay to seek treatment for their symptoms .The way of evaluation and treatment is usually conservative in women than male counterparts. The diagnosis of the disease is overestimated in men and the treatment is more often invasive, even in the category of low risk. Reversely, women of high risk are less likely to undergo a full assessment and invasive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions are seldom. Recommendations of the American Heart Association for ischemic heart disease in women are in accordance to alterations in the way of life interventions in major risk factors such as arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus, preventive use of medications and drugs that are not recommended. In this category of medications belong hormone replacement therapy (HRT.The last is not recommended for primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in women.

  7. HIV and Nonischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Pravin; McCutcheon, Keir; Tsabedze, Nqoba; Vachiat, Ahmed; Zachariah, Don

    2017-01-03

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated heart disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases. HIV infection may involve the pericardium, myocardium, coronary arteries, pulmonary vasculature, and valves, as well as the systemic vasculature. Access to combination antiretroviral therapy, as well as health resources, has had a significant influence on the prevalence and severity of the effects on each cardiac structure. Investigations over the recent past have improved our understanding of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of HIV-associated cardiovascular disease. This review will focus on our current understanding of pathogenesis and risk factors associated with HIV infection and heart disease, and it will discuss relevant advances in diagnosis and management of these conditions. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Homocysteine and coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Robert; Bennett, Derrick A; Parish, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR...

  9. Autoimmunity in Chagas' heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edécio Cunha-Neto

    Full Text Available The time scale dissociation between high parasitemia and tissue pathology, allied to the absence of parasites in the heart lesions of chronic Chagas' disease cardiopathy, casted doubt on the direct participation of Trypanosoma cruzi in tissue lesions. Moreover, the heart tissue lesions in chronic Chagas' disease cardiopathy are associated to an inflammatory mononuclear cell infiltrate, presumably the ultimate effectors of tissue damage. It has been hypothesized that the inflammatory cell infiltrate could mediate a delayed hypersensitivity process directed to the heart tissue components, an autoimmune response triggered by immunological cross-reactivity in the course of a protective immune response against some T.cruzi antigen homologous to heart proteins. However, little is known about the efector role of the T cells in the infiltrate, or about the nature of the antigen that lead to their accumulation in tissue. In this paper, we will review the published evidence on autoimmunity and immunological cross-reactivity between T. cruzi and the mammalian host, along with data generated in our laboratory. The definition of the precise role played by autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease cardiopathy may have important consequences both for immunoprophylaxis and for the therapeutic approach of chronic Chagas' disease.

  10. Predicting coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Fuster, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and disabling disease. Whereas risk factors are well known and constitute therapeutic targets, they are not useful for prediction of risk of future myocardial infarction, stroke, or death. Therefore, methods to identify atherosclerosis itself have been...

  11. Cellular Signaling in Health and Disease

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In today’s world, three great classes of non-infectious diseases – the metabolic syndromes (such as type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis), the cancers, and the neurodegenerative disorders – have risen to the fore. These diseases, all associated with increasing age of an individual, have proven to be remarkably complex and difficult to treat. This is because, in large measure, when the cellular signaling pathways responsible for maintaining homeostasis and health of the body become dysregulated, they generate equally stable disease states. As a result the body may respond positively to a drug, but only for a while and then revert back to the disease state. Cellular Signaling in Health and Disease summarizes our current understanding of these regulatory networks in the healthy and diseased states, showing which molecular components might be prime targets for drug interventions. This is accomplished by presenting models that explain in mechanistic, molecular detail how a particular part of the cellular sign...

  12. Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950286 Percutaneous transluminal coronary angio-plasty for unstable angina.LIU Meilin(刘梅林),et.al.1st Teach Hosp,Beijing Med Univ,Beijing,100034.Chin J Intern Med 1995;34(3):169-172.Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty(PTCA) was performed in 190 patients with 250 dis-eased vessels and 278 lesions from Dec.1987 to Feb.1994.All the patients had unstable angina (UA).There were 52(18.7%) type A lesions,175(62.9%)type B lesions and 51(18.3%) type C lesions.Of the

  13. [Heart disease in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobrock, T; Sittinger, H; Kindermann, M; Behrendt, B

    2004-03-01

    A 63-year-old male patient diagnosed with chronic schizophrenia and characterized by formal disorders of thought with neologism and paranoid ideation, especially grandiose delusions and feelings of being influenced by radiation, is presented. At admission to psychiatric hospital, the patient reported attacks of weakness and dizziness, which he attributed to his feelings of alien influence. The diagnosis of cardiac disease with severe bradycardia could already be established by basic physical examination. Further diagnostic procedures (e.g., ECG) revealed symptomatic atrioventricular conduction defects (atrioventricular block III). After implantation of a cardiac pacemaker, the somatic symptoms vanished and the patient recovered completely in terms of physical condition.

  14. [Valvular heart disease in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornos, Pilar

    2006-08-01

    Very few studies of valvular heart disease have been specifically carried out in women. It is well known that the prevalence of some types of valve disease is influenced by sex: rheumatic mitral stenosis is very common in women but degenerative valve disease affects both sexes similarly. A number of sex differences in the physiopathology of degenerative aortic stenosis have been reported: the degree of calcification is less in women than men and women's ventricles respond to equivalent reductions in valve area with a greater increase in gradient and greater contractility. With regard to prognosis, it is generally accepted that mortality associated with heart surgery is higher in women than men, for both coronary artery and valve surgery. The underlying reasons for the increase in mortality are not clear. Pregnancy presents particular difficulties for women with valvular heart disease. In those with significant valve lesions, it is advisable to correct the valve disease before pregnancy is considered. Anticoagulant treatment involves serious problems for pregnant women with a mechanical prosthesis. They suffer increased risks of prosthetic valve thrombosis and of fetal embryopathy if they take oral anticoagulants during the first trimester.

  15. Exercise echocardiography for structural heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumo, Masaki; Akashi, Yoshihiro J

    2016-03-01

    Since the introduction of transcatheter structural heart intervention, the term "structural heart disease" has been widely used in the field of cardiology. Structural heart disease refers to congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, and cardiomyopathy. In structural heart disease, valvular heart disease is frequently identified in the elderly. Of note, the number of patients who suffer from aortic stenosis (AS) and mitral regurgitation (MR) is increasing in developed countries because of the aging of the populations. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement and percutaneous mitral valve repair has been widely used for AS and MR, individually. Echocardiography is the gold standard modality for initial diagnosis and subsequent evaluation of AS and MR, although the difficulties in assessing patients with these diseases still remain. Here, we review the clinical usefulness and prognostic impact of exercise echocardiography on structural heart disease, particularly on AS and MR.

  16. Gallstones Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_160497.html Gallstones Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk Researcher says study highlights a connection between ... may have a slightly increased risk of developing heart disease down the road, a large new study suggests. ...

  17. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Past Newsletters Flu and Heart Disease & Stroke Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Heart Disease* and Those Who Have Had a Stroke Are at High Risk of Developing Complications from ...

  18. Heart Disease Linked to Anxiety, Negative Feelings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163702.html Heart Disease Linked to Anxiety, Negative Feelings And that's especially ... Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with mild heart disease are more likely to say they have poorer ...

  19. How Can Heart Disease be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Heart Disease Be Prevented? Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay coronary heart disease (CHD). Your risk for CHD increases with the ...

  20. Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_162978.html Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease In just 10 weeks, cholesterol, blood pressure and ... at moderate intensity may lower the risk of heart disease, a small study suggests. "We know walking is ...

  1. Preventing Heart Disease - At Any Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food and Beverage Toolkit How to Help Prevent Heart Disease - At Any Age Updated:Apr 3,2017 You’ ... Here’s how: What You Can Do to Prevent Heart Disease All Age Groups No matter what your age, ...

  2. Cellular immune findings in Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, L. H.; Moffat, C. M.; Steere, A. C.; Dwyer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:6240164

  3. Diabetes and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two...... chronic diseases results in an elevation in specific elements of the chronic stress concept. A total of 361 participants with IHD were included, of whom 47 suffered from concomitant diabetes. Stress was measured by pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) and by the following questionnaires: the Major Depression...

  4. HEART ANEURYSM IN CHAGAS' DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVEIRA José Alberto Mello de

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This prospective study on 41 autopsy collected human hearts concerns the "apical" lesion in Chagas' disease. Previous report did not show a correlation between lesion frequency and heart weight then discarding a vascular factor in its pathogenesis. The present paper involves other variables besides the heart weight to evaluate the relative coronary insufficiency. Distinct colored gel (green and red injected through the capillary beds of both coronary arteries defined the extent of both vessels before separating the atria and removing the sub-epicardium fat. The Right Ventricle (RV and Left Ventricle (LV free walls furnished the RV/LV mass ratio. The myocardium mass colored green (right coronary artery - RC and the whole Ventricular Weight (VW determined the RC/VW mass ratio. The heart weight plus these mass ratios, graded and added, composed a score inversely proportional to the myocardium irrigation condition. It intended to be a more sensitive morphologic evaluation of the relative ischaemia to correlate to the apical lesion. This study showed a right deviation for the relative accumulated frequency of lesions plotted as a score function and a significant difference for higher scores in hearts with aneurysm. It suggests a ischaemic factor intervening in the apical lesion pathogenesis in Chagas' cardiopathy.

  5. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-02-22

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes.

  6. Cellular basis of Alzheimer′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bali Jitin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer′s disease (AD is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease. A characteristic feature of the disease is the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ which either in its soluble oligomeric form or in the plaque-associated form is causally linked to neurodegeneration. Aβ peptide is liberated from the membrane-spanning -amyloid precursor protein by sequential proteolytic processing employing β- and γ-secretases. All these proteins involved in the production of Aβ peptide are membrane associated and hence, membrane trafficking and cellular compartmentalization play important roles. In this review, we summarize the key cellular events that lead to the progression of AD.

  7. Cellular basis of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Jitin; Halima, Saoussen Ben; Felmy, Boas; Goodger, Zoe; Zurbriggen, Sebastian; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease. A characteristic feature of the disease is the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) which either in its soluble oligomeric form or in the plaque-associated form is causally linked to neurodegeneration. Aβ peptide is liberated from the membrane-spanning -amyloid precursor protein by sequential proteolytic processing employing β- and γ-secretases. All these proteins involved in the production of Aβ peptide are membrane associated and hence, membrane trafficking and cellular compartmentalization play important roles. In this review, we summarize the key cellular events that lead to the progression of AD. PMID:21369424

  8. PREVALENCE OF HEART DISEASE IN PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumathi Natarajan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Previously, the high maternal mortality in cardiac patients who became pregnant prompted the assertion: Women with an abnormal heart should not become pregnant. This long-standing notion needs to be revised today. AIM To study the prevalence of heart disease in antenatal admissions at Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai. METHODOLOGY An observational study of 3669 antenatal patients being admitted in GRH, Madurai, from March 2016 to April 2016. Both primigravida and multi-gravida with no age restrictions were included in the study. Screening ECHOs were done. Among 3669 admissions, 46 patients were diagnosed to have heart disease. The cardiac diseases include multivalvular heart disease, congenital heart disease, peripartum cardiomyopathy, coronary heart disease, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. RESULTS The study showed that the prevalence of heart disease in Government Rajaji Hospital is 1.25% and it is more common in 20-30 years of age (p value <0.001, which is significant. DISCUSSION Pregnancy and puerperium are important risk factors for heart disease. Heart disease also significantly affects the course of pregnancy. So it is important to diagnose heart disease early in pregnancy. This study emphasizes that heart disease complicating pregnancy forms an important proportion of antenatal mother and needs early diagnosis and management. CONCLUSION Though considered rare previously, heart disease contributes to a significant proportion of antenatal mothers (1.25% and early referral to proper tertiary care centre helps in reducing the mortality and morbidity

  9. Cellular immunity in Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, S H; D'Silva, H; Gothoskar, B P; Dinshaw, K A; Nair, C N; Gopalkrishna, R; Talwalkar, G V; Desai, P B

    1979-02-01

    Defective cell-mediated immunity (CMI) occurs early in the course of Hodgkin's disease (HD) and may persist even two years after successful treatment. This has been confirmed by in vivo and in vitro tests performed on 51 untreated and 52 treated patients of HD. The grading of skin reponse in vivo to dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) correlated very well with the in vitro leukocyte migration inhibition (LMI) response against phytohemagglutinin (PHA). An inhibitory influence of HD patients' sera was demonstrated by LMI tests in vitro. The response of peripheral leukocytes from HD patients in the LMI tests could be augmented in vitro by addition of levamisole (an immuno-potentiator) to the culture medium, thus pointing to an intrinsic defect in Lymphocytes. The data indicate that defect at multiple sites in the immune system is responsible for persistent anergy in HD.

  10. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease? Some people who have diabetic heart disease (DHD) ... when it's given right after symptoms occur. Coronary Heart Disease A common symptom of coronary heart disease (CHD) ...

  11. How Is Coronary Heart Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... healthy lifestyle changes if you have coronary heart disease. Heart-healthy lifestyle changes include: Heart-healthy eating Maintaining a healthy ... CAD risk factors and prevent or delay the disease. Lifestyle changes include ... following a healthy eating plan, maintaining a healthy weight, and being ...

  12. Other Possible Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Health and Stroke Other possible heart disease risk factors Related information Depression fact sheet Stress and your health fact sheet ... Research also suggests that depression itself is a risk factor for heart disease. Depression, stress, and other negative emotions may affect the ...

  13. Air Pollution, Climate, and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Air Pollution, Climate, and Heart Disease Diane R. Gold , Jonathan ... http://www.epa.gov/greenheart/ . 7 What Is Air Pollution? Air pollution is a mixture of gases and ...

  14. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease.

  15. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease? A common symptom of coronary heart disease (CHD) ... and Symptoms of Heart Problems Related to Coronary Heart Disease Some people who have CHD have no signs ...

  16. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-12

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  17. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-01

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system. PMID:28085104

  18. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Genchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  19. Heart Valve Disease among Patients with Hyperprolactinaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Charlotte; Maegbaek, Merete Lund; Laurberg, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Increased risk of heart valve disease during treatment with certain dopamine agonists, such as cabergoline, has been observed in patients with Parkinson's disease. The same compound is used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but it is unknown whether this also associates with heart valve disease....

  20. How Is Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart tests are done. If you can't exercise, you may be given medicines to increase your heart rate. When your heart is working hard and beating fast, it needs more blood and oxygen. Plaque-narrowed coronary (heart) arteries can' ...

  1. CLINICAL STUDY OF HEART DISEASE COMPLICATING PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction-Heart disease complicating pregnancy is considered as a high risk situation. Increased cardiac demands during the course of pregnancy potentially increase morbidity and mortality in women with underlying heart disease. AIM: To determine maternal and fetal outcome in women with heart disease complicating pregnancy, To emphasize on proper protocol for managing pregnancy complicated by heart disease, To correlate the time of booking & NYHA grading with maternal & fetal outcome. Risk of adverse outcome is more in rural population as compared to its urban counterpart. METHOD: A prospective clinical study of 25 cases of pregnancy complicated by heart disease, reporting to tertiary care hospital for delivery, was carried out to find out the incidence and maternal and fetal outcome. RESULTS: The incidence of heart disease in pregnancy in the present study was 0.6%. Most of the women (91% belonged to low socioeconomic class in the rural population. Rheumatic heart lesions constituted 77% of the cases. Mitral stenosis was the commonest lesion in 40% of cases. Ten (40% women delivered spontaneously vaginally at term. Cesarean section was performed in 14 cases (56%. There were 5 maternal deaths. There were no perinatal deaths. CONCLUSION: Early diagnosis of heart disease, regular antenatal check-up, institutional delivery, limiting family size can reduce the maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity associated with heart disease

  2. HIV and Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachiat, Ahmed; McCutcheon, Keir; Tsabedze, Nqoba; Zachariah, Don; Manga, Pravin

    2017-01-03

    The association of coronary heart disease (CHD) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been well recognized for many years. The etiology of the increased prevalence of CHD in HIV-infected populations is the result of complex interactions among the viral infection, host factors, traditional risk factors, and therapies for HIV. As the HIV population is living longer, largely attributable to combination antiretroviral therapy, there is concern about the effect of the rising prevalence of CHD on morbidity and mortality, as well its effect on health systems around the world. This review will highlight the epidemiological evidence linking HIV infection and CHD. It will also focus on our current understanding of the pathogenesis and factors associated with HIV infection and CHD. In addition, the review will highlight modes of presentation and management strategies for mitigating risk and treatment of HIV-positive patients presenting with CHD. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Disease? The signs and symptoms of coronary heart disease ( ... will have signs and symptoms of the disease. Heart Disease Signs and Symptoms The illustration shows the major ...

  4. Epidemiology of acquired valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iung, Bernard; Vahanian, Alec

    2014-09-01

    Population-based studies including systematic echocardiographic examinations are required to assess the prevalence of valvular heart disease. In industrialized countries, the prevalence of valvular heart disease is estimated at 2.5%. Because of the predominance of degenerative etiologies, the prevalence of valvular disease increases markedly after the age of 65 years, in particular with regard to aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation, which accounts for 3 in 4 cases of valvular disease. Rheumatic heart disease still represents 22% of valvular heart disease in Europe. The prevalence of secondary mitral regurgitation cannot be assessed reliably but it seems to be a frequent disease. The incidence of infective endocarditis is approximately 30 cases per million individiuals per year. Its stability is associated with marked changes in its presentation. Patients are getting older and staphylococcus is now becoming the microorganism most frequently responsible. Heath care-associated infections are the most likely explanation of changes in the microbiology of infective endocarditis. In developing countries, rheumatic heart disease remains the leading cause of valvular heart disease. Its prevalence is high, between 20 and 30 cases per 1000 subjects when using systematic echocardiographic screening. In conclusion, the temporal and geographical heterogeneity illustrates the effect of socioeconomic status and changes in life expectancy on the frequency and presentation of valvular heart disease. A decreased burden of valvular disease would require the elaboration of preventive strategies in industrialized countries and an improvement in the socioeconomic environment in developing countries.

  5. Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 ... or Longer-Term Acute short-term effects of air pollution tend to strike people who are elderly or ...

  6. Smoking, Stress, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Leonard H.; Perkins, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on the interrelation between stressors and smoking, and on its potential impact on coronary heart disease risk beyond that due to stressors or to smoking alone. Reviews evidence supporting the stress-smoking interrelationship, its relevance to the risk of heart disease, and mechanisms explaining why smokers smoke more during stress and why…

  7. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Mortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear. The Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regression was used to assess mortality pre

  8. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Verheugt (Carianne); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); E.T. van der Velde (Enno); F.J. Meijboom (Folkert); P.G. Pieper (Petronella); A.P.J. van Dijk (Arie); H.W. Vliegen (Hubert); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAimsMortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear.Methods and resultsThe Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regressio

  9. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Verheugt (Carianne); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); E.T. van der Velde (Enno); F.J. Meijboom (Folkert); P.G. Pieper (Petronella); A.P.J. van Dijk (Arie); H.W. Vliegen (Hubert); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAimsMortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear.Methods and resultsThe Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's

  10. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, C.L.; Uiterwaal, C.S.; Velde, E.T. van der; Meijboom, F.J.; Pieper, P.G.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Vliegen, H.W.; Grobbee, D.E.; Mulder, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: Mortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regression was

  11. Marital stability and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbert, A R; Newburger, J W; Fyler, D C

    1982-06-01

    The incidence of divorce or legal separation was studied in 438 families of children born with heart disease who entered the New England Regional Infant Cardiac Program between 1968 and 1973. The parents were interviewed when the children were 5 1/2 years old. The rate of divorce in 438 families of children with critical congenital heart disease was not significantly different from the rate in two comparison groups: (1) 25 families of children whose cardiac defect was spontaneously cured, and (2) 26 families of children catheterized in infancy for suspected cardiac defect but who were found to be free of heart disease. Rates of divorce or legal separation for the three groups were: critical congenital heart disease, 12.1%, spontaneously cured, 4.2% free of heart disease, 11.5% these rates were not significantly different. The average national divorce rate was 20.3% for the same period.

  12. Cellular senescence mediates fibrotic pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Marissa J.; White, Thomas A.; Iijima, Koji; Haak, Andrew J.; Ligresti, Giovanni; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Oberg, Ann L.; Birch, Jodie; Salmonowicz, Hanna; Zhu, Yi; Mazula, Daniel L.; Brooks, Robert W.; Fuhrmann-Stroissnigg, Heike; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Prakash, Y. S.; Tchkonia, Tamara; Robbins, Paul D.; Aubry, Marie Christine; Passos, João F.; Kirkland, James L.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Kita, Hirohito; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal disease characterized by interstitial remodelling, leading to compromised lung function. Cellular senescence markers are detectable within IPF lung tissue and senescent cell deletion rejuvenates pulmonary health in aged mice. Whether and how senescent cells regulate IPF or if their removal may be an efficacious intervention strategy is unknown. Here we demonstrate elevated abundance of senescence biomarkers in IPF lung, with p16 expression increasing with disease severity. We show that the secretome of senescent fibroblasts, which are selectively killed by a senolytic cocktail, dasatinib plus quercetin (DQ), is fibrogenic. Leveraging the bleomycin-injury IPF model, we demonstrate that early-intervention suicide-gene-mediated senescent cell ablation improves pulmonary function and physical health, although lung fibrosis is visibly unaltered. DQ treatment replicates benefits of transgenic clearance. Thus, our findings establish that fibrotic lung disease is mediated, in part, by senescent cells, which can be targeted to improve health and function. PMID:28230051

  13. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  14. Heart Disease Detection Using Wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    González S., A.; Acosta P., J. L.; Sandoval M., M.

    2004-09-01

    We develop a wavelet based method to obtain standardized gray-scale chart of both healthy hearts and of hearts suffering left ventricular hypertrophy. The hypothesis that early bad functioning of heart can be detected must be tested by comparing the wavelet analysis of the corresponding ECD with the limit cases. Several important parameters shall be taken into account such as age, sex and electrolytic changes.

  15. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  16. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Facts Heart Disease is the first and stroke ...

  17. [Pulmonary hypertension caused by left heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erer, Betül; Eren, Mehmet

    2010-09-01

    Increased resistance to pulmonary venous drainage is the main mechanism in pulmonary hypertension (PH) developing due to left heart disease. This condition may occur as a result of various diseases affecting left ventricle, left atrium, mitral or aortic valves. Pulmonary hypertension is the common and well-recognized complication of left ventricular systolic dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension accompanying chronic heart failure is related to increased mortality. Treatment should be tailored according to the underlying disease.

  18. Implantation of total artificial heart in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Iki; Morales, David S L

    2014-07-18

    In patients with end-stage heart failure (HF), a total artificial heart (TAH) may be implanted as a bridge to cardiac transplant. However, in congenital heart disease (CHD), the malformed heart presents a challenge to TAH implantation. In the case presented here, a 17 year-old patient with congenital transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) experienced progressively worsening HF due to his congenital condition. He was hospitalized multiple times and received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). However, his condition soon deteriorated to end-stage HF with multisystem organ failure. Due to the patient's grave clinical condition and the presence of complex cardiac lesions, the decision was made to proceed with a TAH. The abnormal arrangement of the patient's ventricles and great arteries required modifications to the TAH during implantation. With the TAH in place, the patient was able to return home and regain strength and physical well-being while awaiting a donor heart. He was successfully bridged to heart transplantation 5 months after receiving the device. This report highlights the TAH is feasible even in patients with structurally abnormal hearts, with technical modification.

  19. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding.

  20. [Sex differences in congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, P; Demian, H

    2016-12-01

    Gender influences the clinical presentation and the management of some acquired cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, resulting in different outcomes. Differences between women and men are also noticed in congenital heart disease. They are mainly related to the prevalence and severity of some congenital heart defects at birth, and in adulthood to the prognosis, incidence of Eisenmenger syndrome and risks of pregnancy. The role of gender on the risk of operative mortality of congenital heart surgery remains debated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Indications for surgery for valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Marcel; Wahlers, Thorsten; Baldus, Stephan; Rudolph, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Due to the demographic change, chronic valvular heart disease becomes increasingly important - especially age-related primary diseases of the aortic and mitral valve as well as secondary diseases of the mitral and tricuspid valve caused by other age-related cardiac disorders. Medical treatment is limited to symptom relief by use of diuretics. Specific drugs or drugs with a prognostic benefit are not available. Thus, valve repair or replacement are the key options for treatment of relevant valvular heart disease. While open heart surgery was the only approach for a long time, interventional, catheter-based therapies have evolved in the last decade. This article describes up-to-date recommendations on indications for surgery for the most prevalent valvular heart diseases in adults - aortic stenosis, and aortic, mitral and tricuspid regurgitation).

  2. Forkhead box transcription factors in embryonic heart development and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic heart development is a very complicated process regulated precisely by a network composed of many genes and signaling pathways in time and space. Forkhead box (Fox, FOX) proteins are a family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of an evolutionary conserved "forkhead"or "winged-helix" DNA-binding domain and able to organize temporal and spatial gene expression during development. They are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, differentiation, migration, metabolism and DNA damage response. An abundance of studies in model organisms and systems has established that Foxa2, Foxc1/c2, Foxh1 and Foxm1, Foxos and Foxps are important components of the signaling pathways that instruct cardiogenesis and embryonic heart development, playing paramount roles in heart development. The previous studies also have demonstrated that mutations in some of the forkhead box genes and the aberrant expression of forkhead box gene are heavily implicated in the congenital heart disease (CHD) of humans. This review primarily focuses on the current understanding of heart development regulated by forkhead box transcription factors and molecular genetic mechanisms by which forkhead box factors modulate heart development during embryogenesis and organogenesis. This review also summarizes human CHD related mutations in forkhead box genes as well as the abnormal expression of forkhead box gene, and discusses additional possible regulatory mechanisms of the forkhead box genes during embryonic heart development that warrant further investigation.

  3. What Are Heart Disease and Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More What Are Heart Disease and Stroke? Updated:Dec 8,2015 There are many types ... build-up in the lungs, called “pulmonary congestion”. STROKE and TIA happen when a blood vessel that ...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  5. [Atrial fibrillation concomitant with valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    Patients with valvular heart disease frequently have atrial fibrillation(AF) due to elevated pressure and dilatation of the left and right atria and pulmonary veins. Guidelines for valvular heart disease and AF recommend that surgical treatment for the valvular heart disease should be performed concomitantly with AF surgery. The Full-Maze procedure has evolved into the gold standard of treatment for medically refractory AF. In addition to the pulmonary vein isolation, the right and left atrial incisions of the Full-Maze procedure are designed to block potential macroreentrant pathways. According to the mechanisms of AF with valvular heart disease, the Full-Maze procedure is more effective for the patients than the pulmonary vein isolation alone.

  6. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events....... It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable...

  7. Stroke Recurrence in Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada identified 135 patients with congenital heart disease diagnosed with arterial ischemic stroke during 1992-2008 and registered in the Canadian Pediatric Stroke Registry-Toronto site.

  8. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  10. 10.8.Rheumatic heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920083 A preliminary study of cell immunefunction in rheumatic heart disease.YANG Qi(杨奇),et al.Res Lab Cardiovasc Dis,Luzhou MedColl Hosp,Sichuan.Chin Cir J 1991; 6 (5): 392-394.Cell immune function of forty one patients withrheumatic heart disease (RHD),forty four withRHD and rheumatic fever (RF) and fifty normal

  11. Biomarkers in kidney and heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maisel, Alan S.; Katz, Nevin; Hillege, Hans L.; Shaw, Andrew; Zanco, Pierluigi; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Anand, Inder; Anker, Stefan D.; Aspromonte, Nadia; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Berl, Tomas; Bobek, Ilona; Cruz, Dinna N.; Daliento, Luciano; Davenport, Andrew; Haapio, Mikko; House, Andrew A.; Mankad, Sunil; McCullough, Peter; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Palazzuoli, Alberto; Ponikowski, Piotr; Ronco, Federico; Sheinfeld, Geoff; Soni, Sachin; Vescovo, Giorgio; Zamperetti, Nereo; Ronco, Claudio

    There is much symptomatic similarity between acute kidney disease and acute heart disease. Both may present with shortness of breath and chest discomfort, and thus it is not surprising that biomarkers of acute myocardial and renal disease often coexist in many physicians' diagnostic work-up

  12. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required.

  13. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  14. Curbing Inflammation in the Ischemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto B. Evora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A modern concept considers acute coronary syndrome as an autoinflammatory disorder. From the onset to the healing stage, an endless inflammation has been presented with complex, multiple cross-talk mechanisms at the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. Inflammatory response following acute myocardial infarction has been well documented since the 1940s and 1950s, including increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, the C-reactive protein analysis, and the determination of serum complement. It is surprising to note, based on a wide literature overview including the following 30 years (decades of 1960, 1970, and 1980, that the inflammatory acute myocardium infarction lost its focus, virtually disappearing from the literature reports. The reversal of this historical process occurs in the 1990s with the explosion of studies involving cytokines. Considering the importance of inflammation in the pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease, the aim of this paper is to present a conceptual overview in order to explore the possibility of curbing this inflammatory process.

  15. Challenges Faced by Parents of Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Challenges Faced by Parents of Children with Congenital Heart Disease Page Content ​​​The first thing most parents want ... common and expected. About Congenital Heart Defects Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth ...

  16. Chemotherapy Side Effects: A Cause of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can chemotherapy side effects increase the risk of heart disease? Answers from Timothy J. Moynihan, M.D. Chemotherapy side effects may increase the risk of heart disease, including weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) and ...

  17. Pregnancy outcomes in women with heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hua; XU Ji-wen; ZHAO Xu-dong; YE Tai-yang; LIN Jian-hua; LIN Qi-de

    2010-01-01

    Background As the Shanghai Obstetrical Cardiology Intensive Care Center, our hospital has accumulated a large number of clinical data of pregnant women with heart disease. This paper is a retrospective analysis of 1142 pregnancies in women with heart disease so as to evaluate the maternal and fetal outcomes of these patients.Methods A retrospective analysis was carried out for pregnancies in 1142 women with heart disease who delivered in Shanghai Obstetrical Cardiology Intensive Care Center between 1993 and 2007.Results In this study, main heart diseases in pregnancy were arrhythmia (n=359, 31.4%), congenital heart disease (CHD; n=291,25.5%), and myocarditis and its sequelae (n=284, 24.9%); based on the functional classification criteria of New York Heart Association (NYHA), more than half (n=678, 59.4%) of patients were classified NYHA Class Ⅰ; pregnant women in NHYA Class Ⅰ-Ⅱ (n=951, 83.3%) commonly had arrhythmia, myocarditis and its sequelae, while those in NHYA Class Ⅲ-Ⅳ (n=191, 16.7%) mainly had CHD, rheumatic heart disease (RHD), cardiopathy induced by hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy, and peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Cardiac failure occurred in 97 (8.5%)patients, and 8 (0.7%) maternal deaths and 12 (1.1%) perinatal deaths were reported in this study. Compared with those in NHYA Class Ⅰ-Ⅱ, women in NHYA Class Ⅲ-Ⅳ had a significantly lower gestational age at birth (P <0.05), lower birth weight (P <0.01), and higher incidence of preterm delivery, small for gestational age and perinatal death (P <0.01). The incidence of cardiac failure in pregnant women with cardiopathy induced by hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy and PPCM was relatively high, with a rate of 80% and 52.2%, respectively. After cardiac operation, 131(90.3%) women were in classified NHYA Class Ⅰ-Ⅱ and 14 (9.7%) in NHYA Class Ⅲ-Ⅳ.Conclusions Arrhythmia is the type of heart disease that has a highest incidence in patients with heart

  18. Challenges to success in heart failure: Cardiac cell therapies in patients with heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hidemasa; Ito, Hiroshi; Sano, Shunji

    2016-11-01

    Heart failure remains the leading cause of death worldwide, and is a burgeoning problem in public health due to the limited capacity of postnatal hearts to self-renew. The pathophysiological changes in injured hearts can sometimes be manifested as scar formation or myocardial degradation, rather than supplemental muscle regeneration to replenish lost tissue during the healing processes. Stem cell therapies have been investigated as a possible treatment approach for children and adults with potentially fatal cardiovascular disease that does not respond to current medical therapies. Although the heart is one of the least regenerative organs in mammals, discoveries made during the past few decades have improved our understanding of cardiac development and resident stem/progenitor pools, which may be lineage-restricted subpopulations during the post-neonatal stage of cardiac morphogenesis. Recently, investigation has specifically focused on factors that activate either endogenous progenitor cells or preexisting cardiomyocytes, to regenerate cardiovascular cells and replace the damaged heart tissues. The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells has advanced our technological capability to direct cardiac reprogramming by essential factors that are crucial for heart field completion in each stage. Cardiac tissue engineering technology has recently shown progress in generating myocardial tissue on human native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds. This review summarizes recent advances in the field of cardiac cell therapies with an emphasis on cellular mechanisms, such as bone marrow stem cells and cardiac progenitor cells, which show the high potential for success in preclinical and clinical meta-analysis studies. Expanding our current understanding of mechanisms of self-renewal in the neonatal mammalian heart may lead to the development of novel cardiovascular regenerative medicines for pediatric heart diseases. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology

  19. Heart Disease in Women | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease in Women Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. In fact, coronary heart disease (CHD)—the most ...

  20. Extracellular Vesicles in Heart Disease: Excitement for the Future?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty M. Danielson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV, including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, are released from numerous cell types and are involved in intercellular communication, physiological functions and the pathology of disease. They have been shown to carry and transfer a wide range of cargo including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. The role of EVs in cardiac physiology and heart disease is an emerging field that has produced intriguing findings in recent years. This review will outline what is currently known about EVs in the cardiovascular system, including cellular origins, functional roles and utility as biomarkers and potential therapeutics.

  1. Tuning flux: autophagy as a target of heart disease therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Morales, Cyndi R.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite maximum medical and mechanical support therapy, heart failure remains a relentlessly progressive disorder with substantial morbidity and mortality. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process of cellular cannibalization, has been implicated in virtually all forms of cardiovascular disease. Indeed, its role is context dependent, antagonizing or promoting disease depending on the circumstance. Here, we review current understanding of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of heart failure and explore this pathway as a target of therapeutic intervention. Recent findings In preclinical models of heart disease, cardiomyocyte autophagic flux is activated; indeed, its role in disease pathogenesis is the subject of intense investigation to define mechanism. Similarly, in failing human heart of a variety of etiologies, cardiomyocyte autophagic activity is upregulated, and therapy, such as with mechanical support systems, elicits declines in autophagy activity. However, when suppression of autophagy is complete, rapid and catastrophic cell death occurs, consistent with a model in which basal autophagic flux is required for proteostasis. Thus, a narrow zone of ‘optimal’ autophagy seems to exist. The challenge moving forward is to tune the stress-triggered autophagic response within that ‘sweet spot’ range for therapeutic benefit. Summary Whereas we have known for some years of the participation of lysosomal mechanisms in heart disease, it is only recently that upstream mechanisms (autophagy) are being explored. The challenge for the future is to dissect the underlying circuitry and titrate the response into an optimal, proteostasis-promoting range in hopes of mitigating the ever-expanding epidemic of heart failure. PMID:21415729

  2. Carcinoid heart disease: Diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Sushil A; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Hedinger syndrome refers to carcinoid valvular heart disease. The disease is believed to be triggered by vasoactive substances that result in valvular fibrosis. It classically occurs in patients with metastatic carcinoid and preferentially involves the right sided cardiac valves. Affected valves become thickened and retracted, exhibiting regurgitation and sometimes, stenosis. Echocardiography is recommended in patients with carcinoid syndrome and a follow up study is advisable in those who develop a murmur or other symptoms or signs of valvular heart disease. For appropriately selected patients, valve replacement surgery appears to improve outcomes.

  3. Adult congenital heart disease and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shaline; Ginns, Jonathan N

    2014-08-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease now form the largest group of women with cardiac disease becoming pregnant in the developed world. This is both a mark of impressive steps forward in the management of congenital heart disease and also a challenge to the medical community to develop systems of care that will best serve these women and their babies. Each woman with congenital heart disease presents a unique pattern of challenges for the cardiologist, obstetrician, and anesthesiologist, and their care should be tailored to deal with their individual circumstances. As this population of patients continues to grow, we must continue to learn and improve our diagnostic tools and management strategies to refine their care. This review intends to focus on reviewing the outcomes in this set of patients and also an approach to the assessment and the management of these patients, primarily for an audience of obstetricians, pediatricians, and anesthesiologists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Anesthesia in pregnancy with heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Luthra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of pregnant women with heart disease remains challenging due to the advancement of innovations in cardiac surgery and correction of complex cardiac anomalies, and more recently, with the successful performance of heart transplants, cardiac diseases are not only likely to coexist with pregnancy, but will also increase in frequency over the years to come. In developing countries with a higher prevalence of rheumatic fever, cardiac disease may complicate as many as 5.9% of pregnancies with a high incidence of maternal death. Since many of these deaths occur during or immediately following parturition, heart disease is of special importance to the anesthesiologist. This importance arises from the fact that drugs used for preventing or relieving pain during labor and delivery exert a major influence – for better or for worse – on the prognosis of the mother and newborn. Properly administered anesthesia and analgesia can contribute to the reduction of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity.

  5. Design for Heart Disease Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    In this teaching and curriculum guide for community health education, a design is suggested for a course that could help prevent premature deaths due to heart disease. The course communicates facts regarding the causes of cardiovascular diseases, and outlines opportunities for attaining the degree of physical conditioning essential to prevention.…

  6. Heart Disease and Stroke in Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-11

    This women's health podcast focuses on the impact of heart disease and stroke in women and includes steps to prevent these conditions.  Created: 5/11/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/11/2009.

  7. Reducing cholesterol to prevent coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew J. Sorrentino

    2005-01-01

    @@ Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains the number one killer of men and women in the United States of America despite major advances in interventional technologies for the treatment of coronary artery disease. CHD is rapidly becoming a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing nations as well and is now recognized as the leading cause of death worldwide.

  8. PREVALENCE OF HEART DISEASE IN PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathi Natarajan; Mallika Selvaraj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previously, the high maternal mortality in cardiac patients who became pregnant prompted the assertion: Women with an abnormal heart should not become pregnant. This long-standing notion needs to be revised today. AIM To study the prevalence of heart disease in antenatal admissions at Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai. METHODOLOGY An observational study of 3669 antenatal patients being admitted in GRH, Madurai, from March 2016 to April 2016. Both primigravida ...

  9. Short Telomere Length and Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheller Madrid, Alexander; Rode, Line; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short telomeres are associated with aging and have been associated with a high risk of ischemic heart disease in observational studies; however, the latter association could be due to residual confounding and/or reverse causation. We wanted to test the hypothesis that short telomeres...... are associated with high risk of ischemic heart disease using a Mendelian randomization approach free of reverse causation and of most confounding. METHODS: We genotyped 3 genetic variants in OBFC1 (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding fold containing 1), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase), and TERC...... logistic and instrumental variable analysis for genetic estimates. RESULTS: Observationally, a 200-bp-shorter telomere length was associated with a multivariable adjusted hazard ratio for ischemic heart disease of 1.02 (95% CI, 1.01-1.03). Per allele, telomeres were shorter by 67 bp (73-60). In meta...

  10. HEART DISEASE IN CHILDREN WITH RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Babachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between heart disease and infectious pathogens is well known. Despite the high frequency of cardiac pathology in infectious diseases, it is rarely diagnosed because of lack of specific clinical  and  laboratory  symptoms. It is especially  difficult to diagnose in  children. Airborne  infections in the structure of infectious morbidity of children occupy a leading place.The aim of this work was to study the nature of the lesions of the heart  in children suffering from acute infection of the respiratory tract.Materials and  methods: 341 children with acute respiratory infection of moderate severity were surveyed by a method of ECG dispersion mapping. Cardiac  pathology has not previously been determined in these children. Signs of disease of the heart was identified in 76 children (22%. Further study included instrumental (ECG, ECHO-KG,  daily monitoring of ECG, biochemical and  etiological (ELISA, PCR, immunocytochemical research  methods for determining the nature of the damage to the heart and the etiology of the disease.Results. Myocarditis was diagnosed in 2%  of children, a violation of repolarization – in 21%,  heart  rhythm disorders  – in 35%  (AV – blockade in 4%.  Most  often  signs  of heart disease were detected in children with Epstein-Barr virus (32%, streptococcal (28%, cytomegalovirus (25%, herpesvirus type  6 infection (24%. Pathogens from the  group of acute respiratory virus infections were identified in 28%, enterovirus – in  10%,  Haemophilus influenzae – in  10%, Mycoplasma pneumonia – in 10%,  Pneumococcus – in 9%, Chlamydia – in 9%, Parvovirus B19 – in 6%.Conclusion. Sensitive screening test  to  detect cardiac pathology is the method of ECG dispersion mapping. Heart damage in children with respiratory diseases in 60% of cases is associated with  mixed infections. Timely  diagnosis of lesions of the heart in infectious diseases in children allows to adjust the

  11. Chagas Heart Disease: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Lindsey H; Singh, Gagan D; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, results from infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and is a major cause of cardiac disease worldwide. Until recently, Chagas disease was confined to those areas of South and Central America where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic. With the migration of infected individuals, however, the disease has spread, and it is estimated that 6-7 million people worldwide are infected. In the US alone, more than 7 million people from Trypanosoma cruzi-endemic countries became legal US residents by the turn of the century, resulting in a surge of Chagas disease in this country. According to preliminary estimates, the US now ranks seventh in the Western Hemisphere in number of individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, and the disease has become a major public health concern due to limited awareness in the medical community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Transplant coronary heart disease: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jentzer JC

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jacob C Jentzer,1 Gavin W Hickey,1 Sameer J Khandhar2,3 1Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Heart and Vascular Institute, Penn-Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV remains one of the leading causes of death and graft failure after heart transplantation. A variety of causes, including donor heart characteristics, recipient risk factors, and immune-mediated influences, are associated with developing CAV. In this review, we will focus on the pathophysiology of developing CAV and various methods to screen for this condition. The pathogenesis of CAV likely involves repeated injuries to the endothelium from a variety of factors such as cellular-mediated rejection, and alloimmune factors, including antibody-mediated injury, ischemia-reperfusion injury at time of transplant, cytomegalovirus infections, immunosuppression medications, systemic inflammation, and traditional atherosclerosis risk factors. Patients with significant CAV are often asymptomatic, and therefore early detection by routine screening prior to graft dysfunction is crucial. There are a variety of invasive, noninvasive, and blood tests that have been studied as screening methods, and we will discuss the role of each of these in this review article. Although some treatment regimens have been established for CAV, this is an area where further studies and research are necessary.Keywords: cardiac allograft vasculopathy, orthotopic heart transplantation, intra-vascular imaging

  14. Radiation-Induced Heart Disease: Pathologic Abnormalities and Putative Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil K Taunk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a common diagnosis in women. Breast radiation has become a critical in managing patients who receive breast conserving surgery, or have certain high-risk features after mastectomy. Most patients have an excellent prognosis, therefore understanding the late effects of radiation to the chest is important. Radiation induced heart disease (RIHD comprises a spectrum of cardiac pathology including myocardial fibrosis and cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, pericardial disease, and arrhythmias. Tissue fibrosis is a common mediator in RIHD. Multiple pathways converge with both acute and chronic cellular, molecular, and genetic changes to result in fibrosis. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of cardiac disease related to radiation therapy to the chest. Our understanding of these mechanisms has improved substantially, but much work remains to further refine radiation delivery techniques and develop therapeutics to battle late effects of radiation.

  15. Virtual Surgery in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper; Kislinskiy, Stefan

    2014-01-01

     Teaching, diagnosing, and planning of therapy in patients with complex structural cardiovascular heart disease require profound understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) nature of cardiovascular structures in these patients. To obtain such understanding, modern imaging modalities provide high...... et al., Cardiol Young 13:451–460, 2003). In combination with the availability of virtual models of congenital heart disease (CHD), techniques for computer- based simulation of cardiac interventions have enabled early clinical exploration of the emerging concept of virtual surgery (Sorensen et al...

  16. Virtual Surgery in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper; Kislinskiy, Stefan

    2014-01-01

     Teaching, diagnosing, and planning of therapy in patients with complex structural cardiovascular heart disease require profound understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) nature of cardiovascular structures in these patients. To obtain such understanding, modern imaging modalities provide high...... et al., Cardiol Young 13:451–460, 2003). In combination with the availability of virtual models of congenital heart disease (CHD), techniques for computer- based simulation of cardiac interventions have enabled early clinical exploration of the emerging concept of virtual surgery (Sorensen et al...

  17. Genetic research in coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, A G

    1984-01-01

    Coronary heart disease research along genetic lines is difficult. Studies in molecular genetics of apolipoprotein and receptor variability appear most promising in the near future. However, unexpected discoveries and methodology may turn up that may completely change the field. Exclusive concentration on lipid research therefore should be avoided. It is likely that most advances will come from carefully designed studies that ask specific questions. Such research design is appropriate not only for laboratory studies but also for clinical and epidemiological investigations. The collaboration of clinicians, biochemists, geneticists, epidemiologists, and statisticians is likely to lead to better understanding of coronary heart disease.

  18. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result of coronary artery disease, or CAD, said Edward A. Fisher, M.D., Ph.D., M.P. ... Problems and Disease • High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Metabolic Syndrome • Pericarditis • Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) • Stroke • Vascular Health • ...

  19. How Can Coronary Heart Disease Be Prevented or Delayed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Coronary Heart Disease Be Prevented or Delayed? You can prevent ... the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Celebrating American Heart Month: NIH Advancing Heart Research 02/07/2014 ...

  20. Peripartum heart disease in cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, N; Okada, H; Koiwa, M; Kudo, K; Matsuo, N; Naito, Y

    1995-11-01

    Thirteen Holstein dairy cows aged 5.1-10.6 years died or were killed as a result of severe illness during the peripartum period, associated with lateral recumbency, moaning, tachycardia and dyspnoea. They were all high milk producers (> 9000 kg/year) and had experienced at least three pregnancies. The average duration of the clinical course was 2.5 +/- 1.7 days. Electro-cardiography revealed marked tachycardia associated with atrial fibrillation or atrioventricular dissociation. Serum clinical chemistry showed severe hypocalcaemia (3.6 +/- 1.3 mg/dl) and at necropsy multifocal myocardial necrosis was invariably found. Myocardial necrosis was accompanied by neutrophilic and mononuclear cellular infiltrates with interstitial fibrosis. The cause of this lesion was not established.

  1. Congenital Heart Disease and General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. de Koning (Wilfred)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe treatment of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has progressed vastly over the last five decennia. In the Netherlands, around 200,000 children are born each year, around 1,800 of whom have a CHD. This incidence – 6 – 8 per thousand live births – is reported to be similar ro

  2. Remnant cholesterol and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent advances in the field of remnant cholesterol as a contributor to the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD). RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiologic, mechanistic, and genetic studies all support a role for elevated remnant cholesterol (=cholesterol in triglyceride...

  3. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...

  4. The Counselor and Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottens, Allen J.

    1977-01-01

    It is clear that steps can be taken for heart disease prevention and that counselors must give thought to adapting existing ideas and techniques and to developing and experimenting with new and innovative preventive tactics. Of utmost importance is the belief that behavioral intervention is both warranted and worthwhile. (Author)

  5. Congenial Heart Disease at Adult Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien)

    2004-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Congenital cardiac defects are by far the most common congenital anomalies. Of all live births around the world, approximately 1% is born with congenital heart disease.1 This number is even higher if patients with a bicuspid aortic valve are included.2 Accordingly, in t

  6. Of mice and men: molecular genetics of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Troels Askhøj; Troelsen, Karin de Linde Lind; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1 % of the population. It is a complex disease, which may be caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studies in human genetics have led to the identification of more than 50 human genes, involved in isolated CHD or genetic syndromes, where CHD is part of the phenotype. Furthermore, mapping of genomic copy number variants and exome sequencing of CHD patients have led to the identification of a large number of candidate disease genes. Experiments in animal models, particularly in mice, have been used to verify human disease genes and to gain further insight into the molecular pathology behind CHD. The picture emerging from these studies suggest that genetic lesions associated with CHD affect a broad range of cellular signaling components, from ligands and receptors, across down-stream effector molecules to transcription factors and co-factors, including chromatin modifiers.

  7. Effect of electromagnetic field emitted by cellular phones on fetal heart rate patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Onder; Hascalik, Seyma

    2004-01-15

    The study was planned to determine the effects of electromagnetic fields produced by cellular phones on baseline fetal heart rate, acceleration and deceleration. Forty pregnant women undergoing non-stress test were admitted to the study. Non-stress test was obtained while the subjects were holding the CP on stand by mode and on dialing mode, each for 5 min. Similar recordings were taken while there were no phones around for 10 min. Electromagnetic fields produced by cellular phones do not cause any demonstrable affect in fetal heart rate, acceleration and deceleration.

  8. Berlin Heart EXCOR use in patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, David L S; Zafar, Farhan; Almond, Christopher S; Canter, Charles; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; Conway, Jennifer; Adachi, Iki; Lorts, Angela

    2017-02-08

    Management of mechanical circulatory support in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is challenging due to physiologic variations and anatomic limitations to device placement. In this study we examine the use of Berlin Heart EXCOR in CHD patients. CHD patients were identified from the EXCOR Pediatric Study data set (2007 to 2010). Mortality and serious adverse events were compared between CHD and non-CHD cohorts, and predictors of poor outcomes in the CHD cohort were identified. CHD was present in 29% (n = 59, 18 with 1-ventricle physiology) of all EXCOR patients (N = 204). Successful bridge (transplant or wean) was less likely in CHD patients compared with non-CHD patients (48% vs 80%; p 1 year) were successfully bridged. Pre-implant congenital heart surgery (CHS) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on the same admission occurred in 60% of children ≤1 year of age (83% of neonates, 50% of infants), with 8% survival. Regardless of age, patients who did not have CHS and ECMO had 61% survival. Smaller pump, pre-implant bilirubin >1.2 mg/dl and renal dysfunction were independently associated with mortality. End-organ function at implant reliably predicts adverse outcomes and should be considered when making implant decisions. EXCOR use in neonates and infants with CHD should be approached cautiously. If patients have undergone pre-implant CHS and ECMO, EXCOR support may not provide any survival benefit. EXCOR support in non-infants with CHD is challenging but can be consistently successful with appropriate patient selection. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  10. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmias in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD).......Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD)....

  11. The Parathyroid Gland and Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Spandana J; Ruppe, Mary D; Tabatabai, Laila S

    2017-01-01

    The parathyroid glands are critical to maintaining calcium homeostasis through actions of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Recent clinical and molecular research has shown that direct and indirect actions of PTH also affect the heart and vasculature through downstream actions of G protein-coupled receptors in the myocardium and endothelial cells. Patients with disorders of the parathyroid gland have higher incidences of hypertension, arrhythmias, left ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, and calcific disease which translate into increased cardiac morbidity and mortality. Importantly, clinical research also suggests that early treatment of parathyroid disorders through medical or surgical management may reverse cardiovascular remodeling and mitigate cardiac risk factors.

  12. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate.......22-1.85) for prospective studies, and 2.61 (95% CI = 1.66-4.10) for case-control studies using hospital controls. Risk of recurrent events in patients with CHD was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.54-2.68). The pooled adjusted risk of chronic heart failure in healthy populations was 1.37 (95% CI = 1.21-1.56), but this was based...

  13. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajani, Ronak, E-mail: Dr.R.Rajani@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Khattar, Rajdeep [Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chiribiri, Amedeo [Divisions of Imaging Sciences, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses.

  14. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Rajani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses.

  15. Pharmacogenomics of hypertension and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arwood, Meghan J; Cavallari, Larisa H; Duarte, Julio D

    2015-09-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death in the United States, and hypertension is a predominant risk factor. Thus, effective blood pressure control is important to prevent adverse sequelae of hypertension, including heart failure, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and ischemic stroke. Over half of Americans have uncontrolled blood pressure, which may in part be explained by interpatient variability in drug response secondary to genetic polymorphism. As such, pharmacogenetic testing may be a supplementary tool to guide treatment. This review highlights the pharmacogenetics of antihypertensive response and response to drugs that treat adverse hypertension-related sequelae, particularly coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. While pharmacogenetic evidence may be more robust for the latter with respect to clinical implementation, there is increasing evidence of genetic variants that may help predict antihypertensive response. However, additional research and validation are needed before clinical implementation guidelines for antihypertensive therapy can become a reality.

  16. Ischemic heart disease: effectiveness and safety of statin treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ischemic heart disease: effectiveness and safety of statin treatment in a malaysian tertiary healthcare facility. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... and safety of statins in ischemic heart disease (IHD) patients in a Malaysian tertiary ...

  17. Heart Disease Kicks in Earlier for Obese People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164003.html Heart Disease Kicks in Earlier for Obese People Study found ... News) -- Overweight and obese people tend to develop heart disease at an earlier age, living with chronic illness ...

  18. Women's Heart Disease: Cindy Parsons and Follow the Fifty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Cindy Parsons and Follow the Fifty Past Issues / ... Program, knowing that her personal risk factors for heart disease, including family history, were high. She watched her ...

  19. Higher Risk of Heart Disease for Blacks in Poorer Neighborhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163099.html Higher Risk of Heart Disease for Blacks in Poorer Neighborhoods Preventive measures must ... in poor neighborhoods are at higher risk for heart disease and stroke than those who live in wealthier ...

  20. Heart Disease: A Price Humans Pay for Fertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166826.html Heart Disease: A Price Humans Pay for Fertility? Study finds ... 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Certain genes linked to heart disease may also improve your chances of having children, ...

  1. Increasing Numbers of Pregnant Women Also Have Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Increasing Numbers of Pregnant Women Also Have Heart Disease Multiple specialists may be needed to care for ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many more American women with heart disease are choosing to have babies, a new study ...

  2. Too Few Women, Docs Understand Dangers of Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Too Few Women, Docs Understand Dangers of Heart Disease It kills more than all cancers combined, but ... 22, 2017 THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease is the leading killer of U.S. women, but ...

  3. Phase-contrast MRI and applications in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, A., E-mail: adgoldberg@geisinger.edu [Department of Radiology, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA (United States); Jha, S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    A review of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging techniques, with specific application to congenital heart disease, is presented. Theory, pitfalls, advantages, and specific examples of multiple, well-described congenital heart disease presentations are discussed.

  4. Study Challenges Touted Link Between Eczema and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Study Challenges Touted Link Between Eczema and Heart Disease Researcher now probing whether more severe cases of ... a link between eczema and increased risk of heart disease, researchers report. The findings challenge recent studies suggesting ...

  5. The educational gradient in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariansen, Inger; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Igland, Jannicke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Independently of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, cognitive ability may account for some of the excess risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) associated with lower education. We aimed to assess how late adolescence cognitive ability and midlife CVD risk factors are associated...... with the educational gradient in CHD in Norway. METHODS: In a cohort of 57 279 men born during 1949-1959, health survey information was linked to military conscription records of cognitive ability, to national educational data, to hospitalisation records from the Cardiovascular Disease in Norway (CVDNOR) project...

  6. Radiation-associated valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Daniel S; Aertker, Robert A; Clark, Alexandra N; Kiefer, Todd; Hughes, G Chad; Harrison, J Kevin; Bashore, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    Therapeutic ionizing radiation, such as that used in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma, can cause cardiac valvular damage that may take several years to manifest as radiation-associated valvular heart disease. Treatment can be complicated by comorbid radiation injury to other cardiac and mediastinal structures that lead to traditional surgical valve replacement or repair becoming high-risk. A representative case is presented that demonstrates the complexity of radiation-associated valvular heart disease and its successful treatment with percutaneous transcatheter valve replacement. The prevalence and pathophysiologic mechanism of radiation-associated valvular injury are reviewed. Anthracycline adjuvant therapy appears to increase the risk of valvular fibrosis. Left-sided heart valves are more commonly affected than right-sided heart valves. A particular pattern of calcification has been noted in some patients, and experimental data suggest that radiation induction of an osteogenic phenotype may be responsible. A renewed appreciation of the cardiac valvular effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation for mediastinal malignancies is important, and the treatment of such patients may be assisted by the development of novel, less-invasive approaches.

  7. Cellular basis of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bali, Jitin; Halima, Saoussen Ben; Felmy, Boas; Goodger, Zoe; Zurbriggen, Sebastian; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease. A characteristic feature of the disease is the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) which either in its soluble oligomeric form or in the plaque-associated form is causally linked to neurodegeneration. Aβ peptide is liberated from the membrane-spanning -amyloid precursor protein by sequential proteolytic processing employing β- and γ-secretases. All these proteins involved in the production of Aβ peptide are membrane associa...

  8. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  9. Keeping children with congenital heart disease healthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Cathy S

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children with congenital heart disease healthy is vital to their long-term survival and quality of life. Nurse practitioners are in an excellent position to keep these sometimes fragile children healthy before, between, and after their cardiac surgeries. Primary care visits should address developmental morbidity. Referral for in-depth evaluations and intervention should be initiated for children with hemodynamically significant heart disease. Infants may also experience poor feeding. Nutritional guidance may include fortifying formulas or enteral tube feedings. Attention to immunization status and prevention of winter illnesses and endocarditis may reduce complications in this high-risk group of children. Copyright © 2011 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy; Maridaki Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-09-23

    Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD.

  11. 10.7.Congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930270 Clinical analysis of rupture of aorticsinus aneurysm in 30 cases.ZHANG Yuwei (张玉威),et al.Instit Cardiovasc Dis,Dept Med,Shenyang Milit General Hosp,PLA.Chin Cir J1993;8(1):30—31.Rupture of aortic sinus aneurysm is a rarecongenital heart disease.It is sometimes misdi-agnosed and treated because of no typical symp-toms and signs.30 cases with rupture of a-neurysm of aortic sinus were studied.Clinicaldata suggested that the disease could be firstlynoticed when the healthy male aged 20~40years developed suddenly chest pain or extreme-ly uncomfortable feeling with gradually increas-ing heart dysfunction low—frequency harsh andsuperficial continuous precordial murmurs.Chest X-ray exhibited enlargement of heartand asymmetry of pulmonary plethora.ECG

  12. When a Heart Murmur Signals Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  13. False heart rate feedback and the perception of heart symptoms in patients with congenital heart disease and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, P.A.; Kindt, M.; Rietveld, S.; Everaerd, W.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose: It was

  14. Targeting interleukin-1 in heart failure and inflammatory heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Raleigh, Juan M Valle; Abbate, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome characterized by dyspnea, fatigue, and poor exercise capacity due to insufficient cardiac function. HF represents the leading cause of hospitalization among adult patients over 65 years of age. Neurohormonal blockade has improved clinical outcomes; however, HF incidence continues to rise, suggesting an urgent need to develop novel drugs that target a different pathophysiological paradigm. Inflammation plays a central role in many cardiovascular diseases. Interleukin-1 (IL-1), a prototypical proinflammatory cytokine, is upregulated in HF and associated with worse prognosis. Preclinical models suggest a beneficial effect of IL-1 blockade, and pilot clinical trials are currently underway to evaluate the role of IL-1 blockade to reduce inflammation, ameliorate ventricular remodeling, and improve exercise capacity in patients with HF.

  15. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoover-Plow J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-Plow, Yanqing GongDepartments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Joseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1 improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2 identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3 development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress.Keywords: mobilization, expansion, homing, survival, engraftment

  16. PREGNANCY WITH HEART DISEASE - FETOMATERNAL OUTCOMEME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the maternal and fetal outcome of pregnancies complicated by cardiac disease in a developing country. METHODS: A prospective analysis was carried out of 40 pregnancies in women with cardiac disease who delivered at 28 weeks of gestation and beyond from June 2009 to May 2010 at a tertiary care center in the eastern part of India. RESULTS: Rheumatic heart disease (n=28 , 70% with isolated mitral stenosis (n=21 was the predominant cardiac problem. Septal defects were the most common form of congenital heart disease (n=10. In 28 (13.52% women , the diagnosis of cardiac disease was made during pregnancy. Patients in NYHA class I/II (n=29 , 72.5% had fewer maternal complications and their babies had a higher birth weight than those in NYHA class III/IV (n=11 , 27.5%. Cardiac complications were noted in 27 (67.5% patients. Commonest complication developing during pregnancy , labor and puerperium was congestive cardiac failure (n=14 , 35%. Maternal mortality was noted in 3 patients (7.5% , 2 of which were due to cardiac failure and pulmonary edema . Six patients (15% delivered preterm and thirteen patients (32.5% had low birth weight babies . There were three neonatal deaths and one stillborn. CONCLUSIONS: Rheumatic heart disease was the predominant type. Patients in NYHA class I /II had a better maternal and fetal outcome than those in NYHA class III/IV. Surgically treated women tolerate pregnancy well. Vaginal delivery was safer and caesarean section should be reserved only for obstetric indications. Maternal and perinatal outcom e can be improved by team approach at tertiary care center .

  17. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in left heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitling, Siegfried; Ravindran, Krishnan; Goldenberg, Neil M; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure leading to right-sided heart failure and can arise from a wide range of etiologies. The most common cause of PH, termed Group 2 PH, is left-sided heart failure and is commonly known as pulmonary hypertension with left heart disease (PH-LHD). Importantly, while sharing many clinical features with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), PH-LHD differs significantly at the cellular and physiological levels. These fundamental pathophysiological differences largely account for the poor response to PAH therapies experienced by PH-LHD patients. The relatively high prevalence of this disease, coupled with its unique features compared with PAH, signal the importance of an in-depth understanding of the mechanistic details of PH-LHD. The present review will focus on the current state of knowledge regarding the pathomechanisms of PH-LHD, highlighting work carried out both in human trials and in preclinical animal models. Adaptive processes at the alveolocapillary barrier and in the pulmonary circulation, including alterations in alveolar fluid transport, endothelial junctional integrity, and vasoactive mediator secretion will be discussed in detail, highlighting the aspects that impact the response to, and development of, novel therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Heart Truth for Women: If You Have Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of physical activity • Unhealthy diet • Diabetes and prediabetes • Metabolic syndrome Other conditions and factors also may contribute to ... The Heart Truth is a way of informing women about what they can do to prevent heart ...

  19. Monkey hybrid stem cells develop cellular features of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorthongpanich Chanchao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pluripotent stem cells that are capable of differentiating into different cell types and develop robust hallmark cellular features are useful tools for clarifying the impact of developmental events on neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. Additionally, a Huntington's cell model that develops robust pathological features of Huntington's disease would be valuable for drug discovery research. Results To test this hypothesis, a pluripotent Huntington's disease monkey hybrid cell line (TrES1 was established from a tetraploid Huntington's disease monkey blastocyst generated by the fusion of transgenic Huntington's monkey skin fibroblast and a wild-type non-transgenic monkey oocyte. The TrES1 developed key Huntington's disease cellular pathological features that paralleled neural development. It expressed mutant huntingtin and stem cell markers, was capable of differentiating to neural cells, and developed teratoma in severely compromised immune deficient (SCID mice. Interestingly, the expression of mutant htt, the accumulation of oligomeric mutant htt and the formation of intranuclear inclusions paralleled neural development in vitro , and even mutant htt was ubiquitously expressed. This suggests the development of Huntington's disease cellular features is influenced by neural developmental events. Conclusions Huntington's disease cellular features is influenced by neural developmental events. These results are the first to demonstrate that a pluripotent stem cell line is able to mimic Huntington's disease progression that parallels neural development, which could be a useful cell model for investigating the developmental impact on Huntington's disease pathogenesis.

  20. Blood Transfusion Therapy in Patients with Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-07

    good health will not require the same transfusion therapy as patients with valvular heart disease who have congestive heart failure and...normal red cell volume and normal red cell oxygen transport function. 1 ,13 When the patient has valvular heart disease or myo- cardiopathy with...cardio- pulmonary bypass patients and in patients with severe valvular heart disease . Blood 1978;52:13-23. : 81. 197. Frledenberg WR, Myers WO, Plotka

  1. [Relationship between congenital heart disease and bronchial dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shuang-Lin; Li, Ya-Jun; Huang, Ting; Tan, Li-Hua; Mei, Xi-Long; Sun, Jian-Ning

    2011-11-01

    To study the relationship of the incidence of bronchial dysplasia (bronchial anomalous origin and bronchial stenosis) with congenital heart disease. A total of 185 children with congenital heart disease or bronchial dysplasia were enrolled. Bronchial dysplasia was identified by the 64-MSCT conventional scanning or thin slice scanning with three-dimensional reconstruction. Forty-five children (25.3%) had coexisting bronchial dysplasia and congenital heart disease. The incidence rate of bronchial dysplasia in children with congenital heart disease associated with ventricular septal defect was higher than in those without ventricular septal defect (33.7% vs 15.0%; Pdysplasia between the children with congenital heart disease who had a large vascular malformation and who did not. Bronchial dysplasia often occurs in children with congenital heart disease. It is necessary to perform a tracheobronchial CT scanning with three-dimensional reconstruction to identify tracheobronchial dysplasia in children with congenital heart disease, especially associated with ventricular septal defect.

  2. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-06-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Amyloid heart disease: genetics translated into disease-modifying therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Brett W; Tang, W H Wilson

    2017-06-01

    Given increased awareness and improved non-invasive diagnostic tools, cardiac amyloidosis has become an increasingly recognised aetiology of increased ventricular wall thickness and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Once considered a rare disease with no treatment options, translational research has harnessed novel pathways and led the way to promising treatment options. Gene variants that contribute to amyloid heart disease provide unique opportunities to explore potential disease-modifying therapeutic strategies. Amyloidosis has become the model disease through which gene therapy using small interfering RNAs and antisense oligonucleotides has evolved. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Neurologic complications of valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is frequently associated with neurologic complications; cerebral embolism is the most common of these since thrombus formation results from the abnormalities in the valvular surfaces or from the anatomic and physiologic changes associated with valve dysfunction, such as atrial or ventricular enlargement, intracardiac thrombi, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Prosthetic heart valves, particularly mechanical valves, are very thrombogenic, which explains the high risk of thromboembolism and the need for anticoagulation for the prevention of embolism. Infective endocarditis is a disease process with protean manifestations that include not only cerebral embolism but also intracranial hemorrhage, mycotic aneurysms, and systemic manifestations such as fever and encephalopathy. Other neurologic complications include nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, a process associated with systemic diseases such as cancer and systemic lupus erythematosus. For many of these conditions, anticoagulation is the mainstay of treatment to prevent cerebral embolism, therefore it is the potential complications of anticoagulation that can explain other neurologic complications in patients with VHD. The prevention and management of these complications requires an understanding of their natural history in order to balance the risks posed by valvular disease itself against the risks and benefits associated with treatment.

  5. Nutrition in neonatal congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan CT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Conall T Morgan,1 Anne Marie Shine,2 Colin J McMahon1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: There are 40,000 infants born in the USA with congenital heart disease annually. Achievement of adequate oral nutrition is difficult in this population. Malnutrition is common. Single ventricle physiology, the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, and cardiopulmonary bypass prevent the establishment of normal oral feeding patterns. Improved nutrition results in improved surgical outcomes, lower mortality, and shorter hospital stay. In this review, we discuss the challenges this population faces. Keywords: necrotizing enterocolitis, malnutrition, growth failure, hypoplastic left heart

  6. 10.9.Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930272 Clinical relevant factors of the my-ocardial ischemic threshold.LU Duan (鲁端),et al.1st Affil Hosp,Zhejiang Med Univ,Hangzhou,310003.Chin J cardiol 1992;20(6):357—358.The myocardial ischemic threshold (heart rateat the onset of ischemia) was assessed in 92 pa-tients with coronary heart disease.The highestmyocardial ischemic threshold (HMIT) rangedfrom 83 to 163 (122±18) beats/min usuallyhappened during activities at the daytime.Thelowest myocardial ischemic threshold (LMIT)ranged from 45 to 115 (82±17) beats/min usu-ally happened when awaken in early morning orasleep at night.The differences were statistical-

  7. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-11-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context.

  8. Congenital Heart Disease: Vascular Risk Factors and Medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P.M. Smedts (Dineke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart disease (CHD) is among the most common congenital abnormalities and involves structural anomalies of the heart and/or related major blood vessels. Congenital heart disease arises in the fi rst trimester of pregnancy, occurring often and in many forms. The reported CHD bi

  9. Congenital heart disease in young adulthood and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Over 95% of children with congenital heart defects now reach adulthood and the number of adults with congenital heart disease is estimated to be at least 1.2 million in Europe alone. Despite major developments in diagnostic methods and treatment of congenital heart disease, cure is rarely achieved.

  10. The Inflammatory Heart Diseases: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lei; Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The inflammation of the heart muscles, such as myocarditis, the membrane sac which surrounds the heart called as pericarditis, and the inner lining of the heart or the myocardium, heart muscle as endocarditis are known as the inflammatory heart diseases. Inflammation of heart is caused by known infectious agents, viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites, and by toxic materials from the environment, water, food, air, toxic gases, smoke, and pollution, or by an unknown origin. Myocarditis is induced by infection of heart muscle by virus like sarcoidosis and immune diseases. The symptoms include chest pain, angina, pain in heart muscle, and shortness of breath, edema, swelling of feet or ankles, and fatigue. The ECG, X-ray, and MRI can diagnose the disease; blood test and rise in enzymes levels provide abnormality in heart function. The treatment includes use of antibiotics for inflammation of heart muscle and medications. The ultrasound imaging indicates further damage to the heart muscle. In severe cases of infection heart failure can occur so long-term medications are necessary to control inflammation. The various biomarkers are reported for the inflammatory heart diseases. The causes, symptoms and treatments of inflammatory heart diseases are described.

  11. Stress echo for evaluation of valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Resting echocardiography is the most important tool for diagnosing valvular heart disease. However, treatment planning in valvular heart diseases may require additional information in some patients, particularly asymptomatic patients with severe valve disease or symptomatic patients with moderate disease. Stress echocardiography provides invaluable information in these situations and aids decision making. Stress echocardiography is performed using either physical stress or dobutamine stress a...

  12. Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention: Data Trends & Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention's Data Trends & Maps online tool allows searching for and view of health indicators related to Heart...

  13. Triglycerides and heart disease: still a hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ira J; Eckel, Robert H; McPherson, Ruth

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic and clinical science relating plasma triglycerides and cardiovascular disease. Although many aspects of the basic physiology of triglyceride production, its plasma transport, and its tissue uptake have been known for several decades, the relationship of plasma triglyceride levels to vascular disease is uncertain. Are triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, their influence on high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein, or the underlying diseases that lead to defects in triglyceride metabolism the culprit? Animal models have failed to confirm that anything other than early fatty lesions can be produced by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Metabolic products of triglyceride metabolism can be toxic to arterial cells; however, these studies are primarily in vitro. Correlative studies of fasting and postprandial triglycerides and genetic diseases implicate very-low-density lipoprotein and their remnants and chylomicron remnants in atherosclerosis development, but the concomitant alterations in other lipoproteins and other risk factors obscure any conclusions about direct relationships between disease and triglycerides. Genes that regulate triglyceride levels also correlate with vascular disease. Human intervention trials, however, have lacked an appropriately defined population and have produced outcomes without definitive conclusions. The time is more than ripe for new and creative approaches to understanding the relationship of triglycerides and heart disease.

  14. Triglycerides and Heart Disease, Still a Hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ira J.; Eckel, Robert H.; McPherson, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic and clinical science relating plasma triglycerides and cardiovascular disease. Although many aspects of the basic physiology of triglyceride production, its plasma transport and tissue uptake have been known for several decades, the relationship of plasma triglyceride levels to vascular disease is uncertain. Are triglyceride rich lipoproteins, their influence on HDL and LDL, or the underlying diseases leading to defects in triglyceride metabolism the culprit? Animal models have failed to confirm that anything other than early fatty lesions can be produced by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Metabolic products of triglyceride metabolism can be toxic to arterial cells; however, these studies are primarily in vitro. Correlative studies of fasting and postprandial triglycerides and genetic diseases implicate VLDL and their remnants, and chylomicron remnants in atherosclerosis development; but the concomitant alterations in other lipoproteins and other risk factors obscure any conclusions about direct relationships between disease and triglycerides. Genes that regulate triglyceride levels also correlate with vascular disease. Human intervention trials, however, have lacked an appropriately defined population, and have produced outcomes without definitive conclusions. The time is more than ripe for new and creative approaches to understanding the relationship of triglycerides and heart disease. PMID:21527746

  15. Fruits, vegetables and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchet, Luc; Amouyel, Philippe; Dallongeville, Jean

    2009-09-01

    Diet plays an important part in the maintenance of optimal cardiovascular health. This Review summarizes the evidence for a relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and the occurrence of coronary heart disease. This evidence is based on observational cohort studies, nutrition prevention trials with fruit and vegetables, and investigations of the effects of fruit and vegetables on cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the evidence supporting a cardioprotective effect comes from observational epidemiological studies; these studies have reported either weak or nonsignificant associations. Controlled nutritional prevention trials are scarce and the existing data do not show any clear protective effects of fruit and vegetables on coronary heart disease. Under rigorously controlled experimental conditions, fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with a decrease in blood pressure, which is an important cardiovascular risk factor. However, the effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on plasma lipid levels, diabetes, and body weight have not yet been thoroughly explored. Finally, the hypothesis that nutrients in fruit and vegetables have a protective role in reducing the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and preventing complications of atherosclerosis has not been tested in prevention trials. Evidence that fruit and vegetable consumption reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease remains scarce thus far.

  16. Hypertension and atherosclerotic (ischaemic) heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, M J

    1991-08-01

    Epidemiological surveys show the clear association of hypertension with an increased risk of developing ischaemic heart disease. One method of quantifying atherosclerosis is to measure, at necropsy, the percentage of the intimal surface of the coronary arteries or aorta which is occupied by raised plaques. When this is done in a large number of subjects the amount of intimal involvement in any particular geographical population correlates directly with the frequency of ischaemic heart disease. In all these populations, whether at a high risk or low risk of developing ischaemic heart disease, hypertensive subjects have a greater intimal involvement by plaques than normotensive subjects. Thus, the increased risk in hypertension is, in part, mediated by possession of more plaques. Plaque growth is due to the accumulation of lipid from the plasma, the ingress of monocytes with their conversion to lipid filled foam cells and the formation of collagen by smooth muscle cells. Hypertension may act by altering endothelial function to potentiate all these processes. Mechanical stress on endothelial cells will evoke the formation of growth factors for smooth muscle cells. Plaque growth in man is also episodic due to the formation of thrombi; a proportion of these episodes are symptomatic producing acute myocardial ischaemia but the majority are silent leading to sudden plaque expansion. Thrombi over plaques are either due to endothelial denudation injury or more commonly due to the tearing of the cap of a plaque leading to deep intimal injury. Necropsy surveys of control populations show that subjects with hypertension have a greater frequency of recent plaque tears compared with normotensive subjects.

  17. Cardiac transplantation for pediatric patients. With inoperable congenital heart disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, K M; Denfield, S W; Schowengerdt, K O; Towbin, J A; Radovancević, B; Frazier, O. H.; Price, J K; Gajarski, R J

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the expanding use of transplantation as the definitive option for pediatric patients with inoperable congenital heart disease. This study compares perioperative risk factors and outcomes in pediatric patients who received heart transplants for congenital heart disease with those in pediatric patients who received heart transplants for cardiomyopathy. Retrospective data collected on 40 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing cardiac transplantation from 1 January...

  18. Anatomical assessment of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John C

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac MRI (CMR) is replacing diagnostic cardiac catheterization as the modality of choice for anatomic and functional characterization of congenital heart disease (CHD) when echocardiographic imaging is insufficient. In this manuscript, we discuss the principles of anatomic imaging of CHD, placing emphasis on the appropriate choice and modification of pulse sequences necessary to evaluate infants and small children. Clinical examples are provided to illustrate the relative strengths and shortcomings of different CMR imaging techniques. Although cardiovascular function and flow techniques are not described, their role in evaluating the severity of anatomic defects is emphasized. Anatomic characterization represents the first component of a carefully-planned, integrated CMR assessment of CHD.

  19. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  20. Cine MR imaging in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Yamada, Naoaki; Itoh, Akira; Miyatake, Kunio

    1989-01-01

    Cine MR Imaging was carried out using FLASH (fast low angle shot) which employes TE of 16 msec and TR of 30/similar to/40 msec. Regurgitant jet was visible as discrete area of low signal intensity extending from the incompetent valve into the respective cardiac chamber. In 20 patients with mitral regurgitation, the correlation of the length and area of mitral jet by cine MR and color doppler mapping was 0.74 and 0.71, respectively. Cine MR imaging is a promising modality for detection and quantification of valvular heart disease.

  1. Metabolically healthy obesity and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise; Netterstrøm, Marie K.; Johansen, Nanna B.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Recent studies have suggested that a subgroup of obese individuals is not at increased risk of obesity-related complications. This subgroup has been referred to as metabolically healthy obese. Objective: To investigate whether obesity is a risk factor for development of ischemic heart...... disease (IHD) irrespective of metabolic health. Design: In all, 6238 men and women from the Danish prospective Inter99 study were followed during 10.6 (standard deviation = 1.7) years. Setting: General community. Participants: Participants were classified according to body mass index and four metabolic...

  2. Psychological factors and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadži-Pešić Marina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CAD results from an interaction of different somatic, environmental and behavioral risk factors. Commonly, development of CAD is associated with arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking, sedentary life style and the like. Psychological factors in their own sake or in combination with other risk factors are also important for genesis of CAD. In this study, 170 people that were diagnosed with CAD and 170 healthy controls of corresponding sex and age were compared for anxiety, aggressiveness and Eysenck's two personality dimension. The data indicate that patients with CAD have very low level of anxiety and aggressiveness and very high level of neuroticism relative to the controls. .

  3. Myocardial disease,anemia and heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donald S Silverberg; Dov Wexler; Adrian Iaina; Doron Schwartz

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Many patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) fail to respond to maximal CHF therapy and progress to end stage CHF with many hospitalizations, very poor quality of life, end stage renal failure, or die of cardiovascular complications within a short time. One factor that has generally been ignored in many of these patients is the fact that they are often anemic.The anemia is due mainly to renal failure but also to the inhibitory effects of cytokines on the bone marrow. Anemia itself may further worsen the cardiac function and make the patients resistant to standard CHF therapies. Indeed anemia has been associated with increased severity of CHF, increased hospitalization, worse cardiac function and functional class, higher doses of diuretics,worsening of renal function and reduced quality of life. In both controlled and uncontrolled studies the correction of the anemia with erythropoietin (EPO) and oral or Ⅳ iron is associated with improvement in all these parameters. EPO itself may also play a direct role in improving the heart unrelated to the improvement of the anemia. Anemia may also play a role in the worsening of coronary heart disease even without CHF.

  4. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2016-11-02

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  5. Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Scope of the Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor Dray, Efrat; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease summarizing its impact on the demographics of the congenital heart disease population and the progress made in order to improve outcomes in this patient population. Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease can be modified by many factors. As a result of decreasing mortality and increasing survival in all forms of congenital heart disease, the median age of patients has increased and adults now compose two-thirds of patients with congenital heart disease. Disease burden and resulting health services utilization increase significantly across the lifespan. Bridging the gap between policy and quality of care can be improved by referral to specialized adult congenital heart disease centers and planning delivery of specialized services that are commensurate with population needs, program accreditation criteria and certified training of designated workforce.

  6. Eosinophilic heart disease in a paediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedieu, Natalie; Giardini, Alessandro; Khambadkone, Sachin; Marek, Jan

    2011-01-01

    A 12-year-old child with no previous medical history was referred with a 4-day history of cough, shortness of breath, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a soft tissue infiltrating the left ventricular free wall, the lateral mitral annulus, and the mitral valve leaflets. A soft tissue strand connecting the lateral left atrial wall and mitral leaflets across the mitral valve orifice was also identified, causing reduced opening and functional mitral stenosis. The diagnosis of Löeffler endocarditis was made, and after 10 weeks of treatment with oral prednisolone, there was complete resolution of symptoms and of the infiltrative tissue with normalization of mitral valve function. The present case highlights some atypical features of eosinophilic heart disease-like occurrence in paediatric age, the complete preservation of the right ventricle and left ventricular apex, and the presentation with mitral stenosis compared with mitral regurgitation typically observed in the late phase of the disease.

  7. High sensitivity troponin and valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cian P; Donnellan, Eoin; Phelan, Dermot; Griffin, Brian P; Sarano, Maurice Enriquez-; McEvoy, John W

    2017-01-16

    Blood-based biomarkers have been extensively studied in a range of cardiovascular diseases and have established utility in routine clinical care, most notably in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (e.g., troponin) and the management of heart failure (e.g., brain-natriuretic peptide). The role of biomarkers is less well established in the management of valvular heart disease (VHD), in which the optimal timing of surgical intervention is often challenging. One promising biomarker that has been the subject of a number of recent VHD research studies is high sensitivity troponin (hs-cTn). Novel high-sensitivity assays can detect subclinical myocardial damage in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, hs-cTn may have utility in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with severe VHD who do not have a clear traditional indication for surgical intervention. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence for hs-cTn as a potential biomarker in the most commonly encountered VHD conditions, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. This review provides a synopsis of early evidence indicating that hs-cTn has promise as a biomarker in VHD. However, the impact of its measurement on clinical practice and VHD outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality.

  8. Medical management of ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmis, G C

    1981-03-01

    Medical therapy primarily affects myocardial oxygen demands. Nitrates and other vasodilators decrease filling pressure, ventricular diastolic volume and to some extent, impedance to ventricular emptying. Beta blockers decrease myocardial contractility and heart rate through a reduction of sympathetic neural traffic. Afterload reduction by the control of hypertension and preload reduction via the LaPlace relationship through reversal of congestive failure are critical for successful therapy. Modification of smoking habits and personality traits with renunciation of a sedentary life-style are also therapeutically useful. While increases in myocardial blood flow have depended primarily on surgical revascularization procedures, calcium antagonists such as nifedipine have been shown to affect flow by reversing vasospasm, which has been recognized with increasing frequency as a concomitant of even fixed coronary arterial disease. The first therapy, however, is diet since it affects both the supply and demand sides of myocardial oxygen balance. Reduction of body bulk decreases myocardial oxygen demand since both vary in obligate parallel. Religious abstention from saturated fats and cholesterol-containing foods, especially by those with pre-existing coronary heart disease, may arrest the otherwise inexorable deterioration.

  9. Metabolic Modulators in Heart Disease: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2017-07-01

    Ischemic heart disease and heart failure are leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. They continue to be major burden on health care systems throughout the world, despite major advances made over the past 40 years in developing new therapeutic approaches to treat these debilitating diseases. A potential therapeutic approach that has been underutilized in treating ischemic heart disease and heart failure is "metabolic modulation." Major alterations in myocardial energy substrate metabolism occur in ischemic heart disease and heart failure, and are associated with an energy deficit in the heart. A metabolic shift from mitochondrial oxidative metabolism to glycolysis, as well as an uncoupling between glycolysis and glucose oxidation, plays a crucial role in the development of cardiac inefficiency (oxygen consumed per work performed) and functional impairment in ischemic heart disease as well as in heart failure. This has led to the concept that optimizing energy substrate use with metabolic modulators can be a potentially promising approach to decrease the severity of ischemic heart disease and heart failure, primarily by improving cardiac efficiency. Two approaches for metabolic modulator therapy are to stimulate myocardial glucose oxidation and/or inhibit fatty acid oxidation. In this review, the past, present, and future of metabolic modulators as an approach to optimizing myocardial energy substrate metabolism and treating ischemic heart disease and heart failure are discussed. This includes a discussion of pharmacological interventions that target enzymes involved in fatty acid uptake, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose oxidation in the heart, as well as enzymes involved in ketone and branched chain amino acid catabolism in the heart. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Perceived stress and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Naja Rod; Kristensen, Tage Søndergård; Prescott, Eva

    2006-01-01

    It is unclear whether the commonly recognized link between stress and cardiovascular disease is causal or the result of reporting bias. The objective of this study was to address the association between perceived stress and first incidence of ischemic heart disease and to evaluate the suggested...... reporting bias by addressing subdiagnoses of ischemic heart disease separately....

  11. Gender and outcome in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background - Gender differences in prognosis have frequently been reported in cardiovascular disease but less so in congenital heart disease. We investigated whether gender is associated with outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease. Methods and Results - From the CONgenital CORvitia

  12. Gender and outcome in adult congenital heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, C.L.; Uiterwaal, C.S.; Velde, E.T. van der; Meijboom, F.J.; Pieper, P.G.; Vliegen, H.W.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Bouma, B.J.; Grobbee, D.E.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gender differences in prognosis have frequently been reported in cardiovascular disease but less so in congenital heart disease. We investigated whether gender is associated with outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: From the CONgenital CORvitia

  13. Role of hepatic resection for patients with carcinoid heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernheim, A.M.; Connolly, H.M.; Rubin, J.;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of resection of hepatic carcinoid metastases on progression and prognosis of carcinoid heart disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From our database of 265 consecutive patients diagnosed as having carcinoid heart disease from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2005...... nonrandomized study, our data suggest that patients with carcinoid heart disease who undergo hepatic resection have decreased cardiac progression and improved prognosis. Eligible patients should be considered for hepatic surgery Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  14. Life style modification for patients with ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, V

    2013-01-01

    With a view to assess the effectiveness of lifestyle modification in patients with ischemic heart disease, a quasi-experimental study with quantitative approach was undertaken on 60 patients of ischemic heart disease. Purposive sampling technique was used in selecting the patients. The results showed that educating the patients about cessation of smoking, taking proper diet, anxiety reduction and counselling helped in preventing the progression of ischaemic heart disease.

  15. Mapping of cellular iron using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eung Seok; Heo, Chaejeong; Kim, Ji Seon; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jong Min

    2013-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive dopaminergic cell loss in the substantianigra (SN) and elevated iron levels demonstrated by autopsy and with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Direct visualization of iron with live imaging techniques has not yet been successful. The aim of this study is to visualize and quantify the distribution of cellular iron using an intrinsic iron hyperspectral fluorescence signal. The 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced cellular model of PD was established in SHSY5Y cells. The cells were exposed to iron by treatment with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC, 100 μM) for up to 6 hours. The hyperspectral fluorescence imaging signal of iron was examined usinga high- resolution dark-field optical microscope system with signal absorption for the visible/ near infrared (VNIR) spectral range. The 6-hour group showed heavy cellular iron deposition compared with the small amount of iron accumulation in the 1-hour group. The cellular iron was dispersed in a small, particulate form, whereas extracellular iron was detected in an aggregated form. In addition, iron particles were found to be concentrated on the cell membrane/edge of shrunken cells. The cellular iron accumulation readily occurred in MPP+-induced cells, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating elevated iron levels in the SN in PD. This direct iron imaging methodology could be applied to analyze the physiological role of iron in PD, and its application might be expanded to various neurological disorders involving other metals, such as copper, manganese or zinc.

  16. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  17. Study the relationship between adiponectin and coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Hui Yang; Li-Xin Zhao; Yan-Hong Lu; Xiao-Jun Li; Jun Shi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study whether adiponectin in serum of patients with coronary heart disease is reduced, and compare with the test results in total cholesterol (TC), Triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), blood glucose (GLU), C-reactive protein (CRP). Method: We selected 80 cases of coronary heart disease patients as the experimental group, 50 healthy subjects as control group. The coronary heart disease group compared with the control group, we know the changes of adiponectin in coronary heart disease group and compared coronary heart disease group with control group in test results of blood lipid, blood glucose, C-reactive protein. Results: Adiponectin in coronary heart disease group was (0.47±0.09) mg/L, which decreased significantly comparing to control group’s level (t=-18.4, P<0.001), HDL-C in coronary heart disease group was (1.24±0.04) mmol/L, which decreased significantly comparing to control group’s level (t=-27.67, P<0.001). The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: The level’s adiponectin in patients of coronary heart disease dropped, which lead to hypoadiponectinemia, Hypoadiponectinemia may be one of the risk factors of coronary heart disease.

  18. Decline in mortality from heart disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, K; Sjøl, Anette

    1995-01-01

    Mortality rates in Denmark from ischemic heart diseases (IHD), other heart diseases and unknown causes are presented for the period 1968-92. In all age groups, mortality from IHD is higher at the beginning of the period than at the end. For other heart disease, the plot of the mortality rate is U......-shaped for the age groups 65-84 and > or = 85, but first decreases and is then constant for the age group 30-64. There are an increasing number of deaths from symptomatic heart disease. For the group of unknown causes, the rates are increasing for all sex and age groups. The relationship between deaths from IHD...

  19. Decline in mortality from heart disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, K; Sjøl, Anette

    1995-01-01

    Mortality rates in Denmark from ischemic heart diseases (IHD), other heart diseases and unknown causes are presented for the period 1968-92. In all age groups, mortality from IHD is higher at the beginning of the period than at the end. For other heart disease, the plot of the mortality rate is U......-shaped for the age groups 65-84 and > or = 85, but first decreases and is then constant for the age group 30-64. There are an increasing number of deaths from symptomatic heart disease. For the group of unknown causes, the rates are increasing for all sex and age groups. The relationship between deaths from IHD...

  20. Dietary fiber and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Mark A; O'Reilly, Eilis; Augustsson, Katarina

    2004-01-01

    of coronary heart disease. METHODS: We analyzed the original data from 10 prospective cohort studies from the United States and Europe to estimate the association between dietary fiber intake and the risk of coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Over 6 to 10 years of follow-up, 5249 incident total coronary cases......BACKGROUND: Few epidemiologic studies of dietary fiber intake and risk of coronary heart disease have compared fiber types (cereal, fruit, and vegetable) or included sex-specific results. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pooled analysis of dietary fiber and its subtypes and risk...... associated with risk of coronary heart disease....

  1. A vital role for complement in heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena; Espevik, Terje; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne; Mollnes, Tom E; Hovland, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Heart diseases are common and significant contributors to worldwide mortality and morbidity. During recent years complement mediated inflammation has been shown to be an important player in a variety of heart diseases. Despite some negative results from clinical trials using complement inhibitors, emerging evidence points to an association between the complement system and heart diseases. Thus, complement seems to be important in coronary heart disease as well as in heart failure, where several studies underscore the prognostic importance of complement activation. Furthermore, patients with atrial fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement system is crucial for the protozoa-host interaction. Thus, complement activation appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of a diverse range of cardiac conditions. Determination of the exact role of complement in the various heart diseases will hopefully help to identify patients that might benefit from therapeutic complement intervention.

  2. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation alterations in heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, N; Mori, J; Lopaschuk, G D

    2014-04-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. In many forms of heart disease, including heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathies, changes in cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism contribute to contractile dysfunction and to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. Specific metabolic changes include a relative increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates and an uncoupling of glycolysis from glucose oxidation. In heart failure, overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be impaired while, in ischaemic heart disease, energy production is impaired due to a limitation of oxygen supply. In both of these conditions, residual mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation dominates over mitochondrial glucose oxidation. In diabetes, the ratio of cardiac fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation also increases, although primarily due to an increase in fatty acid oxidation and an inhibition of glucose oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutically regulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation can improve cardiac function of the ischaemic heart, the failing heart and in diabetic cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review the cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolic changes that occur in these forms of heart disease, what role alterations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have in contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the potential for targeting fatty acid oxidation to treat these forms of heart disease.

  3. The heart-liver metabolic axis: defective communication exacerbates disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Kedryn K; Bookout, Angie L; Olson, Eric N

    2014-04-01

    The heart has been recognized as an endocrine organ for over 30 years (de Bold, 2011); however, little is known about how the heart communicates with other organs in the body, and even less is known about this process in the diseased heart. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Magida and Leinwand (2014) introduce the concept that a primary genetic defect in the heart results in aberrant hepatic lipid metabolism, which consequently exacerbates hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This study provides evidence in support of the hypothesis that crosstalk occurs between the heart and liver, and that this becomes disrupted in the diseased state.

  4. Ocular pathology in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A M; Bitar, F F; Traboulsi, E I; Kassak, K M; Obeid, M Y; Megarbane, A; Salti, H I

    2005-01-01

    To describe the ocular findings in subjects with congenital heart disease (CHD). In a prospective study, the same observer examined 240 consecutive patients with CHD admitted to the medical centre. Two independent geneticists performed identification of syndromes. The commonest anatomic cardiac anomalies were ventricular or atrial septal defects (62), tetralogy of Fallot (39), pulmonary stenosis (25), and transposition of the great arteries (24). The heart lesions were divided physiologically into volume overload (90), cyanotic (87), and obstructive (63). In all, 105 syndromic subjects included the velocardiofacial syndrome (18), Down's syndrome (17), CHARGE association (6), DiGeorge syndrome (5), Williams syndrome (3), Edwards syndrome (3), Noonan syndrome (3), VACTERL association (2), and Patau syndrome (trisomy 13) (2). The paediatric team recognized 51 patients as syndromic. Two independent geneticists recognized additional 54 patients as syndromic. Positive eye findings were present in 55% (132) and included retinal vascular tortuosity (46), optic disc hypoplasia (30), trichomegaly (15), congenital ptosis (12), strabismus (11), retinal haemorrhages (8), prominent eyes (7), and congenital cataract (6). There was a strong correlation between the retinal vascular tortuosity and both a low haematocrit (P=0.000) and a low arterial oxygen saturation (P=0.002). Patients with CHD are at a high risk for ocular pathology and need screening for various ocular abnormalities.

  5. Cellular reprogramming for understanding and treating human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riya Rajan Kanherkar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades we have witnessed a paradigm shift in our understanding of cells so radical that it has rewritten the rules of biology. The study of cellular reprogramming has gone from little more than a hypothesis, to applied bioengineering, with the creation of a variety of important cell types. By way of metaphor, we can compare the discovery of reprogramming with the archaeological discovery of the Rosetta stone. This stone slab made possible the initial decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics because it allowed us to see this language in a way that was previously impossible. We propose that cellular reprogramming will have an equally profound impact on understanding and curing human disease, because it allows us to perceive and study molecular biological processes such as differentiation, epigenetics, and chromatin in ways that were likewise previously impossible. Stem cells could be called cellular Rosetta stones because they allow also us to perceive the connections between development, disease, cancer, aging, and regeneration in novel ways. Here we present a comprehensive historical review of stem cells and cellular reprogramming, and illustrate the developing synergy between many previously unconnected fields. We show how stem cells can be used to create in vitro models of human disease and provide examples of how reprogramming is being used to study and treat such diverse diseases as cancer, aging and accelerated aging syndromes, infectious diseases such as AIDS, and epigenetic diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome. While the technology of reprogramming is being developed and refined there have also been significant ongoing developments in other complementary technologies such as gene editing, progenitor cell production, and tissue engineering. These technologies are the foundations of what is becoming a fully-functional field of regenerative medicine and are converging to a point that will allow us to treat almost any

  6. Scintigraphic detection of inflammatory heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morguet, A.J. (Dept. of Cardiology and Pulmonology, Centre of Internal Medicine, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Munz, D.L. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Radiology, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Kreuzer, H. (Dept. of Cardiology and Pulmonology, Centre of Internal Medicine, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Emrich, D. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Radiology, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany))

    1994-07-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the heart encompass myocarditis, endocarditis and pericarditis. This paper discusses the diagnostic potential of scintigraphy in these entities. In myocarditis, indium-111 antimyosin Fab imaging can visualize active myocyte damage and thus contribute substantially to the diagnosis. Antimyosin uptake is also seen in a large subset of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, indicating ongoing myocyte injury in these cases. In endocarditis, immunoscintigraphy using monoclonal technetium-99m-labelled antigranulocyte antibodies provides useful diagnostic information in patients with equivocal echocardiographic findings. Immunoscintigraphy seems to indicate the floridity of the inflammatory process in endocarditis and may be used to monitor antibiotic therapy. In pericarditis, the clinical value of scintigraphy has not been convincingly demonstrated. (orig.)

  7. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks

  8. Education and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Helene; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

    2013-01-01

    Educational-related gradients in coronary heart disease (CHD) and mediation by behavioral risk factors are plausible given previous research; however this has not been comprehensively addressed in absolute measures. Questionnaire data on health behavior of 69,513 participants, 52 % women, from...... seven Danish cohort studies were linked to registry data on education and incidence of CHD. Mediation by smoking, low physical activity, and body mass index (BMI) on the association between education and CHD were estimated by applying newly proposed methods for mediation based on the additive hazards...... model, and compared with results from the Cox proportional hazards model. Short (vs. long) education was associated with 277 (95 % CI: 219, 336) additional cases of CHD per 100,000 person-years at risk among women, and 461 (95 % CI: 368, 555) additional cases among men. Of these additional cases 17 (95...

  9. In vino veritas: alcohol and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joseph A

    2005-03-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies, numbering nearly 100, have documented an inverse association between alcohol consumption and vascular risk. The preponderance of evidence supports an independent beneficial effect of mild-to-moderate alcoholic beverage consumption on risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is important to remember that observational data cannot prove causation; unmeasured or incompletely controlled confounding factors cannot be excluded. That said, most authorities now attribute a causal role to the relationship: moderate alcohol consumption reduces the risk of CHD, and current research centers on the mechanistic underpinnings and whether patterns of drinking are important. Here, I review the association between alcohol use and CHD risk, explore putative mechanisms, and make recommendations.

  10. [Stress, mental disorders and coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederbogen, F; Ströhle, A

    2012-11-01

    There are numerous associations between stress, mental disorders and coronary heart disease (CHD). Exposure to an acute stressor leads to activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal and sympathoadrenal systems and chronic stressors are associated with sustained functional changes of these systems. Experiencing acute and chronic stress is paralleled by an increased incidence of mental disorders with the most consistent evidence on the triggering of major depressive episodes. Various mental disorders, including depression, anxiety and schizophrenia, are associated with an increased risk of CHD. Furthermore, acute and chronic stressors have been identified as risk factors or triggers of acute coronary syndromes. Thus therapeutic strategies aim at reducing subjective stress experience, therapy of mental disorders and treatment of cardiac risk factors known to be more prevalent in increased stress states and mental disorders.

  11. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity.

  12. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2011 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Véronique L.; Go, Alan S.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Adams, Robert J.; Berry, Jarett D.; Brown, Todd M.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Dai, Shifan; de Simone, Giovanni; Ford, Earl S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Fullerton, Heather J.; Gillespie, Cathleen; Greenlund, Kurt J.; Hailpern, Susan M.; Heit, John A.; Ho, P. Michael; Howard, Virginia J.; Kissela, Brett M.; Kittner, Steven J.; Lackland, Daniel T.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Makuc, Diane M.; Marcus, Gregory M.; Marelli, Ariane; Matchar, David B.; McDermott, Mary M.; Meigs, James B.; Moy, Claudia S.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Mussolino, Michael E.; Nichol, Graham; Paynter, Nina P.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Sorlie, Paul D.; Stafford, Randall S.; Turan, Tanya N.; Turner, Melanie B.; Wong, Nathan D.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Summary Each year, the American Heart Association (AHA), in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and other government agencies, brings together the most up-to-date statistics on heart disease, stroke, other vascular diseases, and their risk factors and presents them in its Heart Disease and Stroke Statistical Update. The Statistical Update is a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, healthcare policy makers, media professionals, the lay public, and many others who seek the best national data available on disease morbidity and mortality and the risks, quality of care, medical procedures and operations, and costs associated with the management of these diseases in a single document. Indeed, since 1999, the Statistical Update has been cited more than 8700 times in the literature (including citations of all annual versions). In 2009 alone, the various Statistical Updates were cited ≈1600 times (data from ISI Web of Science). In recent years, the Statistical Update has undergone some major changes with the addition of new chapters and major updates across multiple areas. For this year’s edition, the Statistics Committee, which produces the document for the AHA, updated all of the current chapters with the most recent nationally representative data and inclusion of relevant articles from the literature over the past year and added a new chapter detailing how family history and genetics play a role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Also, the 2011 Statistical Update is a major source for monitoring both cardiovascular health and disease in the population, with a focus on progress toward achievement of the AHA’s 2020 Impact Goals. Below are a few highlights from this year’s Update. Death Rates From CVD Have Declined, Yet the Burden of Disease Remains High The 2007 overall death rate from CVD (International Classification of Diseases 10, I00–I99) was 251.2 per 100 000. The rates were 294

  13. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-14

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty.

  14. A genetic future for coronary heart disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Kate; Martin, Paul

    2008-04-01

    This paper is concerned with changing conceptions of genetic disease. It is based on an analysis of biomedical literature and focuses on the treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD) in four published commentary papers. The aim of this analysis is to explore the ways in which CHD is constructed as genetic and the place of genetic discourses in the wider set of ideas that circulate about the disease. This analysis is then used to consider some of the claims of the geneticisation thesis (Lippman 1991, 1992). The analysis suggests that a genetic vision for understanding and managing CHD has emerged, which has many of the hallmarks of the geneticisation imagined by Lippman. However, a number of alternative and competing models of CHD are also supported within the biomedical discourse. These are related to the different disciplines with a stake in the field of CHD, and their struggles for authority. In conclusion, it is suggested that the geneticisation thesis, as a universal claim, is at odds with the diffuse and distributed nature of biomedical knowledge and practice. Rather than analysing geneticisation in a literal way, it may be more fruitful to see the thesis, itself, as a form of boundary work (Gieryn 1983).

  15. A cellular automaton framework for infectious disease spread simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Bernhard; Kugler, Karl; Tejada, Maria M; Baumgartner, Christian; Seger, Michael; Osl, Melanie; Netzer, Michael; Handler, Michael; Dander, Andreas; Wurz, Manfred; Graber, Armin; Tilg, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a cellular automaton framework for processing the spatiotemporal spread of infectious diseases is presented. The developed environment simulates and visualizes how infectious diseases might spread, and hence provides a powerful instrument for health care organizations to generate disease prevention and contingency plans. In this study, the outbreak of an avian flu like virus was modeled in the state of Tyrol, and various scenarios such as quarantine, effect of different medications on viral spread and changes of social behavior were simulated.The proposed framework is implemented using the programming language Java. The set up of the simulation environment requires specification of the disease parameters and the geographical information using a population density colored map, enriched with demographic data.The results of the numerical simulations and the analysis of the computed parameters will be used to get a deeper understanding of how the disease spreading mechanisms work, and how to protect the population from contracting the disease. Strategies for optimization of medical treatment and vaccination regimens will also be investigated using our cellular automaton framework.In this study, six different scenarios were simulated. It showed that geographical barriers may help to slow down the spread of an infectious disease, however, when an aggressive and deadly communicable disease spreads, only quarantine and controlled medical treatment are able to stop the outbreak, if at all.

  16. Prevalence and correlates of heart disease among adults in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, Louisa; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and it has been well established that it is associated with both mental and physical conditions. This paper describes the prevalence of heart disease with mental disorders and other chronic physical conditions among the Singapore resident population. Data were from the Singapore Mental Health Study which was a representative, cross-sectional epidemiological survey undertaken with 6616 Singapore residents, between December 2009 and December 2010. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 was used to establish the diagnosis of mental disorders, while a chronic medical conditions checklist was used to gather information on 15 physical conditions, including various forms of heart disease. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Euro-Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). The lifetime prevalence of heart disease was 2.8%. Socio-demographic correlates of heart disease included older age, Indian ethnicity, secondary education (vs. tertiary) and being economically inactive. After adjusting for socio-demographic variables and other comorbid physical and mental disorders, the prevalence of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder were significantly higher among those with heart disease, as were diabetes, arthritis, kidney failure and lung disease. These findings highlight important associations between heart disease and various socio-demographic correlates, mental disorders and physical conditions. Given the high prevalence of mood disorders among heart disease patients, timely and appropriate screening and treatment of mental disorders among this group is essential.

  17. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gandy, M.D., a cardiologist and chief medical marketing officer with the Piedmont Heart Institute in Atlanta and a volunteer with the American Heart Association. High blood pressure , obesity and diabetes are the ...

  18. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t even on Jennifer's radar. And when this television news reporter suffered a heart attack at age ... part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Sleep Apnea Research: The HeartBeat Study 06/07/2012 ...

  20. How Is Coronary Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... signs of a previous or current heart attack . Stress Testing During stress testing , you exercise to make ... 2009, this project provided six awards at five academic institutions to identify genetic connections to heart, lung, ...

  1. Critical Behavior in a Cellular Automata Animal Disease Transmission Model

    CERN Document Server

    Morley, P D; Chang, Julius

    2003-01-01

    Using a cellular automata model, we simulate the British Government Policy (BGP) in the 2001 foot and mouth epidemic in Great Britain. When clinical symptoms of the disease appeared on a farm, there is mandatory slaughter (culling) of all livestock on an infected premise (IP). Those farms that neighbor an IP (contiguous premise, CP), are also culled, aka nearest neighbor interaction. Farms where the disease may be prevalent from animal, human, vehicle or airborne transmission (dangerous contact, DC), are additionally culled, aka next-to-nearest neighbor iteractions and lightning factor. The resulting mathematical model possesses a phase transition, whereupon if the physical disease transmission kernel exceeds a critical value, catastrophic loss of animals ensues. The non-local disease transport probability can be as low as .01% per day and the disease can still be in the high mortality phase. We show that the fundamental equation for sustainable disease transport is the criticality equation for neutron fissio...

  2. Frequency of craniofacial pain in patients with ischemic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bakhshi, Mahin; Rezaei, Rezvan; Baharvand, Maryam; Bakhtiari, Sedigheh

    2017-01-01

    Background Referred craniofacial pain of cardiac origin might be the only symptom of ischemic heart accidents. This study aimed to determine the frequency of craniofacial pain in patients with ischemic heart disease. Material and Methods This cross-sectional study was accomplished on 296 patients who met the criteria of having ischemic heart disease. Data regarding demographics, medical history and referred craniofacial pain were recorded in data forms. In addition, patients underwent oral ex...

  3. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... veins that go from the lungs to the heart. Fluid leaks into the lungs and causes shortness of ... another sign of a heart problem. When your heart doesn't work as ... legs. This causes fluid to build up in your tissues. You may ...

  4. An Update on Gender Disparities in Coronary Heart Disease Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Tina; Palaskas, Nicolas; Ahmed, Ameera

    2016-05-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), traditionally considered a male disease, causes far more deaths in women than cancer. The prevalence of CHD is lower in women at any age, but with advancing age, this differential decreases. The clinical outcomes including myocardial infarction mortality, all-cause mortality, and reinfarction rates are also worse in women with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) than in men. Yet, women appear to be underdiagnosed and undertreated for coronary heart disease. There is still a gap in the knowledge, understanding, and general awareness of CHD in women. This review provides updates in gender disparities in the management of risk factors, treatments, and outcomes of coronary heart disease.

  5. Atrial fibrillation, ischaemic heart disease, and the risk of death in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Søndergaard, Peter; Nielsen, Tonny

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a risk factor for death in patients with a myocardial infarction, but highly variable results are reported in patients with heart failure. We studied the prognostic impact of AF in heart failure patients with and without ischaemic heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS......: During a period of 2 years, 3587 patients admitted to hospital because of heart failure were included in this study. All patients were examined by echocardiography and the presence of AF was recorded. Follow-up was available for 8 years. Twenty four percent of those discharged alive from hospital had AF......), 1.02-1.23, P=0.018]. There was a significant interaction between the importance of AF and the presence of ischaemic heart disease (P=0.034). In patients with AF at the time of discharge and ischaemic heart disease, HR was 1.25 (95% CI: 1.09-1.42) and P

  6. Diagnosing Coronary Heart Disease using Ensemble Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen H. Miao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Globally, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. One in every four people is afflicted with and dies of heart disease. Early and accurate diagnoses of heart disease thus are crucial in improving the chances of long-term survival for patients and saving millions of lives. In this research, an advanced ensemble machine learning technology, utilizing an adaptive Boosting algorithm, is developed for accurate coronary heart disease diagnosis and outcome predictions. The developed ensemble learning classification and prediction models were applied to 4 different data sets for coronary heart disease diagnosis, including patients diagnosed with heart disease from Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF, Hungarian Institute of Cardiology (HIC, Long Beach Medical Center (LBMC, and Switzerland University Hospital (SUH. The testing results showed that the developed ensemble learning classification and prediction models achieved model accuracies of 80.14% for CCF, 89.12% for HIC, 77.78% for LBMC, and 96.72% for SUH, exceeding the accuracies of previously published research. Therefore, coronary heart disease diagnoses derived from the developed ensemble learning classification and prediction models are reliable and clinically useful, and can aid patients globally, especially those from developing countries and areas where there are few heart disease diagnostic specialists.

  7. [Passive smoking and the risk of coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 10 years it has become clear that passive smoking is correlated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. The relative risk of 25-30% is comparable to that of lung cancer due to passive smoking. Since coronary heart disease is the most common cause of death, it is likely that p

  8. Sports participation in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Opic (Petra); E.M.W.J. Utens (Elisabeth); J.A.A.E. Cuypers (Judith); M. Witsenburg (Maarten); A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); Domburg, R.V. (Ron Van); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); H. Boersma (Eric); Pelliccia, A. (Antonio); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: It is unclearwhether sports participation in adultswith repaired congenital heart disease is safe and has benefits. Methods: Congenital heart disease (ConHD) patients who underwent corrective surgery for Atrial Septal Defect, Ventricular Septal Defect, Pulmonary Stenosis, Tet

  9. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population.

  10. Adult Congenital Heart Disease with Focus on Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P.E. Ruys (Titia)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe prevalence of Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) has been described to be 8,2 per 1000 live births in European countries.(1) Congenital heart disease is a collective term for a large number of different diagnoses with different anatomical substrate, complexity and prognosis. The most

  11. Genetically elevated bilirubin and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Frikke-Schmidt, R; Nordestgaard, B G

    2013-01-01

    Elevated plasma levels of bilirubin, an endogenous antioxidant, have been associated with reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Whether this is a causal relationship remains unclear.......Elevated plasma levels of bilirubin, an endogenous antioxidant, have been associated with reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Whether this is a causal relationship remains unclear....

  12. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublished...

  13. Adult Congenital Heart Disease with Focus on Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P.E. Ruys (Titia)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe prevalence of Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) has been described to be 8,2 per 1000 live births in European countries.(1) Congenital heart disease is a collective term for a large number of different diagnoses with different anatomical substrate, complexity and prognosis. The most com

  14. Nonfasting glucose, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; McCarthy, Mark I

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether elevated nonfasting glucose levels associate with and cause ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI).......The purpose of this study was to test whether elevated nonfasting glucose levels associate with and cause ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI)....

  15. A vital role for complement in heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena;

    2014-01-01

    Heart diseases are common and significant contributors to worldwide mortality and morbidity. During recent years complement mediated inflammation has been shown to be an important player in a variety of heart diseases. Despite some negative results from clinical trials using complement inhibitors...

  16. Estrogen and ischemic heart disease in females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stević-Gajić Vesna

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although ischemic heart disease (IHD develops in both genders under the influence of the same risk factors, it is much less frequent among female population, which is mostly assigned to favorable effects of estrogen. Objective: Since latest investigations have pointed to higher incidence of disease in female population, the objective of our study was to examine the relation between estrogen and other clinical and biochemical parameters significant for its manifestation. Method: The relation between estrogen levels and frequency of obesity, diabetes, hypertension as well as the levels of total, HDL, LDL i VLDL cholesterol, triglycerides, Lp(a, apoprotein A i B i PAI-1 was analyzed in 50 (25 pre- and postmenopausal patients, treated due to IHD in the Health Center, Krusevac, in 2002 year. Results: Low concentration of estrogen was found in 22 (44% patients. In addition, frequency of diabetes, obesity and risky levels of high atherogenic lipid fractions (total and LDL cholesterol, Lp(a, apoprotein B was insignificantly higher, whereas the concentrations of PAI 1, triglycerides and HDL cholesterol were lower, with significant correlation between estrogen level and PAI-1 (T=0.32, p<0.05. Conclusion: Despite all past investigations, numerous questions related to high incidence of IHD among premenopausal women, have remained open - whether it occurs as a consequence of reduced estrogen synthesis, lower expression of estrogen receptors, their modified function or maybe concomitant influence of other risk factors, not necessarily connected with sex, that eliminate protective effects of this hormone.

  17. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and skin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, D.A.; Lee, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a recently described mechanism of immunologic lysis in which cellular targets sensitized by specific antibodies are efficiently and selectively lysed by Fc receptor (FcR) bearing nonspecific effectors. Immunoglobulins of various classes (IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE) and various cellular effectors (large granular lymphocytes, monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils) can induce ADCC in vitro, and the importance of ADCC in vivo is being tested experimentally in resistance to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection, in tumor surveillance, in allograft rejection, and in inflammatory diseases. There is much indirect evidence that ADCC may be the mechanism of damage of different cellular targets in skin diseases, but the best direct evidence concerns immunologic keratinocyte damage, especially in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). The authors have shown that keratinocytes of several species are highly susceptible to lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC, but not to neutrophil or eosinophil ADCC in vitro using two different cytotoxicity assays. In contrast, complement was a relatively ineffective mediator of lysis of metabolically intact keratinocyte targets. Patients with certain cutaneous lupus syndromes have serum antibodies capable of inducing monocyte and lymphocyte ADCC of targets coated with extractable nuclear antigens. The authors have shown that these antigens apparently move to the cell membrane of keratinocytes in vitro following ultraviolet irradiation. In an animal model, they have shown that antibodies to SSA/Ro bind to human keratinocytes in vivo, especially after ultraviolet irradiation.

  18. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  19. Heart disease link to fetal hypoxia and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giussani, Dino A; Niu, Youguo; Herrera, Emilio A; Richter, Hans G; Camm, Emily J; Thakor, Avnesh S; Kane, Andrew D; Hansell, Jeremy A; Brain, Kirsty L; Skeffington, Katie L; Itani, Nozomi; Wooding, F B Peter; Cross, Christine M; Allison, Beth J

    2014-01-01

    The quality of the intrauterine environment interacts with our genetic makeup to shape the risk of developing disease in later life. Fetal chronic hypoxia is a common complication of pregnancy. This chapter reviews how fetal chronic hypoxia programmes cardiac and endothelial dysfunction in the offspring in adult life and discusses the mechanisms via which this may occur. Using an integrative approach in large and small animal models at the in vivo, isolated organ, cellular and molecular levels, our programmes of work have raised the hypothesis that oxidative stress in the fetal heart and vasculature underlies the mechanism via which prenatal hypoxia programmes cardiovascular dysfunction in later life. Developmental hypoxia independent of changes in maternal nutrition promotes fetal growth restriction and induces changes in the cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrine systems of the adult offspring, which are normally associated with disease states during ageing. Treatment with antioxidants of animal pregnancies complicated with reduced oxygen delivery to the fetus prevents the alterations in fetal growth, and the cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrine dysfunction in the fetal and adult offspring. The work reviewed offers both insight into mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for clinical intervention against the early origin of cardiometabolic disease in pregnancy complicated by fetal chronic hypoxia.

  20. Device complications in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Robert M; Dewland, Thomas A; Moyers, Brian; Vittinghoff, Eric; Tanel, Ronn E; Marcus, Gregory M; Tseng, Zian H

    2015-02-01

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are increasingly implanted in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD), but little is known about implant-related complications and mortality. The purpose of this study was to compare pacemaker and ICD implantation complication rates between adults with and those without CHD using a comprehensive, statewide database. We used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database to identify initial transvenous pacemaker and ICD implantations and implant-related complications in California hospitals from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2011. We calculated relative risks of implant-related complications by comparing those with and those without CHD using Poisson regression with robust standard errors, adjusting for age and medical comorbidities. We identified 105,852 patients undergoing pacemaker implantation, 1465 with noncomplex CHD and 66 with complex CHD. CHD was not associated with increased risk of pacemaker implant-related complications: adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-1.14, P = .45. We identified 32,948 patients undergoing ICD implantation, 815 with noncomplex CHD and 87 with complex CHD. Patients with CHD had increased risk of ICD implant-related complications: aRR 1.36, 95% CI 1.05-1.76, P = .02. Patients with complex CHD had greater increased risk of ICD implant-related complications: aRR 2.14, 95% CI 1.16-3.95, P = .02. In patients receiving devices, CHD was associated with a trend toward lower 30-day in-hospital mortality after pacemaker (P = .07) and ICD (P = .19) implantation. Among adult patients undergoing device implantation in California, CHD was associated with increased risk of ICD implant-related complications, but not pacemaker implant-related complications or higher 30-day in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Secondary athrocytotic cardiomyopathy--heart damage due to Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaduk, B; Metze, K; Schmidt, P F; Brandt, G

    1980-01-01

    Post-mortem atomic absorption spectrophotometry of the myocardium of a 14-year-old boy revealed a hundred-fold increase in copper. Further electrolyte analysis of the myocardium showed changes corresponding to metabolic heart muscle damage. Ultrastructural examination showed all the feature of a cardiomyopathy at the cellular level. Laser-Microprobe-Mass-Analysis demonstrated an inhomogeneous distribution of copper. An essential factor in the mechanism of death is heart damage.

  2. Cellular immunity and immunopathology in autoimmune Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratland, Eirik; Husebye, Eystein S

    2011-04-10

    Autoimmune adrenocortical failure, or Addison's disease, is a prototypical organ-specific autoimmune disorder. In common with related autoimmune endocrinopathies, Addison's disease is only manageable to a certain extent with replacement therapy being the only treatment option. Unfortunately, the available therapy does not restore the physiological hormone levels and biorhythm. The key to progress in treating and preventing autoimmune Addison's disease lies in improving our understanding of the predisposing factors, the mechanisms responsible for the progression of the disease, and the interactions between adrenal antigens and effector cells and molecules of the immune system. The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge on the role of T cells and cellular immunity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune Addison's disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cellular transport of L-histidine in Hartnup disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, S; Hygstedt, O; Jagenburg, R; Sjaastad, O

    1969-08-01

    The urinary excretion, the intestinal absorption, and the elimination of histidine from blood were studied in two patients with Hartnup disease. On standard diet the patients lost a great proportion of the dietary histidine in the urine, whereas the fecal loss was negligible. A high oral dose of L-histidine gave only a slight increase in plasma histidine and no increase in fecal histidine, but a considerable increase in the urinary histidine output. Intravenously administered L-histidine was eliminated more rapidly than in controls. The lack of increase in plasma histidine after the oral loading may be explained by the rapid elimination from the blood. This was mainly due to a rapid cellular uptake of histidine which is supposed to be a normal reaction of histidine-deprived cells. Thus the only obvious defect in the histidine transport in Hartnup disease is the reabsorption defect in the renal tubules. A generally impaired cellular transport of L-histidine is improbable.

  4. Incidence of congenital heart disease in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xue-yong; LI Xiao-feng; L(U) Xiao-dong; LIU Ying-long

    2009-01-01

    Background The incidence of congenital heart disease has been studied in developed countries for many years, but rarely in the mainland of China. Fetal echocardiographic screening for congenital heart disease was first performed in Beijing in the early 2000s, but the impact was not clear. The current study was undertaken to determine the incidence of congenital heart disease in Beijing, China and to estimate the impact of fetal echocardiography on the incidence of liveborn congenital heart disease.Methods The study involved all infants with congenital heart disease among the 84 062 total births in Beijing during the period of January 1 and December 31, 2007. An echocardiographic examination was performed on every baby suspected to have congenital heart disease, prenatally or/and postnatally.Results A total of 686 infants were shown to have congenital heart disease among 84 062 total births. The overall incidence was 8.2/1000 total births. Mothers of 128 of 151 babies diagnosed prenatally were chosen to terminate the pregnancy. Two of the 151 infants died in utero. A specific lesion was identified for each infant and the frequencies of lesions were determined for each class of infants (total births, stillbirths and live births). The incidence of congenital heart disease in stillbirths and live births was 168.8/1000 and 6.7/1000, respectively. The difference between the incidence of total birth and the incidence of live birth was statistically significant (P<0.001).Conclusions The incidence of liveborn congenital heart disease in Beijing is within the range reported in developed countries. Fetal echocardiography reduce significantly the incidence of livebom congenital heart disease.

  5. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Nagib Gaui

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. Objective: To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast, from 1996 to 2011. Methods: Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Results: Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Conclusions: Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  6. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib, E-mail: engaui@cardiol.br; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Klein, Carlos Henrique [Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sérgio Arouca da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-06-15

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  7. Heart Rate and Cardiovascular Disease: An Alternative to Beta Blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Liang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ivabradine, an If inhibitor, acts primarily on the sinoatrial node and is used to reduce the heart rate with minimal effect on myocardial contractility, blood pressure, and intracardiac conduction. Heart rate reduction is an important aspect of care in patients with chronic stable angina and heart failure. Many patients with coronary artery disease have coexisting asthma or chronic obstructive airway disease, and most of them are unable to tolerate beta blockers. Ivabradine may thus be a useful medicine in therapeutic heart rate management especially in patients who are intolerant of beta-blockers.

  8. Heart failure in the general Danish population and among individuals with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach

    MI. Yet, the treatment of heart failure has also improved. It is unknown to what extent the incidence, prevalence and survival with heart failure in the general population and among patients with ischemic heart disease has changed over time. Aim The aim of this study is to estimate incidence...... and prevalence of heart failure (HF) in the Danish population and among individuals with ischemic heart disease (IHD) during 1996-2006, applying register data from the national patient register (NPR) and the national dispensing register (NDR). Data and methods All Danish inhabitants (aged >15) by January 1996......Background The incidence and fatality of acute myocardial infarction (MI) has decreased during the last decade - due to both improved medical treatment and a shift toward a healthier lifestyle. The consequence of the improved treatment is likely to be a falling incidens of heart failure following...

  9. Advanced imaging in valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria

    2017-04-01

    Although echocardiography remains the mainstay imaging technique for the evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), innovations in noninvasive imaging in the past few years have provided new insights into the pathophysiology and quantification of VHD, early detection of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, and advanced prognostic assessment. The severity grading of valve dysfunction has been refined with the use of Doppler echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and CT imaging. LV ejection fraction remains an important criterion when deciding whether patients should be referred for surgery. However, echocardiographic strain imaging can now detect impaired LV systolic function before LV ejection fraction reduces, thus provoking the debate on whether patients with severe VHD should be referred for surgery at an earlier stage (before symptom onset). Impaired LV strain correlates with the amount of myocardial fibrosis detected with CMR techniques. Furthermore, accumulating data show that the extent of fibrosis associated with severe VHD has important prognostic implications. The present Review focuses on using these novel imaging modalities to assess pathophysiology, early LV dysfunction, and prognosis of major VHDs, including aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation, and aortic regurgitation.

  10. Right Ventricular Adaptation in Congenital Heart Diseases

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    Beatrijs Bartelds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last four decades, enormous progress has been made in the treatment of congenital heart diseases (CHD; most patients now survive into adulthood, albeit with residual lesions. As a consequence, the focus has shifted from initial treatment to long-term morbidity and mortality. An important predictor for long-term outcome is right ventricular (RV dysfunction, but knowledge on the mechanisms of RV adaptation and dysfunction is still scarce. This review will summarize the main features of RV adaptation to CHD, focusing on recent knowledge obtained in experimental models of the most prevalent abnormal loading conditions, i.e., pressure load and volume load. Models of increased pressure load for the RV have shown a similar pattern of responses, i.e., increased contractility, RV dilatation and hypertrophy. Evidence is accumulating that RV failure in response to increased pressure load is marked by progressive diastolic dysfunction. The mechanisms of this progressive dysfunction are insufficiently known. The RV response to pressure load shares similarities with that of the LV, but also has specific features, e.g., capillary rarefaction, oxidative stress and inflammation. The contribution of these pathways to the development of failure needs further exploration. The RV adaptation to increased volume load is an understudied area, but becomes increasingly important in the growing groups of survivors of CHD, especially with tetralogy of Fallot. Recently developed animal models may add to the investigation of the mechanisms of RV adaptation and failure, leading to the development of new RV-specific therapies.

  11. Familial congenital heart disease in Bandung, Indonesia

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    Sri Endah Rahayuningsih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart disease (CHD may occur in several members of a family. Studies have shown that familial genetic factor play a role in CHD.Objective To identify familial recurrences of CHD in families with at least one member treated for CHD in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung Indonesia.Methods In this descriptive study, subjects were CHD patients hospitalized or treated from January 2005 to December 2011. We constructed family pedigrees for five families.Results During the study period, there were 1,779 patients with CHD. We found 5 families with 12 familial CHD cases, consisting of 8 boys and 4 girls. Defects observed in these 12 patients were tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, persistent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, tricuspid atresia, pulmonary stenosis, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Persistent ductus arteriosus was the most frequently observed defect (4 out of 12 subjects. None of the families had a history of consanguinity. The recurrence risk of CHD among siblings was calculated to be 0.67%, and the recurrence risk of CHD among cousins was 0.16%.Conclusion Familial CHD may indicate the need for genetic counseling and further pedigree analysis.

  12. Familial congenital heart disease in Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Endah Rahayuningsih

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart disease (CHD may occur in several members of a family. Studies have shown that familial genetic factor play a role in CHD. Objective To identify familial recurrences of CHD in families with at least one member treated for CHD in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung Indonesia. Methods In this descriptive study, subjects were CHD patients hospitalized or treated from January 2005 to December 2011. We constructed family pedigrees for five families. Results During the study period, there were 1,779 patients with CHD. We found 5 families with 12 familial CHD cases, consisting of 8 boys and 4 girls. Defects observed in these 12 patients were tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, persistent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, tricuspid atresia, pulmonary stenosis, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Persistent ductus arteriosus was the most frequently observed defect (4 out of 12 subjects. None of the families had a history of consanguinity. The recurrence risk of CHD among siblings was calculated to be 0.67%, and the recurrence risk of CHD among cousins was 0.16%. Conclusion Familial CHD may indicate the need for genetic counseling and further pedigree analysis. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:173-6.

  13. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, J Simon R; Martinez, Fernando; Semigran, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol; Seeger, Werner

    2013-12-24

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), a common complication of left heart diseases (LHD), negatively impacts symptoms, exercise capacity, and outcome. Although the true prevalence of PH-LHD is unknown, a subset of patients might present significant PH that cannot be explained by a passive increase in left-sided filling pressures. The term "out-of-proportion" PH has been used to identify that population without a clear definition, which has been found less than ideal and created confusion. We propose a change in terminology and a new definition of PH due to LHD. We suggest to abandon "out-of-proportion" PH and to distinguish "isolated post-capillary PH" from "post-capillary PH with a pre-capillary component" on the basis of the pressure difference between diastolic pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Although there is no validated treatment for PH-LHD, we provide insights into management and discuss completed and randomized trials in this condition. Finally, we provide recommendations for future clinical trials to establish safety and efficacy of novel compounds to target this area of unmet medical need. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cellular Senescence and the Biology of Aging, Disease, and Frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Tchkonia, Tamara; Kirkland, James L

    2015-01-01

    Population aging simultaneously highlights the remarkable advances in science, medicine, and public policy, and the formidable challenges facing society. Indeed, aging is the primary risk factor for many of the most common chronic diseases and frailty, which result in profound social and economic costs. Population aging also reveals an opportunity, i.e. interventions to disrupt the fundamental biology of aging could significantly delay the onset of age-related conditions as a group, and, as a result, extend the healthy life span, or health span. There is now considerable evidence that cellular senescence is an underlying mechanism of aging and age-related conditions. Cellular senescence is a process in which cells lose the ability to divide and damage neighboring cells by the factors they secrete, collectively referred to as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Herein, we discuss the concept of cellular senescence, review the evidence that implicates cellular senescence and SASP in age-related deterioration, hyperproliferation, and inflammation, and propose that this underlying mechanism of aging may play a fundamental role in the biology of frailty.

  15. Gut microbiota, diet, and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Julia M W; Esfahani, Amin; Singh, Natasha; Villa, Christopher R; Mirrahimi, Arash; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C

    2012-01-01

    Modulation of the gut microbiota is an area of growing interest, particularly for its link to improving and maintaining the systemic health of the host. It has been suggested to have potential to reduce risk factors associated with chronic diseases, such as elevated cholesterol levels in coronary heart disease (CHD). Diets of our evolutionary ancestors were largely based on plant foods, high in dietary fiber and fermentable substrate, and our gut microbiota has evolved against a background of such diets. Therapeutic diets that mimic plant-based diets from the early phases of human evolution may result in drug-like cholesterol reductions. In contrast, typical Western diets low in dietary fiber and fermentable substrate, and high in saturated and trans fatty acids, are likely contributors to the increased need for pharmacological agents for cholesterol reduction. The gut microbiota of those consuming a Western diet are likely underutilized and depleted of metabolic fuels, resulting in a less than optimal gut microbial profile. As a result, this diet is mismatched to our archaic gut microbiota and, therefore, to our genome, which has changed relatively little since humans first appeared. While the exact mechanism by which the gut microbiota may modulate cholesterol levels still remains uncertain, end products of bacterial fermentation, particularly the short chain fatty acids (i.e., propionate), have been suggested as potential candidates. While more research is required to clarify the potential link between gut microbiota and CHD risk reduction, consuming a therapeutic diet rich in plant foods, dietary fiber, and fermentable substrate would be a useful strategy for improving systemic health, possibly by altering the gut microbiota.

  16. Heart rate and heart rate variability in dogs with different degrees of myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth;

    2011-01-01

    HEART RATE AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN DOGS WITH DIFFERENT DEGREES OF MYXOMATOUS MITRAL VALVE DISEASE. CE Rasmussen1, T Falk1, NE Zois1, SG Moesgaard1, HD Pedersen2, J Häggström3 and LH Olsen1. 1. Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University...... of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. 2. Novo Nordic A/S, Maaloev, Denmark. 3. Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden. Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indirect measurement of the autonomic modulation of heart rate (HR). Reduced HRV measured from short......-time electrocardiography is seen in dogs with heart failure (HF) secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). However, HRV is suggested to increase with disease severity at early stages of MMVD. The aims of this study were 1) to associate HR and HRV with severity of MMVD in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS...

  17. [The cellular immunity indices of patients with a rheumatic heart defect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manev, V; Grigorov, M; Penkova, K; Chaushev, A; Ramshev, K; Topalov, I; Leseva, N; Ivanov, G; Ivanova, I; Nedialkova, V

    1990-01-01

    In 29 patients with clinical diagnosis of rheumatic valvular disease the quantitative values of active rosettes and the specific sensitization to human heart myosin were examined. The specific sensitization to human heart myosin was examined by two methods concurrently: method of inhibiting leucocyte migration in agarose and method for direct specific lymphocytolysis with myosin. The results were compared with those of 44 clinically healthy controls. In the patients with rheumatic valvular disease (RVD) the values of the active rosettes are significantly lower (p less than 0.01) than in the healthy controls. With the method of direct specific lymphocytolysis with myosin statistically significant sensibilization of the lymphocytes to myosin was found in the patients with RVD (p less than 0.001). In 5 patients examined before and after operation it was established that 2-4 weeks after a successful correction of the hemodynamics the specific sensibilization of the lymphocytes to myosin was no more present.

  18. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  19. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-06-02

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect.

  20. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart while you exercise. If you can’t exercise, you may be given medicine to raise your heart rate. Urinalysis For this test, you'll give a sample of urine for analysis. The sample is checked for abnormal levels of protein or blood cells. In people who have diabetes, protein in ...

  1. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greutmann, Matthias; Pieper, Petronella G.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects. Major advances in open-heart surgery have led to rapidly evolving cohorts of adult survivors and the majority of affected women now survive to childbearing age. The risk of cardiovascular complications during pregnancy and peripartum depend

  2. The epidemic of the 20(th) century: coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalen, James E; Alpert, Joseph S; Goldberg, Robert J; Weinstein, Ronald S

    2014-09-01

    Heart disease was an uncommon cause of death in the US at the beginning of the 20th century. By mid-century it had become the commonest cause. After peaking in the mid-1960s, the number of heart disease deaths began a marked decline that has persisted to the present. The increase in heart disease deaths from the early 20th century until the 1960s was due to an increase in the prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis with resultant coronary heart disease, as documented by autopsy studies. This increase was associated with an increase in smoking and dietary changes leading to an increase in serum cholesterol levels. In addition, the ability to diagnose acute myocardial infarction with the aid of the electrocardiogram increased the recognition of coronary heart disease before death. The substantial decrease in coronary heart disease deaths after the mid-1960s is best explained by the decreased incidence, and case fatality rate, of acute myocardial infarction and a decrease in out-of-hospital sudden coronary heart disease deaths. These decreases are very likely explained by a decrease in coronary atherosclerosis due to primary prevention, and a decrease in the progression of nonobstructive coronary atherosclerosis to obstructive coronary heart disease due to efforts of primary and secondary prevention. In addition, more effective treatment of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction has led to a substantial decrease in deaths due to acute myocardial infarction. It is very likely that the 20th century was the only century in which heart disease was the most common cause of death in America.

  3. Acquired heart conditions in adults with congenital heart disease: a growing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutarel, Oktay

    2014-09-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing due to the great achievements in the field of paediatric cardiology, congenital heart surgery and intensive care medicine over the last decades. Mortality has shifted away from the infant and childhood period towards adulthood. As congenital heart disease patients get older, a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is encountered similar to the general population. Consequently, the contribution of acquired morbidities, especially acquired heart conditions to patient outcome, is becoming increasingly important. Therefore, to continue the success story of the last decades in the treatment of congenital heart disease and to further improve the outcome of these patients, more attention has to be given to the prevention, detection and adequate therapy of acquired heart conditions. The aim of this review is to give an overview about acquired heart conditions that may be encountered in adults with congenital heart disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Vasculogenic and hematopoietic cellular progenitors are scattered within the prenatal mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Madej, Maria; Niderla-Bielińska, Justyna; Ruminski, Sławomir; Flaht-Zabost, Aleksandra; Czarnowska, Elzbieta; Gula, Grzegorz; Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota M; Ratajska, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Vasculogenesis and hematopoiesis are co-localized in the embryonic body, but precise phenotypes of the cells contributing to these processes are not defined. The aim of this study was to characterize phenotypic profiles and location of putative vasculogenic and hematopoietic cellular progenitors in the embryonic mouse heart. Confocal microscopy, as well as ultrastructural and stereomicroscopic analyses, was performed on immunohistochemical whole-mount-stained or sectioned hearts at stages 11.5-14 dpc. A FASC analysis was conducted to quantify putative vasculogenic and hematopoietic cells. We found subepicardial blood islands in the form of foci of accumulation of cells belonging to erythroblastic and megakaryocytic lineages at various stages of maturation, exhibiting phenotypes: GATA2(+)/CD41(+), GATA2(-)/CD41(+), GATA2(+)/CD71(-), GATA2(-)/CD71(+), Fli1(+)/CD71(+), Fli1(-)/CD71(+), with a majority of cells expressing the Ter119 antigen, but none of them expressing Flk1. The subepicardium and the outflow tract endothelium were recognized to be the areas where progenitor cells were scattered or adjoining the endothelial cells. These progenitor cells were characterized as possessing the following antigens: CD45(+)/Fli1(+), CD41(+)/Flk1(+), Flk1(+)/Fli1(+). A FACS analysis demonstrated that the CD41/Flk1 double-positive population of cells constituted 2.68% of total cell population isolated from 12.5 dpc hearts. Vessels and tubules were positive for CD31, Flk1, Fli1, Tie2, including blood islands endothelia. The endocardial wall endothelia were found to function as an anchoring apparatus for megakaryocytes releasing platelets into the cardiac cavities. Phenotypic characteristics of vasculogenic (Flk1(+)/Fli1(+)) and hematopoietic (GATA2(+)/CD71(+), CD41(+)/GATA2(+)) progenitors, as well as the putative hemogenic endothelium (Flk1(+)/CD41(+)) in embryonic mouse hearts, have been presented. Cardiac blood islands, the subepicardium and endothelium of the outflow tract

  5. Management of the sick neonate with suspected heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Paul A; Penny, Daniel J

    2008-03-01

    A proportion of symptomatic neonates with congenital heart disease have lesions requiring urgent stabilisation. Despite increasing antenatal diagnoses, the importance of early recognition of symptomatic neonates is highlighted by the fact that up to 10% of all deaths in congenital heart disease continue to occur in children undiagnosed at the time of death. Specific anatomical knowledge of the many complex lesions is not required for good early management. The focus of this article is the specific symptom complexes in critically ill neonates with congenital heart disease, initial management strategies for stabilization and transfer to specialist centres, and issues in the ongoing preoperative care.

  6. Pathogenetic relationship between coronary heart disease and osteopenic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Mykhailovskaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the comorbidity problem of coronary heart disease and osteoporosis is caused by the rising prevalence, lack of early detection, prevention, severe complications and significant impact on the quality of life of the patients. Aim. In order to compile and submit a current point of view on the pathogenetic relationship between the coronary heart disease and the osteopenic syndrome we reviewed specialized literature. Conclusion. We established that coronary heart disease and osteoporosis have common mechanisms of progression involving a cascade of proinflammatory cytokines, osteoprotegerin, endothelial dysfunction, estrogen, calcium deficiency, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous system.

  7. Sedentary lifestyle and state variation in coronary heart disease mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, K K; Anda, R F; Macera, C A; Donehoo, R S; Eaker, E D

    1995-01-01

    Using linear regression, the authors demonstrated a strong association between State-specific coronary heart disease mortality rates and State prevalence of sedentary lifestyle (r2 = 0.34; P = 0.0002) that remained significant after controlling for the prevalence of diagnosed hypertension, smoking, and overweight among the State's population. This ecologic analysis suggests that sedentary lifestyle may explain State variation in coronary heart disease mortality and reinforces the need to include physical activity promotion as a part of programs in the States to prevent heart disease. PMID:7838933

  8. Spectrum of congenital heart diseases in Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Mohd; Chowdhary, J; Khajuria, K; Reyaz, A M

    2009-12-01

    A retrospective analysis of case-records data of 53,653 patients (0-18 years) over a two and half year period was conducted to ascertain the spectrum of congenital heart diseases. Two hundred and twenty one patients were found having congenital heart diseases; a prevalence of 4.1/1000. Ventricular septal defect (VSD) was the most frequent lesion seen in 69 (31.2%), followed by patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in 36 (16.3%) children. Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) was the most frequent cyanotic heart disease seen in 17 (7.8%) patients.

  9. Arterial hypertension, microalbuminuria, and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J S; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Strandgaard, S

    2000-01-01

    Albumin excretion in urine is positively correlated with the presence of ischemic heart disease and atherosclerotic risk factors. We studied prospectively whether a slight increase of urinary albumin excretion, ie, microalbuminuria, adds to the increased risk of ischemic heart disease among...... hypertensive subjects. In 1983 and 1984, blood pressure, urinary albumin/creatinine concentration ratio, plasma total and HDL cholesterol levels, body mass index, and smoking status were obtained in a population-based sample of 2085 subjects, aged 30 to 60 years, who were free from ischemic heart disease......, diabetes mellitus, and renal or urinary tract disease. Untreated arterial hypertension or borderline hypertension was present in 204 subjects, who were followed until 1993 by the National Hospital and Death Certificate Registers with respect to development of ischemic heart disease. During 1978 person...

  10. Assessment of Diastolic Function in Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Dilveer Kaur; Burch, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Diastolic function is an important component of left ventricular (LV) function which is often overlooked. It can cause symptoms of heart failure in patients even in the presence of normal systolic function. The parameters used to assess diastolic function often measure flow and are affected by the loading conditions of the heart. The interpretation of diastolic function in the context of congenital heart disease requires some understanding of the effects of the lesions themselves on these parameters. Individual congenital lesions will be discussed in this paper. Recently, load-independent techniques have led to more accurate measurements of ventricular compliance and remodeling in heart disease. The combination of inflow velocities and tissue Doppler measurements can be used to estimate diastolic function and LV filling pressures. This review focuses on diastolic function and assessment in congenital heart disease.

  11. Echocardiographic pattern of acquired heart diseases in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyo Effiong Ekpe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acquired heart diseases (AHDs are present from childhood to old age, and the frequency of pathology differs according to age and the geographical region of the patients. The aim of this study was to document the echocardiographic patterns of AHDs in our setting. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of echocardiographic diagnosis of AHD was done for age, sex, and echocardiographic pattern. Results: There were 190 diagnoses in the 163 patients with 27 patients having a double diagnosis, consisting of 88 (54% males and 75 (46% females. The mean age was 50.4 years (age range 9-85 years. Ten types of acquired heart pathologies were identified and they included hypertensive heart disease in 49.47%, rheumatic heart disease in 26.32%, cardiomyopathy in 11.05%, endomyocardial fibrosis in 4.74%, and pericarditis in 3.68%. Others were cor pulmonale, pulmonary hypertension, intracardiac thrombi, left atrial myxoma and degenerative heart disease which accounted for the remaining 4.74%. Conclusion: This study identifies 10 types of AHDs among the study population. The huge impact of hypertensive heart disease and rheumatic heart disease is a big indicator pointing to the existence of a sub-optimal level of healthcare in the country.

  12. Congenital heart disease in Mexico: advances of the regionalization project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Cervantes-Salazar, Jorge; Curi-Curi, Pedro; Ramírez-Marroquín, Samuel

    2013-04-01

    Consistent with the mission of the World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery to promote health care for children with congenital heart disease all around the world, a Mexican Association of Specialists in Congenital Heart Disease (abbreviated in Spanish as AMECC) was created in Mexico in 2008. Our efforts were coordinated with those of the National Health Secretary with the objective being implementation of a national plan for regionalization of care for patients with congenital heart disease. To improve our knowledge related to technologic and human resources for management of congenital heart disease, we developed a national survey. Finally, a national database was created for collecting all Mexican centers' information related to congenital heart disease care in order to quantify the advances related to the proposed plans. The database utilized international consensus nomenclature. The aim of this article is to show the sequence of our actions in relation to direct accomplishments and the current status of congenital heart disease care in Mexico. This article emphasizes the main aspects of these actions: regionalization project implementation, national survey results, and cardiovascular pediatric surgical database creation. Knowledge of outcomes related to successful actions would be useful for those countries that face similar challenges and may lead them to consider adoption of similar measures with the respective adjustments to their own reality.

  13. Risk of ischaemic heart disease in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rungoe, Christine; Basit, Saima; Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder. Systemic inflammation increases the risk of atherosclerosis and ischaemic heart disease (IHD).......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder. Systemic inflammation increases the risk of atherosclerosis and ischaemic heart disease (IHD)....

  14. [Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Tfelt-Hansen, 1jacob; Olesen, Morten S

    2010-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease, which can lead to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in patients with a structurally normal heart. The age of onset is usually between two and 12 years and the initial symptom is frequently syncope...

  15. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Mygind, Naja Dam; Qayyum, Abbas Ali

    2016-01-01

    Although, treatment of ischemic heart disease (IHD) has improved considerably within the last decades, it is still the main cause of death worldwide. Despite maximum treatment, many IHD patients suffer from refractory angina and heart failure, which severely limits their daily lives. Moreover, IHD...

  16. Carcinoid heart disease : outcomes after surgical valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokhles, Palwasha; van Herwerden, Lex A.; de Jong, Peter L.; de Herder, Wouter W.; Siregar, Sabrina; Constantinescu, Alina A.; van Domburg, Ron T.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2012-01-01

    To describe the early and late outcomes of carcinoid patients undergoing surgical heart valve replacement. In a retrospective study, records of patients with symptomatic carcinoid heart disease referred for valve surgery between 1993 and 2010 at two academic centres were reviewed. The perioperative

  17. Conceptual model for heart failure disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Abbate, Kariann; Whellan, David J

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to propose a conceptual model for heart failure (HF) disease management (HFDM) and to define the components of an efficient HFDM plan in reference to this model. Articles that evaluated 1 or more of the following aspects of HFDM were reviewed: (1) outpatient clinic follow-up; (2) self-care interventions to enhance patient skills; and (3) remote evaluation of worsening HF either using structured telephone support (STS) or by monitoring device data (telemonitoring). The success of programs in reducing readmissions and mortality were mixed. Outpatient follow-up programs generally resulted in improved outcomes, including decreased readmissions. Based on 1 meta-analysis, specialty clinics improved outcomes and nonspecialty clinics did not. Results from self-care programs were inconsistent and might have been affected by patient cognitive status and educational level, and intervention intensity. Telemonitoring, despite initially promising meta-analyses demonstrating a decrease in the number and duration of HF-related readmissions and all-cause mortality rates at follow-up, has not been shown in randomized trials to consistently reduce readmissions or mortality. However, evidence from device monitoring trials in particular might have been influenced by technology and design issues that might be rectified in future trials. Results from the literature suggest that the ideal HFDM plan would include outpatient follow-up at an HF specialty clinic and continuous education to improve patient self-care. The end result of this plan would lead to better understanding on the part of the patient and improved patient ability to recognize and respond to signs of decompensation. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Heterozygote loss of ACE2 is sufficient to increase the susceptibility to heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wang; Patel, Vaibhav B; Parajuli, Nirmal; Fan, Dong; Basu, Ratnadeep; Wang, Zuocheng; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Penninger, Josef M; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2014-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) metabolizes Ang II into Ang 1-7 thereby negatively regulating the renin-angiotensin system. However, heart disease in humans and in animal models is associated with only a partial loss of ACE2. ACE2 is an X-linked gene; and as such, we tested the clinical relevance of a partial loss of ACE2 by using female ACE2(+/+) (wildtype) and ACE2(+/-) (heterozygote) mice. Pressure overload in ACE2(+/-) mice resulted in greater LV dilation and worsening systolic and diastolic dysfunction. These changes were associated with increased myocardial fibrosis, hypertrophy, and upregulation of pathological gene expression. In response to Ang II infusion, there was increased NADPH oxidase activity and myocardial fibrosis resulting in the worsening of Ang II-induced diastolic dysfunction with a preserved systolic function. Ang II-mediated cellular effects in cultured adult ACE2(+/-) cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts were exacerbated. Ang II-mediated pathological signaling worsened in ACE2(+/-) hearts characterized by an increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 and STAT-3 pathways. The ACE2(+/-) mice showed an exacerbated pressor response with increased vascular fibrosis and stiffness. Vascular superoxide and nitrotyrosine levels were increased in ACE2(+/-) vessels consistent with increased vascular oxidative stress. These changes occurred with increased renal fibrosis and superoxide production. Partial heterozygote loss of ACE2 is sufficient to increase the susceptibility to heart disease secondary to pressure overload and Ang II infusion. Heart disease in humans with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is associated with a partial loss of ACE2. Heterozygote female ACE2 mutant mice showed enhanced susceptibility to pressure overload-induced heart disease. Heterozygote female ACE2 mutant mice showed enhanced susceptibility to Ang II-induced heart and vascular diseases. Partial loss of ACE2 is sufficient to enhance the susceptibility to

  19. Cohort profile: prevalence of valvular heart disease in community patients with suspected heart failure in UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Anna; Glover, Keli; Sharma, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the proportion of suspected heart failure patients with significant valvular heart disease. Early diagnosis of valve disease is essential as delay can limit treatment and negatively affect prognosis for undiagnosed patients. The prevalence of unsuspected valve disease in the community is uncertain. Participants We prospectively evaluated 79 043 patients, between 2001 and 2011, who were referred to a community open access echocardiography service for suspected heart failure. All patients underwent a standard transthoracic echocardiogram according to British Society of Echocardiography guidelines. Findings to date Of the total number, 29 682 patients (37.5%) were diagnosed with mild valve disease, 8983 patients (11.3%) had moderate valve disease and 2134 (2.7%) had severe valve disease. Of the total number of patients scanned, the prevalence of aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, mitral stenosis, mitral regurgitation was 10%, 8.4%, 1%, and 12.5% respectively. 18% had tricuspid regurgitation. 5% had disease involving one or more valves. Conclusions Of patients with suspected heart failure in the primary care setting, a significant proportion have important valvular heart disease. These patients are at high risk of future cardiac events and will require onward referral for further evaluation. We recommend that readily available community echocardiography services should be provided for general practitioners as this will result in early detection of valve disease. PMID:28131996

  20. Pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune disease: the role of cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Leví, Ana Maria; Marazuela, Mónica

    2016-10-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD) are two very common organ-specific autoimmune diseases which are characterized by circulating antibodies and lymphocyte infiltration. Although humoral and cellular mechanisms have been classically considered separately in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), recent research suggests a close reciprocal relationship between these two immune pathways. Several B- and T-cell activation pathways through antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and cytokine production lead to specific differentiation of T helper (Th) and T regulatory (Treg) cells. This review will focus on the cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AITD. Specifically, it will provide reasons for discarding the traditional simplistic dichotomous view of the T helper type 1 and 2 pathways (Th1/Th2) and will focus on the role of the recently characterized T cells, Treg and Th17 lymphocytes, as well as B lymphocytes and APCs, especially dendritic cells (DCs). Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct myocardial perfusion imaging in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, R.C.; Durante, M.L.; Villacorta, E.V.; Torres, J.F.; Monzon, O.P.

    1981-02-01

    Twenty two patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease - 21 having a history of heart failure - were studied using direct coronary injection of /sup 99m/Tc labelled MAA particles during the course of hemodynamic and arteriographic studies. Myocardial perfusion deficit patterns have been shown to be consistent or indicative of either patchy, regional or gross ischemia. In patients with history of documented heart failure 90% (18 cases) had ischemic perfusion deficit in the involved ventricle. We conclude that diminished myocardial blood flow is an important mechanism contributing to the development of heart failure.

  2. Nonlinear heart rate variability measures under electromagnetic fields produced by GSM cellular phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazzini, Marta; Ravazzani, Paolo; Thuroczy, György; Molnar, Ferenc B; Ardesi, Gianluca; Sacchettini, Alessio; Mainardi, Luca Tommaso

    2013-06-01

    This study was designed to assess the nonlinear dynamics of heart rate variability (HRV) during exposure to low-intensity EMFs. Twenty-six healthy young volunteers were subjected to a rest-to-stand protocol to evaluate autonomic nervous system in quiet condition (rest, vagal prevalence) and after a sympathetic activation (stand). The procedure was conducted twice in a double-blind design: once with a genuine EMFs exposure (GSM cellular phone at 900 MHz, 2 W) and once with a sham exposure (at least 24 h apart). During each session, three-lead electrocardiograms were recorded and RR series extracted off-line. The RR series were analyzed by nonlinear deterministic techniques in every phase of the protocol and during the different exposures. The analysis of the data shows there was no statistically significant effect due to GSM exposure on the nonlinear dynamics of HRV.

  3. [Heart rhythm disturbances in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in aggregate with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoĭkhet, Ia N; Klester, E B; Golovin, V A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study kinds, frequencies and features of heart rhythm disturbances (HRD) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) subject to degree of severity, including presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). 1189 of patients with registered HRD were examined. 315 of them had COPD (group 1), 531--combination of COPD and CHD (group 2), 343 were CHD patients (group 3). The extent of examinations included electrocardiogram (ECG), Halter monitoring (HM), bicycle ergometry (BEM), external respiration function estimation. Supraventricular HRD were registered statistically more frequently in group 1: according to ECG data in rest - in 37.2% patients, by BEM results--in 18.8%, by HM--in 50%. Combined (supraventricular and ventricular) HRD were registered most frequently in group 2: 41.2 24.4, and 45.5% respectively. Ventricular HRD dominated in group 3: 47.6, 29.3 and 48.6% respectively. The results of the study indicate that supraventricular HRDprevaile in patients with COPD, combined HRD - in patients with COPD and CHD. Ventricular HRD, which most informatively reflect changes in intracardiac geometry and left ventricle hemodynamics, dominate in CHD patients. The optimization of therapy correction consists in early diagnostics of HRD subject to features of cardiorespiratory system functional state.

  4. Spectrum of congenital heart diseases in children with Down ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    Key words:Down syndrome, congenital heart diseases, pattern, Sokoto ... Research Journal of Health Sciences subscribed to terms and conditions of Open Access publication. Articles are .... information such as age, gender, mobile phone.

  5. Congenital Heart Diseases in Adults: A Review of Echocardiogram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital Heart Diseases in Adults: A Review of Echocardiogram Records in Enugu, South‑East Nigeria. ... Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research ... Enugu, and to determine whether there are any gender differences in frequency.

  6. Pattern of acquired heart diseases among children seen in Sokoto ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-11

    Feb 11, 2015 ... Conclusion: The pattern of AHD is similar to other studies in ... Key words: Acquired heart disease, children, Nigeria, outcome, .... direction and pressure gradients were assessed with color ..... skin changes of the extremities.

  7. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... notice a fluttering, racing, or irregular heartbeat. Some types of heart valve disease, such as aortic or mitral valve stenosis, can cause dizziness or fainting. ... FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health ...

  8. Underlying congenital heart disease in Nigerian children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pneumonia is a common cause of childhood morbidity and mortality globally. Some congenital heart disease(CHD) may predispose their sufferer to bronchopneumonia. ... Children with CHD were 3 and 256 times more likely to

  9. The Spectrum of Paediatric Congenital Heart Disease at The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    January 2013 Volume 10 Issue 1. 8. The ANNALS of ... Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is a significant cause of morbidity and ... selected CHD lesions was examined and compared with .... time of conception and that the prevalence of severe.

  10. Effectiveness of Interventions to Reduce Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness of Interventions to Reduce Coronary Heart Disease Risk. ... modifications on some risk factors of CHD were studied retrospectively in 47 males and ... within a short period of time in all patients, irrespective of their initial risk status.

  11. Rheumatic heart disease in Tennessee: An overlooked diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahana A Choudhury

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic heart disease, already a major burden in low- and middle-income countries, is becoming an emerging problem in high-income countries. Although acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease have almost been eradicated in areas with established economies, the emergence of this problem may be attributable to the migration from low-income to high-income settings. Between 2010 and 2012, we diagnosed a cluster of rheumatic heart disease cases in children from the Middle Tennessee area. The goal of this report is to increase awareness among clinicians as the incidence and prevalence of acute rheumatic fever remain relatively significant in large US metropolitan areas. Although acute rheumatic fever is seasonal, a high suspicion index may lead to the early diagnosis and prevention of its cardiac complications. Furthermore, screening procedures may be recommended for populations at risk for rheumatic heart disease in endemic areas, and active surveillance with echocardiography-based screening might become very important.

  12. Physical rehabilitation of congenital heart disease as a social problem

    OpenAIRE

    Іrina Kulchenko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to attract the attention to the problem of physical rehabilitation of congenital heart diseases. Material and Methods: analyzed the domestic and foreign scientific and methodological literature on the problems of the physical rehabilitation of congenital heart disease. Results: in the domestic literature lacks modern works on the subject. Foreign literature sources indicate the positive impact of the programs of physical rehabilitation on exercise tolerance, health and quality of lif...

  13. Sexual functioning is impaired in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Opic (Petra); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); J.A.A.E. Cuypers (Judith); M. Witsenburg (Maarten); A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); R.T. van Domburg (Ron); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); E.M.W.J. Utens (Elisabeth)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To investigate the overall sexual functioning and disease specific sexual problems in congenital heart disease (ConHD) patients, for both genders and different cardiac diagnostic groups, and compare these with Dutch normative data. Also disease specific sexual problems were

  14. Maximum entropy, fractal dimension and lacunarity in quantification of cellular rejection in myocardial biopsy of patients submitted to heart transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, L A [Universidade Estadual Paulista, IGCE, DEMAC, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, F R; Peres, F A [Faculdade de Tecnologia de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Moreira, R D; Moriel, A R; De Godoy, M F [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, FAMERP, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Murta Junior, L O, E-mail: laneves@rc.unesp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo, FFCLRP, Depto Computacao e Matematica, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil)

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a method for the quantification of cellular rejection in endomyocardial biopsies of patients submitted to heart transplant. The model is based on automatic multilevel thresholding, which employs histogram quantification techniques, histogram slope percentage analysis and the calculation of maximum entropy. The structures were quantified with the aid of the multi-scale fractal dimension and lacunarity for the identification of behavior patterns in myocardial cellular rejection in order to determine the most adequate treatment for each case.

  15. Maximum entropy, fractal dimension and lacunarity in quantification of cellular rejection in myocardial biopsy of patients submitted to heart transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, L. A.; Oliveira, F. R.; Peres, F. A.; Moreira, R. D.; Moriel, A. R.; de Godoy, M. F.; Murta Junior, L. O.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a method for the quantification of cellular rejection in endomyocardial biopsies of patients submitted to heart transplant. The model is based on automatic multilevel thresholding, which employs histogram quantification techniques, histogram slope percentage analysis and the calculation of maximum entropy. The structures were quantified with the aid of the multi-scale fractal dimension and lacunarity for the identification of behavior patterns in myocardial cellular rejection in order to determine the most adequate treatment for each case.

  16. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated heart rate is an established marker of cardiovascular risk. Previous analyses have suggested that ivabradine, a heart-rate-reducing agent, may improve outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heart rate of 70 beats per...... minute or more. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ivabradine, added to standard background therapy, in 19,102 patients who had both stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure and a heart rate of 70 beats per minute or more (including 12......,049 patients with activity-limiting angina [class ≥II on the Canadian Cardiovascular Society scale, which ranges from I to IV, with higher classes indicating greater limitations on physical activity owing to angina]). We randomly assigned patients to placebo or ivabradine, at a dose of up to 10 mg twice daily...

  17. Evaluation of cellular energetics by the pasteur effect in intact cardiomyoblasts and isolated perfused hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscari, Claudio; Gamberini, Chiara; Bonafe', Francesca; Giordano, Emanuele; Bianchi, Cristina; Lenaz, Giorgio; Caldarera, Claudio Marcello

    2004-03-01

    This work aims at exploring changes in cellular energetics by exploiting the Pasteur effect. We assumed that lactate overproduction arising from antimycin A-induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration (delta-lactate = stimulated [lactate] -basal [lactate]) is indicative of the energy provided aerobically by the cell. Rat embryonal cardiomyocytes (H9c2), incubated with 2 micromol/L antimycin A, increased about 6 fold their lactate production in a manner linear with time and cell number. Antimycin A was also delivered to Langendorff-perfused rat hearts under control aerobic conditions or after 20 min-ischemia and 30 min-reperfusion. The test started at the end of each perfusion and lactate was measured into perfusate collected for further 25 min. A cardioplegic solution was also delivered during the test to exclude that lactate production was influenced by cardiac contraction. Control delta-lactate was 20.9 +/- 2.31 (S.E.M.) microg/mL and markedly decreased after reperfusion (7.66 +/- 0.51, p < 0.001), showing that energy production was impaired of about 70%. The determination of oxygen consumption by mitochondria isolated from reperfused hearts also suggested that the damage to the respiratory chain was similar to that evaluated by lactate overproduction (Respiratory Control Index: 75% lower than control, p < 0.001). Moreover, when delta-lactate was referred to the estimated cells which remained viable at the end of reperfusion (49.9%), it was 25% lower than control (p < 0.05). Therefore, we proposed this test as a tool for quantifying both physiological and pathological energetic modifications in living intact cardiomyocytes and in isolated and perfused hearts.

  18. Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for correction of congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Elisa; Caputo, Massimo; Madeddu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This review article reports on the new field of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering and its potential on the management of congenital heart disease. To date, stem cell therapy has mainly focused on treatment of ischemic heart disease and heart failure, with initial indication of safety and mild-to-moderate efficacy. Preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the approach could be uniquely suited for the correction of congenital defects of the heart. The basic concept is to create living material made by cellularized grafts that, once implanted into the heart, grows and remodels in parallel with the recipient organ. This would make a substantial improvement in current clinical management, which often requires repeated surgical corrections for failure of implanted grafts. Different types of stem cells have been considered and the identification of specific cardiac stem cells within the heterogeneous population of mesenchymal and stromal cells offers opportunities for de novo cardiomyogenesis. In addition, endothelial cells and vascular progenitors, including cells with pericyte characteristics, may be necessary to generate efficiently perfused grafts. The implementation of current surgical grafts by stem cell engineering could address the unmet clinical needs of patients with congenital heart defects. PMID:26176009

  19. Cellular Reparative Mechanisms of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Retinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suet Lee Shirley Ding

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been reported as promising for the treatment of numerous degenerative disorders including the eye. In retinal degenerative diseases, MSCs exhibit the potential to regenerate into retinal neurons and retinal pigmented epithelial cells in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Delivery of MSCs was found to improve retinal morphology and function and delay retinal degeneration. In this review, we revisit the therapeutic role of MSCs in the diseased eye. Furthermore, we reveal the possible cellular mechanisms and identify the associated signaling pathways of MSCs in reversing the pathological conditions of various ocular disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Current stem cell treatment can be dispensed as an independent cell treatment format or with the combination of other approaches. Hence, the improvement of the treatment strategy is largely subjected by our understanding of MSCs mechanism of action.

  20. Cellular interactions in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Bagnato

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD encompasses a large and diverse group of pathological conditions that share similar clinical, radiological and pathological manifestations, despite potentially having quite different aetiologies and comorbidities. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF represents probably the most aggressive form of ILD and systemic sclerosis is a multiorgan fibrotic disease frequently associated with ILD. Although the aetiology of these disorders remains unknown, in this review we analyse the pathogenic mechanisms by cell of interest (fibroblast, fibrocyte, myofibroblast, endothelial and alveolar epithelial cells and immune competent cells. New insights into the complex cellular contributions and interactions will be provided, comparing the role of cell subsets in the pathogenesis of IPF and systemic sclerosis.

  1. [Valvular heart disease: preoperative assessment and postoperative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nägele, Reto; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2013-10-30

    Patients with valvular heart disease or with a prosthetic heart valve replacement are seen with increasing frequency in clinical practice. The medical care and evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease before valve surgery, but also the post-operative treatment is complex and managed by general practitioners, cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. In this mini-review we will first discuss the preoperative assessment of the two most common valvulopathies, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. Then we will discuss the post-operative care, which includes the management of anticoagulation, serial follow up and as well as the diagnostic assessment of complications such as thromboembolism, hemolysis, endocarditis and valve dysfunction.

  2. Primary Testicular Carcinoid Tumor presenting as Carcinoid Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunath L Chikkaraddi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary carcinoid tumors of the testis are very rare, and they seldom present with carcinoid syndrome. We report a hereto unreported instance, where a patient with a long-standing testicular mass presented with carcinoid heart disease, an uncommon form of carcinoid syndrome. He presented with symptoms of right heart failure, episodic facial flushing and was found to have severe right-sided valvular heart disease. His urinary 5-hydroxy indole acetic acid level was elevated. He underwent orchidectomy and the histopathology confirmed a testicular carcinoid tumor.

  3. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Trevisan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype.DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on.DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome. These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky.CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype.

  4. Oxidative Stress, Redox Regulation and Diseases of Cellular Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Jie; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Within cells, there is a narrow concentration threshold that governs whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce toxicity or act as second messengers. Scope of review We discuss current understanding of how ROS arise, facilitate cell signaling, cause toxicities and disease related to abnormal cell differentiation and those (primarily) sulfur based pathways that provide nucleophilicity to offset these effects. Primary conclusions Cellular redox homeostasis mediates a plethora of cellular pathways that determine life and death events. For example, ROS intersect with GSH based enzyme pathways to influence cell differentiation, a process integral to normal hematopoiesis, but also affecting a number of diverse cell differentiation related human diseases. Recent attempts to manage such pathologies have focused on intervening in some of these pathways, with the consequence that differentiation therapy targeting redox homeostasis has provided a platform for drug discovery and development. General Significance The balance between electrophilic oxidative stress and protective biomolecular nucleophiles predisposes the evolution of modern life forms. Imbalances of the two can produce aberrant redox homeostasis with resultant pathologies. Understanding the pathways involved provides opportunities to consider interventional strategies. PMID:25445706

  5. Diet and coronary heart disease. The National Heart Foundation of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrapnel, W S; Calvert, G D; Nestel, P J; Truswell, A S

    1992-05-04

    Over the last four decades there has been extensive research into the links between diet and coronary heart disease. The most recent literature is reviewed in this position statement. The clinical and public health aspects of the National Heart Foundation's nutrition policy are based on this review. The key points are as follows: 1. Saturated fatty acids A high intake of saturated fatty acids is strongly associated with elevated serum cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels and increased risk of coronary heart disease. 2. The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (principally linoleic acid) lower serum cholesterol levels when substituted for saturated fats and probably have an independent cholesterol-lowering effect. 3. The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (fish oils) The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reduce serum triglyceride levels, decrease the tendency to thrombosis and may further reduce coronary risk through other mechanisms. 4. Monounsaturated fatty acids Monounsaturated fatty acids reduce serum cholesterol levels when substituted for saturated fatty acids. It is not clear whether this is an independent effect or simply the result of displacement of saturates. 5. Trans fatty acids Trans fatty acids may increase serum cholesterol levels and can be reckoned to be equivalent to saturated fatty acids. 6. Total fat Total fat intake, independent of fatty acid type, is not strongly associated with coronary heart disease but may contribute to obesity. Associations between total fat intake and coronary heart disease are primarily mediated through the saturated fatty acid component. 7. Dietary cholesterol Dietary cholesterol increases serum cholesterol levels in some people and may increase risk of coronary heart disease. 8. Alcohol A high intake of alcohol increases blood pressure and serum triglyceride levels and increases mortality from cardiovascular disease. Light alcohol consumption reduces the risk of coronary heart disease. 9

  6. Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opotowsky, Alexander R; Moko, Lilamarie E; Ginns, Jonathan; Rosenbaum, Marlon; Greutmann, Matthias; Aboulhosn, Jamil; Hageman, Abbie; Kim, Yuli; Deng, Lisa X; Grewal, Jasmine; Zaidi, Ali N; Almansoori, Ghadeera; Oechslin, Erwin; Earing, Michael; Landzberg, Michael J; Singh, Michael N; Wu, Fred; Vaidya, Anand

    2015-04-01

    Aberrant cellular oxygen sensing is a leading theory for development of pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and paraganglioma (PGL). The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) increases the risk for PHEO-PGL. We investigated the association between CCHD and PHEO-PGL with two complementary studies: study 1) an international consortium was established to identify congenital heart disease (CHD) patients with a PHEO-PGL diagnosis confirmed by pathology or biochemistry and imaging; study 2) the 2000-2009 Nationwide Inpatient Survey, a nationally representative discharge database, was used to determine population-based cross-sectional PHEO-PGL frequency in hospitalized CCHD patients compared with noncyanotic CHD and those without CHD using multivariable logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, and genetic PHEO-PGL syndromes. In study 1, we identified 20 PHEO-PGL cases, of which 18 had CCHD. Most presented with cardiovascular or psychiatric symptoms. Median cyanosis duration for the CCHD PHEO-PGL cases was 20 years (range 1-57 y). Cases were young at diagnosis (median 31.5 y, range 15-57 y) and 7 of 18 had multiple tumors (two bilateral PHEO; six multifocal or recurrent PGL), whereas 11 had single tumors (seven PHEO; four PGL). PGLs were abdominal (13 of 17) or head/neck (4 of 17). Cases displayed a noradrenergic biochemical phenotype similar to reported hypoxia-related PHEO-PGL genetic syndromes but without clinical signs of such syndromes. In study 2, hospitalized CCHD patients had an increased likelihood of PHEO-PGL (adjusted odds ratio 6.0, 95% confidence interval 2.6-13.7, P < .0001) compared with those without CHD; patients with noncyanotic CHD had no increased risk (odds ratio 0.9, P = .48). There is a strong link between CCHD and PHEO-PGL. Whether these rare diseases coassociate due to hypoxic stress, common genetic or developmental factors, or some combination requires further

  7. Ivabradine, coronary artery disease, and heart failure: beyond rhythm control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Scicchitano,1 Francesca Cortese,1 Gabriella Ricci,1 Santa Carbonara,1 Michele Moncelli,1 Massimo Iacoviello,1 Annagrazia Cecere,1 Michele Gesualdo,1 Annapaola Zito,1 Pasquale Caldarola,2 Domenico Scrutinio,3 Rocco Lagioia,3 Graziano Riccioni,4 Marco Matteo Ciccone1 1Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari, School of Medicine, Policlinico, Bari, Italy; 2Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Policlinic, San Paolo Hospital, Bari, Italy; 3Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Fondazione Maugeri, Cassano Murge, Italy; 4Intensive Cardiology Care Unit, San Camillo de Lellis Hospital, Manfredonia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Elevated heart rate could negatively influence cardiovascular risk in the general population. It can induce and promote the atherosclerotic process by means of several mechanisms involving endothelial shear stress and biochemical activities. Furthermore, elevated heart rate can directly increase heart ischemic conditions because of its skill in unbalancing demand/supply of oxygen and decreasing the diastolic period. Thus, many pharmacological treatments have been proposed in order to reduce heart rate and ameliorate the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals, especially those suffering from coronary artery diseases (CAD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Ivabradine is the first pure heart rate reductive drug approved and currently used in humans, created in order to selectively reduce sinus node function and to overcome the many side effects of similar pharmacological tools (ie, β-blockers or calcium channel antagonists. The aim of our review is to evaluate the role and the safety of this molecule on CAD and CHF therapeutic strategies. Keywords: chronic heart failure, heart rate reduction, cardiac ischemic disease, heart-rate lowering drugs, funny current

  8. The tricuspid valve in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, Jonathan; Ammash, Naser; Bernier, Pierre-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The tricuspid valve is frequently affected in adults with congenital heart disease but is also frequently overlooked. Disease of this valve can occur primarily or develop secondary to changes in the right ventricle caused by other disease states. The embryology and anatomy of the tricuspid valve are important to understanding pathogenesis of valve dysfunction in congenital heart disease. Clinical findings can be subtle. Multimodality imaging may be necessary to fully assess the cause and impact of tricuspid valve lesions. More research is needed in pathophysiology, imaging, and treatment in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Ubiquitin-Like SUMO System and Heart Function: From Development to Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendler, Luca; Braun, Thomas; Müller, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    SUMOylation is a ubiquitin-related transient posttranslational modification pathway catalyzing the conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins (SUMO1, SUMO2, and SUMO3) to lysine residues of proteins. SUMOylation targets a wide variety of cellular regulators and thereby affects a multitude of different cellular processes. SUMO/sentrin-specific proteases are able to remove SUMOs from targets, contributing to a tight control of SUMOylated proteins. Genetic and cell biological experiments indicate a critical role of balanced SUMOylation/deSUMOylation for proper cardiac development, metabolism, and stress adaptation. Here, we review the current knowledge about SUMOylation/deSUMOylation in the heart and provide an integrated picture of cardiac functions of the SUMO system under physiologic or pathologic conditions. We also describe potential therapeutic approaches targeting the SUMO machinery to combat heart disease.

  10. The Relationship between Ischemic Heart Disease and Diabete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Mette Lykke

    2012-01-01

    THE FOLLOWING OBJECTIVES ON THE SUBJECT: The relationship between ischemic heart disease and diabetes: 1. To examine the short- and long-term risk of death and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with incident diabetes and in patients with first-time MI during a 10 year period in Denmark, using the general...... diabetes increases with increasing severity of heart failure. Focus on the development of diabetes in patients with ischemic heart disease with or without the presence of heart failure still compose a public health matter, because early and aggressive evidence-based therapy is thought to reduce......Diabetes is a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is common among patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), where the prevalence is as high as 20%. Patients with diabetes requiring glucose-lowering medication (GLM) have been reported as having the same long-term risk...

  11. COMPLICATED CASE OF RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE; UNEXPLORED FOR YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arif Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic heart disease is a one of the very common heart problem commonly prevalent among the children of developing countries, may occur in adults in their fourties also, if undiagnosed in early ages, similar in symptoms to ‘rheumatism’ but quite difficult to diagnose or are often misdiagnosed. The main objective of this article is to make acquainted about the disease and its further consequences, since initially it appears to be just a simple general fever but may prove deadly if undiagnosed or misdiagnosed leading to severe heart valve damage and consequent complications. The methods involved in the case include bilateral Femoral Embolectomy (BFE, Fasciotomy and Balloon Mitral Valvotomy (BMV. Through this case study an attempt has been made by the authors to make the people especially from the medical and related field, well acquainted about this deadly, silent, heart disease and its consequent complications.

  12. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Nederend

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that measure both branches of the nervous system for prolonged periods of time in well-defined patient cohorts in various phases of childhood and adolescence are currently lacking. Pending such studies, there is not yet a good grasp on the extent and direction of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic function in pediatric congenital heart disease. Longitudinal studies in homogenous patient groups linking autonomic nervous system function and clinical outcome are warranted.

  13. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, A. de; Roest, A.A.W. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be useful in the assessment of patients with complex congenital heart disease and in the post-surgical follow-up of patients with corrected congenital heart disease. A thorough understanding of the congenital cardiac malformations that can be encountered is needed and the use of the sequential segmental analysis helps to standardize the evaluation and diagnosis of (complex) congenital heart disease. After surgical correction of congenital heart defects, patients must be followed over extended periods of time, because morphological and functional abnormalities may still be present or may develop. The use of echocardiography may be hampered in these patients as scar tissue and thorax deformities limit the acoustic window. Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be advantageous in the follow-up of these post-surgical patients and with the use of several different techniques the morphological as well as functional abnormalities can be evaluated and followed over time. (orig.)

  14. Congenital heart disease protein 5 associates with CASZ1 to maintain myocardial tissue integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Stephen; Amin, Nirav M; Gibbs, Devin; Christine, Kathleen S; Charpentier, Marta S; Conlon, Frank L

    2014-08-01

    The identification and characterization of the cellular and molecular pathways involved in the differentiation and morphogenesis of specific cell types of the developing heart are crucial to understanding the process of cardiac development and the pathology associated with human congenital heart disease. Here, we show that the cardiac transcription factor CASTOR (CASZ1) directly interacts with congenital heart disease 5 protein (CHD5), which is also known as tryptophan-rich basic protein (WRB), a gene located on chromosome 21 in the proposed region responsible for congenital heart disease in individuals with Down's syndrome. We demonstrate that loss of CHD5 in Xenopus leads to compromised myocardial integrity, improper deposition of basement membrane, and a resultant failure of hearts to undergo cell movements associated with cardiac formation. We further report that CHD5 is essential for CASZ1 function and that the CHD5-CASZ1 interaction is necessary for cardiac morphogenesis. Collectively, these results establish a role for CHD5 and CASZ1 in the early stages of vertebrate cardiac development. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Karen; Böhm, Michael

    2014-03-15

    Worldwide, the numbers of women who have a pre-existing cardiovascular disease or develop cardiac problems during pregnancy are increasing and, due to the lack of evidenced-based data, this provides challenges for the treating physician. Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy is a complex topic as women can present either pre- or post-partum, due to a pre-existing heart disease such as operated on or unoperated on congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, chronic hypertension, or familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Women often present with symptoms and signs of acute heart failure. On the other hand, there are diseases which are directly related to pregnancy, such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and peripartum cardiomyopathy, or where pregnancy increases risk of a disease as, for example, the risk of myocardial infarction. These diseases can have long-term implications to the life of the affected women and their families. There is, in particular, a paucity of data from developing countries of this unique disease pattern and its presentations. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related cardiovascular disease in women presenting pre- or post-partum.

  16. Quality of life among parents of children with heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Mostafa A; Zaher, Salah R; El-Dowaty, Amira A; Moneeb, Dalia E

    2008-11-03

    Quality of life of parents of chronically ill children has become increasingly important as the mortality rates associated with such illnesses have decreased and survival rates have increased. To describe the Health related quality of life (HRQOL) of parents whose children are suffering from heart diseases and to identify the most important factors that could affect it. A cross sectional study was conducted in Alexandria, Egypt in the two main hospitals that treat children with heart diseases. 400 parents of children with heart diseases were recruited and a comparison group (400) of parents of children with minor illnesses were included from both hospitals. Socioeconomic and disease related data were collected, SF36 was used to collect data regarding the QOL. MANOVA was used to compare the SF-36 scores between groups and to explore the impact of different variables. In all SF-36 subscales, parents of children with heart diseases reported significantly poorer HRQOL, except for pain subscale. The most striking differences were for General Health, Vitality and role limitation physical. Factors that had a significant impact of HRQOL were severity of illness, type of heart disease in addition to age of child, having multiple children, financial situation and presence of comorbid condition. The mean scores for different domains were the lowest for younger age, rheumatic heart disease and female children. QOL of parents of children with heart diseases was significantly impaired and it was influenced by several factors; mainly related to the clinical status of the child. Psychological status, social support and reassurance of the parents should be considered when making treatment decision for their children.

  17. Quality of life among parents of children with heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Dowaty Amira A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of life of parents of chronically ill children has become increasingly important as the mortality rates associated with such illnesses have decreased and survival rates have increased. Aim To describe the Health related quality of life (HRQOL of parents whose children are suffering from heart diseases and to identify the most important factors that could affect it. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in Alexandria, Egypt in the two main hospitals that treat children with heart diseases. 400 parents of children with heart diseases were recruited and a comparison group (400 of parents of children with minor illnesses were included from both hospitals. Socioeconomic and disease related data were collected, SF36 was used to collect data regarding the QOL. MANOVA was used to compare the SF-36 scores between groups and to explore the impact of different variables. Results In all SF-36 subscales, parents of children with heart diseases reported significantly poorer HRQOL, except for pain subscale. The most striking differences were for General Health, Vitality and role limitation physical. Factors that had a significant impact of HRQOL were severity of illness, type of heart disease in addition to age of child, having multiple children, financial situation and presence of comorbid condition. The mean scores for different domains were the lowest for younger age, rheumatic heart disease and female children. Conclusion QOL of parents of children with heart diseases was significantly impaired and it was influenced by several factors; mainly related to the clinical status of the child. Psychological status, social support and reassurance of the parents should be considered when making treatment decision for their children.

  18. Temporally Distinct Six2-Positive Second Heart Field Progenitors Regulate Mammalian Heart Development and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengfang; Wang, Jingying; Guo, Chaoshe; Chang, Weiting; Zhuang, Jian; Zhu, Ping; Li, Xue

    2017-01-24

    The embryonic process of forming a complex structure such as the heart remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Six2 marks a dynamic subset of second heart field progenitors. Six2-positive (Six2(+)) progenitors are rapidly recruited and assigned, and their descendants are allocated successively to regions of the heart from the right ventricle (RV) to the pulmonary trunk. Global ablation of Six2(+) progenitors resulted in RV hypoplasia and pulmonary atresia. An early stage-specific ablation of a small subset of Six2(+) progenitors did not cause any apparent structural defect at birth but rather resulted in adult-onset cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. Furthermore, Six2 expression depends in part on Shh signaling, and Shh deletion resulted in severe deficiency of Six2(+) progenitors. Collectively, these findings unveil the chronological features of cardiogenesis, in which the mammalian heart is built sequentially by temporally distinct populations of cardiac progenitors, and provide insights into late-onset congenital heart disease.

  19. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Meyer-Fernandes, José R.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol’s actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC. PMID:27788262

  20. Smoking status, sports participation and mortality from coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, H; Iso, H; Toyoshima, H; Date, C; Yamamoto, A; Kikuchi, S; Koizumi, A; Kondo, T; Watanabe, Y; Wada, Y; Inaba, Y; Tamakoshi, A

    2008-04-01

    Since smoking and exercise have opposite effects on coronary risk factors, the hypothesis was proposed that smoking might weaken the protective effect of exercise on prevention of coronary heart disease. To determine the effect of smoking on the relationship between sports participation and mortality from coronary heart disease. Population-based prospective cohort study in Japan. A total of 76 832 Japanese men and women, aged 40-79 years with no history of stroke, coronary heart disease, or cancer, completed a self-administered questionnaire between 1988 and 1990. Systematic mortality surveillance was carried out through 2003, and 638 deaths from coronary heart disease (496 myocardial infarction) were identified. People who reported the longest time in sports participation (>or=5 hours/week) had an approximately 50-80% lower age-adjusted risk of mortality from coronary heart disease compared with those in the second lowest category (1-2 hours/week) among never and ex-smokers, but no association was found among current smokers. Adjustment for known risk factors and exclusion of subjects who died within 2 years of the baseline inquiry did not substantially alter these associations. The multivariable hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of coronary heart disease for the >or=5 hours/week versus 1-2 hours/week of sports participation were 0.44 (0.23 to 0.86) among never smokers, 0.18 (0.05 to 0.60) among ex-smokers, and 0.82 (0.47 to 1.40) among current smokers. Similar associations were found for men and women. Smoking may reduce the beneficial effect of sports participation for reduction of fatal coronary heart disease.

  1. Heart Transplantation in Congenital Heart Disease: In Whom to Consider and When?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine H. Attenhofer Jost

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to impressive improvements in surgical repair options, even patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD may survive into adulthood and have a high risk of end-stage heart failure. Thus, the number of patients with CHD needing heart transplantation (HTx has been increasing in the last decades. This paper summarizes the changing etiology of causes of death in heart failure in CHD. The main reasons, contraindications, and risks of heart transplantation in CHD are discussed and underlined with three case vignettes. Compared to HTx in acquired heart disease, HTx in CHD has an increased risk of perioperative death and rejection. However, outcome of HTx for complex CHD has improved over the past 20 years. Additionally, mechanical support options might decrease the waiting list mortality in the future. The number of patients needing heart-lung transplantation (especially for Eisenmenger’s syndrome has decreased in the last years. Lung transplantation with intracardiac repair of a cardiac defect is another possibility especially for patients with interatrial shunts. Overall, HTx will remain an important treatment option for CHD in the near future.

  2. The epidemiology of heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Fred H; Marelli, Ariane J

    2014-01-01

    The impact of lifelong exposure to myocardial dysfunction in populations with congenital heart disease (CHD) is becoming increasingly recognized. Most children born with CHD now reach adulthood and the long-term sequelae of treatment are contributing to substantial comorbidity. The combination of structural changes present at birth with changes resulting from cardiac surgery can result in heart failure. This article reports on the current state of knowledge on the epidemiology of heart failure in this patient population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. GRAVES’ DISEASE INDUCED REVERSIBLE SEVERE RIGHT HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathyayani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A middle aged man presented with evidence of right - sided heart failure in atrial fibrillation (AF and was found to have severe Tricuspid Regurgitation (TR with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH, with normal left ventricular function. The common possible seconda ry causes of PAH were ruled out, but during investigation he was found to have elevated thyroid function tests compatible with the diagnosis of Graves’ disease. The treatment of Graves’ disease was started with anti - thyroid drugs and associated with a sign ificant reduction in the pulmonary arterial pressure. This case report is presented to highlight one of the rare and underdiagnosed presentations of Graves’ disease. Thyrotoxicosis can present with profound cardiovascular complications. In recent times, th ere have been few reports of secondary PAH with TR in patients with hyperthyroidism. Previously asymptomatic Graves’ disease having the signs and symptoms of right heart failure is a rare presentation and the association could be easily missed. This case p resentation emphasizes that the diagnosis of thyroid heart disease with heart failure secondary to Graves’ disease should be considered in any patient regardless of age, gender with clinical features of heart failure of unknown etiology and timely initiation of anti - thyroid drugs is necessary to treat these reversible cardiac failures.

  4. Stress echocardiography in valvular heart disease: a current appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Peyman; Patel, Krishna; Griffin, Brian P; Desai, Milind Y

    2015-03-01

    Stress echocardiography is increasingly used in the management of patients with valvular heart disease and can aid in evaluation, risk stratification and clinical decision making in these patients. Evaluation of symptoms, exercise capacity and changes in blood pressure can be done during the exercise portion of the test, whereas echocardiographic portion can reveal changes in severity of disease, pulmonary artery pressure and left ventricular function in response to exercise. These parameters, which are not available at rest, can have diagnostic and prognostic importance. In this article, we will review the indications and diagnostic implications, prognostic implications, and clinical impact of stress echocardiography in decision making and management of patients with valvular heart disease.

  5. Thigh circumference and risk of heart disease and premature death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, Berit L; Frederiksen, Peder

    2009-01-01

    in Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 1436 men and 1380 women participating in the Danish MONICA project, examined in 1987-8 for height, weight, and thigh, hip, and waist circumference, and body composition by impedance. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: 10 year incidence of cardiovascular and coronary heart disease and 12.5 years......OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between thigh circumference and incident cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease and total mortality. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study with Cox proportional hazards model and restricted cubic splines. SETTING: Random subset of adults...... of follow-up for total death. RESULTS: A small thigh circumference was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and coronary heart diseases and total mortality in both men and women. A threshold effect for thigh circumference was evident, with greatly increased risk of premature death below...

  6. Nutritional aspects to prevent heart diseases in traditional Persian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Kenari, Hoorieh Mohammadi; Esfahani, Mohammad Mehdi; Ardakani, Mohammad Reza Shams; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Nazem, Esmaeil; Moghimi, Maryam; Zargaran, Arman

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major health complications currently in various societies. Management of heart diseases as a prevention step or as treatment with low-cost procedures like lifestyle modifications including nutrition are important current trends. Although the term nutrition dates back to 2 past centuries, Persian physicians contributed to this term at least from 1000 years ago. Rhazes (865-925 AD) was one of the pioneers in this field. He preferred using foods in treating illnesses. "Foods and drinks" were 1 subject from 6 principles (Setteh Zarorieh) that Persian physicians believed can affect human health. In this review, we described some medieval Persian views on the role of nutrition in heart diseases and compare their prescriptions with current findings. Interestingly, current investigations mostly support Persian medicine principles. Historically, this work shows that the concept of nutrition in heart diseases has had a successful background at least from 1000 years ago in Persia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Depression: links with ischemic heart disease and erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roose, Steven P

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the relationships among depression, ischemic heart disease, and erectile dysfunction. Depression is an independent risk factor for the development of ischemic heart disease, and depression in the post-myocardial infarction patient is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Ischemic heart disease and erectile dysfunction are also frequently comorbid and share many common risk factors including age, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and smoking. Depression and erectile dysfunction often occur together; however, the causal relation may be difficult to determine because erectile dysfunction may be a symptom of depression, social distress accompanying erectile dysfunction may precipitate depressive symptoms, or both conditions may result from a common factor such as vascular disease.

  8. Novel targets and future strategies for acute cardioprotection: Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausenloy, Derek J; Garcia-Dorado, David; Erik Bøtker, Hans; Davidson, Sean M; Downey, James; Engel, Felix B; Jennings, Robert; Lecour, Sandrine; Leor, Jonathan; Madonna, Rosalinda; Ovize, Michel; Perrino, Cinzia; Prunier, Fabrice; Schulz, Rainer; Sluijter, Joost P G; Van Laake, Linda W; Vinten-Johansen, Jakob; Yellon, Derek M; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Heusch, Gerd; Ferdinandy, Péter

    2017-03-17

    Ischaemic heart disease and the heart failure that often results, remain the leading causes of death and disability in Europe and worldwide. As such, in order to prevent heart failure and improve clinical outcomes in patients presenting with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery, novel therapies are required to protect the heart against the detrimental effects of acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury. During the last three decades, a wide variety of ischaemic conditioning strategies and pharmacological treatments have been tested in the clinic - however, their translation from experimental to clinical studies for improving patient outcomes has been both challenging and disappointing. Therefore, in this Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart, we critically analyse the current state of ischaemic conditioning in both the experimental and clinical settings, provide recommendations for improving its translation into the clinical setting, and highlight novel therapeutic targets and new treatment strategies for reducing acute myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury.

  9. Heart-lung transplantation for end-stage heart disease with Eisenmenger's syndrome: report of two cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xi; XIONG Mai; WANG Zhi-ping; YIN Sheng-li; WU Zhong-kai; XU Ying-qi; TANG Bai-yun; YAO Jian-ping; CHEN Guang-xian

    2009-01-01

    @@ From September 2006 to January 2007, 2 patients with end-staged heart and lung disease (congenital disease, Eisenmenger's syndrome, severe pulmonary artery hypertension and heart failure) underwent heart and lung transplantation (HLT) at the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.

  10. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Ivy, D D; Feinstein, J. A.; Humpl, T; Rosenzweig, E. B.

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, he...

  11. Educational assessment of the adult with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, M J

    1994-06-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) have specific educational needs that are influenced by a variety of factors. This article identifies and discusses learning needs and factors that impact educational outcomes for the adult CHD patient population. Assessment techniques and an assessment tool are presented to guide the nurse through the process of assessing an adult patient seeking health care for this disease.

  12. Interleukin-6 receptor pathways in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, Nadeem; Butterworth, Adam S; Freitag, Daniel F

    2012-01-01

    Persistent inflammation has been proposed to contribute to various stages in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) signalling propagates downstream inflammation cascades. To assess whether this pathway is causally relevant to coronary heart disease, we studied...

  13. Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  14. Coronary collaterals improve prognosis in patients with ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Regieli; J.W. Jukema; H.M. Nathoe; A.H. Zwinderman; S. ng; D.E. Grobbee; Y. van der Graaf; P.A. Doevendans

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recruitment of coronary collateral vessels results from an endogenous adaptation to ischemic heart disease (IHD). Presence of collaterals may exert protection at the time of acute or chronic obstructive coronary disease. The protective role of collaterals in patients with extensive c

  15. Genes in congenital heart disease: atrioventricular valve formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joziasse, I.C.; van de Smagt, J.J.; Smith, K.; Bakkers, J.; Sieswerda, G.J.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Through the use of animal studies, many candidate genes (mainly encoding transcriptional factors and receptors) have been implicated in the development of congenital heart disease. Thus far, only a minority of these genes have been shown to carry mutations associated with congenital disease in human

  16. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoušek, Jan; Kubuš, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established treatment option for adult patients suffering heart failure due to idiopathic or ischemic cardiomyopathy associated with electromechanical dyssynchrony. There is limited evidence suggesting similar efficacy of CRT in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Due to the heterogeneity of structural and functional substrates, CRT implantation techniques are different with a thoracotomy or hybrid approach prevailing. Efficacy of CRT in CHD seems to depend on the anatomy of the systemic ventricle with best results achieved in systemic left ventricular patients upgraded to CRT from conventional pacing. Indications for CRT in patients with CHD were recently summarized in the Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) Expert Consensus Statement on the Recognition and Management of Arrhythmias in Adult Congenital Heart Disease and are presented in the text.

  17. Propose a Enhanced Framework for Prediction of Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sudhakar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Heart disease diagnosis requires more experience and it is a complex task. The Heart MRI, ECG and Stress Test etc are the numbers of medical tests are prescribed by the doctor for examining the heart disease and it is the way of tradition in the prediction of heart disease. Today world, the hidden information of the huge amount of health care data is contained by the health care industry. The effective decisions are made by means of this hidden information. For appropriate results, the advanced data mining techniques with the information which is based on the computer are used. In any empirical sciences, for the inference and categorisation, the new mathematical techniques to be used called Artificial neural networks (ANNs it also be used to the modelling of the real neural networks. Acting, Wanting, knowing, remembering, perceiving, thinking and inferring are the nature of mental phenomena and these can be understand by using the theory of ANN. The problem of probability and induction can be arised for the inference and classification because these are the powerful instruments of ANN. In this paper, the classification techniques like Naive Bayes Classification algorithm and Artificial Neural Networks are used to classify the attributes in the given data set. The attribute filtering techniques like PCA (Principle Component Analysis filtering and Information Gain Attribute Subset Evaluation technique for feature selection in the given data set to predict the heart disease symptoms. A new framework is proposed which is based on the above techniques, the framework will take the input dataset and fed into the feature selection techniques block, which selects any one techniques that gives the least number of attributes and then classification task is done using two algorithms, the same attributes that are selected by two classification task is taken for the prediction of heart disease. This framework consumes the time for predicting the symptoms of

  18. Differential diagnostic algorithm for diseases manifested with heart murmurs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Leonid B

    2009-08-01

    Diagnostic interpretation at auscultation of heart murmurs is accompanied by frequent errors. It creates serious clinical, pedagogical, organizational and social problems. The standard nosological principle of a clinical information description from the diagnosis (a disease name) to the description of symptoms/signs contradicts to real clinical practice from revealing of symptoms through differential diagnostics to a diagnosis establishment. The differential diagnostic algorithm or diagnostic algorithm developed by the author, is based on the opposite syndromic principle of thinking - from the signs to the diagnosis. It completely corresponds to the practical purposes of reliable diagnostics of 35 illnesses, manifested by heart murmurs at a heart auscultation.

  19. Exercise Testing and Stress Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Henri, Christine; Pierard, Luc; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Mongeon, Francois-Pierre; Pibarot, Philippe; Basmadjian, Arsene J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of exercise testing and stress imaging in the management of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) is reviewed in this article. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology/European Association of Cardiothoracic Surgery have recently put emphasis on the role of exercise testing to clarify symptom status and the use of stress imaging to assess the dynamic component of valvular abnormalities and unmask subclinical myocardial d...

  20. Heart Disease Prevention: Does Oral Health Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Forum. 2013;16:e232. Chapple ILC, et al. Diabetes and periodontal diseases: Consensus report of the Joint EFP/AAP Workshop on Periodontitis and Systemic Diseases. Journal of Clinical Periodontology. 2013; ...

  1. Guideline for appropriate use of cardiac CT in heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Hong, Yoo Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yong, Hwan Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Mok [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong A [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dong Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of deaths in Korea, along with malignant neoplasms and cerebrovascular diseases. The proper diagnosis and management for patients with suspected heart diseases should be warranted for the public health care. Advances in CT technology have allowed detailed images of the heart to be obtained, which enable evaluations not only of the coronary arteries but also of other cardiac structures. Currently, the latest multi-detector CT machines are widespread around Korea. The appropriate use of cardiac CT may lead to improvements of the physicians' medical performances and to reduce medical costs which eventually contribute to promotions of public health. However, until now, there has been no guidelines regarding the appropriate use of cardiac CT in Korea. We intend to provide guidelines for the appropriate use of cardiac CT in heart diseases based on scientific data. The purpose of this guideline is to assist the clinicians and other health professionals when using cardiac CT for diagnosis and treatments of heart diseases.

  2. Congenital Heart Disease and Impacts on Child Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Alievi Mari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the child development and evaluate a possible association with the commitment by biopsychosocial factors of children with and without congenital heart disease. Methods: Observational study of case-control with three groups: Group 1 - children with congenital heart disease without surgical correction; Group 2 - children with congenital heart disease who underwent surgery; and Group 3 - healthy children. Children were assessed by socio-demographic and clinical questionnaire and the Denver II Screening Test. Results: One hundred and twenty eight children were evaluated, 29 in Group 1, 43 in Group 2 and 56 in Group 3. Of the total, 51.56% are girls and ages ranged from two months to six years (median 24.5 months. Regarding the Denver II, the children with heart disease had more "suspicious" and "suspect/abnormal" ratings and in the group of healthy children 53.6% were considered with "normal" development (P≤0.0001. The biopsychosocial variables that were related to a possible developmental delay were gender (P=0.042, child's age (P=0.001 and income per capita (P=0.019. Conclusion: The results suggest that children with congenital heart disease are likely to have a developmental delay with significant difference between children who have undergone surgery and those awaiting surgery under clinical follow-up.

  3. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation and Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saad; Wilt, Heath

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinically staggering burden of disease stemming from cerebrovascular events, of which a majority are ischemic in nature and many are precipitated by atrial fibrillation (AF). AF can occur in isolation or in association with myocardial or structural heart disease. In the latter case, and when considering health at an international level, congenital and acquired valve-related diseases are frequent contributors to the current pandemic of AF and its clinical impact. Guidelines crafted by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society underscore the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) among patients with valvular heart disease, particularly in the presence of concomitant AF, to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke of cardioembolic origin; however, the non-VKAs, also referred to as direct, target-specific or new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have not been actively studied in this particular population. In fact, each of the new agents is approved in patients with AF not caused by a valve problem. The aim of our review is to carefully examine the available evidence from pivotal phase 3 clinical trials of NOACs and determine how they might perform in patients with AF and concomitant valvular heart disease.

  4. Heart transplantation in rapidly progressive end-stage heart failure associated with celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Juan P; Cura, Geraldine; Ramallo, German; Diez, Mirta; Vigliano, Carlos A; Katus, Hugo A; Mereles, Derliz

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterised by chronic immune-mediated malabsorption in genetically susceptible individuals induced by gluten proteins present in wheat, barley and rye. It occurs in adults and children at rates approaching 1% of the population. Cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease is infrequent. The authors present here a first case of a severe progressive dilated cardiomyopathy that required heart transplantation in young woman with celiac disease. PMID:22696747

  5. Etiology of valvular heart disease-genetic and developmental origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Joy; Garg, Vidu

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease occurs as either a congenital or acquired condition and advances in medical care have resulted in valve disease becoming increasingly prevalent. Unfortunately, treatments remain inadequate because of our limited understanding of the genetic and molecular etiology of diseases affecting the heart valves. Therefore, surgical repair or replacement remains the most effective option, which comes with additional complications and no guarantee of life-long success. Over the past decade, there have been significant advances in our understanding of cardiac valve development and, not surprisingly, mutations in these developmental genes have been identified in humans with congenital valve malformations. Concurrently, there has been a greater realization that acquired valve disease is not simply a degenerative process. Molecular investigation of acquired valve disease has identified that numerous signaling pathways critical for normal valve development are re-expressed in diseased valves. This review will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the development of the heart valves, as well as the implications of these findings on the genetics of congenital and acquired valvular heart disease.

  6. Hypertension and hypertensive heart disease in African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Karen; Ojji, Dike; Bachelier, Katrin; Böhm, Michael; Damasceno, Albertino; Stewart, Simon

    2014-07-01

    Hypertension and hypertensive heart disease is one of the main contributors to a growing burden of non-communicable forms of cardiovascular disease around the globe. The recently published global burden of disease series showed a 33 % increase of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy in the past two decades with long-term consequences. Africans, particularly younger African women, appear to be bearing the brunt of this increasing public health problem. Hypertensive heart disease is particularly problematic in pregnancy and is an important contributor to maternal case-fatality. European physicians increasingly need to attend to patients from African decent and need to know about unique aspects of disease presentation and pharmacological as well as non-pharmacological care. Reductions in salt consumption, as well as timely detection and treatment of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease remain a priority for effective primary and secondary prevention of CVD (particularly stroke and CHF) in African women. This article reviews the pattern, potential causes and consequences and treatment of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease in African women, identifying the key challenges for effective primary and secondary prevention in this regard.

  7. Valvular heart disease: classic teaching and emerging paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley, D Marshall; Gelfand, Eli V

    2013-12-01

    Valvular heart disease is both prevalent and increases with age. The final pathway of valvular disease is heart failure and sometimes sudden death, so clinicians must identify and treat it before these endpoints occur. Noninvasive diagnostic modalities such as echocardiography, exercise tolerance testing, and cardiac magnetic resonance provide additional quantitative, qualitative, and prognostic data. Studies have elucidated predictors of disease progression and potential medical therapies, but the niche of valvular disease has benefited relatively less from randomized controlled clinical trials than other cardiovascular disease fields. New invasive techniques like transcatheter valve replacement offer hope for high-risk operative candidates. We review classic teaching with current guidelines and emphasize recent advances in disease management.

  8. Disease management programs for heart failure: not just for the 'sick' heart failure population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Ken; Conlon, Carmel; Ledwidge, Mark

    2007-02-01

    The development of disease management programs has been a major advance in heart failure care, bringing about significant improvements for the heart failure population, with reduction in readmission, better use of guideline therapy and improved survival. However, at present, the majority of such programs focus their attention only on the sicker segment of this population, with little application of this important service to the broader heart failure population, where potentially benefits may be even more impressive. This has led to an imbalance in the care of patients with heart failure, where aspects of management such as regular structured review and education are preferentially given to the group at the later stages of the natural history of the syndrome. This paper argues for a far wider application of the disease management program concept in heart failure care so as to bring the benefits of specialist care, patient education and follow-up to patients at an earlier stage in the natural history of heart failure.

  9. Evaluation of proinflammatory cytokines and brain natriuretic peptide in patients with rheumatic heart diseases and coronary heart disease complicated by chronic heart insufficiency

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To study proinflammatory cytokines and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with rheumatic heart diseases (RHD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) complicated by chronic heart insufficiency (CHI). Material and methods. 54 pts with CHI (among them 16 with RHD and 38 with CHD with signs of CHI ofll-IV functional class according to NYHA that correspond to 11A-III stage according to N.D. Strazesko-V.H. \\frsilenko classification) and 30 healthy persons of control group were examine...

  10. Formyl Peptide Receptors in Cellular Differentiation and Inflammatory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Young; Lee, Mingyu; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2017-06-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a family of classical chemoattractant receptors. Although FPRs are mainly expressed in phagocytic innate immune cells including monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils, recent reports demonstrated that additional different cell types such as T-lymphocytes and several non-immune cells also express functional FPRs. FPRs were first reported as a specific receptor to detect bacteria-derived N-formyl peptides. However, accumulating evidence has shown that FPRs can recognize various ligands derived from pathogens, mitochondria, and host. This review summarizes studies on some interesting endogenous agonists for FPRs. Here, we discuss functional roles of FPRs and their ligands concerning the regulation of cellular differentiation focusing on myeloid lineage cells. Accumulating evidence also suggests that FPRs may contribute to the control of inflammatory diseases. Here, we briefly review the current understanding of the functional role of FPRs and their ligands in inflammatory disorders in some animal disease models. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1300-1307, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Decision Support in Heart Disease Prediction System using Naive Bayes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Subbalakshmi,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Data Mining refers to using a variety of techniques to identify suggest of information or decision making knowledge in thedatabase and extracting these in a way that they can put to use in areas such as decision support, predictions, forecasting and estimation. The healthcare industry collects huge amounts of healthcare data which, unfortunately, are not “mined” to discover hidden information for effective decision making. Discovering relations that connect variables in a database is the subject of data mining. This research has developed a Decision Support in Heart Disease Prediction System (DSHDPS using data mining modeling technique, namely, Naïve Bayes. Using medical profiles such as age, sex, blood pressure and blood sugar it can predict the likelihood of patients getting a heart disease. It is implemented as web based questionnaire application. It can serve a training tool to train nurses and medical students to diagnose patients with heart disease.

  12. Managing the lipid profile of coronary heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakopoulou, Maria; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Stathogiannis, Konstantinos; Synetos, Andreas; Trantalis, George; Tousoulis, Dimitrios

    2016-11-01

    Lipid profile management is even more critical in patients treated for secondary prevention, since patients with established coronary heart disease are at higher risk of developing events. Current guidelines encourage lifestyle modification and patient engagement in disease prevention. However, the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines seem to differ considerably from their predecessors, having an impact on clinical practice of lipid management. Area covered: This review article discusses and provides a summary of the current recommendations for lipid profile management in patients with coronary heart disease, with a view to present lifestyle modification and novel treatment strategies, and to indicate areas of dispute among recent guidelines. Expert commentary: Existing controversies between current guidelines concerning treatment goals and therapeutic decisions may have potential implications on the clinical management of patients. In the meantime, we eagerly wait for the results of randomized controlled trials evaluating promising, potent, safe and prolonged drugs that are in progress.

  13. Gluten Sensitivity among Egyptian Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Alameey, Inas R.; Ahmed, Hanaa H.; Tawfik, Sawsan M.; Hassaballa, Fawzia; Gawad, Ayman M. Abdel; Eltahlawy, Eman

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal symptoms are a common feature in infants with congenital heart disease. AIM: This study was designed to evaluate age-dependent serum levels of antigliadin antibodies among malnourished Egyptian infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) and gastrointestinal symptoms. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This case-control study conducted on 60 infants with established congenital heart disease. They were subdivided into cyanotic and acyanotic groups, and each group includes 30 patients compared with thirty apparently healthy infants of matched age, sex, and social class. Serum antigliadin antibodies levels were measured using ELISA. RESULTS: The mean age of introduction of cereals in the diet and appearance of gastrointestinal symptoms were six months. On comparison with controls, patients showed highly significant higher serum levels of antigliadin antibodies (P Gluten containing foods should never be introduced before the end of the six months. PMID:28293318

  14. Hybrid Workflow Policy Management for Heart Disease Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyun Kim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As science technology grows, medical application is becoming more complex to solve the physiological problems within expected time. Workflow management systems (WMS in Grid computing are promisingsolution to solve the sophisticated problem such as genomic analysis, drug discovery, disease identification, etc. Although existing WMS can provide basic management functionality in Grid environment, consideration of user requirements such as performance, reliability and interaction with user is missing. In this paper, we proposehybrid workflow management system for heart disease identification and discuss how to guarantee different user requirements according to user SLA. The proposed system is applied to Physio-Grid e-health platform to identify human heart disease with ECG analysis and Virtual Heart Simulation (VHS workflow applications.

  15. Type A Behaviours and Heart Disease: Epidemiological and Experimental Foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Bennett

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper critically examines three strands of evidence that concern the relationship between type A behaviours and coronary heart disease; prospective epidemiological studies of healthy populations, studies of those at high risk for coronary heart disease, and angiographic studies of atherosclerosis. The first of these would seem to provide the strongest test. Methodological and conceptual issues mean that the results of studies using the other methods should be interpreted with care. It is concluded that there is relatively strong evidence of an association between Type A behaviour as measured by Structured Interview and coronary heart disease. Hostility and anger appear to be the most powerful determinants of CHD. However, it is likely that they interact with other type A behaviours and related environmental factors in determining risk.

  16. Hybrid Workflow Policy Management for Heart Disease Identification

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Youn, Chan-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    As science technology grows, medical application is becoming more complex to solve the physiological problems within expected time. Workflow management systems (WMS) in Grid computing are promising solution to solve the sophisticated problem such as genomic analysis, drug discovery, disease identification, etc. Although existing WMS can provide basic management functionality in Grid environment, consideration of user requirements such as performance, reliability and interaction with user is missing. In this paper, we propose hybrid workflow management system for heart disease identification and discuss how to guarantee different user requirements according to user SLA. The proposed system is applied to Physio-Grid e-health platform to identify human heart disease with ECG analysis and Virtual Heart Simulation (VHS) workflow applications.

  17. Pregnancy and non-valvular heart disease - Anesthetic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitra Gaurab

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-valvular heart disease is an important cause of cardiac disease in pregnancy and presents a unique challenge to the anesthesiologist during labor and delivery. A keen understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, in addition to the altered physiology of pregnancy, is the key to managing such patients. Disease-specific goals of management may help preserve the hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters within an acceptable limit and a successful conduct of labor and postpartum period

  18. Social class and heart disease mortality among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Elizabeth; Williams, Carol R; Moore, Latetia; Chen, Fangfei

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine variation in heart disease death rates by the social class of decedents. The term, "social class" refers to a complex set of phenomena such as control over economic resources, social status, and power relative to others in society. The target population for this study was African-American adults aged 35-74 years old who resided in the United States during the years 1996-1997. As a proxy for social class, we examined 5 levels of educational attainment: 0-8 years of school completed (Social Class I), 9-11 years of school completed (Social Class II), high school graduate/12 years of school completed (Social Class III), some college completed (Social Class IV), and college degree completed (Social Class V). Older age, male gender, and lower social class were all independently associated with higher heart disease death rates. For all ages, more disadvantaged social classes had a higher risk of heart disease mortality. The highest relative risks were found for Social Classes I and II among the younger age groups. Many of the "prerequisites" for the "heart healthy lifestyle" are predicated on the benefits of a privileged social class position. For African Americans, there are the additional stressors of segregation, exclusion, and discrimination to overcome, as well as the cumulative physiological toll of lifetime resistance to various forms of racism. For many African Americans in disadvantaged social class positions, the obstacles to reducing the risk for heart disease are very difficult to overcome.

  19. Triglycerides and Heart Disease, Still a Hypothesis?

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Ira J.; Eckel, Robert H.; McPherson, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic and clinical science relating plasma triglycerides and cardiovascular disease. Although many aspects of the basic physiology of triglyceride production, its plasma transport and tissue uptake have been known for several decades, the relationship of plasma triglyceride levels to vascular disease is uncertain. Are triglyceride rich lipoproteins, their influence on HDL and LDL, or the underlying diseases leading to defects in triglyceride metabo...

  20. Preventing clinically evident coronary heart disease in the postmenopausal woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Francine K

    2004-01-01

    This review summarizes data on the prevalent coronary heart disease risk factors of postmenopausal women and the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies available for preventing or treating them. Medline searches from 1966 on were used to identify manuscripts for coronary heart disease risk factor information, lipid levels as predictors of cardiovascular disease in women, non-pharmacologic therapies, side effects of statins, and lipid-lowering trials that included women and had myocardial infarction or coronary heart disease death as endpoints. Dyslipidemias that occur with menopause are particularly atherogenic and tend to cluster with other metabolic and nonmetabolic risk factors. Estrogen therapy, with or without progestogen, can no longer be recommended for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. Statins have been effective in reducing cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality and should be first-line therapy for lipid-lowering. A considerable number of women look to obstetricians-gynecologists for primary care. For postmenopausal women especially, primary care must include management of risk factors for coronary heart disease. Estrogen or estrogen plus progestin should be used only for symptomatic hot flashes and at the lowest dose possible. Statins should be first-line therapy in preventive strategies for lipid-lowering.

  1. PREVALENCE OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH VALVULAR HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranya Kumar Saharia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Heart disease is a growing problem, particularly in developing countries. India has quoted to have 12.2% and 12% prevalence of coronary artery disease and rheumatic valvular heart disease respectively. Some older reports suggest that rheumatic fever, in addition to producing specific injuries to small coronary arterial branches may accelerate the development of coronary atherosclerosis. AIM To assess the prevalence of Coronary Artery disease in patients with Valvular Heart disease in some selected hospitals of Guwahati, Assam. SETTING AND DESIGN It was conducted in Gauhati Medical College and Hospital and Hayat Hospital, Guwahati. Explorative approach, survey design was selected for the study. MATERIALS AND METHODS Purposive sampling technique was used to select 126 patients who were diagnosed with valvular heart disease. Data was collected through a self-structured interview scheduled on prevalence of coronary artery disease. RESULTS Of the total 126 patients of valvular heart disease, 108 (85.71% cases were rheumatic valvular heart disease and 18 (14.29% were non-rheumatic valvular heart disease. Majority (56.34% of cases with CAD and RHD were in the range of 45 to 54 years. The prevalence of typical angina was significantly high among men (41.18%. Most of the rheumatic patients (72.22% did not complain about angina. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidaemia are significantly high among non-rheumatic group and Coronary artery disease group. In our study, the overall prevalence of significant coronary artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease was 14.28%. CONCLUSION Coronary artery disease prevalence is very high in this part of the country. Health professionals should actively participate in health promotion activities, apply the findings of the study to identify high risk individuals and prevent the occurrence of coronary artery disease.

  2. Anemic syndrome in patients with ischemic heart disease and chronic heart failure (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shvarts Y.G.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anemic syndrome of different severity often accompanies ischemic heart disease (IHD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Anemia has association with unfavorable prognosis in patients with all forms of CVD — acute and chronic. In this article the authors summarize a literature review of English articles dedicated to the problem of anemia and ischemic heart disease (IHD and the results of original research on the relationship between anemic syndrome and prognosis in the hospitalized patients with IHD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Anemia is frequently observed in patients with CHF, and evidence suggests that anemia might be associated with an increased mortality in both systolic and diastolic chronic heart failure (CHF, morbidity and rate of hospitalization in CHF patients. Moreover, CHF itself could be involved in the pathogenesis of anemia. Early studies suggested a pathogenic role of inflammation mediators. The normalization of hemoglobin concentration by EPO and iron supply in patients with CHF and chronic renal insufficiency results in improved exercise capacity by increasing oxygen delivery and improving cardiac function. However, there is limited information concerning the association of hemoglobin concentration and new onset of clinically recognized coronary artery disease, and lack of information about the effect of anemia treatment on prognosis of acute forms of IHD

  3. Pathophysiology and Imaging Techniques of Diabetic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle L. Harrop

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic patients are at an increased risk of developing heart failure. The aetiology of diabetic heart disease is likely to be multifactorial, ranging from altered myocardial metabolism, increased interstitial fibrosis, endothelial dysfunction, microvascular disease, and coronary atherosclerosis. These factors act synergistically with resultant myocardial systolic and diastolic dysfunction. The aim of the present review is to illustrate the role of multimodality cardiac imaging such as echocardiography, nuclear imaging, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging in providing insights into these pathological processes, and to quantify the extent of myocardial diastolic and systolic dysfunction.

  4. A review of the economics of adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckeler, Michael D; Thomas, Ian D; Andrews, Jennifer; Joiner, Keith; Klewer, Scott E

    2016-01-01

    Adults living with congenital heart disease (CHD) now outnumber children with the disease. Thanks to medical advances over the past 75 years, many of these fatal childhood heart problems have changed to chronic medical conditions. As the population of adults with CHD increases, they will require increasingly complex medical, surgical and catheter-based therapies. In addition, social burdens including education, employment and insurability, which increase the societal costs of adult CHD, are now being recognized for adults living with CHD. This review summarizes the available literature on the economics of adult CHD.

  5. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  6. The role of coronary artery disease in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Anuradha; Desai, Akshay S

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced survival following acute myocardial infarction and the declining prevalence of hypertension and valvular heart disease as contributors to incident heart failure (HF) have fueled the emergence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as the primary risk factor for HF development. Despite the acknowledged role of CAD in the development of HF, the role of coronary revascularization in reducing HF-associated morbidity and mortality remains controversial. The authors review key features of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CAD in patients with HF as well as the emerging data from recent clinical trials that inform the modern approach to management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Posttraumatic stress disorder in the wake of heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Helle; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that patients after a cardiac event may be at risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present article reviews studies looking at PTSD as a sequel of heart disease with a focus on prevalence, risk factors, and future research directions.......There is increasing recognition that patients after a cardiac event may be at risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present article reviews studies looking at PTSD as a sequel of heart disease with a focus on prevalence, risk factors, and future research directions....

  8. Ryanodine receptors as pharmacological targets for heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco SANTONASTASI; Xander H T WEHRENS

    2007-01-01

    Calcium release from intracellular stores plays an important role in the regulationof muscle contraction and electrical signals that determine the heart rhythm. Theryanodine receptor (RyR) is the major calcium (Ca2+) release channel required forexcitation-contraction coupling in the heart. Recent studies have demonstratedthat RyR are macromolecular complexes comprising of 4 pore-forming channelsubunits, each of which is associated with regulatory subunits. Clinical andexperimental studies over the past 5 years have provided compelling evidencethat intracellular Ca2+release channels play a pivotal role in the development ofcardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. Changes in the channel regulation andsubunit composition are believed to cause diastolic calcium leakage from thesarcoplasmic reticulum, which could trigger arrhythmias and weaken cardiaccontractility. Therefore, cardiac RyR have emerged as potential therapeutic tar-gets for the treatment of heart disease. Consequently, there is a strong desire toidentify and/or develop novel pharmacological agents that may target these Ca2+signaling pathways. Pharmacological agents known to modulate RyR in the heart,and their potential application towards the treatment of heart disease are dis-cussed in this review.

  9. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Andrew C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2009-12-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease are diseases of socioeconomic disadvantage. These diseases are common in developing countries and in Indigenous populations in industrialized countries. Clinicians who work with Indigenous populations need to maintain a high index of suspicion for the potential diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever, particularly in patients presenting with joint pain. Inexpensive medicines, such as aspirin, are the mainstay of symptomatic treatment of rheumatic fever; however, antiinflammatory treatment has no effect on the long-term rate of progression or severity of chronic valvular disease. The current focus of global efforts at prevention of rheumatic heart disease is on secondary prevention (regular administration of penicillin to prevent recurrent rheumatic fever), although primary prevention (timely treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis to prevent rheumatic fever) is also important in populations in which it is feasible.

  10. Childhood acquired heart diseases in Jos, north central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidelia Bode-Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The patterns of childhood acquired heart diseases (AHD vary in different parts of the world and may evolve over time. We aimed to compare the pattern of childhood AHD in our institution to the historical and contemporary patterns in other parts of the country, and to highlight possible regional differences and changes in trend. Materials and Methods: Pediatric echocardiography records spanning a period of 10 years were reviewed. Echocardiography records of children with echocardiographic or irrefutable clinical diagnoses of AHD were identified and relevant data extracted from their records. Results: One hundred and seventy five children were diagnosed with AHD during the period, including seven that had coexisting congenital heart disease (CHD. They were aged 4 weeks to 18 years (mean 9.84΁4.5 years and comprised 80 (45.7% males and 95 (54.3% females. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD was the cause of the AHD in 101 (58.0% children, followed by dilated cardiomyopathy (33 cases, 18.9% which was the most frequent AHD in younger (under 5 years children. Other AHD encountered were cor pulmonale in 16 (9.1%, pericardial disease in 15 (8.6%, infective endocarditis in 8 (4.6% and aortic aneurysms in 2 (1.1% children. Only one case each of endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF and Kawasaki Disease were seen during the period. Conclusions: The majority of childhood acquired heart diseases in our environment are still of infectious aeitology, with RHD remaining the most frequent, particularly in older children. Community-based screening and multicenter collaborative studies will help to better describe the pattern of AHD in our country. More vigorous pursuit of the Millennium development goals will contribute to reducing the burden of childhood acquired heart diseases in the country.

  11. Grown Up Congenital Heart Diseases (GUCH: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajmer Singh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The survival of children with congenital heart disease into adulthood has increased. These patients may require primary cardiac surgical repair, repair after prior palliation, revision of repair for residual lesion, or non-cardiac surgery. Preoperative cardiac evaluation consists of review of laboratory data, echocardiography, cardiac MRI, CT, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, arrhythmia monitoring, and cardiac catheterization. Perioperative complications are more frequently seen in high-risk patients i.e. those with pulmonary hypertension, cyanosis, heart failure, and poor general health. Guidelines for the management of patients with grown up congenital heart (GUCH diseases suggest that such patients are best treated in dedicated tertiary care centres by a multidisciplinary team, knowledgeable about the anatomy and pathophysiology of the lesion.

  12. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medications in children with heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Stuart

    2016-10-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is quite common in the general pediatric population, Its incidence is thought to be even higher in the population of patients with congenital heart disease, especially in those patients with complex disease and who have had cardiac surgical interventions early in life. There has been controversy as to the safety of ADHD medications, especially in the latter population of patients. This compendium is meant to review the effects of the ADHD medications and the safety of these medications in patients with either known or undiagnosed congenital heart disease. The concern with regard to the use of ADHD medications has been as a result of the reports of sudden unexpected deaths among patients taking stimulant drugs for ADHD. Therefore, the question of whether or not stimulant drugs increase the risk of adverse cardiovascular events has led to a discussion of the appropriate use of these drugs in patients with known cardiovascular disease, as well as a discussion as to the appropriate evaluation in order to identify undiagnosed 'at-risk' patients with congenital heart disease or arrhythmias. This article will review and amplify these discussions, as well as the conclusions that have come forth as a result of these discussions. Currently available data suggest that there is no evidence for serious adverse cardiovascular complications in children with known cardiovascular diseases including patients of congenital heart disease who are treated with stimulant medications. Despite this, if the patient does have known cardiac disease, or if the history and physical examination is suggestive of cardiac disease, it is suggested that consultation/evaluation with a pediatric cardiologist occur. It is extremely unlikely that stimulant medications would be contraindicated in almost any condition that falls under this category. However, a few specific cardiac conditions might tailor the choice of the specific ADHD medication. Therefore

  13. Medical therapy for rheumatic heart disease: is it time to be proactive rather than reactive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamannan, Nalini M; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Moura, Luis; Zamorano, Jose L; Rosenhek, Raphael A; Best, Patricia Jm; Lloyd, Margaret A; Rocha-Goncalves, F; Chandra, Sarat; Alfieri, Ottavio; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Tornos, Pilar; Baliga, Ragavendra R; Wang, Andrew; Bashore, Thomas; Ramakrishnan, S; Spargias, Konstantinos; Shuvy, Mony; Beeri, Ronen; Lotan, Chaim; Suwaidi, Jassim Al; Bahl, Vinay; Pierard, Luc A; Maurer, Gerald; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi; Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H; Chopra, K; Pandian, Natesa G

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is well known to be an active inflammatory process which develops progressive calcification and leaflet thickening over time. The potential for statin therapy in slowing the progression of valvular heart disease is still controversial. Retrospective studies have shown that medical therapy is beneficial for patients with calcific aortic stenosis and recently for rheumatic valve disease. However, the prospective randomized clinical trials have been negative to date. This article discusses the epidemiologic risk factors, basic science, retrospective and prospective studies in valvular heart disease and a future clinical trial to target RHD with statin therapy to slow the progression of this disease. Recent epidemiological studies have revealed the risk factors associated with valvular disease include male gender, smoking, hypertension and elevated serum cholesterol and are similar to the risk factors for vascular atherosclerosis. An increasing number of models of experimental hypercholesterolemia demonstrate features of atherosclerosis in the aortic valve (AV), which are similar to the early stages of vascular atherosclerotic lesions. Calcification, the end stage process of the disease, must be understood as a prognostic indicator in the modification of this cellular process before it is too late. This is important in calcific aortic stenosis as well as in rheumatic valve disease. There are a growing number of studies that describe similar pathophysiologic molecular markers in the development of rheumatic valve disease as in calcific aortic stenosis. In summary, these findings suggest that medical therapies may have a potential role in patients in the early stages of this disease process to slow the progression of RHD affecting the valves. This review will summarize the potential for statin therapy for this patient population.

  14. Grover's Disease after Heart Transplantation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanbattista Ippoliti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Grover's disease is a transient acantholytic dermatosis of unknown cause, manifesting clinically as a papular skin eruption that is usually located on the anterior chest and abdomen. Histologically characterized by an acantholytic pattern, it has been associated with numerous disorders, including hematologic malignancies, chronic renal failure, and HIV infection, as well as with chemotherapy and bone marrow and/or kidney transplant. Evaluation of followup and treatment is often complicated by spontaneous remission and the occasionally fluctuant course of the disease. Here we report the case of a patient with sudden onset of Grover's disease after heart transplantation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first observation of Grover's disease as diagnosed after heart transplantation.

  15. Genes Tied to Belly Size Also Linked to Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... he said, that the genes that contribute to abdominal obesity also feed the development of diabetes and heart disease -- through mechanisms other than extra belly fat. Still, everyone agreed on what the findings imply: ... vulnerable to abdominal obesity, that does not mean it's destiny. It's ...

  16. Ankylosing spondylitis and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Essers, Ivette; Stolwijk, Carmen; Boonen, Annelies;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence and risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), including the role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) compared with population controls. METHODS: All patients...

  17. Conductional remodeling and arrhythmias in the diseased heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontes, Magda Sofia Cristóvão Martins Castro

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of death in Western society and it is a global public health problem, particularly taking into account the ageing of the population in many countries. An important player in CVD is heart failure, which is a complex syndrome defined by insufficient pump

  18. Predicting the effect of prevention of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Priority setting in public health policy must be based on information on the effectiveness of alternative preventive and therapeutic interventions. The purpose of this study is to predict the effect on mortality from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in Denmark of reduced exposure to the risk factors...

  19. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj.; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advan

  20. Risk for valvular heart disease after treatment for hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. Cutter (David J.); M. Schaapveld (Michael); S. Darby (S.); M. Hauptmann; F.A. Van Nimwegen (Frederika A.); A.D.G. Krol (Augustinus); C.P.M. Janus (Cécile P.M.); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); B.M.P. Aleman (Berthe)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are at increased risk for developing valvular heart disease (VHD). We evaluated the determinants of the risk and the radiation dose-response. Methods: A case-control study was nested in a cohort of 1852 five-year HL survivors diagnosed at ages

  1. Echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular function in ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollema, Sjoerd Adriaan

    2010-01-01

    The presence of a decreased left ventricular (LV) function after myocardial infarction has demonstrated to be of considerable clinical importance. In this thesis, the role of 2D echocardiography to evaluate LV function in ischemic heart disease was investigated. In the first part of the thesis, rece

  2. Visible aging signs as risk markers for ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Association of common aging signs (i.e., male pattern baldness, hair graying, and facial wrinkles) as well as other age-related appearance factors (i.e., arcus corneae, xanthelasmata, and earlobe crease) with increased risk of ischemic heart disease was initially described in anecdotal reports from...

  3. Mendelian randomization of blood lipids for coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, Michael V.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Palmer, Tom M.; Drenos, Fotios; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Dale, Caroline E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Finan, Chris; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Tragante, Vinicius; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Shah, Sonia; Elbers, Clara C.; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Zabaneh, Delilah; Sofat, Reecha; McLachlan, Stela; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Hall, Alistair S.; North, Kari E.; Almoguera, Berta; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Cushman, Mary; Fornage, Myriam; Patel, Sanjay R.; Redline, Susan; Siscovick, David S.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Hofker, Marten H.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Bots, Michiel L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Melander, Olle; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Richard; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Price, Jackie; Kumari, Meena; Baumert, Jens; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Humphries, Steve E.; Clarke, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Lange, Leslie A.; Smith, George Davey; Reiner, Alex P.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimaeki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Dudbridge, Frank; Samani, Nilesh J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the causal role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides in coronary heart disease (CHD) using multiple instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization. Methods and results We developed weighted allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (S

  4. Medications Used in the Treatment of Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on medications used in the treatment of ischemic heart disease is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first.…

  5. Binge drinking, drinking frequency, and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov-Ettrup, Lise; Eliasen, Marie; Ekholm, Ola

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Light-to-moderate alcohol drinking is associated with a decreased risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). However, drinking heavily and in binges has been suggested to increase IHD risk. This complexity makes the issue of binge drinking within the light-to-moderate alcohol range...

  6. Heart Disease Management by Women: Does Intervention Format Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Noreen M.; Janz, Nancy K.; Dodge, Julia A.; Lin, Xihong; Trabert, Britton L.; Kaciroti, Niko; Mosca, Lori; Wheeler, John R.; Keteyian, Steven

    2014-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of two formats of a program (Women Take PRIDE) to enhance management of heart disease by patients was conducted. Older women (N = 575) were randomly assigned to a group or self-directed format or to a control group. Data regarding symptoms, functional health status, and weight were collected at baseline and at 4, 12,…

  7. Tea and coronary heart disease : protection through estrogenlike activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleijnse, J.M.; Witteman, J.C.; Launer, L.J.; Lamberts, S.J.; Pols, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Tea drinking appears to be protective against coronary heart disease in a number of epidemiologic studies. It has been suggested that tea flavonols with antioxidative activity, including quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin,1 could account for the favorable effect on cardiovascular health. In the ol

  8. Urinary and plasma magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, Michel M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; van der Harst, Pim; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous studies on dietary magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) have yielded inconsistent results, in part because of a lack of direct measures of actual magnesium uptake. Urinary excretion of magnesium, an indicator of dietary magnesium uptake, might provide more consiste

  9. Mental vulnerability--a risk factor for ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eplov, Lene Falgaard; Jørgensen, Torben; Birket-Smith, Morten

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to examine whether mental vulnerability is a risk factor for the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD) after adjustment for well-established risk factors. METHODS: In three prospective cohort studies in Copenhagen County, Denmark, we recorded the leve...

  10. Heart Disease Management by Women: Does Intervention Format Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Noreen M.; Janz, Nancy K.; Dodge, Julia A.; Lin, Xihong; Trabert, Britton L.; Kaciroti, Niko; Mosca, Lori; Wheeler, John R.; Keteyian, Steven

    2014-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of two formats of a program (Women Take PRIDE) to enhance management of heart disease by patients was conducted. Older women (N = 575) were randomly assigned to a group or self-directed format or to a control group. Data regarding symptoms, functional health status, and weight were collected at baseline and at 4, 12,…

  11. Inflammatory cytokines and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Gao, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Because low-grade inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), and pro-inflammatory cytokines govern inflammatory cascades, this study aimed to assess the associations of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and CHD risk in a new prospective study, including meta...

  12. Coping Behaviors of Parents with Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobino, Jane

    The study addresses parental coping patterns of children with congenital heart disease in the state of Hawaii. Attention was given to geography and ethnicity as well as parental and child characteristics as factors impacting on the coping pattern. Telephone interviews with parents (N=32) obtained data concerning parent characteristics, their…

  13. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins.

  14. Heart Disease in Women: Understand Symptoms and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or higher can be associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Waist circumference also is a useful tool to measure whether or not you're overweight. Women are generally considered overweight if their waist ... and reducing your risk of diabetes — both of which increase your risk ...

  15. Hematologic Abnormalities in Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Chamanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with cyanotic heart disease may have an acceptable quality of life. However, they are invariably prone to several complications. The aim of this study is search about hematologic abnormalities in cyanotic congenital heart disease patients. Materials and Methods:  In this cross sectional study every cyanotic congenital heart disease patients who was referred to the adult congenital heart disease clinic was selected and asked of any possible hyperviscosity symptoms, gingival bleeding, Epistaxis, hemoptysis, hypermenorrhagia and gouty arthritis irrespective of their age, gender and primary diagnosis in a six-month period. In this regard, 02 saturation was obtained via pulse oximetry, an abdominal ultrasound was done in order to discover any gallstones and lab tests including CBC, coagulation parameters (bleeding time(BT,clotting time(CT, prothrombin time(PT,international ratio( INR, Ferritin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine (Cr were provided as well. Results:  A total of 69 patients were enrolled in the present study. The mean age of the patients was 22.44±5.72 with a minimum of 15 and the maximum of 46 years old. Twenty two (34.4% of them were female and 45(65.6% were male. Conclusion: Our patients had less hyperuricemia, there is no correlation between hyperviscosity symptoms and haematocrit level and an inverse correlation between the Ferritin level and hyperviscosity symptoms were seen.  

  16. Conductional remodeling and arrhythmias in the diseased heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontes, Magda Sofia Cristóvão Martins Castro

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of death in Western society and it is a global public health problem, particularly taking into account the ageing of the population in many countries. An important player in CVD is heart failure, which is a complex syndrome defined by insufficient pump

  17. Association between height and coronary heart disease mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Skytthe, Axel

    2006-01-01

    An inverse association between height and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) is well demonstrated, but it is not known whether this association is because of genetic factors, socioeconomic background, or other environmental factors. Four population-based twin cohorts with register-based follow...

  18. Echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular function in ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollema, Sjoerd Adriaan

    2010-01-01

    The presence of a decreased left ventricular (LV) function after myocardial infarction has demonstrated to be of considerable clinical importance. In this thesis, the role of 2D echocardiography to evaluate LV function in ischemic heart disease was investigated. In the first part of the thesis,

  19. Prospective studies on diet and coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of prospective studies on fatty acids, B-vitamins and arginine and the occurrence of coronary heart disease have been described. The results presented are mainly based on the Zutphen Elderly Study. In this study of 939 men aged 64-84 years, detailed information was availa

  20. Parity, breastfeeding and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Sanne Ae; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Wood, Angela M;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is uncertainty about the direction and magnitude of the associations between parity, breastfeeding and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined the separate and combined associations of parity and breastfeeding practices with the incidence of CHD later in life among...

  1. Environmental Stress and Biobehavioral Antecedents of Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of research on the biobehavioral antecedents of coronary heart disease, including stressful occupational settings characterized by high demands and little control over the job, and the Type A pattern, particularly hostility and mode of anger expression (anger-in). Discusses research on physiologic responsiveness (reactivity)…

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, K K; Kjaergaard, J; Akkan, D

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important differential diagnosis in patients with heart failure (HF). The primary aims were to determine the prevalence of COPD and to test the accuracy of self-reported COPD in patients admitted with HF. Secondary aims were to study...

  3. Genetic and metabolomic approaches for coronary heart disease risk prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaarhorst, Anika Antoinette Maria

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk is currently based on traditional risk factors (TRFs) like age, sex, lipid levels, blood pressure. Here we investigated, using the CAREMA cohort, whether this prediction can potentially be improved by applying a metabolomics approach and by includi

  4. Sotalol for atrial tachycardias after surgery for congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BeaufortKrol, GCM; BinkBoelkens, MTE

    1997-01-01

    Atrial tachycardias, in particular atrial flutter after surgery for congenital heart disease, is associated with a high mortality. Treatment with various antiarrhythmic drugs and/or antitachycardia pacemakers is not very successful. Sotalol, a Class III drug, has shown to be a promising drug in adul

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fatal ischemic heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burstyn, I.; Kromhout, H.; Partanen, T.A.; Svane, O.; Langard, S.; Ahrens, W.; Kauppinen, T.; Stucker, I.; Shaham, J.; Heederik, D.; Ferro, G.; Heikkila, P.; Hooiveld, M.; Johansen, C.; Randem, B.G.; Boffetta, P.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have produced evidence that occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is a risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, a clear exposure-response relation has not been demonstrated. METHODS: We studied a

  6. Chance of surgery in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Vaartjes, Ilonca; van der Velde, Enno T.; Zomer, A. C.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Post, Marco C.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Hazekamp, Mark G.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    Background: Young patients with congenital heart disease reaching adulthood face mandatory transition to adult cardiology. Their new cardiologist needs to assess the chances of major future events such as surgery. Using a large national registry, we assessed if patient characteristics at the age of

  7. Who Is at Risk for Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who have diabetes, the disease counters the protective effects of estrogen. Overweight and Obesity The terms "overweight" and "obesity" refer to body ... pauses in breathing or shallow breaths while you sleep. Breathing pauses can ... an hour. Typically, normal breathing starts again after the pause, ...

  8. Vitamin D deficiency and heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilz, Stefan; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Drechsler, Christiane; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is present in the vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and correcting a poor vitamin D status is recommended as a treatment of CKD-mineral and bone disorders. In this review, we summarize the molecular and clinical data on the role of vitamin D status for

  9. Dynamic Heterogeneity of the Heart Valve Interstitial Cell Population in Mitral Valve Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tori E. Horne

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart valve interstitial cell (VIC population is dynamic and thought to mediate lay down and maintenance of the tri-laminar extracellular matrix (ECM structure within the developing and mature valve throughout life. Disturbances in the contribution and distribution of valve ECM components are detrimental to biomechanical function and associated with disease. This pathological process is associated with activation of resident VICs that in the absence of disease reside as quiescent cells. While these paradigms have been long standing, characterization of this abundant and ever-changing valve cell population is incomplete. Here we examine the expression pattern of Smooth muscle α-actin, Periostin, Twist1 and Vimentin in cultured VICs, heart valves from healthy embryonic, postnatal and adult mice, as well as mature valves from human patients and established mouse models of disease. We show that the VIC population is highly heterogeneous and phenotypes are dependent on age, species, location, and disease state. Furthermore, we identify phenotypic diversity across common models of mitral valve disease. These studies significantly contribute to characterizing the VIC population in health and disease and provide insights into the cellular dynamics that maintain valve structure in healthy adults and mediate pathologic remodeling in disease states.

  10. Autonomic regulation in fetuses with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Saira; Wilpers, Abigail; Myers, Michael; Nugent, J David; Fifer, William P; Williams, Ismée A

    2015-03-01

    Exposure to antenatal stressors affects autonomic regulation in fetuses. Whether the presence of congenital heart disease (CHD) alters the developmental trajectory of autonomic regulation is not known. This prospective observational cohort study aimed to further characterize autonomic regulation in fetuses with CHD; specifically hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), transposition of the great arteries (TGA), and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). From 11/2010 to 11/2012, 92 fetuses were enrolled: 41 controls and 51 with CHD consisting of 19 with HLHS, 12 with TGA, and 20 with TOF. Maternal abdominal fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were obtained at 3 gestational ages: 19-27 weeks (F1), 28-33 weeks (F2), and 34-38 weeks (F3). Fetal ECG was analyzed for mean heart rate along with 3 measures of autonomic variability of the fetal heart rate: interquartile range, standard deviation, and root mean square of the standard deviation of the heart rate (RMSSD), a measure of parasympathetic activity. During F1 and F2 periods, HLHS fetuses demonstrated significantly lower mean HR than controls (pHeart rate variability at F3, as measured by standard deviation, interquartile range, and RMSSD was lower in HLHS than controls (p<0.05). Other CHD subgroups showed a similar, though non-significant trend towards lower variability. Autonomic regulation in CHD fetuses differs from controls, with HLHS fetuses most markedly affected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of echogenicity of the heart in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Hazumu; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Uike, Kiyoshi; Nakashima, Yasutaka; Hirata, Yuichiro; Morihana, Eiji; Mizuno, Yumi; Ishikawa, Shiro; Hara, Toshiro

    2014-08-01

    Pathologic studies of the heart in patients with Kawasaki disease (KD) revealed vasculitis, valvulitis, myocarditis, and pericarditis. However, there have been no studies on the quantitative determination of multi-site echogenicity of the heart in KD patients. It is also undetermined whether the degree of echogenicity of each site of the heart in patients with KD might be related to the response to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment. In 81 KD patients and 30 control subjects, we prospectively analyzed echogenicity of the heart. Echogenicity was measured in four sites: coronary artery wall (CAW), mitral valve (MV), papillary muscle (PM), and ascending aortic wall (AAo wall) by the calibrated integrated backscatters (cIBs). The cIB values of all measurement sites at acute phase in KD patients were significantly higher than those in control subjects (KD patients vs control subjects; CAW, 19.8 ± 6.2 dB vs 14.5 ± 2.0 dB, p IVIG nonresponders were significantly higher than those in responders. Conclusion: Echogenicity of the heart in KD patients at the acute phase increased not only in the coronary artery wall but also in other parts of the heart. Echogenicity of CAW might be helpful in determining the unresponsiveness of IVIG treatment.

  12. Roles of FGF Signals in Heart Development, Health, and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Nobuyuki; Ohta, Hiroya; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika

    2016-01-01

    The heart provides the body with oxygen and nutrients and assists in the removal of metabolic waste through the blood vessels of the circulatory system. It is the first organ to form during embryonic morphogenesis. FGFs with diverse functions in development, health, and disease are signaling proteins, mostly as paracrine growth factors or endocrine hormones. The human/mouse FGF family comprises 22 members. Findings obtained from mouse models and human diseases with FGF signaling disorders hav...

  13. Urinary albumin excretion. An independent predictor of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch-Johnsen, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Strandgaard, S

    1999-01-01

    ischemic heart disease (IHD) in a population-based cohort. In 1983, urinary albumin and creatinine levels were measured, along with the conventional atherosclerotic risk factors, in 2085 consecutive participants without IHD, renal disease, urinary tract infection, or diabetes mellitus. The participants......Cross-sectional studies suggest that an increased urinary albumin excretion rate is associated with cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. The purpose of this study was to analyze prospectively whether the urinary albumin-to -creatinine (A/C) ratio can independently predict......, 1.3 to 3.9, P=0.002), and the 10-year disease-free survival decreased from 97% to 91% (P

  14. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is one...

  15. Three-dimensional Echocardiography in Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurklinsky, Andrew; Mankad, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    Recent technologic advances in 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography, using parallel processing to scan a pyramidal volume, have allowed for a superior ability to describe valvular anatomy using both transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography. Although still in evolution and at an early phase of adaptation with respect to its clinical application, 3D echocardiography has emerged as an important clinical tool in the assessment of valvular heart disease. Three-dimensional echocardiography provides unique perspectives of valvular structures by presenting "en face" views of valvular structures, allowing for a better understanding of the topographical aspects of pathology, and a refined definition of the spatial relationships of intracardiac structures. Three-dimensional echocardiography makes available indices not described by 2D echocardiography and has been demonstrated to be superior to 2D echocardiography in a variety of valvular disease scenarios. The information gained from 3D echocardiography has especially made an impact in guiding clinical decisions in the evaluation of mitral valve (MV) disease. The decision of early surgery in degenerative MV disease is based on the suitability of repair, and the suitability of repair is generally based on echocardiography. The superior understanding of MV anatomy afforded by 3D echocardiography has been shown to be quite valuable in this setting. This review will describe the contemporary use of 3D echocardiography in the assessment of valvular heart disease, including MV, aortic, tricuspid, and prosthetic valve abnormalities. This article illustrates how 3D echocardiography can complement current echocardiography techniques in the management of valvular heart disease.

  16. Clinical Significance of Serum Bilirubin Detection of Patient with Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAOLi; LUORui; ZHUANGDiankui

    2004-01-01

    To explore the relation between serum bilinabin and eoronary heart disease Methods Compare the level of serum bilinabin among patients with eoronary heart disease, patients with other disease and normal persons. Results The level of serum bilinabin of patients with coronary heart disease is higher than that of normal persons. Conclusion The reduction of density of serum bihrubin is one of the independent risk factors of coronary heart disease.

  17. Clinical Significance of Serum Bilirubin Detection of Patient with Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Li; LUO Rui; ZHUANG Diankui

    2004-01-01

    Objective To explore the relation between serum bilirubin and coronary heart disease.Methods Compare the level of serum bilirubin among patients with coronary heart disease, patients with other disease and normal persons. Results The level of serum bilirubin of patients with coronary heart disease is higher than that of normal persons. Conclusion The reduction of density of serum bilirubin is one of the independent risk factors of coronary heart disease.

  18. Awareness of heart disease among female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Laura R; Etnyre, Annette; Adams, Melinda; Herbers, Sharon; Witte, Amy; Horlen, Cheryl; Baynton, Sally; Estrada, Rosanna; Jones, Mary Elaine

    2010-12-01

    Awareness of heart disease as the leading cause of death in women has increased over the past 10 years, but little is known about the awareness level of college students. This study evaluated the level of awareness and knowledge of heart disease in women among college students. Using a cross-sectional design, a sample of 320 women from a private university was queried. A 13-item survey assessed demographic information and awareness of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The mean age was 23 years; the majority were single and of Hispanic ethnicity. Almost one third believed breast cancer was the greatest problem facing women. One half recognized CVD as the leading cause of death among women. Students aged 18-24 years were significantly less likely to identify heart disease/heart attack as the leading cause of death in women compared with students aged 25-34 years. Significant ethnic differences in perceptions of risk were found. Family history and obesity were seen as major contributors to CVD; less than a fourth ever discussed CVD with their healthcare provider. Information was gained primarily from television, magazines, and the Internet. Exercise and maintenance of healthy blood pressure were viewed as priorities in prevention of CVD. Results add to the body of research on CVD risk and the need for intervention to increase awareness and knowledge of heart disease risk among younger and ethnically diverse young women and raises questions about the role of colleges and universities in promotion of student health. Colleges and universities may provide the last opportunity to reach youth as a group to affect lifestyle changes.

  19. [Valvular heart disease in patients with anti-phospholipid syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Rodríguez, F J; Reverter Calatayud, J C; Font Franco, J; Espinosa Garriga, G; Tàssies Penella, D; Ingelmo Morin, M

    2002-10-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies (APA) may involve heart and valvular heart disease seems to be the most common clinical manifestation. To study the prevalence and characteristics of valvular heart disease in a large patient population with anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and also to analyze the clinical and immunological profile of patients with valvular involvement compared with those without involvement. Patients and methods. Retrospective analysis of 113 patients diagnosed of APS. Eighty-one percent were females and the mean age was 39 years (SD:14). Sixty-two percent of patients were diagnosed of primary APS (70 patients) and the remaining 38% (43 patients) corresponded to patients with APS associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The median follow-up of patients was 55 months (range: 7-144 months). The cardiologic assessment was performed by means of transthoracic echocardiogram. The study of anti-lupus anticoagulant (AL) was performed by means of coagulometric assays and measurement of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), anti-beta2 glycoprotein I (abeta2-PGI) and anti-prothrombin (aPT) by ELISA. The prevalence of valvular heart disease was 19%. The mitral valve was mostly involved (91%) and the most common structural abnormality corresponded to mitral insufficiency. Valvular replacement was required in 24% of patients. In the subgroup of patients with valvular heart disease, a significantly higher prevalence was observed in the following parameters: total thrombosis (71% versus 49%; p = 0.05), arterial thrombosis (57% versus 23%; p = 0.002), stroke (38% versus 13%; p = 0.01), trombocitopenia (71% versus 45%; p = 0.02), hemolytic anemia (29% versus 9%; p = 0.02), and livedo reticularis (48% versus 3%; p < 0.0001). As for immunological differences, only a higher prevalence of LA was found (81% versus 59%; p= 0.04) and abeta2-GPI (IgG isotype) (43% versus 22%; p = 0.05) in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is more frequent in pa

  20. Orthotropic heart transplantation for adult congenital heart disease: a case with heterotaxy and dextrocardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hikaru; Fukushima, Norihide; Ichikawa, Hajime; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-01-01

    A 41-year-old male with heterotaxy (left isomerism) and dextrocardia composed by single ventricle, absent inferior vena cava, bilateral superior vena cava (SVC), common atrioventricular valve has received orthotopic heart transplantation (HTx) after long waiting period as Status-1. Reconstructions of bilateral SVC and hepatic vein route were successful without use of prosthetic material, and the donor heart was placed in the left mediastinum. In spite of satisfactory early recovery, the patient expired 4 months after transplantation mainly from fungal infection which developed following humoral rejection. HTx for adult patients with complex congenital heart disease is demanding in technical as well as pre- and post-transplant management, and indication should be critically determined.

  1. Management of pulmonary hypertension from left heart disease in candidates for orthotopic heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulova, Anna; Gass, Alan L; Patibandla, Saikrishna; Gupta, Chhaya Aggarwal; Aronow, Wilbert S; Lanier, Gregg M

    2017-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in left heart disease (PH-LHD) commonly complicates prolonged heart failure (HF). When advanced, the PH becomes fixed or out of proportion and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing orthotopic heart transplant (OHT). To date, the only recommended treatment of out of proportion PH is the treatment of the underlying HF by reducing the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) with medications and often along with use of mechanical circulatory support. Medical therapies typically used in the treatment of World Health Organization (WHO) group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have been employed off-label in the setting of PH-LHD with varying efficacy and often negative outcomes. We will discuss the current standard of care including treating HF and use of mechanical circulatory support. In addition, we will review the studies published to date assessing the efficacy and safety of PAH medications in patients with PH-LHD being considered for OHT.

  2. Stem cells:An eventual treatment option for heart diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph; C; Bilgimol; Subbareddy; Ragupathi; Lakshmanan; Vengadassalapathy; Nathan; S; Senthil; Kali-muthu; Selvakumar; M; Ganesan; Sadananda; Rao; Manjunath

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are of global excitement for various diseases including heart diseases. It is worth to understand the mechanism or role of stem cells in the treatment of heart failure. Bone marrow derived stem cells are commonly practiced with an aim to improve the function of the heart. The majority of studies have been conducted with acute myocardial infarction and a few has been investigated with the use of stem cells for treating chronic or dilated cardiomyopathy. Heterogeneity in the treated group using stem cells has greatly emerged. Ever increasing demand for any alternative made is of at most priority for cardiomyopathy. Stem cells are of top priority with the current impact that has generated among physicians. However,meticulous selection of proper source is required since redundancy is clearly evident with the present survey. This review focuses on the methods adopted using stem cells for heart diseases and outcomes that are generated so far with an idea to determine the best therapeutic possibility in order to fulfill the present demand.

  3. Heart diseases and strokes in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the relevance of the problem associated with the diagnosis and treatment of stroke in young patients aged 15-45 years. It considers the major causes of acute cerebrovascular accidents in young people, including pregnant women. Diseases, such patent foramen ovale, mitral valve prolapse, infective endocarditis, and postpartum cardiomyopathy, are described in detail. The basic principles of the diagnosis and therapy of ischemic stroke at a young age are given. The mainstay of therapy for acute ischemic stroke is stated to include two procedures: reperfusion and neuronal protection.

  4. Temporally Distinct Six2-Positive Second Heart Field Progenitors Regulate Mammalian Heart Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengfang Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The embryonic process of forming a complex structure such as the heart remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Six2 marks a dynamic subset of second heart field progenitors. Six2-positive (Six2+ progenitors are rapidly recruited and assigned, and their descendants are allocated successively to regions of the heart from the right ventricle (RV to the pulmonary trunk. Global ablation of Six2+ progenitors resulted in RV hypoplasia and pulmonary atresia. An early stage-specific ablation of a small subset of Six2+ progenitors did not cause any apparent structural defect at birth but rather resulted in adult-onset cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. Furthermore, Six2 expression depends in part on Shh signaling, and Shh deletion resulted in severe deficiency of Six2+ progenitors. Collectively, these findings unveil the chronological features of cardiogenesis, in which the mammalian heart is built sequentially by temporally distinct populations of cardiac progenitors, and provide insights into late-onset congenital heart disease.

  5. The role of cardiac magnetic resonance in valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Mattei, Juan C; Shah, Dipan J

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of valvular heart disease is increasing as the population ages. In diagnosing individuals with valve disease, echocardiography is the primary imaging modality used by clinicians both for initial assessment and for longitudinal evaluation. However, in some cases cardiovascular magnetic resonance has become a viable alternative in that it can obtain imaging data in any plane prescribed by the scan operator, which makes it ideal for accurate investigation of all cardiac valves: aortic, mitral, pulmonic, and tricuspid. In addition, CMR for valve assessment is noninvasive, free of ionizing radiation, and in most instances does not require contrast administration. The objectives of a comprehensive CMR study for evaluating valvular heart disease are threefold: (1) to provide insight into the mechanism of the valvular lesion (via anatomic assessment), (2) to quantify the severity of the valvular lesion, and (3) to discern the consequences of the valvular lesion.

  6. Fatigue, General Health, and Ischemic Heart Disease in Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekmann, Anette; Petersen, Inge; Mänty, Minna Regina

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds.Fatigue has been shown to predict ischemic heart disease (IHD) and mortality in nonsmoking middle-aged men free of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of fatigue for IHD and general health in nondisabled individuals free...... of cardiovascular disease and older than 70 years. METHODS: The study population was drawn from The Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins. In total, 1,696 participants were followed up for 2-10 years by questionnaires and 10-16 years through registries. Kaplan Meier, Cox Proportional Hazard and logistic......-related diagnoses, no use of heart medication, sustained good mobility, and participation at follow-up. IHD was defined as first hospitalization due to IHD (ICD10: I20-I25) or death due to IHD as primary cause. RESULTS: Participants without fatigue had higher chances of a sustained good general health at 2 (odds...

  7. Reducing heart disease through the vegetarian diet using primary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticher, Megan A; Smith, Christine B; Davidson, Susan

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate research on the vegetarian diet for its safety, effectiveness in reducing heart disease, special considerations, contraindications, and its association with decreased cardiovascular disease risk. Selected research and evidence-based dietary guidelines found by searching CINAHL, PubMed, Ovid databases, and the World Wide Web. A carefully planned vegetarian diet with adequate supplementation may be effective for primary prevention of heart disease. The vegetarian diet is cost effective, safe, and relatively easy to implement. Improved dietary choices can help improve many chronic conditions. Guidelines for proper nutrition within a vegetarian lifestyle are readily accessible to patients and professionals alike. Referral to a dietitian is an appropriate option in primary care settings.

  8. Micro- and macrovascular treatment targets in scleroderma heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulas, Theodoros; Giannakoulas, George; Karvounis, Haralambos; Garyfallos, Alexandros; Settas, Lucas; Kitas, George D

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a frequent visceral complication that considerably affects the prognosis of the disease. The pathophysiologic hallmark is myocardial fibrosis which can progress leading to arrhythmia, right and/or left heart dysfunction and failure. Symptoms range from unusual to prominent and from mild to dramatic, but clinically overt disease is a poor prognostic factor. Primary myocardial involvement is related to focal ischemia due to transient coronary spasm, and the available data support that microvascular functional and structural abnormalities rather than macrovascular coronary involvement represent the main underlying mechanism of the disease. However, the existence and prevalence of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease in SSc remain to be determined, as several studies have generated conflicting reports. Despite the lack of effective targeted therapy for SSc itself, sensitive and quantitative techniques have demonstrated the ability of vasodilators to improve myocardial function and perfusion and to prevent the evolution of subclinical heart involvement to decompensated heart failure. Further research will provide a better understanding of the disease by detecting the potent contribution of coronary artery involvement, explaining differences in accelerated atherosclerosis between SSc and other autoimmune disorders, and opening directions for the development of novel treatment strategies for this life-threatening complication of SSc.

  9. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Recognition, Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Mi; Merz, C Noel Bairey

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent causes of death in both males and females throughout the world. However, women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This paradoxical sex difference appears to be linked to a sex-specific pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia including coronary microvascular dysfunction, a component of the 'Yentl Syndrome'. Accordingly, the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) is more appropriate for a discussion specific to women rather than CAD or coronary heart disease. Following the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Heart Truth/American Heart Association, Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation and guideline campaigns, the cardiovascular mortality in women has been decreased, although significant gender gaps in clinical outcomes still exist. Women less likely undergo testing, yet guidelines indicate that symptomatic women at intermediate to high IHD risk should have further test (e.g. exercise treadmill test or stress imaging) for myocardial ischemia and prognosis. Further, women have suboptimal use of evidence-based guideline therapies compared with men with and without obstructive CAD. Anti-anginal and anti-atherosclerotic strategies are effective for symptom and ischemia management in women with evidence of ischemia and nonobstructive CAD, although more female-specific study is needed. IHD guidelines are not "cardiac catheterization" based but related to evidence of "myocardial ischemia and angina". A simplified approach to IHD management with ABCs (aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-renin blockers, beta blockers, cholesterol management and statin) should be used and can help to increases adherence to guidelines.

  10. Cardiovascular microRNAs: as modulators and diagnostic biomarkers of diabetic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Shruti; Manning, Patrick; Katare, Rajesh

    2014-02-14

    Diabetic heart disease (DHD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the people with diabetes, with approximately 80% of the deaths in diabetics are due to cardiovascular complications. Importantly, heart disease in the diabetics develop at a much earlier stage, although remaining asymptomatic till the later stage of the disease, thereby restricting its early detection and active therapeutic management. Thus, a better understanding of the modulators involved in the pathophysiology of DHD is necessary for the early diagnosis and development of novel therapeutic implications for diabetes-associated cardiovascular complications. microRNAs (miRs) have recently been evolved as key players in the various cardiovascular events through the regulation of cardiac gene expression. Besides their credible involvement in controlling the cellular processes, they are also released in to the circulation in disease states where they serve as potential diagnostic biomarkers for cardiovascular disease. However, their potential role in DHD as modulators as well as diagnostic biomarkers is largely unexplored. In this review, we describe the putative mechanisms of the selected cardiovascular miRs in relation to cardiovascular diseases and discuss their possible involvement in the pathophysiology and early diagnosis of DHD.

  11. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Community Medicine

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  12. Establishment of an Australian National Genetic Heart Disease Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Jodie; McGaughran, Julie; Vohra, Jitendra; Weintraub, Robert G; Davis, Andrew; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2008-12-01

    A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry has recently been established, with the aim to enroll every family in Australia with a genetically determined cardiomyopathy or primary arrhythmic disorder. The Registry seeks to further our understanding of the impact and burden of disease in this population; increase awareness and provide education to health professionals and families; and establish a large cardiac genetic cohort as a resource for approved research studies. The Registry is currently recruiting families with inherited cardiomyopathies (e.g. hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) and primary arrhythmogenic disorders (e.g. long QT syndrome), with scope to expand this in the future. Affected individuals, as well as their first-degree (at-risk) family members are eligible to enroll. Participants are currently being recruited from cardiac genetics clinics in approved recruitment sites and hope to expand to other Australian centres including general cardiology practice in the future. A significant focus of the Registry is to improve understanding and create awareness of inherited heart diseases, which includes ensuring families are aware of genetic testing options and current clinical screening recommendations for at-risk family members. A Registry Advisory Committee has been established under the NHMRC Guidelines, and includes a representative from each major recruitment centre. This committee approves all decisions relating to the Registry including approval of research studies. A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry will provide a valuable resource to further our knowledge of the clinical and genetic aspects of these diseases. Since most of the current data about the prevalence, natural history and outcomes of genetic heart diseases has emanated from the United States and Europe, characterising these Australian populations will be of significant benefit, allowing for more informed and specific health care planning and resource provision.

  13. Gene therapy for ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malosky, S; Kolansky, D M

    1996-07-01

    Gene therapy techniques are being developed as potential treatments for dyslipidemias, coronary restenosis, and vein graft disease. Retroviral and now adenoviral gene delivery techniques are being studied. A human protocol for the treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia has recently been completed using ex vivo hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor gene transfer via a retroviral vector. Work in most other areas is currently in the animal model stage. Significant progress has been made in the area of coronary restenosis, particularly in identifying target genes to reduce neointima formation, such as herpesvirus thymidine kinase and the retinoblastoma gene. Work also continues in developing strategies to decrease neointima formation in vein grafts used in coronary bypass surgery and in improving methods of myocardial protection during surgery.

  14. Stem cell therapy for chronic ischaemic heart disease and congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Sheila A; Doree, Carolyn; Mathur, Anthony; Taggart, David P; Martin-Rendon, Enca

    2016-12-24

    A promising approach to the treatment of chronic ischaemic heart disease and congestive heart failure is the use of stem cells. The last decade has seen a plethora of randomised controlled trials developed worldwide, which have generated conflicting results. The critical evaluation of clinical evidence on the safety and efficacy of autologous adult bone marrow-derived stem/progenitor cells as a treatment for chronic ischaemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. We searched CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, LILACS, and four ongoing trial databases for relevant trials up to 14 December 2015. Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials comparing autologous adult stem/progenitor cells with no cells in people with chronic ischaemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. We included co-interventions, such as primary angioplasty, surgery, or administration of stem cell mobilising agents, when administered to treatment and control arms equally. Two review authors independently screened all references for eligibility, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. We undertook a quantitative evaluation of data using random-effects meta-analyses. We evaluated heterogeneity using the I(2) statistic and explored substantial heterogeneity (I(2) greater than 50%) through subgroup analyses. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We created a 'Summary of findings' table using GRADEprofiler (GRADEpro), excluding studies with a high or unclear risk of selection bias. We focused our summary of findings on long-term follow-up of mortality, morbidity outcomes, and left ventricular ejection fraction measured by magnetic resonance imaging. We included 38 randomised controlled trials involving 1907 participants (1114 cell therapy, 793 controls) in this review update. Twenty-three trials were at high or unclear risk of selection bias. Other sources of potential bias included lack of blinding of participants (12 trials) and

  15. Poor Diet Tied to Half of U.S. Deaths from Heart Disease, Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diet Tied to Half of U.S. Deaths From Heart Disease, Diabetes Study explores which foods and nutrients may ... HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease, stroke and diabetes in the United States are ...

  16. Heart Disease Could Cost U.S. $1 Trillion Per Year by 2035: Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163587.html Heart Disease Could Cost U.S. $1 Trillion Per Year By ... estimates that nearly half of Americans will have heart disease in less than 20 years To use the ...

  17. Women and heart disease, the underrecognized burden: sex differences, biases, and unmet clinical and research challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Stacy; Wenger, Nanette K

    2016-04-01

    For many years the significance of heart disease in women was vastly underappreciated, and women were significantly underrepresented in cardiovascular clinical research. We now know that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for women. Women and men share many similarities in the pathophysiology and manifestations of heart disease. However, as research advances with the continued inclusion of more women, knowledge about gender differences between the female and male heart, both on a physiological and pathophysiological basis, grows. These differences can be found in all domains of cardiovascular health and disease, including heart rhythm, heart failure, coronary disease and valvular disease. Further understanding of gender differences in the heart is crucial for advancing our ability to maintain a healthy population and identify and treat heart disease in both women and men. Specific examples within the spectrum of heart disease will be discussed in this review paper, and areas for further research will be proposed.

  18. Women and Heart Disease | Healthy Blood Pressure | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure Women and Heart Disease Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Photos: ... still underestimate their own personal risk of getting heart disease.” "Having even one risk factor can double a ...

  19. Early complications of stenting in patients with congenital heart disease : a multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gameren, Menno; Witsenburg, Maarten; Takkenberg, Johanna J. M.; Boshoff, Derize; Mertens, Luc; van Oort, Anton M.; de Wolf, DanieL; Freund, Matthias; Sreeram, Narayanswani; Bokenkamp, Regina; Talsma, Melle D.; Gewillig, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Aims Stenting has become an established interventional cardiology procedure for congenital heart disease. Although most stent procedures are completed successfully, complications may occur. This multicentre study evaluated early complications after stenting in patients with congenital heart disease,

  20. Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn JavaScript on. Heart Disease Doesn't Care What You Wear Past Issues / ... matter how great you look on the outside, heart disease can strike on the inside. And being a ...