WorldWideScience

Sample records for healthy cooking recipes

  1. Smart Substitutions for Healthy Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  2. Healthy Cooking Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Nutrition and healthy eating Healthy-cooking techniques capture the flavor and nutrients of food without extra fat or salt. By Mayo Clinic Staff Healthy cooking doesn't mean that ...

  3. Mommio's Recipe Box: Assessment of the Cooking Habits of Mothers of Preschoolers and Their Perceptions of Recipes for a Video Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Maciel; Brand, Leah; Beltran, Alicia; Dadabhoy, Hafza; Chen, Tzu-An; O'Connor, Teresia M; Hughes, Sheryl O; Baranowski, Tom; Buday, Richard; Nicklas, Theresa A; Baranowski, Janice

    2017-10-17

    Vegetables are an important part of a healthy diet because they help prevent several chronic diseases. Mothers of preschoolers reported difficulty getting their young children to eat vegetables, and many did not know how to cook child-pleasing recipes. The cooking habits of mothers of preschoolers, their perceptions of recipes designed for their children, and the involvement of their children in food preparation were assessed to inform a food parenting video game called Mommio. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Eligibility criteria included mothers of 3- to 5-year-old children who reported difficulty getting their children to eat vegetables. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire with questions about their food preparation practices. They were asked to select up to 4 of the 10 provided recipes they wanted to try and to prepare and report back on their experiences. Most (46) of the 50 recipes included in Mommio's in-game recipe box were evaluated at least once and some up to 5 times with a total of 85 evaluations. This well-educated, mostly employed, sample of 27 mothers of preschoolers preferred simple, quick recipes. They ate primarily at home, made dinners from scratch, and indicated that the 46 recipes were generally simple, quick, and easy to prepare. Involvement in preparation enhanced their child's acceptance of the food. Prior food and preparation preferences influenced the children's acceptance of the dish at the ensuing meal. The high rate of home recipe preparation indicated that including a recipe selection and preparation component in a food parenting video game could be attractive and may enhance effectiveness. Mothers reported that the recipes provided were generally easy to prepare, tasted good, and the instructions were easy to understand, suggesting they could be helpful to the mothers when playing a vegetable parenting game. Some mothers reported that involving their children in recipe preparation influenced their children

  4. Mommio’s Recipe Box: Assessment of the Cooking Habits of Mothers of Preschoolers and Their Perceptions of Recipes for a Video Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Maciel; Brand, Leah; Beltran, Alicia; Dadabhoy, Hafza; Chen, Tzu-An; O'Connor, Teresia M; Hughes, Sheryl O; Buday, Richard; Nicklas, Theresa A; Baranowski, Janice

    2017-01-01

    Background Vegetables are an important part of a healthy diet because they help prevent several chronic diseases. Mothers of preschoolers reported difficulty getting their young children to eat vegetables, and many did not know how to cook child-pleasing recipes. Objective The cooking habits of mothers of preschoolers, their perceptions of recipes designed for their children, and the involvement of their children in food preparation were assessed to inform a food parenting video game called Mommio. Methods A cross-sectional survey design was used. Eligibility criteria included mothers of 3- to 5-year-old children who reported difficulty getting their children to eat vegetables. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire with questions about their food preparation practices. They were asked to select up to 4 of the 10 provided recipes they wanted to try and to prepare and report back on their experiences. Results Most (46) of the 50 recipes included in Mommio’s in-game recipe box were evaluated at least once and some up to 5 times with a total of 85 evaluations. This well-educated, mostly employed, sample of 27 mothers of preschoolers preferred simple, quick recipes. They ate primarily at home, made dinners from scratch, and indicated that the 46 recipes were generally simple, quick, and easy to prepare. Involvement in preparation enhanced their child’s acceptance of the food. Prior food and preparation preferences influenced the children’s acceptance of the dish at the ensuing meal. Conclusions The high rate of home recipe preparation indicated that including a recipe selection and preparation component in a food parenting video game could be attractive and may enhance effectiveness. Mothers reported that the recipes provided were generally easy to prepare, tasted good, and the instructions were easy to understand, suggesting they could be helpful to the mothers when playing a vegetable parenting game. Some mothers reported that involving their

  5. Evaluation of owner experiences and adherence to home-cooked diet recipes for dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L N; Linder, D E; Heinze, C R; Kehs, R L; Freeman, L M

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate owner experiences and adherence to home-cooked diet recipes for dogs. Clients of a veterinary teaching hospital clinical nutrition service who had a home-cooked diet recipe formulated for their dogs between March 2011 and December 2013 were given a survey by email, postal mail and telephone. Survey questions addressed motivations, positive and negative aspects of feeding home-cooked diets and current feeding practices. Responses were compared to animals' medical records to determine adherence. Of the 93 owners who were contacted, 53 (57%) completed the survey. Of the 53 respondents, 43 owners (81%) reported that they were still feeding an home-cooked diet or had fed an home-cooked diet until the time of their dogs' deaths. The most common motivation for feeding a home-cooked diet was suitability for specific medical needs. Of the 30 surveys that included a complete diet history, only four (13%) demonstrated exact adherence to home-cooked diet recipes. Most respondents liked and continued to feed a home-cooked diet, but few owners adhered to prescribed recipes and many dogs required recipe modifications. It is important to counsel dog owners about benefits and drawbacks of feeding home-cooked diets, importance of recipe adherence and necessity for follow-up after diet formulation with a board-certified veterinary nutritionist. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  6. A Cooking Recipe Recommendation System with Visual Recognition of Food Ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Yanai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a cooking recipe recommendation system which runs on a consumer smartphone as an interactive mobile application. The proposed system employs real-time visual object recognition of food ingredients, and recommends cooking recipes related to the recognized food ingredients. Because of visual recognition, by only pointing a built-in camera on a smartphone to food ingredients, a user can get to know a related cooking recipes instantly. The objective of the proposed system is to assist people who cook to decide a cooking recipe at grocery stores or at a kitchen. In the current implementation, the system can recognize 30 kinds of food ingredient in 0.15 seconds, and it has achieved the 83.93% recognition rate within the top six candidates. By the user study, we confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  7. Cooking Up U.S. History: Recipes and Research To Share with Children. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchers, Suzanne I.; Marden, Patricia C.

    Focusing on the rich heritage of North American cooking, this resource encourages teachers of elementary and middle school students to use cooking experiences when teaching about U.S. history. More than 100 recipes are grouped by historical periods, by the cultural groups, or regional areas which influenced food preferences at that time. Recipes…

  8. Recipe Modification Improves Food Safety Practices during Cooking of Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Curtis; Godwin, Sandria; Chambers, Delores; Chambers, Edgar

    2016-08-01

    Many consumers do not practice proper food safety behaviors when preparing food in the home. Several approaches have been taken to improve food safety behaviors among consumers, but there still is a deficit in actual practice of these behaviors. The objective of this study was to assess whether the introduction of food safety instructions in recipes for chicken breasts and ground turkey patties would improve consumers' food safety behaviors during preparation. In total, 155 consumers in two locations (Manhattan, KS, and Nashville, TN) were asked to prepare a baked chicken breast and a ground turkey patty following recipes that either did or did not contain food safety instructions. They were observed to track hand washing and thermometer use. Participants who received recipes with food safety instructions (n = 73) demonstrated significantly improved food safety preparation behaviors compared with those who did not have food safety instructions in the recipe (n = 82). In addition, the majority of consumers stated that they thought the recipes with instructions were easy to use and that they would be likely to use similar recipes at home. This study demonstrates that recipes could be a good source of food safety information for consumers and that they have the potential to improve behaviors to reduce foodborne illness.

  9. Earth Science Data Education through Cooking Up Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, A. M.; Maskey, M.; Smith, T.; Conover, H.

    2016-12-01

    One of the major challenges in Earth science research and applications is understanding and applying the proper methods, tools, and software for using scientific data. These techniques are often difficult and time consuming to identify, requiring novel users to conduct extensive research, take classes, and reach out for assistance, thus hindering scientific discovery and real-world applications. To address these challenges, the Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) DAAC has developed a series of data recipes that novel users such as students, decision makers, and general Earth scientists can leverage to learn how to use Earth science datasets. Once the data recipe content had been finalized, GHRC computer and Earth scientists collaborated with a web and graphic designer to ensure the content is both attractively presented to data users, and clearly communicated to promote the education and use of Earth science data. The completed data recipes include, but are not limited to, tutorials, iPython Notebooks, resources, and tools necessary for addressing key difficulties in data use across a broad user base. These recipes enable non-traditional users to learn how to use data, but also curates and communicates common methods and approaches that may be difficult and time consuming for these users to identify.

  10. Recipe for success: cooking and food in business metaphors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina Oana Nicolae

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article sets out to disclose the range of applications and implications of the business media metaphors that draw on the more familiar cognitive domain related to food and cooking. The conclusions rely on a corpus-based approach, while the theoretical framework is provided by cognitive semantics.

  11. RECIPE Rx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    As we started planning this issue on food and nutrition, we kept hearing about the importance of cooking. If physicians are going to be credible when talking to patients about healthy eating, they ought to know something about making a healthy meal, right? They might even want to share a recipe. We know many physicians and medical students like to cook, and we thought it would be fun to find out what they are making. So we asked you to share your favorite healthy recipes with us. The following are a few that we received. We’ll post these and others on our website (mnmed.org). Try them out and share them with your patients and colleagues. Also feel free to send us your favorite. We’ll add it to the collection.

  12. Recipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Prince

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available After a distinction is made between avant-garde texts, post-modernist texts, and experimental texts, it is argued that the latter consist in the productions and products of recipes for textual rewritings. These rewritings must be systematic, bear on formal as opposed to contentual matters, and have as a dominant the exploration of writing rather than self or world. Furthermore, they may be more or less impersonal, explicit, massive, and new. To put it in other words, an experimental text is one that is taken to substitute the being of writing for the writing of being.

  13. Home cooking trends and dietary illness: nutritional compliance of recipes in a Swedish food magazine 1970-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muharemovic, Kanita; Taboul, Nicole; Håkansson, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the trends in nutritional compliance of recipes from a Swedish food magazine to offer a perspective on the effects of home cooking on public health. The nutritional content of 654 recipes from magazine issues published in 1970, 1980, 2000, and 2010 were collected. The recipes were analyzed for macronutrient energy contribution, sodium content, and composition. The recipes were in poor agreement with nutritional recommendations (excessive fat, protein, and sodium and insufficient carbohydrate and fiber content). Significant changes between 1970 and 2010 were the increased calorific contribution of fat (from 38 to 46%) and the reduced contribution of proteins (from 27 to 21%). The calorific contribution from spreads, cheese, bread, and fruit and vegetables have increased significantly, whereas the contribution from meat has decreased significantly. The poor nutritional compliance identified in this work indicates that consumers using the recipes as norms for home cooking risk following an unhealthy diet. This might have adverse effects on public health. However, the recipes have not become less compliant over time and therefore the data do not show an adverse trend in these norms. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  14. Improving diet recipe and cooking methods attenuates hyperphosphatemia in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, N; Fang, W; Gu, A P; Yuan, J Z; Yang, X X; Lin, A W; Ni, Z H; Qian, J Q

    2015-09-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is an independent predictor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). The study aimed to investigate the effect of dietary intervention on reducing serum phosphate concentration in hyperphosphatemic PD patients. In this single-center clinical trial, 97 prevalent PD patients with serum phosphate concentration ≥ 1.6 mmol/l were allocated to the intervention (n = 48) or control (n = 49) group and followed up for 1 year. In addition to phosphate binder (calcium carbonate) therapy, patients in the intervention group were intensively educated to reduce phosphate-rich food intake and improve cooking methods. While stable in the control group (1.97 ± 0.20 to 1.94 ± 0.35 mmol/l, p > 0.05), the serum phosphate concentration decreased significantly in the intervention group (1.98 ± 0.28 to 1.65 ± 0.33 mmol/l, p = 0.015) concurrently with the drop in dietary phosphate intake (13.03 ± 3.39 to 10.82 ± 3.00 mg/kg ideal body weight/day, p = 0.001). Moreover, after 6 months of intervention, fewer patients needed to use calcium carbonate (from 64.6% to 41.5%, p = 0.029) and the medicine dose reduced significantly (from 2.25 (0, 3.94) to 0 (0, 1.50) g/day, p cooking methods attenuated hyperphosphatemia in PD patients. It suggests that regular assessment of dietary phosphate intake and modification of diet recipe and cooking methods are essential for hyperphosphatemia treatment in PD patients in addition to phosphate binder therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Adventures in Cooking: A Collection of Recipes for Use in Nursery Schools, Day Care Centers, Head Start Programs, Kindergartens, and Primary Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Florence P.

    This is a collection of recipes which children involved in early childhood education centers can prepare for their own consumption. The recipes were contributed by teachers in such schools based on their own successful experiences in using cooking as a learning experience for children to incorporate and integrate a number of intellectual tasks,…

  16. Nutritional value of traditional Italian meat-based dishes: influence of cooking methods and recipe formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Evoli, L; Salvatore, P; Lucarini, M; Nicoli, S; Aguzzi, A; Gabrielli, P; Lombardi-Boccia, G

    2009-01-01

    The present study provides a picture of the compositional figure and nutritive value of meat-based dishes typical of Italian culinary tradition. Recipes specific for a bovine meat cut (top-side) were selected among the most widespread ones in Italy: in pan, pizzaiola, cutlet, meat ball, and escalope. The total fat and cholesterol content varied depending on the ingredients utilized (extra-virgin olive oil, parmesan, egg). Meat-based dishes that utilized extra-virgin olive oil showed a significant reduction in palmitic and stearic acids and a parallel increase in oleic acid compared with raw meat; furthermore, the ratio among saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids shifted in favour of monounsaturated fatty acids. B vitamins were affected at different extent by heating; by contrast, vitamin E content increased because of the new sources of this vitamin, which masked losses due to heating. Ingredients (parmesan, discretionary salt) induced significant increases in the calcium and sodium concentrations compared with raw meat. The total iron content did not show marked differences in most of the meat-based dishes compared with raw meat; by contrast, losses in the heme-iron concentration were detected depending on the severity of heating treatments. Our findings suggest that heme iron, because of its important health aspects, might be a useful index of the nutritional quality of cooked meats.

  17. Muskox Milk, Ptarmigan Pie and Other Northern Delicacies (Kids Can Cook): Recipes and Related Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Territories Dept. of Education, Yellowknife.

    This profusely illustrated book of recipes encourages the use of foods in children's learning activities, especially foods that are harvested in the Northwest Territories of Canada and that play a role in health maintenance. The activities described also provide an opportunity for children to experience new foods. Introductory material includes…

  18. Now You're Cooking! Heat Transfer Labs: From Basic Recipes to Full Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzard, Edmund

    2012-01-01

    A recipe is a great way to learn about the procedure and the variables (or "ingredients") involved. Cookbooks are comforting and valuable: They're easy to follow, and people know what they'll get. The problem is that cookbook labs end just when things get interesting. The excitement of science is in understanding the discovery and pursuing the…

  19. Comparison of Self-Prompting of Cooking Skills via Picture-Based Cookbooks and Video Recipes

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    Mechling, Linda C.; Stephens, Erin

    2009-01-01

    This investigation compared the use of static picture prompting, in a cookbook format, and video prompting to self-prompt four students with moderate intellectual disabilities to independently complete multi-step cooking tasks. An adapted alternating treatments design (AATD) with baseline, alternating treatments, and final treatment condition, was…

  20. An evidence-based conceptual framework of healthy cooking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Raber

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Eating out of the home has been positively associated with body weight, obesity, and poor diet quality. While cooking at home has declined steadily over the last several decades, the benefits of home cooking have gained attention in recent years and many healthy cooking projects have emerged around the United States. The purpose of this study was to develop an evidence-based conceptual framework of healthy cooking behavior in relation to chronic disease prevention. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken using broad search terms. Studies analyzing the impact of cooking behaviors across a range of disciplines were included. Experts in the field reviewed the resulting constructs in a small focus group. The model was developed from the extant literature on the subject with 59 studies informing 5 individual constructs (frequency, techniques and methods, minimal usage, flavoring, and ingredient additions/replacements, further defined by a series of individual behaviors. Face validity of these constructs was supported by the focus group. A validated conceptual model is a significant step toward better understanding the relationship between cooking, disease and disease prevention and may serve as a base for future assessment tools and curricula.

  1. Recipe for an Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abilock, Debbie; Williams, Connie

    2014-01-01

    In this article Debbie Abilock and Connie Williams apply the processes used by a food testing organization that strives to develop absolutely the best recipes for popular dishes, testing each recipe until they arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most fool-proof recipe…

  2. A Cooking Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Wynn D., Ed.

    This cooking curriculum, issued by the Washington District Early Childhood Council, details specific ways in which language arts, math, science, and social studies may be taught through cooking specific recipes. Cooking activities and recipes are presented for the fall, winter, and spring months, and guidelines are provided for preparing…

  3. [Convenience foods -- a simple way of healthy cooking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentsch, N; Mühlemann, P; Baumgartner-Perren, S; Exl-Preysch, B M

    2001-09-01

    Convenience foods stand for a culinary revolution that commenced just over 100 years ago. The food industry came into being parallel to industrialization and urbanization. Nicolas Appert invented the can at that time and Julius Maggi invented dehydrated soup. Today convenience foods--from powdered spices to ready-to-eat dishes--are prepared using state-of-the-art technology and offer a ubiquitous range of healthy, easy-to-serve foods.

  4. Dietary Recommendations for Healthy Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  5. Healthy Post-Play Snacks

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    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  6. Vitamin Supplements: Healthy or Hoax?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  7. Healthy cooking classes at a children’s cancer hospital and patient/survivor summer camp: initial reactions and feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raber, Margaret; Crawford, Karla; Chandra, Joya

    2018-01-01

    Objective Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) have been shown to practice sub-optimal dietary intake and may benefit from nutrition interventions during and after treatment. Cooking classes have become popular for encouraging healthy eating behaviors in community-based programming and academic research, however, literature on teaching cooking classes in CCS is limited. The purpose of this study is to address the development and implementation of classes for CCS based on a recently developed framework of healthy cooking behavior. Design A conceptual framework was developed from a systematic literature review and used to guide healthy cooking classes for CCS in different settings. Setting One pediatric cancer hospital inpatient unit, one pediatric cancer in-hospital camp program and two off-site pediatric cancer summer camp programs. Subjects One hundred and eighty nine CCS of varying ages and thirteen parents of CCS. Results Seventeen classes were taught at camps and seven classes in the hospital inpatient unit. Healthy cooking classes based on the conceptual framework are feasible and were well received by CCS. Conclusions Cooking classes for CCS, both at the hospital and at camp, reinforced the principles of the conceptual framework. Future trials should assess the dietary and anthropometric impact of evidence-based healthy cooking classes in CCS. PMID:28463101

  8. Culinary recipes: orality and scripturality (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Milică

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The international research devoted to the study of recipes is a flourishing area of scientific inquiry. The study of cooking recipes is an emerging scientific area in contemporary Romanian linguistics. The aim of this first part of our research is to grasp, from a semiotic angle, a set of basic features to account for a larger project of culinary text linguistics. The paper outlines the major European culinary traditions, the compositional patterns of cooking recipes and their isotopies. Moreover, we examine several textual features of recipes employing the model of Beaugrande & Dressler (1981; however, the analysis is not strictly conducted within the framework of the chosen model as other interpretative frameworks may be adopted to reveal the textual properties of recipes.

  9. Ingredients and meals rather than recipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woolrych, Alan; Hornbæk, Kasper; Frøkjær, Erik

    2011-01-01

    scheme for evaluation resources is developed, and the scheme is extended with project specific resources that impact the effective use of methods. With these reviews and analyses in place, implications for research, teaching, and practice are derived. Throughout, the article draws on culinary analogies...... approaches to usability that are new to them. As with culinary dishes, HCI needs to focus more on what gets cooked, and how it gets cooked, and not just on how recipes suggest that it could be cooked....

  10. Healthy Foods under $1 Per Serving

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    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  11. Search Recipes

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    ... Cost: Makes: 8 servings 3-Can Chili Favorite Cookbook With almost no cooking required to prepare this chili , just open cans of beans, corn, and tomatoes, and heat everything together in a pan! Rating: Total Cost: Makes: 6 Servings 30-Minute ...

  12. Culinary efficacy: an exploratory study of skills, confidence, and healthy cooking competencies among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Douglas W; Mahadevan, Meena; Gatto, Kelsey; O'Connor, Kaitlyn; Fissinger, Alexis; Bailey, Dylan; Cassara, Eric

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether a group of college-age students in New Jersey, USA, had the requisite culinary skills, knowledge, and confidence to take personal control of their meal planning and production. The long-term threat to the public health systems posed by high rates of obesity among young adults in higher education institutions has garnered widespread attention across the world. Studies have shown that assuming personal responsibility over preparing and consuming food can play a key role in addressing the problem of poor nutrient intakes. Focus groups were conducted with students (N = 24) who fit the eligibility criteria of not having a university meal plan, and living independently at the time of the study (not with family members). The sessions were recorded, transcribed, and then coded into themes. Two trained research assistants tested the results and inter-rater reliability was confirmed. Content analysis revealed three major themes: Health Perceptions, Life influences, and Barriers to Cooking and Eating Healthy. The students' comments indicated that while they had a basic knowledge of the key principles of eating a balanced diet, it may not have necessarily translated into actual food choices and cooking practices. Several students reported an overreliance on processed and prepared foods, and they consumed few fruits and vegetables. Factors such as lack of culinary knowledge and skill, financial instability, inadequate access to healthy food options, and other time/lifestyle constraints may have played a significant role in limiting their ability to prepare and consume healthy meals. The findings of this study highlight the importance of designing programmes with effective strategies to motivate and encourage college students to improve their food behaviours and practices. © Royal Society for Public Health 2015.

  13. Keep the Beat Recipes | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Beat Recipes: Deliciously Healthy Dinners. The new cookbook features 75 simple and delicious recipes influenced by ... nhlbi.nih.gov/files/docs/public/heart/Dinners_Cookbook_508-compliant.pdf . Fall 2011 Issue: Volume 6 ...

  14. Can Processed Foods Be Part of a Healthy Diet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  15. Is scratch-cooking a cost-effective way to prepare healthy school meals with US Department of Agriculture foods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward-Lopez, Gail; Kao, Janice; Kiesel, Kristin; Lewis Miller, Markell; Boyle, Maria; Drago-Ferguson, Soledad; Braff-Guajardo, Ellen; Crawford, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    Despite the resurgence of interest in scratch-cooking as a way to increase the quality and appeal of school meals, many school districts are concerned about the cost implications of switching to scratch-cooking. US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Foods are the single largest source of ingredients for school meals, and about half of USDA Foods are diverted for processing before being sent to the school district. We aimed to determine whether school lunch entrées made in a district from basic or raw USDA Foods ingredients can be healthier and less expensive to prepare than those sent to external processors. This cross-sectional study examined the relationship between the extent of scratch-cooking and the nutritional content and cost to prepare entrées. Information was gathered by interview with school foodservice personnel and from school foodservice records from a convenience sample of 10 school districts in California that employed varying degrees of scratch-cooking and is diverse in terms of geographic location and the sociodemographics of the student body. The sample included all elementary school lunch entrées that contain USDA Foods offered during October 2010 for a total sample of 146 entrées. Ordinary least squares regressions were used to test for statistically significant differences in cost and nutrient content of entrées according to the level of scratch-cooking. There was no significant relationship between total costs and level of scratch-cooking. Entrées with the highest scratch-cooking scores had significantly lower food costs, higher labor costs, and not significantly different total costs compared with entrées with no scratch-cooking. Nutrient content was not consistently associated with scratch-cooking, but scratch-cooked entrées did include a larger variety of non-fast-food-type entrées. The findings suggest that scratch-cooking can be a cost-effective way to expand the variety of healthy school lunches prepared with USDA Foods

  16. Evaluation of the “Eat Better Feel Better” Cooking Programme to Tackle Barriers to Healthy Eating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada L. Garcia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated a 6-week community-based cooking programme, “Eat Better Feel Better”, aimed at tackling barriers to cooking and healthy eating using a single-group repeated measures design. 117 participants enrolled, 62 completed baseline and post-intervention questionnaires, and 17 completed these and a 3–4 months follow-up questionnaire. Most participants were female, >45 years, and socioeconomically deprived. Confidence constructs changed positively from baseline to post-intervention (medians, scale 1 “not confident” to 7 “very confident”: “cooking using raw ingredients” (4, 6 p < 0.003, “following simple recipe” (5, 6 p = 0.003, “planning meals before shopping” (4, 5 p = <0.001, “shopping on a budget (4, 5 p = 0.044, “shopping healthier food” (4, 5 p = 0.007, “cooking new foods” (3, 5 p < 0.001, “cooking healthier foods” (4, 5 p = 0.001, “storing foods safely” (5, 6 p = 0.002; “using leftovers” (4, 5 p = 0.002, “cooking raw chicken” (5, 6 p = 0.021, and “reading food labels” (4, 5 p < 0.001. “Microwaving ready-meals” decreased 46% to 39% (p = 0.132. “Preparing meals from scratch” increased 48% to 59% (p = 0.071. Knowledge about correct portion sizes increased 47% to 74% (p = 0.002. Spending on ready-meals/week decreased. Follow-up telephone interviewees (n = 42 reported developing healthier eating patterns, spending less money/wasting less food, and preparing more meals/snacks from raw ingredients. The programme had positive effects on participants’ cooking skills confidence, helped manage time, and reduced barriers of cost, waste, and knowledge.

  17. Insulated Solar Electric Cooking – Tomorrow's healthy affordable stoves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Watkins

    Full Text Available We present a cooking technology consisting of a solar panel directly connected to an electric heater inside of a well-insulated chamber. Assuming continued decrease in solar panel prices, we anticipate that in a few decades Solar Electric Cooking (SEC technologies will be the most common cooking technology for the poor. Appropriate use of insulation reduces the power demand making low-power Insulated Solar Electric Cooking (ISEC systems already cost competitive. We present a $100 prototype and preliminary results of two implementations in Uganda.

  18. Perspectives on learning to cook and public support for cooking education policies in the United States: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Julia A; Frattaroli, Shannon; Bleich, Sara N; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Teret, Stephen P

    2017-01-01

    Declines in cooking skills in the United States may contribute to poor diet quality and high obesity rates. Little is known about how Americans learn to cook or their support for cooking education policies. The objective of this study was to examine how Americans learn to cook, attributions of responsibility for teaching children how to cook, and public support for policies to teach cooking skills. We used a concurrent, triangulation mixed-methods design that combined qualitative focus group data (from 7 focus groups in Baltimore, MD (N = 53)) with quantitative survey data from a nationally representative, web-based survey (N = 1112). We analyzed focus group data (using grounded theory) and survey data (using multivariable logistic regression). We find that relatively few Americans learn to cook from formal instruction in school or community cooking classes; rather, they primarily learn from their parents and/or by teaching themselves using cookbooks, recipe websites or by watching cooking shows on television. While almost all Americans hold parents and other family members responsible for teaching children how to cook, a broad majority of the public supports requiring cooking skills to be taught in schools either through existing health education (64%) or through dedicated home economics courses (67%). Slightly less than half of all Americans (45%) support increasing funding for cooking instruction for participants in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Broad public support for teaching cooking skills in schools suggests that schools are one promising avenue for policy action. However, school-based strategies should be complemented with alternatives that facilitate self-learning. More research is needed to identify effective means of teaching and disseminating the key cooking skills and knowledge that support healthy eating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Satiating Properties of Pork are not Affected by Cooking Methods, Sousvide Holding Time or Mincing in Healthy Men—A Randomized Cross-Over Meal Test Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehlet, Ursula; Mitra, Bhaskar; Aaslyng, Margit D.

    2017-01-01

    Low temperature long time (LTLT) sous-vide cooking may modify meat proteins in a way that could promote satiety. We investigated the effects of (1) cooking method (LTLT 58 °C vs. oven 160 °C), (2) LTLT holding time (17 h vs. 72 min), and (3) pork structure, LTLT 58 °C for 17 h (minced vs. roast) on appetite regulation and in vitro protein digestibility. In a cross-over study, 37 healthy men consumed four meals containing pork: LTLT-cooked roast, 58 °C, 72 min; LTLT-cooked roast, 58 °C, 17 h; and, oven-cooked roast, 160 °C to a core temperature of 58 °C and LTLT-cooked minced patties, 58 °C, 17 h. Ad libitum energy intake (EI) after three hours was the primary endpoint. Moreover, subjective appetite sensations were assessed. Protein digestibility was determined in an in vitro simulated digestion model. Ad libitum EI did not differ between the meals. Furthermore, appetite ratings were not clearly affected. LTLT cooking for 72 min increased the proteolytic rate in the early gastric phase during digestion as compared to LTLT cooking for 17 h or oven cooking. In conclusion, LTLT cooking, LTLT holding time, and pork structure did not affect ad libitum EI. However, LTLT cooking at 58 °C for 72 min seemed to enhance in vitro protein digestibility. PMID:28846600

  20. The Satiating Properties of Pork are not Affected by Cooking Methods, Sousvide Holding Time or Mincing in Healthy Men-A Randomized Cross-Over Meal Test Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehlet, Ursula; Mitra, Bhaskar; Ruiz Carrascal, Jorge; Raben, Anne; Aaslyng, Margit D

    2017-08-26

    Low temperature long time (LTLT) sous-vide cooking may modify meat proteins in a way that could promote satiety. We investigated the effects of (1) cooking method (LTLT 58 °C vs. oven 160 °C), (2) LTLT holding time (17 h vs. 72 min), and (3) pork structure, LTLT 58 °C for 17 h (minced vs. roast) on appetite regulation and in vitro protein digestibility. In a cross-over study, 37 healthy men consumed four meals containing pork: LTLT-cooked roast, 58 °C, 72 min; LTLT-cooked roast, 58 °C, 17 h; and, oven-cooked roast, 160 °C to a core temperature of 58 °C and LTLT-cooked minced patties, 58 °C, 17 h. Ad libitum energy intake (EI) after three hours was the primary endpoint. Moreover, subjective appetite sensations were assessed. Protein digestibility was determined in an in vitro simulated digestion model. Ad libitum EI did not differ between the meals. Furthermore, appetite ratings were not clearly affected. LTLT cooking for 72 min increased the proteolytic rate in the early gastric phase during digestion as compared to LTLT cooking for 17 h or oven cooking. In conclusion, LTLT cooking, LTLT holding time, and pork structure did not affect ad libitum EI. However, LTLT cooking at 58 °C for 72 min seemed to enhance in vitro protein digestibility.

  1. The Recipe for Success: Syntactic Features of "la chronique gastronomique."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Dulcie M.

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes the syntactic structure of noun phrases and verb phrases in recipes and cookery articles in the French press and argues that the complexity of writing about cooking parallels the complexity of the cooking process itself, demonstrating how syntax can reflect function and meaning in a restricted text-type. (Author/MSE)

  2. Nutrition Advice and Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sign-Up Home Patient Information Nutrition Advice & Recipes Nutrition Advice & Recipes This is a very important section ... information on all aspects of daily life, including nutrition, medical treatments, pain management, and practical tips. For ...

  3. Biogas cook stoves for healthy and sustainable diets? A case study in Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Lee Anderman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alternative cook stoves that replace solid fuels with cleaner energy sources, such as biogas, are gaining popularity in low-income settings across Asia, Africa and South America. Published research on these technologies focuses on their potential to reduce indoor air pollution and improve respiratory health. Effects on other cooking related aspects, such as diets and women’s time management, are less understood. In this study in southern India, we investigate if using biogas cook stoves alters household diets and women’s time management. We compare treatment households who are supplied with a biogas cook stove with comparison households who do not have access to these stoves, while controlling for several socio-economic factors. We find that diets of treatment households are more diverse than diets of comparison households. In addition, women from treatment households spend on average 40 minutes less cooking and 70 minutes less collecting firewood per day than women in comparison households. This study illustrates that alongside known benefits for respiratory health, using alternative cook stoves may benefit household diets and free up women’s time. To inform development investments and ensure these co-benefits, we argue that multiple dimensions of sustainability should be considered in evaluating the impact of alternative cook stoves.

  4. Walk, Don't Run, Your Way to a Healthy Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  5. Fresh, Frozen or Canned Fruits and Vegetables: All Can Be Healthy Choices!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  6. Cooking and oxygen. An explosive recipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, H L; Ralston, D; Muller, M; Pegg, S

    2001-02-01

    Home oxygen therapy is commonly prescribed for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The risks of smoking while using this therapy have been well described. To discuss the Royal Brisbane Hospital Burns Unit's experience and present case studies which illustrate the danger of alternative ignition sources while using home oxygen. The dangers of home oxygen therapy can be minimised by careful patient selection, education and ongoing monitoring.

  7. Chemistry Cook-Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    For this activity, high school chemistry students compete in a cooking contest. They must determine the chemical and physical changes that occur in the food they prepare, present their recipe as a step-by-step procedure similar to a lab procedure, identify chemicals in the food, and present all measurements in both metric and English units. The…

  8. Mix, Stir, Blend...A Pantry of Cooking Activities and Ideas for Elementary K-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    Contained in this multi-curriculum guide are recipes, activities, and ideas for teaching elementary students about nutrition, foods, cooking, utensils, table setting, and cooking safety. The recipes involve the basic four food groups and may be reproduced to provide students with their own cookbooks. Recipes are divided between primary and…

  9. Cooking crisis: What crisis?

    OpenAIRE

    Caraher, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cooking has long been a topic of discussion and concern among those arguing for a healthy diet. Chadwick, the great public health reformer, in 1842 called for cooking education.\\ud \\ud The Obama administration has heartedly endorsed cooking, mainly through the First Lady and a program called Cooking Matters, to address the obesity problem in the United States (http://cookingmatters.org/). \\ud \\ud Changing practices in cooking and food preparation and the way we eat some argue are driven by a ...

  10. Oracle and PLSQL Recipes

    CERN Document Server

    Juneau, Josh

    2010-01-01

    Oracle PL/SQL Recipes is your go to book for PL/SQL programming solutions. It takes a task-oriented approach to PL/SQL programming that lets you quickly look up a specific task and see the pattern for a solution. Then it's as simple as modifying the pattern for your specific application and implementing it. And you're done and home for dinner. Oracle PL/SQL Recipes is another in Apress' ongoing series of recipe books aimed at Oracle practitioners. The recipe format is ideal for the busy professional who just needs to get the job done. * Covers the most common PL/SQL programming problems * Pres

  11. Recipe of the project Common Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencio Cabello Fernández-Delgado

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The recipe presented in this paper aims at synthetising metaphorically the methodology deployed in the project Commons Translation, an effort of distributed cooperative translation of books related to free culture and the commons carried out by university lecturers and students, as well as external collaborators. This recipe of what we call “commons-based peer translation” is inspired in the ideas of lots of cooks, and some of those ideas are extracted from the same works we translate. In this sense, two cookery books have been especially helpful: the first one is Yochai Benkler's The Wealth of Networks, a crucial recipe book about the art of commons-based peer production; the second one is Chris Kelty's Two Bits, where the anthropologist analyses thoroughly (and exquisitely the condiment characteristic of the best cooking of free software: recursion. Both works are an inspiration for our translation efforts and at the same time constituye the objects of such translation: the cooking of new communities and knowledges.

  12. Food Safety: Recommendations for Determining Doneness in Consumer Egg Dish Recipes and Measurement of Endpoint Temperatures When Recipes Are Followed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandria Godwin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Many consumers do not follow recommended food safety practices for cooking egg dishes, such as pies, quiches, and casseroles, potentially leading to foodborne illnesses such as Salmonellosis. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA recommends cooking egg mixtures until the center reaches 71 °C (160 °F. The objectives of this study were to determine what endpoint temperature information consumers receive from egg dish recipes, and if recipes would lead to safe temperatures when followed. Egg dish recipes (n = 226 from 65 websites, 50 cookbooks, and nine magazine titles (multiple issues of each were analyzed. Time was the most frequently used indicator, given in 92% of the recipes, with 15% using only time. Other indicators included: set (89, browned (76, clean toothpick/knife (60, puffed (27, and jiggled (13. Only two recipes indicated final endpoint temperatures. Three recipes (a pie, a quiche, and an egg casserole were chosen and prepared in triplicate to see if they would reach recommended temperatures. The pie and quiche were still liquid at 71 °C, and were well over the recommended temperature when cooked according to instructions, but the egg casserole was not consistently above 71 °C, when the recipe instructions indicated it was done and the center was light brown and “jiggled” This research indicates that consumers are not receiving information on endpoint temperatures in egg recipes, but the likelihood of foodborne illness is low since most dishes probably be cooked past the recommended temperature before the consumer considers them done unless there are many inclusions that may absorb liquid and reduce the appearance of liquid in the dish.

  13. Food Safety: Recommendations for Determining Doneness in Consumer Egg Dish Recipes and Measurement of Endpoint Temperatures When Recipes Are Followed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Sandria; Maughan, Curtis; Chambers, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    Many consumers do not follow recommended food safety practices for cooking egg dishes, such as pies, quiches, and casseroles, potentially leading to foodborne illnesses such as Salmonellosis. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommends cooking egg mixtures until the center reaches 71 °C (160 °F). The objectives of this study were to determine what endpoint temperature information consumers receive from egg dish recipes, and if recipes would lead to safe temperatures when followed. Egg dish recipes (n = 226) from 65 websites, 50 cookbooks, and nine magazine titles (multiple issues of each) were analyzed. Time was the most frequently used indicator, given in 92% of the recipes, with 15% using only time. Other indicators included: set (89), browned (76), clean toothpick/knife (60), puffed (27), and jiggled (13). Only two recipes indicated final endpoint temperatures. Three recipes (a pie, a quiche, and an egg casserole) were chosen and prepared in triplicate to see if they would reach recommended temperatures. The pie and quiche were still liquid at 71 °C, and were well over the recommended temperature when cooked according to instructions, but the egg casserole was not consistently above 71 °C, when the recipe instructions indicated it was done and the center was light brown and “jiggled” This research indicates that consumers are not receiving information on endpoint temperatures in egg recipes, but the likelihood of foodborne illness is low since most dishes probably be cooked past the recommended temperature before the consumer considers them done unless there are many inclusions that may absorb liquid and reduce the appearance of liquid in the dish. PMID:28231140

  14. Food Safety: Recommendations for Determining Doneness in Consumer Egg Dish Recipes and Measurement of Endpoint Temperatures When Recipes Are Followed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Sandria; Maughan, Curtis; Chambers, Edgar

    2016-06-23

    Many consumers do not follow recommended food safety practices for cooking egg dishes, such as pies, quiches, and casseroles, potentially leading to foodborne illnesses such as Salmonellosis. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommends cooking egg mixtures until the center reaches 71 °C (160 °F). The objectives of this study were to determine what endpoint temperature information consumers receive from egg dish recipes, and if recipes would lead to safe temperatures when followed. Egg dish recipes ( n = 226) from 65 websites, 50 cookbooks, and nine magazine titles (multiple issues of each) were analyzed. Time was the most frequently used indicator, given in 92% of the recipes, with 15% using only time. Other indicators included: set (89), browned (76), clean toothpick/knife (60), puffed (27), and jiggled (13). Only two recipes indicated final endpoint temperatures. Three recipes (a pie, a quiche, and an egg casserole) were chosen and prepared in triplicate to see if they would reach recommended temperatures. The pie and quiche were still liquid at 71 °C, and were well over the recommended temperature when cooked according to instructions, but the egg casserole was not consistently above 71 °C, when the recipe instructions indicated it was done and the center was light brown and "jiggled" This research indicates that consumers are not receiving information on endpoint temperatures in egg recipes, but the likelihood of foodborne illness is low since most dishes probably be cooked past the recommended temperature before the consumer considers them done unless there are many inclusions that may absorb liquid and reduce the appearance of liquid in the dish.

  15. Attitudes and beliefs of Australian adults on reality television cooking programmes and celebrity chefs. Is there cause for concern? Descriptive analysis presented from a consumer survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, A M; Egan, T; Keogh, J B; Clifton, P M

    2015-08-01

    There is evidence suggesting that the nutritional content of recipes promoted by celebrity chefs or television cooking programmes contradict healthy eating guidelines. This study aims to investigate people's attitudes and beliefs about popular television cooking programmes and celebrity chefs. Males and females who watch television cooking programmes were recruited to participate in a self-administered online questionnaire (22-items) which included multiple-choice and rank order questions. A total of n = 207 participants undertook the questionnaire with fully completed questionnaires available for n = 150 participants (Males, n = 22; Females, n = 128; aged 38.4 ± 14 years). The majority of respondents watch ≤30 minutes of television cooking programming per day (total responses, n = 153/207; 74%) with almost three-quarters (total responses, n = 130/175; 74%) having attempted a recipe. New cooking ideas (total responses, n = 81/175; 46%) and entertainment (total responses, n = 64/175; 36.5%) were the two main reasons participants gave for watching these programmes. Significantly more respondents believed recipes use excessive amounts of unhealthy fat, sugar or salt (unhealthy: 24%; healthy: 7%; P cooking programmes and celebrity chefs are unlikely to impact habitual dietary intake; rather, vicarious viewing and entertainment appear important factors relating to why people watch these programmes. However results generated from the present study are descriptive and subjective and further investigation into the impact of television cooking programmes and celebrity chefs on behavioural change requires attention. Further investigation including a systematic investigation into the dietary quality of recipes promoted by celebrity chefs against national healthy eating benchmarks is also warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Replacing Recipe Realism

    OpenAIRE

    Saatsi, J

    2017-01-01

    Many realist writings exemplify the spirit of ‘recipe realism’. Here I characterise recipe realism, challenge it, and propose replacing it with ‘exemplar realism’. This alternative understanding of realism is more piecemeal, robust, and better in tune with scientists’ own attitude towards their best theories, and thus to be preferred.

  17. Vitamin profile of cooked foods: how healthy is the practice of ready-to-eat foods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agte, Vaishali; Tarwadi, Kirtan; Mengale, Sangeeta; Hinge, Ashwini; Chiplonkar, Shashi

    2002-05-01

    During recent years importance of B complex vitamins, beta-carotene and vitamin C has been realised in terms of their antioxidative and anticarcinogenic properties. Fruits and vegetables are the rich sources of these vitamins. However, there are considerable cooking losses of vitamins, and information on vitamin contents of cooked foods is essential for assessing the adequacy of vitamin intakes. Secondly, there is a growing trend to consume ready-to-eat foods such as stuffed pancakes (samosa, patties), pastries, French fries; replacing traditional foods for lunch or dinner like roti, vegetable curry, bread, non-vegetarian items. Ready-to-eat foods are considered to give empty calories rather than a balanced diet. A study was undertaken to estimate ascorbic acid, folic acid, riboflavin, thiamine and beta-carotene of 263 cooked food samples and 260 meals representing dietary patterns of Asia, Africa, Europe, USA and Latin America by spectrophotometry and photoflurometry. A broad range of beta-carotene (84-2038 mcg%), riboflavin (0.01-0.48 mg%), thiamine (0.04-0.36 mg%), vitamin C (1-28 mg%) and folate (26-111 mcg%) was observed in individual foods. Bakery products and sweets were found to be poor sources and green leafy vegetables and fruits were good sources of these five vitamins. The differences between ready-to-eat foods and meals consumed during lunch or dinner were prominent for beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, riboflavin and folic acid (P < 0.05). The cooking losses were 34.6, 30, 52.2, 45.9 and 32.2% in case of ascorbic acid, thiamine, riboflavin, beta-carotene and folic acid respectively. Irrespective of whether it is ready-to-eat or a lunch/dinner food item, the contribution of vegetables in the preparations was found to make a marked impact on the vitamin profile. While results justify the concept of a food pyramid, emphasis needs to be given to types of fruits and vegetables rich in vitamins; preferably in their uncooked form, rather than considering their

  18. Nutrition and Culinary in the Kitchen Program: a randomized controlled intervention to promote cooking skills and healthy eating in university students - study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Greyce Luci; Jomori, Manuela Mika; Fernandes, Ana Carolina; Colussi, Claudia Flemming; Condrasky, Margaret D; Proença, Rossana Pacheco da Costa

    2017-12-20

    factors. The control group participants have continued with their usual activities. Data analyses will evaluate the intervention effect on changes in outcomes within and between groups, as well as explore relations with personal characteristics. This method provides new evidence about whether or not a culinary intervention targeting university students has an impact on the improvement of cooking skills and healthy eating practices. Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry - RBR-8nwxh5 ( http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/rg/RBR-8nwxh5/ ).

  19. The satiating properties of pork are not affected by cooking methods, sousvide holding time or mincing in healthy men - a randomized cross-over meal test study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Ursula; Mitra, Bhaskar; Ruiz Carrascal, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Low temperature long time (LTLT) sous-vide cooking may modify meat proteins in a way that could promote satiety. We investigated the effects of (1) cooking method (LTLT 58 °C vs. oven 160 °C), (2) LTLT holding time (17 h vs. 72 min), and (3) pork structure, LTLT 58 °C for 17 h (minced vs. roast......) on appetite regulation and in vitro protein digestibility. In a cross-over study, 37 healthy men consumed four meals containing pork: LTLT-cooked roast, 58 °C, 72 min; LTLT-cooked roast, 58 °C, 17 h; and, oven-cooked roast, 160 °C to a core temperature of 58 °C and LTLT-cooked minced patties, 58 °C, 17 h. Ad...... libitum energy intake (EI) after three hours was the primary endpoint. Moreover, subjective appetite sensations were assessed. Protein digestibility was determined in an in vitro simulated digestion model. Ad libitum EI did not differ between the meals. Furthermore, appetite ratings were not clearly...

  20. Rhetorical Recipes: Women's Literacies in and out of the Kitchen

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Farnham, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on interview data regarding literacy practices done in tandem with housework, this article presents an array of recipe uses among retirement-age women. Given their backgrounds as professionals who come of age during second-wave feminism, the women see little value in "domestic" practices such as cooking literacies (Barton & Hamilton).…

  1. The recipe: the queen of pragmatics. An Italian case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldina FORTUNATI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the communicative status and the daily practices of use of the recipe in the broader context of cooking and eating inside the home. My thesis is that the recipe should be regarded as the queen of pragmatics of communication, as recipes are to be found in homes all over the world. I draw on two different research projects: the first study reports upon semi-structured interviews with 137 respondents living in the North East of Italy. The second study presents and discusses the most important categories of meaning that emerged from a content analysis of 398 messages posted on the online cooking forum of the site of Donna Moderna [Modern Woman], the most widely read women’s weekly magazine in Italy.

  2. Developing a healthy web-based cookbook for pediatric cancer patients and survivors: rationale and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rhea; Raber, Margaret; Chandra, Joya

    2015-03-31

    Obesity has been a growing problem among children and adolescents in the United States for a number of decades. Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are more susceptible to the downstream health consequences of obesity such as cardiovascular disease, endocrine issues, and risk of cancer recurrence due to late effects of treatment and suboptimal dietary and physical activity habits. The objective of this study was to document the development of a Web-based cookbook of healthy recipes and nutrition resources to help enable pediatric cancer patients and survivors to lead healthier lifestyles. The Web-based cookbook, named "@TheTable", was created by a committee of researchers, a registered dietitian, patients and family members, a hospital chef, and community advisors and donors. Recipes were collected from several sources including recipe contests and social media. We incorporated advice from current patients, parents, and CCS. Over 400 recipes, searchable by several categories and with accompanying nutritional information, are currently available on the website. In addition to healthy recipes, social media functionality and cooking videos are integrated into the website. The website also features nutrition information resources including nutrition and cooking tip sheets available on several subjects. The "@TheTable" website is a unique resource for promoting healthy lifestyles spanning pediatric oncology prevention, treatment, and survivorship. Through evaluations of the website's current and future use, as well as incorporation into interventions designed to promote energy balance, we will continue to adapt and build this unique resource to serve cancer patients, survivors, and the general public.

  3. Effect of a combination of Phaseolus vulgaris L. extract and acarbose on postprandial glucose level after cooked rice intake in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robby Zulkarnain

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim This study was aimed to measure the effects of combination Phaseolus vulgaris extract and acarbose compared to acarbose alone on postprandial glucose concentration in healthy volunteers after cooked rice intake.Methods Blood sample were obtained at several time points up to three hours after cooked rice intake. The parameter for postprandial glucose concentration is the area under the curve (AUC of glucose concentration vs.time for three hours after cooked rice intake.Results After taking this combination, postprandial glucose concentration was reduced by 21.6%, while the reduction by acarbose alone was 22.9%.Conclusions The reduction of postprandial glucose concentration after administration of this combination was not significantly different compared to that after administration of acarbose alone. (Med J Indones 2009; 18: 25-30Keywords: Phaseolus vulgaris extract, acarbose, postprandial glucose concentration

  4. Java 8 recipes

    CERN Document Server

    Dea, Carl; Guime, Freddy; OConner, John; Juneau, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Java 8 Recipes offers solutions to common programming problems encountered while developing Java-based applications. Fully updated with the newest features and techniques available, Java 8 Recipes provides code examples involving Lambdas, embedded scripting with Nashorn, the new date-time API, stream support, functional interfaces, and much more. Especial emphasis is given to features such as lambdas that are newly introduced in Java 8. Content is presented in the popular problem-solution format: Look up the programming problem that you want to solve. Read the solution. Apply the solution dir

  5. Cooking Bolshevik: Anastas Mikoian and the making of the "Book about Delicious and Healthy Food".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Both one of the most iconic cookbooks of all time and one of the strangest, the "Kniga o vkusnoi i zdorovoi pishche" became the culinary bible of the Soviet household during the mid-twentieth century. The logical culmination of a decade of Soviet culinary evolution under the leadership of Anastas Mikoian, the original "Book about Delicious and Healthy Food" is a microcosm of Stalinist civilization that exemplifies the contradictory trends making up Soviet politics and culture in the late 1930s. Drawing on previously unexamined documents from the State Archive of the Russian Federation, Anastas Mikoian's personal papers retained in the Russian State Archive of Socio-Political History, as well as published primary sources, this article seeks to contextualize the complex tale of the cookbook's origins in a broader narrative of the construction of the Soviet Union's official food culture under Mikoian's leadership during the 1930s.

  6. Recipe for Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jacquelyn W.; Shaul, Nancy Pera

    The program described in this paper was based upon the premise that the activity of cooking in the classroom is an excellent way of integrating all areas of learning and a very useful reading vehicle. Through cooking activities and related field trips, children can add to both their knowledge in basic subject areas and their motor skills as well…

  7. Calculating the nutrient composition of recipes with computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, P M; Hoover, L W

    1989-02-01

    The objective of this research project was to compare the nutrient values computed by four commonly used computerized recipe calculation methods. The four methods compared were the yield factor, retention factor, summing, and simplified retention factor methods. Two versions of the summing method were modeled. Four pork entrée recipes were selected for analysis: roast pork, pork and noodle casserole, pan-broiled pork chops, and pork chops with vegetables. Assumptions were made about changes expected to occur in the ingredients during preparation and cooking. Models were designed to simulate the algorithms of the calculation methods using a microcomputer spreadsheet software package. Identical results were generated in the yield factor, retention factor, and summing-cooked models for roast pork. The retention factor and summing-cooked models also produced identical results for the recipe for pan-broiled pork chops. The summing-raw model gave the highest value for water in all four recipes and the lowest values for most of the other nutrients. A superior method or methods was not identified. However, on the basis of the capabilities provided with the yield factor and retention factor methods, more serious consideration of these two methods is recommended.

  8. sensory analysis of cooked fresh meat sausages containing beef offal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Sensory analysis of cooked fresh meat sausages containing beef offal. 22 .... Trained and consumer pan- els from the local black ... selected as the best formulations or recipes, as judged by the ... loosening of the sausage from the pan with a.

  9. Eyes Bigger than the Tummy: A Comparative Evaluation of Cooking and Drinking Preferences vs. Healthy Cooking and Drinking Knowledge in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Maria do Rosário; Duque, Alexandra Freches

    2016-01-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity have been increasing over recent years and, more than ever, we are being called to act, whether as clinicians, parents or educators. The aim of this empirical research is to assess children's cognitive and emotionally internalized mental representation of a "Preferred" and "Healthy Meal," using…

  10. What does cooking mean to you?: Perceptions of cooking and factors related to cooking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Julia A; Bleich, Sara N; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Frattaroli, Shannon

    2016-02-01

    Despite the importance of cooking in American life and evidence suggesting that meals cooked at home are healthier, little is known about perceptions of what it means to cook in the United States. The objective of this study was to describe perceptions of cooking and factors important to how cooking is perceived and practiced among American adults. Seven focus groups (N = 53; 39 female; 35 Black, 16 White, 2 Asian) were conducted from November 2014 to January 2015 in Baltimore City, Maryland. Participants were recruited from two neighborhoods; one with higher median income and access to healthy food and the other with lower income and low access to healthy food. Focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Participants' perceptions of cooking varied considerably, regardless of neighborhood income or food access, and spanned a continuum from all scratch cooking to anything made at home. Perceptions of cooking incorporated considerations of whether or how food was heated and the degree of time, effort and love involved if convenience foods were used. Key barriers to cooking included affordability, lack of time, and lack of enjoyment. Key facilitators of frequent cooking included extensive organization and time management to enable participants to incorporate cooking into their daily lives. Cooking is a complex concept and not uniformly understood. Efforts to encourage healthy cooking at home should consider the broad spectrum of activities Americans recognize as cooking as well as the barriers and facilitators to preparing food at home. Public health messages to encourage more frequent cooking should account for the heterogeneity in perspectives about cooking. More research should explore differences in perceptions about cooking in other diverse populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Oracle Application Express 4 Recipes

    CERN Document Server

    Zehoo, Edmund

    2011-01-01

    Oracle Application Express 4 Recipes provides an example-based approach to learning Application Express - the ground-breaking, rapid application development platform included with every Oracle Database license. The recipes format is ideal for the quick-study who just wants a good example or two to kick start their thinking and get pointed in the right direction. The recipes cover the gamut of Application Express development. Author and Application Express expert Edmund Zehoo shows how to create data entry screens, visualize data in the form of reports and charts, implement validation and back-

  12. 21 Recipes for Mining Twitter

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Millions of public Twitter streams harbor a wealth of data, and once you mine them, you can gain some valuable insights. This short and concise book offers a collection of recipes to help you extract nuggets of Twitter information using easy-to-learn Python tools. Each recipe offers a discussion of how and why the solution works, so you can quickly adapt it to fit your particular needs. The recipes include techniques to: Use OAuth to access Twitter dataCreate and analyze graphs of retweet relationshipsUse the streaming API to harvest tweets in realtimeHarvest and analyze friends and followers

  13. Recipe for an Eclectic Life as Research Scientist and Mom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Recipe for an Eclectic Life as Research Scientist and Mom Fresh ingredients: curiosity, conviction, who knows what else Spices: equal parts ambition, humility, risk Staples: Boundless energy! This recipe requires a lot of prep time. It makes a great first meal but also "keeps on giving" as leftovers for many meals. It can be set aside and rekindled at various stages but requires frequent touch-ups to stay fresh. This recipe is especially great for large gatherings, eclectic palettes, and it includes a mix of cultural opportunities (AGU council member for example!). First, shop for a graduate department as you might for a farmers' market that has a good feel and good mix of "customers" (grad students) who share your attitude and interests. Then seek out professors and later, career mentors, who not only have great methods and recipes but whose lifestyles seem like good examples. I like my mentors and advisees alike to be approachable, supportive, and dedicated to both problem solving and whole-life choices. For the cooking part of the recipe, you'll certainly need a great partner who is hungry for science and appreciative of those pairings between new discoveries and long-awaited accomplishments. My own husband is a geologist. My professors were in their "late career" stages (one had retired 25 years before; another retired within a year of my degree) and this seemed to foster a philosophical perspective rather than a competitive one. Advice? The keys to my child-rearing recipe were efficiency and concentration: I try to organize and sequence and to save the multi-tasking for cleanups and paperwork. Don't take yourself too seriously: we all think of ourselves as frauds and know-nothings; we all are stretched between worry and guilt when it comes to child rearing. Don't give up: who is to say whether your quest for science isn't as fundamental to your goodness as your maternal drive?

  14. Building Recipes and Understanding Nutrition for Cancer-Survivor Health (BRUNCH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urowitz, Sara; Chiu, Winnie; Cockburn, Moira; Dunlop, Barbara; Fierini, Daniela; Himel, Danielle; Jones, Erin; Pulandiran, Menaka; Smith, James; Wiljer, David

    2012-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team from the health and culinary sectors developed and evaluated nutritious recipes for cancer-survivors to inform and support healthy eating post-cancer. Participants in the study indicated that they were likely to incorporate the recipes into their diets, and that it would help them change their eating habits. (Contains 1…

  15. Metabolic Availability of the Limiting Amino Acids Lysine and Tryptophan in Cooked White African Cornmeal Assessed in Healthy Young Men Using the Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Mahroukh; Elango, Rajavel; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B; Courtney-Martin, Glenda

    2018-06-01

    Maize is a staple food in many regions of the world, particularly in Africa and Latin America. However, maize protein is limiting in the indispensable amino acids lysine and tryptophan, making its protein of poor quality. The main objective of this study was to determine the protein quality of white African cornmeal by determining the metabolic availability (MA) of lysine and tryptophan. To determine the MA of lysine, 4 amounts of l-lysine (10, 13, 16, and 18 mg · kg-1 · d-1 totaling 28.6%, 37.1%, 45.7%, and 51.4% of the mean lysine requirement of 35 mg · kg-1 · d-1, respectively) were studied in 6 healthy young men in a repeated-measures design. To determine the MA of tryptophan, 4 amounts of l-tryptophan (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mg · kg-1 · d-1 totaling 12.5%, 25.0%, 37.5%, and 50.0% of the mean tryptophan requirement of 4 mg · kg-1 · d-1, respectively) were studied in 7 healthy young men in a repeated-measures design. The MAs of lysine and tryptophan were estimated by comparing the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) response with varying intakes of lysine and tryptophan in cooked white cornmeal compared with the IAAO response to l-lysine and l-tryptophan intakes in the reference protein (crystalline amino acid mixture patterned after egg protein) with the use of the slope ratio method. The MAs of lysine and tryptophan from African cooked white cornmeal were 71% and 80%, respectively. Our study provides a robust estimate of the availability of lysine and tryptophan in African white maize to healthy young men. This estimate provides a basis for postproduction fortification or supplementation of maize-based diets. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02402179.

  16. Delicious Heart-Healthy Latino Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... en agua hirviendo por un minuto. Bote el agua. 2. Ponga el repollo en un recipiente grande y agregue las zanahorias ralladas, la cebolla picada, el chile rojo picante, el orégano, el aceite de oliva, ...

  17. Healthy n-6/n-3 fatty acid composition from five European game meat species remains after cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencak, Teresa G; Gamsjäger, Lisa; Ohrnberger, Sarah; Culbert, Nicole J; Ruf, Thomas

    2015-06-27

    Intensive farming of livestock along with recent food scandals and consumer deception have increased awareness about risks for human nutrition. In parallel, the demand for meat obtained under more natural conditions from animals that can freely forage has largely increased. Interestingly, the consumption of game meat has not become more common despite its excellent quality and content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). We addressed the question if game meat fatty acid composition is modified through kitchen preparation. By analysing muscle fatty acid (FA) composition (polar and total lipids) of five European game species in a raw and a processed state, we aimed to quantify the proportion of PUFA that are oxidised and hydrogenated during processing. All game meat species originated from local hunters and free-living individuals. To mimic a realistic situation a professional chef prepared the meat samples with gentle use of heat in a standardised way. Expectedly, the overall content of polyunsaturated fatty acids declined during the cooking process but the decrease size was cooking does not substantially alter its favourable fatty acid composition. Further research is needed to elucidate species-specific differences and the role of habitat quality and locomotion for tissue composition.

  18. The impact of video technology on learning: A cooking skills experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgenor, Dawn; Hollywood, Lynsey; Furey, Sinéad; Lavelle, Fiona; McGowan, Laura; Spence, Michelle; Raats, Monique; McCloat, Amanda; Mooney, Elaine; Caraher, Martin; Dean, Moira

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the role of video technology in the development of cooking skills. The study explored the views of 141 female participants on whether video technology can promote confidence in learning new cooking skills to assist in meal preparation. Prior to each focus group participants took part in a cooking experiment to assess the most effective method of learning for low-skilled cooks across four experimental conditions (recipe card only; recipe card plus video demonstration; recipe card plus video demonstration conducted in segmented stages; and recipe card plus video demonstration whereby participants freely accessed video demonstrations as and when needed). Focus group findings revealed that video technology was perceived to assist learning in the cooking process in the following ways: (1) improved comprehension of the cooking process; (2) real-time reassurance in the cooking process; (3) assisting the acquisition of new cooking skills; and (4) enhancing the enjoyment of the cooking process. These findings display the potential for video technology to promote motivation and confidence as well as enhancing cooking skills among low-skilled individuals wishing to cook from scratch using fresh ingredients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Low-temperature cooking of beef

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Louise Mørch

    . The third group showed a different behaviour; in this group time and temperature worked in different directions. Thus, the results showed three dominant behaviours in sensory properties. Two sensory properties, tenderness and juiciness, are very important in cooked meat according to both consumers and chefs......Molecular gastronomy is a new scientific field concerned with domestic and restaurant cooking, perception of food, and other factors relevant for cooking and meals. Most available gastronomic knowledge is based on experience and handed-down procedures from cookbooks and recipes. This inductive way......-time sous-vide-cooking of meat. This method is increasingly used, especially in high-end restaurants, where it receives much praise from leading chefs worldwide. Sous-vide-cooking uses vacuum-packaging of the meat and preparation in thermostated water-baths at temperatures between 54°C and 65°C for periods...

  20. Developing a Healthy Web-Based Cookbook for Pediatric Cancer Patients and Survivors: Rationale and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raber, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity has been a growing problem among children and adolescents in the United States for a number of decades. Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are more susceptible to the downstream health consequences of obesity such as cardiovascular disease, endocrine issues, and risk of cancer recurrence due to late effects of treatment and suboptimal dietary and physical activity habits. Objective The objective of this study was to document the development of a Web-based cookbook of healthy recipes and nutrition resources to help enable pediatric cancer patients and survivors to lead healthier lifestyles. Methods The Web-based cookbook, named “@TheTable”, was created by a committee of researchers, a registered dietitian, patients and family members, a hospital chef, and community advisors and donors. Recipes were collected from several sources including recipe contests and social media. We incorporated advice from current patients, parents, and CCS. Results Over 400 recipes, searchable by several categories and with accompanying nutritional information, are currently available on the website. In addition to healthy recipes, social media functionality and cooking videos are integrated into the website. The website also features nutrition information resources including nutrition and cooking tip sheets available on several subjects. Conclusions The “@TheTable” website is a unique resource for promoting healthy lifestyles spanning pediatric oncology prevention, treatment, and survivorship. Through evaluations of the website’s current and future use, as well as incorporation into interventions designed to promote energy balance, we will continue to adapt and build this unique resource to serve cancer patients, survivors, and the general public. PMID:25840596

  1. Supersymmetric Recipes (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    In these lectures, I shall describe the theory of supersymmetry accessible to people with a knowledge of basic quantum field theory. The lectures will contain recipes of how to calculate which interactions (and which special relations) are in supersymmetry, without providing detailed proofs of where they come from. We shall also cover: motivation for weak-scale supersymmetry and the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  2. Solar cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over two billion people face fuel wood shortages, causing tremendous personal and environmental stress. Over 4 million people die prematurely from indoor air pollution. Solar cooking can reduce fuel wood consumption and indoor air pollution. Solar cooking has been practiced and published since th...

  3. Cooking Healthy, Eating Smart (CHES): Evaluating the feasibility of using volunteers to deliver nutrition and food safety education to rural older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Morgan

    Due to their limited resources, rural, older adults in the United States are at risk for poor diet-related health outcomes. Nutrition education is a key component in improving health outcomes in older adults. Cooking Healthy, Eating Smart (CHES) is a nine-lesson curriculum designed to teach rural, older adults culturally appropriate nutrition and food safety information. Funding to hire health professionals to deliver such a curriculum is limited, presenting the need to explore a less expensive mode of dissemination. In this community-based, participatory research study, a formative evaluation and feasibility study were conducted to examine the use of volunteers to deliver a nutrition and food safety curriculum to rural, older adults in South Carolina. Seven focus groups were conducted with members of the South Carolina Family and Community Leaders (SCFCL) and members of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) in the four regions of South Carolina to explore barriers and facilitators of volunteers delivering CHES (N=65 participants). The focus group findings informed the development of the volunteer training manual. A comparative case study method was used to examine the feasibility of a volunteer-based approach by observing and describing the delivery of CHES by two groups of volunteers in SC. The case study findings, including volunteer knowledge change, self-efficacy change, curriculum experience, program experience, and project team observations of volunteers indicated that using volunteers to deliver CHES is a plausible approach with the assistance of paid staff or project team members.

  4. Evaluating a food bank recipe-tasting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Olaman, Susan J; Edwards, Vicki; Elliott, Susan J

    2005-01-01

    Food banks mitigate immediate food insecurity, but their ability to promote healthy nutrition is constrained by how often recipients may visit and the range of foods available. In a descriptive study, a formative evaluation was completed of a combined heart-healthy recipe-tasting and education program that aims to promote healthy eating knowledge and skills in a group of food bank recipients in Hamilton, Ontario. Fifty-five adults were surveyed about food bank attendance, program awareness, perceived enhancement of knowledge and skills, and suggestions for program improvement. Most participants (73%) were positive about the program, and 91% wanted the program to continue. In addition, 78% would prepare the recipes sampled. In contrast, program awareness and planning food bank visits to coincide with the program were generally low. Food banks are potential sites for effective nutrition promotion programs. To reach more recipients, more frequent implementation and seeking the use of a designated room are suggested for the current program. The findings also suggest that the sampling approach to promoting healthy eating to food bank recipients deserves further study. For example, monitoring the selection of featured recipe ingredients would be a useful indicator of behaviour.

  5. Analysis and Evaluation of Cooking Parameters for Sweet Bakery Products

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Vignali; Andrea Volpi

    2013-01-01

    Cooking process is essential for the preparation of sweet bakery products, such as Panettone, a typical Italian seasonal dessert. This study is aimed at evaluating the features of the finished product leaving the oven chamber using the Design of Experiments technique. Four features of the product like “water activity”, “humidity”, “pH” and “sensorial judge” have been explained as functions of independent variables: recipe of the dough, affecting the dough strength and cooking process paramete...

  6. Nutritious Meal Planning; Commercial Cooking and Baking I: 9193.02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This 90 clock hour course has been prepared as a guide for the tenth grade student in commercial cooking and baking or food management, production and services. It has been divided into six blocks of instruction (menu planning, recipes, condiments and their uses, introduction to cooking, food cost and accounting), and a Quinmester post-test. As a…

  7. DASH Diet: Tips for Shopping and Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dash-in-brief-html. Accessed April 7, 2016. Essential kitchen equipment. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyCooking/Essential-Kitchen-Equipment_UCM_430098_Article.jsp. Accessed April 7, ...

  8. Increasing intention to cook from basic ingredients: A randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Fiona; Hollywood, Lynsey; Caraher, Martin; McGowan, Laura; Spence, Michelle; Surgenor, Dawn; McCloat, Amanda; Mooney, Elaine; Raats, Monique; Dean, Moira

    2017-09-01

    The promotion of home cooking is a strategy used to improve diet quality and health. However, modern home cooking typically includes the use of processed food which can lead to negative outcomes including weight gain. In addition, interventions to improve cooking skills do not always explain how theory informed their design and implementation. The Behaviour Change Technique (BCT) taxonomy successfully employed in other areas has identified essential elements for interventions. This study investigated the effectiveness of different instructional modes for learning to cook a meal, designed using an accumulating number of BCTs, on participant's perceived difficulty, enjoyment, confidence and intention to cook from basic ingredients. 141 mothers aged between 20 and 39 years from the island of Ireland were randomised to one of four conditions based on BCTs (1) recipe card only [control condition]; (2) recipe card plus video modelling; (3) recipe card plus video prompting; (4) recipe card plus video elements. Participants rated their enjoyment, perceived difficulty, confidence and intention to cook again pre, mid and post experiment. Repeated one-way factorial ANOVAs, correlations and a hierarchical regression model were conducted. Despite no significant differences between the different conditions, there was a significant increase in enjoyment (P cook from basics again (P cook from basics pre-experiment, and confidence and enjoyment (both pre and post experiment) significantly contributed to the final regression model explaining 42% of the variance in intention to cook from basics again. Cooking interventions should focus on practical cooking and increasing participants' enjoyment and confidence during cooking to increase intention to cook from basic ingredients at home. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Video Modeling and Prompting: A Comparison of Two Strategies for Teaching Cooking Skills to Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber-Doughty, Teresa; Bouck, Emily C.; Tom, Kinsey; Jasper, Andrea D.; Flanagan, Sara M.; Bassette, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Self-operated video prompting and video modeling was compared when used by three secondary students with mild intellectual disabilities as they completed novel recipes during cooking activities. Alternating between video systems, students completed twelve recipes within their classroom kitchen. An alternating treatment design with a follow-up and…

  10. Cooking "shrimp à la créole": a pilot study of an ecological rehabilitation in semantic dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Nathalie; Macoir, Joël; Joubert, Sven; Bottari, Carolina; Chayer, Céline; Pigot, Hélène; Giroux, Sylvain

    2011-08-01

    New learning in semantic dementia (SD) seems to be tied to a specific temporal and spatial context. Thus, cognitive rehabilitation could capitalise upon preserved episodic memory and focus on everyday activities which, once learned, will have an impact in everyday life. This pilot study thus explores the effectiveness of an ecological approach in one patient suffering from SD. EC, a 68-year-old woman with SD, stopped cooking complex meals due to a substantial loss of knowledge related to all food types. The therapy consisted of preparing a target recipe. She was asked to generate semantic attributes of ingredients found in one target, one control and two no-therapy recipes. The number of recipes cooked by EC between therapy sessions was computed. She was also asked to prepare a generalisation recipe combining ingredients from the target and control recipes. EC's generated semantic attributes (GSA) of ingredients pertaining to the target and control recipes increased significantly (p recipes (ps > .79). The proportion of meals cooked also increased significantly (p = .021). For the generalisation recipe, she could not succeed without assistance. Frequent food preparation may have provided EC with new memories about the context, usage and appearance of some concepts. These memories seem very context-bound, but EC nonetheless re-introduced some recipes into her day-to-day life. The impact of these results on the relationship between semantic, episodic and procedural memory is discussed, as well as the relevance of an ecological approach in SD.

  11. Cooking and Science. Ideas in Science. Notes for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Pat, Ed.

    Presented are seven articles (reprinted from "The Exploratorium" magazine) which focus on the scientific explanations for the specific (and oftentimes peculiar) instructions and procedures called for in many recipes. "Baking, Boiling, and Other Hot Topics" (Joel Myerson) discusses different methods of cooking. "The…

  12. Traditional Bulgarian Hunter's Cuisine (Hunter's Cooking Book (1939 [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petrushev

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This very rare book was published in Belogradchik in 1939. The publisher is Stamen Kamenov. Stamen Kamenov owned a printing press, where several books of local and national importance were printed. This is a cookbook with recipes for cooking wild game. The book is relevant to modern man because it shows what has been the cuisine of old Bulgarians.

  13. Cooking in prison – from crook to cook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær Minke, Linda

    2014-01-01

    thinking about, purchasing, and preparing food. Overall, prisoners reported being very pleased with self-catering systems. Prisoners also stressed the importance of making healthy food although some prisoners felt they lacked cooking skills. In addition, study data describe and explores prisoner food...... groups, which are formed for economic and social reasons. The food-groups are understood as arenas for group solidarity, and opportunities to measure access, or lack thereof, to capital and resources. Self-catering supports prisoners’ responsibility, need for autonomy and improves prisoners’ cooking...... abilities and personal resources. During incarceration few roles are available for prisoner. The self-catering system offers the role as a cook which offers an opportunity for identity realignment from crook to cook....

  14. Restaurant Cooking Trends and Increased Risk for Campylobacter Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anna K; Rigby, Dan; Burton, Michael; Millman, Caroline; Williams, Nicola J; Jones, Trevor R; Wigley, Paul; O'Brien, Sarah J; Cross, Paul

    2016-07-01

    In the United Kingdom, outbreaks of Campylobacter infection are increasingly attributed to undercooked chicken livers, yet many recipes, including those of top chefs, advocate short cooking times and serving livers pink. During 2015, we studied preferences of chefs and the public in the United Kingdom and investigated the link between liver rareness and survival of Campylobacter. We used photographs to assess chefs' ability to identify chicken livers meeting safe cooking guidelines. To investigate the microbiological safety of livers chefs preferred to serve, we modeled Campylobacter survival in infected chicken livers cooked to various temperatures. Most chefs correctly identified safely cooked livers but overestimated the public's preference for rareness and thus preferred to serve them more rare. We estimated that 19%-52% of livers served commercially in the United Kingdom fail to reach 70°C and that predicted Campylobacter survival rates are 48%-98%. These findings indicate that cooking trends are linked to increasing Campylobacter infections.

  15. Cooking does not decrease hydrophilic antioxidant capacity of wild blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Rebecca Ree; Renfroe, Michael H; Brevard, Patricia Bowling; Lee, Robert E; Gloeckner, Janet W

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of domestic cooking methods on the hydrophilic antioxidant activity (HAA) of wild blueberries. Baked, microwaved, simmered, and pan-fried frozen wild blueberries, and a thawed uncooked control, were analyzed for HAA using an ABTS/H(2)O(2)/HRP decoloration method. All cooking treatments were derived from recipes using wild blueberries, and were performed in triplicate. A randomized block design was used to determine whether there were statistical differences in antioxidant content after cooking and between each of the trials. There were no statistically significant decreases after cooking the thawed berries. On both a fresh weight and a dry weight basis, pan-fried blueberries had significantly higher HAA than baked, simmered, and control blueberries (Pcooked berries retained significant HAA. Cooked wild blueberries can be recommended as a good source of dietary antioxidants.

  16. Biobased lubricant from used cooking oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    As more and more people look for healthy alternatives for cooking and frying oils, the opportunity to develop high-value products from these waste streams increases. Cooking oils that are often described as healthier contain higher levels of monounsaturated fats. NuSun® sunflower oil is an example o...

  17. Entree Production Guides for Cook/Freeze Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    92.29 50.00 22,680 1. Fill roasting pans with cut-up chicken . Salt 0.35 0.19 86 2. Combine ingredients listed Pepper, black 0.07 0.04 18 in this...INSTALLATIONS FREEZING RECIPES HOSPITAL FEEDING i, WACT (Vmentbs m reves - W neete y lsmer ~lr y block nguber) Entree production guides have been...control and better use of personnel. Standard recipes must be adapted to production guides for use in cook/freeze systems. Products must withstand the

  18. Hibernate Recipes A Problem-Solution Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Hibernate continues to be the most popular out-of-the-box framework solution for Java Persistence and data/database accessibility techniques and patterns. It is used for e-commerce-based web applications as well as heavy-duty transactional systems for the enterprise. Gary Mak, the author of the best-selling Spring Recipes, now brings you Hibernate Recipes. This book contains a collection of code recipes and templates for learning and building Hibernate solutions for you and your clients. This book is your pragmatic day-to-day reference and guide for doing all things involving Hibernate. There

  19. Cooking in Crisis: Lessons from the UK.

    OpenAIRE

    Caraher, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The concern with low levels of cooking skills among the British population can be traced back to the 1780s coinciding with the start of urbanisation of the English rural classes. Modern concerns with the lack of cooking skills, since the 1980s, have focused on the links to healthy food choice and preparation. This has resulted in a number of initiatives but little policy development to support cooking in any structured way. Cooking was de-facto removed from the educational experience in schoo...

  20. Getting healthier : creating interactive cooking tools for kids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spermon, M.; Bruns, M.; Zampollo, F.; Smith, C.

    2012-01-01

    Cooking lessons are believed to be the basis for a healthy lifestyle for both children and adults. However, while children learn their eating habits during childhood, most people only learn to cook from the age of sixteen onwards. Therefore, it is suggested that people should learn to cook during

  1. Medicinal plant recipes from Kırklareli

    OpenAIRE

    Kültür, Şükran

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: In this study, have been reported different medicinal plant recipesin the Kırklareli region. 15 medicinal plant recipes belonging to 20 families (20wild plant species, 7 cultivated plant species) which were used for different medicinalpurposes by local people have been recorded totally 27 plant species in thearea. Traditional medicinal plant recipes have been mostly used for the traetmentof cough, cold and influenza.Key words: Ethnobotany, Kırklareli, Turkey, medicinal plant.

  2. Cooking without salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000760.htm Cooking without salt To use the sharing features on ... other dishes to add zest. Try Salt-free Cooking Explore cooking with salt substitutes. Add a splash ...

  3. Cooking and Society

    OpenAIRE

    Teplá, Hedvika

    2012-01-01

    The bachelor thesis "Cooking and Society" focuses on cooking, a process of food preparation. The thesis analyzes cooking as a leisure activity, type of housework and it also discusses the relation between cooking and cultural identity. It focuses on the importance of national and ethnic cuisine and deals with the differences in cooking influenced by religion and social stratification. The thesis also deals with the acquisition of cooing skills and transgeneral transfer of cooking skills. It d...

  4. Evaluation of a cooking skills programme in parents of young children--a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ada L; Vargas, Elisa; Lam, Po S; Shennan, David B; Smith, Fiona; Parrett, Alison

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate longitudinally the effectiveness of a cooking programme on self-reported confidence about cooking skills and food consumption patterns in parents of young children. An evaluation of cooking programmes delivered by National Health Service (NHS) community food workers using a single group pre-test/post-test repeated measures design. A shortened version of a validated questionnaire at baseline, post intervention and 1-year follow-up determined confidence in cooking using basic ingredients, following a simple recipe, tasting new foods, preparing and cooking new foods on consumption of ready meals, vegetables and fruit. Deprived communities in Ayrshire and Arran, Scotland. Parents of nursery age children, 97 % were female and cooking increased significantly from baseline to post intervention (P recipe and preparing and cooking new foods. Improved food consumption patterns were reported from baseline to post intervention (ready-meal consumption reduced from 2-4 times/week to 1 time/week, P cooking programmes appeared to improve cooking confidence and food consumption patterns in the target group and some of these changes were retained after 1 year.

  5. Retention of Rotavirus Infectivity in Mussels Heated by Using the French Recipe Moules Marinières.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Doris Sobral Marques; Miura, Takayuki; Le Mennec, Cécile; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the persistence of infectious virus after heating, mussels contaminated with a rotavirus strain were prepared following the French recipe moules marinières (mariner's mussels). Rotavirus was then quantified by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and a cell culture infectivity assay. Results showed the persistence of infectious virus after 3 min of cooking. After 5 min, when no infectious virus could be detected, the RT-qPCR approach showed a 1-log decrease compared with concentrations detected after 1 min of cooking.

  6. Teaching Basic Cooking Skills: Evaluation of the North Carolina Extension "Cook Smart, Eat Smart" Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Carolyn; Jayaratne, K. S. U.; Baughman, Kristen; Levine, Katrina

    2014-01-01

    Cook Smart, Eat Smart (CSES) is a 12-hour cooking school that teaches participants to prepare nutritious, delicious food using simple, healthy preparation techniques, basic ingredients, and minimal equipment. The purpose of this evaluation was to examine the impact of CSES on food preparation and meal consumption behavior. Program outcomes include…

  7. The impact of visual media to encourage low protein cooking in inherited metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S; Daly, A; Hopkins, V; Davies, P; MacDonald, A

    2009-10-01

    The use of educational visual aids is one way to help children with inherited metabolic disorders (IMD) understand and develop a positive attitude towards their low protein diet. However, it is difficult to establish their effectiveness in the clinical setting. The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of a low protein recipe book and accompanying DVD for children with IMD. One hundred and five children (53% female; median age = 6-8 years) with IMD on low protein diets were each given a low protein recipe book and DVD. After 6 months, children and carers were posted a questionnaire asking whether they used these resources; identifying any change in frequency of low protein cooking; and the outcome when preparing recipes. One hundred and two questionnaires were returned, representing 105 patients. Seventy percent (n = 71) of questionnaires were from carers. Ninety-three percent (n = 66) of carers acknowledged receipt of the resource; one-third (n = 22) had not watched the DVD and 23% (n = 15) had not opened the recipe book; 55% (n = 36) had tried the recipes; and 71% (n = 47) said the recipe book and/or DVD motivated them to try new recipes. Children were more likely to have watched the DVD (75%; n = 21/28) and read the recipe book (86%; n = 24/28) than carers. Although a helpful educational tool, just over one-half of respondents had used the resource. Identifying visual media that, by itself, will motivate most families of children with IMD to prepare low protein recipes may be unrealistic. The combined approach of visual aids and 'hands-on' practical experience, such as low protein cooking workshops and individual counselling, may be more beneficial.

  8. Culinary practices mimicking a polysaccharide-rich recipe enhance the bioaccessibility of fat-soluble micronutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuique-Mayer, Claudie; Servent, Adrien; Descalzo, Adriana; Mouquet-Rivier, Claire; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Achir, Nawel

    2016-11-01

    This study was carried out to assess the impact of heat processing of a complex emulsion on the behavior of fat soluble micronutrients (FSM) in a traditional Tunisian dish. A simplified recipe involved, dried mucilage-rich jute leaves, tomato paste and olive oil, followed by a cooking treatment (150min). Hydrothermal pattern and viscosity were monitored along with the changes of FSM content and the bioaccessibility (called micellarization, using an in vitro digestion model). Partitioning of carotenoids differed according to their lipophilicity: lycopene, β-carotene and lutein diffused to the oil phase (100%, 70% and 10% respectively). In contrast with the poor carotenes/tocopherol bioaccessibility (0.9-1%), the highest micellarization was observed for lutein (57%) and it increased with heating time and viscosity change. Domestic culinary cooking practices probably increase the bioavailability of carotenes mainly by their diffusion to the oil phase, facilitating their in vivo transfer into micelles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An antibiotic recipe for an arrhythmic disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Keir; Manga, Pravin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient who developed torsade de pointes during temporary pacemaker insertion after administration of intravenous erythromycin. The case highlights the dangers of administering drugs that prolong the QT interval in patients with complete atrioventricular block, and we discuss the underlying pathophysiological recipe that can lead to a potential arrhythmic disaster.

  10. Software Process Improvement: Blueprints versus Recipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Ivan

    2003-01-01

    Viewing software processes as blueprints emphasizes that design is separate from use, and thus that software process designers and users are independent. In the approach presented here, software processes are viewed as recipes; developers individually and collectively design their own software...... processes through facilitation, reflection, and improvisation. Udgivelsesdato: SEP-OCT...

  11. Solar cooking and baking in Central Europe; Kochen mit der Sonne. Solar kochen und backen in Mitteleuropa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behringer, Rolf; Goetz, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Even in the Western and Central European climate, solar cookers can enable environment-friendly cooking and baking on about 100 to 150 days of the year. Some foods taste better when cooked more carefully, and vitamins and nutrients will be better preserved than in conventionally cooked food. After a short historical outline, the authors present some commercial solar cookers suited for our climate. This is followed by a detailed guide on how to construct a simple wooden solar cooker box from commercially available materials. Examples of solar cooking initiatives illustrate the many applications of solar cookers and parabolic trough cookers. The text is supplemented by practical hints and recipes.

  12. Cooking utensils and nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002461.htm Cooking utensils and nutrition To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cooking utensils can have an effect on your nutrition. ...

  13. Computer Algebra Recipes for Mathematical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Enns, Richard H

    2005-01-01

    Over two hundred novel and innovative computer algebra worksheets or "recipes" will enable readers in engineering, physics, and mathematics to easily and rapidly solve and explore most problems they encounter in their mathematical physics studies. While the aim of this text is to illustrate applications, a brief synopsis of the fundamentals for each topic is presented, the topics being organized to correlate with those found in traditional mathematical physics texts. The recipes are presented in the form of stories and anecdotes, a pedagogical approach that makes a mathematically challenging subject easier and more fun to learn. Key features: * Uses the MAPLE computer algebra system to allow the reader to easily and quickly change the mathematical models and the parameters and then generate new answers * No prior knowledge of MAPLE is assumed; the relevant MAPLE commands are introduced on a need-to-know basis * All MAPLE commands are indexed for easy reference * A classroom-tested story/anecdote format is use...

  14. Influence of a School-Based Cooking Course on Students' Food Preferences, Cooking Skills, and Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahr, Rola; Sibeko, Lindiwe

    2017-03-01

    A quasi-experimental study was conducted to evaluate the influence of Project CHEF, a hands-on cooking and tasting program offered in Vancouver public schools, on students' food preferences, cooking skills, and confidence. Grade 4 and 5 students in an intervention group (n = 68) and a comparison group (n = 32) completed a survey at baseline and 2 to 3 weeks later. Students who participated in Project CHEF reported an increased familiarity and preference for the foods introduced through the program. This was statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05) for broccoli, swiss chard, carrots, and quinoa. A higher percentage of students exposed to Project CHEF reported a statistically significant increase (P ≤ 0.05) in: cutting vegetables and fruit (97% vs 81%), measuring ingredients (67% vs 44%), using a knife (94% vs 82%), and making a balanced meal on their own (69% vs 34%). They also reported a statistically significant increase (P ≤ 0.05) in confidence making the recipes introduced in the program: fruit salad (85% vs 81%), minestrone soup (25% vs 10%), and vegetable tofu stir fry (39% vs 26%). Involving students in hands-on cooking and tasting programs can increase their preferences for unpopular or unfamiliar foods and provide them with the skills and cooking confidence they need to prepare balanced meals.

  15. Middle English medical recipes: A metadiscursive approach

    OpenAIRE

    Quintana-Toledo, Elena

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to explore Middle English medical recipes from a metadiscursive perspective. This study will draw on Hyland’s (2005) metadiscourse model where code glosses, endophoric markers, evidentials, frame markers and transition markers are included in the interactive dimension, and attitude markers, boosters, engagement markers, hedges and self mention are to be found within interactional metadiscourse. I shall apply this framework for the identification and analysis of...

  16. Surprise, Recipes for Surprise, and Social Influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, Jeffrey

    2018-02-07

    Surprising people can provide an opening for influencing them. Surprises garner attention, are arousing, are memorable, and can prompt shifts in understanding. Less noted is that, as a result, surprises can serve to persuade others by leading them to shifts in attitudes. Furthermore, because stories, pictures, and music can generate surprises and those can be widely shared, surprise can have broad social influence. People also tend to share surprising items with others, as anyone on social media has discovered. This means that in addition to broadcasting surprising information, surprising items can also spread through networks. The joint result is that surprise not only has individual effects on beliefs and attitudes but also collective effects on the content of culture. Items that generate surprise need not be random or accidental. There are predictable methods or recipes for generating surprise. One such recipe is discussed, the repetition-break plot structure, to explore the psychological and social possibilities of examining surprise. Recipes for surprise offer a useful means for understanding how surprise works and offer prospects for harnessing surprise to a wide array of ends. Copyright © 2017 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  17. Healthy Living after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Cooking for Health Food for Thought: Heart-healthy Diet is Also Good For Your Brain Physical Activity Get Moving and Boost Your Brain Power Understanding Risky Conditions Converging Risk Factors for Stroke ...

  18. Prepare Healthy Foods with Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi-Taylor, Satomi; Rike, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Toddlers--from about 16 to 36 months--can learn a variety of skills as they prepare food and follow recipes in developmentally appropriate ways. Early childhood teachers are encouraged to support young children's healthy eating habits by offering simple food preparation experiences. When toddlers--and preschoolers--safely prepare healthy snacks,…

  19. Spring Recipes A Problem-solution Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Josh; Mak, Gary

    2010-01-01

    With over 3 Million users/developers, Spring Framework is the leading "out of the box" Java framework. Spring addresses and offers simple solutions for most aspects of your Java/Java EE application development, and guides you to use industry best practices to design and implement your applications. The release of Spring Framework 3 has ushered in many improvements and new features. Spring Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach, Second Edition continues upon the bestselling success of the previous edition but focuses on the latest Spring 3 features for building enterprise Java applications.

  20. Simple recipe for holographic Weyl anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugini, F. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción,Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Diaz, D.E. [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andres Bello,Autopista Concepción-Talcahuano 7100, Talcahuano (Chile)

    2017-04-20

    We propose a recipe — arguably the simplest — to compute the holographic type-B Weyl anomaly for general higher-derivative gravity in asymptotically AdS spacetimes. In 5 and 7 dimensions we identify a suitable basis of curvature invariants that allows to read off easily, without any further computation, the Weyl anomaly coefficients of the dual CFT. We tabulate the contributions from quadratic, cubic and quartic purely algebraic curvature invariants and also from terms involving derivatives of the curvature. We provide few examples, where the anomaly coefficients have been obtained by other means, to illustrate the effectiveness of our prescription.

  1. Android Recipes A Problem-Solution Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Friesen, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Android continues to be one of the leading mobile OS and development platforms driving today's mobile innovations and the apps ecosystem. Android appears complex, but offers a variety of organized development kits to those coming into Android with differing programming language skill sets. Android Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach guides you step-by-step through a wide range of useful topics using complete and real-world working code examples. In this book, you'll start off with a recap of Android architecture and app fundamentals, and then get down to business and build an app with Google'

  2. Bioaccessibility of Pb from ammunition in game meat is affected by cooking treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Mateo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The presence of lead (Pb ammunition residues in game meat has been widely documented, yet little information exists regarding the bioaccessibility of this Pb contamination. We study how cooking treatment (recipe can affect Pb bioaccessibility in meat of animals hunted with Pb ammunition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used an in vitro gastrointestinal simulation to study bioaccessibility. The simulation was applied to meat from red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa hunted with Pb shot pellets and cooked using various traditional Spanish game recipes involving wine or vinegar. Total Pb concentrations in the meat were higher in samples with visible Pb ammunition by X-ray (mean±SE: 3.29±1.12 µg/g w.w. than in samples without this evidence (1.28±0.61 µg/g. The percentage of Pb that was bioaccessible within the simulated intestine phase was far higher in meat cooked with vinegar (6.75% and wine (4.51% than in uncooked meat (0.7%. Risk assessment simulations using our results transformed to bioavailability and the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic model (IEUBK; US EPA show that the use of wine instead of vinegar in cooking recipes may reduce the percentage of children that would be expected to have >10 µg/dl of Pb in blood from 2.08% to 0.26% when game meat represents 50% of the meat in diet. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Lead from ammunition in game meat is more bioaccessible after cooking, especially when using highly acidic recipes. These results are important because existing theoretical models regarding Pb uptake and subsequent risk in humans should take such factors into account.

  3. Bioaccessibility of Pb from ammunition in game meat is affected by cooking treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Rafael; Baos, Ana R; Vidal, Dolors; Camarero, Pablo R; Martinez-Haro, Monica; Taggart, Mark A

    2011-01-14

    The presence of lead (Pb) ammunition residues in game meat has been widely documented, yet little information exists regarding the bioaccessibility of this Pb contamination. We study how cooking treatment (recipe) can affect Pb bioaccessibility in meat of animals hunted with Pb ammunition. We used an in vitro gastrointestinal simulation to study bioaccessibility. The simulation was applied to meat from red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa) hunted with Pb shot pellets and cooked using various traditional Spanish game recipes involving wine or vinegar. Total Pb concentrations in the meat were higher in samples with visible Pb ammunition by X-ray (mean±SE: 3.29±1.12 µg/g w.w.) than in samples without this evidence (1.28±0.61 µg/g). The percentage of Pb that was bioaccessible within the simulated intestine phase was far higher in meat cooked with vinegar (6.75%) and wine (4.51%) than in uncooked meat (0.7%). Risk assessment simulations using our results transformed to bioavailability and the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic model (IEUBK; US EPA) show that the use of wine instead of vinegar in cooking recipes may reduce the percentage of children that would be expected to have >10 µg/dl of Pb in blood from 2.08% to 0.26% when game meat represents 50% of the meat in diet. Lead from ammunition in game meat is more bioaccessible after cooking, especially when using highly acidic recipes. These results are important because existing theoretical models regarding Pb uptake and subsequent risk in humans should take such factors into account.

  4. Butter, margarine, and cooking oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000095.htm Butter, margarine, and cooking oils To use the sharing features on this ... these oils when possible. What to Use When Cooking When you cook, solid margarine or butter is ...

  5. Going to School with Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & ... inclusive for your child. If there will be cooking going on, provide recipes, and possibly ingredients, to make safe foods. Consider ...

  6. What's Cooking For Kids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee Valley Authority (Land Between the Lakes), Golden Pond, KY.

    This booklet on nutrition for grades 4-6 contains classroom activities as well as recipes for easily prepared nutritious dishes, e.g., applesauce, cookies, bread. Information is provided on the nutritional values of items in the basic food groups, and activity sheets are included. (JD)

  7. Design implications for a community-based social recipe system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, V.; Yalvac, F.; Funk, M.; Hu, J.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.; Regazzoni, C.S.; Marcenaro, L.

    2014-01-01

    We introduced the concept of a community-based social recipe system which suggests recipes to groups of users based on available ingredients from these users (i.e. who can be from the same household or different households). In this paper we discuss the relevance and desirability of such a system

  8. Using Insects to Make Healthy Space Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Naomi; Yamashita, Masamichi; Kok, Robert; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    Providing foods to space crew is the important requirements to support long term manned space exploration. Foods fill not only physiological requirements to sustain life, but psychological needs for refreshment and joy during the long and hard mission to extraterrestrial planets. We designed joyful and healthy recipe with materials (plants, insects, fish et.cet. la.), which can be produced by the bio-regenerative agricultural system operated at limited resources available in spaceship or on Moon and Mars. And we need to get the storage method of the food without the problem of food poisoning. The consideration about the food allergy is necessary, too. Nutritional analysis on the basic vegetable menu consisting of rice, barley, soybean, sweet potato cassava, quinoa and green reveals a shortage of vitamins D and B12, cholesterol and sodium salt. Since vitamin D deficiency results in demineralization of bone. Vitamin B12 is essential to prevent pernicious anemia. Fish contains both vitamins D and B12. The pupa of the silkworm becomes the important nourishment source as protein and lipid. The silk thread uses it as clothing and cosmetics and medical supplies. However, we can use the silk thread as food as protein. A law of nature shakes high quality oils and fats included in termite for cooking. I use the bee as food after having used it for the pollination of the plant. Of course the honey becomes the important food, too. The snail and mud snail become the food as protein. We decided to use the menu consisting of the basic vegetarian menu plus insect and loach for further conceptual design of space agriculture. We succeeded to develop joyful and nutritious space recipe at the end. Since energy consumption for physical exercise activities under micro-or sub-gravity is less than the terrestrial case, choice of our space foods is essential to suppress blood sugar level, and prevent the metabolic syndrome. Because of less need of agricultural resources at choosing

  9. Evaluation of format preference and effectiveness of vodcasts for recipe demonstrations and nutrition education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danforth SK

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie K Danforth,1 Julie Raeder Schumacher,2 Robert W Cullen,2 Yoon Jin Ma2 1University of Iowa Hospital, Iowa City, IA, USA; 2Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, USA Abstract: Video podcasts, termed “vodcasts”, offer viewers a visual aid when learning about health and nutrition. Although there are many vodcasts featuring cooking demonstrations, little is known about their effectiveness in the field of nutrition or which format of communication technology is preferred. The purpose of this study was to determine which vodcast format was best suited to increase nutrition knowledge and interest as well as intention to use a cancer-preventing food. Participants were recruited from a community cancer center in the Midwest region of the United States. The convenience sample received either an email or an information card from the center that contained a link to the online survey instrument. The survey consisted of initial questions, the vodcast link, and access to final survey questions after viewing the vodcast. Participants (n=120 viewed one of three vodcast formats and evaluated length, nutrition information, and cooking instruction. Nutrition knowledge and the effect each video had on participants' interest and intention to use the food were also measured. A vodcast containing four to six nutrition facts and demonstrating a recipe was preferred by most individuals (X2=10.954, df =4, P=0.027. Participants were indifferent regarding length preference. All formats were successful in increasing interest in cancer-preventing foods and delivering nutrition information to participants. Vodcasts containing a recipe demonstration may offer a convenient method of delivering nutrition information to community members. Keywords: community, dietetics, podcasts

  10. Purity of food cooked in stainless steel utensils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, G N; Packirisamy, S

    1997-01-01

    An extensive programme of cooking operations, using household recipes, has shown that, apart from aberrant values associated with new pans on first use, the contribution made by 19% Cr/9% Ni stainless steel cooking utensils to chromium and nickel in the diet is negligible. New pans, if first used with acid fruits, showed a greater pick-up of chromium and nickel, ranging from approximately 1/20 to 1/3 and 1/20 to 1/2 of the normal daily intake of chromium and nickel respectively. This situation did not recur in subsequent usage, even after the pan had been cleaned by abrasion. A higher rate of chromium and nickel release in new pans on first use was observed on products from four manufactures and appears to be related to surface finish, since treatment of the surface of a new pan was partly, and in the case of electropolishing, wholly effective in eliminating their initial high release.

  11. A reclamation recipe: Composting answers reclamation worries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverty, K.

    2004-06-01

    A much simplified recipe for successful wellsite remediation, an alternative to landfill cuttings, is described. The process is co-composting, and the recipe consists of combining oil and gas wellbore cuttings with wood waste, spread it out thinly, allowing the resulting mixture to stand for a period of two years, and adding seed. The result is a stabilized, non-toxic soil with a lush green carpet of grass, the product of combining two waste material streams into a valuable product that is also environmentally benign. Co-composting is essentially a biodegradation process where the work is done by indigenous microorganisms in the wood waste. Proponents of this process claim that the forestry industry is only too happy to provide the needed raw material as stored piles of wood waste are a fire hazard and have no market value. The process was pioneered by Newpark Environmental Services. Since 1996 they have successfully reclaimed some 500 drilling sites in Alberta and British Columbia, combining an estimated 400,000 cu. m of wood waste and wellbore cuttings to provide nutrient-rich topsoil, frequently in heavily-forested areas. Although faced initially with skepticism, the Newpark system now appears to have won respectability and is about to become part of the mainstream in that bioremediation is being added to the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board's 'Guide 50', the industry's principal guide to site remediation. Part of the reason for the acceptance of bioremediation as an acceptable method for site remediation is a change of heart at the EUB itself; prior to 1996 the EUB was quite fond of 'land-farming', a process which not only requires a period of five to ten years, but is also less than effective, particularly in areas that received a lot of rain and snow. photos.

  12. A reclamation recipe: Composting answers reclamation worries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverty, K.

    2004-01-01

    A much simplified recipe for successful wellsite remediation, an alternative to landfill cuttings, is described. The process is co-composting, and the recipe consists of combining oil and gas wellbore cuttings with wood waste, spread it out thinly, allowing the resulting mixture to stand for a period of two years, and adding seed. The result is a stabilized, non-toxic soil with a lush green carpet of grass, the product of combining two waste material streams into a valuable product that is also environmentally benign. Co-composting is essentially a biodegradation process where the work is done by indigenous microorganisms in the wood waste. Proponents of this process claim that the forestry industry is only too happy to provide the needed raw material as stored piles of wood waste are a fire hazard and have no market value. The process was pioneered by Newpark Environmental Services. Since 1996 they have successfully reclaimed some 500 drilling sites in Alberta and British Columbia, combining an estimated 400,000 cu. m of wood waste and wellbore cuttings to provide nutrient-rich topsoil, frequently in heavily-forested areas. Although faced initially with skepticism, the Newpark system now appears to have won respectability and is about to become part of the mainstream in that bioremediation is being added to the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board's 'Guide 50', the industry's principal guide to site remediation. Part of the reason for the acceptance of bioremediation as an acceptable method for site remediation is a change of heart at the EUB itself; prior to 1996 the EUB was quite fond of 'land-farming', a process which not only requires a period of five to ten years, but is also less than effective, particularly in areas that received a lot of rain and snow. photos

  13. Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Possible Cut away visible fat from meat and poultry. Roast food on a rack to let the ... plain yogurt and light mayonnaise if used in dressing, sauces and dips. Why? Fewer calories. Instead of ...

  14. Case-Based Cooking with Generic Computer Utensils: Taaable Next Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Gaillard , Emmanuelle; Lieber , Jean; Nauer , Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents the participation of the Taaable team in the 2014 Computer Cooking Contest. The three challenges proposed this year are addressed. The basic challenge is addressed with a new version of the Taaable system, built on Tuuurbine, a generic case-basedreasoning system over RDFS. The mixology challenge which requires building recipes only by using a set of available foods is also directly addressed using Tuuurbine conjointly with Revisor, an adaptation eng...

  15. Towards the Creation of a Cooking Recipe for Inexperienced Users by Supplementing Multimedia Information

    OpenAIRE

    志土地, 由香; 井手, 一郎; 中村, 裕一; 出口, 大輔; 高橋, 友和; 村瀬, 洋; SHIDOCHI, Yuka; IDE, Ichiro; NAKAMURA, Yuichi; DEGUCHI, Daisuke; TAKAHASHI, Tomokazu; MURASE, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    既存のテキスト料理レシピから初心者に分かりにくい表現を検出した後,大量の料理レシピから抽出した情報に基づいてテキストを,調理動作の種類に応じて画像・映像を補足することで,分かりやすいマルチメディア料理レシピを作る方法を検討した.

  16. Silverlight 2 Recipes A Problem-solution Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    Microsoft .NET Architect Evangelist, Jit Ghosh, presents a practical companion guide to developing rich, interactive web applications with Silverlight 2. Common problems, issues, and every--day scenarios are tackled with a detailed discussion of the solution and ready--made code recipes that will save you hours of coding time. The recipes included in Silverlight 2 Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach have been carefully selected and tested with the professional developer in mind. You'll find clearly and succinctly stated problems, well--architected solutions, and ample discussion of the code a

  17. Java EE 7 recipes a problem-solution approach

    CERN Document Server

    Juneau, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Java EE 7 Recipes takes an example-based approach in showing how to program Enterprise Java applications in many different scenarios. Be it a small-business web application, or an enterprise database application, Java EE 7 Recipes provides effective and proven solutions to accomplish just about any task that you may encounter. You can feel confident using the reliable solutions that are demonstrated in this book in your personal or corporate environment. The solutions in Java EE 7 Recipes are built using the most current Java Enterprise specifications, including EJB 3.2, JSF 2.2, Expression La

  18. 20 Recipes for Programming MVC 3 Faster, Smarter Web Development

    CERN Document Server

    Munro, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    There's no need to reinvent the wheel every time you run into a problem with ASP.NET's Model-View-Controller (MVC) framework. This concise cookbook provides recipes to help you solve tasks many web developers encounter every day. Each recipe includes the C# code you need, along with a complete working example of how to implement the solution. Learn practical techniques for applying user authentication, providing faster page reloads, validating user data, filtering search results, and many other issues related to MVC3 development. These recipes help you: Restrict access to views with password

  19. Stability of vitamin D in foodstuffs during cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Jette; Knuthsen, Pia

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the retention of vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in eggs, vitamin D3 in margarine, and vitamin D3 and vitamin D2 in bread. Our set-up illustrated the cooking methods usually performed in households i.e. boiling, frying in pan and oven, and baking. All experiments were performed three times independently of one another. The retention of vitamin D compounds in eggs and margarine during heat treatment in an oven for 40 min at normal cooking temperature showed retention at 39-45%, while frying resulted in retention at 82-84%. Boiled eggs were found to have a similar level of retention (86-88%). For bread baked, as recommended in the recipe, the retention of vitamin D3 in rye bread at 69% was lower than the retention in wheat bread at 85%. A similar observation was made for vitamin D2, although the retention was slightly higher, 73% and 89%. No difference between retention of vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in eggs was shown. Cooking may cause detrimental loss of vitamin D, but it depends on the actual foodstuffs and the heating process. Further research is needed to optimise cooking procedures to enhance retention of vitamin D. Vitamin D retention should be taken into account in future calculations of dietary intake of vitamin D. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Information activities and resources in an episode of gourmet cooking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hartel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This paper contributes to what is known about everyday life information seeking within serious leisure. It is the first case study of a making and tinkering (or craft hobby, gourmet cooking. The central activity of the hobby is described and serves as a context to relate and locate information activities and information resources. Method. In this scientific ethnography, twenty gourmet cooks from Boston and Los Angeles, USA were interviewed in their homes about their pursuit of the hobby and its associated information phenomena. Then, domestic culinary information resources and spaces were documented via a photographic inventory. Analysis. Interview transcripts and field notes were studied for themes through an iterative process of inductive and deductive analysis. A visual analysis process was performed on the photographs. Results. Hands-on cooking takes the form of a nine step episode. Information activities and resources are instrumental, interwoven, and varied across the process. In any cooking episode use and re-use are the prevailing information activities; the hobbyist is an active producer and manager of information; and the recipe is a primary document. Conclusion. The study demonstrates how to explicate and conceptualize information phenomena in serious leisure, and sets up lines of inquiry to explore in future research.

  1. GES DISC Data Recipes in Jupyter Notebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A.; Banavige, B.; Garimella, K.; Rice, J.; Shen, S.; Liu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project manages twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) which are geographically dispersed across the United States. The DAACs are responsible for ingesting, processing, archiving, and distributing Earth science data produced from various sources (satellites, aircraft, field measurements, etc.). In response to projections of an exponential increase in data production, there has been a recent effort to prototype various DAAC activities in the cloud computing environment. This, in turn, led to the creation of an initiative, called the Cloud Analysis Toolkit to Enable Earth Science (CATEES), to develop a Python software package in order to transition Earth science data processing to the cloud. This project, in particular, supports CATEES and has two primary goals. One, transition data recipes created by the Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Service Center (GES DISC) DAAC into an interactive and educational environment using Jupyter Notebooks. Two, acclimate Earth scientists to cloud computing. To accomplish these goals, we create Jupyter Notebooks to compartmentalize the different steps of data analysis and help users obtain and parse data from the command line. We also develop a Docker container, comprised of Jupyter Notebooks, Python library dependencies, and command line tools, and configure it into an easy to deploy package. The end result is an end-to-end product that simulates the use case of end users working in the cloud computing environment.

  2. Regularizations: different recipes for identical situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambin, E.; Lobo, C.O.; Battistel, O.A.

    2004-03-01

    We present a discussion where the choice of the regularization procedure and the routing for the internal lines momenta are put at the same level of arbitrariness in the analysis of Ward identities involving simple and well-known problems in QFT. They are the complex self-interacting scalar field and two simple models where the SVV and AVV process are pertinent. We show that, in all these problems, the conditions to symmetry relations preservation are put in terms of the same combination of divergent Feynman integrals, which are evaluated in the context of a very general calculational strategy, concerning the manipulations and calculations involving divergences. Within the adopted strategy, all the arbitrariness intrinsic to the problem are still maintained in the final results and, consequently, a perfect map can be obtained with the corresponding results of the traditional regularization techniques. We show that, when we require an universal interpretation for the arbitrariness involved, in order to get consistency with all stated physical constraints, a strong condition is imposed for regularizations which automatically eliminates the ambiguities associated to the routing of the internal lines momenta of loops. The conclusion is clean and sound: the association between ambiguities and unavoidable symmetry violations in Ward identities cannot be maintained if an unique recipe is required for identical situations in the evaluation of divergent physical amplitudes. (author)

  3. Comparing the Effects of Commercially Available and Custom-Made Video Prompting for Teaching Cooking Skills to High School Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Foster, Ashley L.; Bryant, Kathryn J.

    2013-01-01

    The study compared the effects of using commercially available and custom-made video prompts on the completion of cooking recipes by four high school age males with a diagnosis of autism. An adapted alternating treatments design with continuous baseline, comparison, final treatment, and best treatment condition was used to compare the two…

  4. Short term exposure to cooking fumes and pulmonary function

    OpenAIRE

    Qvenild Torgunn; Svendsen Kristin; Svedahl Sindre; Sjaastad Ann; Hilt Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Exposure to cooking fumes may have different deleterious effects on the respiratory system. The aim of this study was to look at possible effects from inhalation of cooking fumes on pulmonary function. Methods Two groups of 12 healthy volunteers (A and B) stayed in a model kitchen for two and four hours respectively, and were monitored with spirometry four times during twenty four hours, on one occasion without any exposure, and on another with exposure to controlled level...

  5. Cooking up diversity. Impact of a multicomponent, multicultural, experiential intervention on food and cooking behaviors among elementary-school students from low-income ethnically diverse families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiong; Goto, Keiko; Wolff, Cindy; Bianco-Simeral, Stephanie; Gruneisen, Kristin; Gray, Katharine

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a pilot intervention promoting ethnic produce through classroom food demonstrations, tastings and home cooking activities among ethnically diverse elementary-school children ages 5-8 years old and their family members in Northern California. A total of 604 intervention students from four schools participated in classroom food demonstrations and tasting activities using seven food recipes. The control group included 600 students from two additional schools. Each recipe featured one vegetable from Latino, Hmong, or mainstream American cultures. Intervention students also received food kits containing ingredients to take home for each recipe. Mixed methods of quantitative student and parent pre-post surveys, parent feedback surveys, and qualitative focus groups were used to evaluate the intervention. Generalized estimating equations were used for survey data analysis. Qualitative data from parent focus groups were analyzed based on the principles of grounded theory. Both quantitative and qualitative results revealed that intervention students increased familiarity, preferences, and consumption of the featured vegetables and significantly increased their involvement in food preparation at home. Qualitative results showed that children were actively involved in food preparation at home. In addition, the intervention helped parents increase their appreciation for new foods and recipes. The results suggest that promoting locally grown ethnic produce to children is effective in increasing their consumption of a variety of vegetables and their involvement in food preparation at home. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular gastronomy, a scientific look at cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This, Hervé

    2009-05-19

    Food preparation is such a routine activity that we often do not question the process. For example, why do we cook as we do? Why do we eat certain foods and avoid other perfectly edible ingredients? To help answer these questions, it is extremely important to study the chemical changes that food undergoes during preparation; even simply cutting a vegetable can lead to enzymatic reactions. For many years, these molecular transformations were neglected by the food science field. In 1988, the scientific discipline called "molecular gastronomy" was created, and the field is now developing in many countries. Its many applications fall into two categories. First, there are technology applications for restaurants, for homes, or even for the food industry. In particular, molecular gastronomy has led to "molecular cooking", a way of food preparation that uses "new" tools, ingredients, and methods. According to a British culinary magazine, the three "top chefs" of the world employ elements of molecular cooking. Second, there are educational applications of molecular gastronomy: new insights into the culinary processes have led to new culinary curricula for chefs in many countries such as France, Canada, Italy, and Finland, as well as educational programs in schools. In this Account, we focus on science, explain why molecular gastronomy had to be created, and consider its tools, concepts, and results. Within the field, conceptual tools have been developed in order to make the necessary studies. The emphasis is on two important parts of recipes: culinary definitions (describing the objective of recipes) and culinary "precisions" (information that includes old wives' tales, methods, tips, and proverbs, for example). As for any science, the main objective of molecular gastronomy is, of course, the discovery of new phenomena and new mechanisms. This explains why culinary precisions are so important: cooks of the past could see, but not interpret, phenomena that awaited scientific

  7. Mediterranean Diet: Choose This Heart-Healthy Diet Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lifestyle Nutrition and healthy eating The heart-healthy Mediterranean diet is a healthy eating plan based on typical ... Mediterranean-style cooking. Here's how to adopt the Mediterranean diet. By Mayo Clinic Staff If you're looking ...

  8. Applying Creativity Research to Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghetto, Ronald A.; Kaufman, James C.; Hatcher, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    What, if any, benefit might there be to applying creativity research to cooking? The purpose of this paper was to address this question. Specifically, we draw on concepts and theories from creativity research to help clarify what is meant by creative cooking. This includes exploring creative cooking through the lens of the 4-C and Propulsion…

  9. Outdoorsman: Outdoor Cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Agriculture, Edmonton.

    This Outdoor Cookery manual provides information and instruction on the basic outdoor skills of building suitable cooking fires, handling fires safely, and storing food. The necessity of having the right kind of fire is stressed (high flames for boiling, low for stewing, and coals for frying and broiling). Tips on gauging temperature, what types…

  10. Cooking with Quadratics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Luajean N.

    2010-01-01

    A project that mixes algebra with data collection, uses technology, extends into data analysis, and cooks marshmallows can excite both teachers and students. This article describes a project that intends to pique students' interest in higher mathematics, incorporate their knowledge of parabolas, and offer a meaningful mathematics experience. Using…

  11. Wine distillates: practical operating recipe formulation for stills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Daniel; Pérez-Correa, J Ricardo; Biegler, Lorenz T; Agosin, Eduardo

    2005-08-10

    Consumer perceptions of flavors are associated with the chemical composition of foods. However, consumer preferences change; therefore, it is necessary for food manufacturers to be able to adapt their products. Unlike in aged spirits, the chemical composition of young spirits is determined during distillation; therefore, this is where distillers must tailor their operating recipes to the new trends. Even for an experienced distiller, the complexity of the process makes adapting the operating recipe far from straightforward. In this study, we developed a methodology for generating practical recipes that makes use of computer simulations and optimization techniques. We used Pisco Brandy, a young Muscat wine distillate from Chile and Peru as our case study. Even so, because our methodology is independent of the chemical composition of the broth, it can be applied throughout the industry. Drawing on the experience and preferences of industry enologists, we designed a preferred distillate and used our methodology to obtain the appropriate recipe. This recipe was validated in lab scale experiments, and we obtained a much closer distillate to the desired prescription than commercial products.

  12. A semi-automatic annotation tool for cooking video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Simone; Ciocca, Gianluigi; Napoletano, Paolo; Schettini, Raimondo; Margherita, Roberto; Marini, Gianluca; Gianforme, Giorgio; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    In order to create a cooking assistant application to guide the users in the preparation of the dishes relevant to their profile diets and food preferences, it is necessary to accurately annotate the video recipes, identifying and tracking the foods of the cook. These videos present particular annotation challenges such as frequent occlusions, food appearance changes, etc. Manually annotate the videos is a time-consuming, tedious and error-prone task. Fully automatic tools that integrate computer vision algorithms to extract and identify the elements of interest are not error free, and false positive and false negative detections need to be corrected in a post-processing stage. We present an interactive, semi-automatic tool for the annotation of cooking videos that integrates computer vision techniques under the supervision of the user. The annotation accuracy is increased with respect to completely automatic tools and the human effort is reduced with respect to completely manual ones. The performance and usability of the proposed tool are evaluated on the basis of the time and effort required to annotate the same video sequences.

  13. Shell Scripting Expert Recipes for Linux, Bash and more

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Steve

    2011-01-01

    A compendium of shell scripting recipes that can immediately be used, adjusted, and applied The shell is the primary way of communicating with the Unix and Linux systems, providing a direct way to program by automating simple-to-intermediate tasks. With this book, Linux expert Steve Parker shares a collection of shell scripting recipes that can be used as is or easily modified for a variety of environments or situations. The book covers shell programming, with a focus on Linux and the Bash shell; it provides credible, real-world relevance, as well as providing the flexible tools to get started

  14. Experiential Cooking Programs for Low-Income Adults: Strategies for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Karen; Vineyard, Michelle; Olson, Ann; Peterson, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Experiential cooking classes for low-income adults can help improve healthy nutrition behaviors. However, nutrition educators and Extension professionals can face challenges in successful implementation of these programs such as difficulties recruiting and retaining participants. Drawing upon lessons learned from a cooking intervention with…

  15. Great apes prefer cooked food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobber, Victoria; Hare, Brian; Wrangham, Richard

    2008-08-01

    The cooking hypothesis proposes that a diet of cooked food was responsible for diverse morphological and behavioral changes in human evolution. However, it does not predict whether a preference for cooked food evolved before or after the control of fire. This question is important because the greater the preference shown by a raw-food-eating hominid for the properties present in cooked food, the more easily cooking should have been adopted following the control of fire. Here we use great apes to model food preferences by Paleolithic hominids. We conducted preference tests with various plant and animal foods to determine whether great apes prefer food items raw or cooked. We found that several populations of captive apes tended to prefer their food cooked, though with important exceptions. These results suggest that Paleolithic hominids would likewise have spontaneously preferred cooked food to raw, exapting a pre-existing preference for high-quality, easily chewed foods onto these cooked items. The results, therefore, challenge the hypothesis that the control of fire preceded cooking by a significant period.

  16. The energetic significance of cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Rachel N; Wrangham, Richard W

    2009-10-01

    While cooking has long been argued to improve the diet, the nature of the improvement has not been well defined. As a result, the evolutionary significance of cooking has variously been proposed as being substantial or relatively trivial. In this paper, we evaluate the hypothesis that an important and consistent effect of cooking food is a rise in its net energy value. The pathways by which cooking influences net energy value differ for starch, protein, and lipid, and we therefore consider plant and animal foods separately. Evidence of compromised physiological performance among individuals on raw diets supports the hypothesis that cooked diets tend to provide energy. Mechanisms contributing to energy being gained from cooking include increased digestibility of starch and protein, reduced costs of digestion for cooked versus raw meat, and reduced energetic costs of detoxification and defence against pathogens. If cooking consistently improves the energetic value of foods through such mechanisms, its evolutionary impact depends partly on the relative energetic benefits of non-thermal processing methods used prior to cooking. We suggest that if non-thermal processing methods such as pounding were used by Lower Palaeolithic Homo, they likely provided an important increase in energy gain over unprocessed raw diets. However, cooking has critical effects not easily achievable by non-thermal processing, including the relatively complete gelatinisation of starch, efficient denaturing of proteins, and killing of food borne pathogens. This means that however sophisticated the non-thermal processing methods were, cooking would have conferred incremental energetic benefits. While much remains to be discovered, we conclude that the adoption of cooking would have led to an important rise in energy availability. For this reason, we predict that cooking had substantial evolutionary significance.

  17. Recipes and nutritional value of dishes prepared from green-leafy vegetables in an urban district of Antananarivo (Madagascar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randrianatoandro, Verohanitra Annie; Avallone, Sylvie; Picq, Christian; Ralison, Charlotte; Trèche, Serge

    2010-06-01

    The recipes of 50 multi-ingredient dishes consumed by the population in an urban district were noted down. The nutritional value was determined as well as the cook value of the dishes in order to evaluate the severity of the thermal treatment. The recipes were simple and involved steps such as boiling, mixing, and cutting. Fibre contents were rather low except when the leaf stems were included. All the dishes had very high beta-carotene content (15.8-25.0 mg/100 g dry matter) and retinol activity equivalent (RAE) (1.3-2.3 mg RAE/100 g dry matter) because of the high proportion of fresh leafy vegetables (from 41.2% to 58.8% of the total dry matter of the ingredients). When meat was added to the preparation, the micronutrient content (iron, zinc, and retinol) was not increased significantly. In three dishes, a positive correlation was found between the thermal treatment severity and the 13-cis-beta-carotene amount.

  18. Literacy: An Essential Ingredient in the Recipe for Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Scott

    2005-01-01

    The ingredients that underpin economic growth are well-known and generally accepted; population growth, physical capital, financial capital and human capital all play a part in creating long term differences in the wealth of nations. There remains, however, considerable debate about the ideal recipe for economic growth. Recently, Statistics Canada…

  19. Development and testing of recipes suitable for patients with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The main objectives of the study were to develop and test recipes that meet the nutritional requirements of and are acceptable to patients with chronic renal failure. The secondary objectives were to determine gender and racial differences in the participants' responses during consumer sensory testing. Design: ...

  20. Introducing CSR - The Missing Ingredient in the Land Reform Recipe?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article identifies corporate social responsibility (CSR) as one of the missing ingredients in the recipe for a successful land reform programme. The article introduces CSR and discusses the business case for CSR; identifies its benefits; considers its possible limitations; and examines the major drivers behind the notion.

  1. A duality recipe for non-convex variational problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchitté, Guy; Phan, Minh

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a general convexification recipe that can be useful for studying non-convex variational problems. In particular, this allows us to treat such problems by using a powerful primal-dual scheme. Possible further developments and open issues are given. xml:lang="fr"

  2. The Dutch xAPI Experience: xAPI Recipes

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Alan; Scheffel, Maren; Drachsler, Hendrik; Ternier, Stefaan; Specht, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    We present the collected experiences since 2012 of the Dutch Special Interest Group (SIG) for Learning Analytics in the application of the xAPI standard and best practices around the application of xAPI in various contexts. We present three projects that apply xAPI in very different ways and publish a consistent set of xAPI recipes.

  3. Using Cooking, Baking, and Cutting Terms. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.1a. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with some of the terms used in recipes. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided on important cooking, baking, and cutting terms. The…

  4. Effects of cooking method, cooking oil, and food type on aldehyde emissions in cooking oil fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chiung-Yu; Lan, Cheng-Hang; Lin, Pei-Chen; Kuo, Yi-Chun

    2017-02-15

    Cooking oil fumes (COFs) contain a mixture of chemicals. Of all chemicals, aldehydes draw a great attention since several of them are considered carcinogenic and formation of long-chain aldehydes is related to fatty acids in cooking oils. The objectives of this research were to compare aldehyde compositions and concentrations in COFs produced by different cooking oils, cooking methods, and food types and to suggest better cooking practices. This study compared aldehydes in COFs produced using four cooking oils (palm oil, rapeseed oil, sunflower oil, and soybean oil), three cooking methods (stir frying, pan frying, and deep frying), and two foods (potato and pork loin) in a typical kitchen. Results showed the highest total aldehyde emissions in cooking methods were produced by deep frying, followed by pan frying then by stir frying. Sunflower oil had the highest emissions of total aldehydes, regardless of cooking method and food type whereas rapeseed oil and palm oil had relatively lower emissions. This study suggests that using gentle cooking methods (e.g., stir frying) and using oils low in unsaturated fatty acids (e.g., palm oil or rapeseed oil) can reduce the production of aldehydes in COFs, especially long-chain aldehydes such as hexanal and t,t-2,4-DDE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. 46 CFR 121.220 - Cooking equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooking equipment. 121.220 Section 121.220 Shipping... SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Cooking and Heating § 121.220 Cooking equipment. (a) Doors on a cooking appliance... cooking appliance must be installed to prevent movement in heavy seas. (c) For a grill or similar type of...

  6. Kitchen Magic: A Nutrition and Cooking Activities Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Mary Jo; And Others

    This handbook on nutrition and cooking is one of a series written especially for parents and other caregivers. Contents include: (1) the importance of nutrition, (2) the four basic food groups in terms of serving size, menu planning, and major nutrients, (3) ways to build healthy attitudes toward food, (4) unsafe foods which have the potential to…

  7. Who is cooking dinner?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lotte; Ekström, Marianne Pipping; Hach, Sara

    2015-01-01

    on almost identical questionnaires centering on the previous day’s eating as reported by the individuals: this included foods eaten, the social context of its consumption and details of who had prepared the food. We make use of a sub-sample encompassing respondents from two-adult households who ate dinner...... developments in the gendering of cooking dinners in multi-person households. The analysis is based on two surveys from a project investigating changes in meal patterns in the Nordic countries. Individuals from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden were interviewed in 1997 (n = 4823) and 2012 (n = 8242) based...

  8. Effects of cooking methods and temperatures on nutritional and quality characteristics of anchovy (Engraulis encrasicholus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uran, Harun; Gokoglu, Nalan

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the nutritional and quality characteristics of anchovy after cooking. The fish were cooked by different methods (frying, baking and grilling) at two different temperatures (160 °C, 180 °C). Crude ash, crude protein and crude fat contents of cooked fish increased due to rise in dry matter contents. While cooking methods affected mineral content of anchovy, cooking temperature did not affect. The highest values of monounsaturated fatty acids were found in baked samples. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in baked samples were also high and similar in fried samples. Fried samples, which were the most preferred, lost its nutritional characteristics more than baked and grilled samples. Grilled and baked fish samples can be recommended for healthy consumption. However, grilled fish samples had hard texture due to more moisture loss than other methods. Therefore, it is concluded that baking is the best cooking method for anchovy.

  9. A Data Set of Portuguese Traditional Recipes Based on Published Cookery Books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Soveral Dias

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a data set resulting from the abstraction of books of traditional recipes for Portuguese cuisine. Only starters, main courses, side dishes, and soups were considered. Desserts, cakes, sweets, puddings, and pastries were not included. Recipes were characterized by the province and ingredients regardless of quantities or preparation. An exploratory characterization of recipes and ingredients is presented. Results show that Portuguese traditional recipes organize differently among the eleven provinces considered, setting up the basis for more detailed analyses of the 1382 recipes and 421 ingredients inventoried.

  10. Culinary Grief Therapy: Cooking for One Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickrand, Heather L; Brock, Cara M

    2017-02-01

    Although loss of loved ones is a universal experience, individuals who experience this loss grieve in different ways. Complicated grief involves the development of trauma symptoms, such as flashbacks, anxiety, and fear associated with daily activities after a death that disrupts the healthy grieving process. Daily activities such as eating, meal planning, grocery shopping, managing finances, and household maintenance can become painful and isolating for those experiencing complicated grief. Cognitive behavioral therapy is used to address irrational beliefs, feelings of depression or anger, and avoidance or numbing behaviors with a goal of leading the individual to adapting to a life, which no longer includes the lost loved one. As part of the bereavement counseling program in a hospice, a need was identified in individuals who had lost loved ones and were having difficulty with adjusting to meal planning, grocery shopping, and cooking for one. To address this need for grief counseling centered on meal planning, grocery shopping, meal preparations, and eating meals alone, "Culinary Grief Therapy: Cooking for One Series" was developed with a local Culinary Arts Program. Partnering with a local community college culinary arts program, the Cooking for One Series provides an interactive venue for cognitive behavioral therapy centered on meal planning and meal times. Along with demonstrations and hands-on experiences, participants are engaged in bereavement counseling with hospice staff. Initial reactions to Culinary Grief Therapy have been positive. Many attendees have participated in multiple workshops, and the number of participants grows for each offering. Culinary Grief Therapy is a novel approach to the needs of those experiencing the loss of a loved one and may reduce or prevent complicated grief associated with meal planning, grocery shopping, and cooking for one.

  11. Cooking up a Culinary Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongshem, Lars

    1993-01-01

    A program to introduce inner-city students to the fundamentals of French cooking has spread to more than 100 schools in 6 cities. The program awarded $400,000 in scholarships nationwide this year. Highlights a cooking competition of 10 juniors and seniors from the District of Columbia public schools. (MLF)

  12. A RIXS cookbook: Five recipes for successful RIXS applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueff, J.-P., E-mail: jean-pascal.rueff@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L‘Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Chimie Physique – Matière et Rayonnement, CNRS-UMR 7614, UPMC, 75005 Paris (France); Shukla, A., E-mail: abhay.shukla@upmc.fr [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, IMPMC, CNRS UMR7590, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: •Revolutionize absorption spectroscopy: improve resolution beyond natural lifetime broadening, K-edge MCD with RIXS, absorption spectroscopy of dilute elements in a matrix. •Perform ultrafast time resolved spectroscopy (at no extra cost). •Determine the spin state of materials, spin transition in cross-over complexes, remnant magnetism in the high pressure hcp phase of iron. •Accurately extract valence in 4f electrons systems. •Investigate dispersive behavior of excitations in correlated system. -- Abstract: In this “cookbook”, we present some recipes of pertinent Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) experiments with a focus on hard X-ray range. As a starter, we discuss the new possibilities of investigation of materials introduced by this method. Our 5 recipes focus on spectroscopic innovations or new physical insights, and the dessert looks very briefly at perspectives for the years to come.

  13. A RIXS cookbook: Five recipes for successful RIXS applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueff, J.-P.; Shukla, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Revolutionize absorption spectroscopy: improve resolution beyond natural lifetime broadening, K-edge MCD with RIXS, absorption spectroscopy of dilute elements in a matrix. •Perform ultrafast time resolved spectroscopy (at no extra cost). •Determine the spin state of materials, spin transition in cross-over complexes, remnant magnetism in the high pressure hcp phase of iron. •Accurately extract valence in 4f electrons systems. •Investigate dispersive behavior of excitations in correlated system. -- Abstract: In this “cookbook”, we present some recipes of pertinent Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) experiments with a focus on hard X-ray range. As a starter, we discuss the new possibilities of investigation of materials introduced by this method. Our 5 recipes focus on spectroscopic innovations or new physical insights, and the dessert looks very briefly at perspectives for the years to come

  14. Improvements in a four factor formula recipe for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelgaard, P.L.

    1995-05-01

    In introductory reactor physics courses the four-factor-formula and two-group theory is normally used to demonstrate to students in a quantitative way the physics of nuclear reactors. However, the agreement obtained between lattice calculations with such simple recipes and measurements is not very good. This is in particular the case for light water reactors. To improve this situation it has been investigated whether it is possible by relative simple modifications of such a recipe to obtain better agreement between theory and measurements. The results obtained from this investigation are presented in this paper. It is seen from the results that significant improvements in the agreement between measurements and theory have been obtained. This report was presented to the meeting on Reactor Physics Calculations in the Nordic Countries, Helsinki, May 8-9, 1995. (au)

  15. Facts about Type 2

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ...

  16. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ...

  17. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ...

  18. Fluidised bed cereal cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, Simon Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Man has been cooking food for thousands of years for a number of reasons: to improve flavour and palatability, sterilise, increase digestibility, improve texture and colour. Increasingly more advanced techniques are employed today in food production plants to engineer foods with many different properties. With this in mind manufacturers are constantly seeking to improve processing techniques and apply new or different technologies (such as microwaves, RF and extrusion) to develop foods with new properties (like puffed texture starches) and to increase process efficiencies (energy efficiency, water reduction). This thesis reports on work undertaken to demonstrate the potential to achieve high temperature starch conversion of whole wheat grains in a fluidised bed, thereby reducing the amount of water required and processing time. Specifically, wheat from the farm at 14% water content is cooked in a fluidised bed. The fluidised bed heats the wheat quickly by convective heating. In addition, energy can be delivered directly to the grain by microwave heating during fluidisation. Degree of starch conversion is determined by measuring the reduction in size of endotherm of reaction as observed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The fluidising gas, processing temperature and starting moisture content were varied in order to investigate their effect on the cooking process. A mathematical model based on energy and species concentration equations was developed to help understand the internal grain processes. The model coupled the thermal energy equation with water diffusion. The effect of water evaporation was represented as a thermal sink in the energy equation. Popular kinetic models from literature were adapted to predict the degree of starch conversion. The model gives solutions consistent with experimental data and physical intuition. A commercial computational fluid dynamics package was used to study simple airflow and particle tracks in the fluidisation column. A

  19. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & ... & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying ...

  20. Getting a Urine Test (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & ... & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying ...

  1. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & ... & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying ...

  2. Guide to Eating for Sports

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    Full Text Available ... Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & ... & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying ...

  3. Special Needs: Planning for Adulthood (Videos)

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    Full Text Available ... Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & ... & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying ...

  4. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

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    Full Text Available ... Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & ... & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying ...

  5. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & ... & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying ...

  6. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

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    Full Text Available ... Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & ... & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying ...

  7. Special Needs: Planning for Adulthood (Videos)

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    Full Text Available ... How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & ...

  8. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & ...

  9. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

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  10. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & ...

  11. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

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    Full Text Available ... How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & ...

  12. Getting a Urine Test (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & ...

  13. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & ...

  14. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & ...

  15. Cooking Up Creative Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-05-31

    There comes a time in every scientist’s career when one's mind seems to hit a wall. You can’t think of a new experiment that hasn’t been done before or figure out how to crack a problem that is blocking your progress. The easy questions have been answered. You go back to the wellspring of your creativity and find it dry. What to do? Collaborating with investigators who are investigating problems from a different data or analytical perspective is the best way I know to kick-start research creativity. They not only can provide new data, but they can also bring an expertise on how to get the most “flavor” out of the ingredient that they bring to your problem. As the complexity of the important biological problems continues to grow, too many cooks will never spoil the broth, but become a hallmark of the most creative research.

  16. Determination of the fraction of 90Sr extracting from bones during cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunert, J.; Ziesak, H.

    1976-01-01

    Fresh, commercial cattle bones containing 600 pCi 90 Sr per kilogram were cooked in waters of different degrees of hardness according to an usual beef-tea recipe. After cooking, 90 Sr was also detected in the leftover meat (about 40 pCi per kilogram) adhering to the bones. The beef-tea contained about 1 pCi 90 Sr per litre corresponding to 0.5 to 0.7% of the total amount of 90 Sr which were found in fresh bones. Assuming a weekly consumption of 1 litre beef-tea and 50 g leftover meat, the annual ingestion of 90 Sr would be 160 pCi corresponding to 0.1 to 0.2% of the maximum permissible annual intake, or to 5% of the total 90 Sr dietary intake in 1974, respectively. (author)

  17. Energy-efficient cooking methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, Dilip K. [Department of Physics, University of Jos, P.M.B. 2084, Jos, Plateau State (Nigeria); Muwa Shawhatsu, N. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Technology, Yola, P.M.B. 2076, Yola, Adamawa State (Nigeria); De, N.N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Ikechukwu Ajaeroh, M. [Department of Physics, University of Abuja, Abuja (Nigeria)

    2013-02-15

    Energy-efficient new cooking techniques have been developed in this research. Using a stove with 649{+-}20 W of power, the minimum heat, specific heat of transformation, and on-stove time required to completely cook 1 kg of dry beans (with water and other ingredients) and 1 kg of raw potato are found to be: 710 {+-}kJ, 613 {+-}kJ, and 1,144{+-}10 s, respectively, for beans and 287{+-}12 kJ, 200{+-}9 kJ, and 466{+-}10 s for Irish potato. Extensive researches show that these figures are, to date, the lowest amount of heat ever used to cook beans and potato and less than half the energy used in conventional cooking with a pressure cooker. The efficiency of the stove was estimated to be 52.5{+-}2 %. Discussion is made to further improve the efficiency in cooking with normal stove and solar cooker and to save food nutrients further. Our method of cooking when applied globally is expected to contribute to the clean development management (CDM) potential. The approximate values of the minimum and maximum CDM potentials are estimated to be 7.5 x 10{sup 11} and 2.2 x 10{sup 13} kg of carbon credit annually. The precise estimation CDM potential of our cooking method will be reported later.

  18. 9 CFR 166.7 - Cooking standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooking standards. 166.7 Section 166.7... HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.7 Cooking standards. (a) Garbage shall...) Garbage shall be agitated during cooking, except in steam cooking equipment, to ensure that the prescribed...

  19. 46 CFR 184.220 - Cooking equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooking equipment. 184.220 Section 184.220 Shipping...) VESSEL CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Cooking and Heating § 184.220 Cooking equipment. (a) Doors on a cooking appliance must be provided with hinges and locking devices to prevent...

  20. Short term exposure to cooking fumes and pulmonary function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qvenild Torgunn

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to cooking fumes may have different deleterious effects on the respiratory system. The aim of this study was to look at possible effects from inhalation of cooking fumes on pulmonary function. Methods Two groups of 12 healthy volunteers (A and B stayed in a model kitchen for two and four hours respectively, and were monitored with spirometry four times during twenty four hours, on one occasion without any exposure, and on another with exposure to controlled levels of cooking fumes. Results The change in spirometric values during the day with exposure to cooking fumes, were not statistically significantly different from the changes during the day without exposure, with the exception of forced expiratory time (FET. The change in FET from entering the kitchen until six hours later, was significantly prolonged between the exposed and the unexposed day with a 15.7% increase on the exposed day, compared to a 3.2% decrease during the unexposed day (p-value = 0.03. The same tendency could be seen for FET measurements done immediately after the exposure and on the next morning, but this was not statistically significant. Conclusion In our experimental setting, there seems to be minor short term spirometric effects, mainly affecting FET, from short term exposure to cooking fumes.

  1. Cooking Up Hot Quark Soup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Karen McNulty

    2011-03-28

    Near-light-speed collisions of gold ions provide a recipe for in-depth explorations of matter and fundamental forces. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has produced the most massive antimatter nucleus ever discovered?and the first containing an anti-strange quark. The presence of strange antimatter makes this antinucleus the first to be entered below the plane of the classic Periodic Table of Elements, marking a new frontier in physics.

  2. A RECIPE FOR LINEAR COLLIDER FINAL FOCUS SYSTEM DESIGN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2003-01-01

    The design of Final Focus systems for linear colliders is challenging because of the large demagnifications needed to produce nanometer-sized beams at the interaction point. Simple first- and second-order matrix matching have proven insufficient for this task, and minimization of third- and higher-order aberrations is essential. An appropriate strategy is required for the latter to be successful. A recipe for Final Focus design, and a set of computational tools used to implement this approach, are described herein. An example of the use of this procedure is given

  3. The concept of cooking skills: A review with contributions to the scientific debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Mika JOMORI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper aimed to conduct a literature review about the concept of cooking skills to contribute to the scientific debate about the subject. A systematic search was performed in the Scopus, PubMed/MedLine and Web of Science databases as well as the periodicals of the Federal Agency for Support and Evaluation of Graduate Education in Brazil Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior website, using the following Portuguese and English keywords: cooking skills, cooking and food/meal preparation. We also consulted references cited by these papers, electronic dictionaries (in Portuguese, English and French, technical documents found on public and private institutional websites, as well as books. Basic, etymological/vernacular and systematic definitions for cooking were identified, including historical global and national contexts. To conceptualize cooking skills, categories related to food and individuals were established, purposing a conceptual model. The category related to food referred to the use of unprocessed/minimal processed foods (which require procedures prior to their preparation, and/or processed/ultra-processed foods (which need a little or no preparation, such as re-heating. The category related to individuals involved dimensions such as confidence, attitudes, behavior, and individual knowledge used to prepare foods. The historical definitions of cooking allowed us to clarify the concept of cooking skills. Considering the global context of valuing and recovering cooking for the promotion of healthy eating, this review can contribute to the scientific discussion about the concept of cooking skills. The purposed conceptual model enables parameters to be established for further investigations, allowing cooking interventions to be directed toward promoting healthy eating.

  4. Tasty Recipes for People with Diabetes and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ingredients: 5 small potatoes, peeled and sliced Vegetable cooking spray ½ medium onion, minced 1 small zucchini, sliced 1½ cups green/red peppers, sliced thin 5 medium mushrooms, sliced 3 whole eggs, beaten 5 egg whites, beaten Pepper and garlic ...

  5. Public perceptions of cooking and the implications for cooking behaviour in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Julia A; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Frattaroli, Shannon; Bleich, Sara N

    2016-06-01

    Despite the importance of cooking in modern life, public perceptions about what it means to cook are unknown. We aimed to examine perceptions of cooking and their association with cooking confidence, attitudes and behaviours in the USA. We designed and fielded a nationally representative survey among US adults (n 1112) in April 2015. We used factor analysis to identify perceptions about cooking and multivariate ordered logit and Poisson models to explore associations between those perceptions and cooking confidence, attitudes and behaviours. Nationally representative web-based survey of US adults. US adults aged ≥18 years. Americans conceptualized cooking in three ways: the use of scratch ingredients, convenience foods and not using heat. Respondents who perceived cooking as including convenience foods were less confident in their ability to cook from scratch (OR=0·52, Pcooking (OR=0·68, P=0·01) than those who did not. Although individuals who perceived cooking as including only scratch ingredients reported cooking dinner (4·31 times/week) and using packaged/boxed products (0·95 times/week) the least frequently, few notable differences in the frequency of cooking meals were observed. Cooking frequency is similar among US adults regardless of how they perceive cooking, but cooking confidence and enjoyment are lowest among Americans who perceive cooking as including the use of convenience foods. These insights should inform the development of more specific measures of cooking behaviour as well as meaningful and targeted public health messages to encourage healthier cooking.

  6. Refolding of proteins from inclusion bodies: rational design and recipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anindya; Li, Xiang; Leong, Susanna Su Jan

    2011-10-01

    The need to develop protein biomanufacturing platforms that can deliver proteins quickly and cost-effectively is ever more pressing. The rapid rate at which genomes can now be sequenced demands efficient protein production platforms for gene function identification. There is a continued need for the biotech industry to deliver new and more effective protein-based drugs to address new diseases. Bacterial production platforms have the advantage of high expression yields, but insoluble expression of many proteins necessitates the development of diverse and optimised refolding-based processes. Strategies employed to eliminate insoluble expression are reviewed, where it is concluded that inclusion bodies are difficult to eliminate for various reasons. Rational design of refolding systems and recipes are therefore needed to expedite production of recombinant proteins. This review article discusses efforts towards rational design of refolding systems and recipes, which can be guided by the development of refolding screening platforms that yield both qualitative and quantitative information on the progression of a given refolding process. The new opportunities presented by light scattering technologies for developing rational protein refolding buffer systems which in turn can be used to develop new process designs armed with better monitoring and controlling functionalities are discussed. The coupling of dynamic and static light scattering methodologies for incorporation into future bioprocess designs to ensure delivery of high-quality refolded proteins at faster rates is also discussed.

  7. Cooking up an open source EMR for developing countries: OpenMRS - a recipe for successful collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlin, Burke W; Biondich, Paul G; Wolfe, Ben A; Fraser, Hamish; Jazayeri, Darius; Allen, Christian; Miranda, Justin; Tierney, William M

    2006-01-01

    Millions of people are continue to die each year from HIV/AIDS. The majority of infected persons (>95%) live in the developing world. A worthy response to this pandemic will require coordinated, scalable, and flexible information systems. We describe the OpenMRS system, an open source, collaborative effort that can serve as a foundation for EMR development in developing countries. We report our progress to date, lessons learned, and future directions.

  8. Ruoanvalmistuspaperi Cook and chill prosessissa

    OpenAIRE

    Sarjohalme, Sirkka; Helin, Inga

    2012-01-01

    Opinnäytetyö lähti liikkeelle opinnäytetyön tilaajan, Metsä Tissuen, toiveesta tutkia Cook and chill -ruoanvalmistuspaperin soveltuvuutta Cook and chill -tuotantotapaan ammattikeittiöissä. Uudet toimintamenetelmät eroavat perinteisistä menetelmistä käytännössä näkyvimmin siinä, että ruoanvalmistus ei ole sidottu tarjoilupaikkaan ja ruoan tarjoilun ei tarvitse välttämättä tapahtua valmistuspäivänä. Tähän perustuu myös Cook and chill -tuotantotapa. Tutkimusyhteistyötä tehtiin Pirkkalan tuotanto...

  9. Onsite LLW storage at Cook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacRae, W.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Donald C. Cook nuclear plant has gained much experience through the onsite storage of low-level radioactive waste. Owned and operated by the Indiana Michigan Power Company, which is owned by American Electric Power, the plant is located in Bridgman, Michigan, on the southeast side of Lake Michigan, about 50 miles from Chicago. In November 1990, waste generators in the state of Michigan were denied access to licensed low-level waste disposal sites because of a lack of progress by the state in developing its own disposal site. Because of this lack, wastes from the Cook plant have been stored onsite for three years. This article covers four issues related to the Cook nuclear plant's experience in the low-level waste storage: storage capacity and waste generation rates, waste form and packages, regulatory issues, and the monitoring of the waste

  10. Captain Cook Chased a Chook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Schlunke

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available How can we write the contemporary 'histories' of Captain Cook when they include such textual and material diversity? When that diversity ranges from children's rhymes to convenience stores as well as journals now claimed as iconic documents of the enlightenment? How might the insights of Bruno Latour into how the 'experimental' is produced in the laboratory be helpful in showing how Cook is produced in a settler culture? How does revealing the 'experimental' (the material and textual ethnography of history show us new ways of 'doing' history that engages with its textual as well as its material diversity.

  11. Automated CD-SEM recipe creation technology for mass production using CAD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Toshikazu; Yoshida, Masamichi; Tanaka, Masashi; Ido, Sanyu; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Naokaka; Abe, Yuichi; Nagatomo, Wataru

    2011-03-01

    Critical Dimension Scanning Electron Microscope (CD-SEM) recipe creation needs sample preparation necessary for matching pattern registration, and recipe creation on CD-SEM using the sample, which hinders the reduction in test production cost and time in semiconductor manufacturing factories. From the perspective of cost reduction and improvement of the test production efficiency, automated CD-SEM recipe creation without the sample preparation and the manual operation has been important in the production lines. For the automated CD-SEM recipe creation, we have introduced RecipeDirector (RD) that enables the recipe creation by using Computer-Aided Design (CAD) data and text data that includes measurement information. We have developed a system that automatically creates the CAD data and the text data necessary for the recipe creation on RD; and, for the elimination of the manual operation, we have enhanced RD so that all measurement information can be specified in the text data. As a result, we have established an automated CD-SEM recipe creation system without the sample preparation and the manual operation. For the introduction of the CD-SEM recipe creation system using RD to the production lines, the accuracy of the pattern matching was an issue. The shape of design templates for the matching created from the CAD data was different from that of SEM images in vision. Thus, a development of robust pattern matching algorithm that considers the shape difference was needed. The addition of image processing of the templates for the matching and shape processing of the CAD patterns in the lower layer has enabled the robust pattern matching. This paper describes the automated CD-SEM recipe creation technology for the production lines without the sample preparation and the manual operation using RD applied in Sony Semiconductor Kyusyu Corporation Kumamoto Technology Center (SCK Corporation Kumamoto TEC).

  12. Cognitive capacities for cooking in chimpanzees

    OpenAIRE

    Warneken, Felix; Rosati, Alexandra G.

    2015-01-01

    The transition to a cooked diet represents an important shift in human ecology and evolution. Cooking requires a set of sophisticated cognitive abilities, including causal reasoning, self-control and anticipatory planning. Do humans uniquely possess the cognitive capacities needed to cook food? We address whether one of humans' closest relatives, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), possess the domain-general cognitive skills needed to cook. Across nine studies, we show that chimpanzees: (i) prefer...

  13. Recipe for attaining optimal energy resolution in inorganic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai; Koblov, Alexander [School of Engineering and IT, B-purple-12, Faculty of EHSE, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2012-12-15

    Using an approximate form of the density of excitation created within the track initiated by an incident {gamma} - photon on a scintillator, the light yield is derived as a function of linear, bimolecular and Auger radiative and quenching recombination rates. The non-proportionality in the yield is analysed as a function of the bimolecular and Auger quenching rates and also its dependence on the track radius is studied. An optimal combination of these quenching rates and track radius is presented to obtain a recipe for inventing a scintillator material with optimal energy resolution. The importance of the mobility of charge carriers in minimising the non-proportionality in a scintillator is also discussed (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Plasmonic Films Can Easily Be Better: Rules and Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    High-quality materials are critical for advances in plasmonics, especially as researchers now investigate quantum effects at the limit of single surface plasmons or exploit ultraviolet- or CMOS-compatible metals such as aluminum or copper. Unfortunately, due to inexperience with deposition methods, many plasmonics researchers deposit metals under the wrong conditions, severely limiting performance unnecessarily. This is then compounded as others follow their published procedures. In this perspective, we describe simple rules collected from the surface-science literature that allow high-quality plasmonic films of aluminum, copper, gold, and silver to be easily deposited with commonly available equipment (a thermal evaporator). Recipes are also provided so that films with optimal optical properties can be routinely obtained. PMID:25950012

  15. Recipe for attaining optimal energy resolution in inorganic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jai; Koblov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Using an approximate form of the density of excitation created within the track initiated by an incident γ - photon on a scintillator, the light yield is derived as a function of linear, bimolecular and Auger radiative and quenching recombination rates. The non-proportionality in the yield is analysed as a function of the bimolecular and Auger quenching rates and also its dependence on the track radius is studied. An optimal combination of these quenching rates and track radius is presented to obtain a recipe for inventing a scintillator material with optimal energy resolution. The importance of the mobility of charge carriers in minimising the non-proportionality in a scintillator is also discussed (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Development of a new recipe muffins increased nutritional value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Ponomareva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the technology of flour confectionery products non-traditional types of plant raw materials can be used. Introduction of muffins of pumpkin and flour from whole wheat seeds, rich in vitamins and microelements, will enrich muffins with useful substances and increase their nutritional value. The purpose work was to study the technological properties of enrichers, their chemical composition, as well as to study the efficiency of using pumpkin pulp in the recipes of cupcakes and to identify its rational dosage. In this work, conventional methods of investigating the properties of finished products have been used. The object of study were ready-made muffins with different dosages of pumpkin pulp. The rational dosage was established by examining organoleptic (taste, smell, surface, fracture appearance, structure and form and physicochemical parameters (moisture mass fraction, density, specific volume and alkalinity. The result of this work is the development of a new recipe and production technology for the cake "Ilya Muromets" with the addition of 50% pumpkin pulp to the mass of flour. The addition of the enrichant in the formulation contributed to an increase in the density of the product by 21%, a decrease in the specific volume by 16.7%. Calculation of the nutritional value of the developed product showed that due to the rich chemical and vitamin composition of the pumpkin pulp, the consumption of 100 g of cake will provide a degree of satisfaction of the daily protein requirements by 6.9%, fat 16.2%, carbohydrates – 9.2%, dietary fiber 7.2%. With the help of the received data it is possible to characterize the "Ilya Muromets" cake as a product of increased nutritional value for preventive and functional nutrition that will allow expanding the assortment of products on the bakery market.

  17. Cook's Carteaux: Trends in nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The following Nuclear News interview, conducted by associate editor Gregg M. Taylor, is with Paul F. Carteaux, training superintendent at Indiana/Michigan Power Company's Cook nuclear power plant. The site has two Westinghouse pressurized water reactors. Cook-1, rated 1020-MWe (net), started commercial operation in August 1975, and the 1060-MWe Cook-2 began operation in July 1978

  18. Food, nutrition or cooking literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Jette

    2014-01-01

    similarities and differences concerning the understanding of food literacy, ranging from a narrow r understanding of food literacy as the ability to read food messages to broader interpretations aimed at empowerment and self-efficacy concerning food and nutrition and from simple cooking skills to life skills...

  19. What’s Cooking, Man?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Jonatan

    2016-01-01

    : 1) rechefisation, 2) the TV chef as a moral entrepreneur, 3) the TV chef and the revitalisation of the national myth and 4) cooking as masculine escapism. The article concludes that the innovation of the masculine identity that was launched in The Naked Chef has not continued; rather, the genre has...

  20. Soup Cooking by Thermal Insulation Method

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 辰江; 根本, 勢子; サトウ, タツエ; ネモト, セイコ; TATSUE, SATO; SEIKO, NEMOTO

    1992-01-01

    In order to examine the thermal insulation method of soup cooking, we cooked two kinds of soup. The soup cooked by thermal insulation method was compared with the soup cooked by standard boiling method. ln sensory test, it was more aromatic and palatable than the soup by boiling, and some panels commented that it was rather mild. The measured values of pH, specific gravity, acidity and amount of dry weight of souble solids, total-N, formal-N of the soup cooked by the two methods mentioned abo...

  1. Nutrient retention values and cooking yield factors for three South African lamb and mutton cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, Salomina M; Strydom, Phillip E

    2017-11-01

    Nutrient content of raw and cooked foods is important for formulation of healthy diets. The retention of nutrients during cooking can be influenced by various factors, including animal age, carcass characteristics and cooking method, and these factors are often unique to specific countries. Here the effects of animal age (lamb and mutton) and carcass cut (shoulder, loin and leg) combined with cooking method (moist heat and dry heat) on yield and nutrient retention of selected nutrients of South African sheep carcasses were studied. Cooking yields and moisture retention were lower for lamb loin but higher for lamb leg. Energy and fat retention were higher for all cuts of mutton compared with lamb, while higher retention values for cholesterol were recorded for lamb. Mutton retained more iron (P = 0.10) and zinc and also more vitamin B 2 , B 6 and B 12 than lamb. Shoulder cooked according to moist heat cooking method retained more magnesium, potassium and sodium. Incorporating these retention and yield values into the South African Medical Research Council's Food Composition Tables provides a reliable reference to all concerned with nutrient content of food. It will also guide practitioners and primary industry to adjust animal production aimed at optimum nutrient content to specific diets. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Future Smart Cooking Machine System Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Agushinta R.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There are many tools make human task get easier. Cooking has become a basic necessity for human beings, since food is one of basic human needs. Until now, the cooking equipment being used is still a hand tool. However everyone has slightly high activity. The presence of cooking tools that can do the cooking work by itself is now necessary. Future Smart Cooking Machine is an artificial intelligence machine that can do cooking work automatically. With this system design, the time is minimized and the ease of work is expected to be achieved. The development of this system is carried out with System Development Life Cycle (SDLC methods. Prototyping method used in this system is a throw-away prototyping approach. At the end of this research there will be produced a cooking machine system design including physical design engine and interface design.

  3. Flex 4 Cookbook Real-world recipes for developing Rich Internet Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua; Braithwaite, Garth; Casario, Marco; Tretola, Rich

    2010-01-01

    With this collection of proven recipes, you have the ideal problem-solving guide for developing interactive Rich Internet Applications on the Adobe Flash Platform. You'll find answers to hundreds of common problems you may encounter when using Adobe Flex, Flex 4 Framework, or Flash Builder, Adobe's GUI-based development tool. Flex 4 Cookbook has hands-on recipes for everything from Flex basics to solutions for working with visual components and data access, as well as tips on application development, unit testing, and Adobe AIR. Each recipe provides an explanation of how and why it works, an

  4. The Research on the High-Protein Low-Calorie Food Recipe for Teenager Gymnastics Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cong

    2015-01-01

    In order to prevent teenager gymnastics athletes getting fat deposition, weight gain, they should supply a rational food. This paper considers the normal growth and development of athletes, body fat deposition proteins and hunger feel, configured high-protein low-calorie food recipe. Then analysis the composition and the essential amino acids of the recipe. In the final choiced 18 adolescent gymnastics athletes as subjects, to verify the validity of the formula. And analysis the experimental results. The experimental results analysis shows that this recipe basically meets the design requirements.

  5. Do food blogs serve as a source of nutritionally balanced recipes? An analysis of 6 popular food blogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Elizabeth P; McGovern, Emily E; Lynch, Colleen L; Brown, Lisa S

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether sampled food blogs provide nutritionally balanced recipes. Two entree recipes per season, per year (2010-2011) were selected from 6 highly ranked food blogs (n = 96). Food Processor Nutrition and Fitness software was used to analyze sodium, saturated fat, and energy content. Analysis was separated by protein type (vegetarian, poultry, red meat, and seafood). Recipes met energy recommendations but were excessive in saturated fat and sodium. Vegetarian and seafood recipes were significantly lower in risk nutrients compared with red meat and poultry recipes. Red meat recipes were not significantly different from poultry recipes for risk nutrients studied; poultry recipes were higher in sodium and energy compared with red meat recipes. The public should be aware of the nutritional limitations of popular food blogs; dietitians could assist in modifying blog recipes for individuals and partner with bloggers to improve the nutritional profile of recipes. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of infrared final cooking on color, texture and cooking characteristics of ohmically pre-cooked meatball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz Turp, Gulen; Icier, Filiz; Kor, Gamze

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the current study was to improve the quality characteristics of ohmically pre-cooked beef meatballs via infrared cooking as a final stage. Samples were pre-cooked in a specially designed-continuous type ohmic cooker at a voltage gradient of 15.26 V/cm for 92 s. Infrared cooking was then applied to the pre-cooked samples at different combinations of heat fluxes (3.706, 5.678, and 8.475 kW/m(2)), application distances (10.5, 13.5, and 16.5 cm) and application durations (4, 8, and 12min). Effects of these parameters on color, texture and cooking characteristics of ohmically pre-cooked beef meatballs were investigated. The appearance of ohmically pre-cooked meatball samples was improved via infrared heating. A dark brown layer desired in cooked meatballs formed on the surface of the meatballs with lowest application distance (10.5 cm) and longest application duration (12 min). The texture of the samples was also improved with these parameters. However the cooking yield of the samples decreased at the longest application duration of infrared heating. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genre and text-type conventions in Early Modern Women´s recipe books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel de la Cruz Cabanillas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Early Modern recipe books map onto women’s roles in the period. Women were responsible for the health and care of all their household members. This explains the women´s interest in gathering information on the topic, usually put together in manuscripts which circulated in the women´s intellectual and domestic circles to serve this purpose. The manuscript is viewed as an artefact likely to be changed to meet the needs of its users. The article seeks to explore genre and text-type conventions in a corpus of medical and culinary recipes written or compiled by women in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries of Early Modern Britain. The recipes in this period show patterns of continuity from medieval times but also patterns of variation to foreshadow the shape of modern recipes.

  8. Bargaining agents based system for automatic classification of potential allergens in recipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José ALEMANY

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The automatic recipe recommendation which take into account the dietary restrictions of users (such as allergies or intolerances is a complex and open problem. Some of the limitations of the problem is the lack of food databases correctly labeled with its potential allergens and non-unification of this information by companies in the food sector. In the absence of an appropriate solution, people affected by food restrictions cannot use recommender systems, because this recommend them inappropriate recipes. In order to resolve this situation, in this article we propose a solution based on a collaborative multi-agent system, using negotiation and machine learning techniques, is able to detect and label potential allergens in recipes. The proposed system is being employed in receteame.com, a recipe recommendation system which includes persuasive technologies, which are interactive technologies aimed at changing users’ attitudes or behaviors through persuasion and social influence, and social information to improve the recommendations.

  9. Colombia's War on Drugs: Can Peru Provide the Recipe for Success

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hobaugh, Michael

    2000-01-01

    This thesis examines counternarcotics strategies of interdiction, eradication, and alternative development used in Peru during the 199Os to determine if Peru's success can provide the recipe for success in Colombia...

  10. Medicinal folk recipes used as traditional phyto therapies in district Dera Ismail Khan, KPK, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwat, S.K.; Rehman, F.; Khan, M.A.; Ahmad, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on the results of an ethno medicinal research work conducted in Dera Ismail Khan (D.I. Khan) District, Khyber Pakhtun Khwa (KPK), Pakistan, during May 2006 to March 2007. The study was focused for documentation of traditional knowledge of local people about the use of medicinal folk recipes of native plants. During field survey, questionnaires were used to interview the local inhabitants, older people including men and women both, who were familiar with traditional uses of indigenous plants. In total 40 new medicinal folk recipes of 26 plant species, belonging to 19 families were recorded. These folk recipes are used as traditional phyto therapies in the area. Plant specimens were identified, preserved and vouchers were deposited in the Department of Botany, Quaid-i-University Islamabad for future references. Results were systematically arranged by alphabetic order of botanical names followed by medicinal folk recipes. English name, local name, family name and voucher no., were listed. (author)

  11. RECIPES FOR BUILDING THE DUAL OF CONIC OPTIMIZATION PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diah Chaerani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Building the dual of the primal problem of Conic Optimization (CO isa very important step to make the ¯nding optimal solution. In many cases a givenproblem does not have the simple structure of CO problem (i.e., minimizing a linearfunction over an intersection between a±ne space and convex cones but there areseveral conic constraints and sometimes also equality constraints. In this paper wedeal with the question how to form the dual problem in such cases. We discuss theanswer by considering several conic constraints with or without equality constraints.The recipes for building the dual of such cases is formed in standard matrix forms,such that it can be used easily on the numerical experiment. Special attention isgiven to dual development of special classes of CO problems, i.e., conic quadraticand semide¯nite problems. In this paper, we also brie°y present some preliminariestheory on CO as an introduction to the main topic

  12. Modeling and optimization of dough recipe for breadsticks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivosheev, A. Yu; Ponomareva, E. I.; Zhuravlev, A. A.; Lukina, S. I.; Alekhina, N. N.

    2018-05-01

    During the work, the authors studied the combined effect of non-traditional raw materials on indicators of quality breadsticks, mathematical methods of experiment planning were applied. The main factors chosen were the dosages of flaxseed flour and grape seed oil. The output parameters were the swelling factor of the products and their strength. Optimization of the formulation composition of the dough for bread sticks was carried out by experimental- statistical methods. As a result of the experiment, mathematical models were constructed in the form of regression equations, adequately describing the process of studies. The statistical processing of the experimental data was carried out by the criteria of Student, Cochran and Fisher (with a confidence probability of 0.95). A mathematical interpretation of the regression equations was given. Optimization of the formulation of the dough for bread sticks was carried out by the method of uncertain Lagrange multipliers. The rational values of the factors were determined: the dosage of flaxseed flour - 14.22% and grape seed oil - 7.8%, ensuring the production of products with the best combination of swelling ratio and strength. On the basis of the data obtained, a recipe and a method for the production of breadsticks "Idea" were proposed (TU (Russian Technical Specifications) 9117-443-02068106-2017).

  13. Recipe for generating Weyl semimetals with extended topologically protected features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Zhao, J. Z.; Jin, Y. J.; Xu, W. P.; Gan, L.-Y.; Wu, X. Z.; Xu, H.; Tong, S. Y.

    2017-09-01

    We present a recipe that leads to Weyl semimetals with extended topologically protected features. We show that compounds in a family that possess time-reversal symmetry and share a noncentrosymmetric cubic structure with the space group F -43 m (no. 216) host robust Weyl fermions with extended and easily measurable protected features. The candidates in this family are compounds with different chemical formulas, A B2 , ABC, AB C2 , and ABCD, and their Fermi levels are predominantly populated by nontrivial Weyl fermions. Symmetry of the system requires that the Weyl nodes with opposite chirality are well separated in momentum space. Adjacent Weyl points have the same chirality; thus these Weyl nodes would not annihilate each other with respect to lattice perturbations. As Fermi arcs and surface states connect Weyl nodes with opposite chirality, the large separation of the latter in momentum space guarantees the appearance of very long arcs and surface states. This work demonstrates that the use of system symmetry by first-principles calculations is a powerful approach for discovering new Weyl semimetals with attractive features whose protected fermions may be candidates of many applications.

  14. Broadband Ground Motion Simulation Recipe for Scenario Hazard Assessment in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koketsu, K.; Fujiwara, H.; Irikura, K.

    2014-12-01

    The National Seismic Hazard Maps for Japan, which consist of probabilistic seismic hazard maps (PSHMs) and scenario earthquake shaking maps (SESMs), have been published every year since 2005 by the Earthquake Research Committee (ERC) in the Headquarter for Earthquake Research Promotion, which was established in the Japanese government after the 1995 Kobe earthquake. The publication was interrupted due to problems in the PSHMs revealed by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, and the Subcommittee for Evaluations of Strong Ground Motions ('Subcommittee') has been examining the problems for two and a half years (ERC, 2013; Fujiwara, 2014). However, the SESMs and the broadband ground motion simulation recipe used in them are still valid at least for crustal earthquakes. Here, we outline this recipe and show the results of validation tests for it.Irikura and Miyake (2001) and Irikura (2004) developed a recipe for simulating strong ground motions from future crustal earthquakes based on a characterization of their source models (Irikura recipe). The result of the characterization is called a characterized source model, where a rectangular fault includes a few rectangular asperities. Each asperity and the background area surrounding the asperities have their own uniform stress drops. The Irikura recipe defines the parameters of the fault and asperities, and how to simulate broadband ground motions from the characterized source model. The recipe for the SESMs was constructed following the Irikura recipe (ERC, 2005). The National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) then made simulation codes along this recipe to generate SESMs (Fujiwara et al., 2006; Morikawa et al., 2011). The Subcommittee in 2002 validated a preliminary version of the SESM recipe by comparing simulated and observed ground motions for the 2000 Tottori earthquake. In 2007 and 2008, the Subcommittee carried out detailed validations of the current version of the SESM recipe and the NIED

  15. Data Recipes: Toward Creating How-To Knowledge Base for Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Suhung; Lynnes, Chris; Acker, James G.; Beaty, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Both the diversity and volume of Earth science data from satellites and numerical models are growing dramatically, due to an increasing population of measured physical parameters, and also an increasing variety of spatial and temporal resolutions for many data products. To further complicate matters, Earth science data delivered to data archive centers are commonly found in different formats and structures. NASA data centers, managed by the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), have developed a rich and diverse set of data services and tools with features intended to simplify finding, downloading, and working with these data. Although most data services and tools have user guides, many users still experience difficulties with accessing or reading data due to varying levels of familiarity with data services, tools, and or formats. The data recipe project at Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) was initiated in late 2012 for enhancing user support. A data recipe is a How-To online explanatory document, with step-by-step instructions and examples of accessing and working with real data (http:disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.govrecipes). The current suite of recipes has been found to be very helpful, especially to first-time-users of particular data services, tools, or data products. Online traffic to the data recipe pages is significant, even though the data recipe topics are still limited. An Earth Science Data System Working Group (ESDSWG) for data recipes was established in the spring of 2014, aimed to initiate an EOSDIS-wide campaign for leveraging the distributed knowledge within EOSDIS and its user communities regarding their respective services and tools. The ESDSWG data recipe group is working on an inventory and analysis of existing data recipes and tutorials, and will provide guidelines and recommendation for writing and grouping data recipes, and for cross linking recipes to data products. This presentation gives an

  16. Changes in bacterial and fungal communities across compost recipes, preparation methods, and composting times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Deborah A; Weicht, Thomas R; Bates, Scott T; Leff, Jonathan W; Fierer, Noah

    2013-01-01

    Compost production is a critical component of organic waste handling, and compost applications to soil are increasingly important to crop production. However, we know surprisingly little about the microbial communities involved in the composting process and the factors shaping compost microbial dynamics. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing approaches to assess the diversity and composition of both bacterial and fungal communities in compost produced at a commercial-scale. Bacterial and fungal communities responded to both compost recipe and composting method. Specifically, bacterial communities in manure and hay recipes contained greater relative abundances of Firmicutes than hardwood recipes with hay recipes containing relatively more Actinobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes. In contrast, hardwood recipes contained a large relative abundance of Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi. Fungal communities of compost from a mixture of dairy manure and silage-based bedding were distinguished by a greater relative abundance of Pezizomycetes and Microascales. Hay recipes uniquely contained abundant Epicoccum, Thermomyces, Eurotium, Arthrobotrys, and Myriococcum. Hardwood recipes contained relatively abundant Sordariomycetes. Holding recipe constant, there were significantly different bacterial and fungal communities when the composting process was managed by windrow, aerated static pile, or vermicompost. Temporal dynamics of the composting process followed known patterns of degradative succession in herbivore manure. The initial community was dominated by Phycomycetes, followed by Ascomycota and finally Basidiomycota. Zygomycota were associated more with manure-silage and hay than hardwood composts. Most commercial composters focus on the thermophilic phase as an economic means to insure sanitation of compost from pathogens. However, the community succeeding the thermophilic phase begs further investigation to determine how the microbial dynamics observed here can be best managed

  17. Effect of Stewing in Cooking Step on Textural and Morphological Properties of Cooked Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. GHASEMI

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Stewing of rice grains by steam after boiling in excess water can be used for cooking rice perfectly. The effects of this procedure in cooking of three varieties of Iranian rice (Sang Tarom, Domsiyah and Fajr on textural and morphological properties of cooked rice grains were investigated. The results showed that this step in rice cooking reduced the hardness and increased the adhesiveness of rice grains significantly. By the use of the scanning electron microscopy, it was shown that the outer surface of cooked rice stewed by steam had less porosity and closer pores due to the modification during cooking, and better gelatinization and more expansion of starch granules compared to non-stewed samples. The use of this procedure in rice cooking to provide a fully cooked and gelatinized, softer and stickier final product is recommended.

  18. Cooking rice in excess water reduces both arsenic and enriched vitamins in the cooked grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Patrick J; Conklin, Sean D; Todorov, Todor I; Kasko, Sasha M

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of rinsing rice and cooking it in variable amounts of water on total arsenic, inorganic arsenic, iron, cadmium, manganese, folate, thiamin and niacin in the cooked grain. We prepared multiple rice varietals both rinsed and unrinsed and with varying amounts of cooking water. Rinsing rice before cooking has a minimal effect on the arsenic (As) content of the cooked grain, but washes enriched iron, folate, thiamin and niacin from polished and parboiled rice. Cooking rice in excess water efficiently reduces the amount of As in the cooked grain. Excess water cooking reduces average inorganic As by 40% from long grain polished, 60% from parboiled and 50% from brown rice. Iron, folate, niacin and thiamin are reduced by 50-70% for enriched polished and parboiled rice, but significantly less so for brown rice, which is not enriched.

  19. Magical cooking: Some stylistic characteristics of the novel Like water for chocolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uršula Kastelic Vukadinović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we analyze some of the stylistic characteristics of the novel Like Water for Chocolate from the perspective of a non-Mexican reader. The narrator of the story interlaces the typical linguistic structures specific to cooking recipes and the story of a forbidden love between Tita and Pedro. As a good cook she gives advice, describes the procedures for the preparation of the food, all of which she intertwines with the story as once told to her, which is explicitly expressed by using reporting verbs. We found out that one of the characteristics of the novel is the visualization of the story. The author herself says that her literary creation is based on visual images and that afterwards she turns them into a story. In the novel this is reflected in Tita`s intense response to sensory stimuli. In the article, we highlight examples from the text, structured according to the predominant senses involved. Through the food that Tita is preparing Tita and Pedro establish an unusual, passionate and sensual relationship. Among the ingredients for the dishes that are connected to their love story, the reader encounters many unknown Mexican cultural expressions, which do not hinder the understanding of the story. The text shows that we are dealing with a dish or an ingredient that is mentioned at the beginning as a part of the recipe or presented in such a context. Therefore, the coherence of the text is maintained. The reader takes pleasure in the reading that transports him to the distant worlds of magical realism.

  20. Cooking breakfast after a brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Tanguay, Annick N.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Guerrero Nuñez, Karla V.; Ferland, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) often compromises the ability to carry out instrumental activities of daily living such as cooking. ABI patients' difficulties with executive functions and memory result in less independent and efficient meal preparation. Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in cooking is essential for successful community reintegration following ABI, but in vivo assessment of cooking by clinicians is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to standardize. Accordingly, we exam...

  1. Cooking breakfast after a brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Annick N. Tanguay; Patrick S. R. Davidson; Patrick S. R. Davidson; Patrick S. R. Davidson; K. Vanessa eGuerrero Nuñez; Mark B. Ferland; Mark B. Ferland; Mark B. Ferland

    2014-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) often compromises the ability to carry out instrumental activities of daily living such as cooking. ABI patients’ difficulties with executive functions and memory result in less independent and efficient meal preparation. Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in cooking is essential for successful community reintegration following ABI, but in vivo assessment of cooking by clinicians is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to standardize. Accordingly, we exa...

  2. Cooking Appliances Using High-Frequency Heating

    OpenAIRE

    木村, 秀行; Hideyuki, KIMURA; (株)日立製作所機械研究所

    2007-01-01

    We have produced a guide suitable for people with no technical knowledge of cooking appliances that use high-frequency heating. In general, cooking appliances that use an electric heat source are popular since, they are simple to use because the offer easy heat control, are safe because they do not have naked flames, and do not make kitchens dirty because there is no exhaust. In recent years, high-efficiency cooking appliances using high-frequency heating technology have surged in popularity....

  3. Cognitive capacities for cooking in chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneken, Felix; Rosati, Alexandra G

    2015-06-22

    The transition to a cooked diet represents an important shift in human ecology and evolution. Cooking requires a set of sophisticated cognitive abilities, including causal reasoning, self-control and anticipatory planning. Do humans uniquely possess the cognitive capacities needed to cook food? We address whether one of humans' closest relatives, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), possess the domain-general cognitive skills needed to cook. Across nine studies, we show that chimpanzees: (i) prefer cooked foods; (ii) comprehend the transformation of raw food that occurs when cooking, and generalize this causal understanding to new contexts; (iii) will pay temporal costs to acquire cooked foods; (iv) are willing to actively give up possession of raw foods in order to transform them; and (v) can transport raw food as well as save their raw food in anticipation of future opportunities to cook. Together, our results indicate that several of the fundamental psychological abilities necessary to engage in cooking may have been shared with the last common ancestor of apes and humans, predating the control of fire. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Usability analysis of industrial cooking equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, Alexana Vilar Soares; Soares, Marcelo Márcio

    2012-01-01

    This paper refers to the comparative study of the equipment used for cooking in commercial of kitchens restaurants that use the system of traditional cooking and those ones which use the system called smart cooking (combination oven). The study investigates the usability issues concerning to the two systems, analyzing comparatively the aspects related to anthropometry, dimensional variables, the use of the product and also the product safety, as well as issues of information related to operation of the new concepts of cooking in intelligent systems.

  5. Introducing CSR - The Missing Ingredient in the Land Reform Recipe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk J Kloppers

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In reaction to the unequal land ownership brought about by decades of apartheid, the first democratically elected government embarked on an extensive land reform programme - a programme consisting of the three constitutionally protected pillars: restitution, redistribution and tenure reform. The aim of this programme is not only to provide for restitution to persons who lost their land as a result of racially based measures, but also provide previously disadvantaged South Africans with access to land in order to address the unequal land ownership. This research focuses on the restitution and redistribution pillars of the land reform programme. The progress made in terms of both these sub-programmes has been disappointing. With reference to redistribution the government has set the target to redistribute 30% of white owned commercial agricultural land to black persons by 2014. To date, less than 10% of this target has been achieved and all indications are that the overwhelming majority of land which has been redistributed is not being used productively or have fallen into a state of total neglect. The state of the redistributed land can be attributed to a variety of causes, with the main cause being the government's inability to provide proper post-settlement support to land reform beneficiaries. Against this background it is clear that alternative options have to be identified in order to improve the result of land reform. This article identifies corporate social responsibility (CSR as one of the missing ingredients in the recipe for a successful land reform programme. The article introduces CSR and discusses the business case for CSR; identifies its benefits; considers its possible limitations; and examines the major drivers behind the notion. From the discussion of these topics it will become evident that an assumption of social responsibility by businesses in especially the agricultural sector might contribute to an improved land reform

  6. Diabetes Cooking Schools Improve Knowledge and Skills in Making Healthful Food Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archuleta, Martha; VanLeeuwen, Dawn; Halderson, Karen; Wells, Linda; Bock, Margaret Ann

    2012-01-01

    Rates of type 2 diabetes are increasing nationally and in New Mexico, particularly in ethnic minorities. A key self-care area with challenging barriers is healthy eating. The New Mexico Cooperative Extension Service conducts diabetes cooking schools statewide together with community health providers. The study reported here determined if this…

  7. Cooking Matters at the Store: A Case Study of Three Missouri Counties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Cooking Matters at the Store is a grocery store tour where participants learned about healthy eating and tips for saving money on food purchases. Participants learned how to read food labels, compare unit prices, find whole grains, and three ways to purchase produce. Evaluations revealed that participants planned to use the information they…

  8. Radiation preservation of cooked foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurangzeb; Bibi, N.; Badshah, A.; Khan, I.

    1989-01-01

    The preservation of irradiated cooked food has been explained in this report under vacuum conditions. The samples were irradiated at dose levels of 7.5 and 10.0 LGy. Measurement of fungal count was carried immediately after irradiation and after each 15 days of storage life upto 60 days of time interval. The samples were evaluated organolepticaly as well. It has been observed that no significance difference was observed among samples of irradiated and vacuum packed controls during storage for 45 days. (A.B.)

  9. The influence of recipe modification and nutritional information on restaurant food acceptance and macronutrient intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenitsky, K; Aaron, J; Catt, S; Mela, D

    2000-06-01

    To examine the influences of nutritional information and consumer characteristics on meal quality expectations, food selection and subsequent macronutrient intakes of consumers offered a reduced-fat option in a restaurant. A target, full-fat (FF) main restaurant meal option was developed in a version substantially reduced in fat and energy (RF). Restaurant patrons were randomly placed into one of four treatment groups varying in provision of menu information about the target dish, and the actual version of that dish served (if ordered). A full-fat blind (FFB) control group was given no nutritional information in the menu and was served the FF version. The other three groups were all served the modified RF version: (i) reduced-fat blind (RFB), who were given no nutritional information; (ii) reduced-fat informed (RFI), who were given nutritional information; and (iii) reduced-fat informed with details (RFID), who were given the same nutritional information plus recipe modification details. Subjects rated their expected and actual liking, the pleasantness of taste, texture and appearance of the dish, how well the dish matched their expectations, and the likelihood of purchase again. Additional measures included the other dish selections, sociodemographic and attitudinal information. A silver service (training) restaurant. Members of the public (n = 279) consuming meals in the restaurant. The presence of nutritional information on the menu did not significantly increase subsequent intakes of energy and fat from the rest of the meal, and did not significantly influence sensory expectations or post-meal acceptance measures (which also did not differ between the FF and RF versions). Consumer characteristics relating to fat reduction attitudes and behaviours were significantly related to the selection of different dishes. Provision of RF alternatives in a restaurant can have significant positive dietary benefits. Menu nutritional information did not affect measures of meal

  10. Weight maintenance through behaviour modification with a cooking course or neurolinguistic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Lone Brinkmann; Greve, Tine; Kreutzer, Martin; Pedersen, Ulla; Nielsen, Claus Meyer; Toubro, Søren; Astrup, Arne

    2011-01-01

    We compared the effect on weight regain of behaviour modification consisting of either a gourmet cooking course or neurolinguistic programming (NLP) therapy. Fifty-six overweight and obese subjects participated. The first step was a 12-week weight loss program. Participants achieving at least 8% weight loss were randomized to five months of either NLP therapy or a course in gourmet cooking. Follow-up occurred after two and three years. Forty-nine participants lost at least 8% of their initial body weight and were randomized to the next step. The NLP group lost an additional 1.8 kg and the cooking group lost 0.2 kg during the five months of weight maintenance (NS). The dropout rate in the cooking group was 4%, compared with 26% in the NLP group (p=0.04). There was no difference in weight maintenance after two and three years of follow-up. In conclusion, weight loss in overweight and obese participants was maintained equally efficiently with a healthy cooking course or NLP therapy, but the dropout rate was lower during the active cooking treatment.

  11. Cooking fish is not effective in reducing exposure to perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Zhang, Xianming; Guo, Rui; Braekevelt, Eric; Petro, Steve; Gandhi, Nilima; Reiner, Eric J; Lee, Holly; Bronson, Roni; Tittlemier, Sheryl A

    2014-05-01

    Consumption of fish is considered a part of a healthy diet; however, health risks from fish consumption exist due to potential exposure to various contaminants accumulated in fish. Cooking fish can reduce exposure to many organic chemicals in fish. Similar results have been presented for low levels of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), a class of contaminants of emerging concern, in grocery store fish. We examined the effectiveness of three cooking methods (i.e., baking, broiling, and frying) on reducing PFAS levels in four sport fish species. Samples of Chinook salmon, common carp, lake trout and walleye were collected from four rivers in Ontario, Canada and skin-off fillets were analyzed for regular groups of PFASs such as perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) and perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids (PFSAs), as well as perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids (PFPAs), perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids (PFPIAs) and polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters (diPAPs), which are PFASs of emerging concern. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was the dominant PFAS detected and the concentrations were more than an order of magnitude higher than those reported for fish from grocery stores in Canada, Spain, and China. Although concentrations of PFOS in fish fillets generally increase after cooking, amounts of PFOS largely remain unchanged. Relatively minor differences in changes in the fish PFAS amounts after cooking depended on fish species and cooking method used. We conclude that cooking sport fish is generally not an effective approach to reduce dietary exposure to PFASs, especially PFOS. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential Health Implications of the Consumption of Thermally-Oxidized Cooking Oils – a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falade Ayodeji Osmund

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cooking oils are an integral part of a human diet as they are used in almost all types of culinary practices. They serve as sources of lipids with a significant nutritive value and health benefits which can be attributed to their fatty acid compositions and biological antioxidants. However, cooking oils are usually subjected to thermal oxidation which occurs when fresh cooking oil is heated at high temperatures during various food preparations. Repeated use of cooking oils in the commercial food industry is also common to maximize profit. Thermal oxidation of edible oils had since attracted great attention of nutritionist and researchers given the deteriorative effect such as generation of very cytotoxic compounds, loss of carotenoid, phenolics and vitamins thus reducing the overall antioxidant properties of the oils. Furthermore, several in vivo studies had suggested that consumption of thermally-oxidized cooking oils might not be healthy as it might negatively influence the lipid profile (increased low density lipoprotein (LDL, decreased high density lipoprotein (HDL and elevated cholesterol level, haematological system (alteration in concentration of heamoglobin (Hb, packed cell volume (PCV, white blood cell (WBC count, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts, kidney function, and induce lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress which have been associated with the pathogenesis of various degenerative diseases. Therefore, thermal oxidation seems not to provide any health benefit, as it deteriorates cooking oils and the consumption of the oils may predispose consumers to various disease conditions that may ensue from free radical generation, thereby having deleterious effect on human health.

  13. New validated recipes for double-blind placebo-controlled low-dose food challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winberg, Anna; Nordström, Lisbeth; Strinnholm, Åsa; Nylander, Annica; Jonsäll, Anette; Rönmark, Eva; West, Christina E

    2013-05-01

    Double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges are considered the most reliable method to diagnose or rule out food allergy. Despite this, there are few validated challenge recipes available. The present study aimed to validate new recipes for low-dose double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges in school children, by investigating whether there were any sensory differences between the active materials containing cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, wheat or cod, and the placebo materials. The challenge materials contained the same hypoallergenic amino acid-based product, with or without added food allergens. The test panels consisted of 275 school children, aged 8-10 and 14-15 yr, respectively, from five Swedish schools. Each participant tested at least one recipe. Standardized blinded triangle tests were performed to investigate whether any sensory differences could be detected between the active and placebo materials. In our final recipes, no significant differences could be detected between the active and placebo materials for any challenge food (p > 0.05). These results remained after stratification for age and gender. The taste of challenge materials was acceptable, and no unfavourable side effects related to test materials were observed. In summary, these new validated recipes for low-dose double-blinded food challenges contain common allergenic foods in childhood; cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, wheat and cod. All test materials contain the same liquid vehicle, which facilitates preparation and dosing. Our validated recipes increase the range of available recipes, and as they are easily prepared and dosed, they may facilitate the use of double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges in daily clinical practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Healthy Places for Healthy People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes the Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance program that helps communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant places by engaging with local health care facility partners

  15. Egg Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & ... these substitutes may not work as well in recipes that call for more than three ... or bananas When cooking at home, always carefully scrub the utensils you' ...

  16. Factors influencing internal color of cooked meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Surendranath P; Nair, Mahesh N; Joseph, Poulson; Hunt, Melvin C

    2016-10-01

    This manuscript overviews the pertinent research on internal color of uncured cooked meats, biochemical processes involved in meat cookery, and fundamental mechanisms governing myoglobin thermal stability. Heat-induced denaturation of myoglobin, responsible for the characteristic dull-brown color of cooked meats, is influenced by a multitude of endogenous (i.e., pH, muscle source, species, redox state) and exogenous (i.e., packaging, ingredients, storage) factors. The interactions between these factors critically influence the internal cooked color and can confuse the consumers, who often perceive cooked color to be a reliable indicator for doneness and safety. While certain phenomena in cooked meat color are cosmetic in nature, others can mislead consumers and result in foodborne illnesses. Research in meat color suggests that processing technologies and cooking practices in industry as well as households influence the internal cooked color. Additionally, the guidelines of many international public health and regulatory authorities recommend using meat thermometers to determine safe cooking endpoint temperature and to ensure product safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Physicochemical changes in nontraditional pasta during cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changes in biochemical components of non-traditional spaghetti during cooking were reflected in the quality of the cooked product. Spaghetti samples were made from traditional and non-traditional formulations including semolina 100%, whole wheat flour 100%, semolina-whole wheat flour (49:51), semol...

  18. Validation of feasibility and quality of chicken breast meat cooked under various water-cooking conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumngoen, Wanwisa; Chen, Hsin-Yi; Tan, Fa-Jui

    2016-12-01

    Under laboratory conditions, the qualities of boneless chicken breasts are commonly determined by placing them in a bag and cooking them in a water bath. The results are often applied as references for comparing the influences of cooking techniques. However, whether a sample cooked under this "laboratory" condition actually represents the meat cooked under the "real-life" condition in which meat is frequently cooked directly in water without packaging remains unclear. Whether the two cooking conditions lead to comparable results in meat quality should be determined. This study evaluated the influence of cooking conditions, including "placed-in-bag and cooked in a water bath (BC)" and "cooked directly in hot water (WC)" conditions, on the quality of chicken meat. The results reveal that BC samples had a longer cooking time. Deboned-and-skinless BC samples had a higher cooking loss and lower protein solubility (P < 0.01). BC samples with bone and skin had a higher lightness in both skin and muscle. No significant differences were observed in attributes, including shear force, collagen solubility, microstructures, redness, yellowness and descriptive sensory characteristics between treatments. Based on the results, considering the quality attributes that might be influenced, is critical when conducting relevant research. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  19. Just add a pinch of salt!--current directions for the use of salt in recipes in Australian magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jacqui; Dunford, Elizabeth; Barzi, Federica; Neal, Bruce

    2010-02-01

    Australians currently consume too much salt causing adverse consequences for health. The media play an important role in the provision of nutrition advice to consumers. Previous research shows that many foods advertized in consumer magazines are high in salt, but little research has examined magazine recipes in this context. The aim of this project was to summarize directions for salt use in recipes in leading Australian magazines. In August 2007 and 2008, the top 10 magazines by circulation that included at least five recipes, were examined. Standardized information was collected about directions for salt use in recipes. Three hundred and thirty recipes were identified in 2007 and 417 in 2008. About 68% of recipes included high-salt ingredients, 37% instructed to season with salt, 10% instructed to add a specific quantity of salt and 15% recommended selection of low-salt ingredients. There was substantial variability in directions for salt use in recipes between magazines, but no clear differences between 2007 and 2008. Many recipes advised to add salt in direct contradiction to national dietary guidelines. There is clear potential for editorial guidelines on salt use in recipes to play a role in advancing public health efforts in Australia and other such nations.

  20. Text-Picture Relations in Cooking Instructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Ielka; Leito, Shadira; Redeker, Gisela; Bunt, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Like many other instructions, recipes on packages with ready-to-use ingredients for a dish combine a series of pictures with short text paragraphs. The information presentation in such multimodal instructions can be compact (either text or picture) and/or cohesive (text and picture). In an

  1. Analyzing the Cooking Behavior of Sophomore Female Students : In relation to the ability for preparation of cooking

    OpenAIRE

    Imakawa, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the Dandori-ryoku (the ability for preparation in cooking) by analyzing the practical cooking behavior of sophomore female students. Ten sophomore female students were participated in the experiment to cook three kinds of food (cooking rice, making miso soup and fried vegetables). The behavior of the participants during cooking were videotaped and analyzed in detail later especially in relation to Dandori-ryoku. Such behaviors as “starting from cooking ric...

  2. Systemic nickel: the contribution made by stainless-steel cooking utensils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, G N; Packirisamy, S

    1995-04-01

    An extensive programme of cooking operations, using household recipes, has shown that, apart from aberrant values associated with new pans on first use, the contribution made by 19 Cr/9 Ni stainless-steel cooking utensils to nickel in the diet is negligible. The amount of nickel (0 to 8 micrograms) derived from the utensils in standard portions of various "aggressive" foodstuffs tested was less than that to be found occurring in 1 square of a bitter-sweet chocolate bar. New pans, if first used with acid fruits, can show a greater pick-up of nickel, which, in the worst case observed, amounted to approximately 1/5 of the normal daily intake for the average person (ca. 200 micrograms). This situation does not recur in subsequent usage, even after the pan has been cleaned by abrasion. A higher rate of nickel release was observed in new pans on first use from 4 manufacturers located in different countries and appears to be a general phenomenon. This could provide a possible explanation for the high pick-up of nickel by acid fruits reported in 1 instance in the literature.

  3. Supporting Families to Cook at Home and Eat Together: Findings From a Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Jennifer; Denny, Simon

    The current study tested the feasibility and acceptability of an intervention that provided families with meal plans, recipes, and ingredients to cook meals at home. Ten diverse families (1 adolescent, 1 parent) were provided with the resources to prepare 5 family dinners/wk for 8 weeks. Process data were collected by weekly telephone calls. Outcome data were collected by open-ended interviews with parent or caregiver and adolescents, separately. Most of the meals provided were prepared (86%) and a high proportion of meals prepared were eaten together by families (96%). Both parents and adolescents reported that the intervention was acceptable, particularly the opportunity to try new foods. Families reported multiple benefits to participation, including eating healthier, feeling better, and having improved relationships. Providing families with resources for home cooking appears to be an acceptable and well-enjoyed intervention. Further research measuring the health and social impacts of this intervention is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Look who's cooking. Investigating the relationship between watching educational and edutainment TV cooking shows, eating habits and everyday cooking practices among men and women in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, Charlotte J S; Hudders, Liselot

    2016-01-01

    Television (TV) cooking shows have evolved from focusing on educating to focusing on entertaining, as well. At present, educational TV cooking shows focus on the transfer of cooking knowledge and skills, whereas edutainment TV cooking shows focus on entertaining their viewers. Both types of shows are ongoing success stories. However, little is known regarding the shows' links with the cooking and eating habits of their audiences. Therefore, the current study investigates the relationship between watching an educational or edutainment TV cooking show and one's cooking and eating habits. Given public health concerns regarding the decline in cooking behaviors and the simultaneous increase in caloric intake from food outside the home, this study suggests a promising intervention. The results of a cross-sectional survey in Belgium (n = 845) demonstrate that the audiences of educational and edutainment TV cooking shows do not overlap. Although there is little connection between watching specific shows and eating behavior, the connection between watching shows and cooking behaviors varies across gender and age lines. Behaviors also differ depending on whether the viewer is watching an educational or edutainment cooking show. For example, men of all ages appear to cook more often if they watch an educational show. However, only older men (above 38 years) seem to cook more often if they watch an edutainment TV show. The results demonstrate that the relationship between watching TV cooking shows and cooking habits warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Concentration of Umami Compounds in Pork Meat and Cooking Juice with Different Cooking Times and Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotola-Pukkila, Minna K; Pihlajaviita, Seija T; Kaimainen, Mika T; Hopia, Anu I

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the concentrations of umami compounds in pork loins cooked at 3 different temperatures and 3 different lengths of cooking times. The pork loins were cooked with the sous vide technique. The free amino acids (FAAs), glutamic acid and aspartic acid; the 5'-nucleotides, inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP); and corresponding nucleoside inosine of the cooked meat and its released juice were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under the experimental conditions used, the cooking temperature played a more important role than the cooking time in the concentration of the analyzed compounds. The amino acid concentrations in the meat did not remain constant under these experimental conditions. The most notable effect observed was that of the cooking temperature and the higher amino acid concentrations in the released juice of meat cooked at 80 °C compared with 60 and 70 °C. This is most likely due to the heat induced hydrolysis of proteins and peptides releasing water soluble FAAs from the meat into the cooking juice. In this experiment, the cooking time and temperature had no influence on the IMP concentrations observed. However, the AMP concentrations increased with the increasing temperature and time. This suggests that the choice of time and temperature in sous vide cooking affects the nucleotide concentration of pork meat. The Sous vide technique proved to be a good technique to preserve the cooking juice and the results presented here show that cooking juice is rich in umami compounds, which can be used to provide a savory or brothy taste. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Kraft cooking of gamma irradiated wood, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Masamitsu; Meshitsuka, Gyosuke; Nakano, Junzo

    1979-01-01

    Studies have been made of kraft cooking of gamma irradiated wood. Beech (Fagus crenata Blume) wood meal suspended in aqueous alkaline alcohol was irradiated up to 1.5 KGy (0.15 Mrad) with gamma rays from a Co-60 source in the presence or absence of oxygen. The irradiated wood meals were washed thoroughly with fresh water, air dried and cooked under the ordinary cooking conditions. The results are summarized as follows: (1) Pre-irradiation in aqueous alkali have negligible effect on kraft cooking. (2) In the case of ethanol addition (50 g/l), pre-irradiation in vacuo shows acceleration of delignification and stabilization of carbohydrates during kraft cooking. Cooked yield gain by pre-irradiation was about 1.2% in all over the range of delignification from 80 to 90%. Aqueous ethanol without alkali also shows positive but smaller effect than that with alkali. (3) Propanol, iso-propanol and butanol show positive but smaller effects than ethanol. However, methanol does not show any positive effect. (4) Irradiation in the presence of oxygen does not show any attractive effect on kraft cooking. (author)

  7. SQL Server 2012 data integration recipes solutions for integration services and other ETL tools

    CERN Document Server

    Aspin, Adam

    2012-01-01

    SQL Server 2012 Data Integration Recipes provides focused and practical solutions to real world problems of data integration. Need to import data into SQL Server from an outside source? Need to export data and send it to another system? SQL Server 2012 Data Integration Recipes has your back. You'll find solutions for importing from Microsoft Office data stores such as Excel and Access, from text files such as CSV files, from XML, from other database brands such as Oracle and MySQL, and even from other SQL Server databases. You'll learn techniques for managing metadata, transforming data to mee

  8. Comparative study of different cooking methods on nutritional attributes and fatty acid profile of chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A. I.; Chatha, S. A. S.; Iqbal, T.; Zahoor, A. F.; Arshad, M. U.; Afzal, S.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of different cooking methods (boiling, grilling, frying and microwave roasting) on the nutritional quality of chicken meat were assessed by measuring quality parameters i.e. moisture, ash, protein, fat and fiber contents. The fatty acid composition of chicken fat was analyzed by GC-FID. The chicken fat was found to contain high levels of oleic acid (38.0-47.3%) followed by linolenic acid (13.3-28.0%) and palmitic acid (2.0-13.6%). Different cooking methods exhibited significant effect (p<=0.05) on the fatty acid composition and other nutritional parameters of meat samples. Generally, fried meat had lower saturated fatty acid contents. It can be concluded from this study that boiling and frying are healthy cooking practices while grilling and microwave roasting show some negative effects. (author)

  9. Effects of different cooking methods on fatty acid profiles in four freshwater fishes from the Laurentian Great Lakes region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Margaret R; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Braekevelt, Eric; Arts, Michael T

    2014-12-01

    Fish is often promoted as a healthy part of the human diet due its high content of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA). Previous studies have shown that cooked fish can have different fatty acid profiles than raw fillets, depending on the cooking method and fish species. In this study, the fatty acid content of broiled, baked or fried skinless, boneless fillets of four fish species from the tributaries of the Great Lakes, or connecting rivers, was compared to fatty acid profiles in raw sections from the same fillet. Cooking treatments had little effect on n-3 fatty acid content; however, fried treatments generally had higher n-6 and MUFA content, which is likely a result of the cooking oil used (canola). Broiling or baking is generally the most healthy option presented in this study, as these methods result in lower levels of less-favourable fatty acids; however, the choice of cooking oil may also influence the overall fatty acid content in cooked fish. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Validity of an instrument for assessing food consumption, food habits and cooking skills in 8-11 years old students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lera, Lydia; Fretes, Gabriela; González, Carmen Gloria; Salinas, Judith; Vio del Rio, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    An instrument to measure food knowledge, food consumption, cooking skills, food habits and food expenses at school is necessary to assess changes in food practices. To validate an instrument to measure changes in food knowledge, food consumption, cooking skills, food habits and food expenses in Chilean school children 8 - 11 years from third to fifth grade. A validation of a questionnaire with 42 questions was conducted in two stages: the first to assess temporal stability, concordance and internal consistency in 45 children. The second one to apply the survey, modified with the results of the first stage, in 90 children assessing internal consistency. The first survey with 42 questions showed a reasonable temporal stability, concordance and internal consistency for cooking skills, habits and food expenditure at school. Internal consistency was good for food consumption, but not so good for food knowledge. In the final validation with 90 children, there was good consistency for food consumption but bad for food knowledge. Besides, children with cooking skills ate more healthy food and those who expended more money at school, consumed less healthy food. Food knowledge questions were eliminated from the instrument, which was elaborated with 28 questions about food consumption, cooking skills, food habits and food expenses at school. This instrument is useful to assess changes in food and nutrition education interventions in 8 -11 years children, in particular to measure cooking skills and food expenses at school. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  11. Distribution of Radioactive Cesium during Milling and Cooking of Contaminated Buckwheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinohe, Mayumi; Nihei, Naoto; Kawamoto, Shinichi; Hamamatsu, Shioka

    2018-06-01

    To clarify the behavior of radioactive cesium (Cs) in buckwheat grains during milling and cooking processes, parameters such as processing factor (Pf) and food processing retention factor (Fr) were evaluated in two lots of buckwheat grains, R1 and R2, with different concentrations of radioactive Cs. Three milling fractions, the husk, bran, and flour fractions, were obtained using a mill and electric sieve. The radioactive Cs ( 134 Cs + 137 Cs) concentrations in husk and bran were higher than that in grain, whereas the concentration in flour was lower than that in grain. Pf values for the flours of R1 and R2 were 0.60 and 0.80, respectively. Fr values for the flours of R1 and R2 were 0.28 and 0.53, respectively. Raw buckwheat noodles (soba) were prepared using a mixture of buckwheat flour and wheat flour according to the typical recipe and were cooked with boiling water for 0.5, 1, and 2 min, followed by rinsing with water. Pf values for the soba boiled for 2 min (optimal for eating) made with R1 and R2 were 0.34 and 0.40, respectively. Fr values for these R1 and R2 samples were 0.55 and 0.66, respectively. Pf and Fr values for soba boiled for different times for both R1 and R2 were less than 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. Thus, buckwheat flour and its product, soba, cooked by boiling, are considered acceptable for human consumption according to the standard limit for radioactive Cs in buckwheat grains.

  12. Validation of novel recipes for double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlieg-Boerstra, B J; Herpertz, I; Pasker, L; van der Heide, S; Kukler, J; Jansink, C; Vaessen, W; Beusekamp, B J; Dubois, A E J

    2011-07-01

    In double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs), the use of challenge materials in which blinding is validated is a prerequisite for obtaining true blinded conditions during the test procedure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to enlarge the available range of validated recipes for DBPCFCs to facilitate oral challenge tests in all age groups, including young children, while maximizing the top dose in an acceptable volume. Recipes were developed and subsequently validated by a panel recruited by a matching sensory test. The best 30% of candidates were selected to participate in sensory testing using the paired comparison test. For young children, three recipes with cow's milk and one recipe with peanut could be validated which may be utilized in DBPCFCs. For children older than 4 years and adults, one recipe with egg, two with peanut, one with hazelnut, and one with cashew nut were validated for use in DBPCFCs. All recipes contained larger amounts of allergenic foods than previously validated. These recipes increase the range of validated recipes for use in DBPCFCs in adults and children. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. ‘From reading to painting’ : Authors and Audiences of Dutch Recipes for Preparatory Layers for Oil Painting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stols-Witlox, M.

    2017-01-01

    Historical recipes have been used as sources of information on artists’ materials and methods since the nineteenth century, first in the field of art history, more recently also in conservation studies and the history of science. The reliability of recipes as historical sources remains an important

  14. Eating Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... There is much we can do to promote healthy eating habits. Together we can prevent or delay onset of diabetes, obesity and other chronic conditions and diseases. Benefits Helps maintain a healthy weight A healthy weight reduces risk of chronic ...

  15. CERN's 60th anniversary celebrations: "Cook"ed to perfection

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    On 29 September, CERN celebrated its 60th anniversary with a gala celebration. Hundreds of CERN staff members and users, dignitaries from CERN Member States and representatives of international organisations filled the marquee for a ceremony featuring speeches as well as music from the EU Youth Orchestra. CERN Recruitment Unit section leader Anna Cook was called in at the last minute to host the ceremony.   Anna had just got back from a run on her day off when she got the call. On the line CERN60 project leader Sascha Schmeling, Globe manager Bernard Pellequer and video editor Jacques Fichet had a problem. French-Swiss journalist Darius Rochebin, who had been pegged to host CERN's 60th anniversary ceremony, had been forced to cancel at the last minute, just three days before the event. Would Anna host the celebration – a ceremony to be attended by hundreds and broadcast around the world for all to see? After asking whether it was a joke, she said: “OK, I&rsquo...

  16. 20 CFR 654.413 - Cooking and eating facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cooking and eating facilities. 654.413... Cooking and eating facilities. (a) When workers or their families are permitted or required to cook in their individual unit, a space shall be provided and equipped for cooking and eating. Such space shall...

  17. 46 CFR 169.703 - Cooking and heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooking and heating. 169.703 Section 169.703 Shipping... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.703 Cooking and heating. (a) Cooking and heating... cooking, heating or lighting is prohibited on all vessels. (c) The use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or...

  18. EFFECT OF THE ADDITION OF COMMON BEAN FLOUR ON THE COOKING QUALITY AND ANTIOXIDANT CHARACTERISTICS OF SPAGHETTI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pasta is a nutritionally unbalanced food, due to its low fat and fiber and low value of its protein. It is considered an adequate vehicle for food supplementation with minerals, proteins and other healthy components such as bioactive compounds present in common beans. The effect of composite pasta (wheat – common bean; 30 % w/w on the cooking quality (optimal cooking time, cooking loss, weight loss, firmness, color, total phenolic content, antioxidant capacity by DPPH and ORAC assays and phenolic acid profile was investigated. According to the quality parameters, pasta added with bean flour was less hard with respect to the pasta made from durum wheat. The total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity by DPPH and ORAC assays were higher in the pasta with common bean flour than in the pasta control. Also, more phenolic acids were identified in cooked pasta containing common bean flour as analyzed by HPLC.

  19. Effect of different cooking methods on proximate and mineral composition of striped snakehead fish (Channa striatus, Bloch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimuthu, K; Thilaga, M; Kathiresan, S; Xavier, R; Mas, R H M H

    2012-06-01

    The effects of different cooking methods (boiling, baking, frying and grilling) on proximate and mineral composition of snakehead fish were investigated. The mean content of moisture, protein, fat and ash of raw fish was found to be 77.2 ± 2.39, 13.9 ± 2.89, 5.9 ± 0.45 and 0.77 ± 0.12% respectively. The changes in the amount of protein and fat were found to be significantly higher in frying and grilling fish. The ash content increased significantly whereas that of the minerals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn and Mn) was not affected in all cooking methods. Increased in Cu contents and decreased in P contents were observed in all cooking methods except grilling. In the present study, the grilling method of cooking is found to be the best for healthy eating.

  20. Glycaemic index values and physicochemical properties of five brown rice varieties cooked by different domestic cooking methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Kumar Chapagai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of diabetes has increased dramatically in recent decades in the regions where people excessively consume white rice. Due to higher nutritional values and bioactive components, low to medium glycaemic index (GI brown rice could be a potential alternative to white rice in these regions. Methods: Five varieties, Chiang (CH, Sungyod (SY, Lepnok (LP from Thailand, Long grain specialty 1 (LS 1 and Long grain specialty 2 (LS 2 from Malaysia were tested for GI. Ten test foods were prepared from 5 varieties by 2 cooking techniques (pressure cooker, PC and rice cooker, RC. Overnight fasted 10 healthy subjects were fed with 25 g glucose as a reference food (RF on 3 occasions and amount equivalent to 25 g available carbohydrate portion of test food (TF on 1 occasion in separate days. Fasting and post-prandial capillary blood glucose was measured via finger-prick methods at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min, and the incremental area under curve (iAUC was determined. The GI of each TF was calculated as percentage of incremental area under curve (iAUC of TF over RF. Results: The mean GI values of SY (72 – 81, high, CH and LP (59 – 65, medium and LS 1 and LS 2 (64 – 73, medium to high for cooking were discovered by PC and RC methods. The GI did not vary significantly (p>0.05 among varieties as well as between cooking methods. GI showed a significant negative correlation with the amylose content (r = –0.70, p<0.05 and significant positive correlation with cold peak viscosity (r = 0.80, p<0.01. Conclusions: All five rice varieties irrespectively of the cooking method used are classified as medium to high GI foods. Medium GI varieties could have potential of being used in diabetic diet. Cooking methods did not significantly alter the glycaemic characteristics of the studied varieties. Amylose content and pasting properties can be used for predicting GI of brown rice. It is urgent to explore low GI brown rice varieties in these

  1. Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a family meal? Whenever you and your family eat together — whether it's takeout food or a home-cooked meal with all the trimmings. Strive for nutritious food and a time when everyone can be there. This may mean eating dinner a little later to accommodate a teen who's ...

  2. What's Cooking in Children's Literature. Professional Growth Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Gwynne

    This cookbook is designed to help teachers and librarians engage in beneficial collaborations to bring reading to the lips of students in new and "delicious" ways. The more than 200 recipes offered in the book will tempt even the most reluctant reader of any age to "nibble" at a new book. The book's recipes enhance the process…

  3. 2015 Cook & Tift County (GA) Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: NOAA OCM Tift and Cook Counties GA Lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task NOAA Contract No. EA133C-11-CQ-0010 Woolpert Order No. 75271...

  4. Cooking and drying processes optimization of Pentadesma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-09-30

    Sep 30, 2015 ... This work determined the optimum conditions of cooking and drying processes. ... Key words: Forest galeries, Pentadesma butyraceae, cosmetic industry, ..... butyracea kernels can lead to the production of butter of.

  5. Cooking Potatoes: Experimentation and Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Dong

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory activity involving a mathematical model of cooking potatoes that can be solved analytically. Highlights the microstructure aspects of the experiment. Provides the key aspects of the results, detailed background readings, laboratory procedures and data analyses. (MM)

  6. The influence of a cooked-meat meal on estimated glomerular filtration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, David J; Godber, Ian M; Lamb, Edmund J; Dalton, R Neil; Gunn, Ian R

    2007-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important but under-recognized condition. Recent national guidelines have recommended that biochemistry laboratories report estimated GFR (eGFR) to improve diagnosis of CKD and facilitate disease staging and management. Previous reports have suggested that intake of large amounts of cooked meat can lead to a significant increase in serum creatinine concentration. Participants (n = 32), consisting of 17 healthy volunteers and 15 outpatients, were recruited. Measurement of serum creatinine (kinetic Jaffe method, enzymatic, isotope-dilution mass spectrometry [IDMS]) and cystatin C, and calculation of eGFR were carried out before (i) and after a meal containing cooked meat (ii) and a meat-free meal (iii). Following intake of cooked meat, median serum creatinine concentration (kinetic Jaffe) increased from 80.5 micromol/L preprandially to 101.0 micromol/L 1-2 h postprandially (Pcooked meat has a significant effect on serum creatinine concentration and eGFR. Misclassification of CKD is possible if measurements are made after meals containing cooked meat. Clinicians should ensure that CKD classification is based on samples taken in the appropriate conditions: either fasting or after avoidance of cooked meat on the day of sampling. National guidelines which overlook this factor should be revisited.

  7. Sun-dried cowpeas and amaranth leaves recipe improves β-carotene and retinol levels in serum and hemoglobin concentration among preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawiri, Mildred P; Nyambaka, Hudson; Murungi, Jane I

    2013-03-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) and anemia are major challenges among children and expecting and lactating mothers in developing countries. Intervention with locally available dark green leafy vegetables (DGLV) is more sustainable to eradicate VAD, being cost-effective and readily adaptable to local communities. DGLV contain high levels of iron and β-carotene (BC) and therefore useful in fighting VAD and anemia. Since DGLVs are season-dependent sun-drying enables their availability during low seasons. However, their contribution to the bioavailability of BC and the improvement of hemoglobin are not well understood. The study therefore investigated the effect of consuming cooked recipe consisting of sun-dried amaranth and cowpea leaves on the levels of BC, retinol, and hemoglobin in preschool children from Machakos District, a semiarid region in Kenya. Vegetables were purchased from local vegetable market, with some sun-dried in an open shade. Levels of BC and retinol in serum and BC in fresh and processed vegetables were determined by a HPLC method and hemoglobin using a portable Hemocue Analyzer. All-trans-BC levels in uncooked fresh cowpea and amaranth leaves were 806.0 μg/g and 599.0 μg/g dry matter, respectively, while the dehydration and cooking processes retained the β-carotene levels at over 60 %. Consumption of the dehydrated vegetables significantly improved both serum BC and retinol levels (p < 0.05), while the baseline hemoglobin levels improved by 4.6 %. The study has shown that intervention with locally available sun-dried vegetables improves the bioavailability of BC, retinol, and hemoglobin levels among preschool children.

  8. Extrusion Cooking Systems and Textured Vegetable Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many fabricated foods are cooked industrially and are given desired textures, shapes, density and rehydration characteristics by an extrusion cooking process. This relatively new process is used in the preparation of “engineered” convenience foods: textured vegetable proteins, breakfast cereals, snacks, infant foods, dry soup mixes, breading, poultry stuffing, croutons, pasta products, beverage powders, hot breakfast gruels, and in the gelatinization of starch or the starchy component of foods.

  9. The emergence of cooking in Southwest Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Wright

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been surprisingly little systematic study by prehistorians of how in the distant past people cooked and consumed food. There are many unanswered questions. For example, how did cooking emerge and affect human evolution, how did it change with the advent of farming, when did kitchens first appear and who built the earliest known ovens? Research on Palaeolithic and Neolithic food preparation and consumption is now beginning to suggest answers to such questions.

  10. The emergence of cooking in Southwest Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    There has been surprisingly little systematic study by prehistorians of how in the distant past people cooked and consumed food. There are many unanswered questions. For example, how did cooking emerge and affect human evolution, how did it change with the advent of farming, when did kitchens first appear and who built the earliest known ovens? Research on Palaeolithic and Neolithic food preparation and consumption is now beginning to suggest answers to such questions.

  11. 9 CFR 315.2 - Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; utilization for food purposes after cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; utilization for food purposes after cooking. 315.2 Section 315.2 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND... PARTS PASSED FOR COOKING § 315.2 Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; utilization for food purposes...

  12. Translating Government Policy into Recipes for Success! Nutrition Criteria Promoting Fruits and Vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Christina M.; Nicolson, Clemency; Pulker, Claire E.; Binns, Colin W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To develop nutrition criteria consistent with Australian dietary guidelines encouraging fruit and vegetable consumption for branding recipes with the "Go for 2&5" campaign message. Design: Dietary policies, guidelines, food selection guides, nutrient targets, existing consumer education programs' nutrition criteria, food…

  13. Recipes for peace, rights & well-being prepared in international Geneva

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This collection of unique recipes, produced by the Perception Change team of UNOG, showcases examples of work by Geneva-based organizations in an innovative format, as well as including three-course menus by renowned chefs from Geneva’s 5-star hotels.

  14. Seeking to Expand Middle Level Success to All Students: A Not-So-Secret Recipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    The recipe for success of Strive Preparatory Charter School (formerly West Denver Preparatory Charter School) is not a secret. This summer program, turned four-campus, middle level phenomenon, is proving to satisfy the appetite of parents hungry for a change in their children's educational opportunities. The intent of this article is to share a…

  15. School Nutrition Professionals' Usage and Perceptions of USDA Recipes and the Impact of Student Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, Keith; Johnson, J. T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the frequency of usage of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Recipes for Schools and investigate factors influencing their usage. The relationship between these variables and school district size (student enrollment) was also investigated. Methods: An expert panel…

  16. Firms vie to offer DOE a prize-winning recipe for cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Eager to get the most bang for its waste cleanup bucks, the US Department of Energy is conducting its own version of the Pillsbury bake-off. DOE is pitting two environmental contractors, Rust International Corp. and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Co., against each other to come up with the prize-winning recipe for cleaning up some nasty waste problems

  17. Inclusive education: recipe book or quest. On diversity in the classroom and educational research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeman, Y.A.M.; Volman, M.L.L.

    2001-01-01

    Teaching that takes into account the increasing range of differences between pupils is often called 'inclusive education'. The practice of inclusive education in The Netherlands is informed by educational research that has mainly produced 'recipes' for effective education with a view to academic

  18. Story of Stone Soup: A Recipe to Improve Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bowen; Jones, Loretta; Terry, Chrystene; Jones, Andrea; Forge, Nell; Norris, Keith C.

    2013-01-01

    Just as scientific articles are used as a way of sharing knowledge in scientific communities, stories are used as a way of transferring knowledge within African American communities. This article uses the story and metaphor of Stone Soup to illustrate the Healthy African American Families' (HAAF) Community Partnered Participatory Research (CPPR) method of engaging diverse partners to address health issues, such as preterm birth, depression, diabetes, and kidney disease, and to create community-wide change through education, capacity building, resource sharing, and intervention development. PMID:20629241

  19. Cooking frozen and thawed roasts: beef, pork, and lamb cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, C; Davis, C

    1975-09-01

    Cooking time, yield, and palatability of paired beef, pork, and lamb roasts cooked from the frozen and thawed states were compared. Cooking time for all roasts averaged from 3 to 22 min. per pound longer for meat cooked from the frozen state. The longer cooking time from the frozen state. The longer cooking time from the frozen state was greater for roasts with a large amount of bone and for cuts cooked by braising than for less bony roasts and cuts cooked by roasting. Except for thawed beef rump roasts, which had a higher yield of cooked lean meat, yield of cooked lean meat from the various cuts of beef, pork, and lamb was not affected by the state at the start of cooking. Collectively, all pork roasts had a higher yield of cooked lean meat when cooked from the frozen state. Juiciness and natural flavor of the roasts were not affected by the state at the start of cooking. Lamb leg and rib roasts were more tender when cooked from the thawed state.

  20. An Experiential Cooking and Nutrition Education Program Increases Cooking Self-Efficacy and Vegetable Consumption in Children in Grades 3-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarpe-Ratner, Elizabeth; Folkens, Stephanie; Sharma, Sonika; Daro, Deborah; Edens, Neilé K

    Evaluate the effect of a community-based, experiential cooking and nutrition education program on consumption of fruits and vegetables and associated intermediate outcomes in students from low-income families. Quasi-experimental program evaluation by pre-post survey of participating students and their parents. Underserved elementary and middle schools in Chicago. Students (n = 271; 65% girls, 44% Hispanic, 32% African American; 94% eligible for free/reduced price lunch) in grades 3-8 selected by school staff to participate by variable inclusion criteria. 59% of students who applied returned both pre- and post-surveys. Ten-week (2 h/wk) chef-instructor-led program held in cafeteria kitchens after school. Changes in student nutrition knowledge, cooking self-efficacy, fruit and vegetable liking and consumption, and communication to family about healthy eating. Changes from beginning to end of program were analyzed with paired t test. Results were considered significant at P cooking self-efficacy score from 3.2 to 3.6, and vegetable consumption score from 2.2 to 2.4 (all P cooking and nutrition education programs led by chef-instructors may be effective ways to improve nutrition in low-income communities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Condensed tannins in traditional wet-cooked and modern extrusion-cooked sorghum porridges

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlamini, NR

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available the quantity and profile of condensed tannins in traditional wet-cooked and modern ready-to-eat extrusion-cooked sorghum porridges. CT were analyzed using normal-phase HPLC with fluorescence detection and their content was compared to CT and total phenols...

  2. Numerical Recipes in C++: The Art of Scientific Computing (2nd edn). Numerical Recipes Example Book (C++) (2nd edn). Numerical Recipes Multi-Language Code CD ROM with LINUX or UNIX Single-Screen License Revised Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borcherds, P

    2003-01-01

    The two Numerical Recipes books are marvellous. The principal book, The Art of Scientific Computing, contains program listings for almost every conceivable requirement, and it also contains a well written discussion of the algorithms and the numerical methods involved. The Example Book provides a complete driving program, with helpful notes, for nearly all the routines in the principal book. The first edition of Numerical Recipes: The Art of Scientific Computing was published in 1986 in two versions, one with programs in Fortran, the other with programs in Pascal. There were subsequent versions with programs in BASIC and in C. The second, enlarged edition was published in 1992, again in two versions, one with programs in Fortran (NR(F)), the other with programs in C (NR(C)). In 1996 the authors produced Numerical Recipes in Fortran 90: The Art of Parallel Scientific Computing as a supplement, called Volume 2, with the original (Fortran) version referred to as Volume 1. Numerical Recipes in C++ (NR(C++)) is another version of the 1992 edition. The numerical recipes are also available on a CD ROM: if you want to use any of the recipes, I would strongly advise you to buy the CD ROM. The CD ROM contains the programs in all the languages. When the first edition was published I bought it, and have also bought copies of the other editions as they have appeared. Anyone involved in scientific computing ought to have a copy of at least one version of Numerical Recipes, and there also ought to be copies in every library. If you already have NR(F), should you buy the NR(C++) and, if not, which version should you buy? In the preface to Volume 2 of NR(F), the authors say 'C and C++ programmers have not been far from our minds as we have written this volume, and we think that you will find that time spent in absorbing its principal lessons will be amply repaid in the future as C and C++ eventually develop standard parallel extensions'. In the preface and introduction to NR

  3. Prevalence and patterns of cooking dinner at home in the USA: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virudachalam, Senbagam; Long, Judith A; Harhay, Michael O; Polsky, Daniel E; Feudtner, Chris

    2014-05-01

    To measure the prevalence of cooking dinner at home in the USA and test whether home dinner preparation habits are associated with socio-economic status, race/ethnicity, country of birth and family structure. Cross-sectional analysis. The primary outcome, self-reported frequency of cooking dinner at home, was divided into three categories: 0-1 dinners cooked per week ('never'), 2-5 ('sometimes') and 6-7 ('always'). We used bivariable and multivariable regression analyses to test for associations between frequency of cooking dinner at home and factors of interest. The 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The sample consisted of 10 149 participants. Americans reported cooking an average of five dinners per week; 8 % never, 43 % sometimes and 49 % always cooked dinner at home. Lower household wealth and educational attainment were associated with a higher likelihood of either always or never cooking dinner at home, whereas wealthier, more educated households were more likely to sometimes cook dinner at home (P cooked the fewest dinners at home (mean = 4·4, 95 % CI 4·2, 4·6). Households with foreign-born reference persons cooked more dinners at home (mean = 5·8, 95 % CI 5·7, 6·0) than households with US-born reference persons (mean = 4·9, 95 % CI 4·7, 5·1). Households with dependants cooked more dinners at home (mean = 5·2, 95 % CI 5·1, 5·4) than households without dependants (mean = 4·6, 95 % CI 4·3, 5·0). Home dinner preparation habits varied substantially with socio-economic status and race/ethnicity, associations that likely will have implications for designing and appropriately tailoring interventions to improve home food preparation practices and promote healthy eating.

  4. TEXTURE OF COOKED SPELT WHEAT NOODLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdaléna Lacko - Bartošová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available At present, there are limited and incomplete data on the ability of spelt to produce alimentary pasta of suitable quality. Noodles are traditional cereal-based food that is becoming increasingly popular worldwide because of its convenience, nutritional qualities, and palatability. It is generally accepted that texture is the main criterion for assessing overall quality of cooked noodles. We present selected indicators of noodle texture of three spelt cultivars – Oberkulmer Rotkorn, Rubiota and Franckenkorn grown in an ecological system at the locality of Dolna Malanta near Nitra. A texture analyzer TA.XT PLUS was used to determine cooked spelt wheat noodle firmness (N (AACC 66-50. The texture of cooked spelt wheat noodles was expressed also as elasticity (N and extensibility (mm. Statistical analysis showed significant influence of the variety and year of growing on the firmness, elasticity and extensibility of cooked noodles. The wholemeal spelt wheat noodles were characterized with lower cutting firmness than the flour noodles. Flour noodles were more tensile than wholemeal noodles. The best elasticity and extensibility of flour noodles was found in noodles prepared from Rubiota however from wholemeal noodles it was Oberkulmer Rotkorn. Spelt wheat is suitable for noodle production, however also here it is necessary to differentiate between varieties. According to achieved results, wholemeal noodles prepared from Oberkulmer Rotkorn can be recommended for noodle industry due to their consistent structure and better texture quality after cooking.

  5. Cooking utensil with improved heat retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Thomas F.; Benson, David K.; Burch, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A cooking utensil with improved heat retention includes an inner pot received within an outer pot and separated in a closely spaced-apart relationship to form a volume or chamber therebetween. The chamber is evacuated and sealed with foil leaves at the upper edges of the inner and outer pot. The vacuum created between the inner and outer pot, along with the minimum of thermal contact between the inner and outer pot, and the reduced radiative heat transfer due to low emissivity coatings on the inner and outer pot, provide for a highly insulated cooking utensil. Any combination of a plurality of mechanisms for selectively disabling and re-enabling the insulating properties of the pot are provided within the chamber. These mechanisms may include: a hydrogen gas producing and reabsorbing device such as a metal hydride, a plurality of metal contacts which can be adjusted to bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot, and a plurality of bimetallic switches which can selectively bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot. In addition, phase change materials with superior heat retention characteristics may be provided within the cooking utensil. Further, automatic and programmable control of the cooking utensil can be provided through a microprocessor and associated hardware for controlling the vacuum disable/enable mechanisms to automatically cook and save food.

  6. Cooking utensil with improved heat retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, T.F.; Benson, D.K.; Burch, S.D.

    1997-07-01

    A cooking utensil with improved heat retention includes an inner pot received within an outer pot and separated in a closely spaced-apart relationship to form a volume or chamber there between. The chamber is evacuated and sealed with foil leaves at the upper edges of the inner and outer pot. The vacuum created between the inner and outer pot, along with the minimum of thermal contact between the inner and outer pot, and the reduced radiative heat transfer due to low emissivity coatings on the inner and outer pot, provide for a highly insulated cooking utensil. Any combination of a plurality of mechanisms for selectively disabling and re-enabling the insulating properties of the pot are provided within the chamber. These mechanisms may include: a hydrogen gas producing and reabsorbing device such as a metal hydride, a plurality of metal contacts which can be adjusted to bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot, and a plurality of bimetallic switches which can selectively bridge the gap between the inner and outer pot. In addition, phase change materials with superior heat retention characteristics may be provided within the cooking utensil. Further, automatic and programmable control of the cooking utensil can be provided through a microprocessor and associated hardware for controlling the vacuum disable/enable mechanisms to automatically cook and save food. 26 figs.

  7. The influence of a cooked meat meal on creatinine plasma concentration and creatinine clearance.

    OpenAIRE

    Mayersohn, M; Conrad, K A; Achari, R

    1983-01-01

    1 The influence of a meal containing cooked meat (225 g) on creatinine plasma concentration, creatinine urinary excretion and creatinine clearance was determined in six healthy male subjects. 2 The meat meal produced an average 52% increase in creatinine plasma concentration within 1.5 to 3.5 h after ingestion. The 24 h area under the creatinine plasma concentration-time curve increased by about 19%. Urinary creatinine excretion during 24 h increased by an average of 13%. Creatinine clearance...

  8. Influence of cooking method on arsenic retention in cooked rice related to dietary exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Hasegawa, H; Rahman, M Arifur; Rahman, M Mahfuzur; Miah, M A Majid

    2006-10-15

    Arsenic concentration in raw rice is not only the determinant in actual dietary exposure. Though there have been many reports on arsenic content in raw rice and different tissues of rice plant, little is known about arsenic content retained in cooked rice after being cooked following the traditional cooking methods employed by the people of arsenic epidemic areas. A field level experiment was conducted in Bangladesh to investigate the influence of cooking methods on arsenic retention in cooked rice. Rice samples were collected directly from a severely arsenic affected area and also from an unaffected area, to compare the results. Rice was cooked according to the traditional methods employed by the population of subjected areas. Arsenic concentrations were 0.40+/-0.03 and 0.58+/-0.12 mg/kg in parboiled rice of arsenic affected area, cooked with excess water and 1.35+/-0.04 and 1.59+/-0.07 mg/kg in gruel for BRRI dhan28 and BRRI hybrid dhan1, respectively. In non-parboiled rice, arsenic concentrations were 0.39+/-0.04 and 0.44+/-0.03 mg/kg in rice cooked with excess water and 1.62+/-0.07 and 1.74+/-0.05 mg/kg in gruel for BRRI dhan28 and BRRI hybrid dhan1, respectively. Total arsenic content in rice, cooked with limited water (therefore gruel was absorbed completely by rice) were 0.89+/-0.07 and 1.08+/-0.06 mg/kg (parboiled) and 0.75+/-0.04 and 1.09+/-0.06 mg/kg (non-parboiled) for BRRI dhan28 and BRRI hybrid dhan1, respectively. Water used for cooking rice contained 0.13 and 0.01 mg of As/l for contaminated and non-contaminated areas, respectively. Arsenic concentrations in cooked parboiled and non-parboiled rice and gruel of non-contaminated area were significantly lower (p<0.01) than that of contaminated area. The results imply that cooking of arsenic contaminated rice with arsenic contaminated water increases its concentration in cooked rice.

  9. Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Menu Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games ... Lessons Topics Expand Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games ...

  10. Energy Efficient Cooking - The EffiCooker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjær-Jacobsen, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    Substantial energy savings in moist heat cooking may be achieved by employing a pan with integrated electric heating element rather than an ordinary pan on a conventional electric range. The electric pan should be thermally insulated and equipped with an "intelligent" controller and timer....... A working prototype of a saucepan, dubbed the EffiCooker, has been constructed according to these guidelines. The EffiCooker has demonstrated energy savings in the range from 28% to 81% compared to conventional equipment when performing ordinary cooking tasks. The user need not be particularly aware...... of energy conservation to realize such savings; even those who are more concerned with their culinary achievements than with energy efficiency are likely to benefit. Besides being energy efficient the EffiCooker is user friendly. Many cooking tasks, once initiated, are performed automatically without any...

  11. Stainless steel leaches nickel and chromium into foods during cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerud, Kristin L; Hobbie, Kevin A; Anderson, Kim A

    2013-10-02

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan, cooking times of 2-20 h, 10 consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After 6 h of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold, respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34-fold and Cr increased approximately 35-fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, although significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage.

  12. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  13. A culinária na promoção da alimentação saudável: delineamento e experimentação de método educativo dirigido a adolescentes e a profissionais das redes de saúde e de educação Cooking in the promotion of a healthy diet: designing and testing an education model directed to adolescents and professionals of healthcare and education networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Rugani Ribeiro de Castro

    2007-12-01

    diet that adopted cooking as its structural axis. METHODS: The theoretical references adopted were: health promotion precepts, critical approach of health education, human right to adequate food and food and nutrition security and reflections about food culture in the contemporary context. The steps of the project were: identification of people that represented the target groups (elementary school teachers, primary healthcare network professionals, school cooks and adolescents; designing and testing the education model in city of Rio de Janeiro; analysis of the collected material and production of education materials. RESULTS: The model proposed and tested consisted in an educative workshop structured in: experiencing cooking; a debate among the participants; a meeting called "Seasoning Concepts", in which the issues that appeared in the previous debate were discussed and an evaluation meeting. Eight educative workshops were carried out involving 116 participants, who indicated that if the education model was able to motivate them with respect to the subject for their personal life and professional activity. CONCLUSION: The model tested in this study represents a methodological innovation in the area of education practices for healthy diet promotion and proved to be feasible. The second stage of the study, which is ongoing, consists in the development of an education method for training multipliers for healthy diet promotion, using the model presented here as one of its education strategies.

  14. Increased levels of oxidative DNA damage attributable to cooking-oil fumes exposure among cooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yuebin; Cheng, Jinquan; Zhang, Zhicheng; Zhang, Renli; Zhang, Zhunzhen; Shuai, Zhihong; Wu, Tangchun

    2009-07-01

    Previous investigations have indicated that cooks are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from cooking-oil fumes. However, Emission of PAH and their carcinogenic potencies from cooking oil fumes sources have not been investigated among cooks. To investigate the urinary excretion of a marker for oxidative DNA damage, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), in different groups of cooks and different exposure groups, and to study the association between 8-OHdG and 1-hydroxypyrene(1-OHP), a biological marker for PAH exposure. Urine samples were collected from different groups of cooks (n = 86) and from unexposed controls (n = 36); all were male with similar age and smoking habits. The health status, occupational history, smoking, and alcohol consumption 24 h prior to sampling was estimated from questionnaires. The urine samples were frozen for later analyses of 8-OHdG and 1-OHP levels by high-performance liquid chromatography. Excretion in urine of 8-OHdG was similar for controls (mean 1.2micromol/mol creatinine, n = 36), and for those who had been in the kitchen with an exhaust-hood operating (mean 1.5micromol/mol creatinine, n = 45). Cooks exposed to cooking-oil fumes without exhaust-hood operation had significantly increased excretion of 8-OHdG (mean 2.3micromol/mol creatinine, n = 18), compared with controls. The urinary levels of ln 1-OHP and ln 8-OHdG were still significantly correlated in a multiple regression analysis. The results indicate that exposure to PAH or possibly other compounds in cooking-oil fumes may cause oxidative DNA damage.

  15. Simplification of Home Cooking and Its Periphery

    OpenAIRE

    小住, フミ子; 北崎, 康子; Fumiko, OZUMI; Yasuko, KITAZAKI

    1997-01-01

    Sence of home cooking has been changing with the times. Various topics, which make us conscious of health and dietary habits, such as delicatessen, half-ready-made foods, eating out, and utilization of home delivery service and food imports are involved in those of simplification of cooking. We requested 64 students to fill in a questionnaire in three parts. The recovery was 96.4%. The results are as follows : The main reason for purchasing delicatessen or half-ready-made foods was that "they...

  16. γ-ray irradiation of cooked dishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Ruotai; Cheng Wei; Wen Shengli; Xiong Guangquan; Ye Lixiu; Chen Yuxia; Zhang Jinmu; He Jianjun; Lin Yong; Zhan Hanping

    2005-01-01

    Ready-to-eat cooked dishes, including stir-fried dishes, steamed dishes, roast meat, deep dried dishes, shrimps and seashells, and dishes of local flavor, etc were irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays, and the decontamination effects were studied. The results showed that most of the cooked dishes are suitable for irradiation. The effective dose is 4 kGy to 8 kGy. Index of microbe of the irradiated dishes was conformed to the National Food-Health standards, and no significant sensory changes was observed with the irradiated dishes. The quality guarantee period (0-5 degree C) is 60 days. (authors)

  17. Comparison of damage introduced into GaN/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures using selective dry etch recipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R T; Luxmoore, I J; Houston, P A; Ranalli, F; Wang, T; Parbrook, P J; Uren, M J; Wallis, D J; Martin, T

    2009-01-01

    A SiCl 4 /SF 6 dry etch plasma recipe is presented giving a selectivity of 14:1 between GaN and AlGaN. Using a leakage test structure, which enables bulk and surface leakage components to be identified independently, the optimized recipe is compared to an un-etched sample and devices recessed using a Cl 2 /Ar/O 2 -based plasma chemistry. Devices etched using the SiCl 4 /SF 6 recipe demonstrated reduced bulk and surface leakage currents when operated over a wide range of temperatures. Consequently the SiCl 4 /SF 6 recipe is identified as most suitable for the fabrication of gate recessed AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

  18. Food recognition and recipe analysis: integrating visual content, context and external knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Herranz, Luis; Min, Weiqing; Jiang, Shuqiang

    2018-01-01

    The central role of food in our individual and social life, combined with recent technological advances, has motivated a growing interest in applications that help to better monitor dietary habits as well as the exploration and retrieval of food-related information. We review how visual content, context and external knowledge can be integrated effectively into food-oriented applications, with special focus on recipe analysis and retrieval, food recommendation, and the restaurant context as em...

  19. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation by Traditional Thai Herbal Recipes Used for Wound Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chusri, S.; Sompetch, K.; Mukdee, S.; Jansrisewangwong, S.; Srichai, T.; Maneenoon, K.; Limsuwan, S.; Voravuthikunchai, S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Development of biofilm is a key mechanism involved in Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence during device-associated infections. We aimed to investigate antibiofilm formation and mature biofilm eradication ability of ethanol and water extracts of Thai traditional herbal recipes including THR-SK004, THR-SK010, and THR-SK011 against S. epidermidis. A biofilm forming reference strain, S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 was employed as a model for searching anti-biofilm agents by MTT reduction assay. The r...

  20. The Effect of Masterbatch Recipes on the Homogenization Properties of Injection Molded Parts

    OpenAIRE

    Zsíros, László; Török, Dániel; Kovács, József Gábor

    2017-01-01

    Appearance is a key factor in most injection molding applications. Unfortunately, there is no widespread method to objectively test visual appearance, such as color inhomogeneity of the parts or other surface defects. We developed an evaluation method to characterize the color inhomogeneity of injection molded parts. First, we examined manufacturing conditions and masterbatch recipes and then the individual effects of the components and their interactions on homogeneity.

  1. The Effect of Masterbatch Recipes on the Homogenization Properties of Injection Molded Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László Zsíros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Appearance is a key factor in most injection molding applications. Unfortunately, there is no widespread method to objectively test visual appearance, such as color inhomogeneity of the parts or other surface defects. We developed an evaluation method to characterize the color inhomogeneity of injection molded parts. First, we examined manufacturing conditions and masterbatch recipes and then the individual effects of the components and their interactions on homogeneity.

  2. Hereditary Hemochromatosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & ... children's multivitamin that doesn't have iron. Not cooking ... may be possible for iron from the pan to get into the food you cook, although ...

  3. Chemicals in Meat Cooked at High Temperatures and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Chemicals in Meat Cooked at High Temperatures and Cancer Risk On ... hydrocarbons, and how are they formed in cooked meats? What factors influence the formation of HCA and ...

  4. Perancangan SCADA Software dengan Wonderware InTouch Recipe Manager dan SQL Access Manager pada Simulator Proses Pencampuran Bahan

    OpenAIRE

    Wicaksono, Handy; Lim, Resmana; Sutanto, William

    2008-01-01

    In Bahasa Indonesia: Banyak industri yang sudah menggunakan sistem automasi dengan menggunakan PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) dan SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition). Salah satu software untuk membuat program SCADA adalah Wonderware InTouch. Untuk mengelola data dalam bentuk recipe dan database, Wonderware InTouch mempunyai program-program tambahan yaitu Recipe Manager dan SQL Access Manager. Pada penelitian ini, akan digunakan proses pembuatan kertas sebagai contoh kas...

  5. Cooking with traditional crops improves nutrition and boosts ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    and adolescent girls, the majority scored above 90% for acceptability ... these recipes into traditional family meals, and how to package, label, price ... products extended to the women's families as well. Each ... A program is being developed to.

  6. Cooking with traditional crops improves nutrition and boosts ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-01-11

    Jan 11, 2013 ... It's no secret that traditional crops such as millets and pulses are highly nutritious. ... A survey of 310 families in India's Karnataka state determined that the ... developing recipes and food preparation methods that maximized ...

  7. Barriers and facilitators to healthy eating and disease self-management among older adults residing in subsidized housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroka, Katherine; Campbell-Bussiere, Rania; Dychtwald, Dan K; Milliron, Brandy-Joe

    2017-09-01

    As adults transition into older ages, meeting age-specific dietary recommendations can become increasingly challenging, especially for low-income seniors who reside in publicly subsidized rental housing. The primary objectives of this study were to: 1) identify barriers and facilitators to healthy eating and self-management of nutrition-related chronic illnesses experienced by low-income seniors residing in a subsidized housing setting; and 2) assess the interest in community nutrition programming among low-income seniors residing in a subsidized housing setting. A qualitative study design, using food focus groups and food pantry observations, was used. Participants included 24 male and female senior adults, between 65 and 75 years of age, residing in a subsidized housing community in Philadelphia, PA. This setting also included the unique features of a community garden and food pantry. Data were manually analyzed using a content analysis approach, which included familiarization, identification of themes, categorization and interpretation; and verified using NVivo 10. Personal barriers, including food cost and accessibility, physical limitations, desire for convenience, and low self-efficacy to change dietary habits, inhibited motivation to change. External barriers in the food environment, including lack of transportation and distance of markets to access fresh produce, were commonly cited; as well as negative influences of the internal environment, such as the presence of vending machines, common cultural cooking and eating practices, and the lack of social cohesion. Facilitators focused on food preparation and recipe adaptation. Participants expressed an interest in learning more about food, nutrition, and health through community-based programming.

  8. Optimization of the Quality and Safety of Cooked Seafood Products

    OpenAIRE

    Brookmire, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    Seafood products are a common consumer choice and a variety of cooking methods are used in seafood preparation. Although often cooked, products such as shrimp and salmon remain some of the most common carriers of foodborne disease. Cooking these products at elevated temperatures efficiently reduces foodborne disease causing pathogens to a safe level, but applying too much heat to seafood products can produce an overcooked, low quality food. It is necessary to investigate the cooking proces...

  9. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & ... who specializes in teen athletes. If a health professional you trust agrees that it's safe to diet, ...

  10. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  11. Getting a Urine Test (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  12. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  13. Special Needs: Planning for Adulthood (Videos)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  14. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  15. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  16. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  17. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  18. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  19. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  20. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  1. Getting a Urine Test (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  2. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  3. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  4. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  5. Special Needs: Planning for Adulthood (Videos)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Parents Parents site Sitio para padres General Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & ... Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things ...

  6. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things That ... hair growth in girls. Steroids can cause mental health problems, including depression and serious mood swings. Some supplements ...

  7. Determinants of market production of cooking banana in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The factors that influence farmers' decisions to produce cooking banana for market in southeast Nigeria were examined. Data were collected from a ... Results of the study indicate that about 80% of the farmers interviewed produce cooking banana both for household consumption and for sale. The proportion of cooking ...

  8. Exposure to organic compounds during heat treatment of cooking oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Zaciera

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fumes from cooking oils were found to be genotoxic in several short-term tests. Epidemiological research among Taiwanese and Chinese women has shown high incidence of lung cancer. These women were not smoking or rarely smoking , but they cooked meals every day. A lot of organic compounds have been identified from cooking oils including PAH.

  9. Quality factors in beef, pork, and lamb cooked by microwaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korschgen, B M; Baldwin, R E; Snider, S

    1976-12-01

    Three cooking treatments were applied to the longissimus muscle of beef and of pork and to deboned leg of lamb. Cooking treatments included: Intermittent energy application (3-min. cycle) with a microwave range operated at 220V and intermittent energy application (6-min. cycle) with a microwave range operated at 115V. Control roasts were cooked in a conventional gas oven (163+/-3 degrees C.). Cooking was adjusted so that roasts achieved an internal temperature of 70 degrees C. when cut for analyses. Cooking losses were significantly greater for microwave than for conventionally cooked beef. However, microwave cooking resulted in beef, pork, and lamb roasts with flavor of interior portions similar to those prepared conventionally. Flavor differences in samples from the edge of the slices of lamb and of pork and tenderness of lamb appeared to be related to cooking method. For these attributes, meat cooked conventionally was superior. In contrast, patterns in significant differences in tenderness and juiciness of beef and of pork were not consistent and were not related solely to method of cookery. Neither creatine nor creatinine was a good index of flavor of meat cooked by these methods. Aside from the time-saving aspect of microwave heating, there was no major advantage of one method of cooking over another. Thus, either high- or low- powered microwave equipment, operated at 2450 MHz, can be used satisfactorily for cooking tender cuts of beef, pork, and lamb.

  10. Fate of enniatins and deoxynivalenol during pasta cooking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, de Monique; Top, van den Hester; Stoppelaar, de Joyce; Lopez Sanchez, Patricia; Mol, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The fate of deoxynivalenol and enniatins was studied during cooking of commercially available dry pasta in the Netherlands in 2014. Five samples containing relatively high levels of deoxynivalenol and/or enniatins were selected for the cooking experiment. Cooking was performed in duplicate on

  11. 46 CFR 169.685 - Electric heating and cooking equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electric heating and cooking equipment. 169.685 Section... More on Vessels of Less Than 100 Gross Tons § 169.685 Electric heating and cooking equipment. (a) Each...) All electric cooking equipment, attachments, and devices, must be of rugged construction and so...

  12. PM2.5 in Dutch dwellings due to cooking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.; Borsboom, W.A.; Kemp, R.E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Cooking emissions have long been seen as an odour problem. However recent studies showed that Particulate Matter (PM) is the main health risk of indoor air and cooking can be a major source. A small field study within 9 Dutch dwellings indicates that depending on the conditions cooking can have a

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehicles in Vermont Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Vermont to someone by E -mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Vermont on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in

  14. Importance of cooking skills for balanced food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Christina; Dohle, Simone; Siegrist, Michael

    2013-06-01

    A cooking skill scale was developed to measure cooking skills in a European adult population, and the relationship between cooking skills and the frequency of consumption of various food groups were examined. Moreover, it was determined which sociodemographic and psychological variables predict cooking skills. The data used in the present study are based on the first (2010) and second (2011) surveys of a yearly paper-and-pencil questionnaire (Swiss Food Panel). Data from 4436 participants (47.2% males) with a mean age of 55.5 years (SD=14.6, range 21-99) were available for analysis. The cooking skills scale was validated using a test-retest analysis, confirming that this new scale is a reliable and consistent instrument. Cooking enjoyment was the most important predictor for cooking skills, especially for men. Women had higher cooking skills in all age groups. Cooking skills correlated positively with weekly vegetable consumption, but negatively with weekly convenience food consumption frequency, even while holding the effect of health consciousness related to eating constant. In summary, cooking skills may help people to meet nutrition guidelines in their daily nutrition supply. They allow people to make healthier food choices. It is, therefore, important to teach children and teenagers how to cook and to encourage them to develop their cooking skills. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Robustness Recipes for Minimax Robust Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voort, Sebastian van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Water, Steven van de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Perkó, Zoltán [Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lathouwers, Danny [Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Hoogeman, Mischa, E-mail: m.hoogeman@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: We aimed to derive a “robustness recipe” giving the range robustness (RR) and setup robustness (SR) settings (ie, the error values) that ensure adequate clinical target volume (CTV) coverage in oropharyngeal cancer patients for given gaussian distributions of systematic setup, random setup, and range errors (characterized by standard deviations of Σ, σ, and ρ, respectively) when used in minimax worst-case robust intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization. Methods and Materials: For the analysis, contoured computed tomography (CT) scans of 9 unilateral and 9 bilateral patients were used. An IMPT plan was considered robust if, for at least 98% of the simulated fractionated treatments, 98% of the CTV received 95% or more of the prescribed dose. For fast assessment of the CTV coverage for given error distributions (ie, different values of Σ, σ, and ρ), polynomial chaos methods were used. Separate recipes were derived for the unilateral and bilateral cases using one patient from each group, and all 18 patients were included in the validation of the recipes. Results: Treatment plans for bilateral cases are intrinsically more robust than those for unilateral cases. The required RR only depends on the ρ, and SR can be fitted by second-order polynomials in Σ and σ. The formulas for the derived robustness recipes are as follows: Unilateral patients need SR = −0.15Σ{sup 2} + 0.27σ{sup 2} + 1.85Σ − 0.06σ + 1.22 and RR=3% for ρ = 1% and ρ = 2%; bilateral patients need SR = −0.07Σ{sup 2} + 0.19σ{sup 2} + 1.34Σ − 0.07σ + 1.17 and RR=3% and 4% for ρ = 1% and 2%, respectively. For the recipe validation, 2 plans were generated for each of the 18 patients corresponding to Σ = σ = 1.5 mm and ρ = 0% and 2%. Thirty-four plans had adequate CTV coverage in 98% or more of the simulated fractionated treatments; the remaining 2 had adequate coverage in 97.8% and 97.9%. Conclusions: Robustness recipes were derived that can

  16. “What’s Cooking?”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejenova, Silviya

    2016-01-01

    “What’s cooking?” is old-fashioned slang for asking about what is happening or what someone is planning. In this chapter, it denotes an approach to prospective data collection in qualitative research and captures the gist of a case study from the field of haute cuisine that inspired the saying...

  17. Childhood respiratory morbidity and cooking practices among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Household air pollution is a leading risk factor for respiratory morbidity and mortality in developing countries where biomass fuel is mainly used for cooking. Materials and Method: A household cross-sectional survey was conducted in a predominantly rural area of Ghana in 2007 to determine the prevalence of ...

  18. DETERMINANTS OF UNSAFE HAMBURGER COOKING BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    Ralston, Katherine L.; Starke, Yolanda; Adu-Nyako, Kofi; Lin, Chung-Tung Jordan

    1998-01-01

    We used a national hamburger preparation survey to estimate a simultaneous equation model of food safety knowledge, attitudes, and hamburger cooking behavior. The results suggest that food safety risk perceptions, palatability attributes, and food safety knowledge play important roles in determining food preparation behavior.

  19. Cooking exhaust systems for low energy dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.; Borsboom, W.A.

    2017-01-01

    Especially in airtight low energy dwellings exhaust systems are of utmost importance as cooking can be a major source of PM2.5 exposure. Dwellings should be designed including facilities enabling extraction of at least 83 dm3/s (300 m3/h) directly to outside. Residents should be able to select an

  20. What's Cooking in America's Schoolyard Gardens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses what's cooking in America's schoolyard gardens. From First Lady Michelle Obama's world-famous Kitchen Garden, to Alice Waters' groundbreaking Edible Schoolyard in Berkeley, California, to a nationally recognized elementary school learning garden in the small Midwestern town of Ashland, Missouri, school children are planting…

  1. Cooking breakfast after a brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annick N. Tanguay

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acquired brain injury (ABI often compromises the ability to carry out instrumental activities of daily living such as cooking. ABI patients’ difficulties with executive functions and memory result in less independent and efficient meal preparation. Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in cooking is essential for successful community reintegration following ABI, but in vivo assessment of cooking by clinicians is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to standardize. Accordingly, we examined the usefulness of a computerized meal preparation task (the Breakfast Task; Craik & Bialystok, 2006 as an indicator of real life meal preparation skills. Twenty-two ABI patients and 22 age-matched controls completed the Breakfast Task and the Rehabilitation Activities of Daily Living Survey (RADLS; Salmon, 2003. Patients also prepared actual meals, and were rated by members of the clinical team. As expected, the ABI patients had significant difficulty on all aspects of the Breakfast Task (failing to have all their foods ready at the same time, over- and under-cooking foods, setting fewer places at the table, and so on relative to controls. Surprisingly, however, patients’ Breakfast Task performance was not correlated with their in vivo meal preparation. These results indicate caution when endeavoring to replace traditional evaluation methods with computerized tasks for the sake of expediency.

  2. Ensuring production-worthy OPC recipes using large test structure arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cork, Christopher; Zimmermann, Rainer; Mei, Xin; Shahin, Alexander

    2007-03-01

    The continual shrinking of design rules as the industry follows Moore's Law and the associated need for low k1 processes, have resulted in more layout configurations becoming difficult to print within the required tolerances. OPC recipes have needed to become more complex as tolerances decreased and acceptable corrections harder to find with simple algorithms. With this complexity comes the possibility of coding errors and ensuring the solutions are truly general. OPC Verification tools can check the quality of a correction based on pre-determined specifications for CD variation, line-end pullback and Edge Placement Error and then highlight layout configuration where violations are found. The problem facing a Mask Tape-Out group is that they usually have little control over the Design Styles coming in. Different approaches to eliminating problematic layouts have included highly restrictive Design Rules [1], whereby certain pitches or orientations are disallowed. Now these design rules are either becoming too complex or they overly restrict the designer from benefiting from the reduced pitch of the new node. The tight link between Design and Mask Tape-Out found in Integrated Device Manufacturers [2] (IDMs) i.e. companies that control both design and manufacturing can do much to dictate manufacturing friendly layout styles, and push ownership of problem resolution back to design groups. In fact this has been perceived as such an issue that a new class of products for designers that perform Lithographic Compliance Check on design layout is an emerging technology [3]. In contrast to IDMs, Semiconductor Foundries are presented with a much larger variety of design styles and a set of Fabless customers who generally are less knowledgeable in terms of understanding the impact of their layout on manufacturability and how to correct issues. The robustness requirements of a foundry's OPC correction recipe, therefore needs to be greater than that for an IDM's tape-out group

  3. Influence of cooking process on protein fractions in cooked ham and mortadella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vonghia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The mortadella is a pork meat sausage (in natural or artificial bowel accurately triturated and mixed with little backfat cubes, salt, sodium nitrate and nitrite, spices and peppercorns, and then cooked in oven for many hours. The cooked ham is obtained from an anatomically completed piece of meat; the working process provides the addiction of salt and spices, the brine, the bones removal, the churning and the pressing, so the cured meat is first packed in a mould provided for this purpose, then cooked and after cooled and packed. The meat cooking is the last step in the cooked sausage production technology, and let us obtain a stable and eatable product. The effect of the heat and the lenght of processing are the main responsibles for modifications in water- and salt-soluble protein fractions. Indeed myofibrils denature themselves after cooking and consequently their solubility decreases; particularly the denaturation begins over 30°C in the myosin chain, instead the actin solubility begins to decrease over 60°C, being the actin more stable than myosin (Barbieri et al., 1997...

  4. Prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of cooking skills in UK adults: cross-sectional analysis of data from the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jean; Goffe, Louis; Adamson, Ashley J; Halligan, Joel; O'Brien, Nicola; Purves, Richard; Stead, Martine; Stocken, Deborah; White, Martin

    2015-08-05

    Poor cooking skills may be a barrier to healthy eating and a contributor to overweight and obesity. Little population-representative data on adult cooking skills has been published. We explored prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of cooking skills among adult respondents to wave 1 of the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2008-9). Socio-demographic variables of interest were sex, age group, occupational socio-economic group and whether or not respondents had the main responsibility for food in their households. Cooking skills were assessed as self-reported confidence in using eight cooking techniques, confidence in cooking ten foods, and ability to prepare four types of dish (convenience foods, a complete meal from ready-made ingredients, a main meal from basic ingredients, and cake or biscuits from basic ingredients). Frequency of preparation of main meals was also reported. Of 509 respondents, almost two-thirds reported cooking a main meal at least five times per week. Around 90 % reported being able to cook convenience foods, a complete meal from ready-made ingredient, and a main dish from basic ingredients without help. Socio-demographic differences in all markers of cooking skills were scattered and inconsistent. Where these were found, women and main food providers were most likely to report confidence with foods, techniques or dishes, and respondents in the youngest age (19-34 years) and lowest socio-economic group least likely. This is the only exploration of the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of adult cooking skills using recent and population-representative UK data and adds to the international literature on cooking skills in developed countries. Reported confidence with using most cooking techniques and preparing most foods was high. There were few socio-demographic differences in reported cooking skills. Adult cooking skills interventions are unlikely to have a large population impact, but may have important individual effects

  5. System and technique for ultrasonic determination of degree of cooking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Leonard J [Richland, WA; Diaz, Aaron A [W. Richland, WA; Judd, Kayte M [Richland, WA; Pappas, Richard A [Richland, WA; Cliff, William C [Richland, WA; Pfund, David M [Richland, WA; Morgen, Gerald P [Kennewick, WA

    2007-03-20

    A method and apparatus are described for determining the doneness of food during a cooking process. Ultrasonic signal are passed through the food during cooking. The change in transmission characteristics of the ultrasonic signal during the cooking process is measured to determine the point at which the food has been cooked to the proper level. In one aspect, a heated fluid cooks the food, and the transmission characteristics along a fluid-only ultrasonic path provides a reference for comparison with the transmission characteristics for a food-fluid ultrasonic path.

  6. Cooking up the Culinary Nation or Savoring its Regions? Teaching Food Studies in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Annear

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available “In food, as in death, we feel the essential brotherhood of man.” Vietnamese Proverb This paper explores whether or not there is an identifiably Vietnamese national cuisine, one in which the ingredients, recipes, and/or dishes socially, culturally, and politically unite Vietnamese people. It contends that Vietnam, with its long history of foreign invaders, its own appropriation of the middle and southern regions, and its varied regional geographies, provides a critical example for Food Studies of the need to interrogate the idea of a national cuisine and to differentiate it from regional and local cuisines. The paper examines how cookbook authors and cooking schools have more generally sought to represent Vietnamese dishes as national, but that there is a strong argument against the claim of a Vietnamese national cuisine. We advocate a Food Studies methodology that creates an effective pedagogy that explores whether or not national populations are unified as single gastro-states or atomized by a plurality of regional cuisines. Through experiential assignments and student work we illustrate how Food Studies presents the pedagogical opportunity for students to study and learn at the intersection of national politics and the everyday lives of people, providing a framework for understanding connections of labor, gender, class, and, essentially, taste, among many other values. In the case of Vietnamese food, the critical details of ingredients, preparation, and consumption both reveal and conceal truths about the Vietnamese people.

  7. Study to elucidate formation pathways of selected roast-smelling odorants upon extrusion cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidek, Tomas; Festring, Daniel; Dufossé, Thierry; Novotny, Ondrej; Blank, Imre

    2013-10-30

    The formation pathways of the N-containing roast-smelling compounds 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 2-acetyl-1(or 3),4,5,6-tetrahydropyridine, and their structural analogues 2-propionyl-1-pyrroline and 2-propionyl-1(or 3),4,5,6-tetrahydropyridine were studied upon extrusion cooking using the CAMOLA approach. The samples were produced under moderate extrusion conditions (135 °C, 20% moisture, 400 rpm) employing a rice-based model recipe enriched with flavor precursors ([U-(13)C6]-D-glucose, D-glucose, glycine, L-proline, and L-ornithine). The obtained data indicate that the formation of these compounds upon extrusion follows pathways similar to those reported for nonsheared model systems containing D-glucose and L-proline. 2-Acetyl-1-pyrroline is formed (i) by acylation of 1-pyrroline via C2 sugar fragments (major pathway) and (ii) via ring-opening of 1-pyrroline incorporating C3 sugar fragments (minor pathway), whereas 2-propionyl-1-pyrroline incorporates exclusively C3 sugar fragments. 2-Acetyl-1(or 3),4,5,6-tetrahydropyridine and the corresponding propionyl analogue incorporate C3 and C4 sugar fragments, respectively. In addition, it has been shown that the formation of 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline in low-moisture systems depends on the pH value of the reaction mixture.

  8. Caribbean (English-Speaking) Women in the United States: Cooking for Diabetes Prevention and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nigel Mark

    2018-01-22

    This study surveyed 152 Caribbean-American women about their acculturation levels; their health behaviors; and their perceptions about a website portal for diabetes prevention and management. Participants followed a study link to documents created via SurveyMonkey. The study link included seven edited videos each fewer than 2 min; the videos included ingredients; preparation/cooking instructions; and plating tips for modifying traditional Caribbean meals for diabetes management and prevention. Overall engagement in six healthy living behaviors was moderate Mean = 2.07; Minimum = 1 (Never); Maximum = 3.0 (Always). Self-efficacy for cooking 'healthy' before exploring the website was a mean 3.52 between 40 and 60% confident (SD = 1.509) versus the after Mean of 4.59 closest to 80% confident (SD = 1.154); t = - 10.353, df = 147 (P cooking meals more consistent with diabetes prevention and management.

  9. Studies on Tasar Cocoon Cooking Using Permeation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javali, Uday C.; Malali, Kiran B.; Ramya, H. G.; Naik, Subhas V.; Padaki, Naveen V.

    2018-02-01

    Cocoon cooking is an important process before reeling of tasar silk yarn. Cooking ensures loosening of the filaments in the tasar cocoons thereby easing the process of yarn withdrawal during reeling process. Tasar cocoons have very hard shell and hence these cocoons need chemical cooking process to loosen the silk filaments. Attempt has been made in this article to study the effect of using vacuum permeation chamber for tasar cocoon cooking in order to reduce the cooking time and improve the quality of tasar silk yarn. Vacuum assisted permeation cooking method has been studied in this article on tasar daba cocoons for cooking efficiency, deflossing and reelability. Its efficiency has been evaluated with respect to different cooking methods viz, traditional and open pan cooking methods. The tasar silk produced after reeling process has been tested for fineness, strength and cohesion properties. Results indicate that permeation method of tasar cooking ensures uniform cooking with higher efficiency along with better reeling performance and improved yarn properties.

  10. Healthy Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such diets limit your nutritional intake, can be unhealthy, and tend to fail in the long run. The key to achieving and maintaining a healthy weight isn't about short-term dietary changes. It's about a lifestyle that includes healthy eating, regular physical activity, and ...

  11. Evaluation of Cooking Oil as Processing Addtive for Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. SYAMIN

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available It was reported recently that high amount of aromatic ring  or number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds found in aromatic oil are carcinogenic. This paper discusses the work to evaluate the Malaysian cooking oil as an alternative option to be used as process oil since cooking oil is safe to use and non-toxic. The performance of cooking oil is compared againstaromatic and paraffinioils. The results showed that rubber compounds containing cooking oil produced almostsimilar cure characteristicsas those produced by aromatic and paraffinioils indicating that it did not interfere with the vulcanization reaction. The physical properties of the vulcanizates containing cooking oil were almostsimilar to those of vulcanizates containing aromatic and paraffinioils, except the rebound resilience. The vulcanizates containing cooking oil gave higher resilience than vulcanizates containing aromatic and paraffinioils. High resilience is one of the desired features for a low rolling resistance tyre. Cooking oil provided this extra advantage.

  12. SENSORY PROPERTIES OF SOME WHITE WINES, FLAVORED WINES AND VERMOUTH TYPE WINES, PREPARED BY USING OWN RECIPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Elena CULEA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize, from sensorial point of view, the basic white wines White Fetească, Italian Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc, as well as flavored wines and vermouth type wines, obtained by addition of hydroalcoholic plants macerates to basic wines, tasting technique was used. It is known that sensory analysis is a method that can provide an overview of a wine. The main features analyzed were: appearance, color, smell and taste. Initial, wines presented specific features of grapes variety from which they belong, being characterized by harmony and complex flavor. The hydroalcoholic macerates were obtained by preparing two recipes (labeled I and II of different mixtures of plants. Recipes I A in 45% alcohol and I B in 60% alcohol, had characteristics of appearance, color, taste and smell, very intense, specific, prevailing the taste of anise, fennel and coriander. The macerates prepared with recipes II A in 45% alcohol and II B in 60% alcohol (mixture of a few herbs and peel of citrus fruits showed peculiarities of taste, odor, flavor less intense, prevailing the smell of nutmeg and citrus flavor. Recipes I A and I B of hydroalcoholic plants macerates decisively influenced the color, taste, flavor, smell and appearance of flavored wines. Recipes II A and II B influenced discreetly the sensory properties of flavored wines. Vermouth type wines obtained by addition of hydroalcoholic plants macerates + other ingredients (citric acid, alcohol, sugar, presented harmonious sensory characteristics, balanced, discreet, subtle, compared with flavored wines obtained only by the addition of hydroalcoholic plants macerates to the basic wines. The latter had a color, aroma, taste, smell, more intense, more rustic. Herbal recipes I B and II B (prepared in 60% alcohol, have strongly influenced the sensory properties of flavored wines, compared to recipes I A and II A (prepared in 45% alcohol.

  13. Delicious Low GL space foods by using Low GI materials -IH and Vacuum cooking -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Naomi; Nagasaka, Sanako; Murasaki, Masahiro; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    Enough life-support systems are necessary to stay in space for a long term. The management of the meal for astronauts is in particular very important. When an astronaut gets sick in outer space, it means death. To astronauts, the delicious good balance space foods are essential for their work. This study was aimed at making balance space foods menu for the healthy space-life. The kitchen utensil has a limit in the space environment. And a method to warm is only heater without fire. Therefore purpose of this study, we make the space foods which make by using vacuum cooking device and the IH heater We made space foods menu to referred to Japanese nutrition standard in 2010. We made space foods menu which are using "brown rice, wheat, soy bean, sweet potato and green-vegetable" and " loach and insects which are silkworm pupa, snail, mud snail, turmait, fly, grasshopper, bee". We use ten health adults as subjects. Ten subjects performed the sensory test of the questionnaire method. There was the sensuality examination in the item of "taste, a fragrance, color, the quantity" and acquired a mark at ten points of perfect scores.. We could make the space foods which we devised with vacuum cooking and IH deliciously. As a result of sensuality examination, the eight points in ten points of perfect scores was appeared. This result showed, our space food menu is delicious. We can store these space foods with a refrigerator for 20 days by making vacuum cooking. This thing is at all important result so that a save is enabled when surplus food was done in future by performing vacuum cooking. We want to make delicious space foods menu with vacuum cooking and IH heater more in future.

  14. Positive Impacts of a Vegetable Cooking Skills Program among Low-Income Parents and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overcash, Francine; Ritter, Allison; Mann, Traci; Mykerezi, Elton; Redden, Joseph; Rendahl, Aaron; Vickers, Zata; Reicks, Marla

    2017-12-12

    To evaluate the impact of a vegetable-focused cooking skills and nutrition program on parent and child psychosocial measures, vegetable liking, variety, and home availability. Baseline and postcourse surveys collected 1-week after the course. Low-income communities in Minneapolis-St Paul. Parent-child dyads (n = 89; one third each Hispanic, African American, and white) with complete pre-post course data; flyer and e-mail recruitment. Six 2-hour-weekly sessions including demonstration, food preparation, nutrition education lessons, and a meal. Parental cooking confidence and barriers, food preparation/resource management, child self-efficacy and cooking attitudes, vegetable liking, vegetable variety, and vegetable home availability. Pre-post changes analyzed with paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results were significant at P cooking confidence (4.0 to 4.4/5.0), healthy food preparation (3.6 to 3.9/5.0), child self-efficacy (14.8 to 12.4; lower score = greater self-efficacy), parent liking of vegetables used in the course (7.8 to 8.1/10.0), vegetable variety (30 to 32/37 for parent, 22 to 24/37 for child), and home vegetable availability (16 to 18/35) (all P cooking and nutrition program for parents and children showed improvements in psychosocial factors, vegetable liking, variety, and home availability. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Food prices in Brazil: prefer cooking to ultra-processed foods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claro, Rafael Moreira; Maia, Emanuella Gomes; Costa, Bruna Vieira de Lima; Diniz, Danielle Pereira

    2016-08-29

    This study aims to describe the prices of food groups consumed in Brazil considering the nature, extent, and purpose of their processing. Data were obtained from the Brazilian Household Budget Survey for 2008-2009. The mean prices of the groups (natural, cooking ingredients, processed, and ultra-processed) and their respective food subgroups were estimated for Brazil according to income, region, and area. Natural products and cooking ingredients showed lower prices per calorie when compared to the other groups, suggesting an economic advantage to preparing meals at home when compared to replacing them with ultra-processed foods. Families with the highest income paid the highest prices for their food, while families in the Northeast and North regions and rural areas paid the lowest. While fresh foods (meat, milk, fruit, and vegetables) tend to cost more than ultra-processed foods, dry grains (like rice and beans) are a more economical alternative for adopting healthy eating practices.

  16. Composition and antioxidant activity of kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala) raw and cooked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Elżbieta; Bodziarczyk, Izabela

    2012-01-01

    Cabbage vegetables, like Brassica group, are perceived as very valuable food products. They have a very good nutritive value, high antioxidant activity and pro-healthy potential. Especially, kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala) is characterized by good nutritional and pro-healthy properties, but this vegetable is not popular in Poland. The aim of this work was to assess the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of kale variety Winterbor F(1) and investigation of cooking process on selected characteristics. The chemical composition and antioxidant activity were determined in leaves of kale Winterbor F(1) variety after three subsequent years of growing. In one season, analyses were performed on raw and cooked leaves. The investigated kale was characterized by high average contents of: β-carotene (6.40 mg/100 g f.m.), vitamin C (62.27 mg/100 g f.m.), alimentary fiber (8.39 g/100 g f.m.) and ash (2.11 g/100 g f.m.). The average amounts of nitrites (III) and (V) were 3.36 mg NaNO(2)/kg f.m. and 1206.4 mg NaNO(3)/kg f.m., respectively. The investigated kale contained polyphenolic compounds at average level of 574.9 mg of chlorogenic acid/100 g f.m., and its antioxidant activity measured as ABTS radical scavenging ability was 33.22 μM Trolox/g of fresh vegetable. It was observed a significant lowering of antioxidant compounds as a result of cooking. The losses of vitamin C were at about 89%, polyphenols at the level of 56%, in calculation on dry mass of the product. The highest stability was shown in the case of beta-carotene, for which the losses were at about 5%. Antioxidant activity of cooked vegetable lowered and reached the level of 38%. There were also some losses observed in macro-components from 13% for zinc to 47% for sodium. The contents of harmful nitrites and nitrates in calculation on dry mass were significantly lower as a result of cooking, by 67% and 78%, respectively. Winterbor F(1) variety of kale has a great nutritive value and high

  17. Elements of kitchen toxicology to exploit the value of traditional (African recipes: The case of Egusi Okra meal in the diet of HIV+/AIDS subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Frazzoli

    Full Text Available The Egusi Okra soup is a traditional African meal that is considered of high nutritional value and protective against weight loss. We introduce the concept of “kitchen toxicology” to analyse the recipe of the Egusi Okra soup and highlight possible mitigation measures for toxic and/or antinutritional effects in the wide spectrum of health and nutritional needs of HIV+/AIDS subjects. In particular, we focus on toxicants (environmental contaminants, process contaminants, substances leaching from food contact materials dysregulating the immune status, as well as on interactions between nutrients, contaminants, and/or antinutrients which may lead to secondary/conditioned nutritional deficiencies or imbalances; in their turn, these can modulate the ability to cope with toxicants, and increase nutritional requirements. Recommendations are given for practices preserving the Egusi Okra soup from such risk factors, identifying points of particular attention during meal preparation, from purchase of raw ingredients through to food handling, cooking, storage, and consumption. The Egusi Okra soup is discussed in the context of a diet that is asked to mitigate complications (weight loss, opportunistic infections and support antiretroviral therapy in African countries with high HIV/AIDS prevalence. The paper discusses how nutritional interventions benefit of the integration of kitchen toxicology practices in everyday life. Toxicological risk assessment is crucial to understand the history and status of the person exposed to or affected by infectious diseases. Keywords: Traditional diet, Malnutrition, Food safety, Weight loss, Immune system, Dysmetabolic diseases, Clinical toxicology, Nutrition security

  18. ASP.NET MVC 4 recipes a problem-solution approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ciliberti, John

    2013-01-01

    ASP.NET MVC 4 Recipes is a practical guide for developers creating modern web applications, cutting through the complexities of ASP.NET, jQuery, Knockout.js and HTML 5 to provide straightforward solutions to common web development problems using proven methods based on best practices. The problem-solution approach gets you in, out, and back to work quickly while deepening your understanding of the underlying platform and how to develop with it. Author John Ciliberti guides you through the framework and development tools, presenting typical challenges, along with code solutions and clear, conci

  19. Entity Framework 4.0 Recipes A Problem-solution Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tenny, L

    2010-01-01

    Entity Framework 4.0 Recipes provides an exhaustive collection of ready-to-use code solutions for Microsoft's Entity Framework, Microsoft's vision for the future of data access. Entity Framework is a model-centric data access platform with an ocean of new concepts and patterns for developers to learn. With this book, you will learn the core concepts of Entity Framework through a broad range of clear and concise solutions to everyday data access tasks. Armed with this experience, you will be ready to dive deep into Entity Framework, experiment with new approaches, and develop ways to solve even

  20. Biomedical image analysis recipes in Matlab for life scientists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino Carlos

    2015-01-01

    As its title suggests, this innovative book has been written for life scientists needing to analyse their data sets, and programmers, wanting a better understanding of the types of experimental images life scientists investigate on a regular basis. Each chapter presents one self-contained biomedical experiment to be analysed. Part I of the book presents its two basic ingredients: essential concepts of image analysis and Matlab. In Part II, algorithms and techniques are shown as series of 'recipes' or solved examples that show how specific techniques are applied to a biomedical experiments like

  1. Recipes for stable linear embeddings from Hilbert spaces to R^m

    OpenAIRE

    Puy, Gilles; Davies, Michael; Gribonval, Remi

    2017-01-01

    We consider the problem of constructing a linear map from a Hilbert space H (possibly infinite dimensional) to Rm that satisfies a restricted isometry property (RIP) on an arbitrary signal model, i.e., a subset of H. We present a generic framework that handles a large class of low-dimensional subsets but also unstructured and structured linear maps. We provide a simple recipe to prove that a random linear map satisfies a general RIP with high probability. We also describe a generic technique ...

  2. Recipes for stable linear embeddings from Hilbert spaces to R^m

    OpenAIRE

    Puy, Gilles; Davies, Mike; Gribonval, Rémi

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of constructing a linear map from a Hilbert space $\\mathcal{H}$ (possibly infinite dimensional) to $\\mathbb{R}^m$ that satisfies a restricted isometry property (RIP) on an arbitrary signal model $\\mathcal{S} \\subset \\mathcal{H}$. We present a generic framework that handles a large class of low-dimensional subsets but also unstructured and structured linear maps. We provide a simple recipe to prove that a random linear map satisfies a general RIP on $\\mathcal{S}$ with h...

  3. Ciguatera poisoning in the Cook Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stephanie; Withers, Tristan

    2014-06-25

    This case report presents two British medical students who contracted ciguatera poisoning while on elective in the Cook Islands. Thirty-six hours after consuming two reef fish they developed paraesthesia of the mouth, hands and feet, myalgia, pruritis and cold allodynia. Neurological examination was normal. Diagnosis of ciguatera poisoning was made on history of reef fish consumption and classical clinical presentation. Management was symptomatic (antihistamines) and both students made a full recovery within 10 weeks. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Healthy Places

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Every person has a stake in environmental public health. As the environment deteriorates, so does the physical and mental health of the people within it. Healthy places are those designed and built to improve the quality of life for all people who live, work, worship, learn, and play within their borders -- where every person is free to make choices amid a variety of healthy, available, accessible, and affordable options. The CDC recognizes significant health issues and places that are vital in developing the Healthy Places program and provides examples in this report.

  5. Cooking and palatability traits of beef longissimus steaks cooked with a belt grill or an open hearth electric broiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M

    1998-11-01

    The objective of this experiment was to compare the effects of belt grill and Open Hearth electric broiler cookery on palatability and cooking traits of longissimus steaks. The longissimus thoracis from carcasses of grain-fed steers or heifers was used. Duplicate measurements were made for Warner-Bratzler shear force at 3 and at 14 d after slaughter (n = 180) and trained sensory evaluation at 14 d after slaughter (n = 91) using both cooking methods. Belt grill-cooked samples had lower (P<.01) percentage of cooking losses (21.5 vs 25.8%) and higher (P<.01) shear force values (4.6 vs 4.3 kg) than electric broiler-cooked samples. Repeatability of duplicate measurements was higher for cooking losses (.58 vs .23) and shear force values (.85 vs .64) for belt grill than for electric broiler cooked samples. Belt grilled steaks had lower (P<.01) cooking losses (20.2 vs 29.8%); higher (P<.01) tenderness (7.0 vs 6.7) and juiciness (6.0 vs 5.1); and lower (P<.02) connective tissue amount (7.7 vs 7.8), beef flavor intensity (5.0 vs 5.1), and off-flavor (3.2 vs 3.3) ratings than steaks cooked with the electric broiler. Belt grill cooking increased the repeatability of duplicate sensory measurements for tenderness (.87 vs .71), connective tissue amount (.66 vs .30), and juiciness (.51 vs .08) ratings, and cooking losses (.63 vs .18) compared with cooking with the electric broiler. Belt grill cooking increased the precision for measurements of cooking, Warner-Bratzler shear force, and palatability traits of beef longissimus thoracis.

  6. Usefulness of traditionally defined herbal properties for distinguishing prescriptions of traditional Chinese medicine from non-prescription recipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, C Y; Li, H; Kong, C Y; Wang, J F; Chen, Y Z

    2007-01-03

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been widely practiced and is considered as an attractive to conventional medicine. Multi-herb recipes have been routinely used in TCM. These have been formulated by using TCM-defined herbal properties (TCM-HPs), the scientific basis of which is unclear. The usefulness of TCM-HPs was evaluated by analyzing the distribution pattern of TCM-HPs of the constituent herbs in 1161 classical TCM prescriptions, which shows patterns of multi-herb correlation. Two artificial intelligence (AI) methods were used to examine whether TCM-HPs are capable of distinguishing TCM prescriptions from non-TCM recipes. Two AI systems were trained and tested by using 1161 TCM prescriptions, 11,202 non-TCM recipes, and two separate evaluation methods. These systems correctly classified 83.1-97.3% of the TCM prescriptions, 90.8-92.3% of the non-TCM recipes. These results suggest that TCM-HPs are capable of separating TCM prescriptions from non-TCM recipes, which are useful for formulating TCM prescriptions and consistent with the expected correlation between TCM-HPs and the physicochemical properties of herbal ingredients responsible for producing the collective pharmacological and other effects of specific TCM prescriptions.

  7. The structural features of hemicelluloses dissolved out at different cooking stages of active oxygen cooking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianbin; Yang, Qiulin; Lin, Lu

    2014-04-15

    This work described the morphologic changes of corn stalk and the structural characterization of its hemicelluloses dissolved in yellow liquor at different cooking stages. The results showed that active oxygen cooking process was an efficient method to depolymerize the corn stalk into cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin as a pretreatment of biomass conversion. This cooking process can also be divided into three phases: bulk delignification, extended delignification, and residual delignification. During the heating-up period 57.67% of hemicelluloses and 62.31% of lignin were removed from the raw material. However, only 15% of hemicelluloses and 23.21% of lignin were removed during at temperature' period. The hemicelluloses from the corn stalk and yellow liquor were composed of (1→4)-β-D-xylopyranose backbones substituted with α-l-arabinofuranosyl, 4-O-methyl-α-D-glucuronic acid, and some methoxyl residues. The backbones of hemicelluloses were gradually cleaved during the cooking process. The acetyl groups substituted with xylopyranosyl residues were completely cleaved during the cooking process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chimpanzees, cooking, and a more comparative psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Michael J; Hopper, Lydia M; de Waal, Frans B M; Brosnan, Sarah F; Sayers, Ken

    2016-06-01

    A recent report suggested that chimpanzees demonstrate the cognitive capacities necessary to understand cooking (Warneken & Rosati, 2015). We offered alternative explanations and mechanisms that could account for the behavioral responses of those chimpanzees, and questioned the manner in which the data were used to examine human evolution (Beran, Hopper, de Waal, Sayers, & Brosnan, 2015). Two commentaries suggested either that we were overly critical of the original report's claims and methodology (Rosati & Warneken, 2016), or that, contrary to our statements, early biological thinkers contributed little to questions concerning the evolutionary importance of cooking (Wrangham, 2016). In addition, both commentaries took issue with our treatment of chimpanzee referential models in human evolutionary studies. Our response offers points of continued disagreement as well as points of conciliation. We view Warneken and Rosati's general conclusions as a case of affirming the consequent-a logical conundrum in which, in this case, a demonstration of a partial list of the underlying abilities required for a cognitive trait/suite (understanding of cooking) are suggested as evidence for that ability. And although we strongly concur with both Warneken and Rosati (2015) and Wrangham (2016) that chimpanzee research is invaluable and essential to understanding humanness, it can only achieve its potential via the holistic inclusion of all available evidence-including that from other animals, evolutionary theory, and the fossil and archaeological records.

  9. A Study on the Relationship between Cooking Properties of Adzuki Bean and Storage Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Hayakawa, Isao; Breene, William M.; 早川, 功

    1982-01-01

    Adzuki bean (Phaseolus angularis) has been used for many cooking purposes in Japan. The basic method for adzuki bean cooking is heating in the presence of moisture, it seems that the differences of moisture content between the beans before cooking and between cooking methods have influence on the qualities of cooking products. But there is a general complaint about the poor cooking properties of these beans. Since the cooking properties depend, both on the moisture contents of bean before coo...

  10. Influence of cooking methods on bioactive compounds in beetroot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Arruda Ramos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Beetroot is rich in bioactive compounds that may provide health benefits. However, vegetable tissues are physically and chemically damaged by cooking, causing major changes to compounds in cell membranes. The current study aimed to evaluate the influence of several cooking methods on bioactive compounds in beetroot. Four heat treatments were carried out: steam cooking, pressure cooking, baking in an oven, and boiling in water. Beets were matched in uniformity of size, color, and absence of defects. They were washed thoroughly in running water to remove dirt. Next, one of the four cooking methods was applied. After cooking, beets were peeled by hand. Analysis was carried out on both uncooked and cooked beets to evaluate antioxidant activity, content of phenolic compounds, pigments, flavonoids, and betalains. The experiment was completely randomized design (CRD and carried out in triplicate. Data were subjected to analysis of variance (F test, p < 0.05 and mean values compared by Tukey test at 5% probability. There was no change in antioxidant activity or total phenolic and anthocyanin content by any of the cooking methods compared to that in raw beetroots. However, pressure-cooking resulted in lower carotenoid levels compared to that in raw beet. Furthermore, flavonoid and betalain content decreased by all the cooking methods.

  11. Healthy Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Facts School Meals Smart Snacks Celebrations & Rewards Food and Beverage Marketing Water Access Healthy Eating Learning Opportunities Staff ... Services Acute & Emergency Care Care Coordination Chronic Disease Management Family Engagement Chronic ... Allergies Oral Health Local School Wellness Policy Whole ...

  12. Flood design recipes vs. reality: can predictions for ungauged basins be trusted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstratiadis, A.; Koussis, A. D.; Koutsoyiannis, D.; Mamassis, N.

    2014-06-01

    Despite the great scientific and technological advances in flood hydrology, everyday engineering practices still follow simplistic approaches that are easy to formally implement in ungauged areas. In general, these "recipes" have been developed many decades ago, based on field data from typically few experimental catchments. However, many of them have been neither updated nor validated across all hydroclimatic and geomorphological conditions. This has an obvious impact on the quality and reliability of hydrological studies, and, consequently, on the safety and cost of the related flood protection works. Preliminary results, based on historical flood data from Cyprus and Greece, indicate that a substantial revision of many aspects of flood engineering procedures is required, including the regionalization formulas as well as the modelling concepts themselves. In order to provide a consistent design framework and to ensure realistic predictions of the flood risk (a key issue of the 2007/60/EU Directive) in ungauged basins, it is necessary to rethink the current engineering practices. In this vein, the collection of reliable hydrological data would be essential for re-evaluating the existing "recipes", taking into account local peculiarities, and for updating the modelling methodologies as needed.

  13. Flood design recipes vs. reality: can predictions for ungauged basins be trusted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstratiadis, A.; Koussis, A. D.; Koutsoyiannis, D.; Mamassis, N.

    2013-12-01

    Despite the great scientific and technological advances in flood hydrology, everyday engineering practices still follow simplistic approaches, such as the rational formula and the SCS-CN method combined with the unit hydrograph theory that are easy to formally implement in ungauged areas. In general, these "recipes" have been developed many decades ago, based on field data from few experimental catchments. However, many of them have been neither updated nor validated across all hydroclimatic and geomorphological conditions. This has an obvious impact on the quality and reliability of hydrological studies, and, consequently, on the safety and cost of the related flood protection works. Preliminary results, based on historical flood data from Cyprus and Greece, indicate that a substantial revision of many aspects of flood engineering procedures is required, including the regionalization formulas as well as the modelling concepts themselves. In order to provide a consistent design framework and to ensure realistic predictions of the flood risk (a key issue of the 2007/60/EU Directive) in ungauged basins, it is necessary to rethink the current engineering practices. In this vein, the collection of reliable hydrological data would be essential for re-evaluating the existing "recipes", taking into account local peculiarities, and for updating the modelling methodologies as needed.

  14. Dairy Replacement Performance Fed Various Recipes of Pangola (Digitaria eriantha) Silage Ensiled with Irradiated Silage Innoculant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasanpanich, Somkiert; Boon-ek, Lerchart; Piadang, Nattayana

    2006-09-01

    Various kinds of Pangola silage ensiled with molasses and 2 types of silage innoculant (wild and mutant types). There were 6 recipes consisting of Treatment 1 : Pangola silage, Treatment 2: Pangola ensiled with molasses 4 % w/w, Treatment 3 : Pangola ensiled with 106 cfu wild type innoculant /gm Pangola, Treatment 4 : Pangola ensiled with 106 cfu mutant type innoculant/gm Pangola, Treatment 5 : Pangola ensiled with 106 cfu wild type innoculant/gm Pangola and molasses 4 % w/w, Treatment 6 : Pangola ensiled with 106 cfu mutant type innoculant/gm Pangola and molasses 4 % w/w. After 21 days of fermentation, silage sample was taken for nutritive value analysis. Preference testing on all silage recipes was studied using 18 dairy yearlings, aged 10-12 months old and weighed 200-300 kg, at 6 treatments with 3 animals each for 21 days in a Complete Randomized Design. The results did show that Treatment 1 had higher dry matter intake than those consisted of silage innoculant. However, when taking body weight changes and blood metabolites into account, Treatment 4 : Pangola ensiled with 106 cfu mutant type innoculant/gm Pangola, has an advantage on the ease of making process. Then, it is concluded that Treatment 4 is the most appropriate method to improve silage quality.

  15. Diabetes Movie (For Parents)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things That ...

  16. Special Needs: Planning for Adulthood (Videos)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things That ...

  17. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things That ...

  18. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things That ...

  19. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things That ...

  20. Getting a Urine Test (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things That ...

  1. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things That ...

  2. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things That ...

  3. Determination of advanced glycation endproducts in cooked meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gengjun; Smith, J Scott

    2015-02-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), a pathogenic factor implicated in diabetes and other chronic diseases, are produced in cooked meat products. The objective of this study was to determine the AGE content, as measured by Nε-carboxymethyllysine (CML) levels, in cooked chicken, pork, beef and fish (salmon and tilapia) prepared by three common cooking methods used by U.S. consumers: frying, baking, and broiling. The CML was detected in all the cooked samples, but the levels were dependent on types of meat, cooking conditions, and the final internal temperature. Broiling and frying at higher cooking temperature produced higher levels of CML, and broiled beef contained the highest CML content (21.8μg/g). Baked salmon (8.6μg/g) and baked tilapia (9.7μg/g) contained less CML as compared to the other muscle food samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Used cooking oil as a green chemical admixture in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmia, B; Sidek, L M; Hidayah, B; Muda, Zakaria Che; Alam, Md Ashraful

    2013-01-01

    According to National Statistics Approximately 1.35 billion gallons of used oil are generated yearly. With the increasing of the concrete usage, a more cost effective and economic new type of admixtures may give positive impacts on the Malaysian construction building as well as worldwide concrete usage. To objective of this is study is to investigate the effect of used cooking oil in terms of slump test, compressive strength test and rebound hammer. By adding the used cooking oil to the concrete, it increases the slump value from 4% to 72%. And the compressive strength have an increment from 1% to 16.8%. The used cooking oil obtains the optimum contribution to the concrete mix proportion of containing used cooking oil of 1.50% from the cement content. The result of used cooking oil from experimental program of slump value and compressive strength proved that used cooking oil have positive effects on replacement of commercially available superplasticizer.

  5. Effect of Dietary Fiber Enrichment and Different Cooking Methods on Quality of Chicken Nuggets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathera, Ashok K; Riar, C S; Yadav, Sanjay; Sharma, D P

    2017-01-01

    The effect of dietary fiber enrichment (wheat bran) and cooking methods (oven, steam and microwave) on functional and physico-chemical properties of raw nuggets formulation as well as nutritional, color and textural properties of chicken nuggets were analyzed in this study. Among different cooking methods used for nuggets preparation, steam cooked nuggets had significantly ( p cooking yield (97.16%) and total dietary fiber content (4.32%) in comparison to oven and microwave cooked nuggets. The effect of cooking methods and wheat bran incorporation was also noticed on textural properties of the nuggets. Hardness, firmness and toughness values of oven and steam cooked nuggets were significantly ( p cooked nuggets. Among nuggets prepared by different cooking methods, cohesiveness of microwave cooked nuggets was found to be significantly ( p cooked nuggets had significantly ( p cooked nuggets were found to be better among all nuggets due to their higher cooking yield and dietary fiber content.

  6. Evaluating the "Healthy Diabetes" Caribbean Food Plate and Website Portal for Diabetes Prevention and Management: Results of an Online Study and Implications for Reducing Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nigel M.

    2013-01-01

    Given the challenge of cooking traditional Caribbean meals so they are consistent with the goals of diabetes prevention and management, the researcher created and evaluated a new website portal as e-health tailored to be culturally appropriate and teach the following: how to cook and prepare "Healthy Diabetes" Caribbean Plates. A social…

  7. Professional cooking: new approaches; Restauration professionnelle: nouvelles approches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Cegibat, the information-recommendation agency of Gaz de France for building engineering professionals, has organized this conference meeting on professional cooking to present the existing gas solutions to manage together the space heating, the air conditioning, the refrigeration and the cooking: evolution of markets with new consumer habits, natural gas technologies and innovations, architecture of cooking rooms: esthetics and functionality, opening of energy markets and new gas supplying contracts. (J.S.)

  8. The curiously long absence of cooking in evolutionary thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrangham, R

    2016-06-01

    Beran et al. (2015, p. 1) characterized the idea that "cooked food was integral in human evolution" as a "long-held hypothesis" favored by Darwin and Engels. In fact, however, although Darwin and Engels considered the use of cooked food to be an important influence on behavior and society, neither of them suggested that its effects were evolutionary in the sense of affecting biology. Explicit discussion of the possible evolutionary impacts of cooking did not begin until the twentieth century.

  9. Effect of cooking methods on the micronutrient profile of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of cooking methods on the micronutrient profile of selected vegetables: okra fruit ( Abelmoshcus esculentus ), fluted pumpkin ( Telfairia occidentalis ), African spinach ( Amarantus viridis ), and scent leaf ( Ocumum gratissimum.

  10. Effect of cooking on radionuclide concentrations in waterfowl tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halford, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-four commercially raised mallar ducks (Anas platyrhyncos) were released at the Test Reactor Area radioactive leaching ponds, and subsequently collected 56 to 188 days later. Liver, gizzard, and carcass were analyzed for radionuclide concentrations before and after cooking. Significant decreases (P 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 60 Co, 140 La and /sup 110m/Ag concentrations in carcass and liver samples occurred after cooking. Radionuclide concentrations in gizzard showed no significant change in radionuclide concentrations after cooking. Cesium-134 and 137 Cs concentrations decreased by 27% in carcass after cooking and reduced the dose commitment to man by that amount

  11. Healthy Places

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Every person has a stake in environmental public health. As the environment deteriorates, so does the physical and mental health of the people within it. Healthy places are those designed and built to improve the quality of life for all people who live, work, worship, learn, and play within their borders -- where every person is free to make choices amid a variety of healthy, available, accessible, and affordable options. The CDC recognizes significant health issues and places that are vital in developing the Healthy Places program and provides examples in this report.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  12. Fate of polybrominated diphenyl ethers during cooking of fish in a new model cooking apparatus and a household microwave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendig, Paul; Hägele, Florian; Blumenstein, Marina; Schmidt, Jasmin; Vetter, Walter

    2013-07-10

    Fish is a major source of human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Because fish is mainly consumed after cooking, this measure may alter the pattern and amounts of PBDEs that are finally consumed. To investigate this issue, we developed a model cooking apparatus consisting of a small glass bowl and a beaker glass with an exhaust fitted with a polyurethane foam filter connected to a water jet pump. In this model cooking apparatus, fish (1 g) and/or sunflower oil (0.2/0.4 g) spiked with three PBDE congeners was cooked for 30 min. Small amounts of the semi-volatile PBDEs were evaporated from the fish (BDE-47 cooking apparatus proved to be well-suited to study the fate of polyhalogenated compounds in fish during cooking.

  13. Cooking Can Be Profitable; Commercial Cooking and Baking 1:9193.03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is prepared as a guide for the 10th grade student in Commercial Cooking and Baking or Food Management Production and Service. The course introduces the student to effective production of high quality foods and develops an understanding of high standards in quality food service. Totaling 90 hours of instruction, nine blocks of…

  14. Simply Great Cooking Instruction. A Manual for Teaching Cooking to Non-Reading Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesto, Cameron

    This manual presents a method of teaching cooking to nonreaders. The language of the method consists of visual symbols, such as drawings of bowls, spoons, and ingredients, and color. The "Simply Great" method consists of three basic formats: the one-step booklet, the full-page format, and the simply written for the student with some…

  15. Cooking methods and the formation of PhIP (2-Amino, 1-methyl, 6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b] pyridine) in the crust of the habitually consumed meat in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reartes, Gabriela Angelina; Di Paola Naranjo, Romina Daniela; Eynard, Aldo Renato; Muñoz, Sonia Edith

    2016-06-01

    Content of carcinogenic molecules like, 2-Amino, 1-methyl, 6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b] pyridine in meals is one of the main mutagenic substances formed during meat cooking, and it can be used as a dietary exposure marker. Our objective was to estimate the amount of PhIP consumed from habitual Argentinean diet, rich in red meats, comparing different cooking procedures and meat type. Samples (n = 240) of lean and fatty beef, chicken, pork, and fish were cooked using different methods: griddle, grill, sauté pan, and oven. Samples were: Overcooked, or cooked with a microbiologically suitable or "healthy technique" (HT). The PhIP was determined by HPLC-MS. Meats cooked using HT formed little crust amounts and PhIP was below the detection levels. In overcooked meats, large amounts of crust were formed in lean meats, fatty beef, fatty chicken and baked pork. PhIP was measured in lean meats sauted or cooked on a griddle, a method reaching temperatures until 250 °C.It was estimated that Argentine people eats about 12,268.0 ng/day of PhIP being these values above those tolerated limits for total dietary heterocyclic amines in some developed countries. Hence, cooking small meat portions, at medium temperature, avoiding prolonged cooking and preferring baked lean meats could be recommended as a healthier habit. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Conference in honor of Kenneth Cooke

    CERN Document Server

    Martelli, Mario

    1991-01-01

    The meeting explored current directions of research in delay differential equations and related dynamical systems and celebrated the contributions of Kenneth Cooke to this field on the occasion of his 65th birthday. The volume contains three survey papers reviewing three areas of current research and seventeen research contributions. The research articles deal with qualitative properties of solutions of delay differential equations and with bifurcation problems for such equations and other dynamical systems. A companion volume in the biomathematics series (LN in Biomathematics, Vol. 22) contains contributions on recent trends in population and mathematical biology.

  17. The enigma of cooking salt crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolskaya, E.

    1987-01-01

    Two Soviet experts, Vladimir Gromov and Valentin Krylov, have discovered an unexpected phenomenon on irradiating cooking salt crystals with electrons. When the crystals are subsequently ground the rate at which they are dissolved increases, but not always. The electrons cause the salt molecules to polarize thus creating an internal electric field. This acts against the double electric layer which is inevitably formed in the part of the solution touching the crystal surface. So, if the permittivity of the solution is much greater than that of the molecules of the crystal, the rate of dissolution is increased, and vice versa. (G.T.H.)

  18. Opportunity Examining Composition of 'Cook Islands' Outcrop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This image taken by the front hazard-avoidance camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's arm extended to examine the composition of a rock using the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. Opportunity took this image during the 1,826th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's Mars-surface mission (March 13, 2009). The spectrometer is at a target called 'Penrhyn,' on a rock called 'Cook Islands.' As Opportunity makes its way on a long journey from Victoria Crater toward Endeavour Crater, the team is stopping the drive occasionally on the route to check whether the rover finds a trend in the composition of rock exposures.

  19. Influence of infrared final cooking on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in ohmically pre-cooked beef meatballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendirci, Perihan; Icier, Filiz; Kor, Gamze; Onogur, Tomris Altug

    2014-06-01

    Effects of infrared cooking on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation in ohmically pre-cooked beef meatballs were investigated. Samples were pre-cooked in a specially designed-continuous type ohmic cooking at a voltage gradient of 15.26V/cm for 92s. Infrared cooking was applied as a final cooking method at different combinations of heat fluxes (3.706, 5.678, 8.475kW/m(2)), application distances (10.5, 13.5, 16.5cm) and application durations (4, 8, 12min). PAHs were analyzed by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a fluorescence detector. The total PAH levels were detected to be between 4.47 and 64μg/kg. Benzo[a] pyrene (B[a]P) and PAH4 (sum of B[a]P, chrysene (Chr), benzo[a]anthracene (B[a]A) and benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F)) levels detected in meatballs were below the EC limits. Ohmic pre-cooking followed by infrared cooking may be regarded as a safe cooking procedure of meatballs from a PAH contamination point of view. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of pre-cooking protein paste gelation conditions and post-cooking gel storage conditions on gel texture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paker, Ilgin; Matak, Kristen E

    2016-01-15

    Gelation conditions affect the setting of myofibrillar fish protein gels. Therefore the impact of widely applied pre-cooking gelation time/temperature strategies and post-cooking period on the texture and color of final protein gels was determined. Four pre-cooking gelation strategies (no setting time, 30 min at 25 °C, 1 h at 40 °C or 24 h at 4 °C) were applied to protein pastes (fish protein concentrate and standard functional additives). After cooking, texture and color were analyzed either directly or after 24 h at 4 °C on gels adjusted to 25 °C. No-set gels were harder, gummier and chewier (P cooking. Gel-setting conditions had a greater (P cooking stored gels in texture and color, depending on the pre-cooking gelation strategy. Pre-cooking gelation conditions will affect final protein gel texture and color, with gel stability benefiting from a gel-setting period. However, post-cooking storage may have a greater impact on final gels, with textural attributes becoming more consistent between all samples. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Healthy living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... living URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002393.htm Healthy living To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Good health habits can allow you to avoid illness and improve your quality of life. The following steps will help you ...

  2. Domestic cooking and food skills: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Laura; Caraher, Martin; Raats, Monique; Lavelle, Fiona; Hollywood, Lynsey; McDowell, Dawn; Spence, Michelle; McCloat, Amanda; Mooney, Elaine; Dean, Moira

    2017-07-24

    Domestic cooking skills (CS) and food skills (FS) encompass multiple components, yet there is a lack of consensus on their constituent parts, inter-relatedness, or measurement, leading to limited empirical support for their role in influencing dietary quality. This review assessed the measurement of CS and FS in adults (>16 years); critically examining study designs, psychometric properties of measures, theoretical basis, and associations of CS/FS with diet. Electronic databases (PsychInfo), published reports, and systematic reviews on cooking and home food preparation interventions provided 834 articles of which 26 met the inclusion criteria. Multiple CS/FS measures were identified across three study designs-qualitative, cross-sectional, and dietary interventions-conducted from 1998 to 2013. Most measures were not theory-based, limited psychometric data were available, with little consistency of items or scales used for CS/FS measurements. Some positive associations between CS/FS and fruit and vegetables intake were reported, though lasting dietary changes were uncommon. The role of psycho-social (e.g., gender, attitudes) and external factors (e.g., food availability) on CS/FS is discussed. A conceptual framework of CS/FS components is presented for future measurement facilitation, which highlights the role for CS/FS on food-related behavior and dietary quality. This will aid future dietary intervention design.

  3. Kraft cooking of gamma irradiated wood, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Masamitsu; Meshitsuka, Gyosuke; Ishizu, Atsushi; Nakano, Junzo

    1981-01-01

    Pre-irradiation of wood in alkaline aqueous ethanol increases kraft pulp yield by up to 1.2%, as already reported. In order to clarify the mechanism of the pulp yield gain, the behaviors of lignin and carbohydrates during pre-irradiation and cooking were investigated. The results are summarized as follows: 1) γ-Irradiation of guaiacylethane in alkaline aqueous ethanol produced 5-(1-hydroxyethyl)-guaicylethane, which is formed by radical coupling between α-hydroxyethyl radical from ethanol and guaiacylethane radical having an unpaired electron at C-5. 5,5'-Dehydrodiguaiacylethane, which may be a predominant product produced by γ-irradiation in the absence of ethanol, was also detected. 2) The yield of vanillin obtained by nitrobenzene oxidation of MWL decreased with an increase of γ-ray dosage. The presence of ethanol during γ-irradiation lessened the extent of this decrease and also the degradation of cellobiose. 3) Gel filtration of the products obtained by γ-irradiation of MWL and cellobiose in the presence of 14 C-ethanol showed the possible combination between ethanol and MWL or cellobiose. 4) Molecular weight distributions of kraft lignin obtained from pre-irradiated beech chips were compared with those obtained from unirradiated chips. This result shows that γ-irradiation in the presence of ethanol decreases the ability of lignin to condense during kraft cooking. (author)

  4. Validation of novel recipes for double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieg-Boerstra, B. J.; Herpertz, I.; Pasker, L.; van der Heide, S.; Kukler, J.; Jansink, C.; Vaessen, W.; Beusekamp, B. J.; Dubois, A. E. J.

    2011-01-01

    In double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs), the use of challenge materials in which blinding is validated is a prerequisite for obtaining true blinded conditions during the test procedure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to enlarge the available range of validated recipes for

  5. Recipes for Men: Manufacturing Makeup and the Politics of Production in 1910s China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lean, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    In the first decade of Republican China (1911-49), masculinity was explored in writings on how to manufacture makeup that appeared in women's magazines. Male authors and editors of these writings--some of whom were connoisseurs of technology, some of whom were would-be manufacturers--appropriated the tropes of the domestic and feminine to elevate hands-on work and explore industry and manufacturing as legitimate masculine pursuits. Tapping into time-honored discourses of virtuous productivity in the inner chambers and employing practices of appropriating the woman's voice to promote unorthodox sentiment, these recipes "feminized" production to valorize a new masculine agenda, which included chemistry and manufacturing, for building a new China.

  6. Progress of research in treatment of hyperlipidemia by monomer or compound recipe of Chinese herbal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiao-bing; Wo, Xing-de; Fan, Chun-lei

    2008-03-01

    Hyperlipidemia (HLP) is the No.1 risk factor for patients with atherosclerosis (AS) and is directly related to the occurrence of coronary artery disease (CAD) and cerebrovascular disease. Therefore, prevention and treatment of AS is of great importance and of practical significance in controlling the incidence and mortality of CAD. With its peculiar syndrome-dependent therapy, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has accumulated abundant practical experiences in this field and good clinical effects have been achieved. Chinese herbal medicine, with its particularly unique advantages and high potentials yet to be tapped, displays its huge strength in HLP prevention and treatment. The progress of studies concerning prevention and treatment of HLP by Chinese herbal medicines, in the form of monomers or compound recipes, is reviewed in this paper.

  7. Identifying X-consumers using causal recipes: "whales" and "jumbo shrimps" casino gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodside, Arch G; Zhang, Mann

    2012-03-01

    X-consumers are the extremely frequent (top 2-3%) users who typically consume 25% of a product category. This article shows how to use fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to provide "causal recipes" sufficient for profiling X-consumers accurately. The study extends Dik Twedt's "heavy-half" product users for building theory and strategies to nurture or control X-behavior. The study here applies QCA to offer configurations that are sufficient in identifying "whales" and "jumbo shrimps" among X-casino gamblers. The findings support the principle that not all X-consumers are alike. The theory and method are applicable for identifying the degree of consistency and coverage of alternative X-consumers among users of all product-service category and brands.

  8. RESEARCHES REGARDING THE OPTIMIZING RECIPES OF NUTRIENT MEDIUM AT MIMOSA PUDICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela Rusea

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its sensitive leaves, as well as special shape and color of flowers, Mimosa pudica always has been a major horticultural curiosity, both in the tropics and cultivated in greenhouses, in temperate zones. The experimental research was carried out to develop technological links in culture of mimosa by optimizing nutrient medium recipes. For this it was established the influence of the substrate type upon growing and development of Mimosa pudica. To achieve experiences were carried out 5 variants of different types of nutrient mixture in 10 repetitions. Thus, the performed researches have shown a considerable growth rate of 42 cm high, in case of V1 variant, due to the use of culture substrate with high content of nutrient composition having garden soil and Biolan peat. The lowest values were recorded in case of V5 variant, containing medium composed by forest soil, growth rate being of 35 cm.

  9. Recipes for Citizenship: Women, Cookbooks, and Citizenship in the Kitchen, 1941-1945

    OpenAIRE

    Staub, Kimberly Ann

    2012-01-01

    This thesis argues that cookbooks and cooking literature prescribed domesticity, specifically linked to the kitchen, as an obligation for American women in World War II. Building on the work of culinary historians and gender scholars, I argue that the government enlisted women as â kitchen citizens.â In contrast to the obligations of male military service, government propaganda, commercially-published cookbooks, community cookbooks, and agriculture extension pamphlets used understandings o...

  10. Clinical efficacy and safety of Gubitong Recipe () in treating osteoarthritis of knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qing-wen; Xu, Yuan; Jin, Di-er; Yan, Xiao-ping

    2009-12-01

    To observe the therapeutic efficacy and safety of Gubitong Recipe (, GBT) in treating osteoarthritis (OA) of knee joint. Ninety patients with knee osteoarthritis were equally assigned, according to a randomizing digital table, to the treatment group and the control group. The treatment group was treated with GBT Decoction one dose every day and the control group with glucosamine sulfate 500 mg thrice a day, respectively, for eight successive weeks. Besides, diclofenac sodium could be given as supplementary dugs with the dosage used recorded if necessary. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, an index reflecting the degree of joint pain, stiffness, and dysfunction) in patients was assessed before and after treatment, and the patients' symptoms were evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS) as well. Moreover, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), blood C-reactive protein (CRP), blood and urinary routine tests, liver and kidney function examination, and the adverse reaction that occurred during the treatment period were observed. WOMAC index and integral VAS value were lowered in both groups after treatment, showing significant statistical difference as compared with before treatment (P<0.05), but the decrement of WOMAC index in the treatment group was more significant than that in the control group (P<0.05). ESR and CRP levels remained unchanged in all patients, and the proportion and mean dosage of diclofenac sodium used were similar in the two groups. No evident adverse reaction occurred during the treatment period. GBT is an effective and safe recipe for the treatment of osteoarthritis of knee joint, which could alleviate the joint pain, stiffness, and dysfunction.

  11. The Factors Influencing on Consumption of Palm Cooking Oil in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Teti, Ermy; Hutabarat, Sakti; Nofionna, Asriati

    2011-01-01

    Cooking oil is one of the most sensitive basic needs in Indonesia. The aims of the researchare to analyze factors influencing consumption of cooking oil, the cooking oil price, and theCrude Palm Oil price in Indonesia. Using simultaneous equation model, the study show thatpalm cooking oil consumption is significantly affected by domestic palm cooking oil priceand number of population. Whilst palm cooking oil price is significantly influenced by thecooking palm oil production and the domestic ...

  12. The Factors Influencing on Consumption of Palm Cooking Oil in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Teti, Ermy; Hutabarat, Sakti; Nofionna, Asriati

    2009-01-01

    Cooking oil is one of the most sensitive basic needs in Indonesia. The aims of the researchare to analyze factors influencing consumption of cooking oil, the cooking oil price, and theCrude Palm Oil price in Indonesia. Using simultaneous equation model, the study show thatpalm cooking oil consumption is significantly affected by domestic palm cooking oil priceand number of population. Whilst palm cooking oil price is significantly influenced by thecooking palm oil production and the domestic ...

  13. Cook It Up! A community-based cooking program for at-risk youth: overview of a food literacy intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Heather MC

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, there are limited occasions for youth, and especially at-risk youth, to participate in cooking programs. The paucity of these programs creates an opportunity for youth-focused cooking programs to be developed, implemented, and evaluated with the goal of providing invaluable life skills and food literacy to this potentially vulnerable group. Thus, an 18-month community-based cooking program for at-risk youth was planned and implemented to improve the development and progression of cooking skills and food literacy. Findings This paper provides an overview of the rationale for and implementation of a cooking skills intervention for at-risk youth. The manuscript provides information about the process of planning and implementing the intervention as well as the evaluation plan. Results of the intervention will be presented elsewhere. Objectives of the intervention included the provision of applied food literacy and cooking skills education taught by local chefs and a Registered Dietitian, and augmented with fieldtrips to community farms to foster an appreciation and understanding of food, from 'gate to plate'. Eight at-risk youth (five girls and three boys, mean age = 14.6 completed the intervention as of November 2010. Pre-test cooking skills assessments were completed for all participants and post-test cooking skills assessments were completed for five of eight participants. Post intervention, five of eight participants completed in-depth interviews about their experience. Discussion The Cook It Up! program can provide an effective template for other agencies and researchers to utilize for enhancing existing programs or to create new applied cooking programs for relevant vulnerable populations. There is also a continued need for applied research in this area to reverse the erosion of cooking skills in Canadian society.

  14. The replacement value of groundnut cake with cooked Bambara ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventy five day-old Anak 2000 broiler chicks were randomly allotted to five dietary treatments 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 in which groundnut cake (GNC) was replaced by cooked bambara groundnut meal (CBGM) at 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% levels of inclusion for both starter and finisher phases. Replacement levels of cooked bambara ...

  15. Determination of the optimum dietary levels of cracked and cooked ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 35-day feeding trial was conducted to determine the optimal dietary level(s) of cracked and cooked (CAC) jackbean meal for finisher broilers. Five diets were formulated such that they contained cracked and cooked jackbean meal al 0%, 15%, 20%, 25% and 30% levels respectively. Each diet was fed to group of 45 ...

  16. Assessment of nutritional quality of cooked Swazi leafy vegetables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brassica oleracea and Spinacia oleracea were also analysed and compared with other vegetables. Sampled vegetables were divided into two categories. All vegetables in category one were cooked without any additives. In category two Hibiscus escolentus and Corchorius olitorus were cooked with bicarbonate of soda ...

  17. A Touching and Contagious Captain Cook: Thinking History through Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Muecke

    2011-04-01

    What, then, is Cook when he is displaced from ‘western’ history and spread around cultures like a virus? How precarious or robust, then, are the historical certainties associated with Cook-monumentalised Kurnell and its place in time as ‘the birthplace of modern Australia’?

  18. Cook & Chill - Rapid Chilling of Food 'in situ'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    for a given product and process and to compare different cooling fluids and methods. Chilling of hot products in professional cooking kettles immediately after cooking is achieved best by using Binary Ice. The paper gives an equation, which describes the cooling velocity for such kettles and other products...

  19. Nutrients and antinutrients composition of raw, cooked and sun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrients and antinutrients composition of raw, cooked and sun-dried sweet potato leaves. ... African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development ... This study aimed to determine nutrient (iron, calcium, vitamin A and ascorbic acid) and anti-nutrient (oxalates and polyphenols) contents in raw, cooked and dried ...

  20. Impact of Time Expenditure on Household Preferences for Cooking Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Karabee; Hiloidhari, Moonmoon; Baruah, Deben C; Nonhebel, Sanderine

    2018-01-01

    Access to energy for cooking is one of the major challenges that rural India faces. Most of the rural households of North-Eastern India rely heavily upon fuelwood and traditional open-fire cookstoves for cooking activities. And everyday collection of fuelwood is time-consuming. Hence, women often

  1. Soft condensed matter approach to cooking of meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    We have viewed cooking meat from the perspective of soft condensed physics and posed that the moisture transport during cooking can be described by Flory-Rehner theory of swelling/shrinking polymer gels. This theory contains the essential physics to describe the transport of liquid moisture due to

  2. Chimpanzee Food Preferences, Associative Learning, and the Origins of Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Michael J.; Hopper, Lydia M.; de Waal, Frans B.M.; Sayers, Ken; Brosnan, Sarah F.

    2015-01-01

    A recent report suggested that chimpanzees demonstrate the cognitive capacities necessary to understand cooking (Warneken & Rosati, 2015). We offer alternate explanations and mechanisms that could account for the behavioral responses of those chimpanzees without invoking the understanding of cooking as a process. We discuss broader issues surrounding the use of chimpanzees in modeling hominid behavior and understanding aspects of human evolution. PMID:26659967

  3. Gas cooking, kitchen ventilation, and exposure to combustion products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willers, SM; Brunekreef, B; Oldenwening, M; Smit, HA; Kerkhof, M; De Vries, H

    We evaluated a questionnaire-based system for classifying homes into groups with distinctly different chances of accumulating combustion products from cooking appliances. The system was based on questions about type of cooking appliance, type and use of ventilation provisions, and kitchen size.

  4. Psychosocial Benefits of Cooking Interventions: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Nicole; Touchton-Leonard, Katherine; Ross, Alyson

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Cooking interventions are used in therapeutic and rehabilitative settings; however, little is known about the influence of these interventions on psychosocial outcomes. This systematic review examines the research evidence regarding the influence of cooking interventions on psychosocial outcomes. Methods: A systematic review of the…

  5. The effect of cooking on the phytochemical content of vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palermo, M.; Pellegrini, N.; Fogliano, V.

    2014-01-01

    Cooking induces many chemical and physical modifications in foods; among these the phytochemical content can change. Many authors have studied variations in vegetable nutrients after cooking, and great variability in the data has been reported. In this review more than 100 articles from indexed

  6. 7 CFR 58.728 - Cooking the batch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooking the batch. 58.728 Section 58.728 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.728 Cooking the batch. Each batch of cheese within the cooker, including the optional...

  7. Effects of different traditional cooking methods on nutrients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this research was to determine the effect of cooking using two different methods of preparing okra soup in Ondo state on nutrient, mineral content including zinc bioavailability of okra, Abelmoschus esculentus. The okra fruits were grated and divided into four lots; two lots were cooked with other ingredients of ...

  8. Development and Performance Evaluation of Charcoal-Fired Cooking Stoves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndirika, V. I. O.

    2002-01-01

    Three different sizes of cooking stoves which utilizes charcoal as source of fuel with fuel capacities 15.7 kg, 10.6 kg and 3.5 kg for the large, medium and small stoves respectively were designed and fabricated for domestic cooking of food by the rural communities. The stoves were evaluated for performance in terms of fuel efficiency, fuel consumption rate, cooking efficiency and boiling time during testing operation with water. From the result it was revealed that the rate of fuel consumption for the large, medium and small cooking stove were 7.2 kg/h, 5.9 kg/h and 2.3 kg/h respectively, and their fuel efficiencies were 88%, 86% and 82% respectively. Also the cooking efficiencies of these stoves were 94%, 83% and 72% respectively. A comparative evaluation of the cooking efficiencies, fuel efficiencies, fuel consumption rate and cooking time between the three types of stoves and the traditional three stone open fire system, reveals that the cooking efficiencies and fuel efficiencies obtained were greater than the values obtained with the traditional three stone open fire system. But the values of the fuel consumption rate and boiling time obtained for the three stoves were lower than the values obtained with the traditional system. And the difference between their means was statistically significant at 5 % level of significance

  9. Chimpanzee Food Preferences, Associative Learning, and the Origins of Cooking

    OpenAIRE

    Beran, Michael J.; Hopper, Lydia M.; de Waal, Frans B.M.; Sayers, Ken; Brosnan, Sarah F.

    2016-01-01

    A recent report suggested that chimpanzees demonstrate the cognitive capacities necessary to understand cooking (Warneken & Rosati, 2015). We offer alternate explanations and mechanisms that could account for the behavioral responses of those chimpanzees without invoking the understanding of cooking as a process. We discuss broader issues surrounding the use of chimpanzees in modeling hominid behavior and understanding aspects of human evolution.

  10. Chimpanzee food preferences, associative learning, and the origins of cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Michael J; Hopper, Lydia M; de Waal, Frans B M; Sayers, Ken; Brosnan, Sarah F

    2016-06-01

    A recent report suggested that chimpanzees demonstrate the cognitive capacities necessary to understand cooking (Warneken & Rosati, 2015). We offer alternate explanations and mechanisms that could account for the behavioral responses of those chimpanzees, without invoking the understanding of cooking as a process. We discuss broader issues surrounding the use of chimpanzees in modeling hominid behavior and understanding aspects of human evolution.

  11. Applying intercultural markers obtained from cooking in the design process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, M.; Tomico Plasencia, O.; Kint, J.M.L.; Zampollo, F.; Smith, C.

    2012-01-01

    In post-modern society industrial design has lost many of its cultural values as products are directed to a global market and everybody can understand and use them in the same way. In contrast to the globalization of design, cooking is an activity that is very much embedded in culture. Cooking

  12. Characterization of volatile organic compounds from different cooking emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shuiyuan; Wang, Gang; Lang, Jianlei; Wen, Wei; Wang, Xiaoqi; Yao, Sen

    2016-11-01

    Cooking fume is regarded as one of the main sources of urban atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its chemical characteristics would be different among various cooking styles. In this study, VOCs emitted from four different Chinese cooking styles were collected. VOCs concentrations and emission characteristics were analyzed. The results demonstrated that Barbecue gave the highest VOCs concentrations (3494 ± 1042 μg/m3), followed by Hunan cuisine (494.3 ± 288.8 μg/m3), Home cooking (487.2 ± 139.5 μg/m3), and Shandong cuisine (257.5 ± 98.0 μg/m3). The volume of air drawn through the collection hood over the stove would have a large impact on VOCs concentration in the exhaust. Therefore, VOCs emission rates (ER) and emission factors (EF) were also estimated. Home cooking had the highest ER levels (12.2 kg/a) and Barbecue had the highest EF levels (0.041 g/kg). The abundance of alkanes was higher in Home cooking, Shandong cuisine and Hunan cuisine with the value of 59.4%-63.8%, while Barbecue was mainly composed of alkanes (34.7%) and alkenes (39.9%). The sensitivity species of Home cooking and Hunan cuisine were alkanes, and that of Shandong cuisine and Barbecue were alkenes. The degree of stench pollution from cooking fume was lighter.

  13. Evaluation of texture differences among varieties of cooked quinoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texture is one of the most significant factors for consumers’ experience of foods. Texture difference of cooked quinoa among thirteen different varieties was studied. Correlations between the texture and seed composition, seed characteristics, cooking qualities, flour pasting properties and flour th...

  14. assessment of household energy utilized for cooking in ikeja, lagos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EYERE

    ... of employment affects the choice of fuel used for cooking and the type preferred. ... In India, use of biomass. Nigerian Journal of ... of poverty in Nigeria which has favoured the choice of firewood energy ... The analytical tools employed for the study were descriptive ... cooking energy and the value of men or women's time.

  15. Kids Cook! Fabulous Food for the Whole Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Sarah; Williamson, Zachary

    This step-by-step guide for children provides a collection of over 150 recipes for breakfasts, lunches, salads, dinners, snacks, and desserts, with an emphasis on safety and creativity. The first chapter gives information concerning kitchen safety, utensils, term definitions, measuring equivalents, cleanup tips and other useful instructions. The…

  16. Malignant pleural mesothelioma in bakers and pastry cooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, V; Calisti, R; Carnovale-Scalzo, C; Nardi, F

    2001-10-01

    The occurrence of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) among bakers and pastry cooks has never been documented. We detected eight cases of MPM in bakers, pastry cooks, and biscuit cooks engaged in making, baking/cooking, and selling pastry/bread in two hospital-based series (Rome and Orbassano/Turin, Italy; period 1990-1997; 222 cases). Field-investigations revealed asbestos-containing material (ACM) in ovens for baking bread, that were manufactured prior to the 1980s. It is suggested that there is a possible new association of the risk of having worked as a baker or pastry cook and MPM. Presumptive source of exposure to asbestos was the use of asbestos-insulated ovens. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Energy conservation options for cooking with biomass in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Sieverts; Næraa, Rikke; Karlsson, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    Cooking is the main energy consuming activity in Ghana. This is mainly due to a generally low material standard of living, but also because the cooking process itself is energy inefficient. The fuel for cooking in Ghana is mainly biomass either in the form of wood, agricultural residues or charcoal....... An energy chain for the cooking process is established and the possible conservation options are surveyed in kitchen performance tests in Abodom in the tropical zone of Ghana. The energy consumption for the food preparation has been measured and energy saving options have been determined for some parts...... point has been reached. Most cooks tend to continue using a high heat supply even though it is not necessary. This process is often carried out without lid on the pot even though the use of lid will reduce the energy loss considerably. It is also concluded that the average fuelwood consumption in Abodom...

  18. Physicochemical properties of foal meat as affected by cooking methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, José M; Cittadini, Aurora; Munekata, Paulo E; Domínguez, Rubén

    2015-10-01

    The present study deals with the effect of four different cooking techniques (roasting, grilling, microwave baking and frying with olive oil) on physicochemical parameters (cooking loss, WHC, texture and colour) and lipid oxidation (by TBARS measurement) of foal meat. Thermal treatments induced water loss (Pcooked in the grill (25.8%) and higher in foal samples cooked in the microwave (39.5%). As it was expected, all the cooking methods increased TBARS index, since high temperature during cooking seems to cause an increase of the lipid oxidation in foal steaks. Statistical analysis displayed that WHC was affected (Pcooking led to an increase of L*-value (lightness) and b*-value (yellowness), while a*-value (redness) markedly decreased in all samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Factors Influencing on Consumption of Palm Cooking Oil in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermy Teti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cooking oil is one of the most sensitive basic needs in Indonesia. The aims of the researchare to analyze factors influencing consumption of cooking oil, the cooking oil price, and theCrude Palm Oil price in Indonesia. Using simultaneous equation model, the study show thatpalm cooking oil consumption is significantly affected by domestic palm cooking oil priceand number of population. Whilst palm cooking oil price is significantly influenced by thecooking palm oil production and the domestic Crude Palm Oil price. Finally, the domesticCrude Palm Oil is significantly affected by international Crude Palm Oil price.Keywords: consumption, cooking oil price, crude palm oil price and cooking oil

  20. Modeling emission rates and exposures from outdoor cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Rufus; Princevac, Marko; Weltman, Robert; Ghasemian, Masoud; Arora, Narendra K.; Bond, Tami

    2017-09-01

    Approximately 3 billion individuals rely on solid fuels for cooking globally. For a large portion of these - an estimated 533 million - cooking is outdoors, where emissions from cookstoves pose a health risk to both cooks and other household and village members. Models that estimate emissions rates from stoves in indoor environments that would meet WHO air quality guidelines (AQG), explicitly don't account for outdoor cooking. The objectives of this paper are to link health based exposure guidelines with emissions from outdoor cookstoves, using a Monte Carlo simulation of cooking times from Haryana India coupled with inverse Gaussian dispersion models. Mean emission rates for outdoor cooking that would result in incremental increases in personal exposure equivalent to the WHO AQG during a 24-h period were 126 ± 13 mg/min for cooking while squatting and 99 ± 10 mg/min while standing. Emission rates modeled for outdoor cooking are substantially higher than emission rates for indoor cooking to meet AQG, because the models estimate impact of emissions on personal exposure concentrations rather than microenvironment concentrations, and because the smoke disperses more readily outdoors compared to indoor environments. As a result, many more stoves including the best performing solid-fuel biomass stoves would meet AQG when cooking outdoors, but may also result in substantial localized neighborhood pollution depending on housing density. Inclusion of the neighborhood impact of pollution should be addressed more formally both in guidelines on emissions rates from stoves that would be protective of health, and also in wider health impact evaluation efforts and burden of disease estimates. Emissions guidelines should better represent the different contexts in which stoves are being used, especially because in these contexts the best performing solid fuel stoves have the potential to provide significant benefits.

  1. Environmental payoffs of LPG cooking in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D.; Pachauri, S.; Zerriffi, H.

    2017-11-01

    Over two-thirds of Indians use solid fuels to meet daily cooking energy needs, with associated negative environmental, social, and health impacts. Major national initiatives implemented by the Indian government over the last few decades have included subsidies for cleaner burning fuels like liquid petroleum gas (LPG) and kerosene to encourage a transition to these. However, the extent to which these programs have affected net emissions from the use of these improved fuels has not been adequately studied. Here, we estimate the amount of fuelwood displaced and its net emissions impact due to improved access to LPG for cooking in India between 2001 and 2011 using nationally representative household expenditure surveys and census datasets. We account for a suite of climate-relevant emissions (Kyoto gases and other short-lived climate pollutants) and biomass renewability scenarios (a fully renewable and a conservative non-renewable case). We estimate that the national fuelwood displaced due to increased LPG access between 2001 and 2011 was approximately 7.2 million tons. On aggregate, we estimate a net emissions reduction of 6.73 MtCO2e due to the fuelwood displaced from increased access to LPG, when both Kyoto and non-Kyoto climate-active emissions are accounted for and assuming 0.3 as the fraction of non-renewable biomass (fNRB) harvested. However, if only Kyoto gases are considered, we estimate a smaller net emissions decrease of 0.03 MtCO2e (assuming fully renewable biomass harvesting), or 3.05 MtCO2e (assuming 0.3 as the fNRB). We conclude that the transition to LPG cooking in India reduced pressures on forests and achieved modest climate benefits, though uncertainties regarding the extent of non-renewable biomass harvesting and suite of climate-active emissions included in such an estimation can significantly influence results in any given year and should be considered carefully in any analysis and policy-making.

  2. 9 CFR 381.150 - Requirements for the production of fully cooked poultry products and partially cooked poultry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... fully cooked poultry products and partially cooked poultry breakfast strips. 381.150 Section 381.150... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Entry of Articles Into Official Establishments; Processing...

  3. Temporality in British young women's magazines: food, cooking and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Rosemary J; Russell, Jean M; Barker, Margo E

    2014-10-01

    The present study examines seasonal and temporal patterns in food-related content of two UK magazines for young women focusing on food types, cooking and weight loss. Content analysis of magazines from three time blocks between 1999 and 2011. Desk-based study. Ninety-seven magazines yielding 590 advertisements and 148 articles. Cluster analysis of type of food advertising produced three clusters of magazines, which reflected recognised food behaviours of young women: vegetarianism, convenience eating and weight control. The first cluster of magazines was associated with Christmas and Millennium time periods, with advertising of alcohol, coffee, cheese, vegetarian meat substitutes and weight-loss pills. Recipes were prominent in article content and tended to be for cakes/desserts, luxury meals and party food. The second cluster was associated with summer months and 2010 issues. There was little advertising for conventional foods in cluster 2, but strong representation of diet plans and foods for weight loss. Weight-loss messages in articles focused on short-term aesthetic goals, emphasising speedy weight loss without giving up nice foods or exercising. Cluster 3 magazines were associated with post-New Year and 2005 periods. Food advertising was for everyday foods and convenience products, with fewer weight-loss products than other clusters; conversely, article content had a greater prevalence of weight-loss messages. The cyclical nature of magazine content - indulgence and excess encouraged at Christmas, restraint recommended post-New Year and severe dieting advocated in the summer months - endorses yo-yo dieting behaviour and may not be conducive to public health.

  4. Individuals with severe mental illnesses have improved eating behaviors and cooking skills after attending a 6-week nutrition cooking class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alena; Bezyak, Jill; Testerman, Nora

    2015-09-01

    This study assessed current meal planning/cooking behaviors and dietary intake of individuals with severe mental illnesses and determined differences after a 6-week nutrition education cooking class. Eighteen individuals with severe mental illnesses participated in a 6-week nutrition education cooking class and completed pre- and posttest 24-hr recalls and a postretrospective survey. Paired samples t tests were used. Participants met their calories needs, but they consumed high amounts of sodium and fat and low amounts of fiber. Significant increases in calcium, vitamin D, grains, and fruit occurred from pre- to posttest (p cooking and grocery shopping skills improved. Participants desire nutrition education programming that includes simple messages, hands-on cooking demonstrations, and health-related incentives. More research is needed to determine how nutrition education programs lead to sustained knowledge and behavior change within this specialized population. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Deployment of commercial energy efficiency cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    This research concerned the promotion of energy-efficient wood stoves in commercial and institutional kitchens in Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda through technology transfer and training of local commercial stove producers. The key objective of the project was to introduce proven designs of energy-efficient wood stoves to producers in the target countries and train them in the manufacture and marketing of these stoves. The improved designs save 50% of the fuel used by the traditional stoves - a major saving where 10-15% of the kitchen budget is spent on fuel. They also remove smoke more effectively, protect cooks from heat and burns, and are easier to keep clean. The project went well although results have varied from one country to the other. In conclusion, the technology transfer of commercial stove designs can take place between neighbouring countries by a process of training, study visits, prototype development, market surveys and producer support.(author)

  6. A novel solar hot plate for cooking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rincon Mejia, Eduardo A; Osorio Jaramillo, Fidel A [Facultad de Ingenieria, UAEMex, Toluca, Edo. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    In Mexico and other developing countries, the use of firewood as combustible for cooking has contributed to deforestation and desertification of large zones. This is due to the lack of alternative combustibles for the poor inhabitants of the countryside and remote areas. In this paper, a new solar hot plate, intended for contributing to solve this problem, is presented. It can be used for cooking not only a great variety of prehispanic and traditional meals, like tortillas, fried meat and vegetables, but also hot cakes, bacon, eggs, steaks and fries. The hot plate solar cooker, called Tolocatzin, consists of a horizontal metallic plate, which is heated from both of its top and bottom surfaces by concentrated sun light from multicompound concentrator based on nonimaging optics, and built with nine ordinary plane glass-silvered, and two curved aluminum mirrors, so it can be manufactured easily in a small factory or at home. For an acceptance angle of 15 Celsius degrees, which allows the concentration of sun light without sun-tracking for about one hour, it can reach temperatures up to 240 Celsius degrees in a few minutes. This temperature is high enough for cooking almost all fried or grilled meals. The design was optimized using ray-trace procedures. The operational experience with early prototypes has shown that the Tolocatzin solar hot plate does an excellent cooking job and could really be massively used in sunny countries. [Spanish] En Mexico y otros paises en desarrollo, el uso de la madera como combustible para cocinar ha contribuido a la deforestacion y desertificacion de grandes zonas. Esto es debido a la falta de combustibles alternativos por parte de los habitantes pobres del campo y de areas remotas. En este articulo se presenta una nueva placa solar que tiene el proposito de contribuir a resolver este problema. Puede ser usada para cocinar no solamente una gran variedad de comidas prehispanicas y tradicionales, como tortillas, carne frita y verduras sino

  7. Food type soybean cooking time: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deonisio Destro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is an extensive crop that produces more protein per hectare and, compared to other sources, has the lowest proteincost. This turns soybean into one of the basic foods with the potential to fight malnutrition and hunger in the planet. Even though itrepresents the fourth crop in grain production in the world (261 million tons year-1, most of its production is used as animal fodder.Currently, one of the greatest research challenges is to improve soybean production for human consumption. Cooking time is one theseveral characteristics that need improvement so that soybean can be used more extensively in our everyday diet. The objective of thiswork is to carry out a bibliographic review on the topic, to sensitize researchers in the area of soybean breeding about its importance.

  8. [Denaturation of egg antigens by cooking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroko; Akaboshi, Chie; Sekido, Haruko; Tanaka, Kouki; Tanaka, Kazuko; Shimojo, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Changes in egg protein contents by cooking were measured with an ELISA kit using Tris-HCl buffer in model foods including cake, meatballs, pasta and pudding made with whole egg, egg-white and egg-yolk. The egg protein contents were lowest in the deep-fried model foods of cakes and meatballs. Ovalbumin (OVA) was undetectable (meatballs, suggesting that processing temperature and uniform heat-treatment affect the detection of egg protein. Furthermore, egg protein contents were below 6 µg/g in the pouched meatballs and pasta made with egg-yolk, and OVA and OVM were not detected by Western blotting analysis with human IgE from patients' serum. On the other hand, processed egg proteins were detected with an ELISA kit using a surfactant and reductant in the extract buffer.

  9. Mutagenicity of cooked foods. Kuumennuskaesiteltyjen elintarvikkeiden mutageenisuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikkanen, L. (Valtion teknillinen tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland). Elintarvikelaboratorio)

    1989-09-01

    In this study the mutagenic activity in different kinds of ordinary Finnish foods was determined using mainly the Ames Salmonella bacterial assay. The purpose of this study was also to acquire the technical capability to study cooked food mutagens and to get basic informavtion about the mutagenic activity of foods under different cooking conditions. The samples tested were different kinds of ready-to-eat foods. Products were industrially heat-processed by frying and roasting, sterilization, smoking, deep-frying, spray-drying and UHT-treatment. According to the results, the majority of the fried and roasted food samples containing meat or fish were clearly or strongly mutagenic. Some of the products processed by sterilization and deep-frying were marginally mutagenic. The effect of the frying temperature on the mutagenicity in the Ames test was studied with minced meat. The mutagenic activity of the fried meat clearly correlated with the frying temperature. There were conspicuous differences in mutagenic activity between different fried and roasted products. Charcoal-grilled fish and the surface layers of the grilled meat and chicken were strongly mutagenic. Meat and fish hamburgers were in most cases only slightly mutagenic. The mutagenic activity was stronger in the surface layers of the products than in the inside. Also reheating by frying increased the mutagenicity of meat patties clearly. Differences in mutagenic activity between equivalent products of different manufacturers were evident in many cases. Variation of the mutagenicity was most conspicuous in the grilled products. This variation indicates that the industrial processing of food has a marked effect on the mutagenic activity of the final product, which thus might be reduced by modifying the process. The solvent extraction method used in this study was more effective than the Blue-Cotton method for the isolation of mutagenic compounds.

  10. Spent brewer's yeast extract as an ingredient in cooked hams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancrazio, Gaston; Cunha, Sara C; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Loureiro, Mónica; Meireles, Sónia; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O; Pinho, Olívia

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the effect of the incorporation of 1% spent yeast extract into cooked hams. Physical/chemical/sensorial characteristics and changes during 12 and 90days storage were evaluated on control and treated cooked hams processed for 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 or 3h. Spent yeast extract addition increased hardness, chewiness, ash, protein and free amino acid content. Similar volatile profiles were obtained, although there were some quantitative differences. No advantages were observed for increased cooking time. No significant differences were observed for physical and sensorial parameters of cooked hams with spent yeast extract at 12 and 90days post production, but His, aldehydes and esters increased at the end of storage. This behaviour was similar to that observed for control hams. The higher hardness of cooked ham with 1% yeast extract was due to the stronger gel formed during cooking and was maintained during storage. This additive acts as gel stabilizer for cooked ham production and could potentially improve other processing characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Impact of cooking on the content of fish mercury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremiachikh, V A; Tomilina, I I; Komov, V T

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the levels of mercury in the fish inhabiting the water reservoirs of Russia were studied after cooking it in a variety of ways (boiling for different time periods, roasting, and smoking). To have a general idea of the impact of various procedures for cooking the fish on its mercury amount, the authors measured mercury concentrations in smoked perch and manufactured and homemade canned salt-and fresh-water fishes. The absolute content of mercury in the fish is shown to be unchanged during its cooking and not to depend on the procedure and duration of the latter.

  12. Life cycle impact assessment of biodiesel using the ReCiPe method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss Ferenc E.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the life cycle impact assessment (LCIA results of biodiesel produced from rapeseed oil. The functional unit (FU is defined as 3750 km of distance traveled by a truck fuelled with biodiesel. The reference flow is 1000 kg of biodiesel. The LCIA method used in the study is the ReCiPe method. At midpoint level the ReCiPe method addresses environmental issues within 18 impact categories. Most of these midpoint impact categories are further converted and aggregated into 3 endpoint categories (damage to human health, damage to ecosystem diversity, damage to mineral resource availability. The total impact of biodiesel’s life cycle was estimated at 540 Pt/FU. The damage to ecosystem diversity (1.48E-04 species•year/FU, the damage to human health (7.48E-03 DALY/FU and the damage to mineral resource availability (8.11E+03 US$/FU are responsible for 63%, 27% and 10% of the total negative impact in the life cycle of biodiesel, respectively. The results have revealed that only 4 impact categories are responsible for most of the impacts within the specific endpoint categories. These are impacts associated with global warming (3000 kg CO2 ekv./FU, particulate matter formation (12.4 kg PM ekv./FU, agricultural land occupation (6710 m2a./FU and fossil fuel depletion (21168 MJ/FU. Greenhouse gases emitted in the life cycle of biodiesel (mainly N2O, CO2 are responsibly for 56% of the damage caused to human health and for 16% of the damage caused to ecosystem diversity. Airborne emissions which contribute to particulate matter formation (NOx, NH3, PM, SO2 are responsible for 43% of the damage caused to human health. Agricultural land occupation is responsible for 82% of the damage caused to the ecosystem diversity. Damage to mineral resource availability is almost entirely related to the depletion of fossil energy sources. The production chain of biodiesel and the combustion of biodiesel are responsible for 69% and 31% of the total impact of

  13. Cooking for One or Two: Applying Participatory Action Research to improve community-dwelling older adults' health and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojenta, Catherine; Mingay, Edwina; Gresham, Ellie; Byles, Julie

    2018-04-01

    This paper describes the process of the redevelopment and expansion of Cooking for One or Two, a community-based nutrition education program for older adults. This project took place in a large regional city in NSW Australia from September 2011 to September 2013. Previous Cooking for One or Two participants and Hunter Medical Research Institute Research Register members were recruited for focus groups (n = 37), recipe testing (n = 19) and telephone interviews (n = 55) to aid in the development and expansion of the program. Participant's experiences and preferences informed the development of a supplementary cookbook and add-on education modules. Through a variety of methods, the research team sought ongoing feedback on the content and direction of the program. Content experts also reviewed the health promotion information for appropriateness. Utilising the Participatory Action Research process resulted in an expanded set of materials for Cooking for One or Two that can enable older people to engage in peer-to-peer education and to take care of their nutritional and social health. The process is a valuable example of the success of ongoing collaboration between researchers and program developers with the target population. SO WHAT?: While the research team developed evidence-based content for the expanded program, the key to success was the continued engagement with the target population. This engagement fostered a sense of ownership over the program by participants and has led to continued support by the target population. © 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association.

  14. Cooking with Kids Positively Affects Fourth Graders' Vegetable Preferences and Attitudes and Self-Efficacy for Food and Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cooking with Kids (CWK), an experiential school-based food education program, has demonstrated modest influence on fruit and vegetable preference, food and cooking attitudes (AT), and self-efficacy (SE) among fourth-grade, mostly low-income Hispanic students in a quasiexperimental study with an inconsistent baseline. Effect was notably strong for boys and those without previous cooking experience. The aim of this project was to assess the effect of CWK with a mostly non-Hispanic white sample that assured no previous CWK exposure. Methods: The randomized, controlled assessment of CWK effect on fourth graders was conducted with 257 students in 12 classes in four public schools. CWK included a 1-hour introductory lesson, three 2-hour cooking classes, and three 1-hour fruit and vegetable tasting sessions led by trained food educators during the school day for one semester. Fruit preference, vegetable preference, and cooking AT and SE were assessed with a tested 35-item measure, shown to have test-retest reliability. Univariate analyses considered gender and previous cooking experience. Results: Intervention efficacy was confirmed in this mostly white sample (75%; 79% with previous cooking experience; 54% girls). Increases in vegetable preference, AT, and SE were all significantly greater in CWK students with ηp 2 of 0.03, 0.02, and 0.06, respectively. CWK most strongly improved AT and SE for boys without previous cooking experience. Conclusions: CWK significantly improved fourth-grade students' vegetable preferences, AT, and SE toward food and cooking, which are factors important to healthful eating and obesity prevention. Noncookers, especially boys, benefitted from this intervention. PMID:24320723

  15. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of the Adolescent Motivation to Cook Questionnaire: A Self-Determination Theory instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miketinas, Derek; Cater, Melissa; Bailey, Ariana; Craft, Brittany; Tuuri, Georgianna

    2016-10-01

    Increasing adolescents' motivation and competence to cook may improve diet quality and reduce the risk for obesity and chronic diseases. The objective of this study was to develop an instrument to measure adolescents' intrinsic motivation to prepare healthy foods and the four psychological needs that facilitate motivation identified by the Self Determination Theory (SDT). Five hundred ninety-three high school students (62.7% female) were recruited to complete the survey. Participants indicated to what extent they agreed or disagreed with 25 statements pertaining to intrinsic motivation and perceived competence to cook, and their perceived autonomy support, autonomy, and relatedness to teachers and classmates. Data were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and internal consistency reliability. EFA returned a five-factor structure explaining 65.3% of the variance; and CFA revealed that the best model fit was a five-factor structure (χ2 = 524.97 (265); Comparative Fit Index = 0.93; RMSEA = 0.056; and SRMR = 0.04). The sub-scales showed good internal consistency (Intrinsic Motivation: α = 0.94; Perceived Competence: α = 0.92; Autonomy Support: α = 0.94; Relatedness: α = 0.90; and Autonomy: α = 0.85). These results support the application of the Adolescent Motivation to Cook Questionnaire to measure adolescents' motivation and perceived competence to cook, autonomy support by their instructor, autonomy in the classroom, and relatedness to peers. Further studies are needed to investigate whether this instrument can measure change in cooking intervention programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Association between cooking oil fume exposure and lung cancer among Chinese nonsmoking women: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yingbo Xue, Ying Jiang, Shan Jin, Yong Li Department of Oncology, Guizhou Provincial People’s Hospital, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lung cancer has been the main cause of cancer death around the world. Cigarette smoking has been identified as a risk factor for lung cancer in males. However, the etiological factors in nonsmoking women remain elusive. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the relationship between cooking oil fume exposure and lung cancer among Chinese nonsmoking women. Thirteen articles containing three population-based case–control and ten hospital-based case–control studies were included in this meta-analysis. These studies with a total of 3,596 lung cancer women and 6,082 healthy controls were analyzed by RevMan 5.3. Fixed effects model or random effects model was used to obtain pooled estimates of risk ratio. The risk ratios with a 95% CI were 1.74 (95% CI =1.57–1.94 and 2.11 (95% CI =1.54–2.89, respectively. Cooking oil fume exposure as well as not using a kitchen ventilator when cooking was significantly associated with lung cancer among nonsmoking women (Z=10.07, P<0.00001; Z=4.65, P<0.00001. Cooking oil fume exposure, especially lacking a fume extractor, may increase the risk of lung cancer among Chinese nonsmoking women. Keywords: cooking oil fume exposure, lung cancer, meta-analysis, nonsmoking women 

  17. 46 CFR 25.45-2 - Cooking systems on vessels carrying passengers for hire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooking systems on vessels carrying passengers for hire... REQUIREMENTS Cooking, Heating, and Lighting Systems § 25.45-2 Cooking systems on vessels carrying passengers for hire. (a) No fuel may be used in any cooking system on any vessel carrying passengers for hire...

  18. 46 CFR 130.220 - Design of equipment for cooking and heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design of equipment for cooking and heating. 130.220... Design of equipment for cooking and heating. (a) Doors on each cooking appliance must be provided with heavy-duty hinges and locking-devices to prevent accidental opening in heavy weather. (b) Each cooking...

  19. Practical recipes for the model order reduction, dynamical simulation, and compressive sampling of large-scale open quantum systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sidles, John A.; Garbini, Joseph L.; Harrell, Lee E.; Hero, Alfred O.; Jacky, Jonathan P.; Malcomb, Joseph R.; Norman, Anthony G.; Williamson, Austin M.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents numerical recipes for simulating high-temperature and non-equilibrium quantum spin systems that are continuously measured and controlled. The notion of a spin system is broadly conceived, in order to encompass macroscopic test masses as the limiting case of large-j spins. The simulation technique has three stages: first the deliberate introduction of noise into the simulation, then the conversion of that noise into an equivalent continuous measurement and control process...

  20. Recipe for the environment: Calgary company creates a fast-track to lease reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverty, K.

    2004-01-05

    A novel method is being offered by Newpark Environmental Services as a much simplified recipe for lease site remediation. The new method involves mixing wellbore cuttings with wood waste, providing the pile with good ventilation, allowing it to sit for 24 months, spreading it thinly on the ground, and seeding it to get a lush carpet of green grass. The process is referred to as 'co-composting' ; it is essentially a biodegradation process where micro-organisms, indigenous in the wood waste, do the the bulk of the work. Wood waste used in the process ranges from sawdust to wood chips no more than three inches in size, with a specialized nutrient blend of fertilizers and water added; the micro-organisms do the rest. Since pioneering the process in 1996 Newpark has successfully reclaimed about 500 drilling sites in Alberta and British Columbia, combining an estimated 400,000 cubic metres of wood waste and wellbore cuttings to produce nutrient-rich topsoil, generally in heavily forested areas. There is also the added benefit of using the newly created soil to augment soils on side cuts of hills for seeding, thereby reducing risk of landslides due to erosion. As an indication of the success of this process, the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board plans to include Newpark's co-composting process in its 'Guide 50', the industry's Bible of site remediation, as an acceptable method for disposing of well site wastes.

  1. Cardioprotective Effects of HuoxueAnshen Recipe against Myocardial Injuries Induced by Sleep Deprivation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Traditional Chinese Medicine is extensively used in China and HuoxueAnshen Recipe (HAR was formulated according to its method in treating CHD accompanied with insomnia in clinic. However, there are few studies related to the effect of HAR on myocardial injury and sleep disorders. Purpose. To investigate the effects of HAR on sleep deprivation- (SD- induced myocardial I/R injury. Methods. Male Wistar rats receiving a daily gavage of HAR or vehicle were exposed to SD intervention while control rats had normal sleep. Then all rats were exposed to myocardial I/R. Hormone, vascular endothelial, and inflammatory related factors were detected before and after I/R, while cardiac injury, cardiac function, myocardial infarct size, and apoptosis were detected after I/R. Results. Levels of neuropeptide Y, vascular endothelial and inflammatory related factors were significantly increased while melatonin was decreased in vehicle-treated SD rats but not in HAR-treated SD rats after SD. In addition, cardiac injury, cardiac dysfunction, myocardial infarct size, and myocardial apoptosis were deteriorated in vehicle-treated SD rats but were ameliorated in HAR-treated SD rats after I/R. Conclusion. HAR not only improved SD-induced hormone disorders, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction, but also alleviated I/R injury, which supports protective usage in CHD and psychocardiology.

  2. Writing a Recipe for Teaching Sustainable Food Systems: Lessons from Three University Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy Anderson Brekken

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The sustainability of the food system is at the forefront of academic and policy discussions as we face the challenge of providing food security to a growing population amidst environmental uncertainty and depletion, social disruptions, and structural economic shocks and stresses. Crafting a sustainable and resilient food system requires us to go beyond disciplinary boundaries and broaden critical and creative thinking skills. Recent literature calls for examples of pedagogical transformations from food systems courses to identify successful practices and potential challenges. We offer a recipe for what to teach by framing systems thinking concepts, then discuss how to teach it with five learning activities: deductive case studies, experiential learning, reflective narrative learning, system dynamics simulations and scenarios, and inductive/open-ended case studies, implemented with collaborative group learning, inter/trans-disciplinarity, and instructor-modeled co-learning. Each learning activity is animated with concrete examples from our courses at Oregon State University, University of Minnesota, and University of Vermont, USA. We discuss opportunities and challenges implementing these strategies in light of student, instructor, and institutional expectations and constraints. But the challenge is worth the effort, because food system transformation requires active learners and systemic thinkers as engaged citizens, food system advocates, entrepreneurs, and policy makers.

  3. [Clinical study on effect of qingxuan tiaoya recipe in treating menopausal women with hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li-Li; Ma, Xiao-Chang; Chen, Ke-Ji

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the effect and mechanism of Qingxuan Tiaoya Recipe (QXTYR) on depressing blood pressure in menopausal women with hypertension. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups, the 44 patients in the test group were administered with perindopril tablet and QXTYR granule, while the 43 in the control group were administered with the same program, but a simulator of QXTYR was used to replace for the real one. The treatment course for them all was 2 months. Before and after treatment, the ambulatory blood pressure (ABMP), heart rate, related clinical symptoms, blood lipids, serum estradiol (E2), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ( Hs-CRP), homocysteine (HCY) and angiotensin II (Ang II) were measured. The treatment in the test group showed an effect better than that in the control group in terms of reducing blood pressure variability and night-time blood pressure decrease rate (P treatment in the test group (Pmenopausal women with hypertension, it can reduce blood pressure variability, improve the symptoms of the menopause syndrome, blood lipid metabolism and plasma levels of Hs-CRP, E2, and Ang II in patients, suggesting that its mechanism may be related to the functional regulation of sympathetic-vagus nerve and neuro-endocrine-immune system, and also the inhibition on the circulatory renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activity.

  4. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation by Traditional Thai Herbal Recipes Used for Wound Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chusri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of biofilm is a key mechanism involved in Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence during device-associated infections. We aimed to investigate antibiofilm formation and mature biofilm eradication ability of ethanol and water extracts of Thai traditional herbal recipes including THR-SK004, THR-SK010, and THR-SK011 against S. epidermidis. A biofilm forming reference strain, S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 was employed as a model for searching anti-biofilm agents by MTT reduction assay. The results revealed that the ethanol extract of THR-SK004 (THR-SK004E could inhibit the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Furthermore, treatments with the extract efficiently inhibit the biofilm formation of the pathogen on glass surfaces determined by scanning electron microscopy and crystal violet staining. In addition, THR-SK010 ethanol extract (THR-SK010E; 0.63–5 μg/mL could decrease 30 to 40% of the biofilm development. Almost 90% of a 7-day-old staphylococcal biofilm was destroyed after treatment with THR-SK004E (250 and 500 μg/mL and THR-SK010E (10 and 20 μg/mL for 24 h. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrated THR-SK004E could prevent the staphylococcal biofilm development, whereas both THR-SK004E and THR-SK010E possessed remarkable eradication ability on the mature staphylococcal biofilm.

  5. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation by Traditional Thai Herbal Recipes Used for Wound Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusri, S; Sompetch, K; Mukdee, S; Jansrisewangwong, S; Srichai, T; Maneenoon, K; Limsuwan, S; Voravuthikunchai, S P

    2012-01-01

    Development of biofilm is a key mechanism involved in Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence during device-associated infections. We aimed to investigate antibiofilm formation and mature biofilm eradication ability of ethanol and water extracts of Thai traditional herbal recipes including THR-SK004, THR-SK010, and THR-SK011 against S. epidermidis. A biofilm forming reference strain, S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 was employed as a model for searching anti-biofilm agents by MTT reduction assay. The results revealed that the ethanol extract of THR-SK004 (THR-SK004E) could inhibit the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Furthermore, treatments with the extract efficiently inhibit the biofilm formation of the pathogen on glass surfaces determined by scanning electron microscopy and crystal violet staining. In addition, THR-SK010 ethanol extract (THR-SK010E; 0.63-5 μg/mL) could decrease 30 to 40% of the biofilm development. Almost 90% of a 7-day-old staphylococcal biofilm was destroyed after treatment with THR-SK004E (250 and 500 μg/mL) and THR-SK010E (10 and 20 μg/mL) for 24 h. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrated THR-SK004E could prevent the staphylococcal biofilm development, whereas both THR-SK004E and THR-SK010E possessed remarkable eradication ability on the mature staphylococcal biofilm.

  6. Determination of optimum oven cooking procedures for lean beef products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodas-González, Argenis; Larsen, Ivy L; Uttaro, Bethany; Juárez, Manuel; Parslow, Joyce; Aalhus, Jennifer L

    2015-11-01

    In order to determine optimum oven cooking procedures for lean beef, the effects of searing at 232 or 260°C for 0, 10, 20 or 30 min, and roasting at 160 or 135°C on semimembranosus (SM) and longissimus lumborum (LL) muscles were evaluated. In addition, the optimum determined cooking method (oven-seared for 10 min at 232°C and roasted at 135°C) was applied to SM roasts varying in weight from 0.5 to 2.5 kg. Mainly, SM muscles seared for 0 or 10 min at 232°C followed by roast at 135°C had lower cooking loss, higher external browning color, more uniform internal color, and were more tender and flavorful (P searing is the recommended oven cooking procedure; with best response from muscle roast weight ≥1 kg.

  7. Improvement of cassava cooking quality through mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asare, E.; Safo-Kantanka, O.

    1997-01-01

    Many high-yielding cassava varieties do not have the desired cooking quality. The objective of this project was to induce mutations to produce varieties with improved cooking quality while maintaining the disease-resistance and high-yielding characteristics. A cassava mutant (ISU-W) was obtained after irradiation of a variety from IITA with gamma rays and selection. Cuttings of the mutant were grown for 12 months in a field trial and investigated for tuber yield and cooking quality. Pest and disease incidence were monitored during the entire growth period. The results showed that the mutant retained the high-yield and disease resistant characters of the parent, and had improved cooking quality based on increased smoothness, mealiness and elasticity of the flour. (author). 7 refs, 5 tabs

  8. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for alcids, shorebirds, waterfowl, diving birds, pelagic birds, gulls and terns in Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula,...

  9. Virginia Tech's Cook Counseling Center receives international counseling accreditation

    OpenAIRE

    DeLauder, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Thomas E. Cook Counseling Center has been accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc., an organization of United States, Canadian, and Australian counseling agencies based in Alexandria, Va.

  10. [Cooking quality of pastas supplemented with rice bran].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangronis, E; Cafiero, J; Mosqueda, M

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality during and after cooking of four pastas spaghetti type. Rice bran was used as ingredient in order to increase protein and dietetic fiber content. In two of the four formulation, semolina durum was supplemented with 10 and 20% rice bran. In the other two formulation granular flour was supplemented with 10 and 20% rice bran. Time cooking, water absorbtion, solid loss, color and hardness, (instrumental and sensory), Protein Efficiency Ratio (PER) and Apparent Digestibility in vivo were determined. Acceptability was evaluated by a 35-member consumer panel. Rice bran improved solid loss during cooking and increased cooking time, PERs were not affected significantly but Apparent Digestibility decreased when rice bran was increased. Sensory quality was affected because rice bran made pastas hard and dark but they were comparable to high fiber pasta existing in market.

  11. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: VOLCANOS (Volcano Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the locations of volcanos in Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. Vector points in the data set represent the location of the volcanos....

  12. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: INDEX (Index Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing the boundaries used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Cook Inlet and Kenai...

  13. physico-chemical and grain cooking characteristics of selected rice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    Sokoine University of Agriculture, Department of Food Science and Technology,. P.O. Box 3006 ... improve the cooking quality parameters, improve production of the local rice cultivars and increase the ... Sample collection and preparation.

  14. [Risk assessment for food preparation, cooking and service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottica, Danilo; Grignani, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The restaurant and food preparation, cooking and distribution sector includes hotels, restaurants, catering, fast food, ecc. The restaurant and food preparation, cooking and distribution sector form a significant part of the Italian economy; they provide employment for a large number of people, both direct employees as well as part-time and contract staff. In this sector there are many hazards that can lead to a broad range of injuries and/or diseases to the workers. For the safety these hazards principally are slick floors, open flames, high temperature cooking surfaces, steam, knives and other cutting instruments and machineries. For the health: cleaning and disinfecting chemicals substances, cooking fumes and vapors, biological agents, heavy loads handling, thermal comfort, ecc. The paper presents an overview of the hazards in the sector and then make a focus on chemical risks identification and assessment to evaluate the workers' exposure (by skin adsorption and inhalation).

  15. Association studies of dormancy and cooking quality traits in direct ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genome-wide scanning, detected a total of seven significant marker-trait associations. (P < 0.01) ... Assam rice; α-amylase; dormancy; cooking quality; association mapping. ...... resource management, association mapping and crop breed- ing.

  16. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for alcids, shorebirds, waterfowl, diving birds, pelagic birds, gulls and terns in Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula,...

  17. Improvement of cassava cooking quality through mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asare, E; Safo-Kantanka, O [Department of Crop Science, Univ. of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana)

    1997-07-01

    Many high-yielding cassava varieties do not have the desired cooking quality. The objective of this project was to induce mutations to produce varieties with improved cooking quality while maintaining the disease-resistance and high-yielding characteristics. A cassava mutant (ISU-W) was obtained after irradiation of a variety from IITA with gamma rays and selection. Cuttings of the mutant were grown for 12 months in a field trial and investigated for tuber yield and cooking quality. Pest and disease incidence were monitored during the entire growth period. The results showed that the mutant retained the high-yield and disease resistant characters of the parent, and had improved cooking quality based on increased smoothness, mealiness and elasticity of the flour. (author). 7 refs, 5 tabs.

  18. AFSC/REFM: Cook Inlet Beluga Whale Economic Survey 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project was to collect data to understand the publics preferences for protecting the Cook Inlet beluga whale (CIBW), a distinct population...

  19. Stability of vitamin D in foodstuffs during cooking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jette; Knuthsen, Pia

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the retention of vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in eggs, vitamin D3 in margarine, and vitamin D3 and vitamin D2 in bread. Our set-up illustrated the cooking methods usually performed in households i.e. boiling, frying in pan and oven, and baking. All experiments were performed...... three times independently of one another. The retention of vitamin D compounds in eggs and margarine during heat treatment in an oven for 40min at normal cooking temperature showed retention at 39–45%, while frying resulted in retention at 82–84%. Boiled eggs were found to have a similar level...... of vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in eggs was shown. Cooking may cause detrimental loss of vitamin D, but it depends on the actual foodstuffs and the heating process. Further research is needed to optimise cooking procedures to enhance retention of vitamin D. Vitamin D retention should be taken...

  20. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for razor clams in Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of...