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Sample records for healthcare team communication

  1. An interdisciplinary team communication framework and its application to healthcare 'e-teams' systems design

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background There are few studies that examine the processes that interdisciplinary teams engage in and how we can design health information systems (HIS) to support those team processes. This was an exploratory study with two purposes: (1) To develop a framework for interdisciplinary team communication based on structures, processes and outcomes that were identified as having occurred during weekly team meetings. (2) To use the framework to guide 'e-teams' HIS design to support inter...

  2. An interdisciplinary team communication framework and its application to healthcare 'e-teams' systems design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKenzie Patricia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few studies that examine the processes that interdisciplinary teams engage in and how we can design health information systems (HIS to support those team processes. This was an exploratory study with two purposes: (1 To develop a framework for interdisciplinary team communication based on structures, processes and outcomes that were identified as having occurred during weekly team meetings. (2 To use the framework to guide 'e-teams' HIS design to support interdisciplinary team meeting communication. Methods An ethnographic approach was used to collect data on two interdisciplinary teams. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data according to structures, processes and outcomes. Results We present details for team meta-concepts of structures, processes and outcomes and the concepts and sub concepts within each meta-concept. We also provide an exploratory framework for interdisciplinary team communication and describe how the framework can guide HIS design to support 'e-teams'. Conclusion The structures, processes and outcomes that describe interdisciplinary teams are complex and often occur in a non-linear fashion. Electronic data support, process facilitation and team video conferencing are three HIS tools that can enhance team function.

  3. Shared communication processes within healthcare teams for rare diseases and their influence on healthcare professionals' innovative behavior and patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budych Karolina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A rare disease is a pattern of symptoms that afflicts less than five in 10,000 patients. However, as about 6,000 different rare disease patterns exist, they still have significant epidemiological relevance. We focus on rare diseases that affect multiple organs and thus demand that multidisciplinary healthcare professionals (HCPs work together. In this context, standardized healthcare processes and concepts are mainly lacking, and a deficit of knowledge induces uncertainty and ambiguity. As such, individualized solutions for each patient are needed. This necessitates an intensive level of innovative individual behavior and thus, adequate idea generation. The final implementation of new healthcare concepts requires the integration of the expertise of all healthcare team members, including that of the patients. Therefore, knowledge sharing between HCPs and shared decision making between HCPs and patients are important. The objective of this study is to assess the contribution of shared communication and decision-making processes in patient-centered healthcare teams to the generation of innovative concepts and consequently to improvements in patient satisfaction. Methods A theoretical framework covering interaction processes and explorative outcomes, and using patient satisfaction as a measure for operational performance, was developed based on healthcare management, innovation, and social science literature. This theoretical framework forms the basis for a three-phase, mixed-method study. Exploratory phase I will first involve collecting qualitative data to detect central interaction barriers within healthcare teams. The results are related back to theory, and testable hypotheses will be derived. Phase II then comprises the testing of hypotheses through a quantitative survey of patients and their HCPs in six different rare disease patterns. For each of the six diseases, the sample should comprise an average of 30 patients with

  4. The Role of Interpersonal Relations in Healthcare Team Communication and Patient Safety: A Proposed Model of Interpersonal Process in Teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Charlotte Tsz-Sum; Doran, Diane Marie

    2017-06-01

    Patient safety is compromised by medical errors and adverse events related to miscommunications among healthcare providers. Communication among healthcare providers is affected by human factors, such as interpersonal relations. Yet, discussions of interpersonal relations and communication are lacking in healthcare team literature. This paper proposes a theoretical framework that explains how interpersonal relations among healthcare team members affect communication and team performance, such as patient safety. We synthesized studies from health and social science disciplines to construct a theoretical framework that explicates the links among these constructs. From our synthesis, we identified two relevant theories: framework on interpersonal processes based on social relation model and the theory of relational coordination. The former involves three steps: perception, evaluation, and feedback; and the latter captures relational communicative behavior. We propose that manifestations of provider relations are embedded in the third step of the framework on interpersonal processes: feedback. Thus, varying team-member relationships lead to varying collaborative behavior, which affects patient-safety outcomes via a change in team communication. The proposed framework offers new perspectives for understanding how workplace relations affect healthcare team performance. The framework can be used by nurses, administrators, and educators to improve patient safety, team communication, or to resolve conflicts.

  5. Innovation in healthcare team feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Christine; Beard, Leslie; Fonzo, Anthony Di; Tommaso, Michael Di; Mujawaz, Yaman; Serra-Julia, Marcel; Morra, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is evolving from individual, autonomous practice to collaborative team practice. However, barriers such as professional autonomy, time constraints and the perception of error as failure preclude learning behaviours that can facilitate organizational learning and improvement. Although experimentation, engaging in questions and feedback, discussing errors and reflecting on results can facilitate learning and promote effective performance, the cultural barriers within healthcare can prevent or inhibit this type of behaviour among teams. At the University Health Network's Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, we realize the need for a tool that facilitates learning behaviour and is sensitive to the risk-averse nature of the clinical environment. The vehicle for the Team Feedback Tool is a web-based application called Rypple (www.rypple.com), which allows team members to provide anonymous, rapid-fire feedback on team processes and performance. Rypple facilitates communication, elicits feedback and provokes discussion. The process enables follow-up face-to-face team discussions and encourages teams to create actionable solutions for incremental changes to enhance team health and performance. The Team Feedback Tool was implemented and piloted in general internal medicine at the University Health Network's Toronto General Hospital from early May 2009 to July 2009 to address the issues of teamwork and learning behaviour in the clinical environment. This article explores the opportunities and barriers associated with the implementation of the Team Feedback Tool.

  6. Enabling Team Learning in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boak, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper is based on a study of learning processes within 35 healthcare therapy teams that took action to improve their services. The published research on team learning is introduced, and the paper suggests it is an activity that has similarities with action research and with those forms of action learning where teams address collective…

  7. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... them know how you're doing. With good teamwork and communication, you can improve the quality of ... Failure Recognition and Knowing Your Options Planning Ahead Communicating with Your Healthcare Provider Overcoming Barriers to Shared ...

  8. A network model of communication in an interprofessional team of healthcare professionals: A cross-sectional study of a burn unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoham, David A; Harris, Jenine K; Mundt, Marlon; McGaghie, William

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare teams consist of individuals communicating with one another during patient care delivery. Coordination of multiple specialties is critical for patients with complex health conditions, and requires interprofessional and intraprofessional communication. We examined a communication network of 71 health professionals in four professional roles: physician, nurse, health management, and support personnel (dietitian, pharmacist, or social worker), or other health professionals (including physical, respiratory, and occupational therapists, and medical students) working in a burn unit. Data for this cross-sectional study were collected by surveying members of a healthcare team. Ties were defined by asking team members whom they discussed patient care matters with on the shift. We built an exponential random graph model to determine: (1) does professional role influence the likelihood of a tie; (2) are ties more likely between team members from different professions compared to between team members from the same profession; and (3) which professions are more likely to form interprofessional ties. Health management and support personnel ties were 94% interprofessional while ties among nurses were 60% interprofessional. Nurses and other health professionals were significantly less likely than physicians to form ties. Nurses were 1.64 times more likely to communicate with nurses than non-nurses (OR = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.01-2.66); there was no significant role homophily for physicians, other health professionals, or health management and support personnel. Understanding communication networks in healthcare teams is an early step in understanding how teams work together to provide care; future work should evaluate the types and quality of interactions between members of interprofessional healthcare teams.

  9. Building effective clinical teams in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezziane, Zoheir; Maruthappu, Mahiben; Gawn, Lynsey; Thompson, Emily A; Athanasiou, Thanos; Warren, Oliver J

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to review teamwork and the creation of effective teams within healthcare. By combining research material found in management, psychology and health services research the article explores the drivers increasing the importance of teamwork, reviews the current knowledge base on how to build a team and focuses on some of the barriers to effective team performance. The simultaneous inflation of healthcare costs and necessity to improve quality of care has generated a demand for novel solutions in policy, strategy, commissioning and provider organisations. A critical, but commonly undervalued means by which quality can be improved is through structured, formalised incentivisation and development of teams, and the ability of individuals to work collectively and in collaboration. Several factors appear to contribute to the development of successful teams, including effective communication, comprehensive decision making, safety awareness and the ability to resolve conflict. Not only is strong leadership important if teams are to function effectively but the concept and importance of followership is also vital. Building effective clinical teams is difficult. The research in this area is currently limited, as is the authors' understanding of the different requirements faced by those working in different areas of the health and social care environment. This article provides a starting place for those interested in leading and developing teams of clinicians.

  10. Facilitating leadership team communication

    OpenAIRE

    Hedman, Eerika

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand and describe how to facilitate competent communication in leadership teamwork. Grounded in the premises of social constructionism and informed by such theoretical frameworks as coordinated management of meaning theory (CMM), dialogic organization development (OD), systemic-constructionist leadership, communication competence, and reflexivity, this study seeks to produce further insights into understanding leadership team communicati...

  11. Addressing dysfunctional relations among healthcare teams: improving team cooperation through applied organizational theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Sujin K; Horwitz, Irwin B; Barshes, Neal R

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that communication failure and interpersonal conflicts are significant impediments among health-care teams to assess complex information and engage in the meaningful collaboration necessary for optimizing patient care. Despite the prolific research on the role of effective teamwork in accomplishing complex tasks, such findings have been traditionally applied to business organizations and not medical contexts. This chapter, therefore, reviews and applies four theories from the fields of organizational behavior (OB) and organization development (OD) as potential means for improving team interaction in health-care contexts. This study is unique in its approach as it addresses the long-standing problems that exist in team communication and cooperation in health-care teams by applying well-established theories from the organizational literature. The utilization and application of the theoretical constructs discussed in this work offer valuable means by which the efficacy of team work can be greatly improved in health-care organizations.

  12. Promoters and barriers in hospital team communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Louise Isager; McPhail, Mette Arnsfelt; Østergaard, Doris

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Poor teamwork and communication in healthcare teams have been correlated to adverse events and higher patient morbidity and mortality. However, detailed insight into the link between team communication and medical error is still lacking. The objective of this study is to identify...... the common characteristics of team communication among multiprofessional teams at four Danish acute care university hospitals. Method: Four focus group interviews with multiprofessional hospital teams (N = 24). Results: Communication is particularly vulnerable during handover of patient information between...... shifts or units, when a team has to establish skills and roles during teamwork and when staff has to await and combine information from different chart systems. Established frameworks for communication, mutual knowledge, ease of speaking up, experience in getting the message through, and focus...

  13. Organizing for teamwork in healthcare: an alternative to team training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydenfält, Christofer; Odenrick, Per; Larsson, Per Anders

    2017-05-15

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore how organizational design could support teamwork and to identify organizational design principles that promote successful teamwork. Design/methodology/approach Since traditional team training sessions take resources away from production, the alternative approach pursued here explores the promotion of teamwork by means of organizational design. A wide and pragmatic definition of teamwork is applied: a team is considered to be a group of people that are set to work together on a task, and teamwork is then what they do in relation to their task. The input - process - output model of teamwork provides structure to the investigation. Findings Six teamwork enablers from the healthcare team literature - cohesion, collaboration, communication, conflict resolution, coordination, and leadership - are discussed, and the organizational design measures required to implement them are identified. Three organizational principles are argued to facilitate the teamwork enablers: team stability, occasions for communication, and a participative and adaptive approach to leadership. Research limitations/implications The findings could be used as a foundation for intervention studies to improve team performance or as a framework for evaluation of existing organizations. Practical implications By implementing these organizational principles, it is possible to achieve many of the organizational traits associated with good teamwork. Thus, thoughtful organization for teamwork can be used as an alternative or complement to the traditional team training approach. Originality/value With regards to the vast literature on team training, this paper offers an alternative perspective on how to improve team performance in healthcare.

  14. Virtual Teams and Knowledge Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtonen, Miikka; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    How does culture affect virtual teams and the knowledge communication processes in which they engage? As virtual spaces are increasingly used to support teams and establish collaboration in cross-cultural projects, the notion of cross-cultural communication can be understood as shifting from cont...

  15. PERSPECTIVES ON MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEAM PROCESSES AMONG HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVES: PROCESSES THAT FACILITATE TEAM EFFECTIVENESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Amy; Erwin, Cathleen

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) are used in healthcare organizations to address both clinical and managerial functions. Despite their prevalence, little is known about how team processes work to facilitate effectiveness among MDT leadership teams. This study explores perceptions of MDT participation experienced by organizational leaders in healthcare organizations in the United States. A survey of American College of Healthcare Executives members was conducted to assess involvement and perceptions of MDTs among health care management professionals. Descriptive statistics, independent T-Tests and Chi-square analyses were used to examine participation in MDTs, perception of MDT processes, and the association of participation and perceived processes with employee and organizational characteristics. The survey yielded a sample comprised of 492 healthcare executive or executive-track employees. An overwhelming majority indicated participation in MDTs. The study identified team processes that could use improvement including communication, cooperation, and conflict resolution. The study provides evidence that can help guide the development of training programs that focus on providing managerial leaders with strategies aimed at improving communication, coordination, and conflict resolution that will improve the effectiveness of MDT functioning in healthcare organizations.

  16. Virtual Teams and Knowledge Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtonen, Miikka; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    How does culture affect virtual teams and the knowledge communication processes in which they engage? As virtual spaces are increasingly used to support teams and establish collaboration in cross-cultural projects, the notion of cross-cultural communication can be understood as shifting from...... contextual perspective to a semiotic perspective. That is to say, although the team members are using the same vocabulary they might attach different meanings to and have different knowledge about them thus highlighting the importance of approaching virtual teams and collaboration from a semiotic perspective...

  17. Compassion fatigue in military healthcare teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Regina Peterson; Wanzer, Linda

    2014-02-01

    Since the onset of the Iraq war and Afghanistan conflicts, military healthcare teams have had increasing exposure to the traumatic effects of caring for wounded warriors, leading to a phenomenon termed compassion fatigue. The purpose of this integrative review was to develop a proposed definition for compassion fatigue in support of these teams. There is no current standardized formal definition, and this lack of clarity can inhibit intervention. Seven main themes evolved from the literature review and were integrated with the core elements of the Bandura Social Cognitive Theory Model as the first step in developing a uniformed definition.

  18. Effective healthcare teams require effective team members: defining teamwork competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Leggat Sandra G

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Although effective teamwork has been consistently identified as a requirement for enhanced clinical outcomes in the provision of healthcare, there is limited knowledge of what makes health professionals effective team members, and even less information on how to develop skills for teamwork. This study identified critical teamwork competencies for health service managers. Methods Members of a state branch of the professional association of Australian health service managers...

  19. Healthcare Teams Neurodynamically Reorganize When Resolving Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Stevens

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Research on the microscale neural dynamics of social interactions has yet to be translated into improvements in the assembly, training and evaluation of teams. This is partially due to the scale of neural involvements in team activities, spanning the millisecond oscillations in individual brains to the minutes/hours performance behaviors of the team. We have used intermediate neurodynamic representations to show that healthcare teams enter persistent (50–100 s neurodynamic states when they encounter and resolve uncertainty while managing simulated patients. Each of the second symbols was developed situating the electroencephalogram (EEG power of each team member in the contexts of those of other team members and the task. These representations were acquired from EEG headsets with 19 recording electrodes for each of the 1–40 Hz frequencies. Estimates of the information in each symbol stream were calculated from a 60 s moving window of Shannon entropy that was updated each second, providing a quantitative neurodynamic history of the team’s performance. Neurodynamic organizations fluctuated with the task demands with increased organization (i.e., lower entropy occurring when the team needed to resolve uncertainty. These results show that intermediate neurodynamic representations can provide a quantitative bridge between the micro and macro scales of teamwork.

  20. Communicating with Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems & Solutions for Being Active - FAQs About Physical Activity Managing Your Medicines - Introduction - Taking Control of Your Medicines - Medicine Assistance Programs - Medicine Checklist - Medication Tracker Communicating with Professionals - Introduction - Preparing for Medical Visits - ...

  1. Implementing context and team based access control in healthcare intranets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Christos K; Mavridis, Ioannis K; Nikolakopoulou, Georgia; Pangalos, George I

    2002-09-01

    The establishment of an efficient access control system in healthcare intranets is a critical security issue directly related to the protection of patients' privacy. Our C-TMAC (Context and Team-based Access Control) model is an active security access control model that layers dynamic access control concepts on top of RBAC (Role-based) and TMAC (Team-based) access control models. It also extends them in the sense that contextual information concerning collaborative activities is associated with teams of users and user permissions are dynamically filtered during runtime. These features of C-TMAC meet the specific security requirements of healthcare applications. In this paper, an experimental implementation of the C-TMAC model is described. More specifically, we present the operational architecture of the system that is used to implement C-TMAC security components in a healthcare intranet. Based on the technological platform of an Oracle Data Base Management System and Application Server, the application logic is coded with stored PL/SQL procedures that include Dynamic SQL routines for runtime value binding purposes. The resulting active security system adapts to current need-to-know requirements of users during runtime and provides fine-grained permission granularity. Apart from identity certificates for authentication, it uses attribute certificates for communicating critical security metadata, such as role membership and team participation of users.

  2. What healthcare teams find ethically difficult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoal, Dara; Kihlgren, Annica; James, Inger; Svantesson, Mia

    2016-12-01

    Ethically difficult situations are frequently encountered by healthcare professionals. Moral case deliberation is one form of clinical ethics support, which has the goal to support staff to manage ethical difficulties. However, little is known which difficult situations healthcare teams need to discuss. To explore which kinds of ethically difficult situations interprofessional healthcare teams raise during moral case deliberation. A series of 70 moral case deliberation sessions were audio-recorded in 10 Swedish workplaces. A descriptive, qualitative approach was applied, using thematic content analysis. Ethical considerations: An advisory statement specifying no objections to the study was provided from an Ethical Review Board, and consent to be recorded was assumed by virtue of participation in the moral case deliberation. Three themes emerged: powerlessness over managing difficult interactions with patients and next-of-kin, unease over unsafe and unequal care, and uncertainty over who should have power over care decisions. The powerlessness comprised feelings of insufficiency, difficulties to respond or manage patient's/next-of-kin's emotional needs or emotional outbursts and discouragement over motivating patients not taking responsibility for themselves. They could be uncertain over the patient's autonomy, who should have power over life and death, disclosing the truth or how much power next-of-kin should have. The findings suggest that the nature of the ethically difficult situations brought to moral case deliberations contained more relational-oriented ethics than principle-based ethics, were permeated by emotions and the uncertainties were pervaded by power aspects between stakeholders. MCD can be useful in understanding the connection between ethical issues and emotions from a team perspective.

  3. Teams, tribes and patient safety: overcoming barriers to effective teamwork in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Jennifer; Boyd, Matt; Cumin, David

    2014-03-01

    Modern healthcare is delivered by multidisciplinary, distributed healthcare teams who rely on effective teamwork and communication to ensure effective and safe patient care. However, we know that there is an unacceptable rate of unintended patient harm, and much of this is attributed to failures in communication between health professionals. The extensive literature on teams has identified shared mental models, mutual respect and trust and closed-loop communication as the underpinning conditions required for effective teams. However, a number of challenges exist in the healthcare environment. We explore these in a framework of educational, psychological and organisational challenges to the development of effective healthcare teams. Educational interventions can promote a better understanding of the principles of teamwork, help staff understand each other's roles and perspectives, and help develop specific communication strategies, but may not be sufficient on their own. Psychological barriers, such as professional silos and hierarchies, and organisational barriers such as geographically distributed teams, can increase the chance of communication failures with the potential for patient harm. We propose a seven-step plan to overcome the barriers to effective team communication that incorporates education, psychological and organisational strategies. Recent evidence suggests that improvement in teamwork in healthcare can lead to significant gains in patient safety, measured against efficiency of care, complication rate and mortality. Interventions to improve teamwork in healthcare may be the next major advance in patient outcomes.

  4. Effective healthcare teams require effective team members: defining teamwork competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leggat Sandra G

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although effective teamwork has been consistently identified as a requirement for enhanced clinical outcomes in the provision of healthcare, there is limited knowledge of what makes health professionals effective team members, and even less information on how to develop skills for teamwork. This study identified critical teamwork competencies for health service managers. Methods Members of a state branch of the professional association of Australian health service managers participated in a teamwork survey. Results The 37% response rate enabled identification of a management teamwork competency set comprising leadership, knowledge of organizational goals and strategies and organizational commitment, respect for others, commitment to working collaboratively and to achieving a quality outcome. Conclusion Although not part of the research question the data suggested that the competencies for effective teamwork are perceived to be different for management and clinical teams, and there are differences in the perceptions of effective teamwork competencies between male and female health service managers. This study adds to the growing evidence that the focus on individual skill development and individual accountability and achievement that results from existing models of health professional training, and which is continually reinforced by human resource management practices within healthcare systems, is not consistent with the competencies required for effective teamwork.

  5. A qualitative analysis of interprofessional healthcare team members' perceptions of patient barriers to healthcare engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Rhea E; Doty, Amanda; Casten, Robin J; Rovner, Barry W; Rising, Kristin L

    2016-09-20

    Healthcare systems increasingly engage interprofessional healthcare team members such as case managers, social workers, and community health workers to work directly with patients and improve population health. This study elicited perspectives of interprofessional healthcare team members regarding patient barriers to health and suggestions to address these barriers. This is a qualitative study employing focus groups and semi-structured interviews with 39 interprofessional healthcare team members in Philadelphia to elicit perceptions of patients' needs and experiences with the health system, and suggestions for positioning health care systems to better serve patients. Themes were identified using a content analysis approach. Three focus groups and 21 interviews were conducted with 26 hospital-based and 13 ambulatory-based participants. Three domains emerged to characterize barriers to care: social determinants, health system factors, and patient trust in the health system. Social determinants included insurance and financial shortcomings, mental health and substance abuse issues, housing and transportation-related limitations, and unpredictability associated with living in poverty. Suggestions for addressing these barriers included increased financial assistance from the health system, and building a workforce to address these determinants directly. Health care system factors included poor care coordination, inadequate communication of hospital discharge instructions, and difficulty navigating complex systems. Suggestions for addressing these barriers included enhanced communication between care sites, patient-centered scheduling, and improved patient education especially in discharge planning. Finally, factors related to patient trust of the health system emerged. Participants reported that patients are often intimidated by the health system, mistrusting of physicians, and fearful of receiving a serious diagnosis or prognosis. A suggestion for mitigating these

  6. Trauma team leaders' non-verbal communication: video registration during trauma team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härgestam, Maria; Hultin, Magnus; Brulin, Christine; Jacobsson, Maritha

    2016-03-25

    There is widespread consensus on the importance of safe and secure communication in healthcare, especially in trauma care where time is a limiting factor. Although non-verbal communication has an impact on communication between individuals, there is only limited knowledge of how trauma team leaders communicate. The purpose of this study was to investigate how trauma team members are positioned in the emergency room, and how leaders communicate in terms of gaze direction, vocal nuances, and gestures during trauma team training. Eighteen trauma teams were audio and video recorded during trauma team training in the emergency department of a hospital in northern Sweden. Quantitative content analysis was used to categorize the team members' positions and the leaders' non-verbal communication: gaze direction, vocal nuances, and gestures. The quantitative data were interpreted in relation to the specific context. Time sequences of the leaders' gaze direction, speech time, and gestures were identified separately and registered as time (seconds) and proportions (%) of the total training time. The team leaders who gained control over the most important area in the emergency room, the "inner circle", positioned themselves as heads over the team, using gaze direction, gestures, vocal nuances, and verbal commands that solidified their verbal message. Changes in position required both attention and collaboration. Leaders who spoke in a hesitant voice, or were silent, expressed ambiguity in their non-verbal communication: and other team members took over the leader's tasks. In teams where the leader had control over the inner circle, the members seemed to have an awareness of each other's roles and tasks, knowing when in time and where in space these tasks needed to be executed. Deviations in the leaders' communication increased the ambiguity in the communication, which had consequences for the teamwork. Communication cannot be taken for granted; it needs to be practiced

  7. Effective healthcare process redesign through an interdisciplinary team approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rita; Huynh, Nathan; Cai, Bo; Vidal, José; Bennett, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare process redesign is a complex and often high risk undertaking. Typically, there is a limited understanding of the baseline process and often inadequate tools by which to assess it. This can be confounded by narrow redesign team expertise that can result in unanticipated and/or unintended redesign consequences. Interdisciplinary research teams of healthcare, biostatistics, engineering and computer science experts provide broad support for a more effective and safer approach to healthcare process redesign. We describe an interdisciplinary research team focused on medication administration process (MAP)redesign and its achievements and challenges.

  8. The Team Boat Exercise: Enhancing Team Communication Midsemester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Pamela L.; Friedman, Barry A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the Team Boat Exercise, which was developed to provide students with a mechanism for addressing team problems and enhancing team communication midsemester. The inspiration for the exercise came from a video by Prentice Hall, Inc. (2001). Part III of the video, entitled "Corporate Coaching," shows senior staff members from the…

  9. The Team Boat Exercise: Enhancing Team Communication Midsemester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Pamela L.; Friedman, Barry A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the Team Boat Exercise, which was developed to provide students with a mechanism for addressing team problems and enhancing team communication midsemester. The inspiration for the exercise came from a video by Prentice Hall, Inc. (2001). Part III of the video, entitled "Corporate Coaching," shows senior staff members from the…

  10. Total quality leadership tactics for healthcare security teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losefsky, William; Mulcahy, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Leading a large staff of individuals with different personality traits can be a challenge, the authors state, but understanding that each team member is a unique person with thoughts and feelings that may differ from a leader's preconceived notions allows healthcare security officers to celebrate diversity and work together to create positive change. A high functioning team, they add, accepts personality differences and knows that each individual is a value-contributing member of the team.

  11. Implicit Coordination Strategies for Effective Team Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchibabu, Abhizna; Sparano-Huiban, Christopher; Sonenberg, Liz; Shah, Julie

    2016-06-01

    We investigated implicit communication strategies for anticipatory information sharing during team performance of tasks with varying degrees of complexity. We compared the strategies used by teams with the highest level of performance to those used by the lowest-performing teams to evaluate the frequency and methods of communications used as a function of task structure. High-performing teams share information by anticipating the needs of their teammates rather than explicitly requesting the exchange of information. As the complexity of a task increases to involve more interdependence among teammates, the impact of coordination on team performance also increases. This observation motivated us to conduct a study of anticipatory information sharing as a function of task complexity. We conducted an experiment in which 13 teams of four people performed collaborative search-and-deliver tasks with varying degrees of complexity in a simulation environment. We elaborated upon prior characterizations of communication as implicit versus explicit by dividing implicit communication into two subtypes: (a) deliberative/goal information and (b) reactive status updates. We then characterized relationships between task structure, implicit communication, and team performance. We found that the five teams with the fastest task completion times and lowest idle times exhibited higher rates of deliberative communication versus reactive communication during high-complexity tasks compared with the five teams with the slowest completion times and longest idle times (p = .039). Teams in which members proactively communicated information about their next goal to teammates exhibited improved team performance. The findings from our work can inform the design of communication strategies for team training to improve performance of complex tasks. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  12. Creating High Reliability Teams in Healthcare through In situ Simulation Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi Miller RN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of teamwork on patient safety in healthcare has been well established. However, the theory and research of healthcare teams are seriously lacking in clinical application. While conventional team theory assumes that teams are stable and leadership is constant, a growing body of evidence indicates that most healthcare teams are unstable and lack constant leadership. For healthcare organizations to reduce error and ensure patient safety, the true nature of healthcare teams must be better understood. This study presents a taxonomy of healthcare teams and the determinants of high reliability in healthcare teams based on a series of studies undertaken over a five-year period (2005–2010.

  13. Communication in command and control teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.C.; Rasker, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    An important factor affecting team performance in Combat Information Centers is communication. Previous research has shown that high-performing teams use effective communication patterns, such as limiting idle chatter during high workload conditions, and sharing information before it is needed.

  14. The communication process in virtual teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the paradigms of virtual teams in the communication process in the context of the existing literature in this field. We argue the above issues and we explore the communication process within virtual teams like an interactive, complex and limiting process in connxion with the advantages and disadvantages offered by information technology.

  15. The Role of Communication During Trauma Activations: Investigating the Need for Team and Leader Communication Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raley, Jessica; Meenakshi, Rani; Dent, Daniel; Willis, Ross; Lawson, Karla; Duzinski, Sarah

    Fatal errors due to miscommunication among members of trauma teams are 2 to 4 times more likely to occur than in other medical teams, yet most trauma team members do not receive communication effectiveness training. A needs assessment was conducted to examine trauma team members' miscommunication experiences and research scientists' evaluations of live trauma activations. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that communication training is necessary and highlight specific team communication competencies that trauma teams should learn to improve communication during activations. Data were collected in 2 phases. Phase 1 required participants to complete a series of surveys. Phase 2 included live observations and assessments of pediatric trauma activations using the assessment of pediatric resuscitation team assessments (APRC-TA) and assessment of pediatric resuscitation leader assessments (APRC-LA). Data were collected at a southwestern pediatric hospital. Trauma team members and leaders completed surveys at a meeting and were observed while conducting activations in the trauma bay. Trained research scientists and clinical staff used the APRC-TA and APRC-LA to measure trauma teams' medical performance and communication effectiveness. The sample included 29 healthcare providers who regularly participate in trauma activations. Additionally, 12 live trauma activations were assessed monday to friday from 8am to 5pm. Team members indicated that communication training should focus on offering assistance, delegating duties, accepting feedback, and controlling emotional expressions. Communication scores were not significantly different from medical performance scores. None of the teams were coded as effective medical performance and ineffective team communication and only 1 team was labeled as ineffective leader communication and effective medical performance. Communication training may be necessary for trauma teams and offer a deeper understanding of the communication

  16. Verbal communication improves laparoscopic team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiliang Chang; Waid, Erin; Martinec, Danny V; Bin Zheng; Swanstrom, Lee L

    2008-06-01

    The impact of verbal communication on laparoscopic team performance was examined. A total of 24 dyad teams, comprised of residents, medical students, and office staff, underwent 2 team tasks using a previously validated bench model. Twelve teams (feedback groups) received instant verbal instruction and feedback on their performance from an instructor which was compared with 12 teams (control groups) with minimal or no verbal feedback. Their performances were both video and audio taped for analysis. Surgical backgrounds were similar between feedback and control groups. Teams with more verbal feedback achieved significantly better task performance (P = .002) compared with the control group with less feedback. Impact of verbal feedback was more pronounced for tasks requiring team cooperation (aiming and navigation) than tasks depending on individual skills (knotting). Verbal communication, especially the instructions and feedback from an experienced instructor, improved team efficiency and performance.

  17. The effect of transforming care at the bedside initiative on healthcare teams' work environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; O'Conner, Patricia; Harripaul, Anastasia; Biron, Alain; Ritchie, Judith; Lavigne, Genevieve L; Baillargeon, Sophie; Ringer, Justin; Macgibbon, Brenda; Taylor-Ducharme, Sharon; Sourdif, Jacynthe

    2014-02-01

    Different initiatives have been implemented in healthcare organizations to improve efficiency, such as transforming care at the bedside (TCAB). However, there are important gaps in understanding the effect of TCAB on healthcare teams' work environments. The specific aim of the study is to describe findings regarding the TCAB initiative effects on healthcare teams' work environments. A pretest and posttest study design was used for this study. The TCAB initiative was implemented in fall 2010 in a university health center in Montreal, Canada. The sample consisted of healthcare workers from four different care units. Statistically significant improvement was observed with the communicating specific information subscale from the measure of processes of care variable, and a significant difference was found between the support from colleagues variable, which was higher at baseline than postprogram. The differences for psychological demand, decisional latitude, and effort-reward were not significant. TCAB is an intervention that allows healthcare teams to implement change to improve patients' and families' outcomes. Ongoing energy should focus on how to improve communication among all members of the team and ensure their support. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Exploring effectiveness of team communication: Balancing synchronous and asynchronous communication in design teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    den Otter, Ad; Emmitt, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Effective teams use a balance of synchronous and asynchronous communication. Team communication is dependent on the communication acts of team members and the ability of managers to facilitate, stimulate and motivate them. Team members from organizations using different information systems tend...... to have different understanding, opinions, and rates of adoption and skills levels regarding specific IT tools. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effective use of tools for communication in design teams and the strategies for the use of specific tools....

  19. Team Communication as a Collaborative Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Gervits

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Communication channels can reveal a great deal of information about the effectiveness of a team. This is particularly relevant for teams operating in performance settings such as medical groups, military squads, and mixed human-robot teams. Currently, it is not known how various factors including coordination strategy, speaker role, and time pressure affect communication in collaborative tasks. The purpose of this paper is to systematically explore how these factors interact with team discourse in order to better understand effective communication patterns. In our analysis of a corpus of remote task-oriented dialogue (CReST corpus, we found that a variety of linguistic- and dialogue-level features were influenced by time pressure, speaker role, and team effectiveness. We also found that effective teams had a higher speech rate, and used specific grounding strategies to improve efficiency and coordination under time pressure. These results inform our understanding of the various factors that influence team communication, and highlight ways in which effective teams overcome constraints on their communication channels.

  20. Managing and mitigating conflict in healthcare teams: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almost, Joan; Wolff, Angela C; Stewart-Pyne, Althea; McCormick, Loretta G; Strachan, Diane; D'Souza, Christine

    2016-07-01

    To review empirical studies examining antecedents (sources, causes, predictors) in the management and mitigation of interpersonal conflict. Providing quality care requires positive, collaborative working relationships among healthcare team members. In today's increasingly stress-laden work environments, such relationships can be threatened by interpersonal conflict. Identifying the underlying causes of conflict and choice of conflict management style will help practitioners, leaders and managers build an organizational culture that fosters collegiality and create the best possible environment to engage in effective conflict management. Integrative literature review. CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Proquest ABI/Inform, Cochrane Library and Joanne Briggs Institute Library were searched for empirical studies published between 2002-May 2014. The review was informed by the approach of Whittemore and Knafl. Findings were extracted, critically examined and grouped into themes. Forty-four papers met the inclusion criteria. Several antecedents influence conflict and choice of conflict management style including individual characteristics, contextual factors and interpersonal conditions. Sources most frequently identified include lack of emotional intelligence, certain personality traits, poor work environment, role ambiguity, lack of support and poor communication. Very few published interventions were found. By synthesizing the knowledge and identifying antecedents, this review offers evidence to support recommendations on managing and mitigating conflict. As inevitable as conflict is, it is the responsibility of everyone to increase their own awareness, accountability and active participation in understanding conflict and minimizing it. Future research should investigate the testing of interventions to minimize these antecedents and, subsequently, reduce conflict. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The importance of moral emotions for effective collaboration in culturally diverse healthcare teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Catherine; Brunton, Margaret

    2017-07-20

    Moral emotions shape the effectiveness of culturally diverse teams. However, these emotions, which are integral to determining ethically responsive patient care and team relationships, typically go unrecognised. The contribution of emotions to moral deliberation is subjugated within the technorational environment of healthcare decision-making. Contemporary healthcare organisations rely on a multicultural workforce charged with the ethical care of vulnerable people. Limited extant literature examines the role of moral emotions in ethical decision-making among culturally diverse healthcare teams. Moral emotions are evident in ethnocentric moral perspectives that construct some colleagues' practices as 'other'. This article examines how moral emotions are evoked when cultural dissonance influences nurses' moral perceptions. We use a qualitative investigation of teamwork within culturally diverse healthcare organisations. We use Haidt's () account of moral emotions to examine practice-based accounts of 36 internationally educated and 17 New Zealand educated nurses practising in New Zealand. The study provides evidence that moral emotions are frequently elicited by communication and care practices considered 'foreign'. The main implication is that although safe practice in healthcare organisations is reliant on highly functioning teams, collaboration is challenged by interprofessional power relations of contested culturally shaped values. We address practice-based strategies that enable engagement with moral emotions to enhance effective teamwork. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamwork and leverage the existing CWA approaches to analyse team interactions. Team CWA is explained and contrasted with prior approaches to CWA. Team CWA does not replace CWA, but supplements traditional CWA to more easily reveal team information. As a result, Team CWA may be a useful approach to enhance CWA in complex environments where effective teamwork is required. This paper looks at ways of analysing cognitive work in healthcare teams. Team Cognitive Work Analysis, when used to supplement traditional Cognitive Work Analysis, revealed more team information than traditional Cognitive Work Analysis. Team Cognitive Work Analysis should be considered when studying teams.

  3. Influence of a quality improvement learning collaborative program on team functioning in primary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecha, Jyoti; Brown, Judith Belle; Han, Han; Harris, Stewart B; Green, Michael; Russell, Grant; Roberts, Sharon; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Fournie, Meghan; Thind, Amardeep; Reichert, Sonja M; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Quality improvement (QI) programs are frequently implemented to support primary healthcare (PHC) team development and to improve care outcomes. In Ontario, Canada, the Quality Improvement and Innovation Partnership (QIIP) offered a learning collaborative (LC) program to support the development of interdisciplinary team function and improve chronic disease management, disease prevention, and access to care. A qualitative study using a phenomenological approach was conducted as part of a mixed-method evaluation to explore the influence of the program on team functioning in participating PHC teams. A purposive sampling strategy was used to identify PHC teams (n = 10), from which participants of different professional roles were selected through a purposeful recruitment process to reflect maximum variation of team roles. Additionally, QI coaches working with the interview participants and the LC administrators were also interviewed. Data were collected through semistructured telephone interviews that were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was conducted through an iterative and interpretive approach. The shared experience of participating in the program appeared to improve team functioning. Participants described increased trust and respect for each other's clinical and administrative roles and were inspired by learning about different approaches to interdisciplinary care. This appeared to enhance collegial relationships, collapse professional silos, improve communication, and increase interdisciplinary collaboration. Teamwork involves more than just physically grouping healthcare providers from multiple disciplines and mandating them to work together. The LC program provided opportunities for participants to learn how to work collaboratively, and participation in the LC program appeared to enhance team functioning.

  4. Email for clinical communication between healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyder, Clare; Atherton, Helen; Car, Mate; Heneghan, Carl J; Car, Josip

    2015-02-20

    Email is one of the most widely used methods of communication, but its use in healthcare is still uncommon. Where email communication has been utilised in health care, its purposes have included clinical communication between healthcare professionals, but the effects of using email in this way are not well known. We updated a 2012 review of the use of email for two-way clinical communication between healthcare professionals. To assess the effects of email for clinical communication between healthcare professionals on healthcare professional outcomes, patient outcomes, health service performance, and service efficiency and acceptability, when compared to other forms of communicating clinical information. We searched: the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 9 2013), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (1946 to August 2013), EMBASE (OvidSP) (1974 to August 2013), PsycINFO (1967 to August 2013), CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (1982 to August 2013), and ERIC (CSA) (1965 to January 2010). We searched grey literature: theses/dissertation repositories, trials registers and Google Scholar (searched November 2013). We used additional search methods: examining reference lists and contacting authors. Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series studies examining interventions in which healthcare professionals used email for communicating clinical information in the form of: 1) unsecured email, 2) secure email, or 3) web messaging. All healthcare professionals, patients and caregivers in all settings were considered. Two authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, assessed the included studies' risk of bias, and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information and have reported all measures as per the study report. The previous version of this review included one randomised controlled

  5. Cancer: communicating in the team game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Frances M; Robinson, Emma; Heinrich, Paul; Dunn, Stewart M

    2004-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that effective communication is a critical means by which surgeons can assist their patients to achieve the best outcomes. This paper examines the processes and outcomes of effective communication by surgeons in cancer teams, and includes: (i). strategies that promote collaborative relationships with patients and lead to more effective treatment; (ii). strategies to improve multidisciplinary team performance; and (iii). methods to minimize the risk of error and litigation. The experience of a cancer diagnosis involves radical changes in patients' lives, somewhat akin to suddenly finding yourself in the middle of a rugby scrum for the first time. The analogy of rugby throws fresh light on such critical factors in communication as prematch preparation, orientation to the game and the team, a good kick off, sizing up the opposition, creative plays and optimizing teamwork to promote quality of life and survival.

  6. Determining the need for team-based training in delirium management: A needs assessment of surgical healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Tehrani, Hedieh; Kacikanis, Anna; Tan, Adrienne; Hawa, Raed; Anderson, Ruthie; Okrainec, Allan; Abbey, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of delirium in surgical units is a serious quality concern, given its impact on morbidity and mortality. While successful delirium management depends upon interdisciplinary care, training needs for surgical teams have not been studied. A needs assessment of surgical units was conducted to determine perceived comfort in managing delirium, and interprofessional training needs for team-based care. We administered a survey to 106 General Surgery healthcare professionals (69% response rate) with a focus on attitudes towards delirium and team management. Although most respondents identified delirium as important to patient outcomes, only 61% of healthcare professionals indicated that a team-based approach was always observed in practice. Less than half had a clear understanding of their role in delirium care, while just over half observed team communication of delirium care plans during handover. This is the first observation of clear gaps in perceived team performance in a General Surgery setting.

  7. Interprofessional education in team communication: working together to improve patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Douglas; Abu-Rish, Erin; Chiu, Chia-Ru; Hammer, Dana; Wilson, Sharon; Vorvick, Linda; Blondon, Katherine; Schaad, Douglas; Liner, Debra; Zierler, Brenda

    2013-05-01

    Communication failures in healthcare teams are associated with medical errors and negative health outcomes. These findings have increased emphasis on training future health professionals to work effectively within teams. The Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS) communication training model, widely employed to train healthcare teams, has been less commonly used to train student interprofessional teams. The present study reports the effectiveness of a simulation-based interprofessional TeamSTEPPS training in impacting student attitudes, knowledge and skills around interprofessional communication. Three hundred and six fourth-year medical, third-year nursing, second-year pharmacy and second-year physician assistant students took part in a 4 h training that included a 1 h TeamSTEPPS didactic session and three 1 h team simulation and feedback sessions. Students worked in groups balanced by a professional programme in a self-selected focal area (adult acute, paediatric, obstetrics). Preassessments and postassessments were used for examining attitudes, beliefs and reported opportunities to observe or participate in team communication behaviours. One hundred and forty-nine students (48.7%) completed the preassessments and postassessments. Significant differences were found for attitudes toward team communication (pteam structure (p=0.002), situation monitoring (pcommunication (p=0.002). Significant shifts were reported for knowledge of TeamSTEPPS (pcommunicating in interprofessional teams (pEffective team communication is important in patient safety. We demonstrate positive attitudinal and knowledge effects in a large-scale interprofessional TeamSTEPPS-based training involving four student professions.

  8. Team Formation and Communication Restrictions in Collectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agogino, Adrian K.; Turner, Kagan

    2003-01-01

    A collective of agents often needs to maximize a "world utility" function which rates the performance of an entire system, while subject to communication restrictions among the agents. Such communication restrictions make it difficult for agents which try to pursue their own "private" utilities to take actions that also help optimize the world utility. Team formation presents a solution to this problem, where by joining other agents, an agent can significantly increase its knowledge about the environment and improve its chances of both optimizing its own utility and that its doing so will contribute to the world utility. In this article we show how utilities that have been previously shown to be effective in collectives can be modified to be more effective in domains with moderate communication restrictions resulting in performance improvements of up to 75%. Additionally we show that even severe communication constraints can be overcome by forming teams where each agent of a team shares the same utility, increasing performance an additional 25%. We show that utilities and team sizes can be manipulated to form the best compromise between how "aligned" an agent s utility is with the world utility and how easily an agent can learn that utility.

  9. Overcoming the ten most common barriers to effective team communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Communication is at the heart of medical practice management. Yet there are many barriers to effective communication that can interfere with the smooth running of the practice. This article describes the 10 most common barriers to effective medical practice team communication and offers six steps the practice manager can take to break them down. This article also suggests that the practice develop a team communication strategy. It suggests 10 communication principles readers can share directly with their teams and describes three hallmarks of effective team communication. Finally, this article provides a list of 25 practical questions practice managers can use to improve their team's communication.

  10. [Communication of nursing team with patient's family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Edna Gurgel; Lopes, Gerturdes Teixeira

    2009-01-01

    to analyze the information received by the family from patients interned in intensive care units about their clinical condition and arguing with the nursing team possibilities of new strategies of interventions to theses patients' relatives. Research was carried out in a university hospital institution. Investigated individuals were patients' family and nursing team. For data collection it was used sixty hours of participant observation and ten semi-structured interviews, beyond the creation and generation of the movie based on field's diary notations. For data analysis it was used thematic content analysis. Resulting categories were: the communication and the nursing and the care with the family. It was concluded that the nursing care as one complex practice that exceeds the use of techniques and/or technology, implies the necessity of an efficient communication potential.

  11. Measuring multidisciplinary team effectiveness in a ward-based healthcare setting: development of the team functioning assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Gigi; Liao, Jenny; Jimmieson, Nerina L; Restubog, Simon Lloyd D

    2011-01-01

    Nontechnical skills relating to team functioning are vital to the effective delivery of patient care and safety. In this study, we develop a reliable behavioral marker tool for assessing nontechnical skills that are critical to the success of ward-based multidisciplinary healthcare teams. The Team Functioning Assessment Tool (TFAT) was developed and refined using a literature review, focus groups, card-sorting exercise, field observations, and final questionnaire evaluation and refinement process. Results demonstrated that Clinical Planning, Executive Tasks, and Team Relations are important facets of effective multidisciplinary healthcare team functioning. The TFAT was also shown to yield acceptable inter-rater agreement.

  12. Building positive relationships in healthcare: evaluation of the Teams of Interprofessional Staff interprofessional education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajnok, Irmajean; Puddester, Derek; Macdonald, Colla J; Archibald, Douglas; Kuhl, David

    2012-08-01

    The Teams of Interprofessional Staff (TIPS) project consisted of five healthcare teams from across Ontario, participating in three, two-day face-to-face interprofessional educational (IPE) sessions over an 8-month period. The purpose of TIPS was to explore whether interprofessional team development for practicing healthcare professionals, makes a difference in team functioning, team member satisfaction, ability to work effectively both individually and as a team, and improved patient well-being. A comprehensive formative and summative evaluation revealed that all teams perceived they benefitted from and engaged in successful team development. Success meant different things to each team reflecting the continuum of team development from building a safe, trusted group to becoming leaders of team development for other interprofessional teams. Effective teamwork is crucial to nurses who often take on the role of coordinator of care on a day-to-day basis, or are in managerial roles in interprofessional clinics or clinical program teams.

  13. Healthcare professionals' self-reported experiences and preferences related to direct healthcare professional communications : a survey conducted in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piening, S.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.; de Graeff, P.A.; Straus, S.M.; Mol, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Europe, Direct Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPCs) are important tools to inform healthcare professionals of serious, new drug safety issues. However, this tool has not always been successful in effectively communicating the desired actions to healthcare professionals. Obje

  14. Healthcare Professionals' Self-Reported Experiences and Preferences Related to Direct Healthcare Professional Communications A Survey Conducted in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piening, Sigrid; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; de Graeff, Pieter A.; Straus, Sabine M. J. M.; Mol, Peter G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Europe, Direct Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPCs) are important tools to inform healthcare professionals of serious, new drug safety issues. However, this tool has not always been successful in effectively communicating the desired actions to healthcare professionals. Obje

  15. Pulling together and pulling apart: influences of convergence and divergence on distributed healthcare teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingard, L; Sue-Chue-Lam, C; Tait, G R; Bates, J; Shadd, J; Schulz, V

    2017-01-23

    Effective healthcare requires both competent individuals and competent teams. With this recognition, health professions education is grappling with how to factor team competence into training and assessment strategies. These efforts are impeded, however, by the absence of a sophisticated understanding of the the relationship between competent individuals and competent teams . Using data from a constructivist grounded theory study of team-based healthcare for patients with advanced heart failure, this paper explores the relationship between individual team members' perceived goals, understandings, values and routines and the collective competence of the team. Individual interviews with index patients and their healthcare team members formed Team Sampling Units (TSUs). Thirty-seven TSUs consisting of 183 interviews were iteratively analysed for patterns of convergence and divergence in an inductive process informed by complex adaptive systems theory. Convergence and divergence were identifiable on all teams, regularly co-occurred on the same team, and involved recurring themes. Convergence and divergence had nonlinear relationships to the team's collective functioning. Convergence could foster either shared action or collective paralysis; divergence could foster problematic incoherence or productive disruption. These findings advance our understanding of the complex relationship between the individual and the collective on a healthcare team, and they challenge conventional narratives of healthcare teamwork which derive largely from acute care settings and emphasize the importance of common goals and shared mental models. Complex adaptive systems theory helps us to understand the implications of these insights for healthcare teams' delivery of care for the complex, chronically ill.

  16. COMMUNICATING SUCCESSFULLY WHEN MANAGING MULTICULTURAL TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra IOANID

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Day by day globalization covers new areas of life and calls for continuous learning and adjusting to new cultural dimensions. Managers are expected to display adaptation to new ways of working, cultural sensitivity, cultural intelligence and to posses multicultural competencies communication skills. Understanding the impact of cultural diversity on the communication within the organization is essential for the success of a company. Especially in multinational companies, when departments working on the same projects are located in different countries, the managers rely more and more on cultural- specific country characteristics in order to chose the best negotiation and communication techniques. The aim of this paper is to show how the country specific cultural characteristics impact on the success or failure of a business and the organizations’ challenge with preparing managers for success in international business environment. The paper is based on literature review and on authors’ experience in managing multicultural project teams, in international environment.

  17. COMMUNICATING SUCCESSFULLY WHEN MANAGING MULTICULTURAL TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra IOANID

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Day by day globalization covers new areas of life and calls for continuous learning and adjusting to new cultural dimensions. Managers are expected to display adaptation to new ways of working, cultural sensitivity, cultural intelligence and to posses multicultural competencies communication skills. Understanding the impact of cultural diversity on the communication within the organization is essential for the success of a company. Especially in multinational companies, when departments working on the same projects are located in different countries, the managers rely more and more on cultural- specific country characteristics in order to chose the best negotiation and communication techniques. The aim of this paper is to show how the country specific cultural characteristics impact on the success or failure of a business and the organizations’ challenge with preparing managers for success in international business environment. The paper is based on literature review and on authors’ experience in managing multicultural project teams, in international environment.

  18. Pain Management in Children with Collaborative Parents and Healthcare Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Vakili

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Most children in hospital have pain. Seeing your child in pain or discomfort is incredibly difficult. Pain in children is a public health concern of major significance in most parts of the world. We have learned that unrelieved pain causes the body to release certain chemicals that may actually delay healing, so it's important to work with child's nurses and doctors to help children for control the pain. On the other side, medication is not the only way to relieve pain. Pain in children should always be managed and pain expression is dependent on the child’s age, cognitive development, and socio cultural context and it is important to pay particular attention to developmental variations in any behavioural manifestations of pain. In this study to explain some ways for parents and healthcare team to manage pain in children.

  19. Climate uniformity: its influence on team communication quality, task conflict, and team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Romá, Vicente; Hernández, Ana

    2014-11-01

    We investigated whether climate uniformity (the pattern of climate perceptions of organizational support within the team) is related to task conflict, team communication quality, and team performance. We used a sample composed of 141 bank branches and collected data at 3 time points. The results obtained showed that, after controlling for aggregate team climate, climate strength, and their interaction, a type of nonuniform climate pattern (weak dissimilarity) was directly related to task conflict and team communication quality. Teams with weak dissimilarity nonuniform patterns tended to show higher levels of task conflict and lower levels of team communication quality than teams with uniform climate patterns. The relationship between weak dissimilarity patterns and team performance was fully mediated by team communication quality. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Placement Development Teams and interprofessional education with healthcare students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Graham R; Callaghan, Lynne; Whittlesea, Emma; Mutton, Lauren; Heath, Val

    2011-08-01

    The aim was to investigate the impact of a new structure for supporting students and mentors in practice placements (Placement Development Teams) in fostering interprofessional education from the perspective of non-medical health care students and staff. Interprofessional education is an important international issue which received significant impetus in the UK as a result of many high-profile cases where uni-professional boundaries and cultures have contributed to adverse patient and client outcomes. This study was part of a longitudinal qualitative evaluation of Placement Development Teams. The design for this stage was cross-sectional. Data were collected using telephone interviews with key educational stakeholders in trusts and Strategic Health Authorities and focus groups with third-year non-medical health care students working in the south-west peninsula of England. Students' focus group data indicated that interprofessional support and learning was key. Students had mixed views on how much they valued support gained from staff and students from other professions. Staff data indicated that they facilitated communication. Staff discussed their practical activities which made a difference and helped change the organisational culture in favour of interprofessional education. If interprofessional education in clinical practice is to be effective, it needs local facilitation and structures that support it. Placement Development Teams can provide this. The 'best' means of 'doing interprofessional education' in clinical practice and its impact on patient outcomes requires further large-scale research work with rigorous methodologies at a national level. To embed interprofessional education in practice-based professions' curricula and clinical placements requires active, supportive structures and local facilitation. Structures such as Placement Development Teams can help to achieve this where organisational cultures are influenced by committed staff. Students require

  1. Saving lives: A meta-analysis of team training in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ashley M; Gregory, Megan E; Joseph, Dana L; Sonesh, Shirley C; Marlow, Shannon L; Lacerenza, Christina N; Benishek, Lauren E; King, Heidi B; Salas, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    As the nature of work becomes more complex, teams have become necessary to ensure effective functioning within organizations. The healthcare industry is no exception. As such, the prevalence of training interventions designed to optimize teamwork in this industry has increased substantially over the last 10 years (Weaver, Dy, & Rosen, 2014). Using Kirkpatrick's (1956, 1996) training evaluation framework, we conducted a meta-analytic examination of healthcare team training to quantify its effectiveness and understand the conditions under which it is most successful. Results demonstrate that healthcare team training improves each of Kirkpatrick's criteria (reactions, learning, transfer, results; d = .37 to .89). Second, findings indicate that healthcare team training is largely robust to trainee composition, training strategy, and characteristics of the work environment, with the only exception being the reduced effectiveness of team training programs that involve feedback. As a tertiary goal, we proposed and found empirical support for a sequential model of healthcare team training where team training affects results via learning, which leads to transfer, which increases results. We find support for this sequential model in the healthcare industry (i.e., the current meta-analysis) and in training across all industries (i.e., using meta-analytic estimates from Arthur, Bennett, Edens, & Bell, 2003), suggesting the sequential benefits of training are not unique to medical teams. Ultimately, this meta-analysis supports the expanded use of team training and points toward recommendations for optimizing its effectiveness within healthcare settings. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Theoretically-Driven Infrastructure for Supporting Healthcare Teams Training at a Military Treatment Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robert T.; Parodi, Andrea V.

    2011-01-01

    The Team Resource Center (TRC) at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) currently hosts a tri-service healthcare teams training course three times annually . The course consists of didactic learning coupled with simulation exercises to provide an interactive educational experience for healthcare professionals. The course is also the foundation of a research program designed to explore the use of simulation technologies for enhancing team training and evaluation. The TRC has adopted theoretical frameworks for evaluating training readiness and efficacy, and is using these frameworks to guide a systematic reconfiguration of the infrastructure supporting healthcare teams training and research initiatives at NMCP.

  3. Communication between the elderly person and the Family Health Team: is there integrality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Tereza de Almeida

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to verify the forms of communication used in four Primary Health Units with Family Health Program teams in Porto Feliz, São Paulo, and how they impact in the care and control of the health of elderly people. METHOD: this qualitative study sought to capture the communication between elderly people and healthcare professionals. Interviews were conducted with 20 elderly people of both sexes. RESULTS: from the discourses and observations, assertive communication and blocked communication emerged as the central analysis themes, the verbal and nonverbal elements of which, unveiled subjectivity of the communication process, of the local culture and of the psychosocial factors positively and negatively contributing to the healthcare for elderly people. The nursing teams of the Family Health Strategy showed forms of communication that favored the adherence of the elderly people to the care and control of their health. Negatives aspects did not have completely prejudicial consequences, however, should be avoided, in order to facilitate integral care to elderly people. CONCLUSION: it is worth reinforcing the need for improvement of the nursing team and other healthcare professionals regarding health communication as an innovative technology, bringing credibility to the health promotion and prevention programs with elderly users.

  4. Communication and performance : An empirical study in innovation teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kratzer, Jan

    2001-01-01

    The present study Communication and Performance explores how communicational structures impact the performance of innovation teams. Communication is particular important in teams in which members with different specializations and professional backgrounds have to execute the work together as it is c

  5. Communication and performance : an empirical study in innovation teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kratzer, Jan

    2001-01-01

    The present study Communication and Performance explores how communicational structures impact the performance of innovation teams. Communication is particular important in teams in which members with different specializations and professional backgrounds have to execute the work together as it is c

  6. Primary care team communication networks, team climate, quality of care, and medical costs for patients with diabetes: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Marlon P.; Agneessens, Filip; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Zakletskaia, Larissa I.; Kamnetz, Sandra A.; Gilchrist, Valerie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care teams play an important role in providing the best quality of care to patients with diabetes. Little evidence is available on how team communication networks and team climate contribute to high quality diabetes care. Objective To determine whether primary care team communication and team climate are associated with health outcomes, health care utilization, and associated costs for patients with diabetes. Methods A cross-sectional survey of primary care team members collected information on frequency of communication with other care team members about patient care and on team climate. Patient outcomes (glycemic, cholesterol, and blood pressure control, urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital visit days, medical costs) in the past 12 months for team diabetes patient panels were extracted from the electronic health record. The data were analyzed using nested (clinic/team/patient) generalized linear mixed modeling. Participants 155 health professionals at 6 U.S. primary care clinics participated from May through December 2013. Results Primary care teams with a greater number of daily face-to-face communication ties among team members were associated with 52% (Rate Ratio=0.48, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.94) fewer hospital days and US$1220 (95% CI: -US$2416, -US$24) lower health-care costs per team diabetes patient in the past 12 months. In contrast, for each additional registered nurse (RN) who reported frequent daily face-to-face communication about patient care with the primary care practitioner (PCP), team diabetes patients had less-controlled HbA1c (Odds Ratio=0.83, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99), increased hospital days (RR=1.57, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.03), and higher healthcare costs (β=US$877, 95% CI: US$42, US$1713). Shared team vision, a measure of team climate, significantly mediated the relationship between team communication and patient outcomes. Conclusions Primary care teams which relied on frequent daily face-to-face communication among more

  7. Team Learning to Narrow the Gap between Healthcare Knowledge and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Tejwansh S.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored team-based learning in teams of healthcare professionals working on making meaning of evidence-based clinical guidelines in their field to apply them within their practice setting. The research based team learning models posited by Kasl, Marsick, and Dechant (1997) and Edmondson, Dillon, and Roloff (2007) were used as the…

  8. Speech acts, communication problems, and fighter pilot team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Jonathan; Andersson, Jan

    Two aspects of team communication, speech acts and communication problems, and their relation to team performance in a team air combat simulator were studied. The purpose was to enhance the understanding of how team performance is related to team communication. Ten Swedish fighter pilots and four fighter controllers of varying experience participated. Data were collected during fighter simulator training involving four pilots and one fighter controller in each of two teams. Speech acts were collapsed over seven categories and communication problems over five categories. Communication was studied from two perspectives: critical situation outcome and mission outcome. Some problems were closely related to particular speech acts. Speech act frequency, especially meta-communications and tactics, was highest when winning. However, the timing of tactics in critical situations needs further research. Communication problem frequency was highest for runs which ended equally. The most common problem was simultaneous speech, possibly because of the simulator radio system. The number of speech acts was related to enhanced performance but in a complex manner. Thus in order to work efficiently team members need to communicate, but to communicate sufficiently and at appropriate times. This work has applications for fighter pilot and controller team training and the development of communication standards.

  9. Learning teams and networks: using information technology as a means of managing work process development in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Vesa; Paavilainen, Eija

    2002-01-01

    This article focuses on the introduction of team learning and shared knowledge creation using computer-based learning environments and teams as networks in the development of healthcare organizations. Using computer technology, care units can be considered learning teams and the hospital a network of those learning teams. Team learning requires that the healthcare workers' intellectual capital and personal competence be viewed as an important resource in developing the quality of action of the entire healthcare organization.

  10. A Method to Improve Learning Analysing Communication in Team Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Miren; Sanchez, Ana; Gutierrez, Julian; Perez, Tomas A.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years learning how to work in teams has become a common subject in higher education. Communication between student team members can be monitored using a bulletin board system, and hence, analyse individual and group role development. The composition and distribution of roles in a team are relevant characteristics that will considerably…

  11. Exploring the Impact of Toxic Attitudes and a Toxic Environment on the Veterinary Healthcare Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Irene C.; Coe, Jason B.; Adams, Cindy L.; Conlon, Peter D.; Sargeant, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this qualitative study was to compare veterinarians’ and Registered Veterinary Technicians’ (RVT’s) perceptions of the veterinary healthcare team with respect to the impact of toxic attitudes and a toxic environment. Focus group interviews using a semi-structured interview guide and follow up probes were held with four veterinarian groups (23 companion animal veterinarians) and four Registered Veterinary Technician groups (26 RVTs). Thematic analysis of the discussions indicated both veterinarian and RVT participants felt team members with manifestations of toxic attitudes negatively impacted veterinary team function. These manifestations included people being disrespectful, being resistant to change, always wanting to be the “go to person,” avoiding conflict, and lacking motivation. When conflict was ignored, or when people with toxic attitudes were not addressed, a toxic environment often resulted. A toxic environment sometimes manifested when “broken communication and tension between staff members” occurred as a result of employees lacking confidence, skills, or knowledge not being managed properly. It also occurred when employees did not feel appreciated, when there was difficulty coping with turnover, and when there were conflicting demands. The presence of people manifesting a toxic attitude was a source of frustration for both veterinarian and RVT participants. Prompt and consistent attention to negative behaviors is recommended to reduce the development of a toxic environment. PMID:26779492

  12. Challenging hierarchy in healthcare teams - ways to flatten gradients to improve teamwork and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, B; Oeppen, R S; Smith, D W; Brennan, P A

    2017-06-01

    In healthcare, mistakes that are potentially harmful or fatal to patients are often the result of poor communication between members of a team. This is particularly important in high-risk areas such as operating theatres or during any intervention, and the ability to challenge colleagues who are in authority when something does not seem right or is clearly wrong, is crucial. Colleagues in oral and maxillofacial surgery recognised the importance of this as early as 2004, and it is now well known that failure or reluctance to challenge others who might be wrong can severely compromise a patient's safety. The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh runs popular regular courses (Non-technical Skills for Surgeons, NOTSS) that teach how to ensure safety through good communication and teamwork. In this paper we introduce the concept of hierarchical challenge, and discuss models and approaches to address situations when problems arise within a team. Copyright © 2017 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Proposal to Improve Communication between Distributed Development Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashael Saeed Alqhtani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Distributed system development (DSD is implemented by distributed development teams that are separated by long distances and different time-zones. Communication between distributed development teams in distributed software development applies a major and critical role in the success of process. Conflicts between distributed teams bring high risks to fail a development project due to poor communication. Therefore, it is important for distributed teams to communicate effectively to complete a successful project. In this paper, the authors propose an improved solution for effective communication among distributed development team by integrating administrative and technical procedures to successfully complete a project. Survey is used as a research design to validate the proposed solution. The results show that the respondents support the proposed solution that it will solve the industry problem by providing an effective means of communication in a DSD environment.

  14. Equipe multiprofissional de saúde: conceito e tipologia Multiprofessional healthcare team: concept and typology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Peduzzi

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se um conceito e uma tipologia de trabalho em equipe, bem como os critérios de reconhecimento dos tipos de equipe. O conceito e a tipologia foram elaborados com base na literatura sobre o tema e em uma pesquisa empírica sobre trabalho multiprofissional em saúde, fundamentada teoricamente nos estudos do processo de trabalho em saúde e na teoria do agir comunicativo. Segundo essa formulação teórica, o trabalho em equipe consiste numa modalidade de trabalho coletivo que se configura na relação recíproca entre as intervenções técnicas e a interação dos agentes. A tipologia proposta refere-se a duas modalidades de equipe: equipe integração e equipe agrupamento, e os critérios de reconhecimento dos tipos de equipe dizem respeito a comunicação entre os agentes do trabalho; diferenças técnicas e desigual valoração social dos trabalhos especializados; formulação de um projeto assistencial comum; especificidade de cada área profissional; e flexibilidade da divisão do trabalho e autonomia técnica.This paper introduces concept and typology to teamwork as well as criteria to identify types of teams. The concept and the typology were developed based on the literature and research on multi-professional work in healthcare, based in the theory of studies on work process in healthcare and in the theory of communicative action. According to this theoretical proposition, teamwork is a form of collective work characterized by a reciprocal relationship between technical interventions and the interaction of agents. The proposed typology refers to two forms of teams: integrated teams as opposed to groups of people. The criteria to identify the types of team are related to communication among work agents; technical differences and inequality in social recognition of specialized works; formulation of a common care program; specificity of each professional area; flexibility of work division; and technical autonomy.

  15. A team approach to an undergraduate interprofessional communication course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Shelley; Buchanan, Judy; Cole, Tricia; McCoy, Carolyn

    2013-05-01

    Interprofessional communication is a team-taught upper-level undergraduate course for Nursing and Health Sciences students. In addition to teaching fundamental communication skills, this course weaves interprofessional competencies into weekly learning activities and assignments. The utilization of the principles and practices of team-based learning in the classroom enhances the attainment and practice of communication and interprofessional collaboration skills. Lessons learned from conducting informal course evaluations and delivering the course multiple times are presented.

  16. Team innovation climate and knowledge sharing among healthcare managers: mediating effects of altruistic intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Chuan; Cheng, Kai-Lin; Chao, Minston; Tseng, Hsu-Min

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to provide empirical evidence concerning the impact of team climate on knowledge sharing behavior and the mediating effects of individuals' altruistic intentions in the context of healthcare settings. Questionnaire data were collected from 212 administrators employed at a medical center in Taiwan. Team climate was assessed by the Team Climate Inventory composed of four factors, participative safety, support for innovation, vision, and task orientation. The proposed hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. The influence of the team innovation climate on knowledge sharing behavior was evident. Furthermore, individuals' altruistic intentions played a full mediating role in the relationship between team innovation climate and knowledge sharing behavior. These results contribute to the field of the people-orientated perspective in knowledge management. The full mediating effect of employees' altruistic intentions provides healthcare team managers the direction to accelerate knowledge sharing behavior.

  17. Communication Within Hospice Interdisciplinary Teams: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Angela R; Bastian, Randi Ginger; Apenteng, Bettye A

    2016-12-01

    Hospice care is coordinated through an interdisciplinary team (IDT), which assures that a holistic care plan based on the patient's wishes is implemented. The extent to which an IDT provides quality care may be associated with how effectively they communicate within the team as well as with patients, caregivers, and families. This review seeks to characterize communication strategies among hospice IDT members and to determine how such strategies impact patient care. Although the existing literature sheds some light on communication within hospice IDTs, further research is needed. Inquiry into the communicative process of IDTs in settings other than team meetings, such as during patient visits or informal settings, would provide a more comprehensive representation of how communication influences IDT dynamics and overall team functioning. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. The influence of teams, supervisors and organizations on healthcare practitioners' abilities to practise ethically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Sarah; Austin, Wendy

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare practitioners make many important ethical decisions in their day-to-day practices. Questions arising in daily practice require practitioners to make prudent, balanced and good decisions, which are most effectively made interpersonally and reflectively. It is commonly assumed that the team-based structure of healthcare delivery can provide practitioners with the support needed to address ethical questions in their practice, especially if the team involves multidisciplinary collaboration. A phenomenological study was conducted in which the impact of the team and the larger organization on practitioners' experiences of dealing with moral challenges was uncovered. Various mental healthcare professionals shared their experiences of ethically challenging situations in their practices and described the ways in which their teammates and supervisors affected how they faced these troubling situations. These findings allow us to see that there is considerable room for healthcare managers, many of whom are nurses, to facilitate supportive, ethical environments for healthcare professionals. An understanding of the essential experience of practising ethically allows for an appreciation of the significance of the team's role in supporting it and enables healthcare managers to target support for ethical healthcare work.

  19. Sustainable interprofessional teamwork needs a team-friendly healthcare system: Experiences from a collaborative Dutch programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk-de Vries, Anneke; van Dongen, Jerôme Jean Jacques; van Bokhoven, Marloes Amantia

    2017-03-01

    The significance of effective interprofessional teamwork to improve the quality of care has been widely recognised. Effective interprofessional teamwork calls on good collaboration between professionals and patients, coordination between professionals, and the development of teamwork over time. Effective development of teams also requires support from the wider organisational context. In a Dutch village, healthcare professionals work closely together, and mutual consultations as well as interprofessional meetings take place on a regular basis. The network was created as a precondition for sustainable interprofessional teamwork in elderly care. However, several external barriers were experienced regarding the supportive structure and cooperative attitude of the healthcare insurer and municipality. The aim of the article is to examine these experience-based issues regarding internal organisation, perspective, and definition of effective teamwork. Complicating factors refer to finding the right key figures, and the different perspectives on team development and team effectiveness. Our conclusion is that the organisation of healthcare insurance companies needs to implement fundamental changes to facilitate an interprofessional care approach. Furthermore, municipalities should work on their vision of the needs and benefits of a fruitful collaboration with interprofessional healthcare teams. The challenge for healthcare teams is to learn to speak the language of external partners. To support the development of interprofessional teams, external parties need to recognise and trust in a shared aim to provide quality of care in an efficient and effective way.

  20. Can the collective intentions of individual professionals within healthcare teams predict the team's performance: developing methods and theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Marije

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within implementation research, using theory-based approaches to understanding the behaviours of healthcare professionals and the quality of care that they reflect and designing interventions to change them is being promoted. However, such approaches lead to a new range of methodological and theoretical challenges pre-eminent among which are how to appropriately relate predictors of individual's behaviour to measures of the behaviour of healthcare professionals. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between the theory of planned behaviour proximal predictors of behaviour (intention and perceived behavioural control, or PBC and practice level behaviour. This was done in the context of two clinical behaviours – statin prescription and foot examination – in the management of patients with diabetes mellitus in primary care. Scores for the predictor variables were aggregated over healthcare professionals using four methods: simple mean of all primary care team members' intention scores; highest intention score combined with PBC of the highest intender in the team; highest intention score combined with the highest PBC score in the team; the scores (on both constructs of the team member identified as having primary responsibility for the clinical behaviour. Methods Scores on theory-based cognitive variables were collected by postal questionnaire survey from a sample of primary care doctors and nurses from northeast England and the Netherlands. Data on two clinical behaviours were patient reported, and collected by postal questionnaire survey. Planned analyses explored the predictive value of various aggregations of intention and PBC in explaining variance in the behavioural data. Results Across the two countries and two behaviours, responses were received from 37 to 78% of healthcare professionals in 57 to 93% practices; 51% (UK and 69% (Netherlands of patients surveyed responded. None of the aggregations of

  1. Enhancing Virtual Teams: Relations vs. Communication Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smagt, A.G.M. van der

    2000-01-01

    Are virtual teams an adequate alternative for co-located (face-to-face) teams in case of complex, equivocal relations? Business scientists are predominantly pessimistic. They argue that “rich” media – those that transmit higher levels of nonverbal cues – are necessary in these circumstances. In this

  2. International Conference on Communication in Healthcare 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Nasteha Abdullahi; Schopper, Heather; Seegel, Max

    This  symposium follows previous student symposiums in 2008 in Oslo and 2010  in Verona. As the importance of communication skills has become more widely accepted  by medical schools across the globe, curricula  have been changed to reflect this  including dedicated lectures, small group sessions......, simulations, and analyzation of video recordings. There remains little direct feedback from students about these changes and about communication skills curricula in general.     In this symposium, students from Germany, Denmark, Italy, the Netherlands, Russia, and the United States  will speak about...... their experiences learning communication skills.   In particular they    will discuss their experiences with changes in communication skills curricula at their respective institutions, the utility of evaluations of these skills, and what elements are still missing from communication skills teaching that would make...

  3. International Conference on Communication in Healthcare 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Nasteha Abdullahi; Schopper, Heather; Seegel, Max

    This  symposium follows previous student symposiums in 2008 in Oslo and 2010  in Verona. As the importance of communication skills has become more widely accepted  by medical schools across the globe, curricula  have been changed to reflect this  including dedicated lectures, small group sessions......, simulations, and analyzation of video recordings. There remains little direct feedback from students about these changes and about communication skills curricula in general.     In this symposium, students from Germany, Denmark, Italy, the Netherlands, Russia, and the United States  will speak about...... their experiences learning communication skills.   In particular they    will discuss their experiences with changes in communication skills curricula at their respective institutions, the utility of evaluations of these skills, and what elements are still missing from communication skills teaching that would make...

  4. Improving Healthcare Team Collaboration in Hospital Transfers through Cloud-Based Mobile Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Neyem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a clinical fact that better patient flow management in and between hospitals improves quality of care, resource utilization, and cost efficiency. As the number of patients in hospitals constantly grows, the need for hospital transfers is directly affected. Interhospital transfers can be required for several reasons but they are most commonly made when the diagnostic and therapeutic facilities required for a patient are not available locally. Transferring a critical patient between hospitals is commonly associated with risk of death and complications. This raises the question: How can we improve healthcare team collaboration in hospital transfers through the use of emerging information technology and communication services? This paper presents a cloud-based mobile system for supporting team collaboration and decision-making in the transportation of patients in critical condition. The Rapid Emergency Medicine Score (REMS scale was used as an outcome variable, being a useful scale to assess the risk profile of critical patients requiring transfers between hospitals. This helps medical staff to adopt proper risk-prevention measures when handling a transfer and to react on time if any complications arise in transit.

  5. Constructions of the patient in healthcare communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Anja Svejgaard

    2016-01-01

    of an ethnographic case study regarding “The Perspective of the Patient” – a Danish Hospital’s patient-centred communication programme. Mapping methods inspired by Grounded Theory are used to qualify the analysis. Findings – The paper shows that strategic patient-centred communication addresses both a care......; citizen with rights; patient as a competent resource; user as active partner; and consumer. As a result, the patient-centred communication programme renders the patient as a flexible figure able to fit organizational demands of both care orientation and market concerns. Originality/value – This study...

  6. Enhancing Mathematical Communication for Virtual Math Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Gerry Stahl; Murat Perit; Stephen Weimar; Baba Kofi Weusijana; Jimmy Xiantong Ou

    2010-01-01

    The Math Forum is an online resource center for pre-algebra, algebra, geometry and pre-calculus. Its Virtual Math Teams (VMT) service provides an integrated web-based environment for small teams of people to discuss math and to work collaboratively on math problems or explore interesting mathematical micro-worlds together. The VMT Project studies the online math discourse that takes place during sessions of virtual math teams working on open-ended problem-solving tasks. In particular, it inve...

  7. High Performing Teams: The Moderating Effects of Communication Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    3 LITERATURE REVIEW ............................................................................................................................ 4...in Mogadishu, Somalia, Operation GOTHIC SERPENT quickly ran into several complications before turning into a rescue operation (Bowden, 1999). For...have on verbal team member communication and team performance? 3 CHAPTER 2 LITERATURE REVIEW Collaborative Environments Because

  8. Constructions of the patient in healthcare communications: six patient figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pors, Anja Svejgaard

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how strategic, patient-centred communication plays a part in the discursive management of expectations posed to patients and healthcare organizations. The paper provides an analysis of four documents collected as part of an ethnographic case study regarding "The Perspective of the Patient" - a Danish Hospital's patient-centred communication programme. Mapping methods inspired by Grounded Theory are used to qualify the analysis. The paper shows that strategic patient-centred communication addresses both a care-oriented approach to the patient and deploys market perceptions of patients. Market and care is seen as co-existing organizing modes that entail expectations to the patient. In the communication programme the patient is constructed in six information-seeking patient figures: affective patient; target group patient; citizen with rights; patient as a competent resource; user as active partner; and consumer. As a result, the patient-centred communication programme renders the patient as a flexible figure able to fit organizational demands of both care orientation and market concerns. This study contributes to qualitative research in organizational health communication by combining two subfields - patient-centredness and health communication - in an empirical study of how market and care are intertwined in a patient-centred communication programme. The argument goes beyond the prevalent prescriptive approaches to patient-centredness and healthcare communication, instead providing a critical analytical perspective on strategic communication and patient-centredness and showing how expectations are posed to both patient and organization.

  9. Communicating in a Design Team - creating meaning in a design team through boundary objects

    OpenAIRE

    Lindstedt, Sara

    2005-01-01

    This thesis explores object based design team communication. It is assumed that boundary objects in design teams serve as an important communication aid and are considered to have a crucial role in the conducting of multidisciplinary teamwork. Objects, such as design specifications and prototypes, can for example help bridging knowledge gaps between the different interests involved and offer guidance and support in their design work. The aim was to identify the possible problems that might oc...

  10. Operative team communication during simulated emergencies: Too busy to respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W Austin; Jones, Seth; Crowell-Kuhnberg, Adrianna M; O'Keeffe, Dara; Boyle, Kelly M; Klainer, Suzanne B; Smink, Douglas S; Yule, Steven

    2017-05-01

    Ineffective communication among members of a multidisciplinary team is associated with operative error and failure to rescue. We sought to measure operative team communication in a simulated emergency using an established communication framework called "closed loop communication." We hypothesized that communication directed at a specific recipient would be more likely to elicit a check back or closed loop response and that this relationship would vary with changes in patients' clinical status. We used the closed loop communication framework to code retrospectively the communication behavior of 7 operative teams (each comprising 2 surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nurses) during response to a simulated, postanesthesia care unit "code blue." We identified call outs, check backs, and closed loop episodes and applied descriptive statistics and a mixed-effects negative binomial regression to describe characteristics of communication in individuals and in different specialties. We coded a total of 662 call outs. The frequency and type of initiation and receipt of communication events varied between clinical specialties (P communication events than anesthesiologists. For the average participant, directed communication increased the likelihood of check back by at least 50% (P = .021) in periods preceding acute changes in the clinical setting, and exerted no significant effect in periods after acute changes in the clinical situation. Communication patterns vary by specialty during a simulated operative emergency, and the effect of directed communication in eliciting a response depends on the clinical status of the patient. Operative training programs should emphasize the importance of quality communication in the period immediately after an acute change in the clinical setting of a patient and recognize that communication patterns and needs vary between members of multidisciplinary operative teams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Patients as team members: opportunities, challenges and paradoxes of including patients in multi-professional healthcare teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Graham P; Finn, Rachael

    2011-11-01

    Current healthcare policy emphasises the need for more collaborative, team-based approaches to providing care, and for a greater voice for service users in the management and delivery of care. Increasingly, policy encourages 'partnerships' between users and professionals so that users, too, effectively become team members. In examining this phenomenon, this paper draws on insights from the organisational-sociological literature on team work, which highlights the challenges of bringing together diverse professional groups, but which has not, to date, been applied in contexts where users, too, are included in teams. Using data from a qualitative study of five pilot cancer-genetics projects, in which service users were included in teams responsible for managing and developing new services, it highlights the difficulties involved in making teams of such heterogeneous members-and the paradoxes that arise when this task is achieved. It reveals how the tension between integration and specialisation of team members, highlighted in the literature on teams in general, is especially acute for service users, the distinctiveness of whose contribution is more fragile, and open to blurring. © 2011 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2011 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. The role of gender in healthcare communication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study has been to obtain more insight into the health condition of fatigued patients, their expectations when visiting the general practitioner (GP), the way they communicate, and possible gender differences. Data consisted of 579 patient questionnaires and 440 video-observations of

  13. tEACH - European network for teaching communication in healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe

    2014-01-01

    (efteruddannelse af læger) & Annegrethe Nielsen (jordemoderuddannelsen), Danmark – alle medlemmer af tEACH Baggrund European Association of Communication in Healthcare (EACH, www.each.eu) blev stiftet i 2001 som et fælles europæisk samarbejde omkring kommunikation på sundhedsområdet. Kommunikationsundervisning er...

  14. Building Collective Communication Competence in Interdisciplinary Research Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jessica Leigh

    2009-01-01

    Using a grounded theory approach, this investigation addresses how an interdisciplinary research (IDR) team negotiates meaning and struggles to establish and sustain a sense of collective communication competence (CCC). Certain communication processes were foundational to building CCC, such as spending time together, practicing trust, discussing…

  15. Flexible knowledge repertoires: communication by leaders in trauma teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobsson Maritha

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In emergency situations, it is important for the trauma team to efficiently communicate their observations and assessments. One common communication strategy is “closed-loop communication”, which can be described as a transmission model in which feedback is of great importance. The role of the leader is to create a shared goal in order to achieve consensus in the work for the safety of the patient. The purpose of this study was to analyze how formal leaders communicate knowledge, create consensus, and position themselves in relation to others in the team. Methods Sixteen trauma teams were audio- and video-recorded during high fidelity training in an emergency department. Each team consisted of six members: one surgeon or emergency physician (the designated team leader, one anaesthesiologist, one nurse anaesthetist, one enrolled nurse from the theatre ward, one registered nurse and one enrolled nurse from the emergency department (ED. The communication was transcribed and analyzed, inspired by discourse psychology and Strauss’ concept of “negotiated order”. The data were organized and coded in NVivo 9. Results The findings suggest that leaders use coercive, educational, discussing and negotiating strategies to work things through. The leaders in this study used different repertoires to convey their knowledge to the team, in order to create a common goal of the priorities of the work. Changes in repertoires were dependent on the urgency of the situation and the interaction between team members. When using these repertoires, the leaders positioned themselves in different ways, either on an authoritarian or a more egalitarian level. Conclusion This study indicates that communication in trauma teams is complex and consists of more than just transferring messages quickly. It also concerns what the leaders express, and even more importantly, how they speak to and involve other team members.

  16. The ACTive Intervention in Hospice Interdisciplinary Team Meetings: Exploring family caregiver and hospice team communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Parker Oliver, Debra; Demiris, George; Baldwin, Paula

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents the theoretical framework and rationale for the ACTive intervention which proposes the use of video technology to facilitate patient and family participation in hospice interdisciplinary team meetings where plans of care are determined. It is surmised that patient and family involvement will improve communication and compliance in hospice care. An analysis of data from a pilot project of the ACTive intervention was conducted to explore active participation among family caregivers and the hospice team. Through the use of videophone technology caregivers participated in video-recorded team meetings. The actual communication behaviors of caregivers and team members were analyzed for active participation. Findings revealed that team-prompted caregiver participation was most common, however, team use of supportive talk in this context was considerably less frequent. The study also found that the team's use of active participation behaviors elicits caregiver active participation behaviors. The results of this study suggest the intervention was an effective way to involve family caregivers as active participants in the designing of care for their loved one. Findings also suggest that hospice staff would benefit from education and training on best practices for communicating with caregivers in the team meeting setting.

  17. Profile of the dentist in the oral healthcare team in countries with developed economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, M; Treasure, E; van Dijk, W; Feldman, C; Groeneveld, H; Kellett, M; Pazdera, J; Rouse, L; Sae-Lim, V; Seth-Smith, A; Yen, E; Zarkowski, P

    2008-02-01

    This paper confines itself to the description of the profile of a general dentist while outlining where the boundary between specialist and generalist may lie. The profile must reflect the need to recognize that oral health is part of general health. The epidemiological trends and disease variation of a country should inform the profile of the dentist. A particular tension between the provision of oral healthcare in publicly funded and private services may result in dentists practicing dentistry in different ways. However, the curriculum should equip the practitioner for either scenario. A dentist should work to standards appropriate to the needs of the individual and the population within the country's legal and ethical framework. He/she should have communication skills appropriate to ascertain the patient's beliefs and values. A dentist should work within the principles of equity and diversity and have the knowledge and clinical competence for independent general practice, including knowledge of health promotion and prevention. He/she should participate in life-long learning, which should result in a reflective practitioner whose clinical skills reflect the current evidence base, scientific breakthroughs and needs of their patients. Within the 4-5 years of a dental degree it is not possible for a student to achieve proficiency in all areas of dentistry. He/she needs to have the ability to know their own limitations and to access appropriate specialist advice for their patients while taking responsibility for the oral healthcare they provide. The dentist has the role of leader of the oral health team and, in this capacity; he/she is responsible for diagnosis, treatment planning and the quality control of the oral treatment. The dental student on graduation must therefore understand the principles and techniques which enable the dentist to act in this role. He/she should have the abilities to communicate, delegate and collaborate both within the dental team and

  18. Enhancing Mathematical Communication for Virtual Math Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry Stahl

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Math Forum is an online resource center for pre-algebra, algebra, geometry and pre-calculus. Its Virtual Math Teams (VMT service provides an integrated web-based environment for small teams of people to discuss math and to work collaboratively on math problems or explore interesting mathematical micro-worlds together. The VMT Project studies the online math discourse that takes place during sessions of virtual math teams working on open-ended problem-solving tasks. In particular, it investigates methods of group cognition that are employed by teams in this setting. The VMT environment currently integrates social networking, synchronous text chat, a shared whiteboard for drawing, web browsers and an asynchronous wiki for exchanging findings within the larger community. A simple version of MathML is supported in the whiteboard, chat and wiki for displaying mathematical expressions. The VMT Project is currently integrating the dynamic mathematics application, GeoGebra, into its collaboration environment. This will create a multi-user version of GeoGebra, which can be used in concert with the chat, web browsers, curricular topics and wiki repository.

  19. Innovation in globally distributed teams: the role of LMX, communication frequency, and member influence on team decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajendran, Ravi S; Joshi, Aparna

    2012-11-01

    For globally distributed teams charged with innovation, member contributions to the team are crucial for effective performance. Prior research, however, suggests that members of globally distributed teams often feel isolated and excluded from their team's activities and decisions. How can leaders of such teams foster member inclusion in team decisions? Drawing on leader-member exchange (LMX) theory, we propose that for distributed teams, LMX and communication frequency jointly shape member influence on team decisions. Findings from a test of our hypotheses using data from 40 globally distributed teams suggest that LMX can enhance member influence on team decisions when it is sustained through frequent leader-member communication. This joint effect is strengthened as team dispersion increases. At the team level, member influence on team decisions has a positive effect on team innovation.

  20. The Role of Communication and Trust in Global Virtual Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarker, Saonee; Ahuja, Manju; Sarker, Suprateek

    2011-01-01

    the interrelationships between key constructs in the literature. Further, the study, through its adoption of the social network analysis approach, provides awareness within the IS research community of the strengths of applying network approaches in examining new organizational forms.......The importance of communication and trust in the context of global virtual teams has been noted and reiterated in the information systems (IS) literature. Yet precisely how communication and trust influence certain outcomes within virtual teams remains unresolved. In this study, we seek...... to contribute some clarity to the understanding of the theoretical linkages among trust, communication, and member performance in virtual teams. To this end, we identify and test three proposed models (additive, interaction, and mediation) describing the role of trust in its relationship with communication...

  1. Communication in Healthcare: Opportunities for information technology and concerns for patient safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Pirnejad (Habibollah)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractUnderstanding healthcare workflow is fundamental for design and implementation of information systems. Communication and information exchange between healthcare professionals plays a pivotal role in developing smooth workflow within and between healthcare organizations. The study in this

  2. Activities of the healthcare team for women who smoke during pregnancy and the puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Castilhos Teixeira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify activities developed by the healthcare team for pregnant and postpartum women who smoke.METHOD: cross-sectional study with a sample of 135 healthcare team members who assist pregnant and postpartum women in a university hospital located in southern Brazil. The data was collected using questionnaires and analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences software.RESULTS: 76 (56.3% staff members reported that they always addressed smoking cessation; however, the approach occurred in only two periods of the hospitalization and/or prenatal consultations, not including family members. In regard to the effectiveness of their actions, the health team assessed it as fair or poor, and mentioned the need for updating knowledge regarding this issue.CONCLUSIONS: the health team did not perform the approach as recommended by the tobacco control guidelines, requiring training to offer a qualified and efficient intervention.

  3. The effectiveness of assertiveness communication training programs for healthcare professionals and students: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Mieko; Maguire, Jane; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Stone, Teresa Elizabeth

    2017-09-05

    Communication errors have a negative impact on patient safety. It is therefore essential that healthcare professionals have the skills and confidence to speak up assertively when patient safety is at risk. Although the facilitators to and barriers of assertive communication have been the subject of previous reviews, evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions designed to enhance assertive communication is lacking. Thus, this paper reports the findings from a systematic review of the effectiveness of assertiveness communication training programs for healthcare professionals and students. The objective of this review is to identify, appraise and synthesise the best available quantitative evidence in relation to the effectiveness of assertiveness communication training programs for healthcare professionals and students on levels of assertiveness, communication competence and impact on clinicians' behaviours and patient safety. The databases included: CINAHL, Cochrane library, EMBASE, Informit health collection, MEDLINE, ProQuest nursing and allied health, PsycINFO, Scopus and Web of Science. The search for unpublished studies included: MedNar, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I. Studies published in English from 2001 until 2016 inclusive were considered. The review included original quantitative research that evaluated (a) any type of independent assertiveness communication training program; and (b) programs with assertiveness training included as a core component of team skills or communication training for healthcare professionals and students, regardless of healthcare setting and level of qualification of participants. Studies selected based on eligibility criteria were assessed for methodological quality and the data were extracted by two independent researchers using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal and data extraction tools. Eleven papers were critically appraised using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal checklists. Eight

  4. Helping fluid teams work: A research agenda for effective team adaptation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedwell, Wendy L; Ramsay, P Scott; Salas, Eduardo

    2012-12-01

    Although membership changes within teams are a common practice, research into this phenomenon is relatively nascent (Summers et al.; Acad Manag J 55:314-338, 2012). The small literature base, however, does provide insight into skills required for effective adaptation. The purpose of this effort is to provide a brief research synopsis, leading to research hypotheses about medical team training. By generalizing previous scientific findings regarding skills required for effective membership adaptation in different kinds of teams, we posit mechanisms whereby teamwork training might also support adaptation among medical teams (Burke et al.; Qual & Saf Health Care 13:i96-i104, 2004 and Salas et al.; Theor Issues Ergon Sci 8:381-394, 2007). We provide an overview of the membership change literature. Drawing upon literature from both within and outside of the medical domain, we suggest a framework and research propositions to aid in research efforts designed to determine the best content for helping to create adaptable medical teams through team training efforts. For effective adaptation, we suggest ad hoc teams should be trained on generalizable teamwork skills, to share just "enough" and the "right" information, to engage in shared leadership, and to shift from explicit to implicit coordination. Our overarching goal was to present what is known from the general research literature on successful team adaptation to membership changes, and to propose a research agenda to evaluate whether findings generalize to member changes in medical teams.

  5. Communication in Organizations: The Communication Environment of a Task-Force Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulk, Arlene; Stetler, Cheryl

    Changes in organizational structures, with less emphasis on bureaucracy, require new approaches to communication. One relatively new form of organization design is the "task force" or "project team" which is assigned to one specific short-term program, after which the team is dissolved and its members reassigned. A study of a project team in a…

  6. COMMUNICATING SUCCESSFULLY WHEN MANAGING MULTICULTURAL TEAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra IOANID; Carmen-Laura ZARZU; Cezar SCARLAT

    2014-01-01

    Day by day globalization covers new areas of life and calls for continuous learning and adjusting to new cultural dimensions. Managers are expected to display adaptation to new ways of working, cultural sensitivity, cultural intelligence and to posses multicultural competencies communication skills. Understanding the impact of cultural diversity on the communication within the organization is essential for the success of a company. Especially in multinational companies, when departments worki...

  7. Team Communication Influence on Procedure Performance: Findings From Interprofessional Simulations with Nursing and Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reising, Deanna L; Carr, Douglas E; Gindling, Sally; Barnes, Roxie; Garletts, Derrick; Ozdogan, Zulfukar

    Interprofessional team performance is believed to be dependent on the development of effective team communication skills. Yet, little evidence exists in undergraduate nursing programs on whether team communication skills affect team performance. A secondary analysis of a larger study on interprofessional student teams in simulations was conducted to determine if there is a relationship between team communication and team procedure performance. The results showed a positive, significant correlation between interprofessional team communication ratings and procedure accuracy in the simulation. Interprofessional team training in communication skills for nursing and medical students improves the procedure accuracy in a simulated setting.

  8. Attitudes toward interprofessional healthcare teams: a comparison between undergraduate students and alumni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Takatoshi; Shinozaki, Hiromitsu; Hayashi, Kunihiko; Lee, Bumsuk; Matsui, Hiroki; Kururi, Nana; Kazama, Hiroko; Ogawara, Hatsue; Tozato, Fusae; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Asakawa, Yasuyoshi; Abe, Yumiko; Uchida, Yoko; Kanaizumi, Shiomi; Sakou, Keiko; Watanabe, Hideomi

    2013-05-01

    The goal of effective interprofessional education (IPE) is high-quality patient-care delivery and attaining a high level of patient satisfaction in clinical settings. We aimed to examine if alumni who have studied in an IPE program at a pre-licensure stage maintain a positive attitude toward collaborative practice (CP) in the postgraduate clinical experience. This paper presents a cross-sectional descriptive study which employed the modified attitudes toward health care teams scale (ATHCTS) to examine the relationship between exposure to clinical practice and the attitudes toward interprofessional healthcare teams. Results indicated that the overall mean score of alumni was significantly lower than that of undergraduate students on the modified ATHCTS. Only "team efficacy" had a significantly lower regression factor score in alumni than undergraduate students. Our findings suggest that changes in professional identity in a team may be due to contact with patients after graduation in the postgraduate clinical healthcare experience. The reduction of attitudes toward healthcare teams in the postgraduate clinical experience may be related to "team efficacy". We emphasize the need for in-service IPE for sustaining attitudes and providing a useful CP, which results in good clinical outcome.

  9. Shared leadership and group identification in healthcare: The leadership beliefs of clinicians working in interprofessional teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Craig; Mason, Barbara

    2017-02-28

    Despite the proposed benefits of applying shared and distributed leadership models in healthcare, few studies have explored the leadership beliefs of clinicians and ascertained whether differences exist between professions. The current article aims to address these gaps and, additionally, examine whether clinicians' leadership beliefs are associated with the strength of their professional and team identifications. An online survey was responded to by 229 healthcare workers from community interprofessional teams in mental health settings across the East of England. No differences emerged between professional groups in their leadership beliefs; all professions reported a high level of agreement with shared leadership. A positive association emerged between professional identification and shared leadership in that participants who expressed the strongest level of profession identification also reported the greatest agreement with shared leadership. The same association was demonstrated for team identification and shared leadership. The findings highlight the important link between group identification and leadership beliefs, suggesting that strategies that promote strong professional and team identifications in interprofessional teams are likely to be conducive to clinicians supporting principles of shared leadership. Future research is needed to strengthen this link and examine the leadership practices of healthcare workers.

  10. Stepped Skills: A team approach towards communication about sexuality and intimacy in cancer and palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde de Vocht

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCancer often has a profound and enduring impact on sexuality, affecting both patients and their partners. Most healthcare professionals in cancer and palliative care are struggling to address intimate issues with the patients in their care.MethodsStudy 1: An Australian study using semi-structured interviews and documentary data analysis.Study 2: Building on this Australian study, using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach, data were collected in the Netherlands through interviewing 15 cancer patients, 13 partners and 20 healthcare professionals working in cancer and palliative care. The hermeneutic analysis was supported by ATLAS.ti and enhanced by peer debriefing and expert consultation.ResultsFor patients and partners a person-oriented approach is a prerequisite for discussing the whole of their experience regarding the impact of cancer treatment on their sexuality and intimacy. Not all healthcare professionals are willing or capable of adopting such a person-oriented approach.ConclusionA complementary team approach, with clearly defined roles for different team members and clear referral pathways, is required to enhance communication about sexuality and intimacy in cancer and palliative care. This approach, that includes the acknowledgement of the importance of patients’ and partners’ sexuality and intimacy by all team members, is captured in the Stepped Skills model that was developed as an outcome of the Dutch study.

  11. Properties of Healthcare Teaming Networks as a Function of Network Construction Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Zand, Martin S; Farooq, Samir A; Fucile, Christopher; Ghoshal, Grourab; White, Robert J; Quill, Caroline M; Rosenberg, Alexander; Serrano, Hugo; Chafi, Hassan; Boudreau, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Network models of healthcare systems can be used to examine how providers collaborate, communicate, refer patients to each other. Most healthcare service network models have been constructed from patient claims data, using billing claims to link patients with providers. The data sets can be quite large, making standard methods for network construction computationally challenging and thus requiring the use of alternate construction algorithms. While these alternate methods have seen increasing use in generating healthcare networks, there is little to no literature comparing the differences in the structural properties of the generated networks. To address this issue, we compared the properties of healthcare networks constructed using different algorithms and the 2013 Medicare Part B outpatient claims data. Three different algorithms were compared: binning, sliding frame, and trace-route. Unipartite networks linking either providers or healthcare organizations by shared patients were built using each method. We...

  12. Healthcare Team Performance in Time Critical Environments: Coordinating Events, Foraging, and System Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrett S. Caldwell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review paper addresses issues in how healthcare providers search, obtain, and share resources in provider teams. Based in part on a System of Systems (SoS analysis of provider coordination and resource flows, this paper expands the concepts of resource foraging theory and event dynamics to develop systematic methods for studying healthcare provider coordination. Process flow and human factors emphases from industrial engineering are used to address critical concerns of single-scale and multi-scale performance in healthcare delivery settings. Provider strategies for acquiring the information and resources needed for successful healthcare delivery are dependent on interactions between task requirements, time constraints, and provider coordination processes, as well as limitations of information and resource flow capabilities. These improved definitions and measures will enhance engineers' ability to contribute to improved patient care timeliness, effectiveness, quality, and safety.

  13. Communication skills of healthcare professionals in paediatric diabetes services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, H; Robling, M; Crowne, E; Hood, K; Gregory, J W

    2009-05-01

    To identify training needs in communication skills and to assess training preferences of staff working in paediatric diabetes services, which will inform the development of a learning programme in behaviour change counselling for healthcare professionals. Three hundred and eighty-five staff in 67 UK paediatric diabetes services were sent questionnaires to determine their previous communication skills training, to measure their self-reported view of the importance of and confidence in addressing common clinical problems and to assess the perceived feasibility of training methods to improve skillfulness. Two hundred and sixty-six questionnaires (69%) were returned from 65 services. Sixteen per cent of doctors, nurses and dietitians reported no previous training in communication skills and 47% had received no training since graduating. Respondents rated psychosocial issues as more important to address than medical issues within consultations (t = 8.93, P important component of consultations involving young people with diabetes, but healthcare professionals find it easier to address medical issues. This represents a key training need in communication skills for diabetes professionals. The survey will inform the development of a tailored learning programme for health professionals in UK paediatric diabetes clinics.

  14. Patient perspectives on communication with the medical team: pilot study using the Communication Assessment Tool-Team (CAT-T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Laura Min; Tanabe, Paula; Pang, Peter S; Gisondi, Michael A; Courtney, D Mark; Engel, Kirsten G; Donlan, Sarah M; Adams, James G; Makoul, Gregory

    2008-11-01

    Effective communication is an essential aspect of high-quality patient care and a core competency for physicians. To date, assessment of communication skills in team-based settings has not been well established. We sought to tailor a psychometrically validated instrument, the Communication Assessment Tool, for use in Team settings (CAT-T), and test the feasibility of collecting patient perspectives of communication with medical teams in the emergency department (ED). A prospective, cross-sectional study in an academic, tertiary, urban, Level 1 trauma center using the CAT-T, a 15-item instrument. Items were answered via a 5-point scale, with 5 = excellent. All adult ED patients (> or = 18 y/o) were eligible if the following exclusion criteria did not apply: primary psychiatric issues, critically ill, physiologically unstable, non-English speaking, or under arrest. 81 patients were enrolled (mean age: 44, S.D. = 17; 44% male). Highest ratings were for treating the patient with respect (69% excellent), paying attention to the patient (69% excellent), and showing care and concern (69% excellent). Lowest ratings were for greeting the patient appropriately (54%), encouraging the patient to ask questions (54%), showing interest in the patient's ideas about his or her health (53% excellent), and involving the patient in decisions as much as he or she wanted (53% excellent). Although this pilot study has several methodological limitations, it demonstrates a signal that patient assessment of communication with the medical team is feasible and offers important feedback. Results indicate the need to improve communication in the ED. In the ED, focusing on the medical team rather then individual caregivers may more accurately reflect patients' experience.

  15. Ebola, team communication, and shame: but shame on whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Examined as an isolated situation, and through the lens of a rare and feared disease, Mr. Duncan's case seems ripe for second-guessing the physicians and nurses who cared for him. But viewed from the perspective of what we know about errors and team communication, his case is all too common. Nearly 440,000 patient deaths in the U.S. each year may be attributable to medical errors. Breakdowns in communication among health care teams contribute in the majority of these errors. The culture of health care does not seem to foster functional, effective communication between and among professionals. Why? And more importantly, why do we not do something about it?

  16. [Communication within the health care team: doctors and nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollár, János

    2016-04-24

    Proper communication within the health care team is especially important in terms of creating safe emotional and professional conditions for the team members and for quality healing. The aim of the study is to explore the factors that hinder appropriate communication between doctors and nurses and thus to make the effective elimination of the communication disturbances possible. Investigation in main medical databases and general search engines were used for analysing the phenomenon. It was revealed that communication between doctors and nurses is restrained by factors that can be observed on individual, professional and system levels as well. Role confusion, lack of trust, communication barriers arising from hierarchical inequalities, leadership problems, differences in qualifications, burnout and organizational problems can equally be found amongst them. The effectiveness of communication between nurses and doctors in Hungary is especially strongly influenced by the fear of losing jobs, the financial problems arising from different degree of gratuity and the phenomenon of burnout. Changes on individual, professional and system levels are equally important for significant improvement in the communication between doctors and nurses. Joint trainings based on strong organizational development skills and joint conferences could promote significantly better flow of information, mutual appreciation and harmonization.

  17. Emergency department team communication with the patient: the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Danielle M; Ellison, Emily P; Venkatesh, Arjun K; Engel, Kirsten G; Cameron, Kenzie A; Makoul, Gregory; Adams, James G

    2013-08-01

    Effective communication is important for the delivery of quality care. The Emergency Department (ED) environment poses significant challenges to effective communication. The objective of this study was to determine patients' perceptions of their ED team's communication skills. This was a cross-sectional study in an urban, academic ED. Patients completed the Communication Assessment Tool for Teams (CAT-T) survey upon ED exit. The CAT-T was adapted from the psychometrically validated Communication Assessment Tool (CAT) to measure patient perceptions of communication with a medical team. The 14 core CAT-T items are associated with a 5-point scale (5 = excellent); results are reported as the percent of participants who responded "excellent." Responses were analyzed for differences based on age, sex, race, and operational metrics (wait time, ED daily census). There were 346 patients identified; the final sample for analysis was 226 patients (53.5% female, 48.2% Caucasian), representing a response rate of 65.3%. The scores on CAT-T items (reported as % "excellent") ranged from 50.0% to 76.1%. The highest-scoring items were "let me talk without interruptions" (76.1%), "talked in terms I could understand" (75.2%), and "treated me with respect" (74.3%). The lowest-scoring item was "encouraged me to ask questions" (50.0%). No differences were noted based on patient sex, race, age, wait time, or daily census of the ED. The patients in this study perceived that the ED teams were respectful and allowed them to talk without interruptions; however, lower ratings were given for items related to actively engaging the patient in decision-making and asking questions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Working in "teams" in an era of "liquid" healthcare: what is the use of theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Alan

    2013-01-01

    "Team" is used throughout the healthcare literature as if it had a transparent, single meaning, and in policy documents it has become a mantra. Yet, "team" is a contested and imprecise term, inviting theoretical sophistication. New forms of team working in healthcare contexts can be understood as a complex set of practices and a discourse--both performed, and written and talked about as a supplementary practice. In the context of fluid and unpredictable social conditions, teams are now theorized in terms of contradictory process as well as stable membership. Cultural-historical activity theory in particular provides a rich approach to understanding such process, in an era where the desire for stable networks--a will-to-stability--may be secondary to the need for a will-to-adaptability. A new vocabulary has emerged in theoretical accounts to describe activities of an emergent work order, in terms of a shift from stable "networking" to unstable "knotworking." However, this conceptual language can be overwrought and may alienate practitioners. Theory can be developed with practitioners themselves to avoid widening the gap between experience and the understanding and explanation of experience. Teams are not problems to be solved but activities to be expanded.

  19. Nurses' perceptions of multidisciplinary team work in acute health-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, Anita; Caldwell, Kay

    2006-12-01

    Multidisciplinary teamwork is viewed as one of the key processes through which care is managed in the British National Health Service, and yet is often viewed as one of the most problematic. Working in a multidisciplinary team requires many skills, which involves understanding not only one's own role but also the role of other professionals. The aim of this study was to explore nurses' perceptions of multidisciplinary teamwork in acute health-care. Nineteen nurses were interviewed using the critical incident approach to obtain their perceptions of multidisciplinary teamwork. Direct observation was conducted to record interactions between nurses and health-care professionals in multidisciplinary teams. In total, 14 meetings were attended in elder care and orthopaedics and seven in acute medicine. The findings of this study identified three barriers that hindered teamwork: (i) differing perceptions of teamwork; (ii) different levels of skills acquisitions to function as a team member; and (iii) the dominance of medical power that influenced interaction in teams. Thus, education establishments and nursing managers need to ensure that the acquisition of team-playing skills is an integral part of continued professional development.

  20. Medical capability team: the clinical microsystem for combat healthcare delivery in counterinsurgency operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susz; Van Steenvort, Jon K

    2008-01-01

    Today's operational environment in the support of counterinsurgency operations requires greater tactical and operational flexibility and diverse medical capabilities. The skills and organizations required for full spectrum medical operations are different from those of the past. Combat healthcare demands agility and the capacity for rapid change in clinical systems and processes to better support the counterinsurgency environment. This article proposes the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) develop and implement the medical capability team (MCT) for combat healthcare delivery. It discusses using the concept of the brigade combat team to develop medical capability teams as the unit of effectiveness to transform frontline care; provides a theoretical overview of the MCT as a "clinical microsystem"; discusses MCT leadership, training, and organizational support, and the deployment and employment of the MCT in a counterinsurgency environment. Additionally, this article proposes that the AMEDD initiate the development of an AMEDD Combat Training Center of Excellence to train and validate the MCTs. The complexity of combat healthcare demands an agile and campaign quality AMEDD with joint expeditionary capability in order to promote the best patient outcomes in a counterinsurgency environment.

  1. Relating Communications Mode Choice and Teamwork Quality: Conversational versus Textual Communication in IT System and Software Development Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James Robert

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explored how IT system and software development team members communicated in the workplace and whether teams that used more verbal communication (and less text-based communication) experienced higher levels of collaboration as measured using the Teamwork Quality (TWQ) scale. Although computer-mediated communication tools…

  2. Relating Communications Mode Choice and Teamwork Quality: Conversational versus Textual Communication in IT System and Software Development Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James Robert

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explored how IT system and software development team members communicated in the workplace and whether teams that used more verbal communication (and less text-based communication) experienced higher levels of collaboration as measured using the Teamwork Quality (TWQ) scale. Although computer-mediated communication tools…

  3. Virtual Team Leadership: The Effects of Leadership Style and Communication Medium on Team Interaction Styles and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambley, Laura A.; O'Neill, Thomas A.; Kline, Theresa J. B.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of transformational and transactional leadership styles and communication media on team interaction styles and outcomes. Teams communicated through one of the following three ways: (a) face-to-face, (b) desktop videoconference, or (c) text-based chat. Results indicated that transformational and transactional…

  4. Virtual Team Leadership: The Effects of Leadership Style and Communication Medium on Team Interaction Styles and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambley, Laura A.; O'Neill, Thomas A.; Kline, Theresa J. B.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of transformational and transactional leadership styles and communication media on team interaction styles and outcomes. Teams communicated through one of the following three ways: (a) face-to-face, (b) desktop videoconference, or (c) text-based chat. Results indicated that transformational and transactional…

  5. Virtuality, communication, and new product team creativity : a social network perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, RTAJ; van Engelen, JML; Kratzer, J

    2003-01-01

    Creativity is essential to the performance of new product development (NPD) teams. Since the creative NPD task requires teams to combine and integrate input from multiple NPD team members, the team's communication pattern is an important determinant of NPD team creativity. In the empirical part of

  6. Evaluating trauma team performance in a Level I trauma center: Validation of the trauma team communication assessment (TTCA-24).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMoor, Stephanie; Abdel-Rehim, Shady; Olmsted, Richard; Myers, John G; Parker-Raley, Jessica

    2017-07-01

    Nontechnical skills (NTS), such as team communication, are well-recognized determinants of trauma team performance and good patient care. Measuring these competencies during trauma resuscitations is essential, yet few valid and reliable tools are available. We aimed to demonstrate that the Trauma Team Communication Assessment (TTCA-24) is a valid and reliable instrument that measures communication effectiveness during activations. Two tools with adequate psychometric strength (Trauma Nontechnical Skills Scale [T-NOTECHS], Team Emergency Assessment Measure [TEAM]) were identified during a systematic review of medical literature and compared with TTCA-24. Three coders used each tool to evaluate 35 stable and 35 unstable patient activations (defined according to Advanced Trauma Life Support criteria). Interrater reliability was calculated between coders using the intraclass correlation coefficient. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to establish concurrent validity between TTCA-24 and the other two validated tools. Coders achieved an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.87 for stable patient activations and 0.78 for unstable activations scoring excellent on the interrater agreement guidelines. The median score for each assessment showed good team communication for all 70 videos (TEAM, 39.8 of 54; T-NOTECHS, 17.4 of 25; and TTCA-24, 87.4 of 96). A significant correlation between TTTC-24 and T-NOTECHS was revealed (p = 0.029), but no significant correlation between TTCA-24 and TEAM (p = 0.77). Team communication was rated slightly better across all assessments for stable versus unstable patient activations, but not statistically significant. TTCA-24 correlated with T-NOTECHS, an instrument measuring nontechnical skills for trauma teams, but not TEAM, a tool that assesses communication in generic emergency settings. TTCA-24 is a reliable and valid assessment that can be a useful adjunct when evaluating interpersonal and team communication during trauma

  7. Radio Gaga? Intra-team communication of Australian Rules Football umpires - effect of radio communication on content, structure and frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Timothy J; Salmon, Paul M; Read, Gemma J M

    2017-07-31

    Intra-team communication plays an important role in team effectiveness in various domains including sport. As such, it is a key consideration when introducing new tools within systems that utilise teams. The difference in intra-team communication of Australian Rules Football (AFL) umpiring teams was studied when umpiring with or without radio communications technology. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted to analyse the verbal communication of seven umpiring teams (20 participants) grouped according to their experience with radio communication. The results identified that radio communication technology increased the frequency and altered the structure of intra-team communication. Examination of the content of the intra-team communication identified impacts on the 'Big Five' teamwork behaviours and associated coordinating mechanisms. Analysis revealed that the communications utilised did not align with the closed-loop form of communication described in the Big Five model. Implications for teamwork models, coaching and training of AFL umpires are discussed. Practitioner Summary: Assessing the impact of technology on performance is of interest to ergonomics practitioners. The impact of radio communications on teamwork is explored in the highly dynamic domain of AFL umpiring. When given radio technology, intra-team communication increased which supported teamwork behaviours, such as backup behaviour and mutual performance monitoring.

  8. Communication that builds teams: assessing a nursing conflict intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotera, Anne Maydan; Mahon, Margaret M; Wright, Kevin B

    2014-01-01

    Quality communication is essential for building strong nursing teams. Structurational divergence (SD) theory explains how institutional factors can result in poor communication and conflict cycles; the theory has been developed in nursing context, although it is applicable to all organizational settings. We describe the design, implementation, and evaluation of an intervention to reduce SD and improve nurses' work life and team-member relationships. An intensive 9-hour course provided training in conflict/SD analysis and dialogic conflict/SD management to 36 working nurses from a variety of settings. Quantitative pre- and posttests were administered, with a comparison sample. The course reduced measures of negative conflict attitudes and behaviors: direct personalization, persecution feelings, negative relational effects, ambiguity intolerance, and triangulation (gossiping and complaining to uninvolved third parties). The course also increased important attitudes necessary for productive dialogue and conflict management: perceptions of positive relational effects, conflict liking, and positive beliefs about arguing. As compared with nonparticipants, participant posttests showed lower conflict persecution; higher recognition of positive relational effects; lower perceptions of negative relational effects; higher conflict liking; lower ambiguity intolerance; and lower tendency to triangulate. Qualitatively, participants perceived better understanding of, and felt more empowered to manage, workplace conflicts and to sustain healthier workplace relationships. This intervention can help nurses develop tools to improve system-level function and build productive team relationships.

  9. Development of a New Measurement for Team Communication Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ar Ryum; Lee, Seung Woo; Kim, Hyoung Ju; Kang, Hyun Gook; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin Kyun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Operating crew which includes senior reactor operator (SRO), reactor operator (RO), turbine operator (TO), electrical operator (EO) and shift supervisor (SS) performs a task in main control room (MCR) in nuclear power plant. To perform a task adequately, each operator should not only carry out individual.s task but also cooperate with other operators. In this paper, a new measurement method based on Social Network Analysis (SNA) and speech act coding scheme for team communication characteristics is developed. Social network analysis describes structure and patters of relationships, and seeks to understand both their causes and consequences. It has two types of models which constitutes of graph models and matrix models. In the case of graph models, members of the network are represented as points or nodes, with lines (an arrow for directed model) drawn between pairs of nodes to show a relationship between them. In the case of matrix model, it presents a network in the form of an array of units arranged in row and columns. The row represents network members and the columns represent the same set of members in identical sequence of affiliation which is associated with members. In a cell of matrix model, one represents relationship between members and zero means no relationship. As a speech act coding scheme is the classification system of language act types that are embodied to concretize it, the contents of conversation may be classified in each type and applied to many areas. Using speech act coding scheme, the value in the cell of the matrix model and intensity of line of the graph model is counted. When social network analysis is extended, more information can be obtained such as direct or indirect relationship, team cohesion, team coordination, clique and etc. In this study, team communication characteristics are obtained using social network analysis. When the upper and lower is same, there is indirect relationship between members otherwise there is direct

  10. Mental health care: how can Family Health teams integrate it into Primary Healthcare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryschek, Guilherme; Pinto, Adriana Avanzi Marques

    2015-10-01

    Mental health is one of the responsibilities of Brazil's Family Health system. This review of literature sought to understand what position Mental Health occupies in the practice of the Family Health Strategy. A search was made of the scientific literature in the database of the Virtual Health Library (Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde), for the keywords: 'Mental Health'; 'Family Health'; 'Primary Healthcare'. The criteria for inclusion were: Brazilian studies from 2009 through 2012 that contributed to understanding of the following question: "How to insert Mental health care into the routine of the Family Health Strategy?" A total of 11 articles were found, which identified difficulties and strategies of the professionals in Primary Healthcare in relation to mental health. Referral, and medicalization, were common practices. Matrix Support is the strategy of training and skill acquisition for teams that enables new approaches in mental health in the context of Primary healthcare. It is necessary for Management of the Health System to take an active role in the construction of healthcare networks in mental health.

  11. Management of diabetes by a healthcare team in a cardiology unit: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Maria Antonieta P; Rodrigues, Juliane; Cremonesi, Mariana; Polanczyk, Carisi; Schaan, Beatriz D

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of healthcare team guidance in the implementation of a glycemic control protocol in the non-intensive care unit of a cardiology hospital. METHODS: This was a randomized clinical trial comparing 9 months of intensive guidance by a healthcare team on a protocol for diabetes care (Intervention Group, n = 95) with 9 months of standard care (Control Group, n = 87). Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01154413. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 61.7±10 years, and the mean glycated hemoglobin level was 71±23 mmol/mol (8.7±2.1%). The mean capillary glycemia during hospitalization was similar between the groups (9.8±2.9 and 9.1±2.4 mmol/l for the Intervention Group and Control Group, respectively, p = 0.078). The number of hypoglycemic episodes (p = 0.77), hyperglycemic episodes (47 vs. 50 in the Intervention Group and Control Group, p = 0.35, respectively), and the length of stay in the hospital were similar between the groups (p = 0.64). The amount of regular insulin administered was 0 (0–10) IU in the Intervention Group and 28 (7–56) IU in the Control Group (p<0.001), and the amount of NPH insulin administered was similar between the groups (p = 0.16). CONCLUSIONS: While guidance on a glycemic control protocol given by a healthcare team resulted in a modification of the therapeutic strategy, no changes in glycemic control, frequency of episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, or hospitalization duration were observed. PMID:24270950

  12. Management of diabetes by a healthcare team in a cardiology unit: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonieta P. de Moraes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of healthcare team guidance in the implementation of a glycemic control protocol in the non-intensive care unit of a cardiology hospital. METHODS: This was a randomized clinical trial comparing 9 months of intensive guidance by a healthcare team on a protocol for diabetes care (Intervention Group, n = 95 with 9 months of standard care (Control Group, n = 87. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01154413. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 61.7±10 years, and the mean glycated hemoglobin level was 71±23 mmol/mol (8.7±2.1%. The mean capillary glycemia during hospitalization was similar between the groups (9.8±2.9 and 9.1±2.4 mmol/l for the Intervention Group and Control Group, respectively, p = 0.078. The number of hypoglycemic episodes (p = 0.77, hyperglycemic episodes (47 vs. 50 in the Intervention Group and Control Group, p = 0.35, respectively, and the length of stay in the hospital were similar between the groups (p = 0.64. The amount of regular insulin administered was 0 (0-10 IU in the Intervention Group and 28 (7-56 IU in the Control Group (p<0.001, and the amount of NPH insulin administered was similar between the groups (p = 0.16. CONCLUSIONS: While guidance on a glycemic control protocol given by a healthcare team resulted in a modification of the therapeutic strategy, no changes in glycemic control, frequency of episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, or hospitalization duration were observed.

  13. What Patients and Families Don’t Hear: Backstage Communication in Hospice Interdisciplinary Team Meetings

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Backstage communication has been shown to play a vital role in a bona fide group’s teamwork. Hospice interdisciplinary teams are considered bona fide groups, and hospice interdisciplinary team meetings constitute backstage communication because they occur away from patients and families. Video recordings of interdisciplinary team meetings were systematically coded for backstage communication mess ages and the extent to which different interdisciplinary team members participated in backstage c...

  14. [Nurse's care practice according to the view of the healthcare team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanha, Maria de Loudes; Zagonel, Ivete Palmira Sanson

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to comprehend the healthcare team perception about the (in)visibility of care practice of being a nurse in pediatric critical care units, according to Paterson and Zderad Humanist Theory. This is a qualitative research that combines the phenomenological approach. For data collection, it was used semi-structured interviews with nurses, physicians, psichologists, physiotherapists, nurse aides and hygienization employes working in pediatric critical care units of a hospital in Curitiba. The analysis followed the steps proposed by Giorgi and presented six categories, being three related to nurses' perception and three related to the multiprofessional team. Based on these statements it was possible to outline a conceptual model of nurses' perception about invisibility in their care practice, and also showed ways to obtain nurses' visibility.

  15. Using realist evaluation to assess primary healthcare teams' responses to intimate partner violence in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicolea, Isabel; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; San Sebastian, Miguel; Marchal, Bruno; Vives-Cases, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Few evaluations have assessed the factors triggering an adequate health care response to intimate partner violence. This article aimed to: 1) describe a realist evaluation carried out in Spain to ascertain why, how and under what circumstances primary health care teams respond to intimate partner violence, and 2) discuss the strengths and challenges of its application. We carried out a series of case studies in four steps. First, we developed an initial programme theory (PT1), based on interviews with managers. Second, we refined PT1 into PT2 by testing it in a primary healthcare team that was actively responding to violence. Third, we tested the refined PT2 by incorporating three other cases located in the same region. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected and thick descriptions were produced and analysed using a retroduction approach. Fourth, we analysed a total of 15 cases, and identified combinations of contextual factors and mechanisms that triggered an adequate response to violence by using qualitative comparative analysis. There were several key mechanisms -the teams' self-efficacy, perceived preparation, women-centred care-, and contextual factors -an enabling team environment and managerial style, the presence of motivated professionals, the use of the protocol and accumulated experience in primary health care- that should be considered to develop adequate primary health-care responses to violence. The full application of this realist evaluation was demanding, but also well suited to explore a complex intervention reflecting the situation in natural settings. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Significant Attributes and Challenges Related to Cross-Functional Team Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the research work is to investigate the importance of the communication in the cross-functional teams and in what which communicational tools provide better convenience of communication in cross-functional team members. Methodology An empirical study including the data collection from the interviews conducted from the participants working in cross-functional teams. Qualitative approach has been adopted to understand the communicational attributes in the cross-functional...

  17. Bringing employees closer: the effect of proximity on communication when teams function under time pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chong, D.S.F.; van Eerde, W.; Rutte, C.G.; Chai, K.H.

    2012-01-01

    Some studies have assumed close proximity to improve team communication on the premise that reduced physical distance increases the chance of contact and information exchange. However, research showed that the relationship between team proximity and team communication is not always straightforward a

  18. 跨专业医疗团队构建研究%Building of Multi-profession Healthcare Team

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婷; 陈红

    2012-01-01

    跨专业医疗团队指至少两个医疗保健专业人员为了共同的目标一起工作.有效的团队合作能提高服务质量,减少医疗差错和医疗保健专业人员间的冲突,影响患者满意度和工作人员满意度.建立有效的医疗团队的理论基础有团队成员KSAs能力、人力资源管理和团队发展四阶段.团队KSAs能力主要用于评估团队绩效和构建团队训练内容;人力资源管理主要用于作为团队合作模式和构建团队训练内容;团队发展四阶段主要用于指导团队建立过程和评估团队发展进程.%Multi - profession healthcare team is that team members from at least two healthcare professions work together for the common purpose. Studies have noted associations between effective teamwork and improvements in quality of care, and reductions in medical errors. Teamwork in healthcare can be appreciated by patients, positively influences their satisfaction, and augments provider satisfaction. Furthermore, collaborative professional relationships may decrease burnout among healthcare providers. The theoretical basis of multi - profession healthcare team building includes team KSAs competencies, Crew Resource Management ( CRM) and Four Stages of Team Development. Team KSAs competencies are mainly used for assessing team performance, and building the content of team training. Crew Resource Management is mainly used as a teamwork model, and also can be used to construct the content of team training.

  19. Collaboration, credibility, compassion, and coordination: professional nurse communication skill sets in health care team interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apker, Julie; Propp, Kathleen M; Zabava Ford, Wendy S; Hofmeister, Nancee

    2006-01-01

    This study explored how nurses communicate professionalism in interactions with members of their health care teams. Extant research show that effective team communication is a vital aspect of a positive nursing practice environment, a setting that has been linked to enhanced patient outcomes. Although communication principles are emphasized in nursing education as an important component of professional nursing practice, actual nurse interaction skills in team-based health care delivery remain understudied. Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts with 50 participants at a large tertiary hospital revealed four communicative skill sets exemplified by nursing professionals: collaboration, credibility, compassion, and coordination. Study findings highlight specific communicative behaviors associated with each skill set that exemplify nurse professionalism to members of health care teams. Theoretical and pragmatic conclusions are drawn regarding the communicative responsibilities of professional nurses in health care teams. Specific interaction techniques that nurses could use in nurse-team communication are then offered for use in baccalaureate curriculum and organizational in-service education.

  20. Improving Courseware Development Efficiency: The Effects of Authoring Systems on Team Roles and Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiola, Tony

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of courseware development for computer-based training (CBT) focuses on the effects of the use of authoring systems on courseware team roles and team communication. A team concept known as Team Integrated Productivity (TIP) is described and its possible effects on courseware development are discussed. (10 references) (LRW)

  1. Communication and general concern criterion prior to activation of the rapid response team: a grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martland, Jarrad; Chamberlain, Diane; Hutton, Alison; Smigielski, Michael

    2015-11-30

    highly and contributed to the debate.Conclusions This study highlighted that in the surveillance and management of the deteriorating patient and in the absence of effective communication there is a subsequent increase in anxiety, fear or concern that can be directly attributed to the activation of an RRT for the 'general concern' calling criteria.What is known about the topic? Deficiencies in collaboration and communication between healthcare professionals (HCPs) increase the stress and anxiety of healthcare staff and correspond to poorer outcomes for patients. The RRT can be activated as a 'general concern RRT' without observation of physiological derangements if staff are concerned about a patient's condition, allowing for assistance from a skilled critical care team at the patient's bedside. There are limited data on how poor communication affects the frequency of activation of general concern RRTs.What does this paper add? This study shows that poor communication between health professionals increases staff levels of anxiety and concern. In addition, the RRT system is being used to fill deficiencies in many other hospital processes, including end-of-life discussions. The deficiencies in hospital processes contribute to poor communication and increased levels of concern with this study demonstrating a direct link between a clinician's level of anxiety/concern and the 'general concern' activation category for the RRT system.What are the implications for practitioners? The present study highlights the importance of effective communication strategies between HCPs to improve patient safety and quality of care. The study also highlights the expanding role of the RRT in hospitals, which has implications for hospital policy makers with regard to future funding and resource allocation. Finally, many of the concerns raised in the present study by the focus groups have been addressed by recent measures introduced through the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health

  2. Influence of Culture and Communication Practices in Team Functioning : Case Studies on Japanese and Philippine Financial Project Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Andaya, Arleigh

    2010-01-01

    This research paper was aimed at analysing the influence of culture and communication practices in team functioning.  The scope of the study was limited to the project teams in the financial sector in Japan and the Philippines. The study was a qualitative research through the application of case studies whilst the primary data were gathered from semi-structured interviews. The findings of the study revealed that the project teams were collectivist with a noticeable degree of power distance, b...

  3. Influence of Culture and Communication Practices in Team Functioning : Case Studies on Japanese and Philippine Financial Project Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Andaya, Arleigh

    2010-01-01

    This research paper was aimed at analysing the influence of culture and communication practices in team functioning.  The scope of the study was limited to the project teams in the financial sector in Japan and the Philippines. The study was a qualitative research through the application of case studies whilst the primary data were gathered from semi-structured interviews. The findings of the study revealed that the project teams were collectivist with a noticeable degree of power distance, b...

  4. Investigating the effect of nurse-team communication on nurse turnover: relationships among communication processes, identification, and intent to leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apker, Julie; Propp, Kathleen M; Ford, Wendy S Zabava

    2009-03-01

    Enhanced team communication may strengthen nurses' attachment to their organizations and teams and improve nurse retention. This study examines the relationships among nurse-team communication, identification (organizational and team), and intent to leave. Hospital nurses (N = 201) completed surveys measuring 3 nurse-team communication processes: promoting team synergy, ensuring quality decisions, and individualizing communication. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that promoting team synergy was a significant predictor of intent to leave, whereas ensuring quality decisions and individualizing communication did not account for significant additional variance in intent to leave. Separate analyses showed that the relationship between promoting team synergy and intent to leave was partially mediated by team identification or by organizational identification. Further analyses were conducted on the 7 communication practices for promoting team synergy. Mentoring emerged as the only significant predictor of intent to leave; however, its relationship to intent to leave was fully mediated by organizational identification or partially mediated by team identification. Pragmatic suggestions are offered to improve nurse identification and reduce turnover.

  5. Process reengineering: the role of a planning methodology and picture archiving and communications system team building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrino, J A; Unkel, P J; Shelton, P; Johnson, T G

    1999-05-01

    The acquisition of a picture archiving and communications system (PACS) is an opportunity to reengineer business practices and should optimally consider the entire process from image acquisition to communication of results. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the PACS planning methodology used by the Department of Defense (DOD) Joint Imaging Technology Project Office (JITPO), outline the critical procedures for each phase, and review the military experience using this model. The methodology is segmented into four phases: strategic planning, clinical scenario planning, installation planning, and implementation planning. Each is further subdivided based on the specific tasks that need to be accomplished within that phase. By using this method, an institution will have clearly defined program goals, objectives, and PACS requirements before vendors are contacted. The development of an institution-specific PACS requirement should direct the process of proposal comparisons to be based on functionality and exclude unnecessary equipment. This PACS planning methodology is being used at more than eight DOD medical treatment facilities. When properly executed, this methodology facilitates a seamless transition to the electronic environment and contributes to the successful integration of the healthcare enterprise. A crucial component of this methodology is the development of a local PACS planning team to manage all aspects of the process. A plan formulated by the local team is based on input from each department that will be integrating with the PACS. Involving all users in the planning process is paramount for successful implementation.

  6. Interventions for promoting information and communication technologies adoption in healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Légaré, France; Labrecque, Michel; Frémont, Pierre; Pluye, Pierre; Gagnon, Johanne; Car, Josip; Pagliari, Claudia; Desmartis, Marie; Turcot, Lucile; Gravel, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Background Information and communication technologies (ICT) are defined as digital and analogue technologies that facilitate the capturing, processing, storage and exchange of information via electronic communication. ICTs have the potential to improve information management, access to health services, quality of care, continuity of services, and cost containment. Knowledge is lacking on conditions for successful ICT integration into practice. Objectives To carry out a systematic review of the effectiveness of interventions to promote the adoption of ICT by healthcare professionals. Search methods Specific strategies, defined with the help of an information specialist, were used to search the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) register and additional relevant databases. We considered studies published from January 1990 until October 2007. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), controlled before/after studies (CBAs), and interrupted time series (ITS) that reported objectively measured outcomes concerning the effect of interventions to promote adoption of ICT in healthcare professionals’ practices. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently assessed each potentially relevant study for inclusion. We resolved discrepancies by discussion or a third reviewer. Two teams of two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the quality of included studies. A meta-analysis of study outcomes was not possible, given the small number of included studies and the heterogeneity of intervention and outcomes measures. We conducted qualitative analyses, and have presented the results in a narrative format. Main results Ten studies met the inclusion criteria. Nine of them were RCTs. All studies involved physicians as participants (including postgraduate trainees), and one study also included other participants. Only two studies measured patient outcomes. Searching skills and

  7. A qualitative analysis of communication between members of a hospital-based multidisciplinary lung cancer team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, S; Callen, J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how patient information is communicated between health professionals within a multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team and to identify mechanisms to improve these communications. A qualitative method was employed using semi-structured in-depth interviews with a representative sample (n = 22) of members of a multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team including medical, nursing and allied health professionals. Analysis was undertaken using a thematic grounded theory approach to derive key themes to describe communication patterns within the team and how communication could be improved. Two themes with sub-themes were identified: (1) characteristics of communication between team members including the impact of role on direction of communications, and doctors' dominance in communications; and (2) channels of communication including, preference for face-to-face and the suboptimal roles of the Multidisciplinary Team Meeting and the hospital medical record as mediums for communication. Traditional influences of role delineation and the dominance of doctors were found to impact on communication within the multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team. Existing guidelines on implementation of multidisciplinary cancer care fail to address barriers to effective team communication. The paper-based medical record does not support team communications and alternative electronic solutions need to be used. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Emergent team roles in organizational meetings: Identifying communication patterns via cluster analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Beck, S.J.; Kauffeld, S.

    2016-01-01

    Previous team role taxonomies have largely relied on self-report data, focused on functional roles, and described individual predispositions or personality traits. Instead, this study takes a communicative approach and proposes that team roles are produced, shaped, and sustained in communicative behaviors. To identify team roles communicatively, 59 regular organizational meetings were videotaped and analyzed. Cluster analysis revealed five emergent roles: the solution seeker, the problem anal...

  9. An Exploratory Investigation of Locally Constituted Challenges to Communication Management in Multinational Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Jonassson, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    It has been argued that multinational teams create a number of competitive advantages when used strategically. However, multinational teams are not always successful, and a number of studies indicate that communication between team members may be the main obstacle. The purpose of this article...... is to investigate communication problems in organizations consisting of multinational teams. It is argued that researchers should not only look for differences in national culture when analyzing barriers to the communication flow. Challenges to communication may also develop in the locally constituted...

  10. An Exploratory Investigation of Locally Constituted Challenges to Communication Management in Multinational Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Jonassson, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    is to investigate communication problems in organizations consisting of multinational teams. It is argued that researchers should not only look for differences in national culture when analyzing barriers to the communication flow. Challenges to communication may also develop in the locally constituted......It has been argued that multinational teams create a number of competitive advantages when used strategically. However, multinational teams are not always successful, and a number of studies indicate that communication between team members may be the main obstacle. The purpose of this article...

  11. A mixed methods observational simulation-based study of interprofessional team communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltved, Charlotte; Nielsen, Kurt; Musaeus, Peter

    2013-01-01

    communication interactions and link team performance to patient outcome. This study had two aims. First, to develop a theory-based evaluation instrument that measures and qualifies team communication. And second, to investigate the quality and content of summaries and re-evaluations evolving step wise......Interprofessional team communication has been identified as an important focus for safety in medical emergency care. However, in-depth insight into the complexity of team communication is limited. Video observational studies might fill a gap in terms of understanding the meaning of specific...

  12. Hadoop-Based Healthcare Information System Design and Wireless Security Communication Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human health information from healthcare system can provide important diagnosis data and reference to doctors. However, continuous monitoring and security storage of human health data are challenging personal privacy and big data storage. To build secure and efficient healthcare application, Hadoop-based healthcare security communication system is proposed. In wireless biosensor network, authentication and key transfer should be lightweight. An ECC (Elliptic Curve Cryptography based lightweight digital signature and key transmission method are proposed to provide wireless secure communication in healthcare information system. Sunspot wireless sensor nodes are used to build healthcare secure communication network; wireless nodes and base station are assigned different tasks to achieve secure communication goal in healthcare information system. Mysql database is used to store Sunspot security entity table and measure entity table. Hadoop is used to backup and audit the Sunspot security entity table. Sqoop tool is used to import/export data between Mysql database and HDFS (Hadoop distributed file system. Ganglia is used to monitor and measure the performance of Hadoop cluster. Simulation results show that the Hadoop-based healthcare architecture and wireless security communication method are highly effective to build a wireless healthcare information system.

  13. Monitoring communication outbreaks among an unknown team of actors in dynamic networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sparks, Ross

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the detection of communication outbreaks among a small team of actors in time-varying networks. We propose monitoring plans for known and unknown teams based on generalizations of the exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) statistic. For unknown teams, we propose an efficient neighborhood-based search to estimate a collection of candidate teams. This procedure dramatically reduces the computational complexity of an exhaustive search. Our procedure consists of two steps: communication counts between actors are first smoothed using a multivariate EWMA strategy. Densely connected teams are identified as candidates using a neighborhood search approach. These candidate teams are then monitored using a surveillance plan derived from a generalized EWMA statistic. Monitoring plans are established for collaborative teams, teams with a dominant leader, as well as for global outbreaks. We consider weighted heterogeneous dynamic networks, where the expected communication count between each p...

  14. Emergence of differing electronic communication norms within partially distributed teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheshin, A.; Kim, Y.; Bos, N.D.; Nan, N.; Olson, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Modern organizations often consist of teams in which some people are collocated and some are remote. These teams are in-between being entirely virtual to entirely face-to-face and are referred to as partially distributed teams. Partially distributed teams function and operate in two different media

  15. Exploring the impact of toxic attitudes and a toxic environment on the veterinary healthcare team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eMoore

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe objective of this qualitative study was to compare veterinarians’ and Registered Veterinary Technicians’ (RVT’s perceptions of the veterinary health care team with respect to the impact of toxic attitudes and a toxic environment. Focus group interviews using a semi-structured interview guide and follow up probes were held with 4 veterinarian groups (23 companion animal veterinarians and 4 Registered Veterinary Technician groups (26 RVTs. Thematic analysis of the discussions indicated both veterinarian and RVT participants felt team members with toxic attitudes negatively impacted veterinary team function. These attitudes included people being disrespectful, being resistant to change, always wanting to be the go to person, avoiding conflict, and lacking motivation. When conflict was ignored, or when people with toxic attitudes were not addressed, a toxic environment often resulted. A toxic environment sometimes manifested when broken communication and tension between staff members occurred as a result of employees lacking confidence, skills, or knowledge not being managed properly. It also occurred when employees did not feel appreciated, when there was difficulty coping with turnover, and when there were conflicting demands.The presence of people with a toxic attitude was a source of frustration for both veterinarian and RVT participants. Prompt and consistent attention to negative behaviors is recommended to reduce the development of a toxic environment.

  16. How Multi-Levels of Individual and Team Learning Interact in a Public Healthcare Organisation: A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Louise; Kelliher, Felicity; Harrington, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature on organisational learning and offer a preliminary conceptual framework as a basis to explore how the multi-levels of individual learning and team learning interact in a public healthcare organisation. The organisational learning literature highlights a need for further understanding of…

  17. Communication technology and social media: opportunities and implications for healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Betsy; Lindsay, Bill; Gitelman, Betsy

    2012-09-30

    Electronic patient education and communications, such as email, text messaging, and social media, are on the rise in healthcare today. This article explores potential uses of technology to seek solutions in healthcare for such challenges as modifying behaviors related to chronic conditions, improving efficiency, and decreasing costs. A brief discussion highlights the role of technologies in healthcare informatics and considers two theoretical bases for technology implementation. Discussion focuses more extensively on the ability and advantages of electronic communication technology, such as e-mail, social media, text messaging, and electronic health records, to enhance patient-provider e-communications in nursing today. Effectiveness of e-communication in healthcare is explored, including recent and emerging applications designed to improve patient-provider connections and review of current evidence supporting positive outcomes. The conclusion addresses the vision of nurses' place in the vanguard of these developments.

  18. Communication Skills to Develop Trusting Relationships on Global Virtual Engineering Capstone Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Holt; Davies, Randall S.

    2013-01-01

    As universities seek to provide cost-effective, cross-cultural experiences using global virtual (GV) teams, the "soft" communication skills typical of all teams, increases in importance for GV teams. Students need to be taught how to navigate through cultural issues and virtual tool issues to build strong trusting relationships with…

  19. Theory development in nursing and healthcare informatics: a model explaining and predicting information and communication technology acceptance by healthcare consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ji-Young; Hayman, Laura L; Panniers, Teresa; Carty, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    About 110 million American adults are looking for health information and services on the Internet. Identification of the factors influencing healthcare consumers' technology acceptance is requisite to understanding their acceptance and usage behavior of online health information and related services. The purpose of this article is to describe the development of the Information and Communication Technology Acceptance Model (ICTAM). From the literature reviewed, ICTAM was developed with emphasis on integrating multidisciplinary perspectives from divergent frameworks and empirical findings into a unified model with regard to healthcare consumers' acceptance and usage behavior of information and services on the Internet.

  20. A mixed methods observational simulation-based study of interprofessional team communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltved, Charlotte; Nielsen, Kurt; Musaeus, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Interprofessional team communication has been identified as an important focus for safety in medical emergency care. However, in-depth insight into the complexity of team communication is limited. Video observational studies might fill a gap in terms of understanding the meaning of specific commu...

  1. Emergent team roles in organizational meetings: Identifying communication patterns via cluster analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Beck, S.J.; Kauffeld, S.

    2016-01-01

    Previous team role taxonomies have largely relied on self-report data, focused on functional roles, and described individual predispositions or personality traits. Instead, this study takes a communicative approach and proposes that team roles are produced, shaped, and sustained in communicative beh

  2. The impact of team building on communication and job satisfaction of nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Mary Anne; Hu, Jie; Herrick, Charlotte A

    2005-01-01

    A series of team-building activities were conducted on a medical-surgical unit and their impact on staff's communication and job satisfaction was examined. Forty-four unit personnel participated in the interventions. Staff communication and job satisfaction were measured before and after the intervention. The findings linked team-building activities with improved staff communication and job satisfaction. Team-building strategies assisted the nurse leader/manager to build an effective work team by strengthening communication and interpersonal relationships so that the staff could function as a more cohesive group. Staff development consultants can help nurse managers become more effective team leaders by identifying the necessary resources and by helping to plan and coordinate team-building strategies.

  3. The Impact of Environmental Design on Teamwork and Communication in Healthcare Facilities: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaveis, Arsalan; Hamilton, D Kirk; Pati, Debajyoti

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate the current knowledge about the impact of healthcare facility design on teamwork and communication by exploring the relevant literature. Teamwork and communication are behavioral factors that are impacted by physical design. However, the effects of environmental factors on teamwork and communication have not been investigated extensively in healthcare design literature. There are no published systematic reviews on the current topic. Searches were conducted in PubMed and Google Scholar databases in addition to targeted design journals including Health Environmental Research & Design, Environment and Behavior, Environmental Psychology, and Applied Ergonomics. Inclusion criteria were (a) full-text English language articles related to teamwork and communication and (b) involving any healthcare built environment and space design published in peer-reviewed journals between 1984 and 2017. Studies were extracted using defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. In the first phase, 26 of the 195 articles most relevant to teamwork and 19 studies of the 147 were identified and reviewed to understand the impact of communication in healthcare facilities. The literature regarding the impact of built environment on teamwork and communication were reviewed and explored in detail. Eighteen studies were selected and succinctly summarized as the final product of this review. Environmental design, which involves nurses, support staff, and physicians, is one of the critical factors that promotes the efficiency of teamwork and collaborative communication. Layout design, visibility, and accessibility levels are the most cited aspects of design which can affect the level of communication and teamwork in healthcare facilities.

  4. The Effect of Competitive Rivalry on Internal Communication in Private Healthcare Organizations: Evidence from Istanbul, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gültekin Altuntas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Both competitive rivalry and internal communication play a crucial role for a business to position itself in a favourable manner in order to succeed particularly in a hostile environment. While numerous studies present the importance of competitive rivalry and of communication, even internal communication separately, little is known about the specific linkage of how competitive rivalry affects communication in the literature. Within the framework of internal communication, this study focuses on the notion that competitive rivalry is related to the path and style of communication as well as to the usage of internal communication tools but not to quality of communication. Thus, our research presents the linkage and the interaction between competitive rivalry and internal communication, of which the results indicate that, overall, competitive rivalry has a significant direct positive influence on internal communication dimensions in terms of path, style and quality of communication, as well as usage of communication tools in healthcare organizations.

  5. Stimulating the Potential: Creative Performance and Communication in Innovation Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kratzer, Jan; Leenders, R.Th.A.J.; Engelen, Jo M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Creativity is essential to successful new product development efforts. Teams constitute the organizing principle in most modern innovation activities. Although creativity research has revealed many factors influencing individual creativity, little is known about how team-level creativity is determin

  6. Effects of team-building on communication and teamwork among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Y J

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of team-building on communication and teamwork (i.e. teamwork skills and team effectiveness) among nursing students. Team-building is effective for improving communication and teamwork among the nursing organization. However, the effects of team-building are not well known especially in Korea. This study used a quasi-experimental design. The sample was composed of 195 junior-year nursing students in Korea. The experimental group (100 subjects) participated in team-building activities over a 100-day period, whereas no intervention was applied to the control group (95 subjects). Pretest was conducted in both groups, and post-test was conducted after the 100-day intervention. The pre-post change in mean communication competence score did not differ between the two groups. However, the mean scores for teamwork skills and team effectiveness differed significantly between the two groups after team-building activity. This study was not a double-blind test, and randomized sampling was not implemented. Caution should thus be used when interpreting the findings. Team-building activities were effective for improving the teamwork skills and team effectiveness among Korean nursing students. It is recommended that team-building activities should be included regularly as an integral educational approach in nursing education. The findings suggest that suggests that team-building for improving communication and teamwork should be designated as one of the required criteria for nursing college programme accreditation in many countries, including Korea. However team-building requires further testing to verify this across cultures. Nurses need to receive formal team-building training for improving communication and teamwork, and formal education should be included in their job training schedule. It is recommended that communication competence and teamwork be used as one of job performance evaluations in their workplace. © 2015

  7. Meetings matter: Effects of team meeting communication on team and organizational success.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffeld, S.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.

    2012-01-01

    This study follows the idea that the key to understanding team meeting effectiveness lies in uncovering the microlevel interaction processes throughout the meeting. Ninety-two regular team meetings were videotaped. Interaction data were coded and evaluated with the act4teams coding scheme and INTERA

  8. Specific factors influencing information system/information and communication technology sourcing strategies in healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potančok, Martin; Voříšek, Jiří

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare facilities use a number of information system/information and communication technologies. Each healthcare facility faces a need to choose sourcing strategies most suitable to ensure provision of information system/information and communication technology services, processes and resources. Currently, it is possible to observe an expansion of sourcing possibilities in healthcare informatics, which creates new requirements for sourcing strategies. Thus, the aim of this article is to identify factors influencing information system/information and communication technology sourcing strategies in healthcare facilities. The identification was based on qualitative research, namely, a case study. This study provides a set of internal and external factors with their impact levels. The findings also show that not enough attention is paid to these factors during decision-making. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. How Communication Among Members of the Health Care Team Affects Maternal Morbidity and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Rita Allen; Keohane, Carol Ann

    In the United States, rates of severe maternal morbidity and mortality have escalated in the past decade. Communication failure among members of the health care team is one associated factor that can be modified. Nurses can promote effective communication. We provide strategies that incorporate team training principles and structured communication processes for use by providers and health care systems to improve the quality and safety of patient care and reduce the incidence of maternal mortality and morbidity.

  10. Interprofessional experiences of recent healthcare graduates: A social psychology perspective on the barriers to effective communication, teamwork, and patient-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Krist; Outram, Sue; Gilligan, Conor; Levett-Jones, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Achieving safe, quality health care is highly dependent on effective communication between all members of the healthcare team. This study explored the attitudes and experiences of recent healthcare graduates regarding interprofessional teamwork and communication within a clinical setting. A total of 68 pharmacy, nursing, and medicine graduates participated in 12 semi-structured focus group discussions in clinical workplaces across three Australian states. Discussion focussed on graduates' experiences of interprofessional education and its impact on their capacity for interprofessional teamwork and communication. The Social Identity and Realistic Conflict theories were used as a framework for qualitative data analysis. A consistent pattern of profession-focussed, rather than patient- or team-focussed goals was revealed along with reports of negative stereotyping, hierarchical communication, and competition for time with the patient. Graduates acknowledged the importance of communication, teamwork, and patient-centred care and felt a better understanding of the roles of other health professionals would assist them to work together for patients' wellbeing. Identifying workplace identities and differential goals has uncovered possible motivations underlying health professionals' behaviour. These insights may help improve interprofessional collaboration by focusing attention on common team goals, increasing feelings of worth and being valued among different professionals, and decreasing the need for competition.

  11. Inter-organisational communication networks in healthcare: centralised versus decentralised approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Pirnejad (Habibollah); R.A. Bal (Roland); A. Stoop; M. Berg (Marc)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To afford efficient and high quality care, healthcare providers increasingly need to exchange patient data. The existence of a communication network amongst care providers will help them to exchange patient data more efficiently. Information and communication technology (ICT)

  12. The use of electronic devices for communication with colleagues and other healthcare professionals - nursing professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Niemi, Anne; Hupli, Maija

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the study is to describe nursing professionals' experiences of the use of electronic devices for communication with colleagues and other healthcare professionals. Information and communication technology applications in health care are rapidly expanding, thanks to the fast-growing penetration of the Internet and mobile technology. Communication between professionals in health care is essential for patient safety and quality of care. Implementing new methods for communication among healthcare professionals is important. A cross-sectional survey was used in the study. The data were collected in spring 2012 using an electronic questionnaire with structured and open-ended questions. The target group comprised the nursing professionals (N = 567, n = 123) in one healthcare district who worked in outpatient clinics in publically funded health care in Finland. Nursing professionals use different electronic devices for communication with each other. The most often used method was email, while the least used methods were question-answer programmes and synchronous communication channels on the Internet. Communication using electronic devices was used for practical nursing, improving personnel competences, organizing daily operations and administrative tasks. Electronic devices may speed up the management of patient data, improve staff cooperation and competence and make more effective use of working time. The obstacles were concern about information security, lack of technical skills, unworkable technology and decreasing social interaction. According to our findings, despite the obstacles related to use of information technology, the use of electronic devices to support communication among healthcare professionals appears to be useful. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Crew Resource Management for Obstetric and Neonatal Teams to Improve Communication During Cesarean Births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Mary P; Dziadkowiec, Oliwier; Kleiner, Catherine; Halverson-Carpenter, Katherine; Link, Terri; Barry, James

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of crew resource management training and interventions on the quality and quantity of communication during cesarean births in a tertiary academic hospital's labor and birthing services. A prospective pre-post crew resource management training intervention. Tertiary academic hospital in the Western United States. All members of obstetric and neonatal teams that participated in cesarean births. Over a 5-month time period, all obstetric and neonatal staff were required to participate in team training in crew resource management critical language, communication, and team structure. Trained observers collected baseline data (n = 52) for 3 months on the quantity and quality of communications that occurred during cesarean births. Postintervention data (n = 50) were gathered for 3 months after team training. Analysis approach included use of Fisher's exact test, independent-samples t test, and multilevel generalized linear regression models with Poisson distribution. There was a statistically significant increase in quantity and quality of communication from pre- to postintervention assessment for obstetric and neonatal staff. Although the increase in quality was similarly great between both types of teams, increase in quantity was more substantial in obstetric staff. Principles of team communication training shown to be effective in increasing communication among team members in a variety of clinical areas were also effective in improving communication in the labor and birth setting during cesarean births. Copyright © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic team hierarchies in communication-limited multi-robot exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoog, J.; Cameron, S.; Visser, A.

    2010-01-01

    In the near future, groups of autonomous robots using wireless communication will be used for a wide variety of tasks. In many such applications, communication may be unreliable and communication ranges difficult to predict. While most current approaches to this problem strive to keep team members

  15. Dynamic team hierarchies in communication-limited multi-robot exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoog, J.; Cameron, S.; Visser, A.

    2010-01-01

    In the near future, groups of autonomous robots using wireless communication will be used for a wide variety of tasks. In many such applications, communication may be unreliable and communication ranges difficult to predict. While most current approaches to this problem strive to keep team members w

  16. Environmental Factors that Influence Communication between People with Communication Disability and Their Healthcare Providers in Hospital: A Review of the Literature within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Hickson, Louise; Worrall, Linda

    2008-01-01

    The importance of effective healthcare communication between healthcare providers and people needing healthcare is well established. People with communication disabilities are at risk of not being able to communicate effectively with their healthcare providers and this might directly compromise their health, healthcare and their right to…

  17. Intra project team disagreement, conflict communications, and team performance in cross-functional new product teams: A decision-making quality perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsun Jin Chang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops and examines a model of the antecedents and consequences of decision-making comprehensiveness during the new product development process. This model firstly suggests a concave relationship between intrateam task disagreement and decision-making comprehensiveness. It also conjectures that conflict communications influence the effectiveness of decision-making comprehensiveness on new product teams’ performance. An empirical test of the proposed framework involves a survey of 220 cross-functional new product teams. The findings show that an inverse U-shaped relationship exists between intrateam task disagreement and decision-making comprehensiveness. It also indicates that collaborative communication has a negative effect on innovativeness, whereas contentious communication adversely affects constraint adherence. However, decision-making comprehensiveness partially moderates the relationships between conflict communications and team performance. Some managerial and research implications of the findings were also discussed in this study.

  18. Exploring ways to manage healthcare professional-patient communication issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Pauline

    2017-04-01

    Effective communication between clinicians and their patients has a positive impact not only on clinical outcomes but also on their experience of care. Communication skills are a core clinical skill, which can be taught by a number of methods. Understanding the impact of one's own communication skills has on a patient and their family can help hone a clinician's skills to improve both patient and clinician satisfaction.

  19. Assessors for communication skills: SPs or healthcare professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Siaw-Cheok; Dutta, Susmita; Sidhu, Jagmohni Kaur; De-Alwis, Ranjit; Chen, Nicole; Sow, Chew-Fei; Barua, Ankur

    2014-07-01

    The complexity of modern medicine creates more challenges for teaching and assessment of communication skills in undergraduate medical programme. This research was conducted to study the level of communication skills among undergraduate medical students and to determine the difference between simulated patients and clinical instructors' assessment of communication skills. This comparative study was conducted for three months at the Clinical Skills and Simulation Centre of the International Medical University in Malaysia. The modified Calgary-Cambridge checklist was used to assess the communication skills of 50 first year and 50 second year medical students (five-minutes pre-recorded interview videos on the scenario of sore throat). These videos were reviewed and scored by simulated patients (SPs), communication skills instructors (CSIs) and non-communication skills instructors (non-CSIs). Better performance was observed among the undergraduate medical students, who had formal training in communication skills with a significant difference in overall scores detected among the first and second year medical students (p = 0.0008). A non-significant difference existed between the scores of SPs and CSIs for Year 1 (p = 0.151). The SPs could be trained and involved in assessment of communication skills. Formal training in communication skills is necessary in the undergraduate medical programme.

  20. Communicating in organizations, part II: Tips for leaders when starting a team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2012-04-01

    Team projects are an important part of the innovative work done in large organizations. Individuals from various portions of the department or organization are chosen who have different areas of expertise, backgrounds, and personalities. In a properly functioning team, the group decisions made will be superior to those made by any individual on the team. There are many different conversations that are necessary during a team project to make sure that all goes optimally, and this article will focus on communication tips for leaders when starting a team.

  1. The Disparity Information and Communication Technology for Developing Countries has in the Delivery of Healthcare Information

    OpenAIRE

    Chhanabhai, Prajesh N; Holt, Alec

    2010-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have merged into the world of healthcare slowly but surely. However, the marriage between the use of technology and its full impact in the health sector has not been fully realised. The focus of this paper is to highlight the impact of ICT on revolutionising access to healthcare information and thus quality of health for populations of the developing world. This paper highlights on the importance of being able to access health information and h...

  2. The tortuous journey of introducing the nurse practitioner as a new member of the healthcare team: a meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andregård, Anna-Carin; Jangland, Eva

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the obstacles to and the opportunities for achieving optimal interprofessional team collaboration with the introduction of the nurse practitioner (NP). A team approach can contribute importantly to sustainable and safe patient care, and NPs have been added to the healthcare team in many countries. Following the international trend towards the development of the acute care NP, the role has recently been initiated in surgical care in Sweden. The introduction of an advanced nursing role into existing organisations raises questions about how the role will be developed and what its effects will be on collaboration between the different professions. We conducted a systematic review of qualitative studies using the meta-ethnographic approach developed by Noblit and Hare. Literature in the field of nursing was searched on PubMed and CINAHL, and empirical qualitative studies from outpatient and inpatient care in seven countries were included. The studies were appraised according to national guidelines and templates and were analysed and synthesised according to the meta-ethnographic approach. A total of 26 studies were included in the synthesis. The analysis revealed four themes: (i) a threat to professional boundaries, (ii) a resource for the team, (iii) the quest for autonomy and control, and (iv) necessary properties of a developing interprofessional collaboration. Based on these themes, the synthesis was created and presented as a metaphorical journey. The implementation of a new nursing role in a traditional healthcare team is a complex process influenced by many factors and can be described as "a tortuous journey towards a partially unknown destination". The synthesised obstacles and opportunities drawn from international studies may help healthcare organisations and new NPs prepare for, and optimise, the implementation of a new nursing role.

  3. The programme benefits of improving project team communication through a contact centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bond-Barnard, T. J.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A South African national programme to repair government infrastructure uses a contact centre (or call centre to facilitate and manage communication. An important question is: How does the contact centre benefit the programme and its projects? This study discusses the findings of a survey that quantified the benefits of the programme when the communication between team members in the programme was improved by using a contact centre. The results show that, by using a contact centre to improve the communication between project team members, their perception of communication effectiveness, quality of project deliverables, service delivery, and customer satisfaction of the programme dramatically increases.

  4. Does Leader-Affective Presence Influence Communication of Creative Ideas Within Work Teams?

    OpenAIRE

    Madrid, H.P.; Totterdell, P.; Niven, K.

    2016-01-01

    Affective presence is a novel, emotion-related personality trait, supported in experimental studies, concerning the extent to which a person makes his or her interaction partners feel the same way (Eisenkraft & Elfenbein, 2010). Applying this concept to an applied teamwork context, we proposed that team-leader-affective presence would influence team members' communication of creative ideas. Multilevel modeling analysis of data from a survey study conducted with teams from a consultancy firm c...

  5. Enablers of Virtual Communication and Collaboration in Global R & D Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Søderberg, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Previous research tends to overemphasize frictions, cultural clashes and communication breakdowns in virtual teams. The author aims at exploring positive aspects of cross-cultural collaboration and identifying some of the conditions underlying trust-building, employee motivation and team effectiveness. Whereas much research on virtual teams has taken its point of departure in Western MNCs and primarily addressed headquarter concerns, this case study of a Danish MNC´s Indian R & D site giv...

  6. Perspectives of healthcare practitioners: An exploration of interprofessional communication using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardach, Shoshana H; Real, Kevin; Bardach, David R

    2017-05-01

    Contemporary state-of-the-art healthcare facilities are incorporating technology into their building design to improve communication and patient care. However, technological innovations may also have unintended consequences. This study seeks to better understand how technology influences interprofessional communication within a hospital setting based in the United States. Nine focus groups were conducted including a range of healthcare professions. The focus groups explored practitioners' experiences working on two floors of a newly designed hospital and included questions about the ways in which technology shaped communication with other healthcare professionals. All focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and coded to identify themes. Participant responses focused on the electronic medical record, and while some benefits of the electronic medical record were discussed, participants indicated use of the electronic medical record has resulted in a reduction of in-person communication. Different charting approaches resulted in barriers to communication between specialties and reduced confidence that other practitioners had received one's notes. Limitations in technology-including limited computer availability, documentation complexity, and sluggish sign-in processes-also were identified as barriers to effective and timely communication between practitioners. Given the ways in which technology shapes interprofessional communication, future research should explore how to create standardised electronic medical record use across professions at the optimal level to support communication and patient care.

  7. Enhancing Intercultural Communication and Understanding: Team Translation Project as a Student Engagement Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects on a team translation project on Aboriginal culture designed to enhance university students' intercultural communication competence and understanding through engaging in an interactive team translation project funded by the Australia-China Council. A selected group of Chinese speaking translation students participated in the…

  8. MANAGING CROSS-CULTURAL ONLINE COMMUNICATION IN MULTICULTURAL PROJECT TEAMS: THE CASE OF CULTOUR+ PROJECT

    OpenAIRE

    Siguencia, Luis Ochoa; Gómez-Ullate García de León, Martín; Ochoa-Daderska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    The paper aims to present the process and partnership building in multicultural project teams through the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) taking into account the Cultour+ communication project management plan to build virtual teams. CULTOUR+  is a Strategic Partnership (SP) of universities, local governments, SMEs and NGOs, that following the mainlines of the Higher Education Modernization Agenda, will offer high quality and innovative courses and tools, integrating in...

  9. Paradoxes in virtual team knowledge communication and trust building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Braad

    2012-01-01

    a need for a different, multi-level, multi-theoretical approach to virtual team research in order to overcome the paradoxes. A moderate constructionist research position building on Critical Realism is proposed. To situate the project within current literatures, trust, knowledge management and virtual...... team literatures are reviewed. These are used to support the paradoxes used as a lens for understanding. A research design is presented building on interviews, documentary analysis and observations analysed using Social Network Analysis and James Gee’s framework for discourse analysis. Finally......This thesis proposal presents paradoxes within current trust and knowledge management literatures as a lens for understanding challenges in virtual teams working across organisational and geographic boundaries. By exposing contradictions within current virtual team research, the author proposes...

  10. A process-based framework to guide nurse practitioners integration into primary healthcare teams: results from a logic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contandriopoulos, Damien; Brousselle, Astrid; Dubois, Carl-Ardy; Perroux, Mélanie; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Brault, Isabelle; Kilpatrick, Kelley; D'Amour, Danielle; Sansgter-Gormley, Esther

    2015-02-27

    Integrating Nurse Practitioners into primary care teams is a process that involves significant challenges. To be successful, nurse practitioner integration into primary care teams requires, among other things, a redefinition of professional boundaries, in particular those of medicine and nursing, a coherent model of inter- and intra- professional collaboration, and team-based work processes that make the best use of the subsidiarity principle. There have been numerous studies on nurse practitioner integration, and the literature provides a comprehensive list of barriers to, and facilitators of, integration. However, this literature is much less prolific in discussing the operational level implications of those barriers and facilitators and in offering practical recommendations. In the context of a large-scale research project on the introduction of nurse practitioners in Quebec (Canada) we relied on a logic-analysis approach based, on the one hand on a realist review of the literature and, on the other hand, on qualitative case-studies in 6 primary healthcare teams in rural and urban area of Quebec. Five core themes that need to be taken into account when integrating nurse practitioners into primary care teams were identified. Those themes are: planning, role definition, practice model, collaboration, and team support. The present paper has two objectives: to present the methods used to develop the themes, and to discuss an integrative model of nurse practitioner integration support centered around these themes. It concludes with a discussion of how this framework contributes to existing knowledge and some ideas for future avenues of study.

  11. Exploratory Research on the Effect of Autonomous Learners to Team Learning within Healthcare Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Patricia R.; Chalofsky, Neal

    2005-01-01

    How does individual learning impact team learning? Through an exploratory case study, data was collected from questionnaires, documentation review, observations, and interviews. Three themes emerged describing how an autonomous learner affected team learning. The results indicated that the autonomous learner influenced team learning through…

  12. Does leader-affective presence influence communication of creative ideas within work teams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, Hector P; Totterdell, Peter; Niven, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Affective presence is a novel, emotion-related personality trait, supported in experimental studies, concerning the extent to which a person makes his or her interaction partners feel the same way (Eisenkraft & Elfenbein, 2010). Applying this concept to an applied teamwork context, we proposed that team-leader-affective presence would influence team members' communication of creative ideas. Multilevel modeling analysis of data from a survey study conducted with teams from a consultancy firm confirmed that team-leader-affective presence interacted with team-member creative idea generation to predict inhibition of voicing their ideas. Specifically, withholding of ideas was less likely when team members generated creative ideas and their team leader had higher positive affective presence or lower negative affective presence. These findings contribute to emotion research by showing affective presence as a trait with interpersonal meaning, which can shape how cognition is translated into social behavior in applied performance contexts, such as teamwork in organizations. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Patient and team communication in the iPad era - a practical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imburgia, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Communication with the patient and within the team is a critical factor that can influence the treatment outcome, especially in complex and multidisciplinary dental treatments. Indeed, effective communication, not focused on marketing but on proper information of the patient's intraoral situation, can encourage greater acceptance of treatment and also greater treatment satisfaction. Better communication within the dental team is also a very important factor to improve the final result and reduce the time needed to reach it. Thanks to new technological devices widely available, such as tablets, we can use visual communication and interaction with the clinical images of the patient in order to improve communication with the patient, and especially within the dental team. The use of this method allows us to obtain a facial, dentolabial and dental esthetic analysis of the patient that can be used in various clinical steps, improving the predictability of the esthetic outcome and at the same time reducing the number of clinical sessions usually required.

  14. Transfer of communication skills to the workplace: impact of a 38-hour communication skills training program designed for radiotherapy teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckaert, Isabelle; Delevallez, France; Gibon, Anne-Sophie; Liénard, Aurore; Libert, Yves; Delvaux, Nicole; Marchal, Serge; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Bragard, Isabelle; Reynaert, Christine; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Scalliet, Pierre; Van Houtte, Paul; Coucke, Philippe; Razavi, Darius

    2015-03-10

    This study assessed the efficacy of a 38-hour communication skills training program designed to train a multidisciplinary radiotherapy team. Four radiotherapy teams were randomly assigned to a training program or a waiting list. Assessments were scheduled at baseline and after training for the training group and at baseline and 4 months later for the waiting list group. Assessments included an audio recording of a radiotherapy planning session to assess team members' communication skills and expression of concerns of patients with breast cancer (analyzed with content analysis software) and an adapted European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer satisfaction with care questionnaire completed by patients at the end of radiotherapy. Two hundred thirty-seven radiotherapy planning sessions were recorded. Compared with members of the untrained teams, members of the trained teams acquired, over time, more assessment skills (P = .003) and more supportive skills (P = .050) and provided more setting information (P = .010). Over time, patients interacting with members of the trained teams asked more open questions (P = .022), expressed more emotional words (P = .025), and exhibited a higher satisfaction level regarding nurses' interventions (P = .028). The 38-hour training program facilitated transfer of team member learned communication skills to the clinical practice and improved patients' satisfaction with care. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Virtual Team Communication and Collaboration in Army and Corporate Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-12

    to concerns about damaging tourism resulting in a significant loss of life and greater damage (Barton 2008, 124-125). All of these facts show a...healthcare with web-based “radiology theatre .” IBM Media Relations Armonk, NY: 13 March. http://www- 304.ibm.com/jct03001c/press/us/en/pressrelease

  16. Application of the VALUE communication principles in ACTIVE hospice team meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Karla T; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Parker Oliver, Debra; Demiris, George; Shaunfield, Sara; Crumb, Edith

    2013-01-01

    The ACTIVE (Assessing Caregivers for Team Intervention through Video Encounters) intervention uses technology to enable family caregivers to participate in hospice interdisciplinary team (IDT) meetings from geographically remote locations. Previous research has suggested that effective communication is critical to the success of these meetings. The purpose of this study was to explore communication in ACTIVE IDT meetings involving family caregivers and to assess the degree to which hospice teams use specific communication principles (summarized in the mnemonic VALUE: value, acknowledge, listen, understand, and elicit), which have been supported in previous research in intensive care settings. Researchers analyzed team-family communication during 84 video- and/or audio-recorded care plan discussions that took place during ACTIVE team meetings, using a template approach to text analysis to determine the extent and quality of VALUE principles. The total content analyzed was 9 hours, 28 minutes in length. Hospice clinicians routinely employed the VALUE communication principles in communication during ACTIVE IDT meetings with family caregivers, but the quality of this communication was frequently rated moderate or poor. The majority of such communication was task-focused. Less often, communication centered on emotional concerns and efforts to gain a more holistic understanding of patients and families. This analysis suggests an opportunity for improving support for family members during ACTIVE IDT meetings. Members of hospice IDTs should remain aware of the opportunity for additional attention to the emotional realities of the hospice experience for family caregivers and could improve support for family caregivers during IDT meetings by ensuring that messages used to exemplify VALUE principles during team-family communication are of a high quality.

  17. Negotiating the equivocality of palliative care: a grounded theory of team communicative processes in inpatient medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Christy J W; Canzona, Mollie Rose; Cafferty, Lauren A; Kalish, Virginia B

    2016-01-01

    In the majority of U.S. hospitals, inpatient medicine teams make palliative care decisions in the absence of a formalized palliative system. Using a grounded theory approach, interviews with inpatient team members were systematically analyzed to uncover how participants conceptualize palliative care and how they regard the communicative structures that underlie its delivery. During analysis, Weick's model of organizing emerged as a framework that fit the data. The 39 participant inpatient team members discussed palliative care as primarily a communicative process. Themes describing the meaning of palliative care emerged around the concepts of receiver of care, timeline of care, and location of care. The emerging model included four stages in the communicative processes of inpatient palliative care: (a) interpret the need, (b) initiate the conversation, (c) integrate the processes, and (d) identify what works. In contrast to stable, focused palliative care teams or hospice care teams, which have prescribed patient populations and processes, the inpatient medicine team faces the equivocality of providing palliative care within a broader practice. This research offers a four-phase model to show how these inpatient teams communicate within this context. Implications for the provision of palliative care are discussed.

  18. Quantum Physics Principles and Communication in the Acute Healthcare Setting: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Heidi L; Peyerl, Colleen Kraft; Solheim-Witt, Marit

    This pilot study explores whether clinician awareness of quantum physics principles could facilitate open communication between patients and providers. In the spirit of action research, this study was conceptualized with a holistic view of human health, using a mixed method design of grounded theory as an emergent method. Instrumentation includes surveys and a focus group discussion with twelve registered nurses working in an acute care hospital setting. Findings document that the preliminary core phenomenon, energy as information, influences communication in the healthcare environment. Key emergent themes include awareness, language, validation, open communication, strategies, coherence, incoherence and power. Research participants indicate that quantum physics principles provide a language and conceptual framework for improving their awareness of communication and interactions in the healthcare environment. Implications of this pilot study support the feasibility of future research and education on awareness of quantum physics principles in other clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effective factor of virtual team: Resolving communication breakdown in IBS construction project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozin, Mohd Affendi Ahmad; Nawi, Mohd. Nasrun Mohd.

    2016-08-01

    Currently, rapid development of information technology has provided new opportunities to organisation toward increasing the effectiveness of collaboration and teamwork management. Thus the virtual team approach has been implemented in numerous of field. However, there is limited study of virtual team in construction project management. Currently IBS project is still based on traditional construction process which is isolation team working environment. Therefore this approach has been declared as a main barrier to ensure cooperative working relation in term of communication and information in between project stakeholders. Thus, this paper through literature review is attempted to present a discussion of the virtual team approach toward IBS project in developing effective team communication during construction project.

  20. [Training for real: simulation, team-training and communication to improve trauma management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel, Oliver; Papenfuss, Tim; Kranke, Peter

    2010-06-01

    The focus on the role of non-technical skills such as communication, dynamic decision making, situational awareness and teamwork in emergency medicine has gained importance over the past few years. Especially during time-critical and complex treatment of severely injured patients in a multidisciplinary and interprofessional trauma-team these factors play an important role for patient-safety and process optimization and are a key factor influencing the perceived quality of a given scenario by the team members. Thus, apart from medical expertise and technical excellence of single actors within a trauma team, non-technical skills need to be incorporated in trainings for trauma management. For the improvement of non-technical skills, particularly team communication and teamwork, a simulator-based training represents a valuable tool. The technical performance of portable manikin-based simulators has improved tremendously during the last decade, which facilitates realistic and true-to-life multidisciplinary team-training in trauma management.

  1. Effects of time pressure and communication environment on team processes and outcomes in dyadic planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleij, R van der; Lijkwan, J.T.E..; Dreu, C.K.W. de

    2009-01-01

    An experiment compared dyadic performance in a radio communication and a more sophisticated communication environment to face-to-face (FtF) meetings. Thirty-six dyads, working under low or high time-pressure conditions, needed to combine information and to produce a written plan. Teams working in

  2. Effects of time pressure and communication environment on team processes and outcomes in dyadic planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kleij, R.; Lijkwan, J.T.E.; Rasker, P.C.; de Dreu, C.K.W.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment compared dyadic performance in a radio communication and a more sophisticated communication environment to face-to-face (FtF) meetings. Thirty-six dyads, working under low or high time-pressure conditions, needed to combine information and to produce a written plan. Teams working in th

  3. Role Clarification Processes for Better Integration of Nurse Practitioners into Primary Healthcare Teams: A Multiple-Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Brault

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Role clarity is a crucial issue for effective interprofessional collaboration. Poorly defined roles can become a source of conflict in clinical teams and reduce the effectiveness of care and services delivered to the population. Our objective in this paper is to outline processes for clarifying professional roles when a new role is introduced into clinical teams, that of the primary healthcare nurse practitioner (PHCNP. To support our empirical analysis we used the Canadian National Interprofessional Competency Framework, which defines the essential components for role clarification among professionals. A qualitative multiple-case study was conducted on six cases in which the PHCNP role was introduced into primary care teams. Data collection included 34 semistructured interviews with key informants involved in the implementation of the PHCNP role. Our results revealed that the best performing primary care teams were those that used a variety of organizational and individual strategies to carry out role clarification processes. From this study, we conclude that role clarification is both an organizational process to be developed and a competency that each member of the primary care team must mobilize to ensure effective interprofessional collaboration.

  4. Role Clarification Processes for Better Integration of Nurse Practitioners into Primary Healthcare Teams: A Multiple-Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Danielle; Contandriopoulos, Damien; Chouinard, Véronique; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2014-01-01

    Role clarity is a crucial issue for effective interprofessional collaboration. Poorly defined roles can become a source of conflict in clinical teams and reduce the effectiveness of care and services delivered to the population. Our objective in this paper is to outline processes for clarifying professional roles when a new role is introduced into clinical teams, that of the primary healthcare nurse practitioner (PHCNP). To support our empirical analysis we used the Canadian National Interprofessional Competency Framework, which defines the essential components for role clarification among professionals. A qualitative multiple-case study was conducted on six cases in which the PHCNP role was introduced into primary care teams. Data collection included 34 semistructured interviews with key informants involved in the implementation of the PHCNP role. Our results revealed that the best performing primary care teams were those that used a variety of organizational and individual strategies to carry out role clarification processes. From this study, we conclude that role clarification is both an organizational process to be developed and a competency that each member of the primary care team must mobilize to ensure effective interprofessional collaboration. PMID:25692039

  5. Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Hospice Team Meetings

    OpenAIRE

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Regehr, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Hospice and palliative care teams provide interdisciplinary care to seriously-ill and terminally-ill patients and their families. Care teams are comprised of medical and non-medical disciplines and include volunteers and lay workers in healthcare. The authors explored the perception of collaboration among hospice team members and actual collaborative communication practices in team meetings. The data set consisted of videotaped team meetings, some of which included caregiver participation, an...

  6. Using Semantic Components to Represent Dynamics of an Interdisciplinary Healthcare Team in a Multi-Agent Decision Support System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Szymon; Kezadri-Hamiaz, Mounira; Rosu, Daniela; Kuziemsky, Craig; Michalowski, Wojtek; Amyot, Daniel; Carrier, Marc

    2016-02-01

    In healthcare organizations, clinical workflows are executed by interdisciplinary healthcare teams (IHTs) that operate in ways that are difficult to manage. Responding to a need to support such teams, we designed and developed the MET4 multi-agent system that allows IHTs to manage patients according to presentation-specific clinical workflows. In this paper, we describe a significant extension of the MET4 system that allows for supporting rich team dynamics (understood as team formation, management and task-practitioner allocation), including selection and maintenance of the most responsible physician and more complex rules of selecting practitioners for the workflow tasks. In order to develop this extension, we introduced three semantic components: (1) a revised ontology describing concepts and relations pertinent to IHTs, workflows, and managed patients, (2) a set of behavioral rules describing the team dynamics, and (3) an instance base that stores facts corresponding to instances of concepts from the ontology and to relations between these instances. The semantic components are represented in first-order logic and they can be automatically processed using theorem proving and model finding techniques. We employ these techniques to find models that correspond to specific decisions controlling the dynamics of IHT. In the paper, we present the design of extended MET4 with a special focus on the new semantic components. We then describe its proof-of-concept implementation using the WADE multi-agent platform and the Z3 solver (theorem prover/model finder). We illustrate the main ideas discussed in the paper with a clinical scenario of an IHT managing a patient with chronic kidney disease.

  7. Using Publicly Available Data to Characterize Consumers Use of Email to Communicate with Healthcare Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandefer, Ryan H; Khairat, Saif S; Pieczkiewicz, David S; Speedie, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    The use of patient focused technology has been proclaimed as a means to improve patient satisfaction and improve care outcomes. The Center for Medicaid/Medicare Services, through its EHR Incentive Program, has required eligible hospitals and professionals to send and receive secure messages from patients in order to receive financial incentives and avoid reimbursement penalties. Secure messaging between providers and patients has the potential to improve communication and care outcomes. The purpose of this study was to use National Health Interview Series (NHIS) data to identify the patient characteristics associated with communicating with healthcare providers via email. Individual patient characteristics were analyzed to determine the likelihood of emailing healthcare providers. The use of email for this purpose is associated with educational attainment, having a usual place of receiving healthcare, income, and geography. Publicly available data such as the NHIS may be used to better understand trends in adoption and use of consumer health information technologies.

  8. The Disparity Information and Communication Technology for Developing Countries has in the Delivery of Healthcare Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhanabhai, Prajesh N; Holt, Alec

    2010-09-15

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have merged into the world of healthcare slowly but surely. However, the marriage between the use of technology and its full impact in the health sector has not been fully realised. The focus of this paper is to highlight the impact of ICT on revolutionising access to healthcare information and thus quality of health for populations of the developing world. This paper highlights on the importance of being able to access health information and how traditional media methods have been utilised to allow this within a developing country setting, highlighting the clear digital divide. The paper then addresses the impact of convergent communication technologies and mobile technologies in providing a means of addressing existing healthcare problems within a developing country setting.

  9. Influence of healthcare institution managers' proactive approach to communication activities on patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Vinka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Over the recent years customer satisfaction program as a tool for patient satisfaction has been recognized as an important issue in healthcare services. The aim of this preliminary study was to explore an influence of healthcare institution managers' approach and attitudes to marketing and public relations activities (communication activities, in the context of implementation of customer satisfaction programs, on patient satisfaction. Methods. The study was conducted among managers from different state-owned healthcare institutions (healthcare centers, clinics, hospitals in Serbia. The structured questionnaire form, comprising both open and closed questions, was used as a main research tool. The total number of sent questionnaires was 120; 56 questionnaires were sent back, while 49 of them were valid. Results. It was shown that 42.9% of healthcare institutions apply proactive media approach, and that 35.7% of the organizations have a person who, besides his/her basic engagements, performs activities connected with marketing and public relations. Using Chi-square likelihood ratio test it is confirmed that these activities have a significant role in supporting customer satisfaction program implementation (p < 0.05. The results showed that in 69.4% cases, positive attitude of healthcare institutions managers toward marketing and public relations activities had positive influence on patient satisfaction (p < 0.05. Conclusion. Managers in healthcare sector in Serbia who used proactive approach toward media and who had already institutionalized communication activities with external stakeholders have a positive attitude to implementation of customer satisfaction program. Furthermore, managers' attitude toward communication activities has influence on patient satisfaction.

  10. A model-based framework for the analysis of team communication in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yun Hyung [Knowledge and Information Management Department, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Guseong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 335-338 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: yhchung@kins.re.kr; Yoon, Wan Chul [Intelligent Service Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Daihwan [Department of MIS, Korea University, 208 Seochang-Dong, Jochiwon-Eup, Yongi-Gun, Choongnam 339-700 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Advanced human-machine interfaces are rapidly changing the interaction between humans and systems, with the level of abstraction of the presented information, the human task characteristics, and the modes of communication all affected. To accommodate the changes in the human/system co-working environment, an extended communication analysis framework is needed that can describe and relate the tasks, verbal exchanges, and information interface. This paper proposes an extended analytic framework, referred to as the H-H-S (human-human-system) communication analysis framework, which can model the changes in team communication that are emerging in these new working environments. The stage-specific decision-making model and analysis tool of the proposed framework make the analysis of team communication easier by providing visual clues. The usefulness of the proposed framework is demonstrated with an in-depth comparison of the characteristics of communication in the conventional and advanced main control rooms of nuclear power plants.

  11. Exploring Bridge-Engine Control Room Collaborative Team Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Kataria

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The EC funded CyClaDes research project is designed to promote the increased impact of the human element in shipping across the design and operational lifecycle. It addresses the design and operation of ships and ship systems. One of the CyClaDes’ tasks is to create a crew-centered design case-study examination of the information that is shared between the Bridge and Engine Control Room that helps the crew co-ordinate to ensure understanding and complete interconnected tasks. This information can be provided in various ways, including communication devices or obtained from a common database, display, or even the ship environment (e.g., the roll of the ship. A series of semi-structured interviews were conducted with seafarers of diverse ranks to get a better idea of what communication does, or should, take place and any problems or challenges existing in current operations, as seen from both the bridge and ECR operators’ perspectives. Included in the interview were both the standard communications and information shared during planning and executing a voyage, as well as special situations such as safety/casualty tasks or heavy weather. The results were analyzed in terms of the goals of the communication, the primary situations of interest for communication and collaboration, the communication media used, the information that is shared, and the problems experienced. The results of seafarer interviews are presented in the paper to explore on-board inter-departmental communication.

  12. Information Issues and Contexts that Impair Team Based Communication Workflow: A Palliative Sedation Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornett, Alex; Kuziemsky, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Implementing team based workflows can be complex because of the scope of providers involved and the extent of information exchange and communication that needs to occur. While a workflow may represent the ideal structure of communication that needs to occur, information issues and contextual factors may impact how the workflow is implemented in practice. Understanding these issues will help us better design systems to support team based workflows. In this paper we use a case study of palliative sedation therapy (PST) to model a PST workflow and then use it to identify purposes of communication, information issues and contextual factors that impact them. We then suggest how our findings could inform health information technology (HIT) design to support team based communication workflows.

  13. Communication issues for the interdisciplinary community palliative care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, A; Blackford, J

    2001-09-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a critical study that examined the communication patterns between nurses and general practitioners (GPs) providing palliative care in Australia. Interviews and focus groups involved 40 palliative care nurses who worked in the three settings of care: community, hospice and hospital. Issues that impeded effective communication strategies between palliative care nurses and GPs were networking, case management, multiple service providers, lack of standardized documentation and formal tracking of clients, along with difficulties in transmission of relevant practice knowledge. Supporting strategies for effective formal modes of communicating and reporting are described.

  14. [Principles and stakes of external communication of healthcare networks: the case of heathcare networks for health services accessibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plu, Isabelle; Gignon, Maxime; Emery, Sophie; Purssell-François, Irène; Moutel, Grégoire; Hervé, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare networks which purpose is to manage patients through better coordination of the care, need to develop a communication strategy to be recognized by the public and by healthcare professionals and to be inserted in the healthcare landscape. We firstly will present legal requirements related to external communication of healthcare networks. Then, we will describe the different tools which can be used to communicate about healthcare networks in its area, with the example from a healthcare network for health services accessibility. In the French Public health code, the legal status and the ethical charter of the healthcare network have to be delivered to the healthcare professionals in its area and to the patients. Moreover, the example healthcare network informed collectively and individually the healthcare professionals of its area about its activities. It made it known to the public by the way of departmental prevention manifestations and health education sessions in community social associations. From these examples, we will conduct an ethical reflection on the modalities and stakes of the external communication of healthcare networks.

  15. COMS Day as a Communication Senior Capstone Team Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozley, Raymond R.; Wang, Tiffany R.; Ford, Sherry Greenwood; Hardig, Sally Bennett

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Senior Seminar. Objectives: (1) To provide graduating students a semester-long capstone experience where they can apply communication theories/skills in a professional context. (2) To create a capstone project that contributes to programmatic assessment.

  16. The Effect of Communication Strategy and Planning Intervention on the Processes and Performance of Course Material Development Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmo Putri, Dewi A.

    2012-01-01

    In most open and distance learning institutions, the development of learning materials, whether in print or electronic form, is created by teams consisting of people with different skills. Team communication has a critical influence on the development of team shared mental models (SMMs) as well as team performance. A review of the literature…

  17. The Effect of Communication Strategy and Planning Intervention on the Processes and Performance of Course Material Development Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmo Putri, Dewi A.

    2012-01-01

    In most open and distance learning institutions, the development of learning materials, whether in print or electronic form, is created by teams consisting of people with different skills. Team communication has a critical influence on the development of team shared mental models (SMMs) as well as team performance. A review of the literature…

  18. Is there a role for pharmacists in multidisciplinary health-care teams at community outreach events for the homeless?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vincent; Patounas, Marea; Dornbusch, Debbie; Tran, Hung; Watson, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness is a significant public health problem. It is well-documented that people experiencing homelessness exhibit more serious illnesses and have poorer health than the general population. The provision of services and interventions by health-care professionals, including pharmacists, may make a simple yet important contribution to improved health outcomes in those experiencing homelessness, but evidence of roles and interventions is limited and variable. In Australia, the Queensland University of Technology Health Clinic connects with the homeless community by taking part in community outreach events. This paper provides details of one such event, as well as the roles, interventions and experiences of pharmacists. Participation and inclusion of pharmacists in a multidisciplinary health-care team approach at homeless outreach events should be supported and encouraged.

  19. Saving Lives through visual health communication: a multidisciplinary team approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wressell, Adrian; Twaites, Heidi; Taylor, Stephen; Hartland, Dan; Gove-Humphries, Theo

    2014-10-01

    Saving Lives is a public health awareness charity that aims to educate the UK public about HIV and encourage testing for the virus. In May 2011 Saving Lives contacted the Medical Illustration department at Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust to discuss the idea of working together to develop a national HIV awareness campaign. A number of local sporting celebrities were invited to a studio photography session. All the sports stars and celebrities were photographed on a Mamiya 645 AFDII camera, with PhaseOne P30 + digital back, using prime 35 mm, 55 mm and 80 mm lenses. During the photography sessions, the team's film maker captured video footage of the subjects being photographed. Once the final avengers' graphical composition had been created, it was applied to the posters, billboards and public transport signs for the campaign. In the three-month period following the campaign launch, survey research was carried out, the initial data being recorded by a questionnaire which was provided to each of the 1800 patients attending the Heartlands Hospital sexual health clinic for HIV testing. Following the launch of the initial campaign, the Saving Lives team continues to produce material to assist in the promotion of the charity and its message. Its success has led to it becoming an on-going long-term project, and to date the team have photographed and filmed 33 sporting stars and visited numerous sporting institutes.

  20. Team performance in networked supervisory control of unmanned air vehicles: effects of automation, working memory, and communication content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendrick, Ryan; Shaw, Tyler; de Visser, Ewart; Saqer, Haneen; Kidwell, Brian; Parasuraman, Raja

    2014-05-01

    Assess team performance within a net-worked supervisory control setting while manipulating automated decision aids and monitoring team communication and working memory ability. Networked systems such as multi-unmanned air vehicle (UAV) supervision have complex properties that make prediction of human-system performance difficult. Automated decision aid can provide valuable information to operators, individual abilities can limit or facilitate team performance, and team communication patterns can alter how effectively individuals work together. We hypothesized that reliable automation, higher working memory capacity, and increased communication rates of task-relevant information would offset performance decrements attributed to high task load. Two-person teams performed a simulated air defense task with two levels of task load and three levels of automated aid reliability. Teams communicated and received decision aid messages via chat window text messages. Task Load x Automation effects were significant across all performance measures. Reliable automation limited the decline in team performance with increasing task load. Average team spatial working memory was a stronger predictor than other measures of team working memory. Frequency of team rapport and enemy location communications positively related to team performance, and word count was negatively related to team performance. Reliable decision aiding mitigated team performance decline during increased task load during multi-UAV supervisory control. Team spatial working memory, communication of spatial information, and team rapport predicted team success. An automated decision aid can improve team performance under high task load. Assessment of spatial working memory and the communication of task-relevant information can help in operator and team selection in supervisory control systems.

  1. The effect of a nurse team leader on communication and leadership in major trauma resuscitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Alana; Curtis, Kate; Horvat, Leanne; Shaban, Ramon Z

    2015-01-01

    Effective assessment and resuscitation of trauma patients requires an organised, multidisciplinary team. Literature evaluating leadership roles of nurses in trauma resuscitation and their effect on team performance is scarce. To assess the effect of allocating the most senior nurse as team leader of trauma patient assessment and resuscitation on communication, documentation and perceptions of leadership within an Australian emergency department. The study design was a pre-post-test survey of emergency nursing staff (working at resuscitation room level) perceptions of leadership, communication, and documentation before and after the implementation of a nurse leader role. Patient records were audited focussing on initial resuscitation assessment, treatment, and nursing clinical entry. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Communication trended towards improvement. All (100%) respondents post-test stated they had a good to excellent understanding of their role, compared to 93.2% pre-study. A decrease (58.1-12.5%) in 'intimidating personality' as a negative aspect of communication. Nursing leadership had a 6.7% increase in the proportion of those who reported nursing leadership to be good to excellent. Accuracy of clinical documentation improved (P = 0.025). Trauma nurse team leaders improve some aspects of communication and leadership. Development of trauma nurse leaders should be encouraged within trauma team training programmes. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effective Team Practices: Interprofessional Contributions to Communication Issues With a Parent's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper-Duffy, Karena; Eaker, Kerri

    2017-05-17

    This clinical focus article contains a detailed description of how to build effective teams that use interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) with special-education professionals, speech-language pathologists, and families of children with severe disabilities. This clinical focus article provides information on using the essential elements of team building and IPCP to provide quality care to families who have children with severe disabilities. The 6 essential elements for team building are described, with suggestions for including families in each: goal-setting, roles and responsibilities, effective and efficient process, communication and interpersonal relationships, collaborative problem solving, and evaluation. The 4 competency domains of IPCP are embedded into each of the team-building elements to demonstrate how teams can implement IPCP. A case study illustrates the difficulty one parent experienced working with a team across the 6 essential team-building elements when seeking communication services for her child with severe disabilities. Building teams with IPCP can be effective for including families and creating high-quality outcomes for individuals with severe disabilities.

  3. Interdisciplinary collaboration in hospice team meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Parker Oliver, Debra; Demiris, George; Regehr, Kelly

    2010-05-01

    Hospice and palliative care teams provide interdisciplinary care to seriously-ill and terminally-ill patients and their families. Care teams are comprised of medical and non-medical disciplines and include volunteers and lay workers in healthcare. The authors explored the perception of collaboration among hospice team members and actual collaborative communication practices in team meetings. The data set consisted of videotaped team meetings, some of which included caregiver participation, and team member completion of a survey. Findings revealed that the team's reflection on process was most likely to occur in team meetings, however least likely to occur when caregivers were present. Although team members had a high perception of interdependence and flexibility of roles, this was less likely to be enacted in team meetings with and without the presence of caregivers. Caregiver participation in team meetings had a positive impact on collaborative communication and the potential benefit of caregiver inclusion in team meetings is explored.

  4. Team Communication: The Social Identity Approach to Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    disapproval of human and financial waste.”45 The economic approach looked to scientifically, almost mechanistically, align workers with tasks. The economic...cooperation and altruism, emotional contagion and empathy, collective behavior, shared norms, and mutual influence.”341 Therefore, communicating in a way

  5. Using Information and Communication Technology in Home Care for Communication between Patients, Family Members, and Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Lindberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Information and communication technology (ICT are becoming a natural part in healthcare both for delivering and giving accessibility to healthcare for people with chronic illness living at home. Aim. The aim was to review existing studies describing the use of ICT in home care for communication between patients, family members, and healthcare professionals. Methods. A review of studies was conducted that identified 1,276 studies. A selection process and quality appraisal were conducted, which finally resulted in 107 studies. Results. The general results offer an overview of characteristics of studies describing the use of ICT applications in home care and are summarized in areas including study approach, quality appraisal, publications data, terminology used for defining the technology, and disease diagnosis. The specific results describe how communication with ICT was performed in home care and the benefits and drawbacks with the use of ICT. Results were predominated by positive responses in the use of ICT. Conclusion. The use of ICT applications in home care is an expanding research area, with a variety of ICT tools used that could increase accessibility to home care. Using ICT can lead to people living with chronic illnesses gaining control of their illness that promotes self-care.

  6. Using Information and Communication Technology in Home Care for Communication between Patients, Family Members, and Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Birgitta; Nilsson, Carina; Zotterman, Daniel; Söderberg, Siv; Skär, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Information and communication technology (ICT) are becoming a natural part in healthcare both for delivering and giving accessibility to healthcare for people with chronic illness living at home. Aim. The aim was to review existing studies describing the use of ICT in home care for communication between patients, family members, and healthcare professionals. Methods. A review of studies was conducted that identified 1,276 studies. A selection process and quality appraisal were conducted, which finally resulted in 107 studies. Results. The general results offer an overview of characteristics of studies describing the use of ICT applications in home care and are summarized in areas including study approach, quality appraisal, publications data, terminology used for defining the technology, and disease diagnosis. The specific results describe how communication with ICT was performed in home care and the benefits and drawbacks with the use of ICT. Results were predominated by positive responses in the use of ICT. Conclusion. The use of ICT applications in home care is an expanding research area, with a variety of ICT tools used that could increase accessibility to home care. Using ICT can lead to people living with chronic illnesses gaining control of their illness that promotes self-care.

  7. Interprofessional Teamwork and Collaboration Between Community Health Workers and Healthcare Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, Catherine M.; Jean M. Bernhardt; Ruth Palan Lopez; Ellen R. Long-Middleton; Sheila Davis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Community Health Workers (CHWs) serve as a means of improving outcomes for underserved populations. However, their relationship within health care teams is not well studied. The purpose of this integrative review was to examine published research reports that demonstrated positive health outcomes as a result of CHW intervention to identify interprofessional teamwork and collaboration between CHWs and health care teams. Methods: A total of 47 studies spanning 33 years were reviewed...

  8. Interprofessional Teamwork and Collaboration Between Community Health Workers and Healthcare Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine M. Franklin; Jean M. Bernhardt; Ruth Palan Lopez; Ellen R. Long-Middleton; Sheila Davis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Community Health Workers (CHWs) serve as a means of improving outcomes for underserved populations. However, their relationship within health care teams is not well studied. The purpose of this integrative review was to examine published research reports that demonstrated positive health outcomes as a result of CHW intervention to identify interprofessional teamwork and collaboration between CHWs and health care teams. Methods: A total of 47 studies spanning 33 years were reviewed...

  9. Healthcare Communication Barriers and Self-Rated Health in Older Chinese American Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoh, Janice Y; Sentell, Tetine; Gildengorin, Ginny; Le, Gem M; Chan, Elaine; Fung, Lei-Chun; Pasick, Rena J; Stewart, Susan; Wong, Ching; Woo, Kent; Burke, Adam; Wang, Jun; McPhee, Stephen J; Nguyen, Tung T

    2016-08-01

    Older Chinese immigrants are a growing population in the United States who experience multiple healthcare communication barriers such as limited English proficiency and low health literacy. Each of these obstacles has been associated with poor health outcomes but less is known about their effects in combination. This study examined the association between healthcare communication barriers and self-rated health among older Chinese immigrants. Cross-sectional survey data were obtained from 705 Chinese American immigrants ages 50-75 living in San Francisco, California. Communication barriers examined included spoken English proficiency, medical interpreter needs, and health literacy in written health information. The study sample (81 % females, mean age = 62) included 67 % who spoke English poorly or not at all, 34 % who reported needing a medical interpreter, and 37 % who reported "often" or "always" needing assistance to read health information. Two-thirds reported poor self-rated health; many reported having access to racial-concordant (74 %) and language-concordant (86 %) healthcare services. Both poor spoken English proficiency and low health literacy were associated with poor self-rated health, independent of other significant correlates (unemployment, chronic health conditions, and having a primary doctor who was ethnic Chinese). Results revealed that spoken English proficiency and print health literacy are independent communication barriers that are directly associated with health status among elderly Chinese American immigrants. Access to racial- or language-concordant health care services did not appear to resolve these barriers. These findings underscore the importance of addressing both spoken and written healthcare communication needs among older Chinese American immigrants.

  10. Inter-organisational communication networks in healthcare: centralised versus decentralised approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Pirnejad

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To afford efficient and high quality care, healthcare providers increasingly need to exchange patient data. The existence of a communication network amongst care providers will help them to exchange patient data more efficiently. Information and communication technology (ICT has much potential to facilitate the development of such a communication network. Moreover, in order to offer integrated care interoperability of healthcare organizations based upon the exchanged data is of crucial importance. However, complications around such a development are beyond technical impediments. Objectives: To determine the challenges and complexities involved in building an Inter-organisational Communication network (IOCN in healthcare and the appropriations in the strategies. Case study: Interviews, literature review, and document analysis were conducted to analyse the developments that have taken place toward building a countrywide electronic patient record and its challenges in The Netherlands. Due to the interrelated nature of technical and non-technical problems, a socio-technical approach was used to analyse the data and define the challenges. Results: Organisational and cultural changes are necessary before technical solutions can be applied. There are organisational, financial, political, and ethicolegal challenges that have to be addressed appropriately. Two different approaches, one “centralised” and the other “decentralised” have been used by Dutch healthcare providers to adopt the necessary changes and cope with these challenges. Conclusion: The best solutions in building an IOCN have to be drawn from both the centralised and the decentralised approaches. Local communication initiatives have to be supervised and supported centrally and incentives at the organisations' interest level have to be created to encourage the stakeholder organisations to adopt the necessary changes.

  11. Interventions to improve teamwork and communications among healthcare staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, P; Rathbone, J; Catchpole, K

    2011-04-01

    Concern over the frequency of unintended harm to patients has focused attention on the importance of teamwork and communication in avoiding errors. This has led to experiments with teamwork training programmes for clinical staff, mostly based on aviation models. These are widely assumed to be effective in improving patient safety, but the extent to which this assumption is justified by evidence remains unclear. A systematic literature review on the effects of teamwork training for clinical staff was performed. Information was sought on outcomes including staff attitudes, teamwork skills, technical performance, efficiency and clinical outcomes. Of 1036 relevant abstracts identified, 14 articles were analysed in detail: four randomized trials and ten non-randomized studies. Overall study quality was poor, with particular problems over blinding, subjective measures and Hawthorne effects. Few studies reported on every outcome category. Most reported improved staff attitudes, and six of eight reported significantly better teamwork after training. Five of eight studies reported improved technical performance, improved efficiency or reduced errors. Three studies reported evidence of clinical benefit, but this was modest or of borderline significance in each case. Studies with a stronger intervention were more likely to report benefits than those providing less training. None of the randomized trials found evidence of technical or clinical benefit. The evidence for technical or clinical benefit from teamwork training in medicine is weak. There is some evidence of benefit from studies with more intensive training programmes, but better quality research and cost-benefit analysis are needed. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Moving Toward Improved Teamwork in Cancer Care: The Role of Psychological Safety in Team Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anshu K; Fennell, Mary L; Chagpar, Anees B; Connolly, Hannah K; Nembhard, Ingrid M

    2016-11-01

    Effective communication is a requirement in the teamwork necessary for improved coordination to deliver patient-centered, value-based cancer care. Communication is particularly important when care providers are geographically distributed or work across organizations. We review organizational and teams research on communication to highlight psychological safety as a key determinant of high-quality communication within teams. We first present the concept of psychological safety, findings about its communication effects for teamwork, and factors that affect it. We focus on five factors applicable to cancer care delivery: familiarity, clinical hierarchy-related status differences, geographic dispersion, boundary spanning, and leader behavior. To illustrate how these factors facilitate or hinder psychologically safe communication and teamwork in cancer care, we review the case of a patient as she experiences the treatment-planning process for early-stage breast cancer in a community setting. Our analysis is summarized in a key principle: Teamwork in cancer care requires high-quality communication, which depends on psychological safety for all team members, clinicians and patients alike. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of psychological safety in clinical care and suggestions for future research.

  13. The perceived role of ward-based primary healthcare outreach teams in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuzwayo, Landiwe S; Moshabela, Mosa

    2017-05-29

    The aim of ward-based outreach teams (WBOTs) is to improve access to primary healthcare (PHC) services including health promotion and disease prevention in South Africa. Limited information is available in South Africa on user perceptions of services provided by WBOTs in rural households. The study aimed to explore community awareness and perception of WBOTs, as well people's motivation to engage and use WBOT services. The study was conducted between July and September 2015 in iLembe district, KwaZulu-Natal. This was exploratory-descriptive qualitative research. Purposive sampling technique was used in this study. A total of 16 key informant interviews and 4 focus group discussions were conducted. The voice recordings were transcribed in isiZulu and translated into English. Four themes emerged from the data analysis, namely bringing services closer, organising services, expanding services and forming bridges. Respondents demonstrated insightful knowledge and understanding of services provided by WBOTs. They expressed an appreciation of the way WBOT services brought healthcare closer to people and serve to bridge the gap between the community and local healthcare facilities. Respondents identified unclear WBOT work schedules and the failure to carry medication other than vitamin A as the main challenges. However, WBOTs did deliver medication for controlled chronic patients in their households. The study suggests that WBOTs provide a commendable service, but need to expand their service package to further increase access to PHC services and cater for community health needs.

  14. What Indicates Competency in Systems Based Practice? An Analysis of Perspective Consistency among Healthcare Team Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark J.; Naqvi, Zoon; Encandela, John A.; Bylund, Carma L.; Dean, Randa; Calero-Breckheimer, Ayxa; Schmidt, Hilary J.

    2009-01-01

    In many parts of the world the practice of medicine and medical education increasingly focus on providing patient care within context of the larger healthcare system. Our purpose is to solicit perceptions of all professional stakeholders (e.g. nurses) of the system regarding the U.S. ACGME competency Systems Based Practice to uncover the extent to…

  15. Interprofessional Curbside Consults to Develop Team Communication and Improve Student Achievement of Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Kristin Curry; Rico, Janet; Nalliah, Romesh; DiVall, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To design and implement a series of activities focused on developing interprofessional communication skills and to assess the impact of the activities on students’ attitudes and achievement of educational goals. Design. Prior to the first pharmacy practice skills laboratory session, pharmacy students listened to a classroom lecture about team communication and viewed short videos describing the roles, responsibilities, and usual work environments of four types of health care professionals. In each of four subsequent laboratory sessions, students interacted with a different standardized health care professional role-played by a pharmacy faculty member who asked them a medication-related question. Students responded in verbal and written formats. Assessment. Student performance was assessed with a three-part rubric. The impact of the exercise was assessed by conducting pre- and post-intervention surveys and analyzing students’ performance on relevant Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) outcomes. Survey results showed improvement in student attitudes related to team-delivered care. Students’ performance on the problem solver and collaborator CAPE outcomes improved, while performance on the educator outcome worsened. Conclusions. The addition of an interprofessional communication activity with standardized health care professionals provided the opportunity for students to develop skills related to team communication. Students felt the activity was valuable and realistic; however, analysis of outcome achievement from the exercise revealed a need for more exposure to team communication skills. PMID:28289305

  16. Interprofessional Curbside Consults to Develop Team Communication and Improve Student Achievement of Learning Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwin, Jennifer; Greenwood, Kristin Curry; Rico, Janet; Nalliah, Romesh; DiVall, Margarita

    2017-02-25

    Objective. To design and implement a series of activities focused on developing interprofessional communication skills and to assess the impact of the activities on students' attitudes and achievement of educational goals. Design. Prior to the first pharmacy practice skills laboratory session, pharmacy students listened to a classroom lecture about team communication and viewed short videos describing the roles, responsibilities, and usual work environments of four types of health care professionals. In each of four subsequent laboratory sessions, students interacted with a different standardized health care professional role-played by a pharmacy faculty member who asked them a medication-related question. Students responded in verbal and written formats. Assessment. Student performance was assessed with a three-part rubric. The impact of the exercise was assessed by conducting pre- and post-intervention surveys and analyzing students' performance on relevant Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) outcomes. Survey results showed improvement in student attitudes related to team-delivered care. Students' performance on the problem solver and collaborator CAPE outcomes improved, while performance on the educator outcome worsened. Conclusions. The addition of an interprofessional communication activity with standardized health care professionals provided the opportunity for students to develop skills related to team communication. Students felt the activity was valuable and realistic; however, analysis of outcome achievement from the exercise revealed a need for more exposure to team communication skills.

  17. Interprofessional Teamwork and Collaboration Between Community Health Workers and Healthcare Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Jean M.; Lopez, Ruth Palan; Long-Middleton, Ellen R.; Davis, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Community Health Workers (CHWs) serve as a means of improving outcomes for underserved populations. However, their relationship within health care teams is not well studied. The purpose of this integrative review was to examine published research reports that demonstrated positive health outcomes as a result of CHW intervention to identify interprofessional teamwork and collaboration between CHWs and health care teams. Methods: A total of 47 studies spanning 33 years were reviewed using an integrative literature review methodology for evidence to support the following assumptions of effective interprofessional teamwork between CHWs and health care teams: (1) shared understanding of roles, norms, values, and goals of the team; (2) egalitarianism; (3) cooperation; (4) interdependence; and(5) synergy. Results: Of the 47 studies, 12 reported at least one assumption of effective interprofessional teamwork. Four studies demonstrated all 5 assumptions of interprofessional teamwork. Conclusions: Four studies identified in this integrative review serve as exemplars for effective interprofessional teamwork between CHWs and health care teams. Further study is needed to describe the nature of interprofessional teamwork and collaboration in relation to patient health outcomes. PMID:28462254

  18. Interprofessional Teamwork and Collaboration Between Community Health Workers and Healthcare Teams: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Catherine M; Bernhardt, Jean M; Lopez, Ruth Palan; Long-Middleton, Ellen R; Davis, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Community Health Workers (CHWs) serve as a means of improving outcomes for underserved populations. However, their relationship within health care teams is not well studied. The purpose of this integrative review was to examine published research reports that demonstrated positive health outcomes as a result of CHW intervention to identify interprofessional teamwork and collaboration between CHWs and health care teams. A total of 47 studies spanning 33 years were reviewed using an integrative literature review methodology for evidence to support the following assumptions of effective interprofessional teamwork between CHWs and health care teams: (1) shared understanding of roles, norms, values, and goals of the team; (2) egalitarianism; (3) cooperation; (4) interdependence; and(5) synergy. Of the 47 studies, 12 reported at least one assumption of effective interprofessional teamwork. Four studies demonstrated all 5 assumptions of interprofessional teamwork. Four studies identified in this integrative review serve as exemplars for effective interprofessional teamwork between CHWs and health care teams. Further study is needed to describe the nature of interprofessional teamwork and collaboration in relation to patient health outcomes.

  19. Interprofessional Teamwork and Collaboration Between Community Health Workers and Healthcare Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Franklin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Community Health Workers (CHWs serve as a means of improving outcomes for underserved populations. However, their relationship within health care teams is not well studied. The purpose of this integrative review was to examine published research reports that demonstrated positive health outcomes as a result of CHW intervention to identify interprofessional teamwork and collaboration between CHWs and health care teams. Methods: A total of 47 studies spanning 33 years were reviewed using an integrative literature review methodology for evidence to support the following assumptions of effective interprofessional teamwork between CHWs and health care teams: (1 shared understanding of roles, norms, values, and goals of the team; (2 egalitarianism; (3 cooperation; (4 interdependence; and(5 synergy. Results: Of the 47 studies, 12 reported at least one assumption of effective interprofessional teamwork. Four studies demonstrated all 5 assumptions of interprofessional teamwork. Conclusions: Four studies identified in this integrative review serve as exemplars for effective interprofessional teamwork between CHWs and health care teams. Further study is needed to describe the nature of interprofessional teamwork and collaboration in relation to patient health outcomes.

  20. Interprofessional Teamwork and Collaboration Between Community Health Workers and Healthcare Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Franklin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Community Health Workers (CHWs serve as a means of improving outcomes for underserved populations. However, their relationship within health care teams is not well studied. The purpose of this integrative review was to examine published research reports that demonstrated positive health outcomes as a result of CHW intervention to identify interprofessional teamwork and collaboration between CHWs and health care teams. Methods: A total of 47 studies spanning 33 years were reviewed using an integrative literature review methodology for evidence to support the following assumptions of effective interprofessional teamwork between CHWs and health care teams: (1 shared understanding of roles, norms, values, and goals of the team; (2 egalitarianism; (3 cooperation; (4 interdependence; and(5 synergy. Results: Of the 47 studies, 12 reported at least one assumption of effective interprofessional teamwork. Four studies demonstrated all 5 assumptions of interprofessional teamwork. Conclusions: Four studies identified in this integrative review serve as exemplars for effective interprofessional teamwork between CHWs and health care teams. Further study is needed to describe the nature of interprofessional teamwork and collaboration in relation to patient health outcomes.

  1. [Incorporation of Information and Communication Technologies and quality of primary healthcare in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Alaneir de Fátima Dos; Fonseca, Délcio; Araujo, Lucas Lobato; Procópio, Cristiane da Silva Diniz; Lopes, Érica Araújo Silva; Lima, Angela Maria de Lourdes Dayrell de; Reis, Clarice Magalhães Rodrigues Dos; Abreu, Daisy Maria Xavier de; Jorge, Alzira Oliveira; Matta-Machado, Antonio Thomaz

    2017-06-05

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are means to handle information, streamline communication, and contribute to patient care. This article describes the incorporation of Information and Communication Technologies in primary care and its association with quality, based on the Brazilian National Program for the Improvement of Access and Quality in Primary Care (PMAQ in portuguese). This was a cross-sectional study with 17,053 teams. An Index of Incorporation of ICTs was created, which included: information infrastructure, systems, and utilization. Regression analysis was used to assess associations. Only 13.5% of the teams had a high degree of ICTs. The strongest association was seen in the utilization of information. ICTs can contribute to improving quality of primary care.

  2. Communication skills training for healthcare professionals working with people who have cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Philippa M; Rivera Mercado, Solange; Grez Artigues, Mónica; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2013-03-28

    This is an updated version of a review that was originally published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in 2004, Issue 2. People with cancer, their families and carers have a high prevalence of psychological stress which may be minimised by effective communication and support from their attending healthcare professionals (HCPs). Research suggests communication skills do not reliably improve with experience, therefore, considerable effort is dedicated to courses that may improve communication skills for HCPs involved in cancer care. A variety of communication skills training (CST) courses have been proposed and are in practice. We conducted this review to determine whether CST works and which types of CST, if any, are the most effective. To assess whether CST is effective in improving the communication skills of HCPs involved in cancer care, and in improving patient health status and satisfaction. We searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 2, 2012, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo and CINAHL to February 2012. The original search was conducted in November 2001. In addition, we handsearched the reference lists of relevant articles and relevant conference proceedings for additional studies. The original review was a narrative review that included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled before-and-after studies. In this updated version, we limited our criteria to RCTs evaluating 'CST' compared with 'no CST' or other CST in HCPs working in cancer care. Primary outcomes were changes in HCP communication skills measured in interactions with real and/or simulated patients with cancer, using objective scales. We excluded studies whose focus was communication skills in encounters related to informed consent for research. Two review authors independently assessed trials and extracted data to a pre-designed data collection form. We pooled data using the random-effects model and, for continuous

  3. Information delivery in team communication of MCR operators for an emergency task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwang Sub; Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dae

    2005-01-01

    Team performance is a major measure to evaluate the ability of team when a lot of people perform a task of common purpose such as the main control room operators in the nuclear power plant. A team performance is affected the collaboration and communication among operators under dynamic situation as well as by the cognitive process of each team member. Specially, under the emergency situation, more clear and apparent communication in a team is a critical key for the appropriate response to emergency situation. As a general human factor analysis accesses the operator's behavior, it leads to a resulting action of planning, decision, problem-solving. In order to access the internal information and background information of his/her behavior, the verbal protocol analysis is applied. The impact factors on the team performance are derived from the state of the art for team performance, and it is found that the communication is a common key for all impact factors. And, in turn, the impact factors for the communication are accesses and the more detailed analysis is performed. The recorded data for the operator training for emergency situation of nuclear power plant training center are analyzed according to the verbal protocol analysis that are being generally utilized in cognitive psychology, educational psychology, and cognitive science. Two aspects, external (syntax) and internal (symantic) aspects of communication are reviewed. From the syntax analysis, it is found that the task of each step in EOP is separated according to each corresponding operator and the ordinary training is important, and the weak-points for a sentence presentation can be found team-by-team. And, from the symantic analysis for the diagnostic procedure of EOP is performed and the communication errors due to different situation awareness by operators could be found, and it lead to a diagnosis failure. The factors for different symantic cognition for a situation are analyzed and the affecting

  4. Physicians, nonphysician healthcare providers, and patients communicating in hepatitis C: an in-office sociolinguistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Heidi E; Gordon, Cynthia; Nelson, Meaghan; Kerbleski, Marian

    2006-01-01

    In-office conversations about hepatitis C can impact patients' perceptions of outcomes, as well as medication adherence. This study analyzed interactions between physicians, nonphysician healthcare providers (including nurses), and patients with hepatitis C virus infection in order to examine differences based on number and type of providers participating. Gastroenterologists, nonphysician healthcare providers, and patients with hepatitis C virus infection were video- and audio-recorded during regularly scheduled visits. Recordings were transcribed and analyzed using validated sociolinguistic techniques. Thirty-four visits took place with a physician only, 4 with a nonphysician healthcare provider only, and 25 with both providers (9 concurrent and 16 consecutive). Differences among the participant schema included visit length, patient "talk-time," and motivation provided. When providers saw patients consecutively, differing information was sometimes provided. In visits where providers saw the patient concurrently, competing authority between providers and exclusion of the patient through use of medical jargon were obstacles to ideal communication. Differences in hepatitis C-related interactions based on the number and type of participants suggest opportunities for improved communication. In visits with multiple providers, physicians and nurses should attempt to ensure that they (a) avoid supplying differing information, (b) present a "unified front" to avoid competing authority, and (c) minimize the use of medical jargon, which excludes patients from participating in their own healthcare.

  5. General Public Expectation from the Communication Process with their Healthcare Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassali, Ma; Shafie, Aa; Khan, Tm

    2012-07-01

    The current study aimed to explore the public views and expectation about a successful communication process between the healthcare providers/physicians and patients in Penang Island, Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Penang Island using a 14-item questionnaire. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 15.0(®) were used to analyze the collected data. A nonparametric statistics was applied; the Chi-square test was applied to measure the association among the variables. P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of N (500) respondents have shown willingness to participate in the study with a response rate of 83.3%. The majority 319 (63.9%) have disclosed to communicate with their healthcare providers in the Malay language and about 401 (80.4%) of the respondents were found satisfied with the information provided by the physician. It was a common expectation by the most of the sample to focus more on the patient history before prescribing any medicine. Moreover, about 60.0% of the respondents expected that the healthcare providers must show patience to the patient's queries. The level of satisfaction with the information shared by the healthcare providers was higher among the respondents with a higher education level. Furthermore, patients with higher level of education expect that physician shouldwell understand their views and medical history to prescribe a better therapeutic regimen.

  6. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing.

  7. Healthcare model with use of information and communication technology for patients with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisiecka-Biełanowicz, Mira; Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew

    2016-07-15

    The healthcare system is positioned in the patient's environment and works with other determinants of the treatment. Patient care requires a whole system compatible to the needs of organizational and technical solutions. The purpose of this study is to present a new model of patient-oriented care, in which the use of information and communication technology (ICT) can improve the effectiveness of healthcare for patients with chronic diseases. The study material is the process of healthcare for chronically ill patients. Knowledge of the circumstances surrounding ecosystem and of the patients' needs, taking into account the fundamental healthcare goals allows us to build a new models of care, starting with the economic assumptions. The method used is modeling the construction of efficient healthcare system with the patient-centered model using ICT tools. We present a new systemic concept of building patient's environment in which he is the central figure of the healthcare organization - so called patient centered system. The use of ICT in the model of chronic patient's healthcare can improve the effectiveness of this kind of care. The concept is a vision to making wide platform of information management in chronic disease in a real environment ecosystem of patient using ICT tools. On the basis of a systematic approach to the model of chronic disease, and the knowledge of the patient itself, a model of the ecosystem impacts and interactions through information feedback and the provision of services can be constructed. ICT assisted techniques will increase the effectiveness of patient care, in which nowadays information exchange plays a key role.

  8. General Public Expectation from the Communication Process with their Healthcare Providers

    OpenAIRE

    Hassali, MA; Shafie, AA; Khan, TM

    2012-01-01

    The current study aimed to explore the public views and expectation about a successful communication process between the healthcare providers/physicians and patients in Penang Island, Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Penang Island using a 14-item questionnaire. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 15.0® were used to analyze the collected data. A nonparametric statistics was applied; the Chi-square test was applied to measure the association among t...

  9. Curtains up! Using forum theatre to rehearse the art of communication in healthcare education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlewick, Yvonne; Kettle, Trevor J; Wilson, James J

    2012-05-01

    Teaching students to develop high quality communication skills in healthcare education is vitally important if best practice is to be achieved. These skills have often been seen as challenging to successfully develop. Didactic approaches impart knowledge but not necessarily the opportunities to practice communication techniques. This paper shares the experiences of a group of University lecturers introducing the use of an experiential theatrical technique, forum theatre, to support students to develop their communication skills. Forum theatre aims to create a dynamic learning environment enabling students to try out different communication strategies within a safe setting. Academic staff perform short scripted scenes developed using their knowledge from practice along with the experience of carers and service users. The end result is always unsatisfactory for the service user. The scene is then re-run inviting the students to interact with the characters and to change the outcome to a positive one resulting in a collaborative experience.

  10. Managing Ethical Difficulties in Healthcare: Communicating in Inter-professional Clinical Ethics Support Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönlund, Catarina Fischer; Dahlqvist, Vera; Zingmark, Karin; Sandlund, Mikael; Söderberg, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Several studies show that healthcare professionals need to communicate inter-professionally in order to manage ethical difficulties. A model of clinical ethics support (CES) inspired by Habermas' theory of discourse ethics has been developed by our research group. In this version of CES sessions healthcare professionals meet inter-professionally to communicate and reflect on ethical difficulties in a cooperative manner with the aim of reaching communicative agreement or reflective consensus. In order to understand the course of action during CES, the aim of this study was to describe the communication of value conflicts during a series of inter-professional CES sessions. Ten audio- and video-recorded CES sessions were conducted over eight months and were analyzed by using the video analysis tool Transana and qualitative content analysis. The results showed that during the CES sessions the professionals as a group moved through the following five phases: a value conflict expressed as feelings of frustration, sharing disempowerment and helplessness, the revelation of the value conflict, enhancing realistic expectations, seeing opportunities to change the situation instead of obstacles. In the course of CES, the professionals moved from an individual interpretation of the situation to a common, new understanding and then to a change in approach. An open and permissive communication climate meant that the professionals dared to expose themselves, share their feelings, face their own emotions, and eventually arrive at a mutual shared reality. The value conflict was not only revealed but also resolved.

  11. Norms for creativity and implementation in healthcare teams: testing the group innovation inventory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract OBJECTIVE: To test to what extent the four-factor structure of the group innovation inventory (GII) is confirmed for improvement teams participating in a quality improvement collaborative. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental design with baseline and end-measurement after intervention.

  12. The Effect of Geographical Separation, Mediated Communications, and Culture, on Tester Team Member Trust of Other Information Technology Virtual Project Team Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find evidence that employees in the project role of systems and software tester may experience less effect on their trust of team members in other project roles when working in a virtual team setting. In this study, the independent variables of geographic proximity, culture, and communications were studied as…

  13. Dis-integration of communication in healthcare education: Workplace learning challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Marcy E

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this paper, based on a 2016 Heidelberg International Conference on Communication in Healthcare (ICCH) plenary presentation, is to examine a key problem in communication skills training for health professional learners. Studies have pointed to a decline in medical students' communication skills and attitudes as they proceed through their education, particularly during their clinical workplace training experiences. This paper explores some of the key factors in this disintegration, drawing on selected literature and highlighting some curriculum efforts and research conducted at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine as a case study of these issues. Five key factors contributing to the disintegration of communication skills and attitudes are presented including: 1) lack of formal communication skills training during clinical clerkships; 2) informal workplace teaching failing to explicitly address learner clinical communication skills; 3) emphasizing content over process in relation to clinician-patient interactions; 4) the relationship between ideal communication models and the realities of clinical practice; and 5) clinical teachers' lack of knowledge and skills to effectively teach about communication in the clinical workplace. Within this discussion, potential practical responses by individual clinical teachers and broader curricular and faculty development efforts to address each of these factors are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A sequential analysis of procedural meeting communication: How teams facilitate their meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Allen, J.A.; Kauffeld, S.

    2013-01-01

    How do teams facilitate their own meetings? Unmanaged (or free) social interaction often leads to poor decision-making, unnecessary conformity, social loafing, and ineffective communication processes, practices, and products. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential benefits of

  15. Team communication amongst clinical teachers in a formal meeting of post graduate medical training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, I.A.; Scherpbier, A.; Leeuw, R. van Der; Heineman, M.J.; Vleuten, C. van der; Lombarts, K.M.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of team communication, or more specifically speaking up, for safeguarding quality of patient care is increasingly being endorsed in research findings. However, little is known about speaking up of clinical teachers in postgraduate medical training. In order to determine how clinical

  16. A sequential analysis of procedural meeting communication: How teams facilitate their meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Allen, J.A.; Kauffeld, S.

    2013-01-01

    How do teams facilitate their own meetings? Unmanaged (or free) social interaction often leads to poor decision-making, unnecessary conformity, social loafing, and ineffective communication processes, practices, and products. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential benefits of proc

  17. Does sketching stand alone as a communication tool during concept generation in design teams?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nik Ahmad Ariff, N.S.; Badke-Schaub, P.G.; Eris, O.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the relation between sketching and communication in teams during the idea generation process in early concept generation. A quasi-experiment study has been conducted with Masters students of Industrial Design Engineering at Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

  18. Team communication amongst clinical teachers in a formal meeting of post graduate medical training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, I.A.; Scherpbier, A.; Leeuw, R. van Der; Heineman, M.J.; Vleuten, C. van der; Lombarts, K.M.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of team communication, or more specifically speaking up, for safeguarding quality of patient care is increasingly being endorsed in research findings. However, little is known about speaking up of clinical teachers in postgraduate medical training. In order to determine how clinical t

  19. Leadership Trust in Virtual Teams Using Communication Tools: A Quantitative Correlational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert Lynn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to address leadership trust in virtual teams using communication tools in a small south-central, family-owned pharmaceutical organization, with multiple dispersed locations located in the United States. The results of the current research study could assist leaders to develop a communication…

  20. Leadership Trust in Virtual Teams Using Communication Tools: A Quantitative Correlational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert Lynn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to address leadership trust in virtual teams using communication tools in a small south-central, family-owned pharmaceutical organization, with multiple dispersed locations located in the United States. The results of the current research study could assist leaders to develop a communication…

  1. Emotional Intelligence, Communication Competence, and Student Perceptions of Team Social Cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troth, Ashlea C.; Jordan, Peter J.; Lawrence, Sandra A.

    2012-01-01

    Students generally report poor experiences of group work in university settings. This study examines whether individual student perceptions of team social cohesion are determined by their level of emotional intelligence (EI) and whether this relationship is mediated by their communication skills. Business students (N = 273) completed the 16-item…

  2. Politeness Strategies in Healthcare Communication at "Difficult Times": A Pragmatic Analysis of the "Manga" Discourse in "Nurse Aoi"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Rieko; Poole, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the ways in which healthcare professionals interact with patients' family members, and/or colleagues. The data are from healthcare discourses at difficult times found in the manga series entitled Nurse AOI. As the first step, we selected several communication scenes for analysis in terms of politeness strategies. From these…

  3. The Impact of Electronic Health Records on Healthcare Professional's Beliefs and Attitudes toward Face to Face Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickles, Kenneth Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The impact of electronic health records on healthcare professional's beliefs and attitudes toward face to face communication during patient and provider interactions was examined. Quantitative survey research assessed user attitudes towards an electronic health record system and revealed that healthcare professionals from a wide range of…

  4. If You Could Read My Mind: The Role of Healthcare Providers’ Empathic and Communicative Competencies in Clients’ Satisfaction with Consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrooten, Iete; Jong, de Menno D.T.

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between healthcare providers’ empathic and communicative competencies and clients’ overall satisfaction with consultations. Two aspects of empathy were included: empathic attitude (sensitivity to the clients’ perspective) and empathic skills (ability to est

  5. If You Could Read My Mind: The Role of Healthcare Providers’ Empathic and Communicative Competencies in Clients’ Satisfaction with Consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrooten, Iete; de Jong, Menno D.T.

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between healthcare providers’ empathic and communicative competencies and clients’ overall satisfaction with consultations. Two aspects of empathy were included: empathic attitude (sensitivity to the clients’ perspective) and empathic skills (ability to

  6. Frequency and Form of Team Communication from the Perspective of Parents of Preschool Children with Disabilities: Implications for Diverse Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Mary Erin

    2017-01-01

    Effective communication between parents of children with disabilities and other team members positively impacts family-school collaboration. Parents of children with special needs were asked how and how often they communicated with their children's preschool teams. The frequency of both formal and informal meetings varied tremendously. Parents…

  7. [Skilled communication as "intervention" : Models for systematic communication in the healthcare system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, M; Mayer, H; Zojer, E

    2015-02-01

    Specific communication training is currently not integrated into anesthesiology curricula. At the same time communication is an important key factor when working with colleagues, in the physician-patient relationship, during management of emergencies and in avoiding or reducing the legal consequences of adverse medical events. Therefore, focused attention should be brought to this area. In other high risk industries, specific communication training has been standard for a long time and in medicine there is an approach to teach and train these soft skills by simulation. Systematic communication training, however, is rarely an established component of specialist training. It is impossible not to communicate whereby nonverbal indications, such as gestures, mimic expression, posture and tone play an important part. Miscommunication, however, is common and leads to unproductive behavior. The cause of this is not always obvious. This article provides an overview of the communication models of Shannon, Watzlawick et al. and Schulz von Thun et al. and describes their limitations. The "Process Communication Model®" (PCM) is also introduced. An overview is provided with examples of how this tool can be used to look at the communication process from a systematic point of view. People have different psychological needs. Not taking care of these needs will result in individual stress behavior, which can be graded into first, second and third degrees of severity (driver behavior, mask behavior and desperation). These behavior patterns become exposed in predictable sequences. Furthermore, on the basis of this model, successful communication can be established while unproductive behavior that occurs during stress can be dealt with appropriately. Because of the importance of communication in all areas of medical care, opportunities exist to focus research on the influence of targeted communication on patient outcome, complications and management of emergencies.

  8. Perspectives on healthcare, chronic non-communicable disease, and healthworlds in an urban and rural setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez-Gonzalez, Daniel Lopes

    2014-12-01

    Background Amidst diverging discourses describing chronic non-communicable disease (NCD) and healthcare access, the hermeneutical tradition within sociology, particularly as exemplified in the work of Jurgen Habermas, provides a starting point for exploring and interpreting the experiences of chronic illness and healthcare access. In this study, we aimed to understand how women living with NCDs experience their illness and access healthcare in an urban and rural context. Methods This study was a mixed-methods comparative case study of the healthcare access experiences of women with NCDs in an urban and rural area in South Africa. The core of the study methodology was a comparative qualitative case study, with quantitative methods serving to contextualise the findings. Results The cross-sectional survey describes a low resource population with a high prevalence of NCDs. Slightly over half the respondents in urban Soweto (50.7%) reported having at least one NCD. Only around a third (33.3%) of these participants reported accessing formal healthcare services in the past 6 months. Similar trends were found in the review of research carried out in rural Agincourt. The qualitative case study in Soweto is characterised by a preoccupation with how medicine from the clinic interacts with the body. The Agincourt qualitative case study highlights the importance of church membership, particularly of African Christian Churches, as the strongest factor motivating against the open use of traditional medicine. Discussion A consideration of the findings suggests five broad themes for further research: 1) processes of constructing body narratives; 2) encounters with purposive-rational systems; 3) encounters with traditional medicine; 4) encounters with contemporary informal medicine; and 5) religion and healthcare. These five themes constitute the beginning of a comprehensive schema of the lifeworld/healthworld.

  9. Perspectives on healthcare, chronic non-communicable disease, and healthworlds in an urban and rural setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lopes Ibanez-Gonzalez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amidst diverging discourses describing chronic non-communicable disease (NCD and healthcare access, the hermeneutical tradition within sociology, particularly as exemplified in the work of Jurgen Habermas, provides a starting point for exploring and interpreting the experiences of chronic illness and healthcare access. In this study, we aimed to understand how women living with NCDs experience their illness and access healthcare in an urban and rural context. Methods: This study was a mixed-methods comparative case study of the healthcare access experiences of women with NCDs in an urban and rural area in South Africa. The core of the study methodology was a comparative qualitative case study, with quantitative methods serving to contextualise the findings. Results: The cross-sectional survey describes a low resource population with a high prevalence of NCDs. Slightly over half the respondents in urban Soweto (50.7% reported having at least one NCD. Only around a third (33.3% of these participants reported accessing formal healthcare services in the past 6 months. Similar trends were found in the review of research carried out in rural Agincourt. The qualitative case study in Soweto is characterised by a preoccupation with how medicine from the clinic interacts with the body. The Agincourt qualitative case study highlights the importance of church membership, particularly of African Christian Churches, as the strongest factor motivating against the open use of traditional medicine. Discussion: A consideration of the findings suggests five broad themes for further research: 1 processes of constructing body narratives; 2 encounters with purposive–rational systems; 3 encounters with traditional medicine; 4 encounters with contemporary informal medicine; and 5 religion and healthcare. These five themes constitute the beginning of a comprehensive schema of the lifeworld/healthworld.

  10. Communication in healthcare interactions in dementia: a systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Jemima; Bailey, Cate; McCabe, Rose

    2015-08-01

    Communication is affected by dementia, even in the early stages. Studies directly observing how patients, companions and healthcare professionals communicate have not yet been reviewed. Eight databases were searched, and hand searches of relevant journals and grey literature were performed up to August 2014. Two authors reviewed abstracts independently and collectively reviewed for agreement of inclusion. Findings were narratively synthesized. 23 studies were identified observing: diagnostic, follow up, day center, primary care and research consent interactions. Companions were present in 14 studies. Three themes emerged: emotional impact of diagnosis, level of patient involvement and participant strategies to save face and cope with cognitive impairment. Eight studies observed diagnostic disclosure describing emotional reactions, with professionals using mitigating language and rarely checking patient understanding. Studies reported varying patient involvement, showing marginalization in primary care but not in assessments or diagnostic feedback. Patients used humor and metaphor to compensate for difficulties retrieving information and responding appropriately, suggesting preserved awareness of the pragmatics of interaction. Companion roles fluctuated between patient advocate and professional informant. Professionals encountered challenges adapting to heterogeneous patient groups with varying capabilities and needs. Patient-companion-professional communication in dementia care raises various ethical questions: how to strike a balance between different communicative needs of patients and companions; clarity versus sensitivity in delivery of the diagnosis; and whether to minimize or expose interactional difficulties and misunderstanding to enrich patient understanding and involvement. Healthcare professionals need guidance in delivering a diagnosis and strategies to optimize patient and companion participation.

  11. Communicative Competence Inventory for Students Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication: A Team Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yun-Ching; Douglas, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Students who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) represent a heterogonous group with complex communication needs. AAC--including aided communication means (e.g., pictures, devices) and unaided (e.g., signs, gestures)--is often used to support students who have difficulties with speech production, language comprehension, and…

  12. Communicative Competence Inventory for Students Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication: A Team Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yun-Ching; Douglas, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Students who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) represent a heterogonous group with complex communication needs. AAC--including aided communication means (e.g., pictures, devices) and unaided (e.g., signs, gestures)--is often used to support students who have difficulties with speech production, language comprehension, and…

  13. Ensuring the security and privacy of information in mobile health-care communication systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademola P. Abidoye

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of health-care information and its accessibility via the Internet and mobile technology systems is a cause for concern in these modern times. The privacy, integrity and confidentiality of a patient’s data are key factors to be considered in the transmission of medical information for use by authorised health-care personnel. Mobile communication has enabled medical consultancy, treatment, drug administration and the provision of laboratory results to take place outside the hospital. With the implementation of electronic patient records and the Internet and Intranets, medical information sharing amongst relevant health-care providers was made possible. But the vital issue in this method of information sharing is security: the patient’s privacy, as well as the confidentiality and integrity of the health-care information system, should not be compromised. We examine various ways of ensuring the security and privacy of a patient’s electronic medical information in order to ensure the integrity and confidentiality of the information.

  14. Using the Communication and Teamwork Skills (CATS) Assessment to measure health care team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Allan; Gardner, Roxane; Maynard, Laura; Kelly, Andrea

    2007-09-01

    Patient safety administrators, educators, and researchers are striving to understand how best to monitor and improve team skills and determine what approaches to monitoring best suit their organizations. A behavior-based tool, based on principles of crisis resource management (CRM) in nonmedical industries, was developed to quantitatively assess communication and team skills of health care providers in a variety of real and simulated clinical settings. The Communication and Teamwork Skills (CATS) Assessment has been developed through rapid-cycle improvement and piloted through observation of videotaped simulated clinical scenarios, realtime surgical procedures, and multidisciplinary rounds. Specific behavior markers are clustered into four categories-coordination, cooperation, situational awareness, and communication. Teams are scored in terms of the occurrence and quality of the behaviors. The CATS Assessment results enable clinicians to view a spectrum of scores-from the overall score for the categories to specific behaviors. The CATS Assessment tool requires statistical validation and further study to determine if it reliably quantifies health care team performance. The patient safety community is invited to use and improve behavior-based observation measures to better evaluate their training programs, continue to research and improve observation methodology, and provide quantifiable, objective feedback to their clinicians and organizations.

  15. Is it possible to improve radiotherapy team members' communication skills? A randomized study assessing the efficacy of a 38-h communication skills training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibon, Anne-Sophie; Merckaert, Isabelle; Liénard, Aurore; Libert, Yves; Delvaux, Nicole; Marchal, Serge; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Reynaert, Christine; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Scalliet, Pierre; Van Houtte, Paul; Coucke, Philippe; Salamon, Emile; Razavi, Darius

    2013-10-01

    Optimizing communication between radiotherapy team members and patients and between colleagues requires training. This study applies a randomized controlled design to assess the efficacy of a 38-h communication skills training program. Four radiotherapy teams were randomly assigned either to a training program or to a waiting list. Team members' communication skills and their self-efficacy to communicate in the context of an encounter with a simulated patient were the primary endpoints. These encounters were scheduled at the baseline and after training for the training group, and at the baseline and four months later for the waiting list group. Encounters were audiotaped and transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed with content analysis software (LaComm) and by an independent rater. Eighty team members were included in the study. Compared to untrained team members, trained team members used more turns of speech with content oriented toward available resources in the team (relative rate [RR]=1.38; p=0.023), more assessment utterances (RR=1.69; pcommunicate increased (p=0.024 and p=0.008, respectively). The training program was effective in improving team members' communication skills and their self-efficacy to communicate in the context of an encounter with a simulated patient. Future study should assess the effect of this training program on communication with actual patients and their satisfaction. Moreover a cost-benefit analysis is needed, before implementing such an intensive training program on a broader scale. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Managing Communication in New Product Development Process: Virtual R&D Teams and Information Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale; Ahmed, Shamsuddin; Abdul Rashid, Salwa Hanim; Taha, Zahari

    2011-01-01

    Literature proves the importance of the role of information technology in increasing the effectiveness of virtual R&D teams’ communication for new product development. However, the factors that make information technology construct in a virtual R&D team are still ambiguous. Managers of virtual R&D teams for new product development do not know “which type of technology should be used”. To address the gap and answer the question, the paper presents a set of factors that make a const...

  17. Health Human Resources Guidelines: Minimum Staffing Standards and Role Descriptions for Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Healthcare Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis clinics across Canada, the most common barrier that healthcare workers face when providing care to their patients is having too little time. The Health Human Resources Guidelines were developed to define specifically what amounts of time should be allocated for each discipline of cystic fibrosis clinical care and to provide a description of all the roles involved, reinforcing how these work together to provide comprehensive multidisciplinary care. With involvement from all cystic fibrosis clinics in Canada, through the use of a tailored survey, the Health Human Resources Guidelines are an exclusively Canadian document that has been developed for implementation across the country. The guidelines have been incorporated into a national Accreditation Site Visit program for use in evaluating and improving care across the country and have been distributed to all Canadian cystic fibrosis clinics. The guidelines provide hospital administrators with clear benchmarks for allocating personnel resources to the cystic fibrosis clinics hosted within their institutions.

  18. Psychologists' views of inter-disciplinary psychosocial communication within the cancer care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, B; Butow, P; Davis, E; Turner, J; Mason, C

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about how psychologists working in cancer care centres communicate clinical information to other members of the multidisciplinary team or what information is communicated. This study surveyed Australian cancer care psychologists regarding their communication practices and their views on barriers to and facilitators of effective inter-disciplinary communication. Psychologists were invited to complete an online survey containing purpose-designed items that addressed study aims. Forty-four psychologists completed the survey. Psychologists' most common method of recording initial consultations was in patient medical records, with 69 % of respondents recording notes in either most of the time or all of the time. Twenty-two percent of psychologists said they did not regularly feedback the results of an initial assessment to a referrer and more than 40 % used verbal and e-mail communication to do so. This study provides data that will assist in the development of guidelines for inter-professional communication between psychologists and other members of the cancer care team.

  19. Communication and team situation awareness in the OR: Implications for augmentative information display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parush, Avi; Kramer, Chelsea; Foster-Hunt, Tara; Momtahan, Kathryn; Hunter, Aren; Sohmer, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    Team Situation Awareness (TSA) is one of the critical factors in effective Operating Room (OR) teamwork and can impact patient safety and quality of care. While previous research showed a relationship between situation awareness, as measured by communication events, and team performance, the implications for developing technology to augment and facilitate TSA were not examined. This research aims to further study situation-related communications in the cardiac OR in order to uncover potential degradation in TSA which may lead to adverse events. The communication loop construct-the full cycle of information flow between the participants in the sequence-was used to assess susceptibility to breakdown. Previous research and the findings here suggest that communication loops that are open, non-directed, or with delayed closure, can be susceptible to information loss. These were quantitatively related to communication indicators of TSA such as questions, replies, and announcements. Taken together, both qualitative and quantitative analyses suggest that a high proportion of TSA-related communication (63%) can be characterized as susceptible to information loss. The findings were then used to derive requirements and design a TSA augmentative display. The design principles and potential benefits of such a display are outlined and discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Redesigning geriatric healthcare: how cross-functional teams and process improvement provide a competitive advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, B C; Kaye, J; Bowcutt, M; Campbell, J

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the consequences of adding a geriatric subacute unit to the traditional health care mix offered by a nonprofit hospital. Historically, geriatric health care offerings have been limited to either acute care units or long-term care facilities. The study's findings demonstrate that the addition of a subacute unit that is operated by an interdisciplinary team is a competitively rational move for two reasons. First, it provides a continuum of care that integrates services and departments, thereby reducing costs. Second, it provides a supportive environment for patients and their families. As a consequence patients have a higher probability of returning home than patients who are assigned to more traditional modes of care.

  1. The Communicative Multiagent Team Decision Problem: Analyzing Teamwork Theories and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Pynadath, D V; 10.1613/jair.1024

    2011-01-01

    Despite the significant progress in multiagent teamwork, existing research does not address the optimality of its prescriptions nor the complexity of the teamwork problem. Without a characterization of the optimality-complexity tradeoffs, it is impossible to determine whether the assumptions and approximations made by a particular theory gain enough efficiency to justify the losses in overall performance. To provide a tool for use by multiagent researchers in evaluating this tradeoff, we present a unified framework, the COMmunicative Multiagent Team Decision Problem (COM-MTDP). The COM-MTDP model combines and extends existing multiagent theories, such as decentralized partially observable Markov decision processes and economic team theory. In addition to their generality of representation, COM-MTDPs also support the analysis of both the optimality of team performance and the computational complexity of the agents' decision problem. In analyzing complexity, we present a breakdown of the computational complexit...

  2. Seasonal communication about dengue fever in educational groups in primary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Líliam Barbosa; Soares, Sônia Maria; Fernandes, Maria Teresinha de Oliveira; Aquino, Ana Luiza de

    2011-12-01

    To analyze how seasonal communication for dengue control and prevention is conveyed in educational peer groups of Family Health teams. An exploratory and descriptive qualitative study was performed with 25 coordinators of peer education groups, distributed among eight basic health units of Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil. Data collection occurred from March to June 2009, by non-participant observation and semi-structured interviews with coordinators. Content analysis and the principal theories in health communication were utilized in data interpretation. Three thematic units were identified: seasonal communication; subjects discussed and information sources about dengue; and information versus communication for action. Dengue prevention and control actions were principally discussed in groups during outbreaks, based on actions previously programmed by the Ministry of Health. The topics addressed focused on epidemiology, life cycle, modes of transmission, symptoms, prevention, domiciliary visits by zoonosis control units and vaccination for dengue. The predominant communication action is information conveyance by the coordinator, centered on a behavioralist and prescriptive discourse. Communication practices focused on dialogue is recommended, allowing the coordinator and group members freedom in regards to emergent issues in the group, so they learn to recognize and reflexively discuss them in context.

  3. A secure and easy-to-implement web-based communication framework for caregiving robot teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, G.; Daş, R.; Tuna, A.; Örenbaş, H.; Baykara, M.; Gülez, K.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, robots have started to become more commonplace in our lives, from factory floors to museums, festivals and shows. They have started to change how we work and play. With an increase in the population of the elderly, they have also been started to be used for caregiving services, and hence many countries have been investing in the robot development. The advancements in robotics and wireless communications has led to the emergence of autonomous caregiving robot teams which cooperate to accomplish a set of tasks assigned by human operators. Although wireless communications and devices are flexible and convenient, they are vulnerable to many risks compared to traditional wired networks. Since robots with wireless communication capability transmit all data types, including sensory, coordination, and control, through radio frequencies, they are open to intruders and attackers unless protected and their openness may lead to many security issues such as data theft, passive listening, and service interruption. In this paper, a secure web-based communication framework is proposed to address potential security threats due to wireless communication in robot-robot and human-robot interaction. The proposed framework is simple and practical, and can be used by caregiving robot teams in the exchange of sensory data as well as coordination and control data.

  4. Communication skills of health-care professionals working in oncology--can they be improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Nicola G; Green, Claire; Creed, Francis

    2008-02-01

    Communication skills' training has been placed high on the agenda by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence guidelines and the National Health Service in the UK. The paper reviews the importance of good communication skills in cancer care for the patient and describes research that has identified ways in which health-care professionals (HCP) can improve their communication with patients. The evidence as to why there is a lack of facilitative skills is reviewed along with what skills are required in order to improve communication with patients. The paper describes evidence of increased facilitative skills post-training, discusses whether there is evidence of transfer of these skills into clinical practice and how this might be best achieved. To conclude, research evidence would support the fact that training in communication skills needs to provide the best possible outcomes for HCP and their patients. Patient concerns, needs and preferences need to be elicited and the impact of concerns identified, so that the HCP can appropriately tailor their information giving, advice, treatment and plan of care.

  5. Promoting patient participation in healthcare interactions through communication skills training: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Thomas A; Atkinson, Thomas M; Latella, Lauren E; Rogers, Madeline; Morrissey, Dana; DeRosa, Antonio P; Parker, Patricia A

    2017-07-01

    To present literature on training patients in the use of effective communication skills. Systematic searches were conducted in six databases. References were screened for inclusion through several phases. Extracted data included intervention study design, sample characteristics, content and structure of training programs, outcomes assessed, and findings reported. A total of 32 unique intervention studies were included. Most targeted primary care or cancer patients and used a randomized controlled study design. Interventions used a variety of training formats and modes of delivering educational material. Reported findings suggest that communication training is an effective approach to increase patients' total level of active participation in healthcare interactions and that some communication behaviors may be more amenable to training (e.g., expressing concerns). Trained patients do not have longer visits and tend to receive more information from their providers. Most studies have found no relationship between communication training and improved health, psychosocial wellbeing, or treatment-related outcomes. Findings reinforce the importance and potential benefits of patient communication training. Additional research is warranted to determine the most efficacious training programs with the strongest potential for dissemination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding the Effect of Audio Communication Delay on Distributed Team Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    advantageous for tasks that rely on social cues such as conflict resolution and negotiation (Olson et al., 2000). Still, other researchers suspect...Gibson, C. B., & Manuel, J.A. (2003). Building trust: Effective multicultural communication processes in virtual teams. In C. G. S. G. Cohen (Ed...Olson, G., & Fu, X. (1999). Video helps remote work: Speakers who need to negotiate common ground benefit from seeing each other. Paper presented

  7. A conceptual framework to study the role of communication through social software for coordination in globally-distributed software teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuffrida, Rosalba; Dittrich, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    with geographical distance; however, in Software Engineering literature, there is a lack of suitable theoretical concepts to analyze and describe everyday practices of globally-distributed software development teams and to study the role of communication through SoSo. Objective The paper proposes a theoretical...... framework for analyzing how communicative and coordinative practices are constituted and maintained in globally-distributed teams. Method The framework is based on the concepts of communicative genres and coordination mechanisms; it is motivated and explicated through examples from two qualitative empirical...... cases. Results Coordination mechanisms and communicative genres mutually support each other. In particular, communication through SoSo supports team members in establishing, developing and maintaining social protocols within the distributed team. Software Engineering tools and methods provide templates...

  8. Email for clinical communication between patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Helen; Sawmynaden, Prescilla; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Car, Josip

    2012-11-14

    Email is a popular and commonly-used method of communication, but its use in health care is not routine. Where email communication has been demonstrated in health care this has included its use for communication between patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals for clinical purposes, but the effects of using email in this way is not known.This review addresses the use of email for two-way clinical communication between patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals. To assess the effects of healthcare professionals and patients using email to communicate with each other, on patient outcomes, health service performance, service efficiency and acceptability. We searched: the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1 2010), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (1950 to January 2010), EMBASE (OvidSP) (1980 to January 2010), PsycINFO (OvidSP) (1967 to January 2010), CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (1982 to February 2010) and ERIC (CSA) (1965 to January 2010). We searched grey literature: theses/dissertation repositories, trials registers and Google Scholar (searched July 2010). We used additional search methods: examining reference lists, contacting authors. Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised trials, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies examining interventions using email to allow patients to communicate clinical concerns to a healthcare professional and receive a reply, and taking the form of 1) unsecured email 2) secure email or 3) web messaging. All healthcare professionals, patients and caregivers in all settings were considered. Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We assessed risk of bias according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. For continuous measures, we report effect sizes as mean

  9. A Method for Knowledge Management and Communication Within and Across Multidisciplinary Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Flynn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of knowledge management (KM and communication tools in an applied scientific arena where research is performed and knowledge must be managed within and across multidisciplinary teams and organizations is a challenge. Teams of scientists and engineers from up to 17 different technical specialties required knowledge management tools for developing multiple environmental impact statements under challenging circumstances. Factors that contributed to the success of the KM tools included 1 pairing of project staff with Knowledge Systems staff to determine system requirements, 2 the use of the tools by the team as they were being developed thus allowing many opportunities for feedback and interaction, 3 developing the tools to approximate the overall project structure and work flow already in place, 4 providing immediate assistance to the project team as they learned to use the new KM tools, and 5 replacing earlier practices with the new KM approach by "burning the bridges" to past practices after the team had learned to use the new KM tools.

  10. The Promise of Information and Communication Technology in Healthcare: Extracting Value From the Chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlin, Burke W; Tierney, William M

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare is an information business with expanding use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). Current ICT tools are immature, but a brighter future looms. We examine 7 areas of ICT in healthcare: electronic health records (EHRs), health information exchange (HIE), patient portals, telemedicine, social media, mobile devices and wearable sensors and monitors, and privacy and security. In each of these areas, we examine the current status and future promise, highlighting how each might reach its promise. Steps to better EHRs include a universal programming interface, universal patient identifiers, improved documentation and improved data analysis. HIEs require federal subsidies for sustainability and support from EHR vendors, targeting seamless sharing of EHR data. Patient portals must bring patients into the EHR with better design and training, greater provider engagement and leveraging HIEs. Telemedicine needs sustainable payment models, clear rules of engagement, quality measures and monitoring. Social media needs consensus on rules of engagement for providers, better data mining tools and approaches to counter disinformation. Mobile and wearable devices benefit from a universal programming interface, improved infrastructure, more rigorous research and integration with EHRs and HIEs. Laws for privacy and security need updating to match current technologies, and data stewards should share information on breaches and standardize best practices. ICT tools are evolving quickly in healthcare and require a rational and well-funded national agenda for development, use and assessment.

  11. In science communication, why does the idea of a public deficit always return? How do the shifting information flows in healthcare affect the deficit model of science communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Henry

    2016-05-01

    The healthcare field contains a multitude of opportunities for science communication. Given the many stakeholders dancing together in a multidirectional tango of communication, we need to ask how much does the deficit model apply to the health field? History dictates that healthcare professionals are the holders of all knowledge, and the patients and other stakeholders are the ones that need the scientific information communicated to them. This essay argues otherwise, in part due to the rise of shared decision-making and patients and other stakeholders acting as partners in healthcare. The traditional deficit model in health held that: (1) doctors were experts and patients were consumers, (2) it is impossible for the public to grasp the many disciplines of knowledge in medicine, (3) if experts have trouble keeping up with medical research then the public surely can't keep up, and (4) it is safer for healthcare professionals to communicate to the public using a deficit model. However, with the rise of partnerships with patients in healthcare decision-making, the deficit model might be weakening. Examples of public participation in healthcare decision-making include: (1) crowd-sourcing public participation in systematic reviews, (2) public participation in health policy, (3) public collaboration in health research, and (4) health consumer groups acting as producers of health information. With the challenges to the deficit model in science communication in health, caution is needed with the increasing role of technology and social media, and how these may affect the legitimacy of healthcare information flows away from the healthcare professional.

  12. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  13. The Use of WhatsApp Smartphone Messaging Improves Communication Efficiency within an Orthopaedic Surgery Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellanti, Prasad; Moriarty, Andrew; Coughlan, Fionn; McCarthy, Thomas

    2017-02-18

    Effective and timely communication is important for any surgical specialty to function. The use of smartphones is prevalent amongst doctors. Numerous smartphone applications offer the potential for fast and cost-effective communication. WhatsApp is a commonly used application that is free, easy to use, and capable of text and multimedia messaging. We report on the use of WhatsApp over a six month period in our unit. WhatsApp communication between non-consultant members of an orthopaedic team over a six-month period was analysed. Both the phones and the WhatsApp application were password-protected, and patient details were anonymised. A series of 20 communications using the hospital pager system and the telephone system were also analysed. A total of 5,492 messages were sent during the six-month period and were part of 1,916 separate communication events. The vast majority of messages, 5,090, were related to patient care. A total of 195 multimedia messages were sent and these included images of radiographs and wounds. When using the hospital telephones, the length of time spent on a communication averaged 5.78 minutes and using the hospital pager system averaged 7.45 minutes. Using the WhatsApp messaging system has potentially saved up to 7,664 minutes over the study period. All participants found WhatsApp easy to use and found it to be more efficient than the traditional pager system Conclusion: Compared to the traditional pager systems, the use of WhatsApp is easy, inexpensive, and reliable and can help improve the efficiency of communication within a surgical team.

  14. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  15. Combining communication technology utilization and organizational innovation: evidence from Canadian healthcare decision makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbilou, Jalila; Landry, Réjean; Amara, Nabil; El Adlouni, Salaheddine

    2009-08-01

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Organizational Innovation (OI) are seen as the miracle of post-modernity in organizations. In this way, they are supposed to resolve most organizational problems, efficiently and rapidly. OI is highly dependent on the capacity and the investment in knowledge management (internal and external) to support decision making process and to implement significant changes. We know what explains ICT utilization (ICTU) and what determines OI development (OID) in healthcare services. Moreover, the literature tends to link ICTU to OID and vice versa. However, this dependency has never been explored empirically through the lens of roles combination. To identify the existing combined roles profiles of ICTU and OID among healthcare decision makers and determine factors of the shift from a profile to another. We did the following: (1) a structured review of the literature on healthcare management by focusing on ICTU and OID which allowed us to build two indexes and a comprehensive framework; (2) a copula methodology to identify with high precision the thresholds for ICTU and OID; and (3) a cross-sectional study based on a survey done with a sample of 942 decision makers from Canadian healthcare organizations through a multinomial logit model to identify determinants of the shift. ICTU and OID are correlated at 22% (Kendal's Tau). The joint distribution (combination) of ICTU and OID shows that four major profiles exist among decision makers in Canadian healthcare organizations: the traditional decision maker, the innovative decision maker, the technologic decision maker and the contemporary decision maker. We found out that classic factors act as barriers to the shift from one profile to the desired profile (from 1 to 4, from 2 to 4 and from 3 to 4). We have identified that the attitude toward research and relational capital are transversal barriers of shift. We have also found that some factors have a specific impact such as

  16. The role of information and communication technology in the transformation of the healthcare business model: a case study of Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanimirovic, Dalibor; Vintar, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    The Slovenian healthcare business model (BM) has largely failed to integrate information and communication technologies (ICT) into its operational context, instead maintaining its rigid structure and traditional 'way of doing business'wo managers of public clinics). Findings present a roadmap for the redefinition of BM elements and the transformation of the Slovenian healthcare BM. It includes the specific reconfiguration of BM actors and their interactions, and the application of advanced ICT solutions, which could facilitate more effective utilisation of healthcare resources and promote an improved delivery of healthcare services and products. The presented development approach and derived conceptual solution could be transferable to other countries with similar socio-economic characteristics and comparable healthcare systems, subject to certain adjustments and inclusion of national specifics.

  17. Empowering certified nurse's aides to improve quality of work life through a team communication program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Erin E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the impact of a certified nurse's aide (CNA)-led interdisciplinary teamwork and communication intervention on perceived quality of work environment and six-month job intentions. CNAs are frequently excluded from team communication and decision-making, which often leads to job dissatisfaction with high levels of staff turnover. Using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach with pre- post-program design, the intervention utilized the strategy of debriefing from the national patient safety initiative, TeamSTEPPS. Inherent in the program design, entitled Long Term Care (LTC) Team Talk, was the involvement of the CNAs in the development of the intervention as an empowering process on two wings of a transitional care unit in a long-term care facility in upstate NY. CNAs' perceptions of work environment quality were measured using a Quality of Work Life (QWL) instrument. Additionally, job turnover intent within six months was assessed. Results indicated improved scores on nearly all QWL subscales anticipated to be impacted, and enhanced perceived empowerment of the CNAs on each wing albeit through somewhat different experiential processes. The program is highly portable and can potentially be implemented in a variety of long-term care settings.

  18. Educational interventions to train healthcare professionals in end-of-life communication: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Han-Oh; Oczkowski, Simon J W; Hanvey, Louise; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; You, John J

    2016-04-29

    Practicing healthcare professionals and graduates exiting training programs are often ill-equipped to facilitate important discussions about end-of-life care with patients and their families. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of educational interventions aimed at providing healthcare professionals with training in end-of-life communication skills, compared to usual curriculum. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, ERIC and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from the date of inception to July 2014 for randomized control trials (RCT) and prospective observational studies of educational training interventions to train healthcare professionals in end-of-life communication skills. To be eligible, interventions had to provide communication skills training related to end-of-life decision making; other interventions (e.g. breaking bad news, providing palliation) were excluded. Our primary outcomes were self-efficacy, knowledge and end-of-life communication scores with standardized patient encounters. Sufficiently similar studies were pooled in a meta-analysis. The quality of evidence was assessed using GRADE. Of 5727 candidate articles, 20 studies (6 RCTs, 14 Observational) were included in this review. Compared to usual teaching, educational interventions to train healthcare professionals in end-of-life communication skills were associated with greater self-efficacy (8 studies, standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.57;95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40-0.75; P communication scores (8 studies, SMD 0.69; 95% CI 0.41-0.96; p educational interventions affect patient-level outcomes. Very low to low quality evidence suggests that end-of-life communication training may improve healthcare professionals' self-efficacy, knowledge, and EoL communication scores compared to usual teaching. Further studies comparing two active educational interventions are recommended with a continued focus on contextually relevant high-level outcomes

  19. Effective teamwork and communication mitigate task saturation in simulated critical care air transport team missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bradley; Welch, Katherine; Walsh-Hart, Sharon; Hanseman, Dennis; Petro, Michael; Gerlach, Travis; Dorlac, Warren; Collins, Jocelyn; Pritts, Timothy

    2014-08-01

    Critical Care Air Transport Teams (CCATTs) are a critical component of the United States Air Force evacuation paradigm. This study was conducted to assess the incidence of task saturation in simulated CCATT missions and to determine if there are predictable performance domains. Sixteen CCATTs were studied over a 6-month period. Performance was scored using a tool assessing eight domains of performance. Teams were also assessed during critical events to determine the presence or absence of task saturation and its impact on patient care. Sixteen simulated missions were reviewed and 45 crisis events identified. Task saturation was present in 22/45 (49%) of crisis events. Scoring demonstrated that task saturation was associated with poor performance in teamwork (odds ratio [OR] = 1.96), communication (OR = 2.08), and mutual performance monitoring (OR = 1.9), but not maintenance of guidelines, task management, procedural skill, and equipment management. We analyzed the effect of task saturation on adverse patient outcomes during crisis events. Adverse outcomes occurred more often when teams were task saturated as compared to non-task-saturated teams (91% vs. 23%; RR 4.1, p < 0.0001). Task saturation is observed in simulated CCATT missions. Nontechnical skills correlate with task saturation. Task saturation is associated with worsening physiologic derangements in simulated patients. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Quality of healthcare services and its relationship with patient safety culture and nurse-physician professional communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramanian, Akram; Rezaei, Tayyebeh; Abdullahzadeh, Farahnaz; Sheikhalipour, Zahra; Dianat, Iman

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study investigated quality of healthcare services from patients' perspectives and its relationship with patient safety culture and nurse-physician professional communication. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 surgery patients and 101 nurses caring them in a public hospital in Tabriz-Iran. Data were collected using the service quality measurement scale (SERVQUAL), hospital survey on patient safety culture (HSOPSC) and nurse physician professional communication questionnaire. Results: The highest and lowest mean (±SD) scores of the patients' perception on the healthcare services quality belonged to the assurance 13.92 (±3.55) and empathy 6.78 (±1.88) domains,respectively. With regard to the patient safety culture, the mean percentage of positive answers ranged from 45.87% for "non-punitive response to errors" to 68.21% for "organizational continuous learning" domains. The highest and lowest mean (±SD) scores for the nurse physician professional communication were obtained for "cooperation" 3.44 (±0.35) and "non-participative decision-making" 2.84 (±0.34) domains, respectively. The "frequency of reported errors by healthcare professionals" (B=-4.20, 95% CI = -7.14 to -1.27, Pquality of healthcare services. Conclusion: Organizational culture in dealing with medical error should be changed to non-punitive response. Change in safety culture towards reporting of errors, effective communication and teamwork between healthcare professionals are recommended.

  1. Primary health-care teams as adaptive organizations: exploring and explaining work variation using case studies in rural and urban Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jane; West, Christina; Whyte, Bruce; Maclean, Margaret

    2005-08-01

    It is acknowledged, internationally, that health-care practitioners' work differs between and urban areas. While several factors affect individual teams' activities, there is little understanding about how patterns of work evolve. Consideration of work in relation to local circumstances is important for training, devising contracts and redesigning services. Six case studies centred on Scottish rural and urban general practices were used to examine, in-depth, the activity of primary health-care teams. Quantitative workload data about patient contacts were collected over 24 months. Interviews and diaries revealed insightful qualitative data. Findings revealed that rural general practitioners and district nurses tended to conduct more consultations per practice patient compared with their urban counterparts. Conditions seen and work tasks varied between case study teams. Qualitative data suggested that the key reasons for variation were: local needs and circumstances; choices made about deployment of available time, team composition and the extent of access to other services. Primary care teams might be viewed as adaptive organization, with co-evolution of services produced by health professionals and local people. The study highlights limitations in the application of workload data and suggests that understanding the nature of work in relation to local circumstances is important in service redesign.

  2. Professionals' views on interprofessional stroke team functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M; Nieboer, Anna P

    2011-07-01

    The quality of integrated stroke care depends on smooth team functioning but professionals may not always work well together. Professionals' perspectives on the factors that influence stroke team functioning remain largely unexamined. Understanding their experiences is critical to indentifying measures to improve team functioning. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that contributed to the success of interprofessional stroke teams as perceived by team members. We distributed questionnaires to professionals within 34 integrated stroke care teams at various health care facilities in 9 Dutch regions. 558 respondents (response rate: 39%) completed the questionnaire. To account for the hierarchical structure of the study design we fitted a hierarchical random-effects model. The hierarchical structure comprised 558 stroke team members (level 1) nested in 34 teams (level 2). Analyses showed that personal development, social well-being, interprofessional education, communication, and role understanding significantly contributed to stroke team functioning. Team-level constructs affecting interprofessional stroke team functioning were communication and role understanding. No significant relationships were found with individual-level personal autonomy and team-level cohesion. Our findings suggest that interventions to improve team members' social well-being, communication, and role understanding will improve teams' performance. To further advance interprofessional team functioning, healthcare organizations should pay attention to developing professionals' interpersonal skills and interprofessional education.

  3. Professionals’ views on interprofessional stroke team functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Murray Cramm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The quality of integrated stroke care depends on smooth team functioning but professionals may not always work well together. Professionals' perspectives on the factors that influence stroke team functioning remain largely unexamined. Understanding their experiences is critical to indentifying measures to improve team functioning. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that contributed to the success of interprofessional stroke teams as perceived by team members. Methods: We distributed questionnaires to professionals within 34 integrated stroke care teams at various health care facilities in 9 Dutch regions. 558 respondents (response rate: 39% completed the questionnaire. To account for the hierarchical structure of the study design we fitted a hierarchical random-effects model. The hierarchical structure comprised 558 stroke team members (level 1 nested in 34 teams (level 2. Results: Analyses showed that personal development, social well-being, interprofessional education, communication, and role understanding significantly contributed to stroke team functioning. Team-level constructs affecting interprofessional stroke team functioning were communication and role understanding. No significant relationships were found with individual-level personal autonomy and team-level cohesion. Discussion and conclusion: Our findings suggest that interventions to improve team members' social well-being, communication, and role understanding will improve teams' performance. To further advance interprofessional team functioning, healthcare organizations should pay attention to developing professionals' interpersonal skills and interprofessional education.       

  4. Professionals’ views on interprofessional stroke team functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Murray Cramm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The quality of integrated stroke care depends on smooth team functioning but professionals may not always work well together. Professionals' perspectives on the factors that influence stroke team functioning remain largely unexamined. Understanding their experiences is critical to indentifying measures to improve team functioning. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that contributed to the success of interprofessional stroke teams as perceived by team members.  Methods: We distributed questionnaires to professionals within 34 integrated stroke care teams at various health care facilities in 9 Dutch regions. 558 respondents (response rate: 39% completed the questionnaire. To account for the hierarchical structure of the study design we fitted a hierarchical random-effects model. The hierarchical structure comprised 558 stroke team members (level 1 nested in 34 teams (level 2.  Results: Analyses showed that personal development, social well-being, interprofessional education, communication, and role understanding significantly contributed to stroke team functioning. Team-level constructs affecting interprofessional stroke team functioning were communication and role understanding. No significant relationships were found with individual-level personal autonomy and team-level cohesion.  Discussion and conclusion: Our findings suggest that interventions to improve team members' social well-being, communication, and role understanding will improve teams' performance. To further advance interprofessional team functioning, healthcare organizations should pay attention to developing professionals' interpersonal skills and interprofessional education.        

  5. Communicating with Pet Owners About Obesity: Roles of the Veterinary Health Care Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Julie; Ward, Ernie

    2016-09-01

    Obesity continues to be the most prevalent nutritional problem of dogs and cats as well as one of the most frustrating conditions to treat successfully. Educating and assigning roles to all members of the health care team will improve staff engagement and the consistency and effectiveness of nutritional counseling for preventive care and weight loss treatment plans. Excellent communication skills can be used to assess the client's ability to change and implement a weight loss plan at the right time in the right way to achieve better adherence and improve patient health.

  6. The TEDxLSU Student Creative Communications Team: Integrating High-Impact Practices to Increase Engagement, Facilitate Deep Learning, and Advance Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Rebecca; Galeucia, Annemarie; Liggett, Sarah; Thompson, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    This article provides background on Louisiana State University's Communication across the Curriculum (CxC) program and details the history and logistics of its experiential learning and community outreach event--TEDxLSU. In particular, the authors provide details on the Student Creative Communications Team (SCCT) which conceptualizes, plans, and…

  7. Combining Chemical Information Literacy, Communication Skills, Career Preparation, Ethics, and Peer Review in a Team-Taught Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mary Lou Baker; Seybold, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    The widely acknowledged need to include chemical information competencies and communication skills in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum can be accommodated in a variety of ways. We describe a team-taught, semester-length course at Wright State University which combines chemical information literacy, written and oral communication skills,…

  8. Combining Chemical Information Literacy, Communication Skills, Career Preparation, Ethics, and Peer Review in a Team-Taught Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mary Lou Baker; Seybold, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    The widely acknowledged need to include chemical information competencies and communication skills in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum can be accommodated in a variety of ways. We describe a team-taught, semester-length course at Wright State University which combines chemical information literacy, written and oral communication skills,…

  9. Barriers and facilitators to implementing Decision Boxes in primary healthcare teams to facilitate shared decisionmaking: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giguere Anik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision Boxes are summaries of the most important benefits and harms of health interventions provided to clinicians before they meet the patient, to prepare them to help patients make informed and value-based decisions. Our objective is to explore the barriers and facilitators to using Decision Boxes in clinical practice, more precisely factors stemming from (1 the Decision Boxes themselves, (2 the primary healthcare team (PHT, and (3 the primary care practice environment. Methods/design A two-phase mixed methods study will be conducted. Eight Decision Boxes relevant to primary care, and written in both English and in French, will be hosted on a website together with a tutorial to introduce the Decision Box. The Decision Boxes will be delivered as weekly emails over a span of eight weeks to clinicians of PHTs (family physicians, residents and nurses in five primary care clinics located across two Canadian provinces. Using a web-questionnaire, clinicians will rate each Decision Box with the Information Assessment Method (cognitive impacts, relevance, usefulness, expected benefits and with a questionnaire based on the Theory of Planned Behavior to study the determinants of clinicians’ intention to use what they learned from that Decision Box in their patient encounter (attitude, social norm, perceived behavioral control. Web-log data will be used to monitor clinicians’ access to the website. Following the 8-week intervention, we will conduct semi-structured group interviews with clinicians and individual interviews with clinic administrators to explore contextual factors influencing the use of the Decision Boxes. Data collected from questionnaires, focus groups and individual interviews will be combined to identify factors potentially influencing implementation of Decision Boxes in clinical practice by clinicians of PHTs. Conclusions This project will allow tailoring of Decision Boxes and their delivery to overcome the

  10. When direct health-care professional communications have an impact on inappropriate and unsafe use of medicines : A retrospective analysis of determinants of impact of safety warnings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reber, K.C.; Piening, S.; Wieringa, J.E.; Straus, S.M.J.M.; Raine, J.M.; de Graeff, Pauline; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.; Mol, P.G.

    2013-01-01

    Serious safety issues relating to drugs are communicated to health-care professionals via Direct Health-Care Professional Communications (DHPCs). We explored which characteristics determined the impact of DHPCs issued in the Netherlands for ambulatory-care drugs (2001-2008). With multiple linear reg

  11. When direct health-care professional communications have an impact on inappropriate and unsafe use of medicines : A retrospective analysis of determinants of impact of safety warnings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reber, K.C.; Piening, S.; Wieringa, J.E.; Straus, S.M.J.M.; Raine, J.M.; de Graeff, Pauline; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.; Mol, Peter G. M.

    Serious safety issues relating to drugs are communicated to health-care professionals via Direct Health-Care Professional Communications (DHPCs). We explored which characteristics determined the impact of DHPCs issued in the Netherlands for ambulatory-care drugs (2001-2008). With multiple linear

  12. A communication skills intervention for community healthcare workers reduces perceived patient aggression: a pretest-postest study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Nicola; Gale, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that healthcare workers experience high levels of aggression from patients. Prevention packages to address this have received little research support. Communication skills have been shown to influence individuals' experience of aggression and are also amenable to training. This study aims to deliver a communication skills training package that will reduce the experience of aggression in the workplace for healthcare workers. An interactive, multimedia communication skills package was developed that would be suitable for community healthcare workers. The training consisted of four workshops, including teaching, discussion and DVD illustrative examples. These were based on research and clinical experience. This intervention was delivered in two community care organisations over several months. Fifty-six community healthcare workers took part in the trial in small groups. There were 46 females and 10 males with a median age of 45-54 years. For each group a series of four communication skills workshops were given. Measurements of perceived aggression and wellbeing were taken before the workshops, at the end of the workshops, one month after and two months after. Results show statistically significant reductions in perceived aggression one and two months after baseline measures (pcommunication skills training programme is both enjoyable and shows decreases in perceived aggression, distress, and increases in general mental wellness. A full RCT of this intervention is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The surgical prebrief as part of a five-point comprehensive approach to improving pediatric cardiac surgical team communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoganson, David M; Boston, Umar S; Manning, Peter B; Eghtesady, Pirooz

    2014-10-01

    Communication is essential to the safe conduct of any critical task including cardiac surgery. After inspiration by airline crew resource management training, a communication system for the care plans of pediatric cardiac patients was developed and refined over time that encompasses the entire heart center team. Five distinct communication points are used to ensure preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care, which is transitioned efficiently and maintained at the highest level.

  14. Facebook as a tool for communication, collaboration, and informal knowledge exchange among members of a multisite family health team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofters AK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aisha K Lofters,1,2 Morgan B Slater,1 Emily Nicholas Angl,1 Fok-Han Leung1 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, 2Centre for Research on Inner City Health, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Objective: To implement and evaluate a private Facebook group for members of a large Ontario multisite Family Health Team (FHT to facilitate improved communication and collaboration. Design: Program implementation and subsequent survey of team members. Setting: A large multisite FHT in Toronto, Ontario. Participants: Health professionals of the FHT. Main outcome measures: Usage patterns and self-reported perceptions of the Facebook group by team members. Results: At the time of the evaluation survey, the Facebook group had 43 members (37.4% of all FHT members. Activity in the group was never high, and posts by team members who were not among the researchers were infrequent throughout the study period. The content of posts fell into two broad categories: 1 information that might be useful to various team members and 2 questions posed by team members that others might be able to answer. Of the 26 team members (22.6% who completed the evaluation survey, many reported that they never logged into the Facebook page (16 respondents, and never used it to communicate with team members outside of their own site of practice (19 respondents. Only six respondents reported no concerns with using Facebook as a professional communication tool; the most frequent concerns were regarding personal and patient privacy. Conclusion: The use of social media by health care practitioners is becoming ubiquitous. However, the issues of privacy concerns and determining how to use social media without adding to provider workload must be addressed to make it a useful tool in health care. Keywords: social media, team-based care, communication, interprofessionalism, social network

  15. Integrating communication skills training in the curricula of 5 healthcare professions: nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiography and midwifery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Tørring, Birgitte; Hansen, Susanne Hjorth

    2014-01-01

    Structured training of communication skills are needed in undergraduate healthcare education in order to prepare the future professionals to cooperate with patients. Often education in communication is not integrated in the curriculum – making it seem a side activity of less importance...... for professionals. In the effort of integrating communication skills training in the undergraduate curricula of nursing, radiography, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and midwifery, we established a communication skills laboratory and arranged a 5 day course for communication teachers from all 5 educational...... programs at University College North Denmark. After the course communication skills training was offered at least once during every 3½ year program and after 3 years this is retained and in some cases developed further. The combination of getting a room where to train and developing the skills to train...

  16. Communicating Value in Healthcare using Radar Charts: A Case Study of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaker, Nikhil G.; Ali, Tariq; Porter, Michael E.; Feeley, Thomas W.; Kaplan, Robert S.; Frank, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The transformation from volume to value will require communication of outcomes and costs of therapies. However, outcomes are usually non-standardized, and cost of therapy differs amongst stakeholders. We develop a standardized value framework using radar charts to visualize and communicate a wide range of patient outcomes and cost for three forms of prostate cancer treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS We retrospectively reviewed data from men with low-risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy (LDR-BT), proton therapy (PBT), or robotic-assisted prostatectomy (RARP). Patient-reported outcomes comprised the EPIC-50 domains for sexual function, urinary incontinence/bother, bowel bother, and vitality 12 months after treatment. Costs were measured by time-driven activity-based costing for the first 12 months of the care cycle. Outcome and cost data were plotted on a single radar chart for each treatment modality. RESULTS Outcome and cost data from patients treated with RARP (381 patients), PBT (165) and LDR-BT (238) were incorporated into the radar chart. LDR-BT seemed to deliver the highest overall value of the three treatment modalities; however, incorporation of patient preferences regarding outcomes may allow other modalities to be considered a high-value treatment option. CONCLUSIONS Standardization and visualization of outcome and cost metrics may allow more comprehensive and collaborative discussions about the value of healthcare services. Communicating the value framework using radar charts may be an effective method to present total value and the value of all outcomes and costs in a manner that is accessible to all stakeholders. Variations in plotting of costs and outcomes will require future focus-group initiatives. PMID:27577622

  17. DIFFERENT DIMENSIONS OF TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goparaju Purna SUDHAKAR

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Popularity ofteams is growing in 21st Century. Organizations are getting theirwork done through different types of teams. Teams have proved that thecollective performance is more than the sum of the individual performances.Thus, the teams have got different dimensions such as quantitative dimensionsand qualitative dimensions. The Quantitative dimensions of teams such as teamperformance, team productivity, team innovation, team effectiveness, teamefficiency, team decision making and team conflicts and Qualitative dimensionsof teams such as team communication, team coordination, team cooperation, teamcohesion, team climate, team creativity, team leadership and team conflictshave been discussed in this article.

  18. Use of email in communication between the Finnish primary healthcare system and general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhula, Tuula; Kauppila, Timo; Elonheimo, Outi; Brommels, Mats

    2011-01-01

    The volume of emails is rising rapidly everywhere. However, there is no data available concerning how primary healthcare physicians feel about the use of email communication between themselves, with their managers and with other people contacting them. The objective of this study was to find out what the attitudes of primary care physicians are towards email at work. The use of email was studied among a convenience sample of primary healthcare physicians. Physicians thought that email was a good instrument for delivering information but not as an instrument for leadership. Physicians in lead positions thought more often than ordinary general practitioners (GPs) that email is good for information. The leaders used email more actively than other GPs. The contents of the emails received by the GPs differed depending on the site of work. The total number of emails was higher in urban areas than in rural areas. Emails relating to administration, educational information and meeting materials were more often sent in rural than in urban primary healthcare settings. Information about daily work arrangements and about social events were more frequently emailed in urban than in rural surroundings. Email was considered important for information inside the system but a somewhat difficult tool for discussing complicated subjects. Generally, it was agreed that there was some unimportant information filtering through this medium to the target GPs. GPs were uncertain whether important data reached everybody who needed it or not. Still, almost everybody used the email system regularly and the use of it was considered relatively easy. GPs were generally prone to adopt advice and instructions given via email and implemented those in their working routines. The use of the email system was related to technical ability to use the system. The easier the GP thought that the email system was the more he used it. Rural GPs were more critical in applying advice shared via email than their

  19. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Assessment Teams for First Responders in Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief (HA/DR) Missions

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    Immediately following a natural disaster requiring Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief (HA/DR), a myriad of organizations respond. Typically, these early responders send small assessment teams to determine critical needs, which are then paired with the resources available. The needs can range from basic subsistence (food, shelter, and water) to transportation and infrastructure, yet the paramount factor among each team is the need to communicate. To assist in this effort, an Information a...

  20. A predeployment trauma team training course creates confidence in teamwork and clinical skills: a post-Afghanistan deployment validation study of Canadian Forces healthcare personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Thomas; Hennecke, Peter; Garraway, Naisan Robert; Evans, David C; Hameed, Morad; Simons, Richard K; Doucet, Jay; Hansen, Daniel; Annand, Siobhan; Bell, Nathaniel; Brown, D Ross

    2011-11-01

    The 10-day Intensive Trauma Team Training Course (ITTTC) was developed by the Canadian Forces (CFs) to teach teamwork and clinical trauma skills to military healthcare personnel before deploying to Afghanistan. This article attempts to validate the impact of the ITTTC by surveying participants postdeployment. A survey consisting of Likert-type multiple-choice questions was created and sent to all previous ITTTC participants. The survey asked respondents to rate their confidence in applying teamwork skills and clinical skills learned in the ITTTC. It explored the relevancy of objectives and participants' prior familiarity with the objectives. The impact of different training modalities was also surveyed. The survey showed that on average 84.29% of participants were "confident" or "very confident" in applying teamwork skills to their subsequent clinical experience and 52.10% were "confident" or "very confident" in applying clinical knowledge and skills. On average 43.74% of participants were "familiar" or "very familiar" with the clinical topics before the course, indicating the importance of training these skills. Participants found that clinical shadowing was significantly less valuable in training clinical skills than either animal laboratory experience or experience in human patient simulators; 68.57% respondents thought that ITTTC was "important" or "very important" in their training. The ITTTC created lasting self-reported confidence in CFs healthcare personnel surveyed upon return from Afghanistan. This validates the importance of the course for the training of CFs healthcare personnel and supports the value of team training in other areas of trauma and medicine.

  1. A conceptual framework to study the role of communication through social software for coordination in globally-distributed software teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuffrida, Rosalba; Dittrich, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    with geographical distance; however, in Software Engineering literature, there is a lack of suitable theoretical concepts to analyze and describe everyday practices of globally-distributed software development teams and to study the role of communication through SoSo. Objective The paper proposes a theoretical...... student teams. The framework allows explaining the heterogeneity of practices observed. Conclusions This paper presents a conceptual framework to study the role of communication through SoSo for coordination in GSD. The usefulness of the framework is supported by empirical findings on the role of So......So. The theoretical framework can be beneficial for future research that aims to analyze and describe not only the role of SoSo, but also how communicative and coordinative practices can be established and maintained in GSD teams....

  2. Quality of healthcare services and its relationship with patient safety culture and nurse-physician professional communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Ghahramanian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigated quality of healthcare services from patients’ perspectives and its relationship with patient safety culture and nurse-physician professional communication. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 surgery patients and 101 nurses caring them in a public hospital in Tabriz–Iran. Data were collected using the service quality measurement scale (SERVQUAL, hospital survey on patient safety culture (HSOPSC and nurse physician professional communication questionnaire. Results: The highest and lowest mean (±SD scores of the patients’ perception on the healthcare services quality belonged to the assurance 13.92 (±3.55 and empathy 6.78 (±1.88 domains,respectively. With regard to the patient safety culture, the mean percentage of positive answers ranged from 45.87% for "non-punitive response to errors" to 68.21% for "organizational continuous learning" domains. The highest and lowest mean (±SD scores for the nurse physician professional communication were obtained for "cooperation" 3.44 (±0.35 and "non participative decision-making" 2.84 (±0.34 domains, respectively. The "frequency of reported errors by healthcare professionals" (B=-4.20, 95% CI = -7.14 to -1.27, P<0.01 and "respect and sharing of information" (B=7.69, 95% CI=4.01 to 11.36, P<0.001 predicted the patients’perceptions of the quality of healthcare services. Conclusion: Organizational culture in dealing with medical error should be changed to non punitive response. Change in safety culture towards reporting of errors, effective communication and teamwork between healthcare professionals are recommended.

  3. Enhancing Surgical Team Performance with Game-Based training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Kreutzer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available  Poor team communication has been attributed to many patient safety issues in healthcare. Efficacious team training methods are needed. The present study examines the use of a game-based training approach for enhancing surgical team communication skills. Participants who played the game achieved improved declarative knowledge, and had greater levels of training transfer relative to the control group. These results suggest that game-based training may to be a promising mechanism for improving teamwork in the healthcare industry.  

  4. Communication Between Low Income Hispanic Patients and Their Healthcare Providers Regarding Physical Activity and Healthy Eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauri, Aliyah; Rodriguez, Xeniamaria; Gaona, Patricia; Maestri, Stephanie; Dietz, Noella; Stoutenberg, Mark

    2017-05-20

    U.S. Hispanics disproportionately show health burdens that may be decreased by discussing physical activity (PA) and healthy eating with their healthcare providers (HCPs). We examined the perceptions of both HCPs and low-income Hispanic patients regarding the dynamics of these communications. We surveyed 295 low-income Hispanic patients and interviewed 14 HCPs at three community health clinics. Patients were asked about their comfort level with HCPs, how often their HCP discussed PA and healthy eating, and the likelihood of following advice on PA and healthy eating. HCPs were asked about their delivery (frequency/duration) and perceived effectiveness in providing such advice. Patients reported feeling "most comfortable" with their physicians (57%) with a lower proportion (19%) feeling "most comfortable" with nurses. Nearly all patients (95%) reported being very likely to follow the advice of their physician. On average, HCPs (physicians and nurses) reported discussing PA and healthy eating with 85% and 80% of their patients, respectively. In contrast, a fewer proportion of patients (65.8%) reported that their physician discussed PA and healthy eating "some" or "a lot" of the time. Overall, physicians reported discussing PA and healthy eating for an average of 5 and 6 min, respectively; whereas nurses reported discussing PA and healthy eating for an average of 12 and 19 min, respectively. Further study on the content and delivery of conversations between HCPs and their low-income Hispanic patients regarding PA and healthy eating could be vital to optimally impact health behaviors.

  5. PACS as an Essential Tool for Healthcare Informatics and Communication Technology (HICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Dhaenens

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: PACS has evolved from a technical difficult and expensive radiology based business towards the main driver in digital diagnostic imaging in healthcare. Emerging countries will not repeat this evolution but have to jump on the bandwagon of enterprise PACS the motor behind healthcare informatics. PACS will use rather of-the-shelf technologies like internet1+2, commercial storage and communication solutions than special "homemade" technology. PACS will evolve from a local image-data center towards a regional and even countrywide medical imaging expertise and knowledge network. This will increase the role of the organ-based specialized radiologists in the diagnosis and treatment of patients."nDevelopments: There exist 3 levels of PACS deployment with increasing technical complexities. At least all of them require a minimum of RIS and HIS to make them useful."n• Modality based PACS: supported by modality vendors and of increasing importance by the new 3-4D image processing. Here all processing and storage is located around the MRI and CT. It has value for the radiologist but is not helping clinicians and it is costly because it has to be repeated for every modality and every vendor. "n• Departmental PACS: integrates all modalities into 1 type of workstation, storage and communication, but communication towards clinicians and other hospitals is based on film, CD ROM or a kind of simple LAN. This has a very high cost and only helps the radiologist. The use of DICOM standards is mandatory."n• Enterprise PACS is the imaging part of a hospital-wide informatics strategy (called HIS leading to an EMR (Electronic Medical Record, EPR (Electronic Patient record or EHR (Electronic Health record, where neither paper nor film is used. All medical specialties (including the image-rich cardiology are integrated into one system, improving treatment speed and quality. The main decision-takers are governments, health authorities, health insurances

  6. Virtual Team Effectiveness: An Empirical Examination of the Use of Communication Technologies on Trust and Virtual Team Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Valerie Brown

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitous technology and agile organizational structures have enabled a strategic response to increasingly competitive, complex, and unpredictable challenges faced by many organizations. Using cyberinfrastructure, which is primarily the network of information, computers, communication technologies, and people, traditional organizations have…

  7. Overcoming distance in virtual teams : Effects of communication media, experience, and time pressure on distributed teamwork

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleij, R. van der

    2007-01-01

    Een virtueel team is een team waarvan de leden elkaar niet of zelden in levenden lijve ontmoeten, bijvoorbeeld omdat de teamleden verschillende werktijden hebben of op verschillende vestigingen van een organisatie werken. Anders dan reguliere teams zijn virtuele teams in grote mate afhankelijk van i

  8. Chronic non-communicable disease and healthcare access in middle-aged and older women living in Soweto, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lopes Ibanez-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to describe the healthcare access, beliefs, and practices of middle-aged and older women residing in Soweto. This is a cross-sectional study of the primary (female caregivers of the Birth to Twenty Cohort, based in Soweto, South Africa. The study instrument was administered to 1 102 caregivers as part of routine annual data collection. Over half the respondents (50.7% reported having at least one chronic non-communicable disease (CND, only a small portion (33.3% of whom reported accessing a healthcare service in the last 6 months. Reported availability of private medical practice and government clinics was high (75.1% and 61.5% respectively. The low utilisation of healthcare services by women with CND is a concern in terms of healthcare management. There is a need to further investigate how healthcare beliefs are formed, as well as the feasibility of programmes to support the ongoing management of CND in Soweto.

  9. Enhancing Student Learning in Knowledge-Based Courses: Integrating Team-Based Learning in Mass Communication Theory Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gang; Newell, Jay

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the adoption of the team-based learning (TBL) method in knowledge-based and theory-oriented journalism and mass communication (J&MC) courses. It first reviews the origin and concept of TBL, the relevant theories, and then introduces the TBL method and implementation, including procedures and assessments, employed in an…

  10. Cognitive continuum theory in interprofessional healthcare: A critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker-Tomlin, Michelle; Boschen, Mark; Morrissey, Shirley; Glendon, Ian

    2017-07-01

    Effective clinical decision making is among the most important skills required by healthcare practitioners. Making sound decisions while working collaboratively in interprofessional healthcare teams is essential for modern healthcare planning, successful interventions, and patient care. The cognitive continuum theory (CCT) is a model of human judgement and decision making aimed at orienting decision-making processes. CCT has the potential to improve both individual health practitioner, and interprofessional team understanding about, and communication of, clinical decision-making processes. Examination of the current application of CCT indicates that this theory could strengthen interprofessional team clinical decision making (CDM). However, further research is needed before extending the use of this theoretical framework to a wider range of interprofessional healthcare team processes. Implications for research, education, practice, and policy are addressed.

  11. Automated telephone communication systems for preventive healthcare and management of long-term conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzki, Pawel; Mastellos, Nikolaos; Ryan, Rebecca; Gunn, Laura H; Felix, Lambert M; Pappas, Yannis; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Julious, Steven A; Xiang, Liming; Oldenburg, Brian; Car, Josip

    2016-12-14

    Automated telephone communication systems (ATCS) can deliver voice messages and collect health-related information from patients using either their telephone's touch-tone keypad or voice recognition software. ATCS can supplement or replace telephone contact between health professionals and patients. There are four different types of ATCS: unidirectional (one-way, non-interactive voice communication), interactive voice response (IVR) systems, ATCS with additional functions such as access to an expert to request advice (ATCS Plus) and multimodal ATCS, where the calls are delivered as part of a multicomponent intervention. To assess the effects of ATCS for preventing disease and managing long-term conditions on behavioural change, clinical, process, cognitive, patient-centred and adverse outcomes. We searched 10 electronic databases (the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; MEDLINE; Embase; PsycINFO; CINAHL; Global Health; WHOLIS; LILACS; Web of Science; and ASSIA); three grey literature sources (Dissertation Abstracts, Index to Theses, Australasian Digital Theses); and two trial registries (www.controlled-trials.com; www.clinicaltrials.gov) for papers published between 1980 and June 2015. Randomised, cluster- and quasi-randomised trials, interrupted time series and controlled before-and-after studies comparing ATCS interventions, with any control or another ATCS type were eligible for inclusion. Studies in all settings, for all consumers/carers, in any preventive healthcare or long term condition management role were eligible. We used standard Cochrane methods to select and extract data and to appraise eligible studies. We included 132 trials (N = 4,669,689). Studies spanned across several clinical areas, assessing many comparisons based on evaluation of different ATCS types and variable comparison groups. Forty-one studies evaluated ATCS for delivering preventive healthcare, 84 for managing long-term conditions, and seven studies for appointment reminders

  12. Mobile healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Stephen A; Agee, Nancy Howell

    2012-01-01

    Mobile technology's presence in healthcare has exploded over the past five years. The increased use of mobile devices by all segments of the US population has driven healthcare systems, providers, and payers to accept this new form of communication and to develop strategies to implement and leverage the use of mobile healthcare (mHealth) within their organizations and practices. As healthcare systems move toward a more value-driven model of care, patient centeredness and engagement are the keys to success. Mobile healthcare will provide the medium to allow patients to participate more in their care. Financially, mHealth brings to providers the ability to improve efficiency and deliver savings to both them and the healthcare consumer. However, mHealth is not without challenges. Healthcare IT departments have been reluctant to embrace this shift in technology without fully addressing security and privacy concerns. Providers have been hesitant to adopt mHealth as a form of communication with patients because it breaks with traditional models. Our healthcare system has just started the journey toward the development of mHealth. We offer an overview of the mobile healthcare environment and our approach to solving the challenges it brings to healthcare organizations.

  13. Communication practices that encourage and constrain shared decision making in health-care encounters: Systematic review of conversation analytic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Victoria; Parry, Ruth; Seymour, Jane

    2017-05-18

    Shared decision making (SDM) is generally treated as good practice in health-care interactions. Conversation analytic research has yielded detailed findings about decision making in health-care encounters. To map decision making communication practices relevant to health-care outcomes in face-to-face interactions yielded by prior conversation analyses, and to examine their function in relation to SDM. We searched nine electronic databases (last search November 2016) and our own and other academics' collections. Published conversation analyses (no restriction on publication dates) using recordings of health-care encounters in English where the patient (and/or companion) was present and where the data and analysis focused on health/illness-related decision making. We extracted study characteristics, aims, findings relating to communication practices, how these functioned in relation to SDM, and internal/external validity issues. We synthesised findings aggregatively. Twenty-eight publications met the inclusion criteria. We sorted findings into 13 types of communication practices and organized these in relation to four elements of decision-making sequences: (i) broaching decision making; (ii) putting forward a course of action; (iii) committing or not (to the action put forward); and (iv) HCPs' responses to patients' resistance or withholding of commitment. Patients have limited opportunities to influence decision making. HCPs' practices may constrain or encourage this participation. Patients, companions and HCPs together treat and undertake decision making as shared, though to varying degrees. Even for non-negotiable treatment trajectories, the spirit of SDM can be invoked through practices that encourage participation (eg by bringing the patient towards shared understanding of the decision's rationale). © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. How the Role of Socialization Affects Blended Learning Methodologies for Faculty Working with Teams in a Healthcare Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    When looking at healthcare education settings, one barrier to understanding the nature of socialization and its effect on teaching methodology design is the advent of blended learning formats used within education departments. The author utilized qualitative research using grounded theory with deductive, verification and inductive processes to…

  15. A web-based team-oriented medical error communication assessment tool: development, preliminary reliability, validity, and user ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sara; Brock, Doug; Prouty, Carolyn D; Odegard, Peggy Soule; Shannon, Sarah E; Robins, Lynne; Boggs, Jim G; Clark, Fiona J; Gallagher, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Multiple-choice exams are not well suited for assessing communication skills. Standardized patient assessments are costly and patient and peer assessments are often biased. Web-based assessment using video content offers the possibility of reliable, valid, and cost-efficient means for measuring complex communication skills, including interprofessional communication. We report development of the Web-based Team-Oriented Medical Error Communication Assessment Tool, which uses videotaped cases for assessing skills in error disclosure and team communication. Steps in development included (a) defining communication behaviors, (b) creating scenarios, (c) developing scripts, (d) filming video with professional actors, and (e) writing assessment questions targeting team communication during planning and error disclosure. Using valid data from 78 participants in the intervention group, coefficient alpha estimates of internal consistency were calculated based on the Likert-scale questions and ranged from α=.79 to α=.89 for each set of 7 Likert-type discussion/planning items and from α=.70 to α=.86 for each set of 8 Likert-type disclosure items. The preliminary test-retest Pearson correlation based on the scores of the intervention group was r=.59 for discussion/planning and r=.25 for error disclosure sections, respectively. Content validity was established through reliance on empirically driven published principles of effective disclosure as well as integration of expert views across all aspects of the development process. In addition, data from 122 medicine and surgical physicians and nurses showed high ratings for video quality (4.3 of 5.0), acting (4.3), and case content (4.5). Web assessment of communication skills appears promising. Physicians and nurses across specialties respond favorably to the tool.

  16. Telemental health: responding to mandates for reform in primary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kathleen M; Lieberman, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Telemental health (TMH) has established a niche as a feasible, acceptable, and effective service model to improve the mental healthcare and outcomes for individuals who cannot access traditional mental health services. The Accountability Care Act has mandated reforms in the structure, functioning, and financing of primary care that provide an opportunity for TMH to move into the mainstream healthcare system. By partnering with the Integrated Behavioral Healthcare Model, TMH offers a spectrum of tools to unite primary care physicians and mental health specialist in a mind-body view of patients' healthcare needs and to activate patients in their own care. TMH tools include video-teleconferencing to telecommute mental health specialists to the primary care setting to collaborate with a team in caring for patients' mental healthcare needs and to provide direct services to patients who are not progressing optimally with this collaborative model. Asynchronous tools include online therapies that offer an efficient first step to treatment for selected disorders such as depression and anxiety. Patients activate themselves in their care through portals that provide access to their healthcare information and Web sites that offer on-demand information and communication with a healthcare team. These synchronous and asynchronous TMH tools may move the site of mental healthcare from the clinic to the home. The evolving role of social media in facilitating communication among patients or with their healthcare team deserves further consideration as a tool to activate patients and provide more personalized care.

  17. Using a Simulation to Explore the Challenges of Communicating in a Virtual Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebuck, Deborah Britt; Brock, Stephen J.; Moodie, Douglas R.

    2004-01-01

    Virtual teams have become an integral part of many organizations because of an increase in corporate restructuring, competition, and globalization. A virtual team is defined as one that conducts its work almost entirely through electronic technology. Virtual team members, who are typically dispersed both geographically and organizationally, rarely…

  18. Use of communication technologies to cost-effectively increase the availability of interpretation services in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masland, Mary C; Lou, Christine; Snowden, Lonnie

    2010-01-01

    Poor patient-provider communication due to limited English proficiency (LEP) costs healthcare providers and payers through lower patient use of preventive care, misdiagnosis, increased testing, poor patient compliance, and increased hospital and emergency room admissions. Scarcity of bilingual healthcare professionals and prohibitive interpretation costs hinder full implementation of language service despite federal and state laws requiring their provision. We review recent published literature and unpublished data documenting the use of telephonic and video interpretation methodologies to improve healthcare communication with LEP persons. For example, a cooperative of nine California public hospitals and their associated community clinics, psychiatric facilities, skilled nursing facilities, and public health departments have implemented shared video interpretation services with video/voice-over Internet Protocol call center technology that automatically routes requests for interpretation in 15 languages to a pool of 30 full-time interpreters and 4 trained bilingual staff. For organizations seeking to initiate or expand their language services, the Internet provides access to translated documents, promising practices, step-by-step guides, planning tools, and research briefs. Such recent technological advances make provision of language services-to respond to federal and state mandates and improve access and quality of care to LEP persons-more feasible than is widely believed. Increased government and foundation support, and collaboration among provider organizations themselves can catalyze these efforts.

  19. The development of professional identity and the formation of teams in the Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System's Center of Excellence in Primary Care Education Program (CoEPCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Emily M; Zapatka, Susan; Brienza, Rebecca S

    2015-06-01

    The United States Department of Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System (VACHS) is one of five Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education (CoEPCE) pilot sites. The overall goal of the CoEPCE program, which is funded by the Office of Academic Affiliations, is to develop and implement innovative approaches for training future health care providers in postgraduate education programs to function effectively in teams to provide exceptional patient care. This longitudinal study employs theoretically grounded qualitative methods to understand the effect of a combined nursing and medical training model on professional identity and team development at the VACHS CoEPCE site. The authors used qualitative approaches to understand trainees' experiences, expectations, and impressions of the program. From September 2011 to August 2012, they conducted 28 interviews of 18 trainees (internal medicine [IM] residents and nurse practitioners [NPs]) and subjected data to three stages of open, iterative coding. Major themes illuminate both the evolution of individual professional identity within both types of trainees and the dynamic process of group identity development. Results suggest that initially IM residents struggled to understand NPs' roles and responsibilities, whereas NP trainees doubted their ability to work alongside physicians. At the end of one academic year, these uncertainties disappeared, and what was originally artificial had transformed into an organic interprofessional team of health providers who shared a strong sense of understanding and trust. This study provides early evidence of successful interprofessional collaboration among NPs and IM residents in a primary care training program.

  20. Examination of Communication Delays on Team Performance: Utilizing the International Space Station (ISS) as a Test Bed for Analog Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeton, K. E.; Slack, K, J.; Schmidt, L. L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Baskin, P.; Leveton, L. B.

    2011-01-01

    Operational conjectures about space exploration missions of the future indicate that space crews will need to be more autonomous from mission control and operate independently. This is in part due to the expectation that communication quality between the ground and exploration crews will be more limited and delayed. Because of potential adverse effects on communication quality, both researchers and operational training and engineering experts have suggested that communication delays and the impact these delays have on the quality of communications to the crew will create performance decrements if crews are not given adequate training and tools to support more autonomous operations. This presentation will provide an overview of a research study led by the Behavioral Health and Performance Element (BHP) of the NASA Human Research Program that examines the impact of implementing a communication delay on ISS on individual and team factors and outcomes, including performance and related perceptions of autonomy. The methodological design, data collection efforts, and initial results of this study to date will be discussed . The results will focus on completed missions, DRATS and NEEMO15. Lessons learned from implementing this study within analog environments will also be discussed. One lesson learned is that the complexities of garnishing a successful data collection campaign from these high fidelity analogs requires perseverance and a strong relationship with operational experts. Results of this study will provide a preliminary understanding of the impact of communication delays on individual and team performance as well as an insight into how teams perform and interact in a space-like environment . This will help prepare for implementation of communication delay tests on the ISS, targeted for Increment 35/36.

  1. The Effect of Competitive Rivalry on Internal Communication in Private Healthcare Organizations: Evidence from Istanbul, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Gültekin Altuntas; Fatih Semerciöz; Aral Noyan

    2014-01-01

    Both competitive rivalry and internal communication play a crucial role for a business to position itself in a favourable manner in order to succeed particularly in a hostile environment. While numerous studies present the importance of competitive rivalry and of communication, even internal communication separately, little is known about the specific linkage of how competitive rivalry affects communication in the literature. Within the framework of internal communication, this st...

  2. Informational role self-efficacy: a validation in interprofessional collaboration contexts involving healthcare service and project teams

    OpenAIRE

    Chiocchio, François; Lebel, Paule; Dubé, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare professionals perform knowledge-intensive work in very specialized disciplines. Across the professional divide, collaboration becomes increasingly difficult. For effective teamwork and collaboration to occur, it is considered necessary for individuals to believe in their ability to draw on their expertise and provide what others need to perform their job well. To date, however, no instruments exist to measure such a construct. Methods A two-study design is used to test t...

  3. Intra project team disagreement, conflict communications, and team performance in cross-functional new product teams: A decision-making quality perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Tsun Jin Chang; Shang-Pao Yeh

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops and examines a model of the antecedents and consequences of decision-making comprehensiveness during the new product development process. This model firstly suggests a concave relationship between intrateam task disagreement and decision-making comprehensiveness. It also conjectures that conflict communications influence the effectiveness of decision-making comprehensiveness on new product teams’ performance. An empirical test of the proposed framework involves a survey of...

  4. The Climate Science Rapid Response Team - A Model for Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandia, S. A.; Abraham, J. A.; Weymann, R.; Ashley, M.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, there have been many independent initiatives which have commenced with the goal of improving communication between scientists and the larger public. These initiatives have often been motivated by the recognition that concerns amongst scientists related to the pending threats of climate change are not universally shared by the general public. Multiple studies have conclusively demonstrated that while the vast majority of climate scientists are in broad agreement that human-emitted greenhouse gases are causing increases in the Earth's temperature, the larger public is divided. Often, this divide mirrors divides on other political, societal, economic, or scientific issues. One unique approach to improve the conveyance of the state of climate-change science to the public is reflected by a self-organized effort of scientists themselves. This approach has lead to the formation of the Climate Science Rapid Response Team (CSRRT). The mission of this organization is to provide accurate and rapid information on any climate-science topic to general media and governmental inquirers. The CSRRT currently consists of approximately 135 world-class climate scientists whose members cover the sub-disciplines of climate change and include not only the natural sciences but also economics and policy. Since its formation, the CSRRT has fielded approximately four inquires each week from institutions that include The Associated Press, ABC, CBS, CNN, BBC, New York Times, Time of London, National Public Radio, The Guardian, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune, and the U.S. Congress, among others. Members of the CSRRT have been asked to provide quotations for news stories; they have also been asked to give radio, television, or print-media interviews. Some members of the CSRRT have undergone media training to help encourage the use of jargon-free language so that clear communication with the broader public can be more successful. The response from

  5. Challenge: Reframing, communicating, and finding relevance. Solution: Teachers on the research team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholow, S.; Warburton, J.

    2013-12-01

    PolarTREC (Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating) is a program in which K-12 teachers spend 2-6 weeks participating in hands-on field research experiences in the polar regions. The goal of PolarTREC is to invigorate polar science education and understanding by bringing K-12 educators and polar researchers together. Program data has illuminated a crucial dynamic that increases the potential for a successful climate change science campaign. We contend that the inclusion of a teacher into the field research campaign can tackle challenges such as reframing climate change science to better address the need for a particular campaign, as well as garnering the science project the necessary support through effective, authentic, and tangible communication efforts to policymakers, funders, students, and the public. The program evaluation queried researchers on a.) the teachers' primary roles in the field b.) the impact teachers on the team's field research, and c.) the teachers' role conducting outreach. Additionally, researchers identified the importance of the facilitator, the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS), as an integral component to the challenge of providing a meaningful broader impact statement to the science proposal. Researchers reported the value of explaining their science, in-situ, allowed them to reframe and rework the objectives of the science project to attain meaningful outcomes. More than half of the researchers specifically noted that one of the strengths of the PolarTREC project is its benefit to the scientific process. The researchers also viewed PolarTREC as an essential outreach activity for their research project. Other researchers said that the outreach provided by their teacher also improved the research project's public image and articulated complex ideas to the public at large. This presentation will speak to the practices within the PolarTREC program and how researchers can meet outreach expectations, impact

  6. Team Design Communication Patterns in e-Learning Design and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanta, Chrysi; Maina, Marcelo; Lotz, Nicole; Bacchelli, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Prescriptive stage models have been found insufficient to describe the dynamic aspects of designing, especially in interdisciplinary e-learning design teams. There is a growing need for a systematic empirical analysis of team design processes that offer deeper and more detailed insights into instructional design (ID) than general models can offer.…

  7. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES (ICTs) IN THE SERVICES OF HEALTHCARE SECTOR IN EUROPE

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel (El Baaboua) Florentina Ramona

    2010-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) consists of all technical means used to handle information and aid communication, including both computer and network hardware as well as necessary software. Information and Communication Technologies tools and services are used in many sectors like development, education, e-services, policy, health and medicine and so one. This paper links the ICTs tools and services for health. ICTs has the potential to impact almost every aspect of the heal...

  8. Intervention for Smokers through New Communication Technologies: What Perceptions Do Patients and Healthcare Professionals Have? A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Trujillo Gómez

    Full Text Available The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs in the health service is increasing. In spite of limitations, such as lack of time and experience, the deployment of ICTs in the healthcare system has advantages which include patient satisfaction with secure messaging, and time saving benefits and utility for patients and health professionals. ICTs may be helpful as either interventions on their own or as complementary tools to help patients stop smoking.To gather opinions from both medical professionals and smokers about an email-based application that had been designed by our research group to help smoking cessation, and identify the advantages and disadvantages associated with interventions based on the utilization of ICTs for this purpose.A qualitative, descriptive-interpretative study with a phenomenological perspective was performed to identify and interpret the discourses of the participating smokers and primary healthcare professionals. Data were obtained through two techniques: semi-structured individual interviews and discussion groups, which were recorded and later systematically and literally transcribed together with the interviewer's notes. Data were analyzed with the ATLAS TI 6.0 programme.Seven individual interviews and four focal groups were conducted. The advantages of the application based on the email intervention designed by our research group were said to be the saving of time in consultations and ease of access for patients who found work timetables and following a programme for smoking cessation incompatible. The disadvantages were thought to be a lack of personal contact with the healthcare professional, and the possibility of cheating/ self-deception, and a greater probability of relapse on the part of the smokers.Both patients and healthcare professionals viewed the email-based application to help patients stop smoking as a complementary aid to face-to-face consultations. Nevertheless, ICTs could not

  9. CASALUD: an innovative health-care system to control and prevent non-communicable diseases in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Gallardo-Rincón, Héctor; Saucedo-Martinez, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    Mexico and other Latin American countries are currently facing a dramatic increase in the number of adults suffering from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), which require prolonged, continuous care. This epidemiological shift has created new challenges for health-care systems. Both the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations (UN) have recognised the growing human and economic costs of NCDs and outlined an action plan, recognising that NCDs are preventable, often with common preventable risk factors linked to risky health behaviours. In line with international best practices, Mexico has applied a number of approaches to tackle these diseases. However, challenges remain for the Mexican health-care system, and in planning a strategy for combating and preventing NCDs, it must consider how best to integrate these strategies with existing health-care infrastructure. Shifting the paradigm of care in Mexico from a curative, passive approach to a preventive, proactive model will require an innovative and replicable system that guarantees availability of medicines and services, strengthens human capital through ongoing professional education, expands early and continuous access to care through proactive prevention strategies and incorporates technological innovations in order to do so. Here, we describe CASALUD: an innovative model in health-care that leverages international best practices and uses innovative technology to deliver NCD care, control and prevention. In addition, we describe the lessons learned from the initial implementation of the model for its effective use in Mexico, as well as the plans for wider implementation throughout the country, in partnership with the Mexican Ministry of Health. © Royal Society for Public Health 2013.

  10. Intervention for Smokers through New Communication Technologies: What Perceptions Do Patients and Healthcare Professionals Have? A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábregas Escurriola, Mireia; Lozano Moreno, Maribel; Burón Leandro, Raquel; Gomez Quintero, Ana María; Ballve, Jose Luis; Clemente Jiménez, María Lourdes; Puigdomènech Puig, Elisa; Casas More, Ramón; Garcia Rueda, Beatriz; Casajuana, Marc; Méndez-Aguirre, Marga; Garcia Bonias, David; Fernández Maestre, Soraya; Sánchez Fondevila, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the health service is increasing. In spite of limitations, such as lack of time and experience, the deployment of ICTs in the healthcare system has advantages which include patient satisfaction with secure messaging, and time saving benefits and utility for patients and health professionals. ICTs may be helpful as either interventions on their own or as complementary tools to help patients stop smoking. Objectives To gather opinions from both medical professionals and smokers about an email-based application that had been designed by our research group to help smoking cessation, and identify the advantages and disadvantages associated with interventions based on the utilization of ICTs for this purpose. Methods A qualitative, descriptive–interpretative study with a phenomenological perspective was performed to identify and interpret the discourses of the participating smokers and primary healthcare professionals. Data were obtained through two techniques: semi-structured individual interviews and discussion groups, which were recorded and later systematically and literally transcribed together with the interviewer’s notes. Data were analyzed with the ATLAS TI 6.0 programme. Results Seven individual interviews and four focal groups were conducted. The advantages of the application based on the email intervention designed by our research group were said to be the saving of time in consultations and ease of access for patients who found work timetables and following a programme for smoking cessation incompatible. The disadvantages were thought to be a lack of personal contact with the healthcare professional, and the possibility of cheating/ self-deception, and a greater probability of relapse on the part of the smokers. Conclusions Both patients and healthcare professionals viewed the email-based application to help patients stop smoking as a complementary aid to face-to-face consultations

  11. Improving communication between health-care professionals and patients with limited English proficiency in the general practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Melanie; McArthur, Alexa; Riitano, Dagmara; Aromataris, Edoardo; Bollen, Chris; Pearson, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Quality service provision and patient safety and satisfaction in encounters with health-care professionals relies on effective communication between the practitioner and patient. This study aimed to identify effective practices for improving communication between clinical staff in general practice and patients with limited English proficiency, and to promote their implementation in general practice. Effective interventions and strategies were identified from a review of international research. Experiences with their use in practice were explored via focus group discussions with general practitioners and practice nurses. The results suggest that, wherever possible, communication in the patient's primary language is preferable; use of a qualified medical interpreter should be promoted, and practices should have a standardised and documented procedure for accessing interpreter services. General practice staff must increase their awareness about services that are available to facilitate communication with patients with limited English proficiency, and also develop attitudes, both individual and organisational, that will maximise the effectiveness of these strategies. These findings were used to develop brief, evidence-based practice guidelines that were disseminated to focus group participants for evaluation of utility and general feedback. This evidence-based guidance is now available to assist clinical and administrative general practice staff across regional and metropolitan South Australia.

  12. Anti-Smoking Communication to Preadolescents with and without a Cancer Diagnosis: Parents and Healthcare Providers as Important Communicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throckmorton-Belzer, Leslee; Tyc, Vida L; Robinson, Leslie A; Klosky, James L; Lensing, Shelly; Booth, Andrea K

    2009-10-01

    A cancer diagnosis does not prevent smoking among pediatric oncology patients, and anti-smoking communications among parents and health care providers have been proposed as influencing smoking outcomes in this group. Anti-smoking communications were compared among 93 preadolescents with cancer and 402 controls. After adjusting for demographics and covariates, preadolescents with cancer were less likely than control participants to report receipt of anti-smoking messages from physicians and parents, and recalled more messages >/= 4 months post-diagnosis as compared to 1-3 months. Should anti-tobacco communications prove to influence smoking outcomes, parents and physicians may be uniquely positioned to provide smoking prevention interventions to these patients.

  13. Stroke Patients Communicating Their Healthcare Needs in Hospital: A Study within the ICF Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that many patients admitted into acute hospital stroke units have communication-related impairments such as hearing, vision, speech, language and/or cognitive communicative impairment. However, no research has identified how many patients in acute hospital stroke units have difficulty actually…

  14. Stroke Patients Communicating Their Healthcare Needs in Hospital: A Study within the ICF Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that many patients admitted into acute hospital stroke units have communication-related impairments such as hearing, vision, speech, language and/or cognitive communicative impairment. However, no research has identified how many patients in acute hospital stroke units have difficulty actually…

  15. Online Dementia Care Training for Healthcare Teams in Continuing and Long-Term Care Homes: A Viable Solution for Improving Quality of Care and Quality of Life for Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Colla J.; Stodel, Emma J.; Casimiro, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to design, develop, deliver, and evaluate an online dementia care program aimed at enabling healthcare teams deliver better service to residents with dementia in continuing (CC) and long-term care (LTC) facilities. A Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) orientation (Minkler & Wallerstein, 2003) was adopted…

  16. Communicating complex technical information in virtual teams of a multicultural global organization

    OpenAIRE

    Moksén, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Variant communication is used in the case organization to refer to information and interaction related to variant creation, meaning the customization of the mobile phones according to network operator’s or country’s specific requirements. Variant communication is a process of communicating complex technical messages through electronic communication channels to a multicultural audience. In this thesis the aim is to get a comprehensive understanding how the intercultural, virtual and technic...

  17. Impact of communication delays to and from the International Space Station on self-reported individual and team behavior and performance: A mixed-methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintz, Natalie M.; Chou, Chih-Ping; Vessey, William B.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2016-12-01

    Deep space explorations will involve significant delays in communication to and from Earth that will likely impact individual and team outcomes. However, the extent of these impacts and the appropriate countermeasures for their mitigation remain largely unknown. This study utilized the International Space Station (ISS), a high-fidelity analog for deep space, as a research platform to assess the impact of communication delays on individual and team performance, mood, and behavior. Three astronauts on the ISS and 18 mission support personnel performed tasks with and without communication delays (50-s one-way) during a mission lasting 166 days. Self-reported assessments of individual and team performance and mood were obtained after each task. Secondary outcomes included communication quality and task autonomy. Qualitative data from post-mission interviews with astronauts were used to validate and expand on quantitative data, and to elicit recommendations for countermeasures. Crew well-being and communication quality were significantly reduced in communication delay tasks compared to control. Communication delays were also significantly associated with increased individual stress/frustration. Qualitative data suggest communication delays impacted operational outcomes (i.e. task efficiency), teamwork processes (i.e. team/task coordination) and mood (i.e. stress/frustration), particularly when tasks involved high task-related communication demands, either because of poor communication strategies or low crew autonomy. Training, teamwork, and technology-focused countermeasures were identified to mitigate or prevent adverse impacts.

  18. Overcoming language barriers in healthcare: A protocol for investigating safe and effective communication when patients or clinicians use a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuter, Renata F I; Gallois, Cindy; Segalowitz, Norman S; Ryder, Andrew G; Hocking, Julia

    2015-09-10

    Miscommunication in the healthcare sector can be life-threatening. The rising number of migrant patients and foreign-trained staff means that communication errors between a healthcare practitioner and patient when one or both are speaking a second language are increasingly likely. However, there is limited research that addresses this issue systematically. This protocol outlines a hospital-based study examining interactions between healthcare practitioners and their patients who either share or do not share a first language. Of particular interest are the nature and efficacy of communication in language-discordant conversations, and the degree to which risk is communicated. Our aim is to understand language barriers and miscommunication that may occur in healthcare settings between patients and healthcare practitioners, especially where at least one of the speakers is using a second (weaker) language. Eighty individual interactions between patients and practitioners who speak either English or Chinese (Mandarin or Cantonese) as their first language will be video recorded in a range of in- and out-patient departments at three hospitals in the Metro South area of Brisbane, Australia. All participants will complete a language background questionnaire. Patients will also complete a short survey rating the effectiveness of the interaction. Recordings will be transcribed and submitted to both quantitative and qualitative analyses to determine elements of the language used that might be particularly problematic and the extent to which language concordance and discordance impacts on the quality of the patient-practitioner consultation. Understanding the role that language plays in creating barriers to healthcare is critical for healthcare systems that are experiencing an increasing range of culturally and linguistically diverse populations both amongst patients and practitioners. The data resulting from this study will inform policy and practical solutions for

  19. An exploratory study of healthcare professionals' perceptions of interprofessional communication and collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegh, Kim J.; Seller-Boersma, Annamarike; Simons, Robert; Steenbruggen, Jeanet; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Buurman, Bianca M.

    Interprofessional communication and collaboration during hospitalisation is critically important to provide safe and effective care. Clinical rounds are an essential interprofessional process in which the clinical problems of patients are discussed on a daily basis. The objective of this exploratory

  20. Collaborative and Bidirectional Feedback Between Students and Clinical Preceptors: Promoting Effective Communication Skills on Health Care Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kara; Chou, Calvin L

    2016-11-01

    Current literature on feedback suggests that clinical preceptors lead feedback conversations that are primarily unidirectional, from preceptor to student. While this approach may promote clinical competency, it does not actively develop students' competency in facilitating feedback discussions and providing feedback across power differentials (ie, from student to preceptor). This latter competency warrants particular attention given its fundamental role in effective health care team communication and its related influence on patient safety. Reframing the feedback process as collaborative and bidirectional, where both preceptors and students provide and receive feedback, maximizes opportunities for role modeling and skills practice in the context of a supportive relationship, thereby enhancing team preparedness. We describe an initiative to introduce these fundamental skills of collaborative, bidirectional feedback in the nurse-midwifery education program at the University of California, San Francisco. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  1. Effects of nursing unit spatial layout on nursing team communication patterns, quality of care, and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ying; Becker, Franklin; Wurmser, Teri; Bliss-Holtz, Jane; Hedges, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Studies investigating factors contributing to improved quality of care have found that effective team member communication is among the most critical and influential aspects in the delivery of quality care. Relatively little research has examined the role of the physical design of nursing units on communication patterns among care providers. Although the concept of decentralized unit design is intended to increase patient safety, reduce nurse fatigue, and control the noisy, chaotic, and crowded space associated with centralized nursing stations, until recently little attention has been paid to how such nursing unit designs affected communication patterns or other medical and organizational outcomes. Using a pre/post research design comparing more centralized or decentralized unit designs with a new multi-hub design, the aim of this study was to describe the relationship between the clinical spatial environment and its effect on communication patterns, nurse satisfaction, distance walked, organizational outcomes, patient safety, and patient satisfaction. Hospital institutional data indicated that patient satisfaction increased substantially. Few significant changes were found in communication patterns; no significant changes were found in nurse job satisfaction, patient falls, pressure ulcers, or organizational outcomes such as average length of stay or patient census.

  2. Sports and exercise cardiology in the United States: cardiovascular specialists as members of the athlete healthcare team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Christine E; Olshansky, Brian; Washington, Reginald L; Baggish, Aaron L; Daniels, Curt J; Lawrence, Silvana M; Sullivan, Renee M; Kovacs, Richard J; Bove, Alfred A

    2014-04-22

    In recent years, athletic participation has more than doubled in all major demographic groups, while simultaneously, children and adults with established heart disease desire participation in sports and exercise. Despite conferring favorable long-term effects on well-being and survival, exercise can be associated with risk of adverse events in the short term. Complex individual cardiovascular (CV) demands and adaptations imposed by exercise present distinct challenges to the cardiologist asked to evaluate athletes. Here, we describe the evolution of sports and exercise cardiology as a unique discipline within the continuum of CV specialties, provide the rationale for tailoring of CV care to athletes and exercising individuals, define the role of the CV specialist within the athlete care team, and lay the foundation for the development of Sports and Exercise Cardiology in the United States. In 2011, the American College of Cardiology launched the Section of Sports and Exercise Cardiology. Membership has grown from 150 to over 4,000 members in just 2 short years, indicating marked interest from the CV community to advance the integration of sports and exercise cardiology into mainstream CV care. Although the current athlete CV care model has distinct limitations, here, we have outlined a new paradigm of care for the American athlete and exercising individual. By practicing and promoting this new paradigm, we believe we will enhance the CV care of athletes of all ages, and serve the greater athletic community and our nation as a whole, by allowing safest participation in sports and physical activity for all individuals who seek this lifestyle. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Communication and the electronic health record training: a comparison of three healthcare systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle H Lynott

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background The electronic health record (EHR used in the examination room, is becoming the primary method of medical data storage in primary care practice in the USA. One of the challenges in using EHRs is maintaining effective patient–provider communication. Many studies have focused on communication in the examination room.Purpose Scant research exists on the best methods in educating nurse practitioners and other primary care providers (clinicians. The purpose of this study was to explore various health record training programmes for clinicians.Methods One researcher participated in and observed three health systems’ EHR training programmes for ambulatory care providers in the Pacific Northwest. A focused ethnographic approach was used, emphasising patient–provider communication.Results Only one system had formalised communication training in their class, the other two systems emphasised only the software and data aspects of the EHR.Conclusions The fact that clinicians are expected to use EHRs in the examination room necessitates the inclusion of communication training in EHR training programmes and/or as a part of primary care nurse practitioner education programmes.

  4. Auditing Communication Effectiveness in Higher Education: A Team-Based Study by MBA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Claudia; Plemmons, Tony; Stulz, Karin; Vroman, Margo

    2017-01-01

    A regional University in the United States implemented an AQIP (Academic Quality Improvement Program) Action Project with a goal of developing processes for effective leadership communication. An MBA (Masters of Business Administration) class conducted a university-wide communication audit to assist with the AQIP project. Quantitative and…

  5. Working Together: Communicating on Teams. JobLink Winning at Work Instructor's Manual, Module 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coast Community Coll. District, Costa Mesa, CA.

    This instructor's manual for workplace trainers contains the materials required to conduct a course on working in teams. The course includes six lessons for workers, two lessons for supervisors, and strategies for helping workers continue to develop the skills taught in the course. The following materials are provided for each course: lesson plan,…

  6. The IRSC Baccalaureate Transition Team: Leading Change in a Culture of Communication, Collaboration, and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Edwin R.; Locke, Mary G.; Neuhard, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    No other Florida community college has successfully developed and launched nine baccalaureate degree programs at one time. Indian River State College accomplished this goal--and gained Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) Level II accreditation--in 12 months by establishing a college-wide Baccalaureate Transition Team within a…

  7. Discrepant perceptions of communication, teamwork and situation awareness among surgical team members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wauben, L.S.G.L.; Dekker-van Doorn, C.M.; Van Wijngaarden, J.H.D.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Huijsman, R.; Klein, J.; Lange, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess surgical team members’ differences in perception of non-technical skills. Design Questionnaire design. Setting Operating theatres (OTs) at one university hospital, three teaching hospitals and one general hospital in the Netherlands. Participants Sixty-six surgeons, 97 OT nurs

  8. Discrepant perceptions of communication, teamwork and situation awareness among surgical team members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.S.G.L. Wauben; C.M. Dekker-van Doorn (Connie); J.D.H. van Wijngaarden (Jeroen); R.H.M. Goossens (Richard); R. Huijsman (Robbert); J. Klein (Jan); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To assess surgical team members' differences in perception of non-technical skills. Design: Questionnaire design. Setting: Operating theatres (OTs) at one university hospital, three teaching hospitals and one general hospital in the Netherlands. Participants: Sixty-six surgeon

  9. Cooperative Team Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    effectiveness, and the ability to experimentally manipulate endogenous team processes . She reviewed the results of a set of experiments in the Hidden...Profile paradigm of team research that examine how endogenous communication processes influence emergent network structure and team performance...experimentally manipulate endogenous team processes . She reviewed the results of a set of experiments in the Hidden Profile paradigm of team research

  10. Studies in interactive communication. II - The effects of four communication modes on the linguistic performance of teams during cooperative problem solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapanis, A.; Parrish, R. N.; Ochsman, R. B.; Weeks, G. D.

    1977-01-01

    Two-man teams solved credible, 'real world' problems for which computer assistance has been or could be useful. Conversations were carried on in one of four modes of communication: typewriting, handwriting, voice, and natural unrestricted communication. Performance was assessed on three classes of dependent measures: time to solution, behavioral measures of activity, and linguistic measures. Significant differences among the communication modes were found in each of the three classes. This paper is concerned mainly with the results of the linguistic analyses. Linguistic performance was assessed with 182 measures, most of which turned out to be redundant and some of which were useless or meaningless. Those that remain show that although problems can be solved faster in the oral modes than in the hard-copy modes, the oral modes are characterized by many more messages, sentences, words, and unique words; much higher communication rates; but lower type-token ratios. Although a number of significant problem and job-role effects were found, there were relatively few significant interactions of modes with thsse variables. It appears, therefore, that the mode effects hold for both problems and for both job roles assigned to the subjects.

  11. [Simulator-based modular human factor training in anesthesiology. Concept and results of the module "Communication and Team Cooperation"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, M; Hofinger, G; Buerschaper, C; Grapengeter, M; Harms, H; Breuer, G; Schüttler, J

    2004-02-01

    Human factors (HF) play a major role in crisis development and management and simulator training can help to train HF aspects. We developed a modular training concept with psychological intensive briefing. The aim of the study was to see whether learning and transfer in the treatment group (TG) with the module "communication and team-cooperation" differed from that in the control group (CG) without psychological briefing ("anaesthesia crisis resource management type course"). A total of 34 residents (TG: n=20, CG: n=14) managed 1 out of 3 scenarios and communication patterns and management were evaluated using video recordings. A questionnaire was answered at the end of the course and 2 months later participants were asked for lessons learnt and behavioral changes. Good communication and medical management showed a significant correlation (r=0.57, p=0.001). The TG showed greater initiative ( p=0.001) and came more often in conflict with the surgeon ( p=0.06). The TG also reported more behavioral changes than the CG 2 months later. The reported benefit of the simulation was training for rare events in the CG, whereas in the TG it was issues of communication and cooperation ( p=0.001). A training concept with psychological intensive briefing may enhance the transfer of HF aspects more than classical ACRM.

  12. [Communication of the nursing team and its relationship with management in health institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Maria Cláudia; Bernardes, Andrea

    2010-06-01

    Communication should occur constantly, in order to guide managerial activities, allowing for the necessary job information, motivation and satisfaction. This study aims to analyze the contribution of the research produced on communication in nursing management, considering the literature published in Brazilian journals. Integrative Literature Review was used, including dissertations, theses and articles indexed in Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) and Bibliographic Database of the University of São Paulo (DEDALUS), between the years of 1998 and 2008. Strengthening the communication process and guaranteeing that it occurs in a clear and efficient way is essential for nursing management. Through efficient communication, nurses ensure the identification of individual and collective problems, thus making it possible to relate them to the analysis of the found situation and direct them towards a planning of appropriate and effective care.

  13. An electronic patient risk communication board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Caligtan, Christine A; Benoit, Angela N; Breydo, Eugene M; Carroll, Diane L; Keohane, Carol A; Bates, David W; Dykes, John S; Dykes, Patricia C

    2012-01-01

    Communication failures have been identified as the root cause of the majority of medical malpractice claims and patient safety violations. We believe it is essential to share key patient risk information with healthcare team members at the patient's bedside. In this study, we developed an electronic Patient Risk Communication Board (ePRCB) to assist in bridging the communication gap between all health care team members. The goal of the ePRCB is to effectively communicate the patient's key risk factors, such as a fall risk or risk of aspiration, to the healthcare team and to reduce adverse events caused by communication failures. The ePRCB will transmit patient risk information and tailored interventions with easy-to-understand icons on an LCD screen at the point of care. A set of patient risk reminder icons was developed and validated by focus groups. We used the results of the evaluation to refine the icons for the ePRCB.

  14. Development and reliability of the explicit professional oral communication observation tool to quantify the use of non-technical skills in healthcare.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, P.F.; Noord, I. van; Bruijne, M. de; Knol, D.L.; Wagner, C.; Dyck, C. van

    2013-01-01

    Background: A lack of non-technical skills is increasingly recognised as an important underlying cause of adverse events in healthcare. The nature and number of things professionals communicate to each other can be perceived as a product of their use of non-technical skills. This paper describes the

  15. ListeningTime; participatory development of a web-based preparatory communication tool for elderly cancer patients and their healthcare providers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, J.; Driesenaar, J.A.; Bruinessen, I.R. van; Dulmen, S. van

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This paper outlines the participatory development process of a web-based preparatory communication tool for elderly cancer patients and their oncological healthcare providers (HCPs). This tool aims to support them to (better) prepare their encounters. An overarching aim of the project is

  16. Development and reliability of the explicit professional oral communication observation tool to quantify the use of non-technical skills in healthcare.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, P.F.; Noord, I. van; Bruijne, M. de; Knol, D.L.; Wagner, C.; Dyck, C. van

    2013-01-01

    Background: A lack of non-technical skills is increasingly recognised as an important underlying cause of adverse events in healthcare. The nature and number of things professionals communicate to each other can be perceived as a product of their use of non-technical skills. This paper describes the

  17. A WIC-based curriculum to enhance parent communication with healthcare providers

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, AD; Inkelas, M; Whaley, SE; Kuo, AA

    2013-01-01

    The objectives describe a curriculum to support parent-provider communication about child development, and to demonstrate its impact and effectiveness when delivered by staff from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC). A curriculum was developed by a university-WIC partnership for a WIC center-based health education class to teach parents about child development and how to talk to their child's doctor about development. During a 90-min training sessi...

  18. Healthcare IT and Patient Empowerment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danholt, Peter; Bødker, Keld; Hertzum, Morten

    2004-01-01

    This short paper outlines a recently initiated research project that concerns healthcare information systems and patient empowerment. Drawing on various theoretical backgrounds, Participatory Design (PD), Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Computer Mediated Communication (CMC), and Science...... of type II diabetes at the clinic is characterized by team treatment, a diabetes school, standard treatment plans, and an electronic patient record system. By studying work at the clinic as well as the patients’ ‘work’ with their disease, we aim to come to grips with the complexity of treating type II...

  19. When peers count: The effects on integrated type II diabetes care of communication within general practitioner-only subgroups in interprofessional primary care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compagni, Amelia; Armeni, Patrizio; Tasselli, Stefano

    2017-03-16

    Primary care teams (hereafter referred to as primary care units [PCUs]) composed of general practitioners (GPs), nurses, and specialist doctors have recently been established in the Italian context, with the main aim of improving integrated care for chronic diseases. The aim of the study was to assess whether the increased professional diversity of PCUs has resulted in an improvement in the integrated care of type II diabetes and to identify a potential mechanism mediating this effect. We analyzed 213 PCUs, comparing their performance in integrated type II diabetes care at two time points. Using social categorization theory and a fixed effects regression analysis, we tested a mediation model in which the frequency of communication among GPs in the PCUs, that is, within-subgroup communication, mediates the relationship between PCU professional diversity and team performance in diabetes care. We show that when the professional diversity of the PCUs increases, integrated care of type II diabetes improves and better meets the standards of optimal care. Within-GP subgroup communication works as a mediating mechanism that translates the PCU professional diversity into better team performance. The mediation effect, however, is curvilinear. Beyond certain levels, within-subgroup communication can hamper PCUs' capacity to work collaboratively in integrated type II diabetes care. The article suggests that, when creating interprofessional primary care teams, managers might be able to steer teams toward a better performance by encouraging communication among peers of the same profession.

  20. The mediating effects of team and self-efficacy on the relationship between transformational leadership, and job satisfaction and psychological well-being in healthcare professionals: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Karina; Yarker, Joanna; Randall, Raymond; Munir, Fehmidah

    2009-09-01

    The importance of transformational leadership for the health and well-being of staff in the healthcare sector is increasingly acknowledged, however, there is less knowledge about the mechanisms that may explain the links between transformational leaders and employee health and well-being. To examine two possible psychological mechanisms that link transformational leadership behaviours to employee job satisfaction and well-being. Cross-sectional study design. The study took place in two elderly care centers in large Danish local government. Staff were predominantly healthcare assistants but also nurses and other healthcare-related professions participated in the study. 274 elderly care employees completed the questionnaire. Surveys were sent to all employees working at the centers. 91% were female, the average age was 45 years. A questionnaire was distributed to all members of staff in the elderly care centers and where employees were asked to rate their line manager's leadership style and were asked to evaluate their own level of self-efficacy as well as the level of efficacy in their team (team efficacy) and their job satisfaction and psychological well-being. Both team and self-efficacy were found to act as mediators, however, their effects differed. Self-efficacy was found to fully mediate the relationship between transformational leadership and well-being and team efficacy was found to partially mediate the relationship between transformational leadership and job satisfaction and fully mediate the relationship between transformational leadership and well-being. Within the pressurised environment faced by employees in the healthcare sector today transformational leaders may help ensure employees' job satisfaction and psychological well-being. They do so through the establishment of a sense of being in control as individuals but also as being part of a competent group.

  1. How Configuration Management (CM) Can Help Project Teams To Innovate and Communicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioletti, Louis

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, CM is relegated to a support role in project management activities. CM s traditional functions of identification, change control, status accounting, and audits/verification are still necessary and play a vital role. However, this presentation proposes CM s role in a new and innovative manner that will significantly improve communication throughout the organization and, in turn, augment the project s success. CM s new role is elevated to the project management level, above the engineering or sub-project level in the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), where it can more effectively accommodate changes, reduce corrective actions, and ensure that requirements are clear, concise, and valid, and that results conform to the requirements. By elevating CM s role in project management and orchestrating new measures, a new communication will emerge that will improve information integrity, structured baselines, interchangeability/traceability, metrics, conformance to standards, and standardize the best practices in the organization. Overall project performance (schedule, quality, and cost) can be no better than the ability to communicate requirements which, in turn, is no better than the CM process to communicate project decisions and the correct requirements.

  2. Team Learning and Communication: The Effectiveness of Email-Based Ethics Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Lucia; Peek, George; Roxas, Maria; Robichaud, Yves; Blanco, Huguette

    2007-01-01

    In fall 2003, students from two U.S. universities and a Canadian university participated in an ethics project. One solution to overcome the obstacles to ethics discussions among students who are geographically separated is the use of email as a mode of communication. As a basis for their discussions, the students used the accounting ethics…

  3. Team Teaching Political Communication: The 2000 Campus U.S. Presidential Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeman, Keith T.; Jefferson, Kurt W.

    The closeness of the 2000 presidential election clearly demonstrated that the country was divided philosophically and politically. The authors of this paper, a speech communication professor and a political science professor at Westminster College in Missouri, capitalized on that division based upon their diametrically opposed political views by…

  4. Communicating about eating behaviors. A qualitative study of Chilean women and their health-care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Patricia; Valencia, Alejandra; Palomino, Ana M; Cataldo, Marjorie; Schwingel, Andiara

    2015-01-01

    Good communication between health care providers (HCPs) and patients is critical in achieving positive health outcomes. The purpose of this article was to compare the perceptions of Chilean woman and their HCPs with respect to determinants of eating behaviors. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with women (n=15) visiting a public health care center in Chile and with their HCPs (n=8) who were in charge of promoting healthy eating behaviors among women. Data from the interviews indicated similarities and inconsistencies in determinants of eating behaviors between the groups. Both mentioned many important factors that influence women's eating behaviors, including food preferences, dietary knowledge, self-control and self-efficacy, family, food cost, and food availability. HCPs appeared to be less aware of the role that personality traits and past experiences play as potential determinants which women mentioned. In contrast, women were less aware of the influence of anxiety and low self-esteem on eating choices, which HCPs noted as key factors. Although it was encouraging to see agreement between women and their HCPs in some areas, it is important to work on increasing understanding among the groups with respect to the important role psychological factors play in influencing eating behavior. We suggest that HCPs should focus on the importance of women's personality traits and past eating behaviors, as well as work on improving women's self-esteem and helping to decrease their anxiety levels. HCPs should be encouraged to develop good communication with each person in order to help them understand the roles that external and internal factors play in eating behaviors.

  5. Understanding healthcare professionals' self-efficacy to resolve interprofessional conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Martha; Orchard, Carole

    2016-05-01

    Conflict within interprofessional healthcare teams, when not effectively resolved, has been linked to detrimental consequences; however, effective conflict resolution has been shown to enhance team performance, increase patient safety, and improve patient outcomes. Alarmingly, knowledge of healthcare professionals' ability to resolve conflict has been limited, largely due to the challenges that arise when researchers attempt to observe a conflict occurring in real time. Research literature has identified three central components that seem to influence healthcare professional's perceived ability to resolve conflict: communication competence, problem-solving ability, and conflict resolution education and training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of communication competence, problem-solving ability, and conflict resolution education and training on healthcare professionals' perceived ability to resolve conflicts. This study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that two of the three central components-conflict resolution education and training and communication competence-were found to be statistically significant predictors of healthcare professionals' perceived ability to resolve conflict. Implications include a call to action for clinicians and academicians to recognize the importance of communication competence and conflict resolution education and training as a vital area in interprofessional pre- and post-licensure education and collaborative practice.

  6. Five heads are better than one: preliminary results of team-based learning in a communication disorders graduate course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Baila

    2016-01-01

    Clinical problem-solving is fundamental to the role of the speech-language pathologist in both the diagnostic and treatment processes. The problem-solving often involves collaboration with clients and their families, supervisors, and other professionals. Considering the importance of cooperative problem-solving in the profession, graduate education in speech-language pathology should provide experiences to foster the development of these skills. One evidence-based pedagogical approach that directly targets these abilities is team-based learning (TBL). TBL is a small-group instructional method that focuses on students' in-class application of conceptual knowledge in solving complex problems that they will likely encounter in their future clinical careers. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the educational outcomes and students' perceptions of TBL in a communication disorders graduate course on speech and language-based learning disabilities. Nineteen graduate students (mean age = 26 years, SD = 4.93), divided into three groups of five students and one group of four students, who were enrolled in a required graduate course, participated by fulfilling the key components of TBL: individual student preparation; individual and team readiness assurance tests (iRATs and tRATs) that assessed preparedness to apply course content; and application activities that challenged teams to solve complex and authentic clinical problems using course material. Performance on the tRATs was significantly higher than the individual students' scores on the iRATs (p learning and clinical practice. Future studies should examine the utility of this approach in other courses within the field and with more heterogeneous student populations. © 2015 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  7. Increasing patient safety with neonates via handoff communication during delivery: a call for interprofessional health care team training across GME and CME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Allison A; Pappada, Scott M; Stein, Howard; Harper, David; Papadimos, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Hospitals have struggled for years regarding the handoff process of communicating patient information from one health care professional to another. Ineffective handoff communication is recognized as a serious patient safety risk within the health care community. It is essential to take communication into consideration when examining the safety of neonates who require immediate medical attention after birth; effective communication is vital for positive patient outcomes, especially with neonates in a delivery room setting. Teamwork and effective communication across the health care continuum are essential for providing efficient, quality care that leads to favorable patient outcomes. Interprofessional simulation and team training can benefit health care professionals by improving interprofessional competence, defined as one's knowledge of other professionals including an understanding of their training and skillsets, and role clarity. Interprofessional teams that include members with specialization in obstetrics, gynecology, and neonatology have the potential to considerably benefit from training effective handoff and communication practices that would ensure the safety of the neonate upon birth. We must strive to provide the most comprehensive systematic, standardized, interprofessional handoff communication training sessions for such teams, through Graduate Medical Education and Continuing Medical Education that will meet the needs across the educational continuum.

  8. What makes maternity teams effective and safe? Lessons from a series of research on teamwork, leadership and team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siassakos, Dimitrios; Fox, Robert; Bristowe, Katherine; Angouri, Jo; Hambly, Helen; Robson, Lauren; Draycott, Timothy J

    2013-11-01

    We describe lessons for safety from a synthesis of seven studies of teamwork, leadership and team training across a healthcare region. Two studies identified successes and challenges in a unit with embedded team training: a staff survey demonstrated a positive culture but a perceived need for greater senior presence; training improved actual emergency care, but wide variation in team performance remained. Analysis of multicenter simulation records showed that variation in patient safety and team efficiency correlated with their teamwork but not individual knowledge, skills or attitudes. Safe teams tended to declare the emergency earlier, hand over in a more structured way, and use closed-loop communication. Focused and directed communication was also associated with better patient-actor perception of care. Focus groups corroborated these findings, proposed that the capability and experience of the leader is more important than seniority, and identified teamwork and leadership issues that require further research.

  9. Patient, surgeon, and healthcare purchaser views on the use of decision and communication aids in orthopaedic surgery: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Kevin J; Chenok, Kate Eresian; Schindel, Jennifer; Chan, Vanessa; Huddleston, James I; Braddock, Clarence; Belkora, Jeffrey

    2014-08-31

    Despite evidence that decision and communication aids are effective for enhancing the quality of preference-sensitive decisions, their adoption in the field of orthopaedic surgery has been limited. The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to evaluate the perceived value of decision and communication aids among different healthcare stakeholders. Patients with hip or knee arthritis, orthopaedic surgeons who perform hip and knee replacement procedures, and a group of large, self-insured employers (healthcare purchasers) were surveyed regarding their views on the value of decision and communication aids in orthopaedics. Patients with hip or knee arthritis who participated in a randomized controlled trial involving decision and communication aids were asked to complete an online survey about what was most and least beneficial about each of the tools they used, the ideal mode of administration of these tools and services, and their interest in receiving comparable materials and services in the future. A subset of these patients were invited to participate in a telephone interview, where there were asked to rank and attribute a monetary value to the interventions. These interviews were analyzed using a qualitative and mixed methods analysis software. Members of the American Hip and Knee Surgeons (AAHKS) were surveyed on their perceptions and usage of decision and communication aids in orthopaedic practice. Healthcare purchasers were interviewed about their perspectives on patient-oriented decision support. All stakeholders saw value in decision and communication aids, with the major barrier to implementation being cost. Both patients and surgeons would be willing to bear at least part of the cost of implementing these tools, while employers felt health plans should be responsible for shouldering the costs. Decision and communication aids can be effective tools for incorporating patients preferences and values into preference-sensitive decisions in orthopaedics. Future

  10. Improving maternity care in the Dominican Republic: a pilot study of a community-based participatory research action plan by an international healthcare team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jennifer; Gossett, Sarah; Burgos, Rosa; Cáceres, Ramona; Tejada, Carmen; Dominguez García, Luis; Ambrosio Rosario, Angel; Almonte, Asela; Perez, Lydia J

    2015-05-01

    This article is a report of the process and results of a feasibility pilot study to improve the quality of maternity care in a sample of 31 women and their newborns delivering in a public, tertiary hospital in the Dominican Republic. The pilot study was the first "action step" taken as a result of a formative, community-based participatory research (CBPR) study conducted between 2008 and 2010 by an interdisciplinary, international partnership of U.S. academic researchers, Dominican medical/nursing personnel, and Dominican community health workers. Health personnel and community health workers separately identified indicators most important to measure quality of antepartum maternity care: laboratory and diagnostic studies and respectful, interpersonal communication. At the midpoint and the completion of data collection, the CBPR team evaluated the change in quality indicators to assess improvement in care. The pilot study supports the idea that joint engagement of community health workers, health personnel, and academic researchers with data creation and patient monitoring is motivating for all to continue to improve services in the cultural context of the Dominican Republic. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Increasing patient safety with neonates via handoff communication during delivery: a call for interprofessional health care team training across GME and CME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderbilt AA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Allison A Vanderbilt,1 Scott M Pappada,2 Howard Stein,3 David Harper,4 Thomas J Papadimos5 1Department of Family Medicine, 2Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Toledo, 3Department of Pediatrics, ProMedica Toledo Children’s Hospital, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ProMedica Toledo Hospital, 5Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine and the Life Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA Abstract: Hospitals have struggled for years regarding the handoff process of communicating patient information from one health care professional to another. Ineffective handoff communication is recognized as a serious patient safety risk within the health care community. It is essential to take communication into consideration when examining the safety of neonates who require immediate medical attention after birth; effective communication is vital for positive patient outcomes, especially with neonates in a delivery room setting. Teamwork and effective communication across the health care continuum are essential for providing efficient, quality care that leads to favorable patient outcomes. Interprofessional simulation and team training can benefit health care professionals by improving interprofessional competence, defined as one’s knowledge of other professionals including an understanding of their training and skillsets, and role clarity. Interprofessional teams that include members with specialization in obstetrics, gynecology, and neonatology have the potential to considerably benefit from training effective handoff and communication practices that would ensure the safety of the neonate upon birth. We must strive to provide the most comprehensive systematic, standardized, interprofessional handoff communication training sessions for such teams, through Graduate Medical Education and Continuing Medical Education that will meet the needs across the educational continuum. Keywords

  12. Instructional Design Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Judith A.; Collins, Keith

    1974-01-01

    An instructional design team, composed of experts in nursing, education, and media production, is used at the University of Wisconsin School of Nursing, Madison, to produce instructional units for a new curriculum. The authors summarize steps of team/faculty communications, team methodology, and factors influencing the team's effectiveness. (EA)

  13. 团队认知多样性:和团队沟通对团队创造力的影响研究%A Study on the Relationship Between Team Cognitive Diversity, Communication and Creativity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李树祥; 梁巧转; 杨柳青

    2012-01-01

    Analyze the tive diversity and team creativity is a negative cognitive team diversity communication team is relationship; same team and team creativity relationship. Through the study found: Cogni- a negative relationship; team between cognitive diversity and team communication on team diversity and team creativity cognitive rela-tionship between have a moderating effect.%分析了团队认知多样性和团队创造力之间的关系。通过研究发现:团队认知多样性和团队沟通是负向关系;团队认知多样性和团队创造力之间是负向关系;同时,团队沟通对团队认知多样性和团队创造力之间的关系具有调节作用。

  14. Effectiveness of communication skills training of nurses on the quality of life and satisfaction with healthcare professionals among newly diagnosed cancer patients: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Sakiko; Ogawa, Keiko; Yamagishi, Akemi

    2011-12-01

    The importance of effective communication skills to sustain the cancer patient quality of life (QOL) and their satisfaction with healthcare professionals is well documented. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of communication skills training (CST) of nurses for patient QOL and their satisfaction with healthcare professionals just after being diagnosed with cancer. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. Eight nurses, who mainly provide psychological and informational support for patients soon after they were informed of their cancer diagnosis by physicians at a cancer screening center, were randomly assigned to an experimental group attending a CST program (four nurses) or to a control group (four nurses). Eighty-nine patients with gastric, colorectal, or breast cancer were supported and assessed by either group of nurses during the study period. The effectiveness for patient QOL and their satisfaction with healthcare professionals was assessed by administering the Short Form-8 Health Survey (SF-8) and a single-item VAS three times (1 week after diagnosis: T1; 1 month after diagnosis: T2; and 3 months after diagnosis: T3). Repeated measures analysis of variance showed a group-by-time significant increase of the mental aspects of SF-8 (F=3.48; P=0.03) and satisfaction with the nurse (F=3.18; p=0.04). Our findings underscore the importance of CST for healthcare professionals to improve the QOL of patients as well as their satisfaction with these professionals. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Determinants of initial utilization of community healthcare services among patients with major non-communicable chronic diseases in South China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajie Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although expected to act as gate-keeping primary care providers, as community health service (CHS facilities are severely under-utilized; Chinese people in both rural and urban areas used predominantly higher-tier facilities for primary care purpose, with significant financial and outcome consequences. This study intends to explore the determinants of initial utilization of CHS among patients with major non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs in order to understand the care-seeking behavior among urban and rural residents in South China. METHODS: A multi-stage cluster random sampling methodology was adopted to create a sample of 19,466 adults with NCDs from 7,970 urban households and 32,035 adults with NCDs from 3,860 rural households in Guangdong, China. Interviews and physical examinations were conducted in 2010 to collect data on patient characteristics, medical conditions, and awareness and utilization of healthcare. Descriptive analysis and logistic regression analysis were performed to study utilization patterns and the factors associated with the patterns. RESULTS: Prevalence of major NCDs in urban areas was significantly higher than that in rural areas (12.55% vs. 8.70%; p<0.001. Second-tier district hospitals were most preferred for initial consultation (46.05% in rural areas vs. 45.32% in urban areas; p<0.001, followed by tertiary general or specialized hospitals (28.39% in rural areas vs. 33.89% in urban areas; p<0.001. The proportion of patients who had initial use of CHS was relatively low (25.56% in rural areas vs. 20.79% in urban areas; p<0.001. Awareness of self-care and the presence of medical insurance were leading factors associated with first contact of CHS facilities in both urban and rural areas. CONCLUSION: The study suggests that CHS facilities are not often used as the first contact for patients in both rural and urban areas in south China. Much effect must be made to enhance the gatekeeper system and improve

  16. "Achieving Ensemble": Communication in Orthopaedic Surgical Teams and the Development of Situation Awareness--An Observational Study Using Live Videotaped Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Alan; Allard, Jon; Hobbs, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Focused dialogue, as good communication between practitioners, offers a condition of possibility for development of high levels of situation awareness in surgical teams. This has been termed "achieving ensemble". Situation awareness grasps what is happening in time and space with regard to one's own unfolding work in relation to that of…

  17. "Achieving Ensemble": Communication in Orthopaedic Surgical Teams and the Development of Situation Awareness--An Observational Study Using Live Videotaped Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Alan; Allard, Jon; Hobbs, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Focused dialogue, as good communication between practitioners, offers a condition of possibility for development of high levels of situation awareness in surgical teams. This has been termed "achieving ensemble". Situation awareness grasps what is happening in time and space with regard to one's own unfolding work in relation to that of…

  18. The use of a rating instrument to teach and assess communication skills of health-care workers in a clinic in the Western Cape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, M; Borcherds, R; van der Merwe, N

    1999-06-01

    Research in health communication shows communication to be an important aspect of successful health-care. Moreover, training courses which provide feedback have been shown to improve health professionals' ability to conduct successful interviews. This article describes a rating instrument which was developed in order to facilitate teaching and assessing the communication aspects of health-care interviews. The instrument was found to be useful in a training programme offered to nursing staff of a TB Clinic in Mitchells Plain, Western Cape. The instrument appears as Table 1. In the Table categories of communication behaviours, each indicating an important aspect of the interaction, are given as the six headings. These are: establishing rapport and respect listening receptively confirming the patient sharing control informing effectively and checking perceptions. Within each category the more detailed specific behaviours are listed, allowing for close analysis of a care-giver's interviewing skill. The article briefly discusses the importance in effective communication between the care-giver and patient of each category of behaviours given in the instrument, supported by evidence from research. Lastly the article describes a "case study" on how the instrument has been successfully used in a training programme.

  19. The relationship between team climate and interprofessional collaboration: Preliminary results of a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agreli, Heloise F; Peduzzi, Marina; Bailey, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    Relational and organisational factors are key elements of interprofessional collaboration (IPC) and team climate. Few studies have explored the relationship between IPC and team climate. This article presents a study that aimed to explore IPC in primary healthcare teams and understand how the assessment of team climate may provide insights into IPC. A mixed methods study design was adopted. In Stage 1 of the study, team climate was assessed using the Team Climate Inventory with 159 professionals in 18 interprofessional teams based in São Paulo, Brazil. In Stage 2, data were collected through in-depth interviews with a sample of team members who participated in the first stage of the study. Results from Stage 1 provided an overview of factors relevant to teamwork, which in turn informed our exploration of the relationship between team climate and IPC. Preliminary findings from Stage 2 indicated that teams with a more positive team climate (in particular, greater participative safety) also reported more effective communication and mutual support. In conclusion, team climate provided insights into IPC, especially regarding aspects of communication and interaction in teams. Further research will provide a better understanding of differences and areas of overlap between team climate and IPC. It will potentially contribute for an innovative theoretical approach to explore interprofessional work in primary care settings.

  20. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E Epstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE, improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like "well-oiled machines," multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include "staff" from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses′ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others. Their enhanced teamwork counters the "silo effect" by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of "teamwork" for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs, hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs, and most critically, operating rooms (ORs. Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS, and yielded greater patient "staff" satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a "team sport." The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers′ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their "well-oiled machines" enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling "staff" to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction.

  1. [Team communication needed in treatment for denture prosthesis. 1) Opinion from dentist's standpoint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Kaoru; Sekisuke, Miyamoto

    2005-06-01

    The objectives of using a denture to treat a defect are preservation of remaining tissue and improvement in the functional recovery rate. Close cooperation between dentist and dental technician and a shared understanding of fundamental knowledge and technology, from denture design to production, are indispensable in order to successfully achieve a combination of these objectives. Furthermore, accurate communication from dentist to dental technician of all patient information gained from the preoperative examination and necessary for production of the prosthesis is essential for a successful treatment outcome. This information should be shared by both the dentist and the dental technician. It is extremely important to describe this information appropriately and to append other information as needed in order to convey this information from the dentist to the dental technician by means of a dental technician specification. While this exchange of opinions by means of accompanying materials is of course useful in the denture production process, these materials are also valuable for re-evaluating the design of the prosthesis and handling by the technician in case a problem related to preservation of remaining tissue or improvement in the functional recovery rate arises during a subsequent visit by the patient. It is important for the dentist and the dental technician to consider the following six factors using the same criteria when treating a patient using a removable partial denture: (1) minimization of denture movement, (2) occlusion, (3) reduction of burden on the abutment, (4) consideration of periodontal tissue, (5) consideration of sensation, and (6) aesthetic considerations. To that end, the authors have found clinical application of a "design chart" to be useful.

  2. Better team management--better team care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, P; Powney, B

    1994-01-01

    Team building should not be a 'bolt-on' extra, it should be a well planned, integrated part of developing teams and assisting their leaders. When asked to facilitate team building by a group of NHS managers we developed a framework which enabled individual members of staff to become more effective in the way they communicated with each other, their teams and in turn within the organization. Facing the challenge posed by complex organizational changes, staff were able to use 3 training days to increase and develop their awareness of the principles of teamwork, better team management, and how a process of leadership and team building could help yield better patient care.

  3. Nurses' Use and Perception of an Information and Communication Technology System for Improving Coordination During Hospital Discharges: A Survey in Swedish Primary Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Line; Fagerström, Cecilia; Nilsson, Lina

    2017-07-01

    To facilitate communications between care levels and improve coordination during hospital discharges, there is great potential in using information and communication technology systems, because they can significantly help to deter unnecessary readmissions. However, there is still a lack of knowledge about how often nurses use information and communication technology and the indicators related to its use. The aims of this study were to describe the indicators related to nurses' use of an information and communication technology system for collaboration between care levels and to estimate whether the level of use can be related to nurses' perceptions of the information and communication technology system's contribution to improve coordination during hospital discharges. A quantitative survey of 37 nurses from 11 primary healthcare centers was performed in a county in southern Sweden. The data were analyzed using descriptive and comparative analyses. The results showed that perceptions concerning the information and communication technology system's usability and time consumption differed between nurses who used the system and those who did not. Simultaneously, the nurses were rather unaware of the ability of the information and communication technology system to improve coordination during patient discharges.

  4. Skill mix, roles and remuneration in the primary care workforce: who are the healthcare professionals in the primary care teams across the world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Tobias; Everett, Christine; Griffiths, Peter; Hudon, Catherine; Naccarella, Lucio; Laurant, Miranda

    2015-03-01

    World-wide, shortages of primary care physicians and an increased demand for services have provided the impetus for delivering team-based primary care. The diversity of the primary care workforce is increasing to include a wider range of health professionals such as nurse practitioners, registered nurses and other clinical staff members. Although this development is observed internationally, skill mix in the primary care team and the speed of progress to deliver team-based care differs across countries. This work aims to provide an overview of education, tasks and remuneration of nurses and other primary care team members in six OECD countries. Based on a framework of team organization across the care continuum, six national experts compare skill-mix, education and training, tasks and remuneration of health professionals within primary care teams in the United States, Canada, Australia, England, Germany and the Netherlands. Nurses are the main non-physician health professional working along with doctors in most countries although types and roles in primary care vary considerably between countries. However, the number of allied health professionals and support workers, such as medical assistants, working in primary care is increasing. Shifting from 'task delegation' to 'team care' is a global trend but limited by traditional role concepts, legal frameworks and reimbursement schemes. In general, remuneration follows the complexity of medical tasks taken over by each profession. Clear definitions of each team-member's role may facilitate optimally shared responsibility for patient care within primary care teams. Skill mix changes in primary care may help to maintain access to primary care and quality of care delivery. Learning from experiences in other countries may inspire policy makers and researchers to work on efficient and effective teams care models worldwide. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Cohesion in Online Student Teams versus Traditional Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have found that the electronic methods in use for online team communication today increase communication quality in project-based work situations. Because communication quality is known to influence group cohesion, the present research examined whether online student project teams are more cohesive than traditional teams. We tested…

  6. Structured nursing communication on interdisciplinary acute care teams improves perceptions of safety, efficiency, understanding of care plan and teamwork as well as job satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gausvik C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Christian Gausvik,1 Ashley Lautar,2 Lisa Miller,2 Harini Pallerla,3 Jeffrey Schlaudecker4,5 1University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 2The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, 4Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 5Geriatric Medicine Fellowship Program, University of Cincinnati/The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Efficient, accurate, and timely communication is required for quality health care and is strongly linked to health care staff job satisfaction. Developing ways to improve communication is key to increasing quality of care, and interdisciplinary care teams allow for improved communication among health care professionals. This study examines the patient- and family-centered use of structured interdisciplinary bedside rounds (SIBR on an acute care for the elderly (ACE unit in a 555-bed metropolitan community hospital. This mixed methods study surveyed 24 nurses, therapists, patient care assistants, and social workers to measure perceptions of teamwork, communication, understanding of the plan for the day, safety, efficiency, and job satisfaction. A similar survey was administered to a control group of 38 of the same staff categories on different units in the same hospital. The control group units utilized traditional physician-centric rounding. Significant differences were found in each category between the SIBR staff on the ACE unit and the control staff. Nurse job satisfaction is an important marker of retention and recruitment, and improved communication may be an important aspect of increasing this satisfaction. Furthermore, improved communication is key to maintaining a safe hospital environment with quality patient care. Interdisciplinary team rounds that take place at the bedside improve both nursing satisfaction and related communication markers of quality and safety, and may help to achieve higher nurse retention and safer

  7. Patients' views of teamwork in the emergency department offer insights about team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Beverly W; McCarthy, Danielle M; Nannicelli, Anna P; Seivert, Nicholas P; Vozenilek, John A

    2016-06-01

    Research into efforts to engage patients in the assessment of health-care teams is limited. To explore, through qualitative methods, patient awareness of teamwork-related behaviours observed during an emergency department (ED) visit. Researchers used semi-structured question guides for audio-recorded interviews and analysed their verbatim transcripts. Researchers conducted individual phone interviews with 6 teamwork subject matter experts (SMEs) and held 5 face-to-face group interviews with patients and caregivers (n = 25) about 2 weeks after discharge from the emergency department (ED). SMEs suggested that a range of factors influence patient perspectives of teams. Many patients perceived the health-care team within the context of their expectations of an ED visit and their treatment plan. Four themes emerged: (i) patient-centred views highlight gaps in coordination and communication; (ii) team processes do concern patients; (iii) patients are critical observers of ways that team members present their team roles; (iv) patients' observations of team members relate to patients' views of team effectiveness. Analysis also indicated that patients viewed health-care team members' interactions with each other as proxy for how team members actually felt about patients. Results from both sets of interviews (SME and patient) indicated that patient observations of teamwork could add to assessment of team processes/frameworks. Patients' understanding about teamwork organization seemed helpful and witnessed interteam communication appeared to influence patient confidence in the team. Patients perspectives are an important part of assessment in health care and suggest potential areas for improvement through team training. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Development of a formative assessment tool for measurement of performance in multi-professional resuscitation teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Oluf; Jensen, Michael Kammer; Lippert, Anne;

    2010-01-01

    Treating cardiac arrest is linked to the mutual performance of several health-care individuals' task coordination. Non-technical skills, including communication, leadership and team interaction, could improve sequencing the tasks in the cardiac arrest algorithm. Non-technical skills have been a p...

  9. A novel method for reproducibly measuring the effects of interventions to improve emotional climate, indices of team skills and communication, and threat to patient outcome in a high-volume thoracic surgery center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurok, Michael; Lipsitz, Stuart; Satwicz, Paul; Kelly, Andrea; Frankel, Allan

    2010-05-01

    To create and test a reproducible method for measuring emotional climate, surgical team skills, and threats to patient outcome by conducting an observational study to assess the impact of a surgical team skills and communication improvement intervention on these measurements. Observational study. Operating rooms in a high-volume thoracic surgery center from September 5, 2007, through June 30, 2008. Thoracic surgery operating room teams. Two 90-minute team skills training sessions focused on findings from a standardized safety culture survey administered to all participants and highlighting positive and problematic aspects of team skills, communication, and leadership. The sessions created an interactive forum to educate team members on the importance of communication and to role-play optimal interactive and communication strategies. Calculated indices of emotional climate, team skills, and threat to patient outcome. The calculated communication and team skills score improved from the preintervention to postintervention periods, but the improvement extinguished during the 3 months after the intervention (P skills and communication and decrease a calculated score of threats to patient outcome. However, the effect is only durable for threats to patient outcome.

  10. Near Field Communication and Health: Turning a Mobile Phone into an Interactive Multipurpose Assistant in Healthcare Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giuliano; Pozzebon, Alessandro

    In this paper we discuss the introduction of the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology in the management of the assistance operations in the hospitals. NFC is a new short range communication system based on RFID technology.

  11. Leadership for Distributed Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Rooij, J.P.G.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation was to study the little examined, yet important issue of leadership for distributed teams. Distributed teams are defined as: “teams of which members are geographically distributed and are therefore working predominantly via mediated communication means on an

  12. Leadership for Distributed Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Rooij, J.P.G.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation was to study the little examined, yet important issue of leadership for distributed teams. Distributed teams are defined as: “teams of which members are geographically distributed and are therefore working predominantly via mediated communication means on an interdepende

  13. The Cuban National Healthcare System: Characterization of primary healthcare services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Regina DAL PRÁ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a report on the experience of healthcare professionals in Florianópolis, who took the course La Atención Primaria de Salud y la Medicina Familiar en Cuba [Primary Healthcare and Family Medicine in Cuba], in 2014. The purpose of the study is to characterize the healthcare units and services provided by the Cuban National Healthcare System (SNS and to reflect on this experience/immersion, particularly on Cuba’s Primary Healthcare Service. The results found that in comparison with Brazil’s Single Healthcare System (SUS Cuba’s SNS Family Healthcare (SF service is the central organizing element of the Primary Healthcare Service. The number of SF teams per inhabitant is different than in Brazil; the programs given priority in the APS are similar to those in Brazil and the intersectorial nature and scope of the services prove to be effective in the resolution of healthcare problems.

  14. Uterine/Endometrial Cancer: Working with Your Treatment Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... healthcare professionals. These people make up your treatment team. They will work with each other and with you to provide the special care you need. Your treatment team may include some of the healthcare professionals listed ...

  15. Sharing atrocity stories in hospice: A study of niceness message strategies in interdisciplinary team meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Cunningham, Cody P

    2011-07-01

    The telling of atrocity stories offers therapeutic benefits to healthcare providers. Transcripts of hospice interdisciplinary team (IDT) meetings were used to analyze strategies for telling atrocity stories in the performance of symbiotic niceness through criticism. Symbiotic niceness draws upon niceness messages to establish reciprocal niceness by others in order to facilitate emotional labor. In IDT meetings the two predominant strategy types used were indirect and direct criticism. Nurses and medical directors engaged in niceness message strategies mostly about patients and other healthcare professionals. The study concludes that hospice IDT meetings are a venue for team members to communicate symbiotic niceness through emotional labor.

  16. Human factors in healthcare level one

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenorn-Lanng, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    The majority of errors, litigation, and complaints in the health service are due to 'human factors', yet the term is still not widely understood and is sometimes used interchangeably to refer to team training or communication skills. Although including these, the subject of 'human factors' goes far beyond this to look at systems, environmental influences, and interactions with equipment, in addition to self-awareness and human interaction. All of these aspects are captured inHuman Factors in Healthcare and are built into a new framework: the SHEEP model, which breaks down into five key areas:

  17. 医疗失效模式与效应分析在援塞抗疫医疗队员风险管理中的应用%Application of healthcare failure mode and effects analysis system in risk control of anti-Ebola for ;healthcare workers of Chinese Medical Team in Sierra Leone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立; 沙莉

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the application effects of the healthcare failure mode and effects analysis ( HFMEA) system on reducing infection risks of EVD for healthcare workers ( from Suzhou) in Chinese Medical Team in Sierra Leone. Methods Based on the requirement to use HFMEA system, the EVD exposure risks management team was set up to analyze the failure mode and causes of potential risks of EVD exposure, to calculate the Risk Priority Number ( RPN ) , and to take measures to solve priority issues. Results After administration of HFMEA, number of healthcare workers qualified for hand hygiene compliance, personal protective equipment ( PPE) donning and doffing, and epidemiological knowledge mastery was higher, compared to the number before HFMEA administration (χ2 =39. 30,47. 70;P<0. 01). During the two months in Sierra Leone and the 21-day medical observation period, none was infected with EVD. Positive assessment was given by 87. 0% of the healthcare workers. Conclusions Usage of HFMEA to evaluate RPN risks for healthcare workers in Chinese Medical Team, focuses on infection control management, revision and improvement of work processes and contingency plans, and assists team members to adapt to new circumstance, which can reduce the risks of EVD exposure for healthcare workers of Chinese Medical Team.%目的:探讨医疗失效模式与效应分析( HFMEA)在降低中国(江苏)援塞抗疫医疗队员感染埃博拉病毒病风险的应用效果。方法应用HFMEA的方法,成立埃博拉风险管理小组,针对有可能感染埃博拉病毒病的风险进行失效模式及潜在风险原因分析,计算优先风险指数( RPN),对需优先解决的问题进行措施改进。结果实施HFMEA管理后,手卫生依从率97.8%、个人防护装备穿脱正确率100%、埃博拉流行病学知识掌握率91.3%,均高于 HFMEA管理前,差异有统计学意义(χ2值分别为39.30,47.70;P<0.01);在援塞2个月期间及结束后直至医疗队员21 d医学

  18. An educational program to promote positive communication and collaboration between nurses and medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Ruth G; Hayes, RoseMarie; Stuart, Wendy; Cassel, Asenath; Farrell, Cheryl; Miller-Reyes, Sharmin; Donaldson, Audeanne

    2011-01-01

    An educational program was implemented for nurses and medical residents to improve communication and collaboration. It has been noted that communication and collaboration between members of the healthcare team improve patient outcomes and job satisfaction among nurses. In this article, the program is outlined and outcomes are presented.

  19. Overcoming barriers to diabetes care: Perceived communication issues of healthcare professionals attending a pilot Diabetes UK training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosely, Kylie; Aslam, Aysha; Speight, Jane

    2010-02-01

    As part of our evaluation of the Diabetes UK Careline workshop "Overcoming barriers to diabetes care", we received feedback from 18 healthcare professionals. Generally, they felt competent in identifying patients' psychosocial issues but less knowledgeable/skilled in handling them. Lack of time, privacy and support were barriers to addressing patients' psychosocial concerns. 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Skill mix, roles and remuneration in the primary care workforce: who are the healthcare professionals in the primary care teams across the world?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, T.; Everett, C.; Griffiths, P.; Hudon, C.; Naccarella, L.; Laurant, M.G.H.

    2015-01-01

    World-wide, shortages of primary care physicians and an increased demand for services have provided the impetus for delivering team-based primary care. The diversity of the primary care workforce is increasing to include a wider range of health professionals such as nurse practitioners, registered

  1. Skill mix, roles and remuneration in the primary care workforce: who are the healthcare professionals in the primary care teams across the world?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, T.; Everett, C.; Griffiths, P.; Hudon, C.; Naccarella, L.; Laurant, M.G.H.

    2015-01-01

    World-wide, shortages of primary care physicians and an increased demand for services have provided the impetus for delivering team-based primary care. The diversity of the primary care workforce is increasing to include a wider range of health professionals such as nurse practitioners, registered n

  2. Team training/simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Erin A S; Fisher, Janet; Arafeh, Julia; Druzin, Maurice

    2010-03-01

    Obstetrical emergencies require the rapid formation of a team with clear communication, strong leadership, and appropriate decision-making to ensure a positive patient outcome. Obstetric teams can improve their emergency response capability and efficiency through team and simulation training. Postpartum hemorrhage is an ideal model for team and simulation training, as postpartum hemorrhage requires a multidisciplinary team with the capability to produce a protocol-driven, rapid response. This article provides an overview of team and simulation training and focuses on applications within obstetrics, particularly preparation for postpartum hemorrhage.

  3. Information and communication on risks related to medications and proper use of medications for healthcare professionals and the general public: precautionary principle, risk management, communication during and in the absence of crisis situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molimard, Mathieu; Bernaud, Corine; Lechat, Philippe; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Benattia, Cherif; Benkritly, Amel; Braunstein, David; Cabut, Sandrine; David, Nadine; Fourrier-Réglat, Annie; Gallet, Benoit; Gersberg, Marta; Goni, Sylvia; Jolliet, Pascale; Lamarque-Garnier, Véronique; Le Jeunne, Claire; Leurs, Irina; Liard, François; Malbezin, Muriel; Micallef, Joelle; Nguon, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Recent drug crises have highlighted the complexity, benefits and risks of medication communication. The difficulty of this communication is due to the diversity of the sources of information and the target audience, the credibility of spokespersons, the difficulty to communicate on scientific uncertainties and the precautionary principle, which is influenced by variable perceptions and tolerances of the risk. Globally, there is a lack of training in risk management with a tendency of modern society to refuse even the slightest risk. Communication on medications is subject to regulatory or legal requirements, often uses tools and messages that are not adapted to the target audience and is often based on a poor knowledge of communication techniques. In order to improve this situation, the available information must be coordinated by reinforcing the unique medication information website and by coordinating communication between authorities by means of a single spokesperson. A particular effort must be made in the field of training in the proper use and risk of medications for both the general population and patients but also for healthcare professionals, by setting up a unified academic on-line teaching platform for continuing medical education on medications and their proper use.

  4. Development and reliability of the explicit professional oral communication observation tool to quantify the use of non-technical skills in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Peter F; van Noord, Inge; de Bruijne, Martine; Knol, Dirk L; Wagner, Cordula; van Dyck, Cathy

    2013-07-01

    A lack of non-technical skills is increasingly recognised as an important underlying cause of adverse events in healthcare. The nature and number of things professionals communicate to each other can be perceived as a product of their use of non-technical skills. This paper describes the development and reliability of an instrument to measure and quantify the use of non-technical skills by direct observations of explicit professional oral communication (EPOC) in the clinical situation. In an iterative process we translated, tested and refined an existing checklist from the aviation industry, called self, human interaction, aircraft, procedures and environment, in the context of healthcare, notably emergency departments (ED) and intensive care units (ICU). The EPOC comprises six dimensions: assertiveness, working with others; task-oriented leadership; people-oriented leadership; situational awareness; planning and anticipation. Each dimension is specified into several concrete items reflecting verbal behaviours. The EPOC was evaluated in four ED and six ICU. In the ED and ICU, respectively, 378 and 1144 individual and 51 and 68 contemporaneous observations of individual staff members were conducted. All EPOC dimensions occur frequently, apart from assertiveness, which was hardly observed. Intraclass correlations for the overall EPOC score ranged between 0.85 and 0.91 and for underlying EPOC dimensions between 0.53 and 0.95. The EPOC is a new instrument for evaluating the use of non-technical skills in healthcare, which is reliable in two highly different settings. By quantifying professional behaviour the instrument facilitates measurement of behavioural change over time. The results suggest that EPOC can also be translated to other settings.

  5. Interoperative fundus image and report sharing in compliance with integrating the healthcare enterprise conformance and web access todigital imaging and communication in medicinepersistent object protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Qun Wu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To address issues in interoperability between different fundus image systems, we proposed a web eye-picture archiving and communication system (PACS framework in conformance with digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM and health level 7 (HL7 protocol to realize fundus images and reports sharing and communication through internet.METHODS: Firstly, a telemedicine-based eye care work flow was established based on integrating the healthcare enterprise (IHE Eye Care technical framework. Then, a browser/server architecture eye-PACS system was established in conformance with the web access to DICOM persistent object (WADO protocol, which contains three tiers.RESULTS:In any client system installed with web browser, clinicians could log in the eye-PACS to observe fundus images and reports. Multipurpose internet mail extensions (MIME type of a structured report is saved as pdf/html with reference link to relevant fundus image using the WADO syntax could provide enough information for clinicians. Some functions provided by open-source Oviyam could be used to query, zoom, move, measure, view DICOM fundus images.CONCLUSION:Such web eye-PACS in compliance to WADO protocol could be used to store and communicate fundus images and reports, therefore is of great significance for teleophthalmology.

  6. All hands--or eyes or ears--on deck: when it comes to CE and team communication, it's different strokes for folks from different generations. Here's how to make your CE sessions effective for different learning styles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoekstra, Helen; Tumblin, Denise

    2009-01-01

    ... in the workplace (see "Today's generations" on page 46) live and interact differently, communication challenges pop up and affect how the team works together. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Keeping these generational differences in mind is important when you're planning team CE sessions. Not only does everyone in your practice represent a different generation, everyon...

  7. Public Healthcare Organizations: Leadership or Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Martínez-Gonzalez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the type of leadership that managers are currently exercising in the Catalan health system in Catalonia. A questionnaire (MQL-5X was sent to 120 people occupying management positions in healthcare centers and hospitals as well as 14 others who also hold such positions in these healthcare centers and hospitals, were interviewed. The mixed methods research design attests that the Catalan health system is managed through a structure of simultaneous transformational and transactional leadership. However, the efficacy of this system is conditioned purely by the communicative competence that a manager may or may not possess, as the system itself makes no effort to encourage transformational leadership. Transformation leadership inspires positive change, conveys a clear vision and enhances morale, motivation and job performance. It galvanizes a team into changing their expectations and perceptions and motivates them to work towards common goals.

  8. Fostering better policy adoption and inter-disciplinary communication in healthcare: A qualitative analysis of practicing physicians’ common interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Collins, Jeremy D.; Chrisman, Howard B.; Milad, Magdy P.; Vogelzang, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In response to limited physician adoption of various healthcare initiatives, we sought to propose and assess a novel approach to policy development where one first characterizes diverse physician groups’ common interests, using a medical student and constructivist grounded theory. Methods In 6 months, a medical student completed 36 semi-structured interviews with interventional radiologists, gynecologists, and vascular surgeons that were systematically analyzed according to constructivist grounded theory to identifying common themes. Common drivers of clinical decision making and professional values across 3 distinct specialty groups were derived from physicians’ descriptions of their clinical decision making, stories, and concerns. Results Common drivers of clinical decision making included patient preference/benefit, experience, reimbursement, busyness/volume, and referral networks. Common values included honesty, trustworthiness, loyalty, humble service, compassion and perseverance, and practical wisdom. Although personal gains were perceived as important interests, such values were easily sacrificed for the good of patients or other non-financial interests. This balance was largely dependent on the incentives and security provided by physicians’ environments. Conclusions Using a medical student interviewer and constructivist grounded theory is a feasible means of collecting rich qualitative data to guide policy development. Healthcare administrators and medical educators should consider incorporating this methodology early in policy development to anticipate how value differences between physician groups will influence their acceptance of policies and other broad healthcare initiatives. PMID:28235088

  9. Relationship between implementing interpersonal communication and mass education campaigns in emergency settings and use of reproductive healthcare services: evidence from Darfur, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Izzeldin Fadl; Nakamura, Keiko; Kizuki, Masashi; Al Rifai, Rami; Vanching, Urnaa

    2015-09-15

    (1) To examine changes in women's awareness and utilisation of reproductive healthcare services in emergency settings following provision of interpersonal communication (IPC) and mass education campaigns, and (2) to describe factors associated with reproductive healthcare service use in internally displaced person (IDP) camps. Three camps containing 88 984 IDPs in Darfur, Sudan. 640 women aged 15-49 who had experienced pregnancy in the camp during the previous 2 years were enrolled in each of two independent cross-sectional surveys 26 months apart. IPC and mass education campaigns where community health workers disseminated information by home/shelter visits, clinic sessions, public meetings and other means to raise awareness and promote reproductive healthcare service use. Awareness of the existence of antenatal care (ANC) and tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccination services, reception of ANC and TT vaccination, place of delivery and use of postnatal care (PNC). The percentage of women who received home visits, and attended in-clinic sessions and public meetings increased from 61.6% to 86.7%, from 43.0% to 68.8%, and from 3.8% to 39.8%, respectively, between the initial and follow-up surveys. More women were aware of ANC (OR 18.6, 95% CI 13.1 to 26.5) and TT vaccination (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.4 to 4.4) in the follow-up than the initial survey, after multivariable adjustment. More women received ≥3 ANC visits (OR 8.8, 95% CI 6.4 to 12.0) and ≥3 doses of TT (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.9 to 3.3), delivered at a healthcare facility (OR 5.4, 95% CI 4.0 to 7.4) and received a PNC visit (OR 5.5, 95% CI 4.0 to 7.7) in the follow-up than in the initial survey, after multivariable adjustment. Awareness about and utilisation of reproductive healthcare services were higher in the follow-up survey. An integrated IPC and mass education campaign is effective for improving women's reproductive health in emergency settings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Psychosocial Intervention for Children and Teenagers Experiencing Diabetes (DEPICTED: a protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of a communication skills training programme for healthcare professionals working with young people with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowes Lesley

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is the third most common chronic condition in childhood and poor glycaemic control leads to serious short-term and life-limiting long-term complications. In addition to optimal medical management, it is widely recognised that psychosocial and educational factors play a key role in improving outcomes for young people with diabetes. Recent systematic reviews of psycho-educational interventions recognise the need for new methods to be developed in consultation with key stakeholders including patients, their families and the multidisciplinary diabetes healthcare team. Methods/design Following a development phase involving key stakeholders, a psychosocial intervention for use by paediatric diabetes staff and not requiring input from trained psychologists has been developed, incorporating a communication skills training programme for health professionals and a shared agenda-setting tool. The effectiveness of the intervention will be evaluated in a cluster-randomised controlled trial (RCT. The primary outcome, to be measured in children aged 4-15 years diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for at least one year, is the effect on glycaemic control (HbA1c during the year after training of the healthcare team is completed. Secondary outcomes include quality of life for patients and carers and cost-effectiveness. Patient and carer preferences for service delivery will also be assessed. Twenty-six paediatric diabetes teams are participating in the trial, recruiting a total of 700 patients for evaluation of outcome measures. Half the participating teams will be randomised to receive the intervention at the beginning of the trial and remaining centres offered the training package at the end of the one year trial period. Discussion The primary aim of the trial is to determine whether a communication skills training intervention for specialist paediatric diabetes teams will improve clinical and psychological outcomes for young people with

  11. A Project Team: a Team or Just a Group?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with issues related to work in either teams or groups. The theoretical part discusses a team and a group with regards to its definition, classification and basic distinction, brings in more on the typology of team roles, personality assessment and sociometric methods. The analytical part tests the project (work team of a medical center represented in terms of personality and motivational types, team roles and interpersonal team relations concerning the willingness of cooperation and communication. The main objective of this work is to verify the validity of the assumptions that the analyzed team represents a very disparate group as for its composition from the perspective of personality types, types of motivation, team roles and interpersonal relations in terms of the willingness of cooperation and communication. A separate output shall focus on sociometric investigation of those team members where willingness to work together and communicate is based on the authors’ assumption of tight interdependence.

  12. Rural veteran access to healthcare services: investigating the role of information and communication technologies in overcoming spatial barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooley, Benjamin L; Horan, Thomas A; Lee, Pamela W; West, Priscilla A

    2010-04-01

    This multimethod pilot study examined patient and practitioner perspectives on the influence of spatial barriers to healthcare access and the role of health information technology in overcoming these barriers. The study included a survey administered to patients attending a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health visit, and a focus group with VA care providers. Descriptive results and focus group findings are presented. Spatial distance is a significant factor for many rural veterans when seeking healthcare. For this sample of rural veterans, a range of telephone, computer, and Internet technologies may become more important for accessing care as Internet access becomes more ubiquitous and as younger veterans begin using the VA health system. The focus group highlighted the negative impact of distance, economic considerations, geographic barriers, and specific medical conditions on access to care. Lack of adequate technology infrastructure was seen as an obstacle to utilization. This study discusses the need to consider distance, travel modes, age, and information technology infrastructure and adoption when designing health information technology to care for rural patients.

  13. Transforming Virtual Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille

    2005-01-01

    Investigating virtual team collaboration in industry using grounded theory this paper presents the in-dept analysis of empirical work conducted in a global organization of 100.000 employees where a global virtual team with participants from Sweden, United Kingdom, Canada, and North America were...... studied. The research question investigated is how collaboration is negotiated within virtual teams? This paper presents findings concerning how collaboration is negotiated within a virtual team and elaborate the difficulties due to invisible articulation work and managing multiple communities...... in transforming the virtual team into a community. It is argued that translucence in communication structures within the virtual team and between team and management is essential for engaging in a positive transformation process of trustworthiness supporting the team becoming a community, managing the immanent...

  14. Body Area Networks for Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, V.M.; Bults, R.G.A.; Konstantas, D.; Vierhout, P.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The subject of this research proposal is the design and development of novel applications and services targeting 4G wireless technologies. In previous papers [1, 2] we presented a vision of two future healthcare applications which we call Virtual Trauma Team and Virtual Homecare Team. These are two

  15. Body Area Networks for Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Valerie M.; Bults, Richard G.A.; Konstantas, D.; Vierhout, P.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The subject of this research proposal is the design and development of novel applications and services targeting 4G wireless technologies. In previous papers [1, 2] we presented a vision of two future healthcare applications which we call Virtual Trauma Team and Virtual Homecare Team. These are two

  16. Teaching communication skills to hospice teams: comparing the effectiveness of a communication skills laboratory with in-person, second life, and phone role-playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Gillian; Ortega, Rosio; Hochstetler, Vicki; Pierson, Kristen; Lin, Peiyi; Lowes, Susan

    2014-09-01

    Communication skills are critical in hospice care but challenging to teach. Therefore, a hospice agency developed a communication skills laboratory for nurses and social workers. Learners role-played 3 common hospice scenarios. The role-play modalities were in-person, Second Life, and telephone. Learners were scored on 4 communication aspects. Learners in all modalities rated the laboratory as very effective. However, learners in the Second Life and phone modality showed greater improvements from scene 1 to 3 than those in the in-person modality. There were no significant differences in improvement between the Second Life and phone modalities. Results support the effectiveness of this communication skills laboratory while using different teaching modalities and show phone and Second Life role-plays were more effective than an in-person role-play. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Mutual benefit for foreign medical students and Chinese postgraduates: A mixed team-based learning method overcomes communication problems in hematology clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianling; Chen, Buyuan; Li, Xiaofan; Song, Qingxiao; Chen, Yuanzhong

    2017-03-04

    Hematology is difficult for students to learn. A beneficial education method for hematology clerkship training is required to help students develop clinical skills. Foreign medical students often encounter communication issues in China. To address this issue, Chinese post-graduates from our institute are willing to assist with educating foreign students. Therefore, we propose a mixed team-based learning method (MTBL) which might overcome communication problems in hematology clerkship. Twenty-two foreign medical Students attended a 2-week hematology clerkship in Fujian Medical University Union Hospital. Twenty-one foreign African medical students were assigned randomly into two groups. Fourteen foreign African medical students were assigned to MTBL group. Each MTBL team included two foreign African medical students and one Chinese post-graduate. Seven foreign African medical students were assigned to lecture-based learning method (LBL) group, which had a foreign medical classmate from Hong Kong or Chinese intern volunteers to serve as translators. The practice test scores of MTBL were significantly higher than LBL group (p problems in hematology clerkship. Foreign medical students and Chinese post-graduates alike can benefit from MTBL. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(2):93-96, 2017.

  18. [Toward the promotion of effective communication between medical doctors and medical technologists--strategy beyond the team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Miyuki; Koshiba, Masahiro

    2009-02-01

    It is essential to establish effective communication between medical doctors (MDs) and medical technologists (MTs), such as during telephone conversations, to ensure high quality and clinically significant laboratory test results. However, the level of communication between MDs and MTs is still inadequate in Japan. Suggested here in are resources to promote effective MD-MT communication through a case analysis of severe sepsis with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), since, even today, DIC remains life-threatening, and the rapid response of the clinical laboratory is critical. Recently, in our laboratory, a Customer Support Center has been launched to improve the information flow between MDs and MTs and support further mutual understanding. In conclusion, effective communication between MDs and MTs will result in faster and higher quality laboratory tests that are essential for efficient diagnosis and treatment, and thus ensure a better outcome for patients.

  19. Communication difficulties and strategies used by the nurses and their team in caring for the hearing impaired

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda da Rocha Britto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify communication difficulties faced by the nursing staff and to learn the strategies developed for non-oral communication. Methods: This is a descriptive, exploratory, level I study with a quantitative approach. The sample group comprised 37 registered nurses and 63 licensed practical nurses of a private hospital who, after undergoing the ethical-legal procedures, answered a questionnaire to identify difficulties faced and strategies used in the care for hearing-impaired patients. Results: Difficulty in explaining matters of interest to the patient was reported by 66% of professionals; and 32% reported difficulties in understanding patients in their way of communicate. The strategy adopted by 100% of respondents was mimicry, followed by lip reading, used by 94% of respondents; help from a person accompanying the patient was used by 65%, and written communication by 42% of respondents. Only 1% used communication via the Brazilian Sign Language (LIBRAS. Conclusions: The difficulties found and the strategies adopted by the nursing staff in communicating with hearing-impaired patients justify the need to train these professionals to deliver a more humanized care, developing a more inclusive society for those with special needs.

  20. Risk of Performance and Behavioral Health Decrements Due to Inadequate Cooperation, Coordination, Communication, and Psychosocial Adaptation within a Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Lauren Blackwell; Vessey, William B.; Barrett, Jamie D.

    2015-01-01

    A team is defined as: "two or more individuals who interact socially and adaptively, have shared or common goals, and hold meaningful task interdependences; it is hierarchically structured and has a limited life span; in it expertise and roles are distributed; and it is embedded within an organization/environmental context that influences and is influenced by ongoing processes and performance outcomes" (Salas, Stagl, Burke, & Goodwin, 2007, p. 189). From the NASA perspective, a team is commonly understood to be a collection of individuals that is assigned to support and achieve a particular mission. Thus, depending on context, this definition can encompass both the spaceflight crew and the individuals and teams in the larger multi-team system who are assigned to support that crew during a mission. The Team Risk outcomes of interest are predominantly performance related, with a secondary emphasis on long-term health; this is somewhat unique in the NASA HRP in that most Risk areas are medically related and primarily focused on long-term health consequences. In many operational environments (e.g., aviation), performance is assessed as the avoidance of errors. However, the research on performance errors is ambiguous. It implies that actions may be dichotomized into "correct" or "incorrect" responses, where incorrect responses or errors are always undesirable. Researchers have argued that this dichotomy is a harmful oversimplification, and it would be more productive to focus on the variability of human performance and how organizations can manage that variability (Hollnagel, Woods, & Leveson, 2006) (Category III1). Two problems occur when focusing on performance errors: 1) the errors are infrequent and, therefore, difficult to observe and record; and 2) the errors do not directly correspond to failure. Research reveals that humans are fairly adept at correcting or compensating for performance errors before such errors result in recognizable or recordable failures

  1. Leadership for Distributed Teams

    OpenAIRE

    De Rooij, J.P.G.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation was to study the little examined, yet important issue of leadership for distributed teams. Distributed teams are defined as: “teams of which members are geographically distributed and are therefore working predominantly via mediated communication means on an interdependent task and in realizing a joint goal” (adapted from Bell & Kozlowski, 2002 and Dubé & Paré, 2004). Chapter 1 first presents the outline of the dissertation. Next, several characteristics of distri...

  2. Assessing the impact of general practitioner team service on perceived quality of care among patients with non-communicable diseases in China: a natural experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jia; Wei, Xiaolin; Li, Haitao; Jiang, Yanling; Mao, Chunfang

    2016-10-01

    China issued the national primary care policy of promoting general practitioner (GP) team service in 2011. We conducted this study to assess the impact of the GP team service on quality of primary care as perceived by patients with non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Natural experimental study. This study was conducted in Shanghai, where the policy was effectively implemented, and Kunming, where the policy was not implemented. In both cities, NCD patients were interviewed with primary care assessment tool (PCAT) after their clinical consultations in their community health centers. The implementation of GP team service policy. Multiple linear regressions were employed to compare PCAT scores between the two rounds of the surveys in each city. Difference-in-difference (DID) analysis was used to identify the changes between two cities over time. A total of 663 and 587 patients in Shanghai, and 400 and 441 patients in Kunming were surveyed in 2011 and 2013, respectively. The DID analysis showed that the total primary care quality scores improved in Shanghai compared with Kunming between 2011 and 2013 (β = 1.30, 95% CI: 0.74, 1.87). In Shanghai, care quality in 2013 improved significantly for the total score and the six components when compared with those in 2011. No significant changes were observed in Kunming in the same period. Primary care policies that promote long-term provider-patient relationships, coordinated service with hospitals and capitation payment for the GP team may contribute to the improvement of care quality in Shanghai. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Delivering Coordinated Cancer Care by Building Transactive Memory in a Team of Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Elizabeth; Silva, Abigail; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Czerlanis, Cheryl; Bernard, Margie; Chauhan, Cynthia; Schalk, Denise; Stewart, Greg

    2016-11-01

    Cancer care delivery is highly complex. Treatment involves coordination within oncology health-care teams and across other teams of referring primary and specialty providers (a team of teams). Each team interfaces with patients and caregivers to offer component parts of comprehensive care. Because patients frequently obtain specialty care from divergent health-care systems resulting in cross-system health-care use, oncology teams need mechanisms to coordinate and collaborate within and across health-care systems to optimize clinical outcomes for all cancer patients. Transactive memory is one potential strategy that can help improve comprehensive patient care delivery. Transactive memory is a process by which two or more team professionals develop a shared system for encoding, storing, and retrieving information. Each professional is responsible for retaining only part of the total information. Applying this concept to a team of teams results in system benefits wherein all teams share an understanding of specialized knowledge held by each component team. The patient's role as the unifying member of the team of teams is central to successful treatment delivery. This clinical case presents a patient who is receiving oral treatment for advanced prostate cancer within two health systems. The case emphasizes the potential for error when multiple teams function without a point team (the team coordinating efforts of all other primary and specialty teams) and when the specialty knowledge of providers and patients is not well integrated into all phases of the care delivery process.

  4. Effect of obstetric team training on team performance and medical technical skills: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, A F; van de Ven, J; Merién, A E R; de Wit-Zuurendonk, L D; Houterman, S; Mol, B W; Oei, S G

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether obstetric team training in a medical simulation centre improves the team performance and utilisation of appropriate medical technical skills of healthcare professionals. Cluster randomised controlled trial. The Netherlands. The obstetric departments of 24 Dutch hospitals. The obstetric departments were randomly assigned to a 1-day session of multiprofessional team training in a medical simulation centre or to no such training. Team training was given with high-fidelity mannequins by an obstetrician and a communication expert. More than 6 months following training, two unannounced simulated scenarios were carried out in the delivery rooms of all 24 obstetric departments. The scenarios, comprising a case of shoulder dystocia and a case of amniotic fluid embolism, were videotaped. The team performance and utilisation of appropriate medical skills were evaluated by two independent experts. Team performance evaluated with the validated Clinical Teamwork Scale (CTS) and the employment of two specific obstetric procedures for the two clinical scenarios in the simulation (delivery of the baby with shoulder dystocia in the maternal all-fours position and conducting a perimortem caesarean section within 5 minutes for the scenario of amniotic fluid embolism). Seventy-four obstetric teams from 12 hospitals in the intervention group underwent teamwork training between November 2009 and July 2010. The teamwork performance in the training group was significantly better in comparison to the nontraining group (median CTS score: 7.5 versus 6.0, respectively; P = 0.014). The use of the predefined obstetric procedures for the two clinical scenarios was also significantly more frequent in the training group compared with the nontraining group (83 versus 46%, respectively; P = 0.009). Team performance and medical technical skills may be significantly improved after multiprofessional obstetric team training in a medical simulation centre. © 2012 The Authors BJOG An

  5. Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigafoos, J.; Lancioni, G.E.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lang, R.; Singh, N.N.; Didden, H.C.M.; Green, V.A.; Marschik, P.B.

    2016-01-01

    Communication disorders are common among people with intellectual disabilities. Consequently, enhancing the communication skills of such individuals is a major intervention priority. This chapter reviews the nature and prevalence of the speech, language, and communication problems associated with

  6. The Effectiveness of an Educational Brochure as a Risk Minimization Activity to Communicate Important Rare Adverse Events to Health-Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bester, Nicolette; Di Vito-Smith, Michelle; McGarry, Theresa; Riffkin, Michael; Kaehler, Stefan; Pilot, Richard; Bwire, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Educational brochures are an important tool for communicating risk to health-care professionals. It is important to evaluate the impact of any risk minimization tool to understand the effectiveness of the strategy. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness (i.e., respondents' awareness and understanding of the communication) of a targeted educational brochure distributed to health-care professionals (HCPs) as a risk minimization strategy for the communication of new rare and important adverse events (AEs). A prospective, non-interventional, online survey was performed following distribution of a specifically designed brochure highlighting new and important adverse events to a targeted HCP population, consisting of known users of the target medicine, as represented by a commercial database. Predefined multiple-choice survey questions assessed overall HCP awareness of the brochure and understanding and retention of information in those HCPs who reported receiving the brochure. The educational brochure was sent to a total of 565 HCPs; 121 (21.4%) responded to the survey. The majority of respondents (95.0%) had previously prescribed or dispensed the target medicine. In all, 88 (72.7%) respondents said they had received the educational brochure, of whom 95.5% stated they had at least scanned the main points. More participants who had received the brochure (86.4% to 96.6%) answered the five individual survey questions correctly compared with those who did not (51.5% to 97.0%); this was significant for four out of five questions (P ≤ 0.005). Significantly more HCPs who received the brochure achieved the predefined pass rate (at least four of five questions answered correctly) compared with HCPs who did not receive the brochure (93.2% vs 57.6%, respectively; P = 0.000003). Distribution of targeted educational brochures may be an effective risk minimization strategy to raise HCP awareness of new rare and important AEs; educational brochures may also be

  7. Process Variables Critical for Team Effectiveness: A Delphi Study of Wraparound Team Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Janetta L.; Monda-Amaya, Lisa E.

    2001-01-01

    Wraparound team members (n=20) identified as teaming experts rated 109 items that support team effectiveness across six categories: team goals, member roles and membership, communication, cohesion, logistics, and outcomes. Items in the team outcomes, goals, and cohesion categories were ranked most critical to team effectiveness. (Contains…

  8. Making the future of healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Muir

    2008-01-01

    Our healthcare services face radical changes. We are in the middle of the "third healthcare revolution", driven by patients, information technology, and knowledge. Attitudes are changing with a revolution called "consumerism", characterized by expectations for better healthcare and more transparent decision-making. As knowledge-based authority becomes increasingly important, knowledge management will be a major responsibility of healthcare management in the 21st century, and the ongoing information technology revolution will enable efficient knowledge communication to clinicians and patients. As professionals usually lag 1-2 decades behind the "Zeitgeist", the challenge is to adapt to the revolution and help shape the healthcare services of the future.

  9. Collaboration and entanglement: An actor-network theory analysis of team-based intraprofessional care for patients with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, A; Goldszmidt, M; Kinsella, E A; Smith, S; Lingard, L

    2016-09-01

    Despite calls for more interprofessional and intraprofessional team-based approaches in healthcare, we lack sufficient understanding of how this happens in the context of patient care teams. This multi-perspective, team-based interview study examined how medical teams negotiated collaborative tensions. From 2011 to 2013, 50 patients across five sites in three Canadian provinces were interviewed about their care experiences and were asked to identify members of their health care teams. Patient-identified team members were subsequently interviewed to form 50 "Team Sampling Units" (TSUs), consisting of 209 interviews with patients, caregivers and healthcare providers. Results are gathered from a focused analysis of 13 TSUs where intraprofessional collaborative tensions involved treating fluid overload, or edema, a common HF symptom. Drawing on actor-network theory (ANT), the analysis focused on intraprofessional collaboration between specialty care teams in cardiology and nephrology. The study found that despite a shared narrative of common purpose between cardiology teams and nephrology teams, fluid management tools and techniques formed sites of collaborative tension. In particular, care activities involved asynchronous clinical interpretations, geographically distributed specialist care, fragmented forms of communication, and uncertainty due to clinical complexity. Teams 'disentangled' fluid in order to focus on its physiological function and mobilisation. Teams also used distinct 'framings' of fluid management that created perceived collaborative tensions. This study advances collaborative entanglement as a conceptual framework for understanding, teaching, and potentially ameliorating some of the tensions that manifest during intraprofessional care for patients with complex, chronic disease.

  10. Integrating Emerging Topics through Online Team Design in a Hybrid Communication Networks Course: Interaction Patterns and Impact of Prior Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisslein, Jana; Seeling, Patrick; Reisslein, Martin

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge in the introductory communication networks course in electrical and computer engineering curricula is to integrate emerging topics, such as wireless Internet access and network security, into the already content-intensive course. At the same time it is essential to provide students with experiences in online collaboration,…

  11. Effects of Visual Communication Tool and Separable Status Display on Team Performance and Subjective Workload in Air Battle Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    respect or capacity”; Peirce, 1931) as part of meaningful semiotic ‘sign systems’. According to semiotics , meaningful communication can be transmitted...agents can share relevant knowledge (Flach & Bennett, 1996; Schwartz, Flach, Nelson, & Stokes, 2007). According to semiotics , both visual and

  12. CAUSES FOR INEFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION BETWEEN MEDICAL SPECIALISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stayko I. Spiridonov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the resent years the healthcare system has moved to inter-professional, cross-disciplinary, multi-person approach where the communications are very important for ensuring patient safety. Communication in health organisations needs to be studied and analysed deeply and comprehensively because the future of an organisation often depends on good communication. The purpose of this study is to investigate and analyse the reasons for ineffective communication between medical specialists in the teams they work in. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire method is used. Through a survey over a period of 12 months (from 01. 12. 2014 to 01. 12. 2015 at the Escullap Hospital in Pazardzhik, DCC 18 - Sofia, St. Mina Hospital in Plovdiv, MHAT – Plovdiv, DCC 1 in Haskovo, UMHAT in Stara Zagora, DCC 3 in Varna and MHAT – Parvomay, was studied and analyzed the opinion of medical specialists on the effectiveness of communication within the team they work in. The survey includes 477 medical specialists. Results and conclusions: According to 41.1% of the respondents, the communication in the team they work in is insufficiently effective. Most of the respondents (39.8% find their colleagues responsible for the ineffective communication, followed by those who seek the cause for poor communication in the management of the health care facility (27.6%. The leading cause of poor communication in the team according to the study participants is the inequality between the characters of the colleagues (41.9%. According to the majority of respondents (28.3%, improvements in facilities and wage increases (27.3% would be essential to improve communication within the team they work in. Recommendations have been formulated to improve communication among medical specialists.

  13. Team-based learning increases active engagement and enhances development of teamwork and communication skills in a first-year course for veterinary and animal science undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Susan J; Heberle, Nicole; McEwen, Margaret-Mary; Adams, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) was implemented into a first-year course (Principles in Animal Behaviour, Welfare and Ethics) for BSc Veterinary Bioscience (VB) and Animal Science (AS) students. TBL is now used widely in teaching medical students, but has had more limited uptake in veterinary education. This study reports its use over 2 years with cohorts of 126 and 138 students in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Average individual marks for multiple-choice question (MCQ) tests in the Readiness Assurance component of TBL were higher for the teams than for individuals for each session, explicitly demonstrating the advantages of teamwork. Students reported that they felt actively involved and that TBL helped them both with their learning and in developing other important skills, such as teamwork and communication. Qualitative analysis of written feedback from the students revealed positive themes of discussion, application, revelation, socializing, engagement, clarification, and retention/revision. In 2011 negative comments included the need to shorten the TBL sessions, but in 2012 tightening of the timelines meant that this was no longer a major concern. Requests to provide better introductory and background materials and ambiguity in questions in the TBL activities were what students least liked about the TBL. However, most comments were positive rather than negative in nature, and many students preferred the TBL to lectures. With requirements for curricula to teach professional skills, such as communication and teamwork, and the positive results from TBL's implementation, it is hoped that this study will encourage others to trial the use of TBL in veterinary education.

  14. Me, Myself, My Team How to be an effective team player using NLP

    CERN Document Server

    McLeod, Angus

    2006-01-01

    Me, Myself, My Team brings you effective strategies to improve your team's communication and motivation, discover new perceptions and begin new courses of action. Full of practical ideas, this exceptional book demonstrates how team playing achieves the best results.

  15. Multidisciplinary team of intensive therapy: humanization and fragmentation of the work process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Viviane Canhizares; Domingos, Thiago da Silva; Siqueira, Fernanda Paula Cerântola; Braga, Eliana Mara

    2016-01-01

    to understand the meaning of humanized care in intensive care units considering the experience of the multidisciplinary team. descriptive and exploratory qualitative research. For this purpose, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 professionals of the heath-care team, and, after transcription, we organized the qualitative data according to content analysis. from two main categories, we were able to understand that humanized care is characterized in the actions of health-care: effective communication, team work, empathy, singularity, and integrality; and mischaracterized in the management processes, specifically in the fragmentation of the work process and health-care, in the precarious work conditions, and in differing conceptual aspects of the political proposal of humanization. care activities in intensive therapy are guided by the humanization of care and corroborate the hospital management as a challenge to be overcome to boost advances in the operationalization of this Brazilian policy.

  16. Communication and integration: a qualitative analysis of perspectives among Middle Eastern oncology healthcare professionals on the integration of complementary medicine in supportive cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Popper-Giveon, Ariela; Samuels, Noah; Mutafoglu, Kamer; Schiff, Elad; Omran, Suha; Charalambous, Haris; Dweikat, Tahani; Ghrayeb, Ibtisam; Turker, Ibrahim; Hassan, Azza; Hassan, Esmat; Nimri, Omar; Kebudi, Rejin; Silbermann, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The use of complementary and traditional medicine (CTM ) in Middle Eastern countries is widespread, including among patients with cancer. Perspectives of oncology healthcare professionals (HCPs) in this region regarding the integration of CTM within conventional supportive cancer care were explored. An 11-item questionnaire with an open-ended question asking respondents to comment about the integration of CTM within supportive cancer care was sent to Middle Eastern oncology HCPs, using snowball sampling methodology. The narratives provided were examined using thematic analysis. A total of 339 oncology HCPs completed and returned the study tool (80.3 % response rate ), of which 178 from 15 Middle Eastern countries responded to the open-ended question. The majority of respondents are in favor of the integration of CTM within supportive cancer care, though ideas on how this should be implemented varied. Thematic analysis identified multifactorial barriers to integration, which focused on HCPs' perspectives (e.g., a lack of knowledge and training; a skeptical approach to CTM), attitudes of patients and caregivers (e.g., unrealistic expectations regarding the outcomes of CTM treatments) and HCP-patient communication. In order to overcome these barriers, respondents suggested education and training programs for oncology HCPs which would focus on improving patients' quality-of-life-related outcomes. Middle Eastern oncology HCPs support the integration of CTM within supportive cancer care, while recognizing the need for education and training in this field. A better understanding of CTM would provide the knowledge and skills which would promote a non-judgmental, evidence-based approach, fostering better communication with patients.

  17. Union for International Cancer Control International Session: healthcare economics: the significance of the UN Summit non-communicable diseases political declaration in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Kawahara, Norie; Masui, Tohru; Takeyama, Kunihiko; Nogimori, Masafumi; Roh, Jae Kyung

    2013-06-01

    The Japan National Committee for the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) and UICC-Asia Regional Office (ARO) organized an international session as part of the official program of the 71st Annual Meeting of the Japanese Cancer Association to discuss the topic "Healthcare Economics: The Significance of the UN Summit non-communicable diseases (NCDs) Political Declaration in Asia." The presenters and participants discussed the growing cost of cancer in the Asian region and the challenges that are faced by the countries of Asia, all of which face budgetary and other systemic constraints in tackling and controlling cancer in the region. The session benefited from the participation of various stakeholders, including cancer researchers and representatives of the pharmaceutical industry. They discussed the significance of the UN Political Declaration on the prevention and control of NCDs (2011) as a means of boosting awareness of cancer in the Asian region and also addressed the ways in which stakeholders can cooperate to improve cancer control and treatment. Other issues that were covered included challenges relating to pharmaceutical trials in Asia and how to link knowledge and research outcomes. The session concluded with the recognition that with the onset of a super-aged society in most countries in Asia and an increasing focus on quality of life rather than quantity of life, it is more important than ever for all stakeholders to continue to share information and promote policy dialogue on cancer control and treatment.

  18. Relationship of Risk Perception and Entrepreneurial Decision-making of Entrepreneurial Team---Based on the Analysis of Team Communication Intermediary Role%创业团队风险感知与创业决策关系研究--基于团队沟通的中介作用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡桂兰

    2014-01-01

    The relationship of risk perception, team communication and entrepreneurial decision-making of entrepreneurial team is discussed in this paper, and the corresponding research model is constructed. Through using empirical research methods, selecting the entrepreneurial team of Hubei and Jiangsu provinces as the main object of study, regression analysis for data collecting from 269 entrepreneurial team members are made, the findings are risk perception and team communication has significant positive effect on the efficiency and degree of recognition of entrepreneurial decision-making, and risk perception also has significant positive effect on team communication. Finally, another conclusion is got that is team communication plays an intermediate active between risk perception and entrepreneurial decision-making.%文章探讨了创业团队的风险感知、团队沟通与创业决策之间的关系,构建了相应的研究模型,采用实证研究方法,以湖北、江苏两省的创业团队为主要研究对象,通过采用多元线性回归方法对269名创业团队成员的调研数据进行分析,结果表明风险感知与团队沟通对创业决策制定的高效性与认同度等均具有显著的正向影响作用,风险感知对团队沟通也具有显著的正向影响作用,团队沟通在风险感知与创业决策之间具有中介作用。

  19. Team Cognition As a Means to Improve Care Delivery in Critically Ill Patients With Cancer After Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeese, Nathan J; Khera, Nandita; Wordingham, Sara E; Arring, Noel; Nyquist, Sharon; Gentry, Amy; Tomlinson, Brian; Cooke, Nancy J; Sen, Ayan

    2016-11-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an important and complex treatment modality for a variety of hematologic malignancies and some solid tumors. Although outcomes of patients who have undergone HCT and require care in intensive care units (ICUs) have improved over time, mortality rates remain high and there are significant associated costs. Lack of a team-based approach to care, especially during critical illness, is detrimental to patient autonomy and satisfaction, and to team morale, ultimately leading to poor quality of care. In this manuscript, we describe the case of a patient who had undergone HCT and was in the ICU setting, where inconsistent team interaction among the various stakeholders delivering care resulted in a lack of shared goals and poor outcomes. Team cognition is cognitive processing at the team level through interactions among team members and is reflected in dynamic communication and coordination behaviors. Although the patient received multidisciplinary care as needed in a medically complicated case, a lack of team cognition and, particularly, inconsistent communication among the dynamic teams caring for the patient, led to mixed messages being delivered with high-cost implications for the health-care system and the family. This article highlights concepts and recommendations that begin a necessary in-depth assessment of implications for clinical care and initiate a research agenda that examines the effects of team cognition on HCT teams, and, more generally, critical care of the patient with cancer.

  20. Facilitating Team Learning through Transformational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Elisabeth; Decuyper, Stefan; Lismont, Bart; Van den Bossche, Piet; Kyndt, Eva; Demeyere, Sybille; Dochy, Filip

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates when and how teams engage in team learning behaviours (TLB). More specifically, it looks into how different leadership styles facilitate TLB by influencing the social conditions that proceed them. 498 healthcare workers from 28 nursery teams filled out a questionnaire measuring the concepts leadership style, TLB, social…

  1. Facilitating Team Learning through Transformational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Elisabeth; Decuyper, Stefan; Lismont, Bart; Van den Bossche, Piet; Kyndt, Eva; Demeyere, Sybille; Dochy, Filip

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates when and how teams engage in team learning behaviours (TLB). More specifically, it looks into how different leadership styles facilitate TLB by influencing the social conditions that proceed them. 498 healthcare workers from 28 nursery teams filled out a questionnaire measuring the concepts leadership style, TLB, social…

  2. Team Interactions in Specialized Palliative Care Teams: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Klarare, Anna; Hagelin, Carina Lundh; Fürst, Carl Johan; Fossum, Bjoorn

    2013-01-01

    Background: Teamwork is a standard of care in palliative care and that is emphasized by leading organizations. When interdisciplinary teams communicate their varied assessments, outcomes may be more than additive due to the synthesis of information. Interprofessionality does not guarantee multidimensionality in health care interventions, however, and that interprofessional teams promote collaboration may be questioned. Aim: The aim was to explore team interaction among team members in special...

  3. Healthcare and Listening: A Relationship for Caring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Janis; Foley, Amy; Crigger, Nancy; Brannigan, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    The optimal relationship between healthcare provider and patient is one of trust. This therapeutic relationship is dependent on the ability of the healthcare provider to communicate effectively with the patient. Research indicates that when healthcare providers listen to patients, there is more compliance with medical regimens, patient…

  4. Team management of the female athlete triad part 2: optimal treatment and prevention tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, E; Clark, N; Ireland, M L; Martire, J; Nattiv, A; Varechok, S

    1997-04-01

    Multidisciplinary management of the female athlete triad (disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis) is optimal, but what exactly does it entail? With the primary care physician as the point person, the healthcare team addresses the underlying causes of disordered eating through such measures as drawing up a contract for returning to play, resolving nutrition issues, exploring psychotherapy options, and, sometimes, prescribing antidepressants. Hormone replacement therapy and conservative or orthopedic intervention for stress fractures may also be required. Communication among the members of the treatment team is crucial, and athletic trainers especially can provide valuable input. Prevention strategies need to involve education of coaches, teachers, trainers, parents, and others who work closely with female athletes.

  5. Development of a formative assessment tool for measurement of performance in multi-professional resuscitation teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Oluf; Jensen, Michael Kammer; Lippert, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Treating cardiac arrest is linked to the mutual performance of several health-care individuals' task coordination. Non-technical skills, including communication, leadership and team interaction, could improve sequencing the tasks in the cardiac arrest algorithm. Non-technical skills have been...... a part of crew resource management training, created to improve safety in aviation. This study aimed, first, to establish crew resource management and non-technical skill-based learning objectives and behavioural markers for the performance of multi-professional resuscitation teams; second, to develop...

  6. Conceptualizing Interprofessional Teams as Multi-Team Systems-Implications for Assessment and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Courtney; Landry, Karen; Graham, Anna; Graham, Lori; Cianciolo, Anna T; Kalet, Adina; Rosen, Michael; Sherman, Deborah Witt

    2015-01-01

    SGEA 2015 CONFERENCE ABSTRACT (EDITED). Evaluating Interprofessional Teamwork During a Large-Scale Simulation. Courtney West, Karen Landry, Anna Graham, and Lori Graham. CONSTRUCT: This study investigated the multidimensional measurement of interprofessional (IPE) teamwork as part of large-scale simulation training. Healthcare team function has a direct impact on patient safety and quality of care. However, IPE team training has not been the norm. Recognizing the importance of developing team-based collaborative care, our College of Nursing implemented an IPE simulation activity called Disaster Day and invited other professions to participate. The exercise consists of two sessions: one in the morning and another in the afternoon. The disaster scenario is announced just prior to each session, which consists of team building, a 90-minute simulation, and debriefing. Approximately 300 Nursing, Medicine, Pharmacy, Emergency Medical Technicians, and Radiology students and over 500 standardized and volunteer patients participated in the Disaster Day event. To improve student learning outcomes, we created 3 competency-based instruments to evaluate collaborative practice in multidimensional fashion during this exercise. A 20-item IPE Team Observation Instrument designed to assess interprofessional team's attainment of Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competencies was completed by 20 faculty and staff observing the Disaster Day simulation. One hundred sixty-six standardized patients completed a 10-item Standardized Patient IPE Team Evaluation Instrument developed from the IPEC competencies and adapted items from the 2014 Henry et al. PIVOT Questionnaire. This instrument assessed the standardized or volunteer patient's perception of the team's collaborative performance. A 29-item IPE Team's Perception of Collaborative Care Questionnaire, also created from the IPEC competencies and divided into 5 categories of Values/Ethics, Roles and Responsibilities

  7. Mobile Healthcare System using NFC Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Devendran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although primary care physicians are increasingly interested in adopting electronic medical record (EMR systems, few use such systems in practice. Mobile devices offer new ways for users to access health care data and services in a secure and user-friendly environment. Mobile healthcare (m-healthcare systems are regarded as a solution to healthcare costs without reducing the quality of patient care. We are developing a basic architecture for m-healthcare services using Near Field Communication (NFC to facilitate the provisioning of healthcare to people anywhere, anytime using mobile devices that are connected through wireless communication technologies.

  8. Management Teams

    CERN Document Server

    Belbin, R Meredith Meredith

    2012-01-01

    Meredith Belbin's work on teams has become part of everyday language in organizations all over the world. All kinds of teams and team behaviours are covered. At the end of the book is a self-perception inventory so that readers can match their own personalities to particular team roles. Management Teams is required reading for managers concerned with achieving results by getting the best from their key personnel.

  9. Virtual team collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Ngwenyama, Ojelanki

    2009-01-01

    and experienced by the participants at the work process level; however, resolving breakdowns may require critical reflection at other levels. Where previous research argues that face-to-face interaction is an important variable for virtual team performance, our empirical observations reveal that communication......Managing international teams with geographically distributed participants is a complex task. The risk of communication breakdowns increases due to cultural and organizational differences grounded in the geographical distribution of the participants. Such breakdowns indicate general...... misunderstandings and a lack of shared meaning between participants. In this paper, we address the complexity of building shared meaning. We examine the communication breakdowns that occurred in two globally distributed virtual teams by providing an analytical distinction of the organizational context...

  10. Team Learning Ditinjau dari Team Diversity dan Team Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Vivi Gusrini Rahmadani Pohan; Djamaludin Ancok

    2015-01-01

    This research attempted to observe team learning from the level of team diversity and team efficacy of work teams. This research used an individual level of analysis rather than the group level. The team members measured the level of team diversity, team efficacy and team learning of the teams through three scales, namely team learning scale, team diversity scale, and team efficacy scale. Respondents in this research were the active team members in a company, PT. Alkindo Mitraraya. The total ...

  11. The impact of a faculty learning community on professional and personal development: the facilitator training program of the American Academy on Communication in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Calvin L; Hirschmann, Krista; Fortin, Auguste H; Lichstein, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Relationship-centered care attends to the entire network of human relationships essential to patient care. Few faculty development programs prepare faculty to teach principles and skills in relationship-centered care. One exception is the Facilitator Training Program (FTP), a 25-year-old training program of the American Academy on Communication in Healthcare. The authors surveyed FTP graduates to determine the efficacy of its curriculum and the most important elements for participants' learning. In 2007, surveys containing quantitative and narrative elements were distributed to 51 FTP graduates. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The authors analyzed narratives using Burke's dramatistic pentad as a qualitative framework to delineate how interrelated themes interacted in the FTP. Forty-seven respondents (92%) identified two essential acts that happened in the program: an iterative learning process, leading to heightened personal awareness and group facilitation skills; and longevity of learning and effect on career. The structure of the program's learning community provided the scene, and the agents were the participants, who provided support and contributed to mutual success. Methods of developing skills in personal awareness, group facilitation, teaching, and feedback constituted agency. The purpose was to learn skills and to join a community to share common values. The FTP is a learning community that provided faculty with skills in principles of relationship-centered care. Four further features that describe elements of this successful faculty-based learning community are achievement of self-identified goals, distance learning modalities, opportunities to safely discuss workplace issues outside the workplace, and self-renewing membership.

  12. Cancer and the family: assessment, communication and brief interventions-the development of an educational programme for healthcare professionals when a parent has cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Lucy; Sangha, Amrit; Lister, Sara; Wiseman, Theresa

    2016-12-01

    This study developed and piloted an educational intervention to support healthcare professionals (HCPs) to provide supportive care for families when a parent has cancer. Programme development followed the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework, beginning with examination of theory and research, and consultation with experts. The programme content incorporated attachment theory, child development and family systems theory. It was piloted thrice with HCPs from a cancer centre. The evaluation involved a questionnaire, comprising open-ended questions, completed before and after the programme. Data from the questionnaire were analysed using framework analysis. 31 HCPs from varying disciplines participated. The programme was evaluated positively by participants. Before the programme, participants had significant concerns about their professional competence, which included: managing their own emotions; a perceived sensitivity around raising child and family matters with patients and a lack of specialist experience, skills and knowledge. After completing the programme, participants reported greater understanding and knowledge, increased confidence to approach patients about family matters, greater skill to initiate conversations and explore family concerns and guiding parent-child communication according to the child's level of understanding, and an increased engagement and resilience for caring for parents with cancer. Supporting HCPs to provide family-centred care is likely to reduce psychological difficulties in families where a parent has cancer. Further work is planned to disseminate the programme, evaluate the transfer of skills into practice, assess how HCPs manage the emotional demands of providing supportive care over time, and consider on-going professional support for HCPs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Identifying non-technical skills and barriers for improvement of teamwork in cardiac arrest teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.O.; Jensen, Michael Kammer; Lippert, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The application of non-technical skills (NTSs) in health care has previously been described in other health-care educational programmes. NTSs are behavioural principles such as leadership, task distribution and communication. The aim of this study was to identify NTSs suitable...... and data analysis were supported by a template describing 25 NTSs derived from other educational programmes in health care. Results: A framework with five categories relating to NTSs was identified: leadership, communication, mutual performance monitoring, maintenance of standards and guidelines and task...... management. Important barriers that were identified were inexperienced team leaders, task overload and hierarchic structure in the teams' inability to maintain focus on chest compressions. Conclusion: Interview participants pointed out that NTSs of teams could improve the treatment of cardiac arrest...

  14. Impact of Participation on a Solid Organ Transplant Team on Student Pharmacists’ Perceptions of Interprofessional Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Brenda S.; Woodard, Lisa J.; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Hardinger, Karen L.; Wu, Vivian; Hayney, Mary S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To examine student pharmacists’ perceptions of interprofessional roles before and after completing an advanced pharmacy practice experience on solid organ transplantation. Methods. Student pharmacists across the United States participating in an APPE on a solid organ transplant team completed an online pre- and post-APPE survey instrument examining perceptions of interprofessional roles, communication, and teamwork. Results. Student pharmacists’ scores on interprofessionalism increased significantly on 17 of 22 items. Positive changes were seen in the interprofessional education core competency areas of roles and responsibilities, interprofessional communication, and teams and teamwork. Conclusion. Student pharmacist participation in interprofessional clinical APPEs can positively influence their professional development as they prepare to become members of multi-disciplinary teams in the healthcare workforce. PMID:23716742

  15. Managing multicultural teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Jeanne; Behfar, Kristin; Kern, Mary C

    2006-11-01

    Multicultural teams offer a number of advantages to international firms, including deep knowledge of different product markets, culturally sensitive customer service, and 24-hour work rotations. But those advantages may be outweighed by problems stemming from cultural differences, which can seriously impair the effectiveness of a team or even bring itto a stalemate. How can managers best cope with culture-based challenges? The authors conducted in-depth interviews with managers and members of multicultural teams from all over the world. Drawing on their extensive research on dispute resolution and teamwork and those interviews, they identify four problem categories that can create barriers to a team's success: direct versus indirect communication, trouble with accents and fluency, differing attitudes toward hierarchy and authority, and conflicting norms for decision making. If a manager--or a team member--can pinpoint the root cause of the problem, he or she is likelier to select an appropriate strategy for solving it. The most successful teams and managers, the authors found, dealt with multicultural challenges in one of four ways: adaptation (acknowledging cultural gaps openly and working around them), structural intervention (changing the shape or makeup of the team), managerial intervention (setting norms early or bringing in a higher-level manager), and exit (removing a team member when other options have failed). Which strategy is best depends on the particular circumstances--and each has potential complications. In general, though, managers who intervene early and set norms; teams and managers who try to engage everyone on the team; and teams that can see challenges as stemming from culture, not personality, succeed in solving culture-based problems with good humor and creativity. They are the likeliest to harvest the benefits inherent in multicultural teams.

  16. Healthcare leadership's diversity paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Reginald

    2017-02-06

    Purpose The purpose of this research study was to obtain healthcare executives' perspectives on diversity in executive healthcare leadership. The study focused on identifying perspectives about diversity and its potential impact on the access of healthcare services by people of color. The study also identified perspectives about factors that influence the attainment of executive healthcare roles by people of color. Design/methodology/approach A convenience sample of healthcare executives was obtained. The executives identified themselves as belonging to one of two subgroups, White healthcare executives or executives of color. Participants were interviewed telephonically in a semi-structured format. The interviews were transcribed and entered into a qualitative software application. The data were codified and important themes were identified. Findings The majority of the study participants perceive that diversity of the executive healthcare leadership team is important. There were differences in perspective among the subgroups as it relates to solutions to improve access to healthcare by people of color. There were also differences in perspective among the subgroups, as it relates to explaining the underrepresentation of people of color in executive healthcare leadership roles. Research limitations/implications This research effort benefited from the subject matter expertise of 24 healthcare executives from two states. Expansion of the number of survey participants and broadening the geographical spread of where participants were located may have yielded more convergence and/or more divergence in perspectives about key topics. Practical implications The findings from this research study serve to add to the existing body of literature on diversity in executive healthcare leadership. The findings expand on the importance of key elements in contemporary literature such as diversity, cultural competency and perspectives about the need for representation of people of

  17. The Healthcare Future for the iGeneration: Integrating the Patient and the Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy H. Ficzere, PharmD, BCPS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose a vision to integrate patients, their health-related data, and their wellness plans into the healthcare system using smartphone and tablet computer technology.Setting: Ambulatory care and community practicePractice Innovation: Utilization of smartphone and tablet computer technology to assess health care conditions, educate and involve patients, and facilitate seamless communication between the patient, electronic health record, pharmacy system, third-party payers, point-of-care testing, and all health-care providers.Main Outcome Measures: By providing integrated and customized information at the point of use, medication adherence and access to care will be increased and patients will engage in healthy behaviors more often resulting in an improved level of care for patients.Results: In the future, the authors believe if the vision is achieved, the health care system and patients will see improved health outcomes and more efficient utilization of the healthcare system.Conclusions: Our proposed use of technology provides an opportunity to empower patients to positively improve their own health which could be a vital advancement in health care, especially in the areas of medication adherence, improving access to care, and health behavior support. As pharmacists, we may also embrace technology opportunities to expand our roles as health care professionals as we continue to partner with patients and the health care team to improve outcomes.

  18. Healthcare Practitioners' Personal and Professional Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Mpatisi; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity A.; Weller, Jennifer; Robb, Gillian; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    Personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners influence their clinical decisions. Understanding these values for individuals and across healthcare professions can help improve patient-centred decision-making by individual practitioners and interprofessional teams, respectively. We aimed to identify these values and integrate them…

  19. Healthcare Practitioners' Personal and Professional Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Mpatisi; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity A.; Weller, Jennifer; Robb, Gillian; Shulruf, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    Personal and professional values of healthcare practitioners influence their clinical decisions. Understanding these values for individuals and across healthcare professions can help improve patient-centred decision-making by individual practitioners and interprofessional teams, respectively. We aimed to identify these values and integrate them…

  20. Integrating Healthcare Ethical Issues into IS Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellucci, Leigh W.; Layman, Elizabeth J.; Campbell, Robert; Zeng, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Federal initiatives are encouraging the increase of IS graduates to work in the healthcare environment because they possess knowledge of datasets and dataset management that are key to effective management of electronic health records (EHRs) and health information technology (IT). IS graduates will be members of the healthcare team, and as such,…

  1. Communicating with Professionals

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or other healthcare professionals. Find a list of questions to ask at your next appointment . Healthcare professionals talk about why good communication is important A patient describes how he prepares ...

  2. Teamwork skills, shared mental models, and performance in simulated trauma teams: an independent group design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westli Heidi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-technical skills are seen as an important contributor to reducing adverse events and improving medical management in healthcare teams. Previous research on the effectiveness of teams has suggested that shared mental models facilitate coordination and team performance. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether demonstrated teamwork skills and behaviour indicating shared mental models would be associated with observed improved medical management in trauma team simulations. Methods Revised versions of the 'Anesthetists' Non-Technical Skills Behavioural marker system' and 'Anti-Air Teamwork Observation Measure' were field tested in moment-to-moment observation of 27 trauma team simulations in Norwegian hospitals. Independent subject matter experts rated medical management in the teams. An independent group design was used to explore differences in teamwork skills between higher-performing and lower-performing teams. Results Specific teamwork skills and behavioural markers were associated with indicators of good team performance. Higher and lower-performing teams differed in information exchange, supporting behaviour and communication, with higher performing teams showing more effective information exchange and communication, and less supporting behaviours. Behavioural markers of shared mental models predicted effective medical management better than teamwork skills. Conclusions The present study replicates and extends previous research by providing new empirical evidence of the significance of specific teamwork skills and a shared mental model for the effective medical management of trauma teams. In addition, the study underlines the generic nature of teamwork skills by demonstrating their transferability from different clinical simulations like the anaesthesia environment to trauma care, as well as the potential usefulness of behavioural frequency analysis in future research on non-technical skills.

  3. Construction and operation effect of a multi-disciplinary healthcare team in Fast Track Surgery%快速康复外科多学科合作团队的建设及运行效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李益萍; 徐琴鸿; 谢浩芬; 邱江锋; 费惠; 朱红; 黄长顺

    2015-01-01

    out of bed(1. 33 ± 1. 13)d,length of gastric tube indwelling time(2. 00 ± 1. 56)d,first time to feeding time(5. 00 ±1. 42)d,post-hospitalization time(13. 24 ± 3. 12),that all were better than those of the control group(t = -16. 889 6,-25. 068 0,-14. 705 9,-14. 190 1,-5. 693 4;P <0. 05). Conclusions The multi-disciplinary healthcare team is an effective approach to promote patients' recovery in Fast Track Surgery, and is a effective way in the clinical.

  4. Challenges in interdisciplinary weight management in primary care: lessons learned from the 5As Team study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, J; Osunlana, A M; Ogunleye, A A; Sharma, A M; Campbell-Scherer, D

    2016-04-01

    Increasingly, research is directed at advancing methods to address obesity management in primary care. In this paper we describe the role of interdisciplinary collaboration, or lack thereof, in patient weight management within 12 teams in a large primary care network in Alberta, Canada. Qualitative data for the present analysis were derived from the 5As Team (5AsT) trial, a mixed-method randomized control trial of a 6-month participatory, team-based educational intervention aimed at improving the quality and quantity of obesity management encounters in primary care practice. Participants (n = 29) included in this analysis are healthcare providers supporting chronic disease management in 12 family practice clinics randomized to the intervention arm of the 5AsT trial including mental healthcare workers (n = 7), registered dietitians (n = 7), registered nurses or nurse practitioners (n = 15). Participants were part of a 6-month intervention consisting of 12 biweekly learning sessions aimed at increasing provider knowledge and confidence in addressing patient weight management. Qualitative methods included interviews, structured field notes and logs. Four common themes of importance in the ability of healthcare providers to address weight with patients within an interdisciplinary care team emerged, (i) Availability; (ii) Referrals; (iii) Role perception and (iv) Messaging. However, we find that what was key to our participants was not that these issues be uniformly agreed upon by all team members, but rather that communication and clinic relationships support their continued negotiation. Our study shows that firm clinic relationships and deliberate communication strategies are the foundation of interdisciplinary care in weight management. Furthermore, there is a clear need for shared messaging concerning obesity and its treatment between members of interdisciplinary teams.

  5. Teaming up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warhuus, Jan; Günzel-Jensen, Franziska; Robinson, Sarah

    Questions we care about (Objectives): When students have to work on challenging tasks, as it is often the case in entrepreneurship classrooms that leverage experiential learning, team success becomes central to the students learning. Yet, the formation of teams is often left up to the students...... or pre-arranged at random. Therefore we investigate the importance of team formation in the entrepreneurial classroom and ask: (i) What are the underlying factors that influence outcomes of teamwork in student groups? (ii) How does team formation influence student perception of learning?, and (iii) Do...... functioning entrepreneurial student teams as most teams lack personal chemistry which makes them anchor their work too much in a pre-defined project. In contrast, we find that students that can form their own teams aim for less diverse teams than what is achieved by random assignment. However, the homophily...

  6. [Teams working at the heart of precarity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabelot, Chrystel; Khénifer, Fabienne; Le Gal, Dominique; Masson, Thierry; Voisin, Véronique

    2011-05-01

    The specific mission of the Nanterre hospital and nursing home (CASH) is to welcome, care for and accommodate people in situations of precarity. To fulfil this mission, multi-professional teams from the healthcare and social sector work there.

  7. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  8. Improving Care Teams' Functioning: Recommendations from Team Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscella, Kevin; Mauksch, Larry; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Salas, Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    Team science has been applied to many sectors including health care. Yet there has been relatively little attention paid to the application of team science to developing and sustaining primary care teams. Application of team science to primary care requires adaptation of core team elements to different types of primary care teams. Six elements of teams are particularly relevant to primary care: practice conditions that support or hinder effective teamwork; team cognition, including shared understanding of team goals, roles, and how members will work together as a team; leadership and coaching, including mutual feedback among members that promotes teamwork and moves the team closer to achieving its goals; cooperation supported by an emotionally safe climate that supports expression and resolution of conflict and builds team trust and cohesion; coordination, including adoption of processes that optimize efficient performance of interdependent activities among team members; and communication, particularly regular, recursive team cycles involving planning, action, and debriefing. These six core elements are adapted to three prototypical primary care teams: teamlets, health coaching, and complex care coordination. Implementation of effective team-based models in primary care requires adaptation of core team science elements coupled with relevant, practical training and organizational support, including adequate time to train, plan, and debrief. Training should be based on assessment of needs and tasks and the use of simulations and feedback, and it should extend to live action. Teamlets represent a potential launch point for team development and diffusion of teamwork principles within primary care practices. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of team types based on collaborative relationships among doctors, home-visiting nurses and care managers for effective support of patients in end-of-life home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Junko; Fukui, Sakiko; Ikezaki, Sumie; Otoguro, Chizuru; Tsujimura, Mayuko

    2017-02-21

    To define the team types consisting of doctors, home-visiting nurses and care managers for end-of-life care by measuring the collaboration relationship, and to identify the factors related to the team types. A questionnaire survey of 43 teams including doctors, home-visiting nurses and care managers was carried out. The team types were classified based on mutual evaluations of the collaborative relationships among the professionals. To clarify the factors between team types with the patient characteristics, team characteristics and collaboration competency, univariate analysis was carried out with the Fisher's exact test or one-way analysis and multiple comparison analysis. Three team types were classified: the team where the collaborative relationships among all healthcare professionals were good; the team where the collaborative relationships between the doctors and care managers were poor; and the team where the collaborative relationships among all of the professionals were poor. There was a statistically significant association between the team types and the following variables: patient's dementia level, communication tool, professionals' experience of working with other team members, home-visiting nurses' experience of caring for dying patients, care managers' background qualifications, doctor's face-to-face cooperation with other members and home-visiting nurses' collaborative practice. It is suggested that a collaborative relationship would be fostered by more experience of working together, using communication tools and enhancing each professional's collaboration competency. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  10. The Generational Impact in Virtual Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrara, Samuel Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The world of today allows groups of people who are geographically-distributed to communicate through information and communication technologies (ICTs). In the workplace, these geographically-distributed teams are referred to as virtual teams. Quantifying and understanding issues in virtual teams has been a focus of research for the past two decades. This thesis aims to quantify generational differences between the Millennials and the Baby Boomers in the context of virtual teams in the enginee...

  11. Discourses of healthcare professionals about health surveillance actions for Tuberculosis control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Mitano

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze the meanings produced in the Health Surveillance actions for tuberculosis control, carried out by healthcare professionals in Mozambique. METHOD Qualitative study using the theoretical and methodological framework of the French Discourse Analysis. RESULTS A total of 15 healthcare professionals with more than one year of experience in disease control actions participated in the study. Four discursive blocks have emerged from the analysis: tuberculosis diagnosis process; meeting, communication and discussion of treatment; local strategies for tuberculosis control; involvement of family and community leaders in the tuberculosis control. CONCLUSION The statements of the healthcare professionals suggest, as Health Surveillance actions, practices that include collecting sputum in the patient's home and sending it to the laboratory; deployment of the medical team with a microscope for tuberculosis testing; and testing for diseases that may be associated with tuberculosis. In this context, the actions of Health Surveillance for tuberculosis control involve valuing all actors: family, community leaders, patients and health professionals.

  12. Clinicians' strategies for managing their emotions during difficult healthcare conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luff, Donna; Martin, Elliott B; Mills, Kelsey; Mazzola, Natalia M; Bell, Sigall K; Meyer, Elaine C

    2016-09-01

    To examine strategies employed by clinicians from different disciplines to manage their emotions during difficult healthcare conversations. Self-report questionnaires were collected prior to simulation-based Program to Enhance Relational and Communication Skills (PERCS) workshops for professionals representing a range of experience and specialties at a tertiary pediatric hospital. In response to an open-ended prompt, clinicians qualitatively described their own strategies for managing their emotions during difficult healthcare conversations. 126 respondents reported emotion management strategies. Respondents included physicians (42%), nurses (29%), medical interpreters (16%), psychosocial professionals (9%), and other (4%). Respondents identified 1-4 strategies. Five strategy categories were identified: Self-Care (51%), Preparatory and Relational Skills, (29%), Empathic Presence (28%), Team Approach (26%), and Professional Identity (20%). Across disciplines and experience levels, clinicians have developed strategies to manage their emotions when holding difficult healthcare conversations. These strategies support clinicians before, during and after difficult conversations. Understanding what strategies clinicians already employ to manage their emotions when holding difficult conversations has implications for educational planning and implementation. This study has potential to inform the development of education to support clinicians' awareness of their emotions and to enhance the range and effectiveness of emotion management during difficult healthcare conversations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Constructing Healthcare Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harty, Chris; Holm Jacobsen, Peter; Tryggestad, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to inquire into the role of project visualisations in shaping healthcare spaces and practices. The study draws upon an ethnographic field study from a large on-going hospital construction project in Denmark, and focuses on the early phases of on-boarding the design team...... process), 2.Organisational space (work processes and their spatial-temporal dimension) and; 3. Economic space (cost estimations and budgets). In practice, our findings show that the visualisations of different yet connected project spaces and the development of future clinical practices is related...

  14. Constructing Healthcare Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harty, Chris; Holm Jacobsen, Peter; Tryggestad, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to inquire into the role of project visualisations in shaping healthcare spaces and practices. The study draws upon an ethnographic field study from a large on-going hospital construction project in Denmark, and focuses on the early phases of on-boarding the design team...... into the project organisation. The theoretical contribution concerns the ways in which project visualisations plays an active role in developing novel conceptions of space and how these are mobilized in the process of on-boarding, in terms of 1. Design space (especially the engagement of users in the design...

  15. Emergency units’ team leadership in case of increased workload

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kristjan Jovanov; Vasja Roblek

    2016-01-01

    ... and age of the team members? Purpose: The purpose of the research was to find out what are the opinions from the members of the emergency team about managerial and communication skills of leaders of emergency teams in crisis situations...

  16. Collocation Impact on Team Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Eccles

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The collocation of software development teams is common, specially in agile software development environments. However little is known about the impact of collocation on the team’s effectiveness. This paper explores the impact of collocating agile software development teams on a number of team effectiveness factors. The study focused on South African software development teams and gathered data through the use of questionnaires and interviews. The key finding was that collocation has a positive impact on a number of team effectiveness factors which can be categorised under team composition, team support, team management and structure and team communication. Some of the negative impact collocation had on team effectiveness relate to the fact that team members perceived that less emphasis was placed on roles, that morale of the group was influenced by individuals, and that collocation was invasive, reduced level of privacy and increased frequency of interruptions. Overall through it is proposed that companies should consider collocating their agile software development teams, as collocation might leverage overall team effectiveness.

  17. Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  18. Patient Experience: A Critical Indicator of Healthcare Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Pamela H

    2017-01-01

    Patient experience has become a critical differentiator for healthcare organizations, and it will only grow in importance as transparency and consumerism dominate the healthcare landscape. Creating and sustaining a consistently exceptional experience that promotes patient engagement and the best outcomes is far more than just "satisfying" patients, going well beyond amenities that may be provided.Perception of care experience is often shaped by methods we use to address the biopsychosocial needs of patients. Building relationships and communicating well with our patients and families are primary approaches. In a complex healthcare situation, patients may not fully understand or remember the highly clinical nature of treatment. However, they always remember how we made them feel, how we communicated with them as a team, and what interactions they experienced while in our care.Patients who are fully informed and feel connected to their caregivers are often less anxious than those who are disengaged. Informed and engaged patients are enabled to participate in their healthcare. Organizations that focus on developing an accountable culture-one that inspires caregivers to communicate in a way that connects to patients' mind, body, and spirit while leveraging standard, evidence-based patient experience practices-find that patients' perception of care, or "the patient experience," is vastly improved.Adventist Health System has embarked on a journey to patient experience excellence with a commitment to whole-person care and standard patient experience practice across the system. Recognized with several national awards, we continue to strengthen our approach toward bringing all of our campuses and patient settings to sustained high-level performance. We have found that a combination of strong, accountable leadership; a focus on employee culture; engagement of physicians; standardized patient experience practices and education; and meaningful use of patient feedback are top

  19. Building the team for team science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Emily K.; O'Rourke, M.; Hong, G. S.; Hanson, P. C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Crowley, S.; Brewer, C. A.; Weathers, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to effectively exchange information and develop trusting, collaborative relationships across disciplinary boundaries is essential for 21st century scientists charged with solving complex and large-scale societal and environmental challenges, yet these communication skills are rarely taught. Here, we describe an adaptable training program designed to increase the capacity of scientists to engage in information exchange and relationship development in team science settings. A pilot of the program, developed by a leader in ecological network science, the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON), indicates that the training program resulted in improvement in early career scientists’ confidence in team-based network science collaborations within and outside of the program. Fellows in the program navigated human-network challenges, expanded communication skills, and improved their ability to build professional relationships, all in the context of producing collaborative scientific outcomes. Here, we describe the rationale for key communication training elements and provide evidence that such training is effective in building essential team science skills.

  20. Team Training through Communications Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    administered in the fol3owing similar sequenfc; 1. Target Maneuvering Analysis (THA) Basics 2. Sonar Mockup Familiarization (Sonar Technicians (ST) only...3. Surface Attack Unit (SAU) Procedures 4. LAMPS 5. Mockup Familiarization 6. Passive Target Maneuvering Analysis 7. Single Ship ASW 8. SAU/Mainbody...by trainees. Many of these measures can be calculated as a composite of information obtained from system level measures (e.g., water entry point ( WEP