WorldWideScience

Sample records for healthcare information system

  1. Strategies for healthcare information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegwee, R.A.; Spil, Antonius A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Information technologies of the past two decades have created significant fundamental changes in the delivery of healthcare services by healthcare provider organizations. Many healthcare organizations have been in search of ways and strategies to keep up with continuously emerging information

  2. Infrastructuring Multicultural Healthcare Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreessen, Katrien; Huybrechts, Liesbeth; Grönvall, Erik

    2017-01-01

    This paper stresses the need for more research in the field of Participatory Design (PD) and in particular into how to design Health Information Technology (HIT) together with care providers and -receivers in multicultural settings. We contribute to this research by describing a case study...... of this study, we point to the need and the ways of taking spatio-historical aspects of a specific healthcare situation into account in the PD of HIT to support multicultural perspectives on healthcare....

  3. Architecture of personal healthcare information system in ubiquitous healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhardwaj, S.; Sain, M.; Lee, H.-J.; Chung, W.Y.; Slezak, D.; et al., xx

    2009-01-01

    Due to recent development in Ubiquitous Healthcare now it’s time to build such application which can work independently and with less interference of Physician. In this paper we are try to build the whole architecture of personal Healthcare information system for ubiquitous healthcare which also

  4. Concepts and trends in healthcare information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Koutsouris, Dionysios-Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    ​Concepts and Trends in Healthcare Information Systems covers the latest research topics in the field from leading researchers and practitioners. This book offers theory-driven research that explores the role of Information Systems in the delivery of healthcare in its diverse organizational and regulatory settings. In addition to the embedded role of Information Technology (IT) in clinical and diagnostics equipment, Information Systems are uniquely positioned to capture, store, process, and communicate timely information to decision makers for better coordination of healthcare at both the individual and population levels. For example, data mining and decision support capabilities can identify potential adverse events for an individual patient while also contributing to the population's health by providing insights into the causes of disease complications. Information systems have great potential to reduce healthcare costs and improve outcomes. The healthcare delivery systems share similar characteristics w...

  5. Infrastructuring Multicultural Healthcare Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreessen, Katrien; Huybrechts, Liesbeth; Grönvall, Erik; Hendriks, Niels

    2017-01-01

    This paper stresses the need for more research in the field of Participatory Design (PD) and in particular into how to design Health Information Technology (HIT) together with care providers and -receivers in multicultural settings. We contribute to this research by describing a case study, the 'Health-Cultures' project, in which we designed HIT for the context of home care of older people with a migration background. The Health-Cultures project is located in the city of Genk, Belgium, which is known for its multicultural population, formed by three historical migration waves of people coming to work in the nowadays closed coal mines. Via a PD approach, we studied existing means of dialogue and designed HIT that both care receivers and care providers in Genk can use in their daily exchanges between cultures in home care contexts. In discussing relevant literature as well as the results of this study, we point to the need and the ways of taking spatio-historical aspects of a specific healthcare situation into account in the PD of HIT to support multicultural perspectives on healthcare.

  6. Requirements for Interoperability in Healthcare Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Noumeir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interoperability is a requirement for the successful deployment of Electronic Health Records (EHR. EHR improves the quality of healthcare by enabling access to all relevant information at the diagnostic decision moment, regardless of location. It is a system that results from the cooperation of several heterogeneous distributed subsystems that need to successfully exchange information relative to a specific healthcare process. This paper analyzes interoperability impediments in healthcare by first defining them and providing concrete healthcare examples, followed by discussion of how specifications can be defined and how verification can be conducted to eliminate those impediments and ensure interoperability in healthcare. This paper also analyzes how Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE has been successful in enabling interoperability, and identifies some neglected aspects that need attention.

  7. Activity System Theory Approach to Healthcare Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Guohua

    2004-01-01

    Healthcare information system is a very complex system and has to be approached from systematic perspectives. This paper presents an Activity System Theory (ATS) approach by integrating system thinking and social psychology. First part of the paper, the activity system theory is presented, especially a recursive model of human activity system is introduced. A project ‘Integrated Mobile Information System for Diabetic Healthcare (IMIS)’ is then used to demonstrate a practical application of th...

  8. Healthcare system information at language schools for newly arrived immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tynell, Lena Lyngholt; Wimmelmann, Camilla Lawaetz; Jervelund, Signe Smith

    2017-01-01

    a language school in Copenhagen in 2012 received either a course or written information on the Danish healthcare system and subsequently evaluated this quantitatively. Results: The evaluation revealed a positive appraisal of the course/information provided. Conclusion: In times of austerity, incorporating......Objective: In most European countries, immigrants do not systematically learn about the host countries’ healthcare system when arriving. This study investigated how newly arrived immigrants perceived the information they received about the Danish healthcare system. Method: Immigrants attending...... healthcare information into an already existing language programme may be pertinent for providing immigrants with knowledge on the healthcare system....

  9. Electronic healthcare information security

    CERN Document Server

    Dube, Kudakwashe; Shoniregun, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing healthcare expenditure and pressing demand for improved quality and efficiency of patient care services are driving innovation in healthcare information management. The domain of healthcare has become a challenging testing ground for information security due to the complex nature of healthcare information and individual privacy. ""Electronic Healthcare Information Security"" explores the challenges of e-healthcare information and security policy technologies. It evaluates the effectiveness of security and privacy implementation systems for anonymization methods and techniqu

  10. Information security requirements in patient-centred healthcare support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalamah, Shada; Gray, W Alex; Hilton, Jeremy; Alsalamah, Hessah

    2013-01-01

    Enabling Patient-Centred (PC) care in modern healthcare requires the flow of medical information with the patient between different healthcare providers as they follow the patient's treatment plan. However, PC care threatens the stability of the balance of information security in the support systems since legacy systems fall short of attaining a security balance when sharing their information due to compromises made between its availability, integrity, and confidentiality. Results show that the main reason for this is that information security implementation in discrete legacy systems focused mainly on information confidentiality and integrity leaving availability a challenge in collaboration. Through an empirical study using domain analysis, observations, and interviews, this paper identifies a need for six information security requirements in legacy systems to cope with this situation in order to attain the security balance in systems supporting PC care implementation in modern healthcare.

  11. Integrating hospital information systems in healthcare institutions: a mediation architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Azami, Ikram; Cherkaoui Malki, Mohammed Ouçamah; Tahon, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Many studies have examined the integration of information systems into healthcare institutions, leading to several standards in the healthcare domain (CORBAmed: Common Object Request Broker Architecture in Medicine; HL7: Health Level Seven International; DICOM: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine; and IHE: Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise). Due to the existence of a wide diversity of heterogeneous systems, three essential factors are necessary to fully integrate a system: data, functions and workflow. However, most of the previous studies have dealt with only one or two of these factors and this makes the system integration unsatisfactory. In this paper, we propose a flexible, scalable architecture for Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Our main purpose is to provide a practical solution to insure HIS interoperability so that healthcare institutions can communicate without being obliged to change their local information systems and without altering the tasks of the healthcare professionals. Our architecture is a mediation architecture with 3 levels: 1) a database level, 2) a middleware level and 3) a user interface level. The mediation is based on two central components: the Mediator and the Adapter. Using the XML format allows us to establish a structured, secured exchange of healthcare data. The notion of medical ontology is introduced to solve semantic conflicts and to unify the language used for the exchange. Our mediation architecture provides an effective, promising model that promotes the integration of hospital information systems that are autonomous, heterogeneous, semantically interoperable and platform-independent.

  12. Design principles for achieving integrated healthcare information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2013-03-01

    Achieving integrated healthcare information systems has become a common goal for many countries in their pursuit of obtaining coordinated and comprehensive healthcare services. This article focuses on how a small local project termed 'Standardized pull of patient data' expanded and is now used on a large scale providing a majority of hospitals, general practitioners and citizens across Denmark with the possibility of accessing healthcare data from different electronic patient record systems and other systems. I build on design theory for information infrastructures, as presented by Hanseth and Lyytinen, to examine the design principles that facilitated this smallscale project to expand and become widespread. As a result of my findings, I outline three lessons learned that emphasize: (i) principles of flexibility, (ii) expansion from the installed base through modular strategies and (iii) identification of key healthcare actors to provide them with immediate benefits.

  13. An integrated healthcare enterprise information portal and healthcare information system framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, S L; Lai, Feipei; Cheng, P H; Chen, J L; Lee, H H; Tsai, W N; Weng, Y C; Hsieh, S H; Hsu, K P; Ko, L F; Yang, T H; Chen, C H

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents an integrated, distributed Healthcare Enterprise Information Portal (HEIP) and Hospital Information Systems (HIS) framework over wireless/wired infrastructure at National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). A single sign-on solution for the hospital customer relationship management (CRM) in HEIP has been established. The outcomes of the newly developed Outpatient Information Systems (OIS) in HIS are discussed. The future HEIP blueprints with CRM oriented features: e-Learning, Remote Consultation and Diagnosis (RCD), as well as on-Line Vaccination Services are addressed. Finally, the integrated HEIP and HIS architectures based on the middleware technologies are proposed along with the feasible approaches. The preliminary performance of multi-media, time-based data exchanges over the wireless HEIP side is collected to evaluate the efficiency of the architecture.

  14. Method for selecting e-health standards to support interoperability of healthcare information systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebesin, F

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is growing concern over the fragmentation and inability of healthcare information systems (e-health systems) to exchange pertinent healthcare information that can empower healthcare professionals to make informed decisions regarding the care...

  15. Information resources assessment of a healthcare integrated delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, C. S.; Friedman, C. P.; Douglas, G.; Miller, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    While clinical healthcare systems may have lagged behind computer applications in other fields in the shift from mainframes to client-server architectures, the rapid deployment of newer applications is closing that gap. Organizations considering the transition to client-server must identify and position themselves to provide the resources necessary to implement and support the infrastructure requirements of client-server architectures and to manage the accelerated complexity at the desktop, including hardware and software deployment, training, and maintenance needs. This paper describes an information resources assessment of the recently aligned Pennsylvania regional Veterans Administration Stars and Stripes Health Network (VISN4), in anticipation of the shift from a predominantly mainframe to a client-server information systems architecture in its well-established VistA clinical information system. The multimethod assessment study is described here to demonstrate this approach and its value to regional healthcare networks undergoing organizational integration and/or significant information technology transformations. PMID:10566414

  16. Information resources assessment of a healthcare integrated delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, C S; Friedman, C P; Douglas, G; Miller, D J

    1999-01-01

    While clinical healthcare systems may have lagged behind computer applications in other fields in the shift from mainframes to client-server architectures, the rapid deployment of newer applications is closing that gap. Organizations considering the transition to client-server must identify and position themselves to provide the resources necessary to implement and support the infrastructure requirements of client-server architectures and to manage the accelerated complexity at the desktop, including hardware and software deployment, training, and maintenance needs. This paper describes an information resources assessment of the recently aligned Pennsylvania regional Veterans Administration Stars and Stripes Health Network (VISN4), in anticipation of the shift from a predominantly mainframe to a client-server information systems architecture in its well-established VistA clinical information system. The multimethod assessment study is described here to demonstrate this approach and its value to regional healthcare networks undergoing organizational integration and/or significant information technology transformations.

  17. Asan medical information system for healthcare quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyeon Jeong; Kim, Woo Sung; Lee, Jae Ho; Min, Sung Woo; Kim, Sun Ja; Lee, Yong Su; Lee, Young Ha; Nam, Sang Woo; Eo, Gi Seung; Seo, Sook Gyoung; Nam, Mi Hyun

    2010-09-01

    This purpose of this paper is to introduce the status of the Asan Medical Center (AMC) medical information system with respect to healthcare quality improvement. Asan Medical Information System (AMIS) is projected to become a completely electronic and digital information hospital. AMIS has played a role in improving the health care quality based on the following measures: safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, privacy, and security. AMIS CONSISTED OF SEVERAL DISTINCTIVE SYSTEMS: order communication system, electronic medical record, picture archiving communication system, clinical research information system, data warehouse, enterprise resource planning, IT service management system, and disaster recovery system. The most distinctive features of AMIS were the high alert-medication recognition & management system, the integrated and severity stratified alert system, the integrated patient monitoring system, the perioperative diabetic care monitoring and support system, and the clinical indicator management system. AMIS provides IT services for AMC, 7 affiliated hospitals and over 5,000 partners clinics, and was developed to improve healthcare services. The current challenge of AMIS is standard and interoperability. A global health IT strategy is needed to get through the current challenges and to provide new services as needed.

  18. Healthcare delivery systems: designing quality into health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Phil; Green, Rosamund; Winch, Graham

    2007-01-01

    To ensure that quality is 'engineered in' a holistic, integrated and quality approach is required, and Total Quality Management (TQM) principles are the obvious foundations for this. This paper describes a novel approach to viewing the operations of a healthcare provider where electronic means could be used to distribute information (including electronic fund settlements), building around the Full Service Provider core. Specifically, an approach called the "triple pair flow" model is used to provide a view of healthcare delivery that is integrated, yet detailed, and that combines the strategic enterprise view with a business process view.

  19. Service Robotics in Healthcare: A Perspective for Information Systems Researchers?

    OpenAIRE

    Garmann-Johnsen, Niels Frederik; Mettler, Tobias; Sprenger, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in electronics and telecommunication have paved the way for service robots to enter the clinical world. While service robotics has long been a core research theme in computer science and other engineering-related fields, it has attracted little interest of Information Systems (IS) researchers so far. We argue that service robotics represents an interesting area of investigation, especially for healthcare, since current research lacks a thorough examination of socio-technical p...

  20. Accounting Information Systems in Healthcare: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammour, Hadal; Househ, Mowafa; Razzak, Hira Abdul

    2017-01-01

    As information technology progresses in Saudi Arabia, the manual accounting systems have become graduallyinadequate for decision needs. Subsequently, private and public healthcare divisions in Saudi Arabia perceive Computerized accounting information system (CAIS) as a vehicle to safeguard efficient and effective flow of information during the analysis, processes, and recording of financial data. Efficient and effective flow of information improvesthe decision making of staff, thereby improving the capability of health care sectors to reduce cost of the medical services.In this paper, we define computerized accounting systems from the point of view of health informatics. Also, the challenges and benefits of supporting CAIS applications in hospitals of Saudi Arabia. With these elements, we conclude that CAIS in Saudi Arabia can serve as a valuable tool for evaluating and controlling the cost of medical services in healthcare sectors. Supplementary education on the significance of having systems of computerized accounting within hospitals for nurses, doctors, and accountants with other health care staff is warranted in future.

  1. Utilizing Health Information Technology to Support Universal Healthcare Delivery: Experience of a National Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Min-Huei; Iqbal, Usman; Scholl, Jeremiah; Huang, Chih-Wei; Nguyen, Phung Anh; Lee, Peisan; García-Romero, Maria Teresa; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Jian, Wen-Shan

    2015-09-01

    Recent discussions have focused on using health information technology (HIT) to support goals related to universal healthcare delivery. These discussions have generally not reflected on the experience of countries with a large amount of experience using HIT to support universal healthcare on a national level. HIT was compared globally by using data from the Ministry of the Interior, Republic of China (Taiwan). Taiwan has been providing universal healthcare since 1995 and began to strategically implement HIT on a national level at that time. Today the national-level HIT system is more extensive in Taiwan than in many other countries and is used to aid administration, clinical care, and public health. The experience of Taiwan thus can provide an illustration of how HIT can be used to support universal healthcare delivery. In this article we present an overview of some key historical developments and successes in the adoption of HIT in Taiwan over a 17-year period, as well as some more recent developments. We use this experience to offer some strategic perspectives on how it can aid in the adoption of large-scale HIT systems and on how HIT can be used to support universal healthcare delivery.

  2. The role of privacy protection in healthcare information systems adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chien-Lung; Lee, Ming-Ren; Su, Chien-Hui

    2013-10-01

    Privacy protection is an important issue and challenge in healthcare information systems (HISs). Recently, some privacy-enhanced HISs are proposed. Users' privacy perception, intention, and attitude might affect the adoption of such systems. This paper aims to propose a privacy-enhanced HIS framework and investigate the role of privacy protection in HISs adoption. In the proposed framework, privacy protection, access control, and secure transmission modules are designed to enhance the privacy protection of a HIS. An experimental privacy-enhanced HIS is also implemented. Furthermore, we proposed a research model extending the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology by considering perceived security and information security literacy and then investigate user adoption of a privacy-enhanced HIS. The experimental results and analyses showed that user adoption of a privacy-enhanced HIS is directly affected by social influence, performance expectancy, facilitating conditions, and perceived security. Perceived security has a mediating effect between information security literacy and user adoption. This study proposes several implications for research and practice to improve designing, development, and promotion of a good healthcare information system with privacy protection.

  3. Specific factors influencing information system/information and communication technology sourcing strategies in healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potančok, Martin; Voříšek, Jiří

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare facilities use a number of information system/information and communication technologies. Each healthcare facility faces a need to choose sourcing strategies most suitable to ensure provision of information system/information and communication technology services, processes and resources. Currently, it is possible to observe an expansion of sourcing possibilities in healthcare informatics, which creates new requirements for sourcing strategies. Thus, the aim of this article is to identify factors influencing information system/information and communication technology sourcing strategies in healthcare facilities. The identification was based on qualitative research, namely, a case study. This study provides a set of internal and external factors with their impact levels. The findings also show that not enough attention is paid to these factors during decision-making. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Process-driven selection of information systems for healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stephen F.; Yeh, Raymond T.; Giroir, Brett P.; Tanik, Murat M.

    1995-05-01

    Integration of networking and data management technologies such as PACS, RIS and HIS into a healthcare enterprise in a clinically acceptable manner is a difficult problem. Data within such a facility are generally managed via a combination of manual hardcopy systems and proprietary, special-purpose data processing systems. Process modeling techniques have been successfully applied to engineering and manufacturing enterprises, but have not generally been applied to service-based enterprises such as healthcare facilities. The use of process modeling techniques can provide guidance for the placement, configuration and usage of PACS and other informatics technologies within the healthcare enterprise, and thus improve the quality of healthcare. Initial process modeling activities conducted within the Pediatric ICU at Children's Medical Center in Dallas, Texas are described. The ongoing development of a full enterprise- level model for the Pediatric ICU is also described.

  5. National healthcare systems and the need for health information governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovenga, Evelyn J S

    2013-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of health data, information and knowledge governance needs and associated generic principles so that information systems are able to automate such data collections from point-of-care operational systems. Also covered are health information systems' dimensions and known barriers to the delivery of quality health services, including environmental, technology and governance influences of any population's health status within the context of national health systems. This is where health information managers and health informaticians need to resolve the many challenges associated with eHealth implementations where data are assets, efficient information flow is essential, the ability to acquire new knowledge desirable, and where the use of data and information needs to be viewed from a governance perspective to ensure reliable and quality information is obtained to enhance decision making.

  6. The enhancement of security in healthcare information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Hui; Chung, Yu-Fang; Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Wang, Sheng-De

    2012-06-01

    With the progress and the development of information technology, the internal data in medical organizations have become computerized and are further established the medical information system. Moreover, the use of the Internet enhances the information communication as well as affects the development of the medical information system that a lot of medical information is transmitted with the Internet. Since there is a network within another network, when all networks are connected together, they will form the "Internet". For this reason, the Internet is considered as a high-risk and public environment which is easily destroyed and invaded so that a relevant protection is acquired. Besides, the data in the medical network system are confidential that it is necessary to protect the personal privacy, such as electronic patient records, medical confidential information, and authorization-controlled data in the hospital. As a consequence, a medical network system is considered as a network requiring high security that excellent protections and managerial strategies are inevitable to prevent illegal events and external attacks from happening. This study proposes secure medical managerial strategies being applied to the network environment of the medical organization information system so as to avoid the external or internal information security events, allow the medical system to work smoothly and safely that not only benefits the patients, but also allows the doctors to use it more conveniently, and further promote the overall medical quality. The objectives could be achieved by preventing from illegal invasion or medical information being stolen, protecting the completeness and security of medical information, avoiding the managerial mistakes of the internal information system in medical organizations, and providing the highly-reliable medical information system.

  7. Implementing standards for the interoperability among healthcare providers in the public regionalized Healthcare Information System of the Lombardy Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarito, Fulvio; Pinciroli, Francesco; Mason, John; Marceglia, Sara; Mazzola, Luca; Bonacina, Stefano

    2012-08-01

    Information technologies (ITs) have now entered the everyday workflow in a variety of healthcare providers with a certain degree of independence. This independence may be the cause of difficulty in interoperability between information systems and it can be overcome through the implementation and adoption of standards. Here we present the case of the Lombardy Region, in Italy, that has been able, in the last 10 years, to set up the Regional Social and Healthcare Information System, connecting all the healthcare providers within the region, and providing full access to clinical and health-related documents independently from the healthcare organization that generated the document itself. This goal, in a region with almost 10 millions citizens, was achieved through a twofold approach: first, the political and operative push towards the adoption of the Health Level 7 (HL7) standard within single hospitals and, second, providing a technological infrastructure for data sharing based on interoperability specifications recognized at the regional level for messages transmitted from healthcare providers to the central domain. The adoption of such regional interoperability specifications enabled the communication among heterogeneous systems placed in different hospitals in Lombardy. Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) integration profiles which refer to HL7 standards are adopted within hospitals for message exchange and for the definition of integration scenarios. The IHE patient administration management (PAM) profile with its different workflows is adopted for patient management, whereas the Scheduled Workflow (SWF), the Laboratory Testing Workflow (LTW), and the Ambulatory Testing Workflow (ATW) are adopted for order management. At present, the system manages 4,700,000 pharmacological e-prescriptions, and 1,700,000 e-prescriptions for laboratory exams per month. It produces, monthly, 490,000 laboratory medical reports, 180,000 radiology medical reports, 180

  8. Software engineering principles applied to large healthcare information systems--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardon, Fabiane Bizinella; de A Moura, Lincoln

    2007-01-01

    São Paulo is the largest city in Brazil and one of the largest cities in the world. In 2004, São Paulo City Department of Health decided to implement a Healthcare Information System to support managing healthcare services and provide an ambulatory health record. The resulting information system is one of the largest public healthcare information systems ever built, with more than 2 million lines of code. Although statistics shows that most software projects fail, and the risks for the São Paulo initiative were enormous, the information system was completed on-time and on-budget. In this paper, we discuss the software engineering principles adopted that allowed to accomplish that project's goals, hoping that sharing the experience of this project will help other healthcare information systems initiatives to succeed.

  9. Hadoop-Based Healthcare Information System Design and Wireless Security Communication Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human health information from healthcare system can provide important diagnosis data and reference to doctors. However, continuous monitoring and security storage of human health data are challenging personal privacy and big data storage. To build secure and efficient healthcare application, Hadoop-based healthcare security communication system is proposed. In wireless biosensor network, authentication and key transfer should be lightweight. An ECC (Elliptic Curve Cryptography based lightweight digital signature and key transmission method are proposed to provide wireless secure communication in healthcare information system. Sunspot wireless sensor nodes are used to build healthcare secure communication network; wireless nodes and base station are assigned different tasks to achieve secure communication goal in healthcare information system. Mysql database is used to store Sunspot security entity table and measure entity table. Hadoop is used to backup and audit the Sunspot security entity table. Sqoop tool is used to import/export data between Mysql database and HDFS (Hadoop distributed file system. Ganglia is used to monitor and measure the performance of Hadoop cluster. Simulation results show that the Hadoop-based healthcare architecture and wireless security communication method are highly effective to build a wireless healthcare information system.

  10. WISH: a Wireless Mobile Multimedia Information System in Healthcare using RFID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weider D; Ray, Pradeep; Motoc, Tiberiu

    2008-05-01

    It is important to improve the efficiency of healthcare-related operations and the associated costs. Healthcare organizations are constantly under increased pressure to streamline operations and provide enhanced services to their patients. Wireless mobile computing technology has the potential to provide the desired benefits and would be a critical part of today's healthcare information system. In this paper, a system is presented to better facilitate the functions of physicians and medical staff in healthcare by using modern wireless mobile technology, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tools, and multimedia streaming. The paper includes a case study of the development of such a system in the context of healthcare in the United States. The results of the study show how wireless mobile multimedia systems can be developed for the improvement of the quality and efficiency in healthcare for other nations as well. Our testing data show a time reduction of more than 50% in the daily activities of hospital staff.

  11. The application of the unified modeling language in object-oriented analysis of healthcare information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vinod

    2002-10-01

    This paper concerns itself with the beneficial effects of the Unified Modeling Language (UML), a nonproprietary object modeling standard, in specifying, visualizing, constructing, documenting, and communicating the model of a healthcare information system from the user's perspective. The author outlines the process of object-oriented analysis (OOA) using the UML and illustrates this with healthcare examples to demonstrate the practicality of application of the UML by healthcare personnel to real-world information system problems. The UML will accelerate advanced uses of object-orientation such as reuse technology, resulting in significantly higher software productivity. The UML is also applicable in the context of a component paradigm that promises to enhance the capabilities of healthcare information systems and simplify their management and maintenance.

  12. Ensuring the security and privacy of information in mobile health-care communication systems

    OpenAIRE

    Adesina, Ademola O.; Agbele, Kehinde K.; Februarie, Ronald; Abidoye, Ademola P.; Nyongesa, Henry O.

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity of health-care information and its accessibility via the Internet and mobile technology systems is a cause for concern in these modern times. The privacy, integrity and confidentiality of a patient’s data are key factors to be considered in the transmission of medical information for use by authorised health-care personnel. Mobile communication has enabled medical consultancy, treatment, drug administration and the provision of laboratory results to take place outside the hosp...

  13. Application of Agent Methodology in Healthcare Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Abdalla

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study to describe the features and the phases of the two agent methodologies. The Gaia methodology for agent oriented analysis and design, Tropos is a detailed agent oriented software engineering methodology to explore each methodology's ability to present solutions for small problems. Also we provide an attempt to discover whether the methodology is in fact understandable and usable. In addition we were collecting and taking notes of the advantages and weaknesses of these methodologies during the study analysis for each methodology and the relationships among their models. The Guardian Angle: Patient-Centered Health Information System (GA: PCHIS is the personal system to help track, manage, and interpret the subject's health history, and give advice to both patient and provider is used as the case study throughout the paper.

  14. How secure is your information system? An investigation into actual healthcare worker password practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazier, Joseph A; Medlin, B Dawn

    2006-09-27

    For most healthcare information systems, passwords are the first line of defense in keeping patient and administrative records private and secure. However, this defense is only as strong as the passwords employees chose to use. A weak or easily guessed password is like an open door to the medical records room, allowing unauthorized access to sensitive information. In this paper, we present the results of a study of actual healthcare workers' password practices. In general, the vast majority of these passwords have significant security problems on several dimensions. Implications for healthcare professionals are discussed.

  15. An Intelligent Virtual Human System For Providing Healthcare Information And Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    healthcare system, and also to other SMs and Veterans by way of a variety of social networking tools (e.g., 2nd Life, Facebook, etc.). The user can progress... CyberPsychology and Behavior 8, 3 (2005), 187-211. [2] T. Parsons & A.A. Rizzo, Affective Outcomes of Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy for Anxiety...VH System for Providing Healthcare Information and Support508 [4] G. Riva, Virtual Reality in Psychotherapy: Review, CyberPsychology and Behavior 8

  16. E-health and healthcare enterprise information system leveraging service-oriented architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Lai, Feipei

    2012-04-01

    To present the successful experiences of an integrated, collaborative, distributed, large-scale enterprise healthcare information system over a wired and wireless infrastructure in National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). In order to smoothly and sequentially transfer from the complex relations among the old (legacy) systems to the new-generation enterprise healthcare information system, we adopted the multitier framework based on service-oriented architecture to integrate the heterogeneous systems as well as to interoperate among many other components and multiple databases. We also present mechanisms of a logical layer reusability approach and data (message) exchange flow via Health Level 7 (HL7) middleware, DICOM standard, and the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise workflow. The architecture and protocols of the NTUH enterprise healthcare information system, especially in the Inpatient Information System (IIS), are discussed in detail. The NTUH Inpatient Healthcare Information System is designed and deployed on service-oriented architecture middleware frameworks. The mechanisms of integration as well as interoperability among the components and the multiple databases apply the HL7 standards for data exchanges, which are embedded in XML formats, and Microsoft .NET Web services to integrate heterogeneous platforms. The preliminary performance of the current operation IIS is evaluated and analyzed to verify the efficiency and effectiveness of the designed architecture; it shows reliability and robustness in the highly demanding traffic environment of NTUH. The newly developed NTUH IIS provides an open and flexible environment not only to share medical information easily among other branch hospitals, but also to reduce the cost of maintenance. The HL7 message standard is widely adopted to cover all data exchanges in the system. All services are independent modules that enable the system to be deployed and configured to the highest degree of flexibility

  17. ICT use for information management in healthcare system for chronic disease patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M.; Lisiecka-Biełanowicz, Mira

    2013-10-01

    Modern healthcare systems are designed to fulfill needs of the patient, his system environment and other determinants of the treatment with proper support of technical aids. A whole system of care is compatible to the technical solutions and organizational framework based on legal rules. The purpose of this study is to present how can we use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systemic tools in a new model of patient-oriented care, improving the effectiveness of healthcare for patients with chronic diseases. The study material is the long-term process of healthcare for patients with chronic illness. Basing on the knowledge of the whole circumstances of patient's ecosystem and his needs allow us to build a new ICT model of long term care. The method used is construction, modeling and constant improvement the efficient ICT layer for the patient-centered healthcare model. We present a new constructive approach to systemic process how to use ICT for information management in healthcare system for chronic disease patient. The use of ICT tools in the model for chronic disease can improve all aspects of data management and communication, and the effectiveness of long-term complex healthcare. In conclusion: ICT based model of healthcare can be constructed basing on the interactions of ecosystem's functional parts through information feedback and the provision of services and models as well as the knowledge of the patient itself. Systematic approach to the model of long term healthcare assisted functionally by ICT tools and data management methods will increase the effectiveness of patient care and organizational efficiency.

  18. A scalable healthcare information system based on a service-oriented architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzu-Hsiang; Sun, Yeali S; Lai, Feipei

    2011-06-01

    Many existing healthcare information systems are composed of a number of heterogeneous systems and face the important issue of system scalability. This paper first describes the comprehensive healthcare information systems used in National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH) and then presents a service-oriented architecture (SOA)-based healthcare information system (HIS) based on the service standard HL7. The proposed architecture focuses on system scalability, in terms of both hardware and software. Moreover, we describe how scalability is implemented in rightsizing, service groups, databases, and hardware scalability. Although SOA-based systems sometimes display poor performance, through a performance evaluation of our HIS based on SOA, the average response time for outpatient, inpatient, and emergency HL7Central systems are 0.035, 0.04, and 0.036 s, respectively. The outpatient, inpatient, and emergency WebUI average response times are 0.79, 1.25, and 0.82 s. The scalability of the rightsizing project and our evaluation results show that the SOA HIS we propose provides evidence that SOA can provide system scalability and sustainability in a highly demanding healthcare information system.

  19. Web-based integrated public healthcare information system of Korea: development and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seewon; Park, Minsu; Lee, Jaegook; Kim, Sung-Soo; Han, Bum Soo; Mo, Kyoung Chun; Lee, Hyung Seok

    2013-12-01

    The Web-based integrated public healthcare information system (PHIS) of Korea was planned and developed from 2005 to 2010, and it is being used in 3,501 regional health organizations. This paper introduces and discusses development and performance of the system. We reviewed and examined documents about the development process and performance of the newly integrated PHIS. The resources we analyzed the national plan for public healthcare, information strategy for PHIS, usage and performance reports of the system. The integrated PHIS included 19 functional business areas, 47 detailed health programs, and 48 inter-organizational tasks. The new PHIS improved the efficiency and effectiveness of the business process and inter-organizational business, and enhanced user satisfaction. Economic benefits were obtained from five categories: labor, health education and monitoring, clinical information management, administration and civil service, and system maintenance. The system was certified by a patent from the Korean Intellectual Property Office and accredited as an ISO 9001. It was also reviewed and received preliminary comments about its originality, advancement, and business applicability from the Patent Cooperation Treaty. It has been found to enhance the quality of policy decision-making about regional healthcare at the self-governing local government level. PHIS, a Web-based integrated system, has contributed to the improvement of regional healthcare services of Korea. However, when it comes to an appropriate evolution, the needs and changing environments of community-level healthcare service and IT infrastructure should be analyzed properly in advance.

  20. Healthcare Information Systems for the epidemiologic surveillance within the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomidous, Marianna; Pistolis, John; Mechili, Aggelos; Kolokathi, Aikaterini; Zimeras, Stelios

    2013-01-01

    Public health and health care are important issues for developing countries and access to health care is a significant factor that contributes to a healthy population. In response to these issues, the World Health Organization (WHO) has been working on the development of methods and models for measuring physical accessibility to health care using several layers of information integrated in a GIS. This paper describes the methodological approach for the development of a real time electronic health record, based on the statistical and geographic information for the identification of various diseases and accidents that can happen in a specific place.

  1. Process-aware information system development for the healthcare domain : consistency, reliability and effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mans, R.S.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Russell, N.C.; Bakker, P.J.M.; Moleman, A.J.; Rinderle-Ma, S.; Sadiq, S.; Leymann, F.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal support for complex healthcare processes cannot be provided by a single out-of-the-box Process-Aware Information System and necessitates the construction of customized applications based on these systems. In order to allow for the seamless integration of the new technology into the existing

  2. [Development method of healthcare information system integration based on business collaboration model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shasha; Nie, Hongchao; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2015-02-01

    Integration of heterogeneous systems is the key to hospital information construction due to complexity of the healthcare environment. Currently, during the process of healthcare information system integration, people participating in integration project usually communicate by free-format document, which impairs the efficiency and adaptability of integration. A method utilizing business process model and notation (BPMN) to model integration requirement and automatically transforming it to executable integration configuration was proposed in this paper. Based on the method, a tool was developed to model integration requirement and transform it to integration configuration. In addition, an integration case in radiology scenario was used to verify the method.

  3. Healthcare information systems: data mining methods in the creation of a clinical recommender system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, L.; Street, W. N.; Xu, E.

    2011-05-01

    Recommender systems have been extensively studied to present items, such as movies, music and books that are likely of interest to the user. Researchers have indicated that integrated medical information systems are becoming an essential part of the modern healthcare systems. Such systems have evolved to an integrated enterprise-wide system. In particular, such systems are considered as a type of enterprise information systems or ERP system addressing healthcare industry sector needs. As part of efforts, nursing care plan recommender systems can provide clinical decision support, nursing education, clinical quality control, and serve as a complement to existing practice guidelines. We propose to use correlations among nursing diagnoses, outcomes and interventions to create a recommender system for constructing nursing care plans. In the current study, we used nursing diagnosis data to develop the methodology. Our system utilises a prefix-tree structure common in itemset mining to construct a ranked list of suggested care plan items based on previously-entered items. Unlike common commercial systems, our system makes sequential recommendations based on user interaction, modifying a ranked list of suggested items at each step in care plan construction. We rank items based on traditional association-rule measures such as support and confidence, as well as a novel measure that anticipates which selections might improve the quality of future rankings. Since the multi-step nature of our recommendations presents problems for traditional evaluation measures, we also present a new evaluation method based on average ranking position and use it to test the effectiveness of different recommendation strategies.

  4. Ensuring the security and privacy of information in mobile health-care communication systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademola P. Abidoye

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of health-care information and its accessibility via the Internet and mobile technology systems is a cause for concern in these modern times. The privacy, integrity and confidentiality of a patient’s data are key factors to be considered in the transmission of medical information for use by authorised health-care personnel. Mobile communication has enabled medical consultancy, treatment, drug administration and the provision of laboratory results to take place outside the hospital. With the implementation of electronic patient records and the Internet and Intranets, medical information sharing amongst relevant health-care providers was made possible. But the vital issue in this method of information sharing is security: the patient’s privacy, as well as the confidentiality and integrity of the health-care information system, should not be compromised. We examine various ways of ensuring the security and privacy of a patient’s electronic medical information in order to ensure the integrity and confidentiality of the information.

  5. HL7 and DICOM based integration of radiology departments with healthcare enterprise information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazona, Bojan; Koncar, Miroslav

    2007-12-01

    Integration based on open standards, in order to achieve communication and information interoperability, is one of the key aspects of modern health care information systems. However, this requirement represents one of the major challenges for the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) solutions, as systems today use diverse technologies, proprietary protocols and communication standards which are often not interoperable. One of the main producers of clinical information in healthcare settings represent Radiology Information Systems (RIS) that communicate using widely adopted DICOM (Digital Imaging and COmmunications in Medicine) standard, but in very few cases can efficiently integrate information of interest with other systems. In this context we identified HL7 standard as the world's leading medical ICT standard that is envisioned to provide the umbrella for medical data semantic interoperability, which amongst other things represents the cornerstone for the Croatia's National Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS). The aim was to explore the ability to integrate and exchange RIS originated data with Hospital Information Systems based on HL7's CDA (Clinical Document Architecture) standard. We explored the ability of HL7 CDA specifications and methodology to address the need of RIS integration HL7 based healthcare information systems. We introduced the use of WADO service interconnection to IHCIS and finally CDA rendering in widely used Internet explorers. The outcome of our pilot work proves our original assumption of HL7 standard being able to adopt radiology data into the integrated healthcare systems. Uniform DICOM to CDA translation scripts and business processes within IHCIS is desired and cost effective regarding to use of supporting IHCIS services aligned to SOA.

  6. Develop security architecture for both in-house healthcare information systems and electronic patient record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Chen, Xiaomeng; Zhuang, Jun; Jiang, Jianrong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Dongqing; Huang, H. K.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we presented a new security approach to provide security measures and features in both healthcare information systems (PACS, RIS/HIS), and electronic patient record (EPR). We introduced two security components, certificate authoring (CA) system and patient record digital signature management (DSPR) system, as well as electronic envelope technology, into the current hospital healthcare information infrastructure to provide security measures and functions such as confidential or privacy, authenticity, integrity, reliability, non-repudiation, and authentication for in-house healthcare information systems daily operating, and EPR exchanging among the hospitals or healthcare administration levels, and the DSPR component manages the all the digital signatures of patient medical records signed through using an-symmetry key encryption technologies. The electronic envelopes used for EPR exchanging are created based on the information of signers, digital signatures, and identifications of patient records stored in CAS and DSMS, as well as the destinations and the remote users. The CAS and DSMS were developed and integrated into a RIS-integrated PACS, and the integration of these new security components is seamless and painless. The electronic envelopes designed for EPR were used successfully in multimedia data transmission.

  7. Investments in information systems and technology in the healthcare: Project management mediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Gomes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare organisations must improve their business practices and internal procedures in order to answer the increasing demand of health professionals and the general public for more and better information. Hospitals invest massively in information systems and technology (IS/IT in the hope that these investments will improve healthcare and meet patients’ demands. The main objective of our research is to study how organisational maturity, enhanced by investments in IS/IT, project management and best practices, leads to successful projects in public healthcare organisations. The rational of our model is that organisational maturity has a positive effect on IS/IT project success, and that this success is also positively enhanced by the use of project management practices. We emphasise that this combination of approaches can increase the effectiveness of projects. Furthermore, it can also improve the confidence that the results of investments will meet stakeholders’ expectations.

  8. Scaling of an information system in a public healthcare market--infrastructuring from the vendor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Liv Karen; Obstfelder, Aud; Lotherington, Ann Therese

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the making and scaling of information infrastructures, as well as how the conditions for scaling a component may change for the vendor. The first research question is how the making and scaling of a healthcare information infrastructure can be done and by whom. The second question is what scope for manoeuvre there might be for vendors aiming to expand their market. This case study is based on an interpretive approach, whereby data is gathered through participant observation and semi-structured interviews. A case study of the making and scaling of an electronic system for general practitioners ordering laboratory services from hospitals is described as comprising two distinct phases. The first may be characterized as an evolving phase, when development, integration and implementation were achieved in small steps, and the vendor, together with end users, had considerable freedom to create the solution according to the users' needs. The second phase was characterized by a large-scale procurement process over which regional healthcare authorities exercised much more control and the needs of groups other than the end users influenced the design. The making and scaling of healthcare information infrastructures is not simply a process of evolution, in which the end users use and change the technology. It also consists of large steps, during which different actors, including vendors and healthcare authorities, may make substantial contributions. This process requires work, negotiation and strategies. The conditions for the vendor may change dramatically, from considerable freedom and close relationships with users and customers in the small-scale development, to losing control of the product and being required to engage in more formal relations with customers in the wider public healthcare market. Onerous procurement processes may be one of the reasons why large-scale implementation of information projects in healthcare is difficult

  9. A web-based information system for a regional public mental healthcare service network in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiura, Vinicius Tohoru; de Azevedo-Marques, João Mazzoncini; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Vinci, André Luiz Teixeira; Sasso, Ariane Morassi; Miyoshi, Newton Shydeo Brandão; Furegato, Antonia Regina Ferreira; Rijo, Rui Pedro Charters Lopes; Del-Ben, Cristina Marta; Alves, Domingos

    2017-01-01

    Regional networking between services that provide mental health care in Brazil's decentralized public health system is challenging, partly due to the simultaneous existence of services managed by municipal and state authorities and a lack of efficient and transparent mechanisms for continuous and updated communication between them. Since 2011, the Ribeirao Preto Medical School and the XIII Regional Health Department of the Sao Paulo state, Brazil, have been developing and implementing a web-based information system to facilitate an integrated care throughout a public regional mental health care network. After a profound on-site analysis, the structure of the network was identified and a web-based information system for psychiatric admissions and discharges was developed and implemented using a socio-technical approach. An information technology team liaised with mental health professionals, health-service managers, municipal and state health secretariats and judicial authorities. Primary care, specialized community services, general emergency and psychiatric wards services, that comprise the regional mental healthcare network, were identified and the system flow was delineated. The web-based system overcame the fragmentation of the healthcare system and addressed service specific needs, enabling: detailed patient information sharing; active coordination of the processes of psychiatric admissions and discharges; real-time monitoring; the patients' status reports; the evaluation of the performance of each service and the whole network. During a 2-year period of operation, it registered 137 services, 480 health care professionals and 4271 patients, with a mean number of 2835 accesses per month. To date the system is successfully operating and further expanding. We have successfully developed and implemented an acceptable, useful and transparent web-based information system for a regional mental healthcare service network in a medium-income country with a decentralized

  10. Design and implementation of a smart card based healthcare information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardas, Geylani; Tunali, E Turhan

    2006-01-01

    Smart cards are used in information technologies as portable integrated devices with data storage and data processing capabilities. As in other fields, smart card use in health systems became popular due to their increased capacity and performance. Their efficient use with easy and fast data access facilities leads to implementation particularly widespread in security systems. In this paper, a smart card based healthcare information system is developed. The system uses smart card for personal identification and transfer of health data and provides data communication via a distributed protocol which is particularly developed for this study. Two smart card software modules are implemented that run on patient and healthcare professional smart cards, respectively. In addition to personal information, general health information about the patient is also loaded to patient smart card. Health care providers use their own smart cards to be authenticated on the system and to access data on patient cards. Encryption keys and digital signature keys stored on smart cards of the system are used for secure and authenticated data communication between clients and database servers over distributed object protocol. System is developed on Java platform by using object oriented architecture and design patterns.

  11. Understanding requirements of novel healthcare information systems for management of advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagholikar, Amol S; Fung, Maggie; Nelson, Colleen C

    2012-01-01

    Effective management of chronic diseases is a global health priority. A healthcare information system offers opportunities to address challenges of chronic disease management. However, the requirements of health information systems are often not well understood. The accuracy of requirements has a direct impact on the successful design and implementation of a health information system. Our research describes methods used to understand the requirements of health information systems for advanced prostate cancer management. The research conducted a survey to identify heterogeneous sources of clinical records. Our research showed that the General Practitioner was the common source of patient's clinical records (41%) followed by the Urologist (14%) and other clinicians (14%). Our research describes a method to identify diverse data sources and proposes a novel patient journey browser prototype that integrates disparate data sources.

  12. Healthcare System Information at Language Schools for Newly Arrived Immigrants: A Pertinent Setting in Times of Austerity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynell, Lena Lyngholt; Wimmelmann, Camilla Lawaetz; Jervelund, Signe Smith

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In most European countries, immigrants do not systematically learn about the host countries' healthcare system when arriving. This study investigated how newly arrived immigrants perceived the information they received about the Danish healthcare system. Methods: Immigrants attending a language school in Copenhagen in 2012 received…

  13. Commercial versus in-situ usability testing of healthcare information systems: towards "public" usability testing in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Kannry, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The need for improved usability in healthcare IT has been widely recognized. In addition, methods from usability engineering, including usability testing and usability inspection have received greater attention. Many vendors of healthcare software are now employing usability testing methods in the design and development of their products. However, despite this, the usability of healthcare IT is still considered to be problematic and many healthcare organizations that have purchased systems that have been tested at vendor testing sites are still reporting a range of usability and safety issues. In this paper we explore the distinction between commercial usability testing (conducted at centralized vendor usability laboratories and limited beta test sites) and usability testing that is carried out locally within healthcare organizations that have purchased vendor systems and products (i.e. public "in-situ" usability testing). In this paper it will be argued that both types of testing (i.e. commercial vendor-based testing) and in-situ testing are needed to ensure system usability and safety.

  14. Authorization & security aspects in the middleware-based healthcare information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andany, J; Bjorkendal, C; Ferrara, F M; Scherrer, J R; Spahni, S

    1999-01-01

    The integration and evolution of existing systems represents one of the most urgent priorities of health care information systems in order to allow the whole organisation to meet the increasing clinical organisational and managerial needs. The CEN ENV 12967-1 'Healthcare Information Systems Architecture'(HISA) standard defines an architectural approach based on a middleware of business-specific common services, enabling all parts of the local and geographical system to operate on the common information heritage of the organisation and on exploiting a set of common business-oriented functionality. After an overview on the key aspects of HISA, this paper discusses the positioning of the authorization and security aspects in the overall architecture. A global security framework is finally proposed.

  15. Selecting healthcare information systems provided by third-party vendors: a mind map beyond the manuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gortzis, Lefteris G

    2010-01-01

    The selection of a new healthcare information system (HIS) has always been a daunting process for clinicians, health care providers and policy makers. The objective of this study is to present the lessons learned and the main findings from several relevant case studies to support this process. Data were collected by retrospectively reviewing the summative results of three well-established systems, acquiring feedback from two E.U. projects, and conducting semi-structured interviews with a number of collaborators involved in electronic healthcare interventions. Selection issues were identified and classified into the following five categories: (i) data creation, (ii) data management, (iii) data sharing, (iv) data presentation and (v) modules management. A mind map was also structured to provide a more manageable list of issues concerning the most common electronic clinical technologies (e-CT). The vendor manual is intended as an overview of the merchandise e-CT and therefore has limited potential in supporting effectively the selection process of a new HIS. The present classification and the mind map - based on lessons learned - provide a ready-to-use toolkit for supporting the HIS selection process when healthcare organisations are unable to employ research development groups to lay the groundwork for building a new HIS from scratch.

  16. Depiction of Trends in Administrative Healthcare Data from Hospital Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalankesh, Leila R; Pourasghar, Faramarz; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Khanehdan, Negar

    2015-06-01

    administrative healthcare data are among main components of hospital information system. Such data can be analyzed and deployed for a variety of purposes. The principal aim of this research was to depict trends of administrative healthcare data from HIS in a general hospital from March 2011 to March 2014. data set used for this research was extracted from the SQL database of the hospital information system in Razi general hospital located in Marand. The data were saved as CSV (Comma Separated Values) in order to facilitate data cleaning and analysis. The variables of data set included patient's age, gender, final diagnosis, final diagnosis code based on ICD-10 classification system, date of hospitalization, date of discharge, LOS(Length of Stay), ward, and survival status of the patient. Data were analyzed and visualized after applying appropriate cleansing and preparing techniques. morbidity showed a constant trend over three years. Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium were the leading category of final diagnosis (about 32.8 %). The diseases of the circulatory system were the second class accounting for 13 percent of the hospitalization cases. The diseases of the digestive system had the third rank (10%). Patients aged between 14 and 44 constituted a higher proportion of total cases. Diseases of the circulatory system was the most common class of diseases among elderly patients (age≥65). The highest rate of mortality was observed among patients with final diagnosis of the circulatory system diseases followed by those with diseases of the respiratory system, and neoplasms. Mortality rate for the ICU and the CCU patients were 62% and 33% respectively. The longest average of LOS (7.3 days) was observed among patients hospitalized in the ICU while patients in the Obstetrics and Gynecology ward had the shortest average of LOS (2.4 days). Multiple regression analysis revealed that LOS was correlated with variables of surgery, gender, and type of payment, ward, the

  17. Exploring Healthcare Consumer Acceptance of Personal Health Information Management Technology through Personal Health Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare technologies are evolving from a practitioner-centric model to a patient-centric model due to the increasing need for technology that directly serves healthcare consumers, including healthy people and patients. Personal health information management (PHIM) technology is one of the technologies designed to enhance an individual's ability…

  18. Cloud-based hospital information system as a service for grassroots healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qin; Han, Xiong; Ma, Xi-Kun; Xue, Yi-Feng; Chen, Yi-Jun; Li, Jing-Song

    2014-09-01

    Grassroots healthcare institutions (GHIs) are the smallest administrative levels of medical institutions, where most patients access health services. The latest report from the National Bureau of Statistics of China showed that 96.04 % of 950,297 medical institutions in China were at the grassroots level in 2012, including county-level hospitals, township central hospitals, community health service centers, and rural clinics. In developing countries, these institutions are facing challenges involving a shortage of funds and talent, inconsistent medical standards, inefficient information sharing, and difficulties in management during the adoption of health information technologies (HIT). Because of the necessity and gravity for GHIs, our aim is to provide hospital information services for GHIs using Cloud computing technologies and service modes. In this medical scenario, the computing resources are pooled by means of a Cloud-based Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) to serve multiple GHIs, with different hospital information systems dynamically assigned and reassigned according to demand. This paper is concerned with establishing a Cloud-based Hospital Information Service Center to provide hospital information software as a service (HI-SaaS) with the aim of providing GHIs with an attractive and high-performance medical information service. Compared with individually establishing all hospital information systems, this approach is more cost-effective and affordable for GHIs and does not compromise HIT performance.

  19. Sharing Elderly Healthcare information on Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Fangjie; Khan, Israr

    2012-01-01

    Context: Due to rapid increase in the population of elderly people, sharing healthcare information has become an essential requirement for the development of e-health system. By conducting a research in e-health and cloud computing we have explored the advantages and disadvantages of sharing healthcare information for elderly people through cloud computing. Objectives: The main purpose of this research is to investigate the suitability of cloud computing to share healthcare information. The s...

  20. Using hub technology to facilitate information system integration in a health-care enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendler, S M; Friedman, B A; Henricks, W H

    1996-04-01

    The deployment and maintenance of multiple point-to-point interfaces between a clinical information system, such as a laboratory information system, and other systems within a healthcare enterprise is expensive and time consuming. Moreover, the demand for such interfaces is increasing as hospitals consolidate and clinical laboratories participate in the development of regional laboratory networks and create host-to-host links with laboratory outreach clients. An interface engine, also called a hub, is an evolving technology that could replace multiple point-to-point interfaces from a laboratory information system with a single interface to the hub, preferably HL7 based. The hub then routes and translates laboratory information to other systems within the enterprise. Changes in application systems in an enterprise where a centralized interface engine has been implemented then amount to thorough analysis, an update of the enterprise's data dictionary, purchase of a single new vendor-supported interface, and table-based parameter changes on the hub. Two other features of an interface engine, support for structured query language and information store-and-forward, will facilitate the development of clinical data repositories and provide flexibility when interacting with other host systems. This article describes the advantages and disadvantages of an interface engine and lists some problems not solved by the technology. Finally, early developmental experience with an interface engine at the University of Michigan Medical Center and the benefits of the project on system integration efforts are described, not the least of which has been the enthusiastic adoption of the HL7 standard for all future interface projects.

  1. The role of information technology as a complementary resource in healthcare integrated delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, Evelyn H; Revels, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    As in many industries, it is recognized that there is a need to increase the use of information technology (IT) in the healthcare industry. However, until now, this has not occurred. In fact, some say that IT in healthcare has consistently fallen far short of expectations. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the need for a more holistic view of healthcare network integration and demonstrate that simply applying the latest technology to the network is not adequate for improving overall effectiveness. The study results showed that the more holistic view has to include management commitment, of complementarity between IT integration and organizational integration, and continued investments.

  2. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Gvozdanovi_

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1 to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2 to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution.

  3. IoT-Based Information System for Healthcare Application: Design Methodology Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Dziak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, life expectancy has increased significantly. However, elderly people who live on their own often need assistance due to mobility difficulties, symptoms of dementia or other health problems. In such cases, an autonomous supporting system may be helpful. This paper proposes the Internet of Things (IoT-based information system for indoor and outdoor use. Since the conducted survey of related works indicated a lack of methodological approaches to the design process, therefore a Design Methodology (DM, which approaches the design target from the perspective of the stakeholders, contracting authorities and potential users, is introduced. The implemented solution applies the three-axial accelerometer and magnetometer, Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR, thresholding and the decision trees algorithm. Such an architecture enables the localization of a monitored person within four room-zones with accuracy; furthermore, it identifies falls and the activities of lying, standing, sitting and walking. Based on the identified activities, the system classifies current activities as normal, suspicious or dangerous, which is used to notify the healthcare staff about possible problems. The real-life scenarios validated the high robustness of the proposed solution. Moreover, the test results satisfied both stakeholders and future users and ensured further cooperation with the project.

  4. Dutch virtual integration of healthcare information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, J C; Vlug, A E; van Boven, G J

    2007-01-01

    As information technology creates opportunities for cooperation which crosses the boundaries between healthcare institutions, it will become an integral part of the Dutch healthcare system. Along with many involved organizations in healthcare the National IT Institute for Healthcare in the Netherlands (NICTIZ) is working on the realization of a national IT infrastructure for healthcare and a national electronic patient record (EPR). An underlying national architecture is designed to enable the Dutch EPR virtually, not in a national database, nor on a patient's smartcard. The required secure infrastructure provides generic functions for healthcare applications: patient identification, authentication and authorization of healthcare professionals. The first national applications in the EPR program using a national index of where patient data is stored, are the electronic medication record and the electronic record for after hours GP services. The rollout of the electronic medication record and electronic record for after hours GP services has been started in 2007. To guarantee progress of electronic data exchange in healthcare in the Netherlands we have primarily opted for two healthcare applications: the electronic medication record and the electronic record for after hours GP services. The use of a national switch-point containing the registry of where to find what information, guarantees that the professional receives the most recent information and omits large databases to contain downloaded data. Proper authorization, authentication as well as tracing by the national switchpoint also ensures a secure environment for the communication of delicate information.

  5. An assessment of PKI and networked electronic patient record system: lessons learned from real patient data exchange at the platform of OCHIS (Osaka Community Healthcare Information System).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Matsumura, Yasushi; Kuwata, Shigeki; Nakano, Hirohiko; Shanmai, Ji; Qiyan, Zhang; Yufen, Chen; Kusuoka, Hideo; Matsuoka, Masaki

    2004-03-31

    To enhance medical cooperation between the hospitals and clinics around Osaka local area, the healthcare network system, named Osaka Community Healthcare Information System (OCHIS), was established with support of a supplementary budget from the Japanese government in fiscal year 2002. Although the system has been based on healthcare public key infrastructure (PKI), there remain security issues to be solved technically and operationally. An experimental study was conducted to elucidate the central and the local function in terms of a registration authority and a time stamp authority in contract with the Japanese Medical Information Systems Organization (MEDIS) in 2003. This paper describes the experimental design and the results of the study concerning message security.

  6. Improved glycemic control without hypoglycemia in elderly diabetic patients using the ubiquitous healthcare service, a new medical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo; Kang, Seon Mee; Shin, Hayley; Lee, Hak Jong; Won Yoon, Ji; Yu, Sung Hoon; Kim, So-Youn; Yoo, Soo Young; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Ryu, Jun Oh; Jang, Hak C

    2011-02-01

    To improve quality and efficiency of care for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes, we introduced elderly-friendly strategies to the clinical decision support system (CDSS)-based ubiquitous healthcare (u-healthcare) service, which is an individualized health management system using advanced medical information technology. We conducted a 6-month randomized, controlled clinical trial involving 144 patients aged >60 years. Participants were randomly assigned to receive routine care (control, n = 48), to the self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG, n = 47) group, or to the u-healthcare group (n = 49). The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving A1C healthcare system refers to an individualized medical service in which medical instructions are given through the patient's mobile phone. Patients receive a glucometer with a public switched telephone network-connected cradle that automatically transfers test results to a hospital-based server. Once the data are transferred to the server, an automated system, the CDSS rule engine, generates and sends patient-specific messages by mobile phone. After 6 months of follow-up, the mean A1C level was significantly decreased from 7.8 ± 1.3% to 7.4 ± 1.0% (P healthcare group and from 7.9 ± 1.0% to 7.7 ± 1.0% (P = 0.020) in the SMBG group, compared with 7.9 ± 0.8% to 7.8 ± 1.0% (P = 0.274) in the control group. The proportion of patients with A1C healthcare group, 23.4% in the SMBG group (23.4%), and 14.0% in the control group (P healthcare service achieved better glycemic control with less hypoglycemia than SMBG and routine care and may provide effective and safe diabetes management in the elderly diabetic patients.

  7. IAIMS and JCAHO: implications for hospital librarians. Integrated Academic Information Management Systems. Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations.

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, J D

    1999-01-01

    The roles of hospital librarians have evolved from keeping print materials to serving as a focal point for information services and structures within the hospital. Concepts that emerged from the Integrated Academic Information Management Systems (IAIMS) as described in the Matheson Report and the 1994 Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) standards have combined to propel hospital libraries into many new roles and functions. This paper will review the relations...

  8. Design and development of a tele-healthcare information system based on web services and HL7 standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ean-Wen; Hung, Rui-Suan; Chiou, Shwu-Fen; Liu, Fei-Ying; Liou, Der-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technologies progress rapidly and many novel applications have been developed in many domains of human life. In recent years, the demand for healthcare services has been growing because of the increase in the elderly population. Consequently, a number of healthcare institutions have focused on creating technologies to reduce extraneous work and improve the quality of service. In this study, an information platform for tele- healthcare services was implemented. The architecture of the platform included a web-based application server and client system. The client system was able to retrieve the blood pressure and glucose levels of a patient stored in measurement instruments through Bluetooth wireless transmission. The web application server assisted the staffs and clients in analyzing the health conditions of patients. In addition, the server provided face-to-face communications and instructions through remote video devices. The platform deployed a service-oriented architecture, which consisted of HL7 standard messages and web service components. The platform could transfer health records into HL7 standard clinical document architecture for data exchange with other organizations. The prototyping system was pretested and evaluated in a homecare department of hospital and a community management center for chronic disease monitoring. Based on the results of this study, this system is expected to improve the quality of healthcare services.

  9. Network security vulnerabilities and personal privacy issues in Healthcare Information Systems: a case study in a private hospital in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namoğlu, Nihan; Ulgen, Yekta

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare industry has become widely dependent on information technology and internet as it moves from paper to electronic records. Healthcare Information System has to provide a high quality service to patients and a productive knowledge share between healthcare staff by means of patient data. With the internet being commonly used across hospitals, healthcare industry got its own share from cyber threats like other industries in the world. The challenge is allowing knowledge transfer to hospital staff while still ensuring compliance with security mandates. Working in collaboration with a private hospital in Turkey; this study aims to reveal the essential elements of a 21st century business continuity plan for hospitals while presenting the security vulnerabilities in the current hospital information systems and personal privacy auditing standards proposed by regulations and laws. We will survey the accreditation criteria in Turkey and counterparts in US and EU. We will also interview with medical staff in the hospital to understand the needs for personal privacy and the technical staff to perceive the technical requirements in terms of network security configuration and deployment. As hospitals are adopting electronic transactions, it should be considered a must to protect these electronic health records in terms of personal privacy aspects.

  10. Bottom-up and middle-out approaches to electronic patient information systems: a focus on healthcare pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Eason

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background A study is reported that examines the use of electronic health record (EHR systems in two UK local health communities.Objective These systems were developed locally and the aim of the study was to explore how well they were supporting the coordination of care along healthcare pathways that cross the organisational boundaries between the agencies delivering health care.Results The paper presents the findings for two healthcare pathways; the Stroke Pathway and a pathway for the care of the frail elderly in their own homes. All the pathways examined involved multiple agencies and many locally tailored EHR systems are in use to aid the coordination of care. However, the ability to share electronic patient information along the pathways was patchy. The development of systems that enabled effective sharing of information was characterised by sociotechnical system development, i.e. associating the technical development with process changes and organisational changes, with local development teams that drew on all the relevant agencies in the local health community and on evolutionary development, as experience grew of the benefits that EHR systems could deliver.Conclusions The study concludes that whilst there may be a role for a national IT strategy, for example, to set standards for systems procurement that facilitate data interchange, most systems development work needs to be done at a ‘middle-out’ level in the local health community, where joint planning between healthcare agencies can occur, and at the local healthcare pathway level where systems can be matched to specific needs for information sharing.

  11. From buzzword to business strategy: the case for information and decision support systems in e-healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korukonda, Appa Rao; Korukonda, Saritha

    2006-01-01

    Although electronic healthcare can boast of a remarkable origin in modern-day e-commerce in the form of Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), its mission-critical nature in information-based strategising is yet to be realised. Restricting the scope of e-healthcare management to product advertisements and website management reflects an unfortunate trend of underutilisation of the scope of electronic decision support systems in pricing and other business strategies. This paper aims to illustrate how this trend can be corrected by transforming e-healthcare into a full-fledged business strategy for strategic positioning and corporate profitability. This argument is illustrated with the aid of a business example related to transfer pricing.

  12. [Healthcare value chain: a model for the Brazilian healthcare system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, Marcelo Caldeira; Malik, Ana Maria

    2012-10-01

    This article presents a model of the healthcare value chain which consists of a schematic representation of the Brazilian healthcare system. The proposed model is adapted for the Brazilian reality and has the scope and flexibility for use in academic activities and analysis of the healthcare sector in Brazil. It places emphasis on three components: the main activities of the value chain, grouped in vertical and horizontal links; the mission of each link and the main value chain flows. The proposed model consists of six vertical and three horizontal links, amounting to nine. These are: knowledge development; supply of products and technologies; healthcare services; financial intermediation; healthcare financing; healthcare consumption; regulation; distribution of healthcare products; and complementary and support services. Four flows can be used to analyze the value chain: knowledge and innovation; products and services; financial; and information.

  13. Systems design for remote healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Bonfiglio, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a multidisciplinary overview of the design and implementation of systems for remote patient monitoring and healthcare. Readers are guided step-by-step through the components of such a system and shown how they could be integrated in a coherent framework for deployment in practice. The authors explain planning from subsystem design to complete integration and deployment, given particular application constraints. Readers will benefit from descriptions of the clinical requirements underpinning the entire application scenario, physiological parameter sensing techniques, information processing approaches and overall, application dependent system integration. Each chapter ends with a discussion of practical design challenges and two case studies are included to provide practical examples and design methods for two remote healthcare systems with different needs. ·         Provides a multi-disciplinary overview of next-generation mobile healthcare system design; ·         Includes...

  14. Healthcare information technology infrastructures in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogac, A; Yuksel, M; Ertürkmen, G L; Kabak, Y; Namli, T; Yıldız, M H; Ay, Y; Ceyhan, B; Hülür, U; Oztürk, H; Atbakan, E

    2014-05-22

    The objective of this paper is to describe some of the major healthcare information technology (IT) infrastructures in Turkey, namely, Sağlık-Net (Turkish for "Health-Net"), the Centralized Hospital Appointment System, the Basic Health Statistics Module, the Core Resources Management System, and the e-prescription system of the Social Security Institution. International collaboration projects that are integrated with Sağlık-Net are also briefly summarized. The authors provide a survey of the some of the major healthcare IT infrastructures in Turkey. Sağlık-Net has two main components: the National Health Information System (NHIS) and the Family Medicine Information System (FMIS). The NHIS is a nation-wide infrastructure for sharing patients' Electronic Health Records (EHRs). So far, EHRs of 78.9 million people have been created in the NHIS. Similarly, family medicine is operational in the whole country via FMIS. Centralized Hospital Appointment System enables the citizens to easily make appointments in healthcare providers. Basic Health Statistics Module is used for collecting information about the health status, risks and indicators across the country. Core Resources Management System speeds up the flow of information between the headquarters and Provincial Health Directorates. The e-prescription system is linked with Sağlık-Net and seamlessly integrated with the healthcare provider information systems. Finally, Turkey is involved in several international projects for experience sharing and disseminating national developments. With the introduction of the "Health Transformation Program" in 2003, a number of successful healthcare IT infrastructures have been developed in Turkey. Currently, work is going on to enhance and further improve their functionality.

  15. Medical knowledge packages and their integration into health-care information systems and the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Rappelsberger, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Software-based medical knowledge packages (MKPs) are packages of highly structured medical knowledge that can be integrated into various health-care information systems or the World Wide Web. They have been established to provide different forms of clinical decision support such as textual interpretation of combinations of laboratory rest results, generating diagnostic hypotheses as well as confirmed and excluded diagnoses to support differential diagnosis in internal medicine, or for early identification and automatic monitoring of hospital-acquired infections. Technically, an MKP may consist of a number of inter-connected Arden Medical Logic Modules. Several MKPs have been integrated thus far into hospital, laboratory, and departmental information systems. This has resulted in useful and widely accepted software-based clinical decision support for the benefit of the patient, the physician, and the organization funding the health care system.

  16. High-end clinical domain information systems for effective healthcare delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalampalli, Ashish; Rama, Chakravarthy; Muthiyalian, Raja; Jain, Ajeet K

    2007-01-01

    The Electronic Health Record (EHR) provides doctors with a quick, reliable, secure, real-time and user-friendly source of all relevant patient data. The latest information system technologies, such as Clinical Data Warehouses (CDW), Clinical Decision-Support (CDS) systems and data-mining techniques (Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) and Online Transactional Processing (OLTP)), are used to maintain and utilise patient data intelligently, based on the users' requirements. Moreover, clinical trial reports for new drug approvals are now being submitted electronically for faster and easier processing. Also, information systems are used in educating patients about the latest developments in medical science through the internet and specially configured kiosks in hospitals and clinics.

  17. A Collaborative Knowledge Management Process for Implementing Healthcare Enterprise Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chen, Sao-Jie; Lai, Jin-Shin; Lai, Feipei

    This paper illustrates a feasible health informatics domain knowledge management process which helps gather useful technology information and reduce many knowledge misunderstandings among engineers who have participated in the IBM mainframe rightsizing project at National Taiwan University (NTU) Hospital. We design an asynchronously sharing mechanism to facilitate the knowledge transfer and our health informatics domain knowledge management process can be used to publish and retrieve documents dynamically. It effectively creates an acceptable discussion environment and even lessens the traditional meeting burden among development engineers. An overall description on the current software development status is presented. Then, the knowledge management implementation of health information systems is proposed.

  18. Capturing sexual assault data: An information system designed by forensic clinicians and healthcare researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, S Aqif; Smith, Debbie A; Phillips, Maureen A; Kelly, Maire C; Zilkens, Renate R; Semmens, James B

    2018-01-01

    The Sexual Assault Resource Center (SARC) in Perth, Western Australia provides free 24-hour medical, forensic, and counseling services to persons aged over 13 years following sexual assault. The aim of this research was to design a data management system that maintains accurate quality information on all sexual assault cases referred to SARC, facilitating audit and peer-reviewed research. The work to develop SARC Medical Services Clinical Information System (SARC-MSCIS) took place during 2007-2009 as a collaboration between SARC and Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia. Patient demographics, assault details, including injury documentation, and counseling sessions were identified as core data sections. A user authentication system was set up for data security. Data quality checks were incorporated to ensure high-quality data. An SARC-MSCIS was developed containing three core data sections having 427 data elements to capture patient's data. Development of the SARC-MSCIS has resulted in comprehensive capacity to support sexual assault research. Four additional projects are underway to explore both the public health and criminal justice considerations in responding to sexual violence. The data showed that 1,933 sexual assault episodes had occurred among 1881 patients between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2015. Sexual assault patients knew the assailant as a friend, carer, acquaintance, relative, partner, or ex-partner in 70% of cases, with 16% assailants being a stranger to the patient. This project has resulted in the development of a high-quality data management system to maintain information for medical and forensic services offered by SARC. This system has also proven to be a reliable resource enabling research in the area of sexual violence.

  19. Implementation and management of a biomedical observation dictionary in a large healthcare information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbussche, Pierre-Yves; Cormont, Sylvie; André, Christophe; Daniel, Christel; Delahousse, Jean; Charlet, Jean; Lepage, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This study shows the evolution of a biomedical observation dictionary within the Assistance Publique Hôpitaux Paris (AP-HP), the largest European university hospital group. The different steps are detailed as follows: the dictionary creation, the mapping to logical observation identifier names and codes (LOINC), the integration into a multiterminological management platform and, finally, the implementation in the health information system. AP-HP decided to create a biomedical observation dictionary named AnaBio, to map it to LOINC and to maintain the mapping. A management platform based on methods used for knowledge engineering has been put in place. It aims at integrating AnaBio within the health information system and improving both the quality and stability of the dictionary. This new management platform is now active in AP-HP. The AnaBio dictionary is shared by 120 laboratories and currently includes 50 000 codes. The mapping implementation to LOINC reaches 40% of the AnaBio entries and uses 26% of LOINC records. The results of our work validate the choice made to develop a local dictionary aligned with LOINC. This work constitutes a first step towards a wider use of the platform. The next step will support the entire biomedical production chain, from the clinician prescription, through laboratory tests tracking in the laboratory information system to the communication of results and the use for decision support and biomedical research. In addition, the increase in the mapping implementation to LOINC ensures the interoperability allowing communication with other international health institutions.

  20. Using institutional theory with sensemaking theory: a case study of information system implementation in healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Blegind; Kjærgaard, Annemette; Svejvig, Per

    2009-01-01

    Institutional theory has proven to be a central analytical perspective for investigating the role of social and historical structures of information systems (IS) implementation. However, it does not explicitly account for how organisational actors make sense of and enact technologies in their local...... context. We address this limitation by exploring the potential of using institutional theory with sensemaking theory to study IS implementation in organisations. We argue that each theoretical perspective has its own explanatory power and that a combination of the two facilitates a much richer...... interpretation of IS implementation by linking macro- and micro-levels of analysis. To illustrate this, we report from an empirical study of the implementation of an Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system in a clinical setting. Using key constructs from the two theories, our findings address the phenomenon...

  1. Pre-Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Process-oriented Information Systems in Healthcare (ProHealth'07)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichert, M.U.; Peleg, M.; Lenz, R.

    These pre-proceedings contain the presentations given at the 1st Int'l Workshop on Process-oriented Information Systems in Healthcare (ProHealth'07). Formal proceedings will be published in Springer's LNCS series. Process-oriented information systems have been demanded for more than 20 years and

  2. Romanian healthcare system at a glance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Balan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Romanian healthcare system is facing constant challenges to produce high quality care with low costs. Objectives The paper aims to analyze the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system in terms of resources allocation. The evaluation and the dimension of healthcare system efficiency are important for identifying a balance between the resources required and the health outcomes. Prior Work Previous studies describe the Romanian healthcare system as a system in transition. This study focuses on the relationship between the inputs and outputs of the system. Approach In order to assess the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system we use Data Envelopment Analysis approach. Both input and output healthcare indicators are observed for the period 1999-2010 and the years when healthcare inputs have been used efficiently are identified. Results The results show that human, financial, and technological resources have been used at maximum capacity in 1999, 2003, 2004, 2007 and 2010. Implications Though efficiency is defined differently by diverse stakeholders, healthcare policies should focus on rising the responsibility of communities and individuals for better treatments and services and better access to information on healthcare providers. Value The paper is an empirically based study of the healthcare resources allocation in Romania.

  3. Communication in Healthcare: Opportunities for information technology and concerns for patient safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Pirnejad (Habibollah)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractUnderstanding healthcare workflow is fundamental for design and implementation of information systems. Communication and information exchange between healthcare professionals plays a pivotal role in developing smooth workflow within and between healthcare organizations. The study in this

  4. Geographic information system-based healthcare waste management planning for treatment site location and optimal transportation routeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Jothiganesh; Soulalay, Vongdeuane; Chettiyappan, Visvanathan

    2012-06-01

    In Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), a growth of healthcare centres, and the environmental hazards and public health risks typically accompanying them, increased the need for healthcare waste (HCW) management planning. An effective planning of an HCW management system including components such as the treatment plant siting and an optimized routeing system for collection and transportation of waste is deemed important. National government offices at developing countries often lack the proper tools and methodologies because of the high costs usually associated with them. However, this study attempts to demonstrate the use of an inexpensive GIS modelling tool for healthcare waste management in the country. Two areas were designed for this study on HCW management, including: (a) locating centralized treatment plants and designing optimum travel routes for waste collection from nearby healthcare facilities; and (b) utilizing existing hospital incinerators and designing optimum routes for collecting waste from nearby healthcare facilities. Spatial analysis paved the way to understand the spatial distribution of healthcare wastes and to identify hotspots of higher waste generating locations. Optimal route models were designed for collecting and transporting HCW to treatment plants, which also highlights constraints in collecting and transporting waste for treatment and disposal. The proposed model can be used as a decision support tool for the efficient management of hospital wastes by government healthcare waste management authorities and hospitals.

  5. Army Healthcare Enterprise Management System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... The complaint alleged that the Army Healthcare Enterprise Management System was not properly competed, potential conflicts of interest existed, and possible contract performance problems existed...

  6. Implementing healthcare information security: standards can help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Andrej; Bernik, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Using widely spread common approaches to systems security in health dedicated controlled environments, a level of awareness, confidence and acceptance of relevant standardisation is evaluated. Patients' information is sensitive, so putting appropriate organisational techniques as well as modern technology in place to secure health information is of paramount importance. Mobile devices are becoming the top priorities in advanced information security planning with healthcare environments being no exception. There are less and less application areas in healthcare without having a need for a mobile functionality which represents an even greater information security challenge. This is also true in emergency treatments, rehabilitation and homecare just to mention a few areas outside hospital controlled environments. Unfortunately quite often traditional unsecured communications principles are still in routine use for communicating sensitive health related information. The security awareness level with users, patients and care professionals is not high enough so potential threats and risks may not be addressed and the respective information security management is therefore weak. Standards like ISO/IEC 27000 ISMS family, the ISO/IEC 27799 information security guidelines in health are often not well known, but together with legislation principles such as HIPAA, they can help.

  7. Integrating Fingerprint Verification into the Smart Card-Based Healthcare Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Won Park; Sung Bum Pan; Yongwha Chung; Daesung Moon

    2009-01-01

    As VLSI technology has been improved, a smart card employing 32-bit processors has been released, and more personal information such as medical, financial data can be stored in the card. Thus, it becomes important to protect personal information stored in the card. Verification of the card holder's identity using a fingerprint has advantages over the present practices of Personal Identification Numbers (PINs) and passwords. However, the computational workload of fingerprint verification i...

  8. Maternal Healthcare Providers in Uttar Pradesh, India: How to Position Informal Practitioners within the System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chesta Sharma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To understand the knowledge and services of informal providers and to explore their role in addressing the human resource gap in Uttar Pradesh, India, within the context of maternal health.The study is exploratory in nature, conducted in four blocks of four districts of Uttar Pradesh state, India. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 114 informal providers.More than one-third (38% providers have some formal education and unrecognized degrees. Approximately three-fourths (74% of them have more than 5 years of work experience. They also provide delivery and in-patient services and have basic equipment available. However, they lack essential knowledge about maternal health. They have mixed opinion about their contribution towards maternal health but the only ones available. Therefore, despite lacking requisite knowledge, training and services, they become indispensable due to lack of emergency and timely public health services, and being the only ones existing in the community.Informal sector practitioners are a critical link in reaching out to population for health services in developing countries. As opposed to the general notion, they possess years of formal education, experience, informal trainings along with trust of communities. Thus, it becomes important to accept their presence and manage them to the best of their abilities even for specialized care like maternal health.

  9. Slovene smart card and IP based health-care information system infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trcek, D; Novak, R; Kandus, G; Suselj, M

    2001-04-01

    Slovenia initiated a nation-wide project to introduce smart cards in the health sector in 1995 and its full-scale deployment started in September 2000. Although the basic aim of the project was to support insurance related procedures, the system was designed in a flexible and open manner to present an infrastructure for the whole health sector. The functionality of the current system is described in this paper along with lessons learned so far. The upgrade of the system is outlined, with emphasis on technical details, the objective being to provide a real-time EDI based environment for a general set of applications in the medical sector, supported by the flexibility and security of modern smart card technologies. Integration with similar systems in other EU countries is discussed.

  10. Newborn screening healthcare information system based on service-oriented architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Weng, Yung-Ching; Hsu, Kai-Ping; Chen, Chi-Huang; Tu, Chien-Ming; Wang, Zhenyu; Lai, Feipei

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we established a newborn screening system under the HL7/Web Services frameworks. We rebuilt the NTUH Newborn Screening Laboratory's original standalone architecture, having various heterogeneous systems operating individually, and restructured it into a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), distributed platform for further integrity and enhancements of sample collections, testing, diagnoses, evaluations, treatments or follow-up services, screening database management, as well as collaboration, communication among hospitals; decision supports and improving screening accuracy over the Taiwan neonatal systems are also addressed. In addition, the new system not only integrates the newborn screening procedures among phlebotomy clinics, referral hospitals, as well as the newborn screening center in Taiwan, but also introduces new models of screening procedures for the associated, medical practitioners. Furthermore, it reduces the burden of manual operations, especially the reporting services, those were heavily dependent upon previously. The new system can accelerate the whole procedures effectively and efficiently. It improves the accuracy and the reliability of the screening by ensuring the quality control during the processing as well.

  11. Integrating Fingerprint Verification into the Smart Card-Based Healthcare Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Won Park

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As VLSI technology has been improved, a smart card employing 32-bit processors has been released, and more personal information such as medical, financial data can be stored in the card. Thus, it becomes important to protect personal information stored in the card. Verification of the card holder's identity using a fingerprint has advantages over the present practices of Personal Identification Numbers (PINs and passwords. However, the computational workload of fingerprint verification is much heavier than that of the typical PIN-based solution. In this paper, we consider three strategies to implement fingerprint verification in a smart card environment and how to distribute the modules of fingerprint verification between the smart card and the card reader. We first evaluate the number of instructions of each step of a typical fingerprint verification algorithm, and estimate the execution time of several cryptographic algorithms to guarantee the security/privacy of the fingerprint data transmitted in the smart card with the client-server environment. Based on the evaluation results, we analyze each scenario with respect to the security level and the real-time execution requirements in order to implement fingerprint verification in the smart card with the client-server environment.

  12. Integrating Fingerprint Verification into the Smart Card-Based Healthcare Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Daesung; Chung, Yongwha; Pan, Sung Bum; Park, Jin-Won

    2009-12-01

    As VLSI technology has been improved, a smart card employing 32-bit processors has been released, and more personal information such as medical, financial data can be stored in the card. Thus, it becomes important to protect personal information stored in the card. Verification of the card holder's identity using a fingerprint has advantages over the present practices of Personal Identification Numbers (PINs) and passwords. However, the computational workload of fingerprint verification is much heavier than that of the typical PIN-based solution. In this paper, we consider three strategies to implement fingerprint verification in a smart card environment and how to distribute the modules of fingerprint verification between the smart card and the card reader. We first evaluate the number of instructions of each step of a typical fingerprint verification algorithm, and estimate the execution time of several cryptographic algorithms to guarantee the security/privacy of the fingerprint data transmitted in the smart card with the client-server environment. Based on the evaluation results, we analyze each scenario with respect to the security level and the real-time execution requirements in order to implement fingerprint verification in the smart card with the client-server environment.

  13. The Cuban National Healthcare System: Characterization of primary healthcare services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Regina DAL PRÁ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a report on the experience of healthcare professionals in Florianópolis, who took the course La Atención Primaria de Salud y la Medicina Familiar en Cuba [Primary Healthcare and Family Medicine in Cuba], in 2014. The purpose of the study is to characterize the healthcare units and services provided by the Cuban National Healthcare System (SNS and to reflect on this experience/immersion, particularly on Cuba’s Primary Healthcare Service. The results found that in comparison with Brazil’s Single Healthcare System (SUS Cuba’s SNS Family Healthcare (SF service is the central organizing element of the Primary Healthcare Service. The number of SF teams per inhabitant is different than in Brazil; the programs given priority in the APS are similar to those in Brazil and the intersectorial nature and scope of the services prove to be effective in the resolution of healthcare problems.

  14. A Theoretical Approach to Information Needs Across Different Healthcare Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitoharju, Reetta; Aarnio, Eeva

    Increased access to medical information can lead to information overload among both the employees in the healthcare sector as well as among healthcare consumers. Moreover, medical information can be hard to understand for consumers who have no prerequisites for interpreting and understanding it. Information systems (e.g. electronic patient records) are normally designed to meet the demands of one professional group, for instance those of physicians. Therefore, the same information in the same form is presented to all the users of the systems regardless of the actual need or prerequisites. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the differences in information needs across different stakeholders in healthcare. A literature review was conducted to collect examples of these different information needs. Based on the findings the role of more user specific information systems is discussed.

  15. Revolutionizing Healthcare Through Information Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — The Presidents Information Technology Advisory Committee PITAC is appointed by the President to provide independent expert advice on maintaining Americas preeminence...

  16. Tags on healthcare information websites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Ådland, Marit Kristine

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores tags and tagging behaviour on health information websites using an empirical, user-oriented, exploratory case study. Taggers and editors were interviewed about tags and tagging, while taggers solved tasks that included applying tags to a website. This qualitative data...... articles, request information, and value article content. Some of these show that tags are not only not only topical descriptions, but communicative by intent. This result can potentially inform the design of tagging features....

  17. Leveraging Health Information Technology to Improve Quality in Federal Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Fred K; Switaj, Timothy L; Hamilton, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare delivery in America is extremely complex because it is comprised of a fragmented and nonsystematic mix of stakeholders, components, and processes. Within the US healthcare structure, the federal healthcare system is poised to lead American medicine in leveraging health information technology to improve the quality of healthcare. We posit that through developing, adopting, and refining health information technology, the federal healthcare system has the potential to transform federal healthcare quality by managing the complexities associated with healthcare delivery. Although federal mandates have spurred the widespread use of electronic health records, other beneficial technologies have yet to be adopted in federal healthcare settings. The use of health information technology is fundamental in providing the highest quality, safest healthcare possible. In addition, health information technology is valuable in achieving the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's implementation goals. We conducted a comprehensive literature search using the Google Scholar, PubMed, and Cochrane databases to identify an initial list of articles. Through a thorough review of the titles and abstracts, we identified 42 articles as having relevance to health information technology and quality. Through our exclusion criteria of currency of the article, citation frequency, applicability to the federal health system, and quality of research supporting conclusions, we refined the list to 11 references from which we performed our analysis. The literature shows that the use of computerized physician order entry has significantly increased accurate medication dosage and decreased medication errors. The use of clinical decision support systems have significantly increased physician adherence to guidelines, although there is little evidence that indicates any significant correlation to patient outcomes. Research shows that interoperability and usability are continuing challenges for

  18. Behavioral Reference Model for Pervasive Healthcare Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasbi, Arezoo; Adabi, Sahar; Rezaee, Ali

    2016-12-01

    The emergence of mobile healthcare systems is an important outcome of application of pervasive computing concepts for medical care purposes. These systems provide the facilities and infrastructure required for automatic and ubiquitous sharing of medical information. Healthcare systems have a dynamic structure and configuration, therefore having an architecture is essential for future development of these systems. The need for increased response rate, problem limited storage, accelerated processing and etc. the tendency toward creating a new generation of healthcare system architecture highlight the need for further focus on cloud-based solutions for transfer data and data processing challenges. Integrity and reliability of healthcare systems are of critical importance, as even the slightest error may put the patients' lives in danger; therefore acquiring a behavioral model for these systems and developing the tools required to model their behaviors are of significant importance. The high-level designs may contain some flaws, therefor the system must be fully examined for different scenarios and conditions. This paper presents a software architecture for development of healthcare systems based on pervasive computing concepts, and then models the behavior of described system. A set of solutions are then proposed to improve the design's qualitative characteristics including, availability, interoperability and performance.

  19. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitative study using cognitive interviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.; Groenewegen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  20. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitive study using cognitive interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  1. Why (just) information is not enough: The contributions of information services in the management of healthcare information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostagiolas, P.; Lappa, E.

    2015-02-01

    Information is at the centre of every hospital activity including clinical decisions and healthcare service delivery systems. Although information is an important hospital asset, several issues related to its management and organization needs to be addressed within the hospitals. The management of healthcare information is a strategic goal related to the reduction of healthcare service provision costs, and to the improvement of quality and safety of healthcare services. By discussing the rather obvious necessity for information organization and management in the healthcare domain, this work aims at the role of healthcare information services, i.e. hospital libraries and patient medical records. Finally, a typology of information services' contributions to hospital environment is presented.

  2. Why (just) information is not enough: The contributions of information services in the management of healthcare information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostagiolas, P., E-mail: pkostagiolas@ionio.gr [Assistant Professor Department of Archives, Library Science and Museology, Ionian University, CORFU 49100 (Greece); Lappa, E., E-mail: evlappa@med.uoa.gr [Director of Medical Library of General Hospital Attikis KAT, Nikis 2 str, 14564 KIFFISIA-ATHENS (Greece)

    2015-02-09

    Information is at the centre of every hospital activity including clinical decisions and healthcare service delivery systems. Although information is an important hospital asset, several issues related to its management and organization needs to be addressed within the hospitals. The management of healthcare information is a strategic goal related to the reduction of healthcare service provision costs, and to the improvement of quality and safety of healthcare services. By discussing the rather obvious necessity for information organization and management in the healthcare domain, this work aims at the role of healthcare information services, i.e. hospital libraries and patient medical records. Finally, a typology of information services’ contributions to hospital environment is presented.

  3. Why (just) information is not enough: The contributions of information services in the management of healthcare information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostagiolas, P.; Lappa, E.

    2015-01-01

    Information is at the centre of every hospital activity including clinical decisions and healthcare service delivery systems. Although information is an important hospital asset, several issues related to its management and organization needs to be addressed within the hospitals. The management of healthcare information is a strategic goal related to the reduction of healthcare service provision costs, and to the improvement of quality and safety of healthcare services. By discussing the rather obvious necessity for information organization and management in the healthcare domain, this work aims at the role of healthcare information services, i.e. hospital libraries and patient medical records. Finally, a typology of information services’ contributions to hospital environment is presented

  4. Design participation as an insurance: risk-management and end-user participation in the development of information systems in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimarlund, V; Timpka, T

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to build a theoretical framework for analysis of when decision-makers should use end-user participation as a form of insurance for unforeseen consequences of implementing information systems in healthcare organizations. Data were collected in a case study of an information system development project in a small clinical setting. During the initial phase, the future end-users of the system were allowed to actively influence the system design and test every new tool that was considered for implementation. The results of the case study suggest that when time and effort are invested in allowing healthcare staff to participate in information system development processes, the benefits can well exceed the costs throughout the life cycle of the project. Risk-averse decision-makers fearing negative secondary consequences of a HIS, with regard to clinical work flow, will always adopt measures to prevent future failures, if they can find a possibility of shifting these risks. Therefore, they calculate the present discounted value of the effects accrued over time to the unit and predict the amount of resources they are willing to pay to acquire on insurance (such as design participation) that will protect the organization from future losses. End-user participation in the design process can be the key positive influence on the quality of the service and, thereby, organizational effectiveness. Investments in broad design participation can, consequently, be a productive activity that transforms potential current income into future benefits.

  5. Flexible solution for interoperable cloud healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, Mihaela Marcella; Lupşe, Oana Sorina; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Bernad, Elena

    2012-01-01

    It is extremely important for the healthcare domain to have a standardized communication because will improve the quality of information and in the end the resulting benefits will improve the quality of patients' life. The standards proposed to be used are: HL7 CDA and CCD. For a better access to the medical data a solution based on cloud computing (CC) is investigated. CC is a technology that supports flexibility, seamless care, and reduced costs of the medical act. To ensure interoperability between healthcare information systems a solution creating a Web Custom Control is presented. The control shows the database tables and fields used to configure the two standards. This control will facilitate the work of the medical staff and hospital administrators, because they can configure the local system easily and prepare it for communication with other systems. The resulted information will have a higher quality and will provide knowledge that will support better patient management and diagnosis.

  6. A cloud-based home health care information sharing system to connect patients with home healthcare staff -A case report of a study in a mountainous region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Shinichi; Utsumi, Momoe; Sasayama, Satoshi; Dekigai, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a cloud system, the e-Renraku Notebook (e-RN) for sharing of home care information based on the concept of "patient-centricity". In order to assess the likelihood that our system will enhance the communication and sharing of information between home healthcare staff members and home-care patients, we selected patients who were residing in mountainous regions for inclusion in our study. We herein report the findings.Eighteen staff members from 7 medical facilities and 9 patients participated in the present study.The e-RN was developed for two reasons: to allow patients to independently report their health status and to have staff members view and respond to the information received. The patients and staff members were given iPads with the pre-installed applications and the information being exchanged was reviewed over a 54-day period.Information was mainly input by the patients (61.6%), followed by the nurses who performed home visits (19.9%). The amount of information input by patients requiring high-level nursing care and their corresponding staff member was significantly greater than that input by patients who required low-level of nursing care.This patient-centric system in which patients can independently report and share information with a member of the healthcare staff provides a sense of security. It also allows staff members to understand the patient's health status before making a home visit, thereby giving them a sense of security and confidence. It was also noteworthy that elderly patients requiring high-level nursing care and their staff counterpart input information in the system significantly more frequently than patients who required low-level care.

  7. Ensuring healthcare system integrity with blockchain

    OpenAIRE

    I. L?hmus

    2016-01-01

    Blockchain, the underlying protocol behind Bitcoin, has received a tremendous amount of attention over the last two years. Whilst initially focused on financial services, the technology holds much promise for addressing challenges in health-care system. Electronic health records and related information systems have several advantages over historical paper-based management - smooth data transfer between medical care providers, patient empowerment etc. While being convenient and effient these s...

  8. Healthcare system simulation using Witness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakdaman, Masoud; Zeinahvazi, Milad; Zohoori, Bahareh; Nasiri, Fardokht; Wong, Kuan Yew

    2013-01-01

    Simulation techniques have a proven track record in manufacturing industry as well as other areas such as healthcare system improvement. In this study, simulation model of a health center in Malaysia is developed through the application of WITNESS simulation software which has shown its flexibility and capability in manufacturing industry. Modelling procedure is started through process mapping and data collection and continued with model development, verification, validation and experimentation. At the end, final results and possible future improvements are demonstrated.

  9. Nurses' Use and Perception of an Information and Communication Technology System for Improving Coordination During Hospital Discharges: A Survey in Swedish Primary Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Line; Fagerström, Cecilia; Nilsson, Lina

    2017-07-01

    To facilitate communications between care levels and improve coordination during hospital discharges, there is great potential in using information and communication technology systems, because they can significantly help to deter unnecessary readmissions. However, there is still a lack of knowledge about how often nurses use information and communication technology and the indicators related to its use. The aims of this study were to describe the indicators related to nurses' use of an information and communication technology system for collaboration between care levels and to estimate whether the level of use can be related to nurses' perceptions of the information and communication technology system's contribution to improve coordination during hospital discharges. A quantitative survey of 37 nurses from 11 primary healthcare centers was performed in a county in southern Sweden. The data were analyzed using descriptive and comparative analyses. The results showed that perceptions concerning the information and communication technology system's usability and time consumption differed between nurses who used the system and those who did not. Simultaneously, the nurses were rather unaware of the ability of the information and communication technology system to improve coordination during patient discharges.

  10. Health Information Systems

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    the technology and expertise to process and share ... services. GEHS supports efforts that reach beyond healthcare institutions to capture evidence ... Health information systems are a foundation for quality care, and can increase accountability ...

  11. Healthcare and healthcare systems: inspiring progress and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Hammad

    2016-01-01

    growth will occur in the urban areas of poor countries. The rapid, unplanned and unsustainable style of urban development will make developing countries cities the key focal points for emerging environmental and health hazards. Changes will be seen in design, culture and practices of hospitals to better meet the needs of patients, families and providers. Top driving factors of global healthcare system for next 30 years will be leading causes of mortalities, non-health factors (impact of nutrition, sanitation and women's empowerment), investment in health workforce and growth of medical tourism in future healthcare scenario. Evaluating the patterns of previous 30 years and predicting the progress and challenges of future health system are no rocket science. Medical care will be more self-directed in a more tech-savvy population as information will be more accessible and user friendly with higher quality. Health driving factors such as clean water, sanitation and food will take the center stage in humanities struggle and even increase population size.

  12. Healthcare Services Managers: What Information do They Need and Use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Booth

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – The purpose of this research project was to gain insight into the information behaviour of healthcare services managers as they use information while engaged in decision-making unrelated to individual patient care. Methods – This small-scale, exploratory, multiple case study used the critical incident technique in nineteen semi-structured interviews. Responses were analyzed using ‘Framework,’ a matrix-based content analysis system. Results – This paper presents findings related to the internal information that healthcare services managers need and use. Their decisions are influenced by a wide variety of factors. They must often make decisions without all of the information they would prefer to have. Internal information and practical experience set the context for new research-based information, so they are generally considered first.Conclusions – Healthcare services managers support decisions with both facts and value-based information. These results may inform both delivery of health library services delivery and strategic health information management planning. They may also support librarians who extend their skills beyond managing library collections and teaching published information retrieval skills, to managing internal and external information, teaching information literacy, and supporting information sharing.

  13. System integrational and migrational concepts and methods within healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endsleff, F; Loubjerg, P

    1997-01-01

    In this paper an overview and comparison of the basic concepts and methods behind different system integrational implementations is given, including the DHE, which is based on the coming Healthcare Information Systems Architecture pre-standard HISA, developed by CEN TC251. This standard and the DHE...... (Distributed Healthcare Environment) not only provides highly relevant standards, but also provides an efficient and well structured platform for Healthcare IT Systems....

  14. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology

    OpenAIRE

    Naenna, Thanakorn; Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand...

  15. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology

    OpenAIRE

    Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn; Naenna, Thanakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand. D...

  16. The Integration of Two Healthcare Systems: A Common Healthcare Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassatly, Hannah; Cassatly, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The change in reimbursement mandated by the Affordable Care Act is causing a rapid consolidation of the marketplace as well as the delivery of clinical care in a team-based model. This case report examines the successful joining of two clinical teams concurrent with the merger of two healthcare organizations and discusses some of the difficulties encountered. A subsequent discussion focuses on the resolution: the need for physicians to embrace the team concept of healthcare delivery and for healthcare systems to facilitate this transition with team and leadership coaching.

  17. Impact of Healthcare Information Technology on Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscotty, Ronald J; Kalisch, Beatrice; Gracey-Thomas, Angel

    2015-07-01

    To report additional mediation findings from a descriptive cross sectional study to examine if nurses' perceptions of the impact of healthcare information technology on their practice mediates the relationship between electronic nursing care reminder use and missed nursing care. The study used a descriptive design. The sample (N = 165) was composed of registered nurses working on acute care hospital units. The sample was obtained from a large teaching hospital in Southeast Michigan in the fall of 2012. All eligible nursing units (n = 19) were included. The MISSCARE Survey, Nursing Care Reminders Usage Survey, and the Impact of Healthcare Information Technology Scale were used to collect data to test for mediation. Mediation was tested using the method described by Baron and Kenny. Multiple regression equations were used to analyze the data to determine if mediation occurred between the variables. Missed nursing care, the outcome variable, was regressed on the predictor variable, reminder usage, and the mediator variable impact of technology on nursing practice. The impact of healthcare information technology (IHIT) on nursing practice negatively affected missed nursing care (t = -4.12, p information technology mediates the relationship between nursing care reminder use and missed nursing care. The findings are beneficial to the advancement of healthcare technology in that designers of healthcare information technology systems need to keep in mind that perceptions regarding impacts of the technology will influence usage. Many times, information technology systems are not designed to match the workflow of nurses. Systems built with redundant or impertinent reminders may be ignored. System designers must study which reminders nurses find most useful and which reminders result in the best quality outcomes. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Patient-centredness in integrated healthcare delivery systems - needs, expectations and priorities for organised healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhnke, Christin; Mühlbacher, Axel C

    2013-01-01

    Patient-centred healthcare is becoming a more significant success factor in the design of integrated healthcare systems. The objective of this study is to structure a patient-relevant hierarchy of needs and expectations for the design of organised healthcare delivery systems. A questionnaire with 84 items was conducted with N = 254 healthcare experts and N = 670 patients. Factor analyses were performed using SPSS©18. The number of factors retained was controlled by Kaiser's criterion, validation of screeplots and interpretability of the items. Cronbach's α was used to assess the internal consistency of the subscales. Exploratory factor analysis led to 24 factors in the expert sample and 20 in the patient sample. After analysing the screeplots, confirmatory factor analyses were computed for 7-factor solutions accounting for 42.963% of the total variance and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin of 0.914 for the patients (experts: 38.427%, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin = 0.797). Cronbach's α ranged between 0.899 and 0.756. Based on the analysis, coordinated care could be differentiated into seven dimensions: access, data and information, service and infrastructure, professional care, interpersonal care, individualised care, continuity and coordination. The study provides insight into patient and experts expectations towards the organisation of integrated healthcare delivery systems. If providers and payers can take into account patient needs and expectations while implementing innovative healthcare delivery systems, greater acceptance and satisfaction will be achieved. In the best case, this will lead to better adherence resulting in better clinical outcomes.

  19. Introduction to the First International Workshop on Process-Oriented Information Systems in Healthcare (ProHealth 2007)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichert, Manfred; Peleg, Mor; Lenz, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The proHealth’07 workshop is held in Brisbane in conjunction with the fifth international conference on business process management. ProHealth’07 elaborates both the potential and the limitations of IT support for healthcare processes. It further provides a forum wherein challenges, paradigms, and

  20. Army Healthcare Enterprise Management System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    ... to buy the Enterprise Management System. The Information Technology Business Center provides information technology services to Fort Sam Houston tenants which include the Army Medical Command and the Army Medical Department Center and School...

  1. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitative study using cognitive interviews.

    OpenAIRE

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.; Groenewegen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees (n = 20) were asked to think aloud and answer questions, as they were prompted with three Dutch web pages providing comparative healthcare information. Results We identified twelve themes fr...

  2. An Architecture for Health Information Exchange in Pervasive Healthcare Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso de Moraes, J.L.; Lopes de Souza, Wanderley; Ferreira Pires, Luis; Francisco do Prado, Antonio; Hammoudi, S.; Cordeiro, J.; Maciaszek, L.A.; Filipe, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for health information exchange in pervasive healthcare environments meant to be generally applicable to different applications in the healthcare domain. Our architecture has been designed for message exchange by integrating ubiquitous computing technologies,

  3. Mobile healthcare information management utilizing Cloud Computing and Android OS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Charalampos; Pliakas, Thomas; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2010-01-01

    Cloud Computing provides functionality for managing information data in a distributed, ubiquitous and pervasive manner supporting several platforms, systems and applications. This work presents the implementation of a mobile system that enables electronic healthcare data storage, update and retrieval using Cloud Computing. The mobile application is developed using Google's Android operating system and provides management of patient health records and medical images (supporting DICOM format and JPEG2000 coding). The developed system has been evaluated using the Amazon's S3 cloud service. This article summarizes the implementation details and presents initial results of the system in practice.

  4. Management demands on information and communication technology in process-oriented health-care organizations: the importance of understanding managers' expectations during early phases of systems design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Anna; Vimarlund, Vivian; Timpka, Toomas

    2002-01-01

    There are numerous challenges to overcome before information and communication technology (ICT) can achieve its full potential in process-oriented health-care organizations. One of these challenges is designing systems that meet users' needs, while reflecting a continuously changing organizational environment. Another challenge is to develop ICT that supports both the internal and the external stakeholders' demands. In this study a qualitative research strategy was used to explore the demands on ICT expressed by managers from functional and process units at a community hospitaL The results reveal a multitude of partially competing goals that can make the ICT development process confusing, poor in quality, inefficient and unnecessarily costly. Therefore, from the perspective of ICT development, the main task appears to be to coordinate the different visions and in particular clarify them, as well as to establish the impact that these visions would have on the forthcoming ICT application.

  5. Predicting Personal Healthcare Management: Impact of Individual Characteristics on Patient Use of Health Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandefer, Ryan Heath

    2017-01-01

    The use of health information and health information technology by consumers is a major factor in the current healthcare systems' effort to address issues related to quality, cost, and access. Patient engagement in the healthcare process through access to information related to diagnoses, procedures, and treatment has the potential to improve…

  6. Consumer response to a report card comparing healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Barbara L; Kind, Elizabeth A; Fowles, Jinnet B; Suarez, Walter G

    2002-06-01

    Report cards to date have focused on quality of care in health plans rather than within healthcare delivery systems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate consumer response to the first healthcare system-level report card. Qualitative assessment of consumer response. We conducted 5 focus groups of community members to evaluate consumer response to the report card; 2 included community club members, 3 included community-dwelling retired persons. Discussions were audiotaped and transcribed; comments were categorized by topic area from the script, and common themes identified. Focus group participants, in general, were unaware of the current emphasis on medical quality improvement initiatives. However, they believed that the opinion that the descriptive clinic information and patient survey data contained in the report card would be most useful mainly for choosing a healthcare system if they were dissatisfied with current medical care, if their healthcare options changed, or if they were in poor health. Personal experience was considered a more trustworthy measure of healthcare quality than were patient survey results. Trustworthiness was perceived to be higher if the report card sponsor was not affiliated with the healthcare systems being evaluated. Participants also believed care system administrators should use the data to enact positive clinic-level and physician-level changes. Healthcare consumers appreciated the attention to patient experiences and supported healthcare quality improvement initiatives. Report cards were considered important for choosing a healthcare system in certain circumstances and for guiding quality improvement efforts at all levels.

  7. Healthcare Systems and Other Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kasteren, T.L.M.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    This Works in Progress department discusses eight projects related to healthcare. The first project aims to aid people with mild dementia. The second project plans to simplify the delivery of healthcare services to the elderly and cognitively disabled, while the third project is developing models

  8. Awareness of the healthcare system and rights to healthcare in the Colombian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Gallego, María Eugenia; Vázquez-Navarrete, María Luisa

    2013-01-01

    To analyze changes in users' awareness of the healthcare system and of their rights to healthcare in Colombia in the last 10 years, as well as the factors that influence users' awareness. We carried out a descriptive study to compare the results of two cross-sectional studies based on two surveys of users of the Colombian healthcare system. The first survey was performed in 2000 and the second in 2010. The municipalities of Tuluá (urban area) and Palmira (rural area) were surveyed. In both surveys, a stratified, multistage probability sample was selected. There were 1497 users in the first sample and 1405 in the second. Changes in awareness of the healthcare system and associated factors in each year were assessed through multivariate logistic regressions. Users' awareness of the healthcare system was limited in 2000 and was significantly lower in 2010, except for that relating to health insurers and providers. In contrast, more than 90% of users in both surveys perceived themselves as having healthcare rights. The factors consistently associated with greater awareness were belonging to a high socioeconomic stratum and having higher education. The most underprivileged users were less likely to be aware of the healthcare system, hampering their ability to make informed decisions and to exercise their health rights. To correct this situation, health institutions and the government should act decisively to reduce social inequalities. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Measuring healthcare productivity - from unit to system level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämäräinen, Vesa Johannes; Peltokorpi, Antti; Torkki, Paulus; Tallbacka, Kaj

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Healthcare productivity is a growing issue in most Western countries where healthcare expenditure is rapidly increasing. Therefore, accurate productivity metrics are essential to avoid sub-optimization within a healthcare system. The purpose of this paper is to focus on healthcare production system productivity measurement. Design/methodology/approach - Traditionally, healthcare productivity has been studied and measured independently at the unit, organization and system level. Suggesting that productivity measurement should be done in different levels, while simultaneously linking productivity measurement to incentives, this study presents the challenges of productivity measurement at the different levels. The study introduces different methods to measure productivity in healthcare. In addition, it provides background information on the methods used to measure productivity and the parameters used in these methods. A pilot investigation of productivity measurement is used to illustrate the challenges of measurement, to test the developed measures and to prove the practical information for managers. Findings - The study introduces different approaches and methods to measure productivity in healthcare. Practical implications - A pilot investigation of productivity measurement is used to illustrate the challenges of measurement, to test the developed measures and to prove the practical benefits for managers. Originality/value - The authors focus on the measurement of the whole healthcare production system and try to avoid sub-optimization. Additionally considering an individual patient approach, productivity measurement is examined at the unit level, the organizational level and the system level.

  10. Patient-centeredness in Integrated healthcare delivery systems - Needs, expectations and priorities for organized healthcare systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Juhnke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient-centred healthcare is becoming a more significant success factor in the design of integrated healthcare systems. The objective of this study is to structure a patient-relevant hierarchy of needs and expectations for the design of organised healthcare delivery systems. Methods: A questionnaire with 84 items was conducted with N = 254 healthcare experts and N = 670 patients. Factor analyses were performed using SPSS©18. The number of factors retained was controlled by Kaiser's criterion, validation of screeplots and interpretability of the items. Cronbach's α was used to assess the internal consistency of the subscales. Results: Exploratory factor analysis led to 24 factors in the expert sample and 20 in the patient sample. After analysing the screeplots, confirmatory factor analyses were computed for 7-factor solutions accounting for 42.963% of the total variance and Kaiser–Meyer–Olkinof 0.914 for the patients (experts: 38.427%, Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin = 0.797. Cronbach's α ranged between 0.899 and 0.756. Based on the analysis, coordinated care could be differentiated into seven dimensions: access, data and information, service and infrastructure, professional care, interpersonal care, individualised care, continuity and coordination. Conclusion and Discussion: The study provides insight into patient and experts expectations towards the organisation of integrated healthcare delivery systems. If providers and payers can take into account patient needs and expectations while implementing innovative healthcare delivery systems, greater acceptance and satisfaction will be achieved. In the best case, this will lead to better adherence resulting in better clinical outcomes.

  11. Patient-centeredness in Integrated healthcare delivery systems - Needs, expectations and priorities for organized healthcare systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Juhnke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient-centred healthcare is becoming a more significant success factor in the design of integrated healthcare systems. The objective of this study is to structure a patient-relevant hierarchy of needs and expectations for the design of organised healthcare delivery systems.Methods: A questionnaire with 84 items was conducted with N = 254 healthcare experts and N = 670 patients. Factor analyses were performed using SPSS©18. The number of factors retained was controlled by Kaiser's criterion, validation of screeplots and interpretability of the items. Cronbach's α was used to assess the internal consistency of the subscales.Results: Exploratory factor analysis led to 24 factors in the expert sample and 20 in the patient sample. After analysing the screeplots, confirmatory factor analyses were computed for 7-factor solutions accounting for 42.963% of the total variance and Kaiser–Meyer–Olkinof 0.914 for the patients (experts: 38.427%, Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin = 0.797. Cronbach's α ranged between 0.899 and 0.756. Based on the analysis, coordinated care could be differentiated into seven dimensions: access, data and information, service and infrastructure, professional care, interpersonal care, individualised care, continuity and coordination.Conclusion and Discussion: The study provides insight into patient and experts expectations towards the organisation of integrated healthcare delivery systems. If providers and payers can take into account patient needs and expectations while implementing innovative healthcare delivery systems, greater acceptance and satisfaction will be achieved. In the best case, this will lead to better adherence resulting in better clinical outcomes.

  12. Healthcare Firms and the ERP Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garefalakis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the continuous and drastic changes due to the economic crisis, along with the increasing market demands, major reforms are initiated in the healthcare sector in order to improve the quality of healthcare and operational efficiency, while reducing costs and optimizing back-end operations. ERP systems have been the basic technological infrastructure to many sectors as well as healthcare. The main objective of this study is to discuss how the adoption of ERP systems in healthcare organizations improves their functionality, simplifies their business processes, assure the quality of care services and helps their management accounting and controlling. This study presents also the stages required for the implementation of ERP system in healthcare organizations. This study utilizes a literature review in order to reach the research conclusions. Specifically, through related case studies and research, it examines how ERP systems are used to evaluate the better functionality of the healthcare organizations, addressing in parallel important problems, and possible malfunctions. The implementation of ERP systems in healthcare organizations promises to evolve and align strictly to the organizations’ corporate objectives and high-levels of healthcare quality. In order to accomplish this goal, the right decisions should be made by the managers of the healthcare organization regarding the choice of the appropriate ERP system following its installation and its application. Limited research exists on the significance ERP systems implementation in healthcare organizations, while possible dysfunctions and challenges during its installation and implementation are recorded. Therefore, new evidence in the significance of ERP systems in healthcare organization is provided.

  13. Managing Quality in Health Care: Involving Patient Care Information Systems and Healthcare Professionals in Quality Monitoring and Improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Mul (Marleen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIt is no longer possible to ignore the issue of quality in health care. Care institutions strive to provide all patients with effective, efficient, safe, timely, patient-centered care. Increased attention for quality is also found in discussions regarding use of information

  14. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn; Naenna, Thanakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand. Data collected from 400 employees including physicians, nurses, and hospital staff members were tested the model using structural equation modeling technique. The results found that the factors with a significant effect are performance expectancy, effort expectancy and facilitating conditions. They were also found to have a significant impact on behavioral intention to use the acceptance healthcare technology. In addition, in Thai provincial areas, positive significance was found with two factors: social influence on behavioral intention and facilitating conditions to direct using behavior. Based on research findings, in order for healthcare information technology to be widely adopted and used by healthcare staffs in healthcare supply chain management, the healthcare organizational management should improve healthcare staffs' behavioral intention and facilitating conditions.

  15. Factors affecting the adoption of healthcare information technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phichitchaisopa, Nisakorn; Naenna, Thanakorn

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality and performance of healthcare services, healthcare information technology is among the most important technology in healthcare supply chain management. This study sets out to apply and test the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), to examine the factors influencing healthcare Information Technology (IT) services. A structured questionnaire was developed and distributed to healthcare representatives in each province surveyed in Thailand. Data collected from 400 employees including physicians, nurses, and hospital staff members were tested the model using structural equation modeling technique. The results found that the factors with a significant effect are performance expectancy, effort expectancy and facilitating conditions. They were also found to have a significant impact on behavioral intention to use the acceptance healthcare technology. In addition, in Thai provincial areas, positive significance was found with two factors: social influence on behavioral intention and facilitating conditions to direct using behavior. Based on research findings, in order for healthcare information technology to be widely adopted and used by healthcare staffs in healthcare supply chain management, the healthcare organizational management should improve healthcare staffs' behavioral intention and facilitating conditions. PMID:26417235

  16. Perfect match? Generation Y as change agents for information communication technology implementation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kwang Chien; Miils, Erin; Airey, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    The current healthcare delivery model will not meet future healthcare demands. The only sustainable healthcare future is one that best leverages advances in technology to improve productivity and efficiency. Information communication technology (ICT) has, therefore, been touted as the panacea of future healthcare challenges. Many ICT projects in healthcare, however, fail to deliver on their promises to transform the healthcare system. From a technologist's perspective, this is often due to the lack of socio-technical consideration. From a socio-cultural perspective, however, there is often strong inertia to change. While the utilisation of user-centred design principles will generate a new wave of enthusiasm among technologists, this has to be matched with socio-cultural changes within the healthcare system. Generation Y healthcare workers might be the socio-cultural factor required, in combination with new technology, to transform the healthcare system. Generation Y has generated significant technology-driven changes in many other industries. The socio-cultural understanding of generation Y healthcare workers is essential to guide the design and implementation of ICT solutions for a sustainable healthcare future. This paper presents the initial analysis of our qualitative study which aims to generate in-depth conceptual insights of generation Y healthcare workers and their view of ICT in healthcare. Our results show that generation Y healthcare workers might assist future ICT implementation in healthcare. This paper, however, argues that significant changes to the current healthcare organisation will be required in order to unleash the full potential of generation Y workers and ICT implementation. Finally, this paper presents some strategies to empower generation Y workers as change agents for a sustainable future healthcare system.

  17. The construction of a public key infrastructure for healthcare information networks in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, N

    2001-01-01

    The digital signature is a key technology in the forthcoming Internet society for electronic healthcare as well as for electronic commerce. Efficient exchanges of authorized information with a digital signature in healthcare information networks require a construction of a public key infrastructure (PKI). In order to introduce a PKI to healthcare information networks in Japan, we proposed a development of a user authentication system based on a PKI for user management, user authentication and privilege management of healthcare information systems. In this paper, we describe the design of the user authentication system and its implementation. The user authentication system provides a certification authority service and a privilege management service while it is comprised of a user authentication client and user authentication serves. It is designed on a basis of an X.509 PKI and is implemented with using OpenSSL and OpenLDAP. It was incorporated into the financial information management system for the national university hospitals and has been successfully working for about one year. The hospitals plan to use it as a user authentication method for their whole healthcare information systems. One implementation of the system is free to the national university hospitals with permission of the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. Another implementation is open to the other healthcare institutes by support of the Medical Information System Development Center (MEDIS-DC). We are moving forward to a nation-wide construction of a PKI for healthcare information networks based on it.

  18. Engineering the system of healthcare delivery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rouse, William B; Cortese, Denis A

    2010-01-01

    "As the United States continues to debate reform of its healthcare system, this book argues that providing health insurance for all without improving the delivery system will not improve the current...

  19. Assessment of Web-Based Authentication Methods in the U.S.: Comparing E-Learning Systems to Internet Healthcare Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattord, Herbert J.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations continue to rely on password-based authentication methods to control access to many Web-based systems. This research study developed a benchmarking instrument intended to assess authentication methods used in Web-based information systems (IS). It developed an Authentication Method System Index (AMSI) to analyze collected data from…

  20. A new XML-aware compression technique for improving performance of healthcare information systems over hospital networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shammary, Dhiah; Khalil, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Most organizations exchange, collect, store and process data over the Internet. Many hospital networks deploy Web services to send and receive patient information. SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) is the most usable communication protocol for Web services. XML is the standard encoding language of SOAP messages. However, the major drawback of XML messages is the high network traffic caused by large overheads. In this paper, two XML-aware compressors are suggested to compress patient messages stemming from any data transactions between Web clients and servers. The proposed compression techniques are based on the XML structure concepts and use both fixed-length and Huffman encoding methods for translating the XML message tree. Experiments show that they outperform all the conventional compression methods and can save tremendous amount of network bandwidth.

  1. [Information, knowledge and healthcare practice: professionals participation as the key element of the gear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Paula; Permanyer-Miralda, Gaietà; Solà-Morales, Oriol; Canela-Soler, Jaume

    2010-02-01

    This article analyzes the role of ICT within the complicated gear between information, knowledge and healthcare practices, which particular focus on two specific cases: the digitalization process of the healthcare system and the application of knowledge into the healthcare practices. In both cases, international and local experiences suggest, and sometimes demonstrate the importance of the participation, capacity-building and empowerment of healthcare practitioners for the generation, transfer and use of information and knowledge empowered by the digital tools which should bring into the system better performance, more efficacy, efficiency, equity, equality, security, quality. 2010 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Architecture and implementation for a system enabling smartphones to access smart card based healthcare records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampelas, Vasilios; Pallikarakis, Nicholas; Mantas, John

    2013-01-01

    The healthcare researchers', academics' and practitioners' interest concerning the development of Healthcare Information Systems has been on a steady rise for the last decades. Fueling this steady rise has been the healthcare professional need of quality information, in every healthcare provision incident, whenever and wherever this incident may take place. In order to address this need a truly mobile health care system is required, one that will be able to provide a healthcare provider with accurate patient-related information regardless of the time and place that healthcare is provided. In order to fulfill this role the present study proposes the architecture for a Healthcare Smartcard system, which provides authenticated healthcare professionals with remote mobile access to a Patient's Healthcare Record, through their Smartphone. Furthermore the research proceeds to develop a working prototype system.

  3. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitative study using cognitive interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delnoij Diana MJ

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees (n = 20 were asked to think aloud and answer questions, as they were prompted with three Dutch web pages providing comparative healthcare information. Results We identified twelve themes from consumers' thoughts and evaluations. These themes were categorized under four important areas of interest: (1 a response to the design; (2 a response to the information content; (3 the use of the information, and (4 the purpose of the information. Conclusion Several barriers to an effective use of comparative healthcare information were identified, such as too much information and the ambiguity of terms presented on websites. Particularly important for future research is the question of how comparative healthcare information can be integrated with alternative information, such as patient reviews on the Internet. Furthermore, the readability of quality of care concepts is an issue that needs further attention, both from websites and communication experts.

  4. Designing healthcare information technology to catalyse change in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lester

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The gap between best practice and actual patient care continues to be a pervasive problem in our healthcare system. Efforts to improve on this knowledge_performance gap have included computerised disease management programs designed to improve guideline adherence. However, current computerised reminder and decision support interventions directed at changing physician behaviour have had only a limited and variable effect on clinical outcomes. Further, immediate pay-for-performance financial pressures on institutions have created an environmentwhere disease management systems are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems and poorly integrated into the existing workflow, potentially limiting their realworld effectiveness. The authors present a review of disease management as well as a conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective health information technology (HIT tools for translating clinical information into clinical action.

  5. Sustainability of midwifery practice within the South African healthcare system

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Cur. The study on ‘Sustainability of midwifery practice within the South African healthcare system’ is stimulated by the lack of research that influences policy to support midwifery practice in South Africa. The poor database and health information systems for midwives result in the poor performance of maternal healthcare in the public sector (Parkhurst, Penn- Kekana, Blaauw, Balabanova, Danishevski, Rahman, Onama, & Ssengooba 2005) in spite of meeting the Safe Motherhood Initiative of t...

  6. Enhancing Health-Care Services with Mixed Reality Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantchev, Vladimir

    This work presents a development approach for mixed reality systems in health care. Although health-care service costs account for 5-15% of GDP in developed countries the sector has been remarkably resistant to the introduction of technology-supported optimizations. Digitalization of data storing and processing in the form of electronic patient records (EPR) and hospital information systems (HIS) is a first necessary step. Contrary to typical business functions (e.g., accounting or CRM) a health-care service is characterized by a knowledge intensive decision process and usage of specialized devices ranging from stethoscopes to complex surgical systems. Mixed reality systems can help fill the gap between highly patient-specific health-care services that need a variety of technical resources on the one side and the streamlined process flow that typical process supporting information systems expect on the other side. To achieve this task, we present a development approach that includes an evaluation of existing tasks and processes within the health-care service and the information systems that currently support the service, as well as identification of decision paths and actions that can benefit from mixed reality systems. The result is a mixed reality system that allows a clinician to monitor the elements of the physical world and to blend them with virtual information provided by the systems. He or she can also plan and schedule treatments and operations in the digital world depending on status information from this mixed reality.

  7. The Appliance Pervasive of Internet of Things in Healthcare Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Talpur, Mir Sajjad Hussain

    2013-01-01

    In fact, information systems are the foundation of new productivity sources, medical organizational forms, and erection of a global economy. IoT based healthcare systems play a significant role in ICT and have contribution in growth of medical information systems, which are underpinning of recent medical and economic development strategies. However, to take advantages of IoT, it is essential that medical enterprises and community should trust the IoT systems in terms of performance, security,...

  8. Strengthening the decentralised healthcare system in rural South Africa through improved service delivery: testing mobility, information and communication technology intervention options

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chakwizira, J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available their own human resources in providing healthcare services that ultimately counteract these inequalities. Presently, what could be considered the last level of decentralised healthcare is mostly represented by home and community-based healthcare...

  9. Cyberterrorism: is the U.S. healthcare system safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, David; Yellowlees, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The Internet has brought with it many benefits; key among them has been its ability to allow the expansion of communication and transfer of all kinds of information throughout the U.S. healthcare system. As a consequence, healthcare has become increasingly dependent on the activities carried out in that environment. It is this very dependence that increases the likelihood of individuals or organizations conducting activities through the Internet that will cause physical and/or psychological harm. These activities have become known by the term "cyberterrorism." In the healthcare landscape this can appear in a variety of forms, such as bringing down a hospital computer system or publicly revealing private medical records. Whatever shape it takes, the general effects are the same: patient care is compromised, and trust in the health system is diminished. Fortunately no significant cyber attack has been successfully launched against a U.S. healthcare organization to date. However, there is evidence to suggest that cyber threats are increasing and that much of the U.S. healthcare system is ill equipped to deal with them. Securing cyberspace is not an easy proposition as the threats are constantly changing, and recognizing that cyberterrorism should be part of a broader information technology risk management strategy, there are several"best practices" that can be adopted by healthcare organizations to protect themselves against cyber attacks.

  10. Expert Search Strategies: The Information Retrieval Practices of Healthcare Information Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Rose, Tony; Chamberlain, Jon

    2017-10-02

    Healthcare information professionals play a key role in closing the knowledge gap between medical research and clinical practice. Their work involves meticulous searching of literature databases using complex search strategies that can consist of hundreds of keywords, operators, and ontology terms. This process is prone to error and can lead to inefficiency and bias if performed incorrectly. The aim of this study was to investigate the search behavior of healthcare information professionals, uncovering their needs, goals, and requirements for information retrieval systems. A survey was distributed to healthcare information professionals via professional association email discussion lists. It investigated the search tasks they undertake, their techniques for search strategy formulation, their approaches to evaluating search results, and their preferred functionality for searching library-style databases. The popular literature search system PubMed was then evaluated to determine the extent to which their needs were met. The 107 respondents indicated that their information retrieval process relied on the use of complex, repeatable, and transparent search strategies. On average it took 60 minutes to formulate a search strategy, with a search task taking 4 hours and consisting of 15 strategy lines. Respondents reviewed a median of 175 results per search task, far more than they would ideally like (100). The most desired features of a search system were merging search queries and combining search results. Healthcare information professionals routinely address some of the most challenging information retrieval problems of any profession. However, their needs are not fully supported by current literature search systems and there is demand for improved functionality, in particular regarding the development and management of search strategies. ©Tony Russell-Rose, Jon Chamberlain. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http://medinform.jmir.org), 02.10.2017.

  11. Some perspectives on affordable healthcare systems in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y T; Yan, Y S; Poon, C C Y

    2007-01-01

    citizens is proposed based on the development of miniaturized, integrated, networked, digitalized, and smart (MINDS) medical devices. Different from the traditional healthcare systems, the new one should bridge individuals and hospitals through a four-layer (PHCH) system structure: wearable intelligent sensors and devices for p-Healthcare system (PHS), home healthcare system (HHS), community healthcare system (CHS), and hospital health information system (H2IS). This four-layer structure should ensure people be monitored by the new system as closely as it can, resulting in the novel transformation of the function of healthcare systems from symptoms treatment to early risk detection and prevention. The new system is of particular importance to the cost reduction of healthcare services. It can reduce the chance of individual providers taking advantage of the provider-patient information asymmetry to prescribe unnecessary or inappropriate (but profitable) care. It also allows people to self-monitor their health conditions at their convenience in an attempt to lighten the workload of doctors and nurses. Moreover, more people can benefit from the new system with much lower medical insurance fees due to the reduced risk of developing severe diseases through regular, long-term and effective monitoring of citizens' health conditions nation-wide.

  12. Institutionalization of evidence-informed practices in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotná, Gabriela; Dobbins, Maureen; Henderson, Joanna

    2012-11-21

    The effective and timely integration of the best available research evidence into healthcare practice has considerable potential to improve the quality of provided care. Knowledge translation (KT) approaches aim to develop, implement, and evaluate strategies to address the research-practice gap. However, most KT research has been directed toward implementation strategies that apply cognitive, behavioral, and, to a lesser extent, organizational theories. In this paper, we discuss the potential of institutional theory to inform KT-related research. Despite significant research, there is still much to learn about how to achieve KT within healthcare systems and practices. Institutional theory, focusing on the processes by which new ideas and concepts become accepted within their institutional environments, holds promise for advancing KT efforts and research. To propose new directions for future KT research, we present some of the main concepts of institutional theory and discuss their application to KT research by outlining how institutionalization of new practices can lead to their ongoing use in organizations. In addition, we discuss the circumstances under which institutionalized practices dissipate and give way to new insights and ideas that can lead to new, more effective practices. KT research informed by institutional theory can provide important insights into how knowledge becomes implemented, routinized, and accepted as institutionalized practices. Future KT research should employ both quantitative and qualitative research designs to examine the specifics of sustainability, institutionalization, and deinstitutionalization of practices to enhance our understanding of these complex constructs.

  13. Healthcare information technology and medical-surgical nurses: the emergence of a new care partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, An'Nita; Fisher, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Healthcare information technology in US hospitals and ambulatory care centers continues to expand, and nurses are expected to effectively and efficiently utilize this technology. Researchers suggest that clinical information systems have expanded the realm of nursing to integrate technology as an element as important in nursing practice as the patient or population being served. This study sought to explore how medical surgical nurses make use of healthcare information technology in their current clinical practice and to examine the influence of healthcare information technology on nurses' clinical decision making. A total of eight medical surgical nurses participated in the study, four novice and four experienced. A conventional content analysis was utilized that allowed for a thematic interpretation of participant data. Five themes emerged: (1) healthcare information technology as a care coordination partner, (2) healthcare information technology as a change agent in the care delivery environment, (3) healthcare information technology-unable to meet all the needs, of all the people, all the time, (4) curiosity about healthcare information technology-what other bells and whistles exist, and (5) Big Brother is watching. The results of this study indicate that a new care partnership has emerged as the provision of nursing care is no longer supplied by a single practitioner but rather by a paired team, consisting of nurses and technology, working collaboratively in an interdependent relationship to achieve established goals.

  14. The orthopaedist's role in healthcare system governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probe, Robert A

    2013-06-01

    Historically, physicians as participants in healthcare governance were shunned because of perceived potential for conflict of interest. This maxim is being revisited as health systems begin to appreciate the value presented by physician leaders. This overview of the orthopaedist's role in healthcare governance will be addressed in three sections: first to identify the need for change in American healthcare, second to examine the role that physicians should play in governing over this inevitable change, and third to outline strategies for effective participation for those physicians wishing to play a role in healthcare governance. The PubMed data set was queried applying the search commands "governance AND (healthcare OR hospital) AND (doctor OR physician OR surgeon)" for the time period 1969 to 2012. In addition, the bibliographies of relevant articles were reviewed. This search strategy returned 404 titles. Abstract and article review identified 19 relevant to the topic. Bibliographic review identified five more articles of relevance forming the foundation for this review. The delivery of American health care will require change to face current economic realities. Organizations that embrace this change guided by the insight of physician governors are well positioned to recognize the simultaneous improvement in value and quality. Although few physicians are formally trained for these roles, multiple paths to becoming effective governors are available. In this environment of rapid change in healthcare delivery, the medical insight of physician leadership will prove invaluable. Governing bodies should reach out to talented physicians and administratively talented physicians should rise to this challenge.

  15. Information technology for patient empowerment in healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Grando, Maria Adela; Bates, David

    2015-01-01

    The authors explore novel information-based mechanisms that are changing the way patients are involved in their own health care. The book covers models, frameworks and technologies to improve patient-to-provider communication, patient interaction with information technologies, patient education and involvement in health care decision processes, and patient access, understanding and control over their clinical data.

  16. A post-Bertalanffy Systemics Healthcare Competitive Framework Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Rodolfo A; Santacroce, Giulia F

    2014-01-01

    Health Information community can take advantage of a new evolutive categorization cybernetic framework. A systemic concept of principles organizing nature is proposed. It can be used as a multiscaling reference framework to develop successful and competitive antifragile system and new HRO information management strategies in advanced healthcare organization (HO) and high reliability organization (HRO) conveniently. Expected impacts are multifarious and quite articulated at different system scale level: major one is that, for the first time, Biomedical Engineering ideal system categorization levels can be matched exactly to practical system modeling interaction styles, with no paradigmatic operational ambiguity and information loss.

  17. [Dentistry and healthcare legislation 3: informed consent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, W G; van der Ven, J M; Eijkman, M A J

    2013-06-01

    The relationship between a dentist and his patient is based on trust. The principle of informed consent contributes to the quality of that relationship of trust. According to the professional standards for such a relationship, it is up to the dentist to make sure that the patient is well informed. Reliable information is necessary if the patient is to be in a position to give his or her consent for treatment. The Dutch Law of Agreement to Medical Treatment (WGBO) provides aframework for informed consent. Disciplinary judges establish the scope and if necessary the limits. It is clear that, among other things, not defining the risks beforehand can be the basis for a (disciplinary) complaint. Determining the requirements of informed consent calls for familiarity with the law and communication skills. Programmes in dental education ought to devote more attention to this issue.

  18. PROLOGUE : Health Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Tomar, Shivanjali

    2013-01-01

    Prologue is a health information system developed for underserved communities in Bihar, India. It is aimed at helping people living in poverty and with low literacy to take the right steps to manage their and their family’s health. Bihar suffers from one of the worst healthcare records in the country. This is as much due to the lack of access to the right information as it is due to the economic condition of the region. The inaccessibility of information is aggravated by the complex social se...

  19. Systems healthcare: a holistic paradigm for tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiandaca, Massimo S; Mapstone, Mark; Connors, Elenora; Jacobson, Mireille; Monuki, Edwin S; Malik, Shaista; Macciardi, Fabio; Federoff, Howard J

    2017-12-19

    Systems healthcare is a holistic approach to health premised on systems biology and medicine. The approach integrates data from molecules, cells, organs, the individual, families, communities, and the natural and man-made environment. Both extrinsic and intrinsic influences constantly challenge the biological networks associated with wellness. Such influences may dysregulate networks and allow pathobiology to evolve, resulting in early clinical presentation that requires astute assessment and timely intervention for successful mitigation. Herein, we describe the components of relevant biological systems and the nature of progression from at-risk to manifest disease. We illustrate the systems approach by examining two relevant clinical examples: Alzheimer's and cardiovascular diseases. The implications of systems healthcare management are examined through the lens of economics, ethics, policy and the law. Finally, we propose the need to develop new educational paradigms to enhance the training of the health professional in an era of systems medicine.

  20. Secure Wireless Military Healthcare Telemedicine Enterprise System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucas, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    .... In theory clinicians should be able to select and use the information modalities and electronic medical record systems they prefer, with the technical systems integration issues of information...

  1. Accounting System in Croatian Public Healthcare Organizations: an Empirical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor VAŠIČEK

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In considering the adequacy of adopting accruals and IPSASs, this paper tests the appropriateness of existing modified accrual accounting and financial reporting system in Croatian public healthcare sector. The paper indicates that accounting information system contains discrepancies and constraints in assuring true and fair view of organization’s financial position and performance. Our statistics confirms low level of cost and managerial accounting methods development, and external and internal financial reporting convergence.Having in mind its specificities, we argue that Croatian public healthcare sector represents a segmental accounting subsystem within the integral public sector accounting framework, where accruals implementation might prove justifiable.

  2. Agent-Oriented Privacy-Based Information Brokering Architecture for Healthcare Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmutalib Masaud-Wahaishi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare industry is facing a major reform at all levels—locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally. Healthcare services and systems become very complex and comprise of a vast number of components (software systems, doctors, patients, etc. that are characterized by shared, distributed and heterogeneous information sources with varieties of clinical and other settings. The challenge now faced with decision making, and management of care is to operate effectively in order to meet the information needs of healthcare personnel. Currently, researchers, developers, and systems engineers are working toward achieving better efficiency and quality of service in various sectors of healthcare, such as hospital management, patient care, and treatment. This paper presents a novel information brokering architecture that supports privacy-based information gathering in healthcare. Architecturally, the brokering is viewed as a layer of services where a brokering service is modeled as an agent with a specific architecture and interaction protocol that are appropriate to serve various requests. Within the context of brokering, we model privacy in terms of the entities ability to hide or reveal information related to its identities, requests, and/or capabilities. A prototype of the proposed architecture has been implemented to support information-gathering capabilities in healthcare environments using FIPA-complaint platform JADE.

  3. Agent-oriented privacy-based information brokering architecture for healthcare environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaud-Wahaishi, Abdulmutalib; Ghenniwa, Hamada

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare industry is facing a major reform at all levels-locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally. Healthcare services and systems become very complex and comprise of a vast number of components (software systems, doctors, patients, etc.) that are characterized by shared, distributed and heterogeneous information sources with varieties of clinical and other settings. The challenge now faced with decision making, and management of care is to operate effectively in order to meet the information needs of healthcare personnel. Currently, researchers, developers, and systems engineers are working toward achieving better efficiency and quality of service in various sectors of healthcare, such as hospital management, patient care, and treatment. This paper presents a novel information brokering architecture that supports privacy-based information gathering in healthcare. Architecturally, the brokering is viewed as a layer of services where a brokering service is modeled as an agent with a specific architecture and interaction protocol that are appropriate to serve various requests. Within the context of brokering, we model privacy in terms of the entities ability to hide or reveal information related to its identities, requests, and/or capabilities. A prototype of the proposed architecture has been implemented to support information-gathering capabilities in healthcare environments using FIPA-complaint platform JADE.

  4. Electronic information sources access and use for healthcare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Access to and use of electronic information sources for clinical decision is the key to the attainment of health related sustainable goals. Therefore, this study was to assess Electronic Information Sources (EIS) access and use for healthcare service among hospitals of Western Oromia, Ethiopia, 2013. Materials ...

  5. Interorganisational Integration: Healthcare Professionals’ Perspectives on Barriers and Facilitators within the Danish Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Lyngsø

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite many initiatives to improve coordination of patient pathways and intersectoral cooperation, Danish health care is still fragmented, lacking intra- and interorganisational integration. This study explores barriers to and facilitators of interorganisational integration as perceived by healthcare professionals caring for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease within the Danish healthcare system. Methods: Seven focus groups were conducted in January through July 2014 with 21 informants from general practice, local healthcare centres and a pulmonary department at a university hospital in the Capital Region of Denmark. Results and discussion: Our results can be grouped into five influencing areas for interorganisational integration: communication/information transfer, committed leadership, patient engagement, the role and competencies of the general practitioner and organisational culture. Proposed solutions to barriers in each area hold the potential to improve care integration as experienced by individuals responsible for supporting and facilitating it. Barriers and facilitators to integrating care relate to clinical, professional, functional and normative integration. Especially, clinical, functional and normative integration seems fundamental to developing integrated care in practice from the perspective of healthcare professionals.

  6. Exploring how different modes of governance act across health system levels to influence primary healthcare facility managers' use of information in decision-making: experience from Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Vera; Gilson, Lucy

    2017-09-15

    Governance, which includes decision-making at all levels of the health system, and information have been identified as key, interacting levers of health system strengthening. However there is an extensive literature detailing the challenges of supporting health managers to use formal information from health information systems (HISs) in their decision-making. While health information needs differ across levels of the health system there has been surprisingly little empirical work considering what information is actually used by primary healthcare facility managers in managing, and making decisions about, service delivery. This paper, therefore, specifically examines experience from Cape Town, South Africa, asking the question: How is primary healthcare facility managers' use of information for decision-making influenced by governance across levels of the health system? The research is novel in that it both explores what information these facility managers actually use in decision-making, and considers how wider governance processes influence this information use. An academic researcher and four facility managers worked as co-researchers in a multi-case study in which three areas of management were served as the cases. There were iterative cycles of data collection and collaborative analysis with individual and peer reflective learning over a period of three years. Central governance shaped what information and knowledge was valued - and, therefore, generated and used at lower system levels. The central level valued formal health information generated in the district-based HIS which therefore attracted management attention across the levels of the health system in terms of design, funding and implementation. This information was useful in the top-down practices of planning and management of the public health system. However, in facilities at the frontline of service delivery, there was a strong requirement for local, disaggregated information and experiential

  7. Benefits and Risks of Electronic Medical Record (EMR): An Interpretive Analysis of Healthcare Consumers' Perceptions of an Evolving Health Information Systems Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chester D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore healthcare consumers' perceptions of their Electronic Medical Records (EMRs). Although there have been numerous studies regarding EMRs, there have been minimal, if any, research that explores healthcare consumers' awareness of this technology and the social implications that result. As consumers' health…

  8. Knowledge management systems success in healthcare: Leadership matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nor'ashikin; Tretiakov, Alexei; Whiddett, Dick; Hunter, Inga

    2017-01-01

    To deliver high-quality healthcare doctors need to access, interpret, and share appropriate and localised medical knowledge. Information technology is widely used to facilitate the management of this knowledge in healthcare organisations. The purpose of this study is to develop a knowledge management systems success model for healthcare organisations. A model was formulated by extending an existing generic knowledge management systems success model by including organisational and system factors relevant to healthcare. It was tested by using data obtained from 263 doctors working within two district health boards in New Zealand. Of the system factors, knowledge content quality was found to be particularly important for knowledge management systems success. Of the organisational factors, leadership was the most important, and more important than incentives. Leadership promoted knowledge management systems success primarily by positively affecting knowledge content quality. Leadership also promoted knowledge management use for retrieval, which should lead to the use of that better quality knowledge by the doctors, ultimately resulting in better outcomes for patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Healthcare information on YouTube: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madathil, Kapil Chalil; Rivera-Rodriguez, A Joy; Greenstein, Joel S; Gramopadhye, Anand K

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the peer-reviewed literature addressing the healthcare information available on YouTube. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were determined, and the online databases PubMed and Web of Knowledge were searched using the search phrases: (1) YouTube* AND Health* and (2) YouTube* AND Healthcare*. In all, 18 articles were reviewed, with the results suggesting that (1) YouTube is increasingly being used as a platform for disseminating health information; (2) content and frame analysis were the primary techniques employed by researchers to analyze the characteristics of this information; (3) YouTube contains misleading information, primarily anecdotal, that contradicts the reference standards and the probability of a lay user finding such content is relatively high; (4) the retrieval of relevant videos is dependent on the search term used; and (5) videos from government organizations and professional associations contained trustworthy and high-quality information. YouTube is used as a medium for promoting unscientific therapies and drugs that are yet to be approved by the appropriate agencies and has the potential to change the beliefs of patients concerning controversial topics such as vaccinations. This review recognizes the need to design interventions to enable consumers to critically assimilate the information posted on YouTube with more authoritative information sources to make effective healthcare decisions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. The Healthcare Future for the iGeneration: Integrating the Patient and the Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina D. Wood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose a vision to integrate patients, their health-related data, and their wellness plans into the healthcare system using smartphone and tablet computer technology. Setting: Ambulatory care and community practice Practice Innovation: Utilization of smartphone and tablet computer technology to assess health care conditions, educate and involve patients, and facilitate seamless communication between the patient, electronic health record, pharmacy system, third-party payers, point-of-care testing, and all health-care providers. Main Outcome Measures: By providing integrated and customized information at the point of use, medication adherence and access to care will be increased and patients will engage in healthy behaviors more often resulting in an improved level of care for patients. Results: In the future, the authors believe if the vision is achieved, the health care system and patients will see improved health outcomes and more efficient utilization of the healthcare system. Conclusions: Our proposed use of technology provides an opportunity to empower patients to positively improve their own health which could be a vital advancement in health care, especially in the areas of medication adherence, improving access to care, and health behavior support. As pharmacists, we may also embrace technology opportunities to expand our roles as health care professionals as we continue to partner with patients and the health care team to improve outcomes.   Type: Idea Paper

  11. The Healthcare Future for the iGeneration: Integrating the Patient and the Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy H. Ficzere, PharmD, BCPS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose a vision to integrate patients, their health-related data, and their wellness plans into the healthcare system using smartphone and tablet computer technology.Setting: Ambulatory care and community practicePractice Innovation: Utilization of smartphone and tablet computer technology to assess health care conditions, educate and involve patients, and facilitate seamless communication between the patient, electronic health record, pharmacy system, third-party payers, point-of-care testing, and all health-care providers.Main Outcome Measures: By providing integrated and customized information at the point of use, medication adherence and access to care will be increased and patients will engage in healthy behaviors more often resulting in an improved level of care for patients.Results: In the future, the authors believe if the vision is achieved, the health care system and patients will see improved health outcomes and more efficient utilization of the healthcare system.Conclusions: Our proposed use of technology provides an opportunity to empower patients to positively improve their own health which could be a vital advancement in health care, especially in the areas of medication adherence, improving access to care, and health behavior support. As pharmacists, we may also embrace technology opportunities to expand our roles as health care professionals as we continue to partner with patients and the health care team to improve outcomes.

  12. Service models for remote healthcare monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Bridget A

    2010-01-01

    These scenarios reflect where the future is heading for remote health monitoring technology and service expectations. Being able to manage a "system of systems" with timely service hand-off over seams of responsibility and system interfaces will become very important for a BMET or clinical engineer. These interfaces will include patient homes, clinician homes, commercial/civilian infrastructure, public utilities, vendor infrastructure as well as internal departmental domains. Concurrently, technology is changing rapidly resulting in newer software delivery modes and hardware appliances as well as infrastructure changes. Those who are able to de-construct the complex systems and identify infrastructure assumptions and seams of servicing responsibility will be able to better understand and communicate the expectations for service of these systems. Moreover, as identified in Case 1, prodigious use of underlying system monitoring tools (managing the "meta-data") could move servicing of these remote systems from a reactive approach to a proactive approach. A prepared healthcare organization will identify their current and proposed future service combination use cases and design service philosophies and expectations for those use cases, while understanding the infrastructure assumptions and seams of responsibility. This is the future of technical service to the healthcare clinicians and patients.

  13. An Ethnographically Informed Participatory Design of Primary Healthcare Information Technology in a Developing Country Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidende, Nima Herman; Igira, Faraja Teddy; Mörtberg, Christina Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Ethnography, with its emphasis on understanding activities where they occur, and its use of qualitative data gathering techniques rich in description, has a long tradition in Participatory Design (PD). Yet there are limited methodological insights in its application in developing countries. This paper proposes an ethnographically informed PD approach, which can be applied when designing Primary Healthcare Information Technology (PHIT). We use findings from a larger multidisciplinary project, Health Information Systems Project (HISP) to elaborate how ethnography can be used to facilitate participation of health practitioners in developing countries settings as well as indicating the importance of ethnographic approach to participatory Health Information Technology (HIT) designers. Furthermore, the paper discusses the pros and cons of using an ethnographic approach in designing HIT.

  14. A novel concept for integrating and delivering health information using a comprehensive digital dashboard: An analysis of healthcare professionals' intention to adopt a new system and the trend of its real usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keehyuck; Jung, Se Young; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung; Baek, Hyun Young; Baek, Rong-Min; Kim, Seok

    2017-01-01

    To introduce a new concept of medical dashboard system called BESTBoard. Such a system was implemented in all wards in a tertiary academic hospital to explore the development process, core designs, functions, usability and feasibility. The task-force team made user interface designs for 6 months based on a need analysis. Hardware configuration and software development was carried out for 3 months. We conducted a survey of 383 physicians and nurses to determine the usability and feasibility of the system. In March 2012, the system was installed in all wards, including the intensive care units, emergency rooms, operation rooms, and even delivery rooms. Healthcare professionals had access to all information of EHRs optimized for a large 55-inch touchscreen. The satisfaction rate of BESTBoard users was high, with a mean of 3.3 points. Voluntary users tended to consider BESTBoard as a good system that is useful for team round visits, interdisciplinary team approach, and collecting the status of the hospital rooms. Elderly users didn't tend to think of BESTBoard as a useful tool for interdisciplinary team approach and collecting the status of the hospital rooms. Greater expectations regarding work performance affected the users' attitudes positively. A positive attitude toward using the system resulted in consistent real usage and health care professionals' satisfaction with the new dashboard system. A new concept of hospital dashboard system proved to be feasible and useful in delivering health information to healthcare professionals. A positive attitude and an expectation regarding work performance were important factors for intention to use the system. This finding can serve for developing new systems to present health information effectively. Further studies will be needed to evaluate the extent to which BESTBoard can have a positive impact on clinical care outcomes and work performance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. How Can Information and Communication Technology Improve Healthcare Inequalities and Healthcare Inequity? The Concept of Context Driven Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kwang Chien; Bettiol, Silvana; Nash, Rosie; Macintyrne, Kate; Wong, Ming Chao; Nøhr, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Advances in medicine have improved health and healthcare for many around the world. The challenge is achieving the best outcomes of health via healthcare delivery to every individual. Healthcare inequalities exist within a country and between countries. Health information technology (HIT) has provided a mean to deliver equal access to healthcare services regardless of social context and physical location. In order to achieve better health outcomes for every individual, socio-cultural factors, such as literacy and social context need to consider. This paper argues that HIT while improves healthcare inequalities by providing access, might worsen healthcare inequity. In order to improve healthcare inequity using HIT, this paper argues that we need to consider patients and context, and hence the concept of context driven care. To improve healthcare inequity, we need to conceptually consider the patient's view and methodologically consider design methods that achieve participatory outcomes.

  16. Healthcare model with use of information and communication technology for patients with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisiecka-Biełanowicz, Mira; Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew

    2016-07-15

    The healthcare system is positioned in the patient's environment and works with other determinants of the treatment. Patient care requires a whole system compatible to the needs of organizational and technical solutions. The purpose of this study is to present a new model of patient-oriented care, in which the use of information and communication technology (ICT) can improve the effectiveness of healthcare for patients with chronic diseases. The study material is the process of healthcare for chronically ill patients. Knowledge of the circumstances surrounding ecosystem and of the patients' needs, taking into account the fundamental healthcare goals allows us to build a new models of care, starting with the economic assumptions. The method used is modeling the construction of efficient healthcare system with the patient-centered model using ICT tools. We present a new systemic concept of building patient's environment in which he is the central figure of the healthcare organization - so called patient centered system. The use of ICT in the model of chronic patient's healthcare can improve the effectiveness of this kind of care. The concept is a vision to making wide platform of information management in chronic disease in a real environment ecosystem of patient using ICT tools. On the basis of a systematic approach to the model of chronic disease, and the knowledge of the patient itself, a model of the ecosystem impacts and interactions through information feedback and the provision of services can be constructed. ICT assisted techniques will increase the effectiveness of patient care, in which nowadays information exchange plays a key role.

  17. Evaluation methods used on health information systems (HISs) in Iran and the effects of HISs on Iranian healthcare: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Leila; Nejad, Simin Salehi; Khajouei, Reza

    2015-06-01

    The most important goal of a health information system (HIS) is improvement of quality, effectiveness and efficiency of health services. To achieve this goal, health care systems should be evaluated continuously. The aim of this paper was to study the impacts of HISs in Iran and the methods used for their evaluation. We systematically searched all English and Persian papers evaluating health information systems in Iran that were indexed in SID, Magiran, Iran medex, PubMed and Embase databases until June 2013. A data collection form was designed to extract required data such as types of systems evaluated, evaluation methods and tools. In this study, 53 out of 1103 retrieved articles were selected as relevant and reviewed by the authors. This study indicated that 28 studies used questionnaires to evaluate the system and in 27 studies the study instruments were distributed within a research population. In 26 papers the researchers collected the information by means of interviews, observations, heuristic evaluation and the review of documents and records. The main effects of the evaluated systems in health care settings were improving quality of services, reducing time, increasing accessibility to information, reducing costs and decreasing medical errors. Evaluation of health information systems is central to their development and enhancement, and to understanding their effect on health and health services. Despite numerous evaluation methods available, the reviewed studies used a limited number of methods to evaluate HIS. Additionally, the studies mainly discussed the positive effects of HIS on health care services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving the delivery of care and reducing healthcare costs with the digitization of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffsinger, R; Chin, S

    2000-01-01

    In the coming years, the digitization of information and the Internet will be extremely powerful in reducing healthcare costs while assisting providers in the delivery of care. One example of healthcare inefficiency that can be managed through information digitization is the process of prescription writing. Due to the handwritten and verbal communication surrounding prescription writing, as well as the multiple tiers of authorizations, the prescription drug process causes extensive financial waste as well as medical errors, lost time, and even fatal accidents. Electronic prescription management systems are being designed to address these inefficiencies. By utilizing new electronic prescription systems, physicians not only prescribe more accurately, but also improve formulary compliance thereby reducing pharmacy utilization. These systems expand patient care by presenting proactive alternatives at the point of prescription while reducing costs and providing additional benefits for consumers and healthcare providers.

  19. Federated health information architecture: Enabling healthcare providers and policymakers to use data for decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Mostafa, Javed; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2018-05-01

    Health information systems (HIS) in India, as in most other developing countries, support public health management but fail to enable healthcare providers to use data for delivering quality services. Such a failure is surprising, given that the population healthcare data that the system collects are aggregated from patient records. An important reason for this failure is that the health information architecture (HIA) of the HIS is designed primarily to serve the information needs of policymakers and program managers. India has recognised the architectural gaps in its HIS and proposes to develop an integrated HIA. An enabling HIA that attempts to balance the autonomy of local systems with the requirements of a centralised monitoring agency could meet the diverse information needs of various stakeholders. Given the lack of in-country knowledge and experience in designing such an HIA, this case study was undertaken to analyse HIS in the Bihar state of India and to understand whether it would enable healthcare providers, program managers and policymakers to use data for decision-making. Based on a literature review and data collected from interviews with key informants, this article proposes a federated HIA, which has the potential to improve HIS efficiency; provide flexibility for local innovation; cater to the diverse information needs of healthcare providers, program managers and policymakers; and encourage data-based decision-making.

  20. Information Expensiveness Perceived by Vietnamese Patients with Respect to Healthcare Provider's Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan-Hoang, Vuong

    2016-10-01

    Patients have to acquire information to support their decision on choosing a suitable healthcare provider. But in developing countries like Vietnam, accessibility issues remain an obstacle, thus adversely affect both quality and costliness of healthcare information. Vietnamese use both sources from health professionals and friends/relatives, especially when quality of the Internet-based cheaper sources appear to be still questionable. The search of information from both professionals and friends/relatives incurs some cost, which can be viewed as low or high depending low or high accessibility to the sources. These views potentially affect their choices. To investigate the effects that medical/health services information on perceived expensiveness of patients' labor costs. Two related objectives are a) establishing empirical relations between accessibility to sources and expensiveness; and, b) probabilistic trends of probabilities for perceived expensiveness. There is evidence for established relations among the variables "Convexp" and "Convrel" (all p's perceived expensiveness. a) Probabilistic trends show Vietnamese patients have propensity to value healthcare information highly and do not see it as "expensive"; b) The majority of Vietnamese households still take non-professional advices at their own risks; c) There is more for the public healthcare information system to do to reduce costliness and risk of information. The Internet-based health service users communities cannot replace this system.

  1. The healthcare system and provision of oral healthcare in European Union member states. Part 4: Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaskinos, P; Koletsi-Kounari, H; Economou, C; Eaton, K A; Widström, E

    2016-03-11

    This paper presents a description of the healthcare system and how oral healthcare is organised and provided in Greece, a country in a deep economic and social crisis. The national health system is underfunded, with severe gaps in staffing levels and the country has a large private healthcare sector. Oral healthcare has been largely provided in the private sector. Most people are struggling to survive and have no money to spend on general and oral healthcare. Unemployment is rising and access to healthcare services is more difficult than ever. Additionally, there has been an overproduction of dentists and no development of team dentistry. This has led to under or unemployment of dentists in Greece and their migration to other European Union member states, such as the United Kingdom, where over 600 Greek dentists are currently working.

  2. Expert Search Strategies: The Information Retrieval Practices of Healthcare Information Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Russell-Rose, Tony; Chamberlain, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Background Healthcare information professionals play a key role in closing the knowledge gap between medical research and clinical practice. Their work involves meticulous searching of literature databases using complex search strategies that can consist of hundreds of keywords, operators, and ontology terms. This process is prone to error and can lead to inefficiency and bias if performed incorrectly. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the search behavior of healthcare inform...

  3. Yoga Therapy in the German Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Holger

    2018-05-09

    An estimated 15.7 million Germans are currently practicing yoga or are at least interested in starting to practice, and they often perceive yoga as a therapeutic approach. From a healthcare system perspective, the situation is less clear. Here, yoga is only recognized as a recreational or preventive activity. When yoga teachers fulfill specific qualifications, their preventive yoga classes are covered by the statutory health insurances. Only those with additional qualifications in medicine or psychotherapy, however, can independently use and promote "yoga therapy." The general perception of yoga in Germany as a preventive practice is reflected in the professional organization of yoga providers. Most providers are considered to be yoga teachers rather than yoga therapists and are organized mainly in yoga teacher associations. Despite the uncertain legal framework, yoga is now considered in a number of medical guidelines; in a number of hospitals, yoga is part of multimodal inpatient treatment programs and is delivered by physical therapists or members of other health professions. An increasing number of yoga therapy clinical trials are conducted in Germany, and efforts are underway to establish yoga therapy as an accepted adjunct treatment approach for selected medical conditions within the German healthcare system.

  4. Engineering Value-Effective Healthcare Solutions: A Systems Design Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patou, François; Maier, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Our modern healthcare systems commonly face an important dilemma. While they depend on innovation to provide continuously greater healthcare value, they also struggle financially with the burden of adopting a continuous flow of new products and services. Although several disruptive healthcare...... of Design for Evolvability and by elaborating on two examples: MRI systems and Point-of-Care in-vitro diagnostics solutions. We specifically argue that Design for Evolvability can realign the agendas of various healthcare stakeholders, serving both individual and national interests. We finally acknowledge...... the limitations of current engineering design practices and call for new theoretical and empirical research initiatives taking a systems perspective on healthcare product and service design....

  5. Personalized biomedical devices & systems for healthcare applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I.-Ming; Phee, Soo Jay; Luo, Zhiqiang; Lim, Chee Kian

    2011-03-01

    With the advancement in micro- and nanotechnology, electromechanical components and systems are getting smaller and smaller and gradually can be applied to the human as portable, mobile and even wearable devices. Healthcare industry have started to benefit from this technology trend by providing more and more miniature biomedical devices for personalized medical treatments in order to obtain better and more accurate outcome. This article introduces some recent development in non-intrusive and intrusive biomedical devices resulted from the advancement of niche miniature sensors and actuators, namely, wearable biomedical sensors, wearable haptic devices, and ingestible medical capsules. The development of these devices requires carful integration of knowledge and people from many different disciplines like medicine, electronics, mechanics, and design. Furthermore, designing affordable devices and systems to benefit all mankind is a great challenge ahead. The multi-disciplinary nature of the R&D effort in this area provides a new perspective for the future mechanical engineers.

  6. Healthcare technology innovation adoption electronic health records and other emerging health information technology innovations

    CERN Document Server

    Daim, Tugrul U; Basoglu, Nuri; Kök, Orhun M; Hogaboam, Liliya

    2016-01-01

    This book aims to study the factors affecting the adoption and diffusion of Health Information Technology (HIT) innovation. It analyzes the adoption processes of various tools and applications, particularly Electronic Health Records (EHR), highlighting the impact on various sectors of the healthcare system, such as physicians, administration,  and patient care, while also identifying the various pitfalls and gaps in the literature. With the various challenges currently facing the United States healthcare system, the study, adoption and diffusion of healthcare technology innovation, particularly HIT, is imperative to achieving national goals. This book is organized into three sections. Section one reviews theories and applications for the diffusion of Health Care Technologies. Section two evaluates EHR technology, including the barriers and enables in adoption and alternative technologies. Finally, section three examines the factors impacting the adoption of EHR systems. This book will be a key source for stu...

  7. Pervasive mobile healthcare systems for chronic disease monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzooree, Geshwaree; Kumar Khedo, Kavi; Joonas, Noorjehan

    2017-05-01

    Pervasive mobile healthcare system has the potential to improve healthcare and the quality of life of chronic disease patients through continuous monitoring. Recently, many articles related to pervasive mobile healthcare system focusing on health monitoring using wireless technologies have been published. The main aim of this review is to evaluate the state-of-the-art pervasive mobile healthcare systems to identify major technical requirements and design challenges associated with the realization of a pervasive mobile healthcare system. A systematic literature review was conducted over IEEE Xplore Digital Library to evaluate 20 pervasive mobile healthcare systems out of 683 articles from 2011 to 2016. The classification of the pervasive mobile healthcare systems and other important factors are discussed. Potential opportunities and challenges are pointed out for the further deployment of effective pervasive mobile healthcare systems. This article helps researchers in health informatics to have a holistic view toward understanding pervasive mobile healthcare systems and points out new technological trends and design challenges that researchers have to consider when designing such systems for better adoption, usability, and seamless integration.

  8. Oral healthcare systems in the extended European union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widström, Eeva; Eaton, Kenneth A

    2004-01-01

    This article reports a survey of the systems for the provision of oral healthcare in the 28 member and accession states of the EU/EEA in 2003. Descriptions of the systems were collected from the principal dental advisers to governments in the individual states. In many states these were the Chief Dental Officers (CDOs). In states without a CDO, descriptions were gathered from CDO equivalents or senior academics. A template (model description) was used to guide all respondents. Additional statistical information on oral healthcare costs and workforce was collected from the Council of European Chief Dental Officers, WHO and World Bank websites. The study showed that in broad terms there were six patterns (Beveridgian, Bismarkian, The Eastern European (in transition), Nordic, Southern European and Hybrid) for the administration and financing of oral healthcare in the expanding EU. The extent and nature of government involvement in planning and coordinating oral healthcare services and the numbers and pay of the oral healthcare workforce varied between the different models. The biggest recent changes in European oral healthcare were found to have occurred in Eastern Europe, where there has been wide scale privatization of the previously public dental services. However, most of the EU accession (Eastern European) states seemed to be slowly developing insurance systems to cover oral health treatment costs. In the existing EU/EEA, the public dental services such as those in the Nordic countries still have strong political support and some expansion has occurred. In Southern Europe public dental services seemed to have gained some acceptance for the treatment of children and special needs groups. In UK, which has a unique public dental service system, there are plans to make big changes in the delivery, commissioning and remuneration of dental services in the near future. Some EU member states which operate the Bismarkian system with health insurances offering wide

  9. Managing healthcare information using short message service (SMS) in wireless broadband networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documet, Jorge; Tsao, Sinchai; Documet, Luis; Liu, Brent J.; Zhou, Zheng; Joseph, Anika O.

    2007-03-01

    Due to the ubiquity of cell phones, SMS (Short Message Service) has become an ideal means to wirelessly manage a Healthcare environment and in particular PACS (Picture Archival and Communications System) data. SMS is a flexible and mobile method for real-time access and control of Healthcare information systems such as HIS (Hospital Information System) or PACS. Unlike conventional wireless access methods, SMS' mobility is not limited by the presence of a WiFi network or any other localized signal. It provides a simple, reliable yet flexible method to communicate with an information system. In addition, SMS services are widely available for low costs from cellular phone service providers and allows for more mobility than other services such as wireless internet. This paper aims to describe a use case of SMS as a means of remotely communicating with a PACS server. Remote access to a PACS server and its Query-Retrieve services allows for a more convenient, flexible and streamlined radiology workflow. Wireless access methods such as SMS will increase dedicated PACS workstation availability for more specialized DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) workflow management. This implementation will address potential security, performance and cost issues of applying SMS as part of a healthcare information management system. This is in an effort to design a wireless communication system with optimal mobility and flexibility at minimum material and time costs.

  10. [Barriers to the normalization of telemedicine in a healthcare system model based on purchasing of healthcare services using providers' contracts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Francesc; Saigí, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Despite the clear political will to promote telemedicine and the large number of initiatives, the incorporation of this modality in clinical practice remains limited. The objective of this study was to identify the barriers perceived by key professionals who actively participate in the design and implementation of telemedicine in a healthcare system model based on purchasing of healthcare services using providers' contracts. We performed a qualitative study based on data from semi-structured interviews with 17 key informants belonging to distinct Catalan health organizations. The barriers identified were grouped in four areas: technological, organizational, human and economic. The main barriers identified were changes in the healthcare model caused by telemedicine, problems with strategic alignment, resistance to change in the (re)definition of roles, responsibilities and new skills, and lack of a business model that incorporates telemedicine in the services portfolio to ensure its sustainability. In addition to suitable management of change and of the necessary strategic alignment, the definitive normalization of telemedicine in a mixed healthcare model based on purchasing of healthcare services using providers' contracts requires a clear and stable business model that incorporates this modality in the services portfolio and allows healthcare organizations to obtain reimbursement from the payer. 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality of the ophthalmological service to outpatients of the public and private healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercos, Benigno Vicente Santos; Berezovsky, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    To compare perceptions of the quality of ophthalmological services offered to outpatients from the public healthcare system to those from the private healthcare system, and to determine which measures are seen as necessary and a priority for improving the quality of care. This was a prospective observational study on 200 patients, 101 and 99 of whom were from the public and private healthcare systems, respectively. All patients underwent an ophthalmological examination at an ophthalmology hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Personal interviews were conducted using two structured questionnaires adapted from the modified SERVQUAL scale. Overall, patients from the private healthcare system were significantly more dissatisfied than those from the public healthcare system. In both systems, reliability was considered to be the most important determinant of quality, and it presented the highest level of dissatisfaction. Satisfaction with the public healthcare system was significantly greater than that with the private healthcare system in terms of the tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, and assurance determinants of the SERVQUAL scale. Institutions must plan, execute, evaluate, and monitor measures that seek to improve the overall patient satisfaction with the quality of services provided, particularly in the private healthcare system, and special attention must be paid to reliability in both healthcare systems. The identification and monitoring of the quality of healthcare services through the periodic use of the SERVQUAL scale may provide healthcare managers with information so that they can identify, plan, and monitor necessary and priority measures. This could be a key strategy for improving the quality of outpatient health services in the public and private systems.

  12. Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This report, provides detailed analyses and projections of occupations in healthcare fields, and wages earned. In addition, the important skills and work values associated with workers in those fields of healthcare are discussed. Finally, the authors analyze the implications of research findings for the racial, ethnic, and class diversity of the…

  13. Use of information on the shared customers of healthcare services to support care pathway planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olli Nylander

    2002-09-01

    Conclusions The level of integration in the Finnish social welfare and healthcare system is high and seems to be increasing, especially in health centres. Within one year a client uses many kinds of inpatient services. This may at best represent a functioning system of care pathways and at worst mean overlapping work and lack of coordination. This information is of great importance to senior officers in care pathway planning.

  14. Systems Design Perspective of Healthcare Provision in Humanitarian Aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the role of Systems Design in addressing the challenges of healthcare provision by international emergency relief organizations in developing countries. More specifically the challenges related to the safety and performance of medical equipment that is transferred in the aftermath of a humanitarian crisis. The aim of this paper is to describe the transfer of medical equipment and its associated challenges from a systems perspective and to reflect on the value of Systems Design as an approach to humanitarian innovation, addressing the identified systemic challenges. The concepts of Human Factors and Ergonomics, and Product-Service Systems will be presented as valuable contributions to support designers in handling a larger degree of complexity throughout the design process and to support them to make informed choices regarding this particular context.

  15. Materials management information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The hospital materials management function--ensuring that goods and services get from a source to an end user--encompasses many areas of the hospital and can significantly affect hospital costs. Performing this function in a manner that will keep costs down and ensure adequate cash flow requires effective management of a large amount of information from a variety of sources. To effectively coordinate such information, most hospitals have implemented some form of materials management information system (MMIS). These systems can be used to automate or facilitate functions such as purchasing, accounting, inventory management, and patient supply charges. In this study, we evaluated seven MMISs from seven vendors, focusing on the functional capabilities of each system and the quality of the service and support provided by the vendor. This Evaluation is intended to (1) assist hospitals purchasing an MMIS by educating materials managers about the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs and (2) educate clinical engineers and information system managers about the scope of materials management within a healthcare facility. Because software products cannot be evaluated in the same manner as most devices typically included in Health Devices Evaluations, our standard Evaluation protocol was not applicable for this technology. Instead, we based our ratings on our observations (e.g., during site visits), interviews we conducted with current users of each system, and information provided by the vendor (e.g., in response to a request for information [RFI]). We divided the Evaluation into the following sections: Section 1. Responsibilities and Information Requirements of Materials Management: Provides an overview of typical materials management functions and describes the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs. Also includes the supplementary article, "Inventory Cost and Reimbursement Issues" and the glossary, "Materials Management Terminology." Section 2. The

  16. Data Systems vs. Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Amatayakul, Margret K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper examines the current status of “hospital information systems” with respect to the distinction between data systems and information systems. It is proposed that the systems currently existing are incomplete data dystems resulting in ineffective information systems.

  17. Using a logical information model-driven design process in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Yu Chye; Bird, Linda; Tun, Nwe Ni; Brooks, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid standards-based approach has been adopted in Singapore to develop a Logical Information Model (LIM) for healthcare information exchange. The Singapore LIM uses a combination of international standards, including ISO13606-1 (a reference model for electronic health record communication), ISO21090 (healthcare datatypes), SNOMED CT (healthcare terminology) and HL7 v2 (healthcare messaging). This logic-based design approach also incorporates mechanisms for achieving bi-directional semantic interoperability.

  18. Empowering Patients through Healthcare Technology and Information? The Challenge of becoming a Patient 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Søsser Grith Kragh; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    of themselves appeared in newspapers, and self-management and telecare technologies were seen as ways to change elderly patients practices. Transformation of the traditional healthcare system remains on the agenda, and it continues to challenge the traditional view of the patient role (framed in this article...... on numerical representations of illness (i.e., metrics) than on direct observations of patients. Through ethnographic research in the Danish healthcare sector, we show how this new healthcare vision actually manifests in practice by presenting cases of elderly heart and diabetes patients. Technologies aimed......Abstract: In the mid-2000s, the term Patient 2.0 began to be used to denote a new patient role: empowered patients were expected to engage with various types of information and specific technologies in order to manage their own illnesses. Headlines such as Future patients will take care...

  19. An evolving systems-based methodology for healthcare planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Jon; Bell, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare planning seems beset with problems at all hierarchical levels. These are caused by the 'soft' nature of many of the issues present in healthcare planning and the high levels of complexity inherent in healthcare services. There has, in recent years, been a move to utilize systems thinking ideas in an effort to gain a better understanding of the forces at work within the healthcare environment and these have had some success. This paper argues that systems-based methodologies can be further enhanced by metrication and modeling which assist in exploring the changed emergent behavior of a system resulting from management intervention. The paper describes the Holon Framework as an evolving systems-based approach that has been used to help clients understand complex systems (in the education domain) that would have application in the analysis of healthcare problems.

  20. Protecting personal information: Implications of the Protection of Personal Information (POPI) Act for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, M

    2017-10-31

    Careless handling of patient information in daily medical practice can result in Health Professions Council of South Africa sanction, breach of privacy lawsuits and, in extreme cases, serious monetary penalty or even imprisonment. This review will focus on the Protection of Personal Information (POPI) Act (No. 4 of 2013) and the implications thereof for healthcare professionals in daily practice. Recommendations regarding the safeguarding of information are made.

  1. Health-care district management information system plan: Review of operations analysis activities during calendar year 1975 and plan for continued research and analysis activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, G. J.; Stevenson, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Operations research activities developed to identify the information required to manage both the efficiency and effectiveness of the Veterans Administration (VA) health services as these services relate to individual patient care are reported. The clinical concerns and management functions that determine this information requirement are discussed conceptually. Investigations of existing VA data for useful management information are recorded, and a diagnostic index is provided. The age-specific characteristics of diseases and lengths of stay are explored, and recommendations for future analysis activities are articulated. The effect of the introduction of new technology to health care is also discussed.

  2. The value of information for decision-making in the healthcare environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabtai, Itamar; Leshno, Moshe; Blondheim, Orna; Kornbluth, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    With their ever-growing importance and usability, the healthcare sector has been investing heavily in medical information systems in recent years, as part of the effort to improve medical decision-making and increase its efficiency through improved medical processes, reduced costs, integration of patients' data, etc. In light of these developments, this research aims to evaluate the contribution of information technology (IT) to improving the medical decision-making processes at the point of care of internal medicine and surgical departments and to evaluate the degree to which IT investments are worthwhile. This has been done by assessing the value of information to decision-makers (physicians) at the point of care by investigating whether the information systems improved the medical outcomes. The research included three steps (after a pilot study)--the assessment of the subjective value of information, the assessment of the realistic value of information, and the assessment of the normative value of information, the results of each step being used as the starting assumptions for the following steps. Following a discussion and integration of the results from the various steps, the results of the three assessment stages were summarized in a cost-effectiveness analysis and an overall return on investment (ROI) analysis. In addition, we tried to suggest IT strategies for decision-makers in the healthcare sector on the advisability of implementing such systems as well as the implications for managing them. This research is uniquely pioneering in the manner in which it combines an assessment of the three kinds of measures of value of information in the healthcare environment. Our aim in performing it was to contribute to researchers (by providing additional insight into the fields of decision theory, value of information and medical informatics, amongst others), practitioners (by promoting efficiency in the design of new medical IS and improving existing IS), physicians

  3. Video Analysis and Remote Digital Ethnography: Approaches to understanding user perspectives and processes involving healthcare information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    Innovations in healthcare information systems promise to revolutionize and streamline healthcare processes worldwide. However, the complexity of these systems and the need to better understand issues related to human-computer interaction have slowed progress in this area. In this chapter the authors describe their work in using methods adapted from usability engineering, video ethnography and analysis of digital log files for improving our understanding of complex real-world healthcare interactions between humans and technology. The approaches taken are cost-effective and practical and can provide detailed ethnographic data on issues health professionals and consumers encounter while using systems as well as potential safety problems. The work is important in that it can be used in techno-anthropology to characterize complex user interactions with technologies and also to provide feedback into redesign and optimization of improved healthcare information systems.

  4. Efficiency vs Effectiveness: a Benchmarking Study on European Healthcare Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado lo Storto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. This paper illustrates a benchmarking study concerning the healthcare systems in 32 European countries as of 2011 and 2014. Particularly, this study proposes a two-dimensional approach (efficiency/effectiveness models to evaluate the performance of national healthcare systems. Data Envelopment Analysis has been adopted to compute two performance indices, measuring efficiency and effectiveness of these healthcare systems. The results of the study emphasize that the national healthcare systems achieve different efficiency and effectiveness levels. Their performance indices are uncorrelated and behave differently over time, suggesting that there might be no real trade-off between them. The healthcare systems’ efficiencies remain generally stable, while the effectiveness values significantly improved from 2011 to 2014. However, comparing the efficiency and effectiveness scores, the authors identified a group of countries with the lowest performing healthcare systems that includes Ukraine, Bulgaria, Switzerland, Lithuania, and Romania. These countries need to implement healthcare reforms aimed at reducing resource intensity and increasing the quality of medical services. The results also showed the benefits of the proposed approach, which can help policy makers to identify shortcomings in national healthcare systems and justify the need for their reform.

  5. Increasing consumerism in healthcare through intelligent information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Seth B; Grote, Kurt D; Pietraszek, Wayne E; Laflamme, Francois

    2010-12-01

    In healthcare, consumerism is not a product or program. Instead, it is an orientation to new care delivery models that encourage and enable greater patient responsibility through the intelligent use of information technology. Despite the promise of consumerism, current approaches have not fully realized the potential benefits of improved outcomes and lower cost. We recommend 4 guiding principles to ensure that next-generation innovation yields the returns that providers, patients, and other stakeholders expect: (1) keep the consumer at the center of innovation, (2) keep it simple, (3) link products and services to a broader "ecosystem" of care, and (4) encourage health in addition to treating illness. Now may be a particularly compelling time to invest in a consumerist approach.

  6. Information Security in Distributed Healthcare : Exploring the Needs for Achieving Patient Safety and Patient Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie

    2008-01-01

    In healthcare, patient information is a critical factor. The right information at the right time is a necessity in order to provide the best possible care for a patient. Patient information must also be protected from unauthorized access in order to protect patient privacy. It is furthermore common for patients to visit more than one healthcare provider, which implies a need for cross border healthcare and continuity in the patient process. This thesis is focused on information security in he...

  7. Pros and cons of healthcare information technology implementation: the pros win.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, Roxana

    2006-01-01

    Countless studies and investigations have been performed siding either for or against the implementation of technology in the healthcare setting. This article presents both sides of this debate, with an obvious conclusion that the pros of this debate win. The practice of information technology in the medical domain lags behind its knowledge and discovery by at least 7 years. The key to closing this gap is to show, through various studies, how information technology systems provide decision support to users at the point in time when decisions are needed. What the reader will obtain from this article is that the pros for information technology implementation in healthcare settings weigh much more and have a greater effect than the cons.

  8. A healthcare management system for Turkey based on a service-oriented architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herand, Deniz; Gürder, Filiz; Taşkin, Harun; Yuksel, Emre Nuri

    2013-09-01

    The current Turkish healthcare management system has a structure that is extremely inordinate, cumbersome and inflexible. Furthermore, this structure has no common point of view and thus has no interoperability and responds slowly to innovations. The purpose of this study is to show that using which methods can the Turkish healthcare management system provide a structure that could be more modern, more flexible and more quick to respond to innovations and changes taking advantage of the benefits given by a service-oriented architecture (SOA). In this paper, the Turkish healthcare management system is chosen to be examined since Turkey is considered as one of the Third World countries and the information architecture of the existing healthcare management system of Turkey has not yet been configured with SOA, which is a contemporary innovative approach and should provide the base architecture of the new solution. The innovation of this study is the symbiosis of two main integration approaches, SOA and Health Level 7 (HL7), for integrating divergent healthcare information systems. A model is developed which is based on SOA and enables obtaining a healthcare management system having the SSF standards (HSSP Service Specification Framework) developed by the framework of the HSSP (Healthcare Services Specification Project) under the leadership of HL7 and the Object Management Group.

  9. What is found positive in healthcare information and communication technology implementation?-the results of a nationwide survey in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winblad, Ilkka; Hämäläinen, Päivi; Reponen, Jarmo

    2011-03-01

    Considerable expectations have been placed on information and communication technology (ICT) in improving the processes and quality of healthcare. Our purpose was to find out which element is found positive in healthcare ICT implementation. An online questionnaire on e-Health implementation submitted to all Finnish public health service providers and a sample from the private sector included an open question about which the electronic working methods, systems, or applications have most positively influenced the fluency or quality of service processes. The electronic health record was mentioned as an item that has positive influence by 52% of the respondents from the hospital districts, 27% of those from the primary healthcare centers, and 38% of those from the private providers. Digital radiology systems (including teleradiology) were mentioned by 52% of the hospital districts and 27% of the primary healthcare centers. The figures for digital laboratory systems (including telelaboratory) were 5% and 11%, respectively. The figures for teleradiology itself were 5% for the hospital districts and 15% for the primary healthcare centers; the figures for telelaboratory systems were 5% and 9%, respectively. The specialized healthcare seem to experience intraorganizational electronic services integrated to the electronic health record, such as digital radiology and laboratory services as exerting a positive influence, whereas the primary healthcare find such influence from different functions such as interorganizational data exchange and telemedicine services. These might indicate where the efforts should be focused when implementing ICT in healthcare.

  10. Coherence in the Danish Healthcare System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jesper; Olivares Bøgeskov, Benjamin Miguel

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we investigate ‘coherence in healthcare’ as a strategy of welfare policy. We conduct our investigation within the theoretical and methodological framework of Scandinavian praxeology, and we construct our empirical data from Danish administrative documents. The tools and terms...... of this tradition are used to generate data from discourse as representations of institutional logics. The aim is to uncover how coherence in healthcare emerges as different strategies in healthcare governance in relation to different institutions seen as positions. Hence, our findings suggest that, although...... the stated aim in policy is to improve coherence in healthcare for the benefit of the patients, various ambiguities within the institutions producing policy tend to maintain a certain order rather than introducing changes. Furthermore, we discuss how this section of the welfare state, examined in relation...

  11. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT IN HEALTHCARE SYSTEM OPTIMIZATION. INTRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sarancha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Article describes the life cycle assessment method and introduces opportunities for method performance in healthcare system settings. LSA draws attention to careful use of resources, environmental, human and social responsibility. Modelling of environmental and technological inputs allows optimizing performance of the system. Various factors and parameters that may influence effectiveness of different sectors in healthcare system are detected. Performance optimization of detected parameters could lead to better system functioning, higher patient safety, economic sustainability and reduce resources consumption.

  12. Corruption in the Nigerian healthcare system | Buowari | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corruption is the use of public resources for private gain. This is common in most countries though reduced in some and alarming in others. It affects all sectors of the economy and the healthcare system is not spared. Medical corruption is increasing in countries with high rates of corruption and all healthcare professionals ...

  13. Social Media as Source of Medical Information for Healthcare Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Anamaria CORDOȘ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The scope of the research was a more detailed understanding of the influence of social media and the importance of student’s usage of social media context in relation to medical information. The research aimed to increase the understanding of social media and the impact on medical information use, informing policy and practice while highlighting gaps in the literature and areas for further research. Methods: The search of PubMed database was performed in October 2015, using terms to identify peer-reviewed research in which social media technologies were an important feature for health occupations, premedical, pharmacy, nursing or medical students. A systematic approach was used to retrieve papers and extract relevant data. Results: There were initially identified 435 studies involving social media, healthcare information and medical students subject headings (MeSH terminology. After filtering for free full text articles, and exclusion of not students or social media specific ones, 33 articles were reviewed. The majority of the studies were interventional studies that either assessed the outcomes of online discussion groups or teaching methods through social media. The majority of studies focused on the use of social media as a teaching tool, how students use it and the implications upon their education. The largest number of original papers was published in 2013. Facebook, Podcasts, Multiplayer virtual worlds, Blogs, and Twitter were identified as being used by medical students. Conclusion: Social media is used as a tool of information for students mainly as the means for engaging and communicating with students.

  14. Understanding how orthopaedic surgery practices generate value for healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Steven A; Mather, Richard C

    2013-06-01

    Orthopaedic surgery practices can provide substantial value to healthcare systems. Increasingly, healthcare administrators are speaking of the need for alignment between physicians and healthcare systems. However, physicians often do not understand what healthcare administrators value and therefore have difficulty articulating the value they create in discussions with their hospital or healthcare organization. Many health systems and hospitals use service lines as an organizational structure to track the relevant data and manage the resources associated with a particular type of care, such as musculoskeletal care. Understanding service lines and their management can be useful for orthopaedic surgeons interested in interacting with their hospital systems. We provide an overview of two basic types of value orthopaedic surgeons create for healthcare systems: financial or volume-driven benefits and nonfinancial quality or value-driven patient care benefits. We performed a search of PubMed from 1965 to 2012 using the term "service line." Of the 351 citations identified, 18 citations specifically involved the use of service lines to improve patient care in both nursing and medical journals. A service line is a structure used in healthcare organizations to enable management of a subset of activities or resources in a focused area of patient care delivery. There is not a consistent definition of what resources are managed within a service line from hospital to hospital. Physicians can positively impact patient care through engaging in service line management. There is increasing pressure for healthcare systems and hospitals to partner with orthopaedic surgeons. The peer-reviewed literature demonstrates there are limited resources for physicians to understand the value they create when attempting to negotiate with their hospital or healthcare organization. To effectively negotiate for resources to provide the best care for patients, orthopaedic surgeons need to claim and

  15. Patient satisfaction with the healthcare system: Assessing the impact of socio-economic and healthcare provision factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xesfingi, Sofia; Vozikis, Athanassios

    2016-03-15

    Patient satisfaction is an important measure of healthcare quality as it offers information on the provider's success at meeting clients' expectations and is a key determinant of patients' perspective behavioral intention. The aim of this paper is first to assess the degree of patient satisfaction, and second, to study the relationship between patient satisfaction of healthcare system and a set of socio-economic and healthcare provision indicators. This empirical analysis covers 31 countries for the years 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2012. The dependent variable, the satisfaction index, is defined as the patient satisfaction of their country's health system. We first construct an index of patient satisfaction and then, at a second stage, this index is related to socio-economic and healthcare provision variables. Our findings support that there is a strong positive association between patient satisfaction level and healthcare provision indicators, such as nurses and physicians per 100,000 habitants, with the latter being the most important contributor, and a negative association between patient satisfaction level and number of hospital beds. Among the socio-economic variables, public health expenditures greatly shape and positive relate to patient satisfaction, while private spending on health relates negatively. Finally, the elder a patient is, the more satisfied with a country's healthcare system appears to be. We conclude that there is a strong positive association between patient satisfaction and public health expenditures, number of physicians and nurses, and the age of the patient, while there is a negative evidence for private health spending and number of hospital beds.

  16. Uncovering Hospitalists' Information Needs from Outside Healthcare Facilities in the Context of Health Information Exchange Using Association Rule Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D A; Mora, E; Gemmani, M; Zayas-Castro, J

    2015-01-01

    Important barriers to health information exchange (HIE) adoption are clinical workflow disruptions and troubles with the system interface. Prior research suggests that HIE interfaces providing faster access to useful information may stimulate use and reduce barriers for adoption; however, little is known about informational needs of hospitalists. To study the association between patient health problems and the type of information requested from outside healthcare providers by hospitalists of a tertiary care hospital. We searched operational data associated with fax-based exchange of patient information (previous HIE implementation) between hospitalists of an internal medicine department in a large urban tertiary care hospital in Florida, and any other affiliated and unaffiliated healthcare provider. All hospitalizations from October 2011 to March 2014 were included in the search. Strong association rules between health problems and types of information requested during each hospitalization were discovered using Apriori algorithm, which were then validated by a team of hospitalists of the same department. Only 13.7% (2 089 out of 15 230) of the hospitalizations generated at least one request of patient information to other providers. The transactional data showed 20 strong association rules between specific health problems and types of information exist. Among the 20 rules, for example, abdominal pain, chest pain, and anaemia patients are highly likely to have medical records and outside imaging results requested. Other health conditions, prone to have records requested, were lower urinary tract infection and back pain patients. The presented list of strong co-occurrence of health problems and types of information requested by hospitalists from outside healthcare providers not only informs the implementation and design of HIE, but also helps to target future research on the impact of having access to outside information for specific patient cohorts. Our data

  17. Building a Healthcare System's Innovation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Michelle D

    2016-01-01

    OSF HealthCare, based in Peoria, Illinois, has developed an innovative strategy to adapt to the changes and forces disrupting the healthcare environment. This strategy evolved organically from the performance improvement efforts we began more than 15 years ago, as well as from the lessons we learned from years of research into the innovative practices and platforms of other healthcare institutions and of companies in other industries. More important, the strategy reflects our mission "to serve persons with the greatest care and love."The OSF innovation model has three components: internal innovations, partnering with external entities, and validating innovations through simulation. OSF has an ongoing and comprehensive commitment to innovation. Examples include our initiative to transform our model of care in primary care clinics by expanding access, reducing costs, and increasing efficiency; our partnerships with outside entities to find revolutionary solutions and products in which we can invest; and our establishment of a world-class simulation and education center.OSF HealthCare could not do any of this if it lacked the support of its people. To that end, we continue to work on embedding a culture of innovation across all of our facilities. Ours is a culture in which everyone is encouraged to voice creative ideas and no one is afraid to fail-all for the betterment of our organization and the patients we serve.

  18. The role of information and communication technology in the transformation of the healthcare business model: a case study of Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanimirovic, Dalibor; Vintar, Mirko

    The Slovenian healthcare business model (BM) has largely failed to integrate information and communication technologies (ICT) into its operational context, instead maintaining its rigid structure and traditional 'way of doing business'wo managers of public clinics). Findings present a roadmap for the redefinition of BM elements and the transformation of the Slovenian healthcare BM. It includes the specific reconfiguration of BM actors and their interactions, and the application of advanced ICT solutions, which could facilitate more effective utilisation of healthcare resources and promote an improved delivery of healthcare services and products. The presented development approach and derived conceptual solution could be transferable to other countries with similar socio-economic characteristics and comparable healthcare systems, subject to certain adjustments and inclusion of national specifics.

  19. Aeronautical Information System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Aeronautical Information System (AIS) is a leased weather automated system that provides a means of collecting and distributing aeronautical weather information...

  20. The Design and Analysis of a Secure Personal Healthcare System Based on Certificates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungho Kang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the development of information technology (IT, it has been applied to various fields such as the smart home, medicine, healthcare, and the smart car. For these fields, IT has been providing continuous prevention and management, including health conditions beyond the mere prevention of disease, improving the quality of life. e-Healthcare is a health management and medical service to provide prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and the follow-up management of diseases at any time and place in connection with information communication technology, without requiring patients to visit hospitals. However, e-Healthcare has been exposed to eavesdropping, manipulation, and the forgery of information that is personal, biological, medical, etc., and is a security threat from malicious attackers. This study suggests a security service model to exchange personal health records (PHRs for e-Healthcare environments. To be specific, this study suggests a scheme in which communicators are able to securely authorize and establish security channels by constituting the infrastructure each organization relies on. In addition, the possibility of establishing a security service model is indicated by suggesting an e-Healthcare system for a secure e-Healthcare environment as a secure personal health record system. This is anticipated to provide securer communication in e-Healthcare environments in the future through the scheme suggested in this study.

  1. Strategic alliances in healthcare: opportunities for the Veterans Affairs healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, P K; Kaluzny, A D; Young, G J

    1997-01-01

    Strategic alliances are proving to be effective strategies for responding and adapting to changing environments, and as such they offer the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system valuable opportunities for accomplishing the goals of its major reorganization effort. This article begins with an examination of basic strategic-alliance structures that are employed across many different types of industries. Next, consideration is given to the ways in which these basic alliance structures may be adapted to the unique organizations and individuals that serve as providers, purchasers, and consumers of health services. Finally, this article explores how models of strategic alliance in healthcare can be tailored to the specific needs and constraints of the VA healthcare system through an examination of existing and potential alliance opportunities.

  2. Components of Maternal Healthcare Delivery System Contributing to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Components of Maternal Healthcare Delivery System Contributing to Maternal Deaths ... transcripts were analyzed using a directed approach to content analysis. Excerpts were categorized according to three main components of the maternal ...

  3. Value of information and pricing new healthcare interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willan, Andrew R; Eckermann, Simon

    2012-06-01

    Previous application of value-of-information methods to optimal clinical trial design have predominantly taken a societal decision-making perspective, implicitly assuming that healthcare costs are covered through public expenditure and trial research is funded by government or donation-based philanthropic agencies. In this paper, we consider the interaction between interrelated perspectives of a societal decision maker (e.g. the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence [NICE] in the UK) charged with the responsibility for approving new health interventions for reimbursement and the company that holds the patent for a new intervention. We establish optimal decision making from societal and company perspectives, allowing for trade-offs between the value and cost of research and the price of the new intervention. Given the current level of evidence, there exists a maximum (threshold) price acceptable to the decision maker. Submission for approval with prices above this threshold will be refused. Given the current level of evidence and the decision maker's threshold price, there exists a minimum (threshold) price acceptable to the company. If the decision maker's threshold price exceeds the company's, then current evidence is sufficient since any price between the thresholds is acceptable to both. On the other hand, if the decision maker's threshold price is lower than the company's, then no price is acceptable to both and the company's optimal strategy is to commission additional research. The methods are illustrated using a recent example from the literature.

  4. Using grey literature to prepare pharmacy students for an evolving healthcare delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happe, Laura E; Walker, Desiree'

    2013-05-13

    To assess the impact of using "grey literature" (information internally produced in print or electronic format by agencies such as hospitals, government, businesses, etc) rather than a textbook in a course on healthcare delivery systems on students' perception of the relevance of healthcare delivery system topics and their ability to identify credible sources of this information. A reading from the grey literature was identified and assigned to the students for each topic in the course. Pre- and post-course survey instruments were used for the assessment. Students reported healthcare delivery systems topics to be moderately relevant to the profession of pharmacy on both the pre- and post-course survey instruments. Students' knowledge of current and credible sources of information on healthcare delivery system topics significantly improved based on self-reports and scores on objective assessments (pgrey literature in a course on healthcare delivery systems can be used to ensure that information in the pharmacy school curriculum is the most current and credible information available.

  5. Development of Wearable Systems for Ubiquitous Healthcare Service Provisioning

    OpenAIRE

    Ogunduyile, O.O.; Olugbara, O.O.; Lall, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a wearable system using wireless biomedical sensors for ubiquitous healthcare service provisioning. The prototype system is developed to address current healthcare challenges such as increasing cost of services, inability to access diverse services, low quality services and increasing population of elderly as experienced globally. The biomedical sensors proactively collect physiological data of remote patients to recommend diagnostic services. The prot...

  6. Information Systems Security Audit

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Popescu; Veronica Adriana Popescu; Cristina Raluca Popescu

    2007-01-01

    The article covers:Defining an information system; benefits obtained by introducing new information technologies; IT management;Defining prerequisites, analysis, design, implementation of IS; Information security management system; aspects regarding IS security policy; Conceptual model of a security system; Auditing information security systems and network infrastructure security.

  7. A review of the Australian healthcare system: A policy perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambasivan, Murali

    2018-01-01

    This article seeks to review the Australian healthcare system and compare it to similar systems in other countries to highlight the main issues and problems. A literature search for articles relating to the Australian and other developed countries’ healthcare systems was conducted by using Google and the library of Victoria University, Melbourne. Data from the websites of the Commonwealth of Australia, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, the Australian Productivity Commission, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and the World Bank have also been used. Although care within the Australian healthcare system is among the best in the world, there is a need to change the paradigm currently being used to measure the outcomes and allocate resources. The Australian healthcare system is potentially dealing with two main problems: (a) resource allocation, and (b) performance and patient outcomes improvements. An interdisciplinary research approach in the areas of performance measurement, quality and patient outcomes improvement could be adopted to discover new insights, by using the policy implementation error/efficiency and bureaucratic capacity. Hospital managers, executives and healthcare management practitioners could use an interdisciplinary approach to design new performance measurement models, in which financial performance, quality, healthcare and patient outcomes are blended in, for resource allocation and performance improvement. This article recommends that public policy implementation error and the bureaucratic capacity models be applied to healthcare to optimise the outcomes for the healthcare system in Australia. In addition, it highlights the need for evaluation of the current reimbursement method, freedom of choice to patients and a regular scrutiny of the appropriateness of care. PMID:29686869

  8. Designing information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Blethyn, Stanley G

    2014-01-01

    Designing Information Systems focuses on the processes, methodologies, and approaches involved in designing information systems. The book first describes systems, management and control, and how to design information systems. Discussions focus on documents produced from the functional construction function, users, operators, analysts, programmers and others, process management and control, levels of management, open systems, design of management information systems, and business system description, partitioning, and leveling. The text then takes a look at functional specification and functiona

  9. IoT-based Asset Management System for Healthcare-related Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Carman Ka Man

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The healthcare industry has been focusing efforts on optimizing inventory management procedures through the incorporation of Information and Communication Technology, in the form of tracking devices and data mining, to establish ideal inventory models. In this paper, a roadmap is developed towards a technological assessment of the Internet of Things (IoT in the healthcare industry, 2010–2020. According to the roadmap, an IoT-based healthcare asset management system (IoT-HAMS is proposed and developed based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN and Fuzzy Logic (FL, incorporating IoT technologies for asset management to optimize the supply of resources.

  10. Applying analytic hierarchy process to assess healthcare-oriented cloud computing service systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wen-Hwa; Qiu, Wan-Li

    2016-01-01

    Numerous differences exist between the healthcare industry and other industries. Difficulties in the business operation of the healthcare industry have continually increased because of the volatility and importance of health care, changes to and requirements of health insurance policies, and the statuses of healthcare providers, which are typically considered not-for-profit organizations. Moreover, because of the financial risks associated with constant changes in healthcare payment methods and constantly evolving information technology, healthcare organizations must continually adjust their business operation objectives; therefore, cloud computing presents both a challenge and an opportunity. As a response to aging populations and the prevalence of the Internet in fast-paced contemporary societies, cloud computing can be used to facilitate the task of balancing the quality and costs of health care. To evaluate cloud computing service systems for use in health care, providing decision makers with a comprehensive assessment method for prioritizing decision-making factors is highly beneficial. Hence, this study applied the analytic hierarchy process, compared items related to cloud computing and health care, executed a questionnaire survey, and then classified the critical factors influencing healthcare cloud computing service systems on the basis of statistical analyses of the questionnaire results. The results indicate that the primary factor affecting the design or implementation of optimal cloud computing healthcare service systems is cost effectiveness, with the secondary factors being practical considerations such as software design and system architecture.

  11. 45 CFR 61.14 - Confidentiality of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidentiality of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank information. 61.14 Section 61.14 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON...

  12. 45 CFR 61.12 - Requesting information from the Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requesting information from the Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank. 61.12 Section 61.12 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION...

  13. Using HFACS-Healthcare to Identify Systemic Vulnerabilities During Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Tara N; Francis, Sarah E; Wiegmann, Douglas A; Shappell, Scott A; Gewertz, Bruce L

    2018-03-01

    The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System for Healthcare (HFACS-Healthcare) was used to classify surgical near miss events reported via a hospital's event reporting system over the course of 1 year. Two trained analysts identified causal factors within each event narrative and subsequently categorized the events using HFACS-Healthcare. Of 910 original events, 592 could be analyzed further using HFACS-Healthcare, resulting in the identification of 726 causal factors. Most issues (n = 436, 60.00%) involved preconditions for unsafe acts, followed by unsafe acts (n = 257, 35.39%), organizational influences (n = 27, 3.72%), and supervisory factors (n = 6, 0.82%). These findings go beyond the traditional methods of trending incident data that typically focus on documenting the frequency of their occurrence. Analyzing near misses based on their underlying contributing human factors affords a greater opportunity to develop process improvements to reduce reoccurrence and better provide patient safety approaches.

  14. Choosing the right amount of healthcare information technologies investments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Rodolphe; Degoulet, Patrice

    2010-04-01

    Choosing and justifying the right amount of investment in healthcare information technologies (HITECH or HIT) in hospitals is an ever increasing challenge. Our objectives are to assess the financial impact of HIT on hospital outcome, and propose decision-helping tools that could be used to rationalize the distribution of hospital finances. We used a production function and microeconomic tools on data of 21 Paris university hospitals recorded from 1998 to 2006 to compute the elasticity coefficients of HIT versus non-HIT capital and labor as regards to hospital financial outcome and optimize the distribution of investments according to the productivity associated with each input. HIT inputs and non-HIT inputs both have a positive and significant impact on hospital production (elasticity coefficients respectively of 0.106 and 0.893; R(2) of 0.92). We forecast 2006 results from the 1998 to 2005 dataset with an accuracy of +0.61%. With the model used, the best proportion of HIT investments was estimated to be 10.6% of total input and this was predicted to lead to a total saving of 388 million Euros for the 2006 dataset. Considering HIT investment from the point of view of a global portfolio and applying econometric and microeconomic tools allow the required confidence level to be attained for choosing the right amount of HIT investments. It could also allow hospitals using these tools to make substantial savings, and help them forecast their choices for the following year for better HITECH governance in the current stimulation context. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. How users adopt healthcare information: An empirical study of an online Q&A community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiahua; Yan, Xiangbin; Li, Yijun; Li, Yumei

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of social media technology has led to the creation of many online healthcare communities, where patients can easily share and look for healthcare-related information from peers who have experienced a similar problem. However, with increased user-generated content, there is a need to constantly analyse which content should be trusted as one sifts through enormous amounts of healthcare information. This study aims to explore patients' healthcare information seeking behavior in online communities. Based on dual-process theory and the knowledge adoption model, we proposed a healthcare information adoption model for online communities. This model highlights that information quality, emotional support, and source credibility are antecedent variables of adoption likelihood of healthcare information, and competition among repliers and involvement of recipients moderate the relationship between the antecedent variables and adoption likelihood. Empirical data were collected from the healthcare module of China's biggest Q&A community-Baidu Knows. Text mining techniques were adopted to calculate the information quality and emotional support contained in each reply text. A binary logistics regression model and hierarchical regression approach were employed to test the proposed conceptual model. Information quality, emotional support, and source credibility have significant and positive impact on healthcare information adoption likelihood, and among these factors, information quality has the biggest impact on a patient's adoption decision. In addition, competition among repliers and involvement of recipients were tested as moderating effects between these antecedent factors and the adoption likelihood. Results indicate competition among repliers positively moderates the relationship between source credibility and adoption likelihood, and recipients' involvement positively moderates the relationship between information quality, source credibility, and adoption

  16. The Challenges and Issues Regarding E-Health and Health Information Technology Trends in the Healthcare Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Pouyan; Sambasivan, Murali; Kumar, Naresh

    Like other industries, the utilization of the internet and Information Technology (IT) has increased in the health sector. Different applications attributed to the internet and IT in healthcare practice. It includes a range of services that intersect the edge of medicine, computer and information science. The presence of the internet helps healthcare practice with the use of electronic processes and communication. Also, health IT (HIT) deals with the devices, clinical guidelines and methods required to improve the management of information in healthcare. Although the internet and HIT has been considered as an influential means to enhance health care delivery, it is completely naive to imagine all new tools and mechanisms supported by the internet and HIT systems are simply adopted and used by all organizational members. As healthcare professionals play an important role in the healthcare sector, there is no doubt that mechanism of newly introduced HIT and new application of the internet in medical practice should be coupled with healthcare professionals' acceptance. Therefore, with great resistance by healthcare professionals new mechanism and tools supported by IT and the internet cannot be used properly and subsequently may not improve the quality of medical care services. However, factors affecting the healthcare professionals' adoption behavior concerning new e-health and HIT mechanism are still not conclusively identified. This research (as a theoretical study) tries to propose the source of resistance in order to handle the challenges over new e-technology in the health industry. This study uses the involved concepts and develops a conceptual framework to improve overall acceptance of e-health and HIT by healthcare professionals.

  17. Dynamics of Information Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hirsch, Michael J; Murphey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of information and information dynamics has outgrown classical information theory. This book presents the research explaining the importance of information in the evolution of a distributed or networked system. It presents techniques for measuring the value or significance of information within the context of a system

  18. The Healthcare Future for the iGeneration: Integrating the Patient and the Healthcare System

    OpenAIRE

    Cathy H. Ficzere, PharmD, BCPS; Traci M. Poole, PharmD, BCACP; Rachel B. Franks, PharmD, BCACP; Elisa M. Greene, PharmD, BCACP; Kristina D. Wood, PharmD, BCACP; Philip E. Johnston, PharmD

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To propose a vision to integrate patients, their health-related data, and their wellness plans into the healthcare system using smartphone and tablet computer technology. Setting: Ambulatory care and community practice Practice Innovation: Utilization of smartphone and tablet computer technology to assess health care conditions, educate and involve patients, and facilitate seamless communication between the patient, electronic health record, pharmacy system, third-party p...

  19. Mapping healthcare systems: a policy relevant analytic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri Feachem, Neelam; Afshar, Ariana; Pruett, Cristina; Avanceña, Anton L V

    2017-07-01

    In the past decade, an international consensus on the value of well-functioning systems has driven considerable health systems research. This research falls into two broad categories. The first provides conceptual frameworks that take complex healthcare systems and create simplified constructs of interactions and functions. The second focuses on granular inputs and outputs. This paper presents a novel translational mapping tool - the University of California, San Francisco mapping tool (the Tool) - which bridges the gap between these two areas of research, creating a platform for multi-country comparative analysis. Using the Murray-Frenk framework, we create a macro-level representation of a country's structure, focusing on how it finances and delivers healthcare. The map visually depicts the fundamental policy questions in healthcare system design: funding sources and amount spent through each source, purchasers, populations covered, provider categories; and the relationship between these entities. We use the Tool to provide a macro-level comparative analysis of the structure of India's and Thailand's healthcare systems. As part of the systems strengthening arsenal, the Tool can stimulate debate about the merits and consequences of different healthcare systems structural designs, using a common framework that fosters multi-country comparative analyses. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  20. Public trust in the healthcare system in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Dexnell; Youssef, Farid F

    2016-04-01

    Broadly defined, trust in the healthcare system is concerned with how the public perceives the system and the actors therein as it pertains to their ability to both deliver services and seek the best interests of their clientele. Trust is important because it impacts upon a range of health behaviors including compliance and ultimately affects the ability of the healthcare system to meet its goals. While several studies exist on public trust within the developed world, few studies have explored this issue in developing countries. This paper therefore assesses public trust in the healthcare system of a developing small island nation, Trinidad and Tobago. A cross-sectional survey of adults was conducted using a questionnaire that has been successfully used across Europe. We report that trust levels in the healthcare system in Trinidad and Tobago are relatively low with less than 50% of persons indicating fair trust in the healthcare system. In addition, individual health professionals also did not score highly with lowest scores found for nurses and complementary therapists. Results on four out of five dimensions of trust also demonstrated scores significantly lower than those reported in more developed nations. Open-ended comments supported these findings with the majority of persons indicating a lack of confidence in the healthcare system. These results may reflect the reality in the wider developing world, and we suggest that bolstering trust is a needed area of focus in the delivery of healthcare services throughout the nation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Virtual Video Prototyping of Pervasive Healthcare Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus; Madsen, Kim Halskov

    2002-01-01

    Virtual studio technology enables the mixing of physical and digital 3D objects and thus expands the way of representing design ideas in terms of virtual video prototypes, which offers new possibilities for designers by combining elements of prototypes, mock-ups, scenarios, and conventional video....... In this article we report our initial experience in the domain of pervasive healthcare with producing virtual video prototypes and using them in a design workshop. Our experience has been predominantly favourable. The production of a virtual video prototype forces the designers to decide very concrete design...... issues, since one cannot avoid paying attention to the physical, real-world constraints and to details in the usage-interaction between users and technology. From the users' perspective, during our evaluation of the virtual video prototype, we experienced how it enabled users to relate...

  2. Virtual Video Prototyping for Healthcare Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    Virtual studio technology enables the mixing of physical and digital 3D objects and thus expands the way of representing design ideas in terms of virtual video prototypes, which offers new possibilities for designers by combining elements of prototypes, mock-ups, scenarios, and conventional video....... In this article we report our initial experience in the domain of pervasive healthcare with producing virtual video prototypes and using them in a design workshop. Our experience has been predominantly favourable. The production of a virtual video prototype forces the designers to decide very concrete design...... issues, since one cannot avoid paying attention to the physical, real-world constraints and to details in the usage-interaction between users and technology. From the users' perspective, during our evaluation of the virtual video prototype, we experienced how it enabled users to relate...

  3. The deployment of information systems and information technology in field hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Ian R J; Naguib, Raouf N G

    2010-01-01

    Information systems and related technologies continue to develop and have become an integral part of healthcare provision and hospital care in particular. Field hospitals typically operate in the most austere and difficult of conditions and have yet to fully exploit related technologies. This paper addresses those aspects of healthcare informatics, healthcare knowledge management and lean healthcare that can be applied to field hospitals, with a view to improving patient care. The aim is to provide a vision for the deployment of information systems and information technology in field hospitals, using the British Army's field hospital as a representative model.

  4. Aeronautical Information System Replacement -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Aeronautical Information System Replacement is a web-enabled, automation means for the collection and distribution of Service B messages, weather information, flight...

  5. Deaf women: experiences and perceptions of healthcare system access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Annie G; Wiggins, Erin A; Barmada, Carlin Henry; Sullivan, Vicki Joy

    2002-10-01

    The authors investigated the knowledge, attitudes, and healthcare experiences of Deaf women. Interviews with 45 deaf women who participated in focus groups in American Sign Language were translated, transcribed, and analyzed. Deaf women's understanding of women's health issues, knowledge of health vocabulary in both English and American Sign Language, common health concerns among Deaf women, and issues of access to information, including pathways and barriers, were examined. As a qualitative study, the results of this investigation are limited and should be viewed as exploratory. A lack of health knowledge was evident, including little understanding of the meaning or value of cancer screening, mammography, or Pap smears; purposes of prescribed medications, such as hormone replacement therapy (HRT); or necessity for other medical or surgical interventions. Negative experiences and avoidance or nonuse of health services were reported, largely due to the lack of a common language with healthcare providers. Insensitive behaviors were also described. Positive experiences and increased access to health information were reported with practitioners who used qualified interpreters. Providers who demonstrated minimal signing skills, a willingness to use paper and pen, and sensitivity to improving communication were appreciated. Deaf women have unique cultural and linguistic issues that affect healthcare experiences. Improved access to health information may be achieved with specialized resource materials, improved prevention and targeted intervention strategies, and self-advocacy skills development. Healthcare providers must be trained to become more effective communicators with Deaf patients and to use qualified interpreters to assure access to healthcare for Deaf women.

  6. The Swedish strategy and method for development of a national healthcare information architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenälv, Jessica; Lundell, Karl-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    "We need a precise framework of regulations in order to maintain appropriate and structured health care documentation that ensures that the information maintains a sufficient level of quality to be used in treatment, in research and by the actual patient. The users shall be aided by clearly and uniformly defined terms and concepts, and there should be an information structure that clarifies what to document and how to make the information more useful. Most of all, we need to standardize the information, not just the technical systems." (eHälsa - nytta och näring, Riksdag report 2011/12:RFR5, p. 37). In 2010, the Swedish Government adopted the National e-Health - the national strategy for accessible and secure information in healthcare. The strategy is a revision and extension of the previous strategy from 2006, which was used as input for the most recent efforts to develop a national information structure utilizing business-oriented generic models. A national decision on healthcare informatics standards was made by the Swedish County Councils, which decided to follow and use EN/ISO 13606 as a standard for the development of a universally applicable information structure, including archetypes and templates. The overall aim of the Swedish strategy for development of National Healthcare Information Architecture is to achieve high level semantic interoperability for clinical content and clinical contexts. High level semantic interoperability requires consistently structured clinical data and other types of data with coherent traceability to be mapped to reference clinical models. Archetypes that are formal definitions of the clinical and demographic concepts and some administrative data were developed. Each archetype describes the information structure and content of overarching core clinical concepts. Information that is defined in archetypes should be used for different purposes. Generic clinical process model was made concrete and analyzed. For each decision

  7. Barriers to healthcare coordination in market-based and decentralized public health systems: a qualitative study in healthcare networks of Colombia and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Ingrid; Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; De Paepe, Pierre; Ferreira da Silva, Maria Rejane; Unger, Jean-Pierre; Vázquez, María-Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Although integrated healthcare networks (IHNs) are promoted in Latin America in response to health system fragmentation, few analyses on the coordination of care across levels in these networks have been conducted in the region. The aim is to analyse the existence of healthcare coordination across levels of care and the factors influencing it from the health personnel' perspective in healthcare networks of two countries with different health systems: Colombia, with a social security system based on managed competition and Brazil, with a decentralized national health system. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive-interpretative study was conducted, based on a case study of healthcare networks in four municipalities. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with a three stage theoretical sample of (a) health (112) and administrative (66) professionals of different care levels, and (b) managers of providers (42) and insurers (14). A thematic content analysis was conducted, segmented by cases, informant groups and themes. The results reveal poor clinical information transfer between healthcare levels in all networks analysed, with added deficiencies in Brazil in the coordination of access and clinical management. The obstacles to care coordination are related to the organization of both the health system and the healthcare networks. In the health system, there is the existence of economic incentives to compete (exacerbated in Brazil by partisan political interests), the fragmentation and instability of networks in Colombia and weak planning and evaluation in Brazil. In the healthcare networks, there are inadequate working conditions (temporary and/or part-time contracts) which hinder the use of coordination mechanisms, and inadequate professional training for implementing a healthcare model in which primary care should act as coordinator in patient care. Reforms are needed in these health systems and networks in order to modify incentives, strengthen

  8. What might a health information system look like?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Nenonen

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A health information system is more than just an electronic patient database. It is also more than a reporting system for healthcare data. It is a precondition for a modern healthcare system driven by information rather than by resources or norms. However, we have not yet seen such a system operating anywhere. In this paper we try to draft a general framework for a health information system, link it to evidence-based support mechanisms for both clinical and administrative decision making and present it as an integral part of our healthcare systems.

  9. ERP (enterprise resource planning) systems can streamline healthcare business functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, E K; Christenson, E

    2001-05-01

    Enterprise resource planning (ERP) software applications are designed to facilitate the systemwide integration of complex processes and functions across a large enterprise consisting of many internal and external constituents. Although most currently available ERP applications generally are tailored to the needs of the manufacturing industry, many large healthcare systems are investigating these applications. Due to the significant differences between manufacturing and patient care, ERP-based systems do not easily translate to the healthcare setting. In particular, the lack of clinical standardization impedes the use of ERP systems for clinical integration. Nonetheless, an ERP-based system can help a healthcare organization integrate many functions, including patient scheduling, human resources management, workload forecasting, and management of workflow, that are not directly dependent on clinical decision making.

  10. Using ESB and BPEL for Evolving Healthcare Systems Towards Pervasive, Grid-Enabled SOA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufi, V.; Malamateniou, F.; Papakonstantinou, D.; Vassilacopoulos, G.

    Healthcare organizations often face the challenge of integrating diverse and geographically disparate information technology systems to respond to changing requirements and to exploit the capabilities of modern technologies. Hence, systems evolution, through modification and extension of the existing information technology infrastructure, becomes a necessity. Moreover, the availability of these systems at the point of care when needed is a vital issue for the quality of healthcare provided to patients. This chapter takes a process perspective of healthcare delivery within and across organizational boundaries and presents a disciplined approach for evolving healthcare systems towards a pervasive, grid-enabled service-oriented architecture using the enterprise system bus middleware technology for resolving integration issues, the business process execution language for supporting collaboration requirements and grid middleware technology for both addressing common SOA scalability requirements and complementing existing system functionality. In such an environment, appropriate security mechanisms must ensure authorized access to integrated healthcare services and data. To this end, a security framework addressing security aspects such as authorization and access control is also presented.

  11. Geographical information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    The chapter gives an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) with particular focus on their application within environmental management.......The chapter gives an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) with particular focus on their application within environmental management....

  12. Improving quality through effective implementation of information technology in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øvretveit, John; Scott, Tim; Rundall, Thomas G; Shortell, Stephen M; Brommels, Mats

    2007-10-01

    To describe an implementation of one information technology system (electronic medical record, EMR) in one hospital, the perceived impact, the factors thought to help and hinder implementation and the success of the system and compare this with theories of effective IT implementation. To draw on previous research, empirical data from this study is used to develop IT implementation theory. Qualitative case study, replicating the methods and questions of a previously published USA EMR implementation study using semi-structured interviews and documentation. Large Swedish teaching hospital shortly after a merger of two hospital sites. Thirty senior clinicians, managers, project team members, doctors and nurses. The Swedish implementation was achieved within a year and for under half the budget, with a generally popular EMR which was thought to save time and improve the quality of patient care. Evidence from this study and findings from the more problematic USA implementation case suggests that key factors for cost effective implementation and operation were features of the system itself, the implementation process and the conditions under which the implementation was carried out. There is empirical support for the IT implementation theory developed in this study, which provides a sound basis for future research and successful implementation. Successful implementation of an EMR is likely with an intuitive system, requiring little training, already well developed for clinical work but allowing flexibility for development, where clinicians are involved in selection and in modification for their department needs and where a realistic timetable is made using an assessment of the change-capability of the organization. Once a system decision is made, the implementation should be driven by top and departmental leaders assisted by competent project teams involving information technology specialists and users. Corrections for unforeseen eventualities will be needed, especially

  13. The implementation of mindfulness in healthcare systems: a theoretical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarzo, M M P; Cebolla, A; Garcia-Campayo, J

    2015-01-01

    Evidence regarding the efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) is increasing exponentially; however, there are still challenges to their integration in healthcare systems. Our goal is to provide a conceptual framework that addresses these challenges in order to bring about scholarly dialog and support health managers and practitioners with the implementation of MBIs in healthcare. This is an opinative narrative review based on theoretical and empirical data that address key issues in the implementation of mindfulness in healthcare systems, such as the training of professionals, funding and costs of interventions, cost effectiveness and innovative delivery models. We show that even in the United Kingdom, where mindfulness has a high level of implementation, there is a high variability in the access to MBIs. In addition, we discuss innovative approaches based on "complex interventions," "stepped-care" and "low intensity-high volume" concepts that may prove fruitful in the development and implementation of MBIs in national healthcare systems, particularly in Primary Care. In order to better understand barriers and opportunities for mindfulness implementation in healthcare systems, it is necessary to be aware that MBIs are "complex interventions," which require innovative approaches and delivery models to implement these interventions in a cost-effective and accessible way. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Airports Geographic Information System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airports Geographic Information System maintains the airport and aeronautical data required to meet the demands of the Next Generation National Airspace System....

  15. Lofar information system design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, E.; Belikov, A. N.

    2009-01-01

    The Lofar Information System is a solution for Lofar Long Term Archive that is capable to store and handle PBs of raw and processed data. The newly created information system is based on Astro-WISE - the information system for wide field astronomy. We review an adaptation of Astro-WISE for the new

  16. An Attribute Based Access Control Framework for Healthcare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Majid; Samet, Saeed; Hu, Ting

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, access control is an indispensable part of the Personal Health Record and supplies for its confidentiality by enforcing policies and rules to ensure that only authorized users gain access to requested resources in the system. In other words, the access control means protecting patient privacy in healthcare systems. Attribute-Based Access Control (ABAC) is a new access control model that can be used instead of other traditional types of access control such as Discretionary Access Control, Mandatory Access Control, and Role-Based Access Control. During last five years ABAC has shown some applications in both recent academic fields and industry purposes. ABAC by using user’s attributes and resources, makes a decision according to an access request. In this paper, we propose an ABAC framework for healthcare system. We use the engine of ABAC for rendering and enforcing healthcare policies. Moreover, we handle emergency situations in this framework.

  17. Executable Design Models for a Pervasive Healthcare Middleware System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens Bæk; Christensen, Søren

    2002-01-01

     UML is applied in the design of a pervasive healthcare middleware system for the hospitals in Aarhus County, Denmark. It works well for the modelling of static aspects of the system, but with respect to describing the behaviour, UML is not sufficient. This paper explains why and, as a remedy, su...

  18. Case Study: Employee Use of Information and Communication Technologies in a Healthcare Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, Jorge I.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the employee use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a southern Puerto Rico healthcare organization. Thirty-two employees of a southern Puerto Rico healthcare organization provided their perspectives regarding their use of ICT in the workplace. The findings distinguished how employees use ICT…

  19. 78 FR 4983 - Proposed Information Collection; Women Veterans Healthcare Barriers Survey Activity: Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... Veterans Healthcare Barriers Survey Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration... Healthcare Barriers Survey'' in any correspondence. During the comment period, comments may be viewed online... of automated collection techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Women...

  20. Secure Wireless Military Healthcare Telemedicine Enterprise System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucas, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    ...(exp TM) software and Division Tools with cross platform telemedicine systems, inclusive of computer based systems, handheld wireless PDA devices, and miniature computers, to existing DoD legacy...

  1. Secure Wireless Military Healthcare Telemedicine Enterprise System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucas, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    ...) software and Dvision Tools with cross platform telemedicine systems, inclusive of computer based systems, handheld wireless PDA devices, and miniature computers, to existing DoD legacy and developing...

  2. Computerised decision support systems for healthcare professionals: an interpretative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin; Majeed, Azeem; Bates, David W; Sheikh, Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Computerised decision support systems are designed to support clinicians in making decisions and thereby enhance the quality and safety of care. We aimed to undertake an interpretative review of the empirical evidence on computerised decision support systems, their contexts of use, and summarise evidence on the effectiveness of these tools and insights into how these can be successfully implemented and adopted. We systematically searched the empirical literature to identify systematic literature reviews on computerised decision support applications and their impact on the quality and safety of healthcare delivery over a 13-year period (1997-2010). The databases searched included: MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Methodology Register, The Health Technology Assessment Database, and The National Health Service (NHS) Economic Evaluation Database. To be eligible for inclusion, systematic reviews needed to address computerised decision support systems, and at least one of the following: impact on safety; quality; or organisational, implementation or adoption considerations. Our searches yielded 121 systematic reviews relating to eHealth, of which we identified 41 as investigating computerised decision support systems. These indicated that, whilst there was a lack of investigating potential risks, such tools can result in improvements in practitioner performance in the promotion of preventive care and guideline adherence, particularly if specific information is available in real time and systems are effectively integrated into clinical workflows. However, the evidence regarding impact on patient outcomes was less clear-cut with reviews finding either no, inconsistent or modest benefits. Whilst the potential of clinical decision support systems in improving, in particular, practitioner performance is considerable, such technology may

  3. What Is the Role of Informal Healthcare Providers in Developing Countries? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhinaraset, May; Ingram, Matthew; Lofthouse, Heather Kinlaw; Montagu, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    Informal health care providers (IPs) comprise a significant component of health systems in developing nations. Yet little is known about the most basic characteristics of performance, cost, quality, utilization, and size of this sector. To address this gap we conducted a comprehensive literature review on the informal health care sector in developing countries. We searched for studies published since 2000 through electronic databases PubMed, Google Scholar, and relevant grey literature from The New York Academy of Medicine, The World Bank, The Center for Global Development, USAID, SHOPS (formerly PSP-One), The World Health Organization, DFID, Human Resources for Health Global Resource Center. In total, 334 articles were retrieved, and 122 met inclusion criteria and chosen for data abstraction. Results indicate that IPs make up a significant portion of the healthcare sector globally, with almost half of studies (48%) from Sub-Saharan Africa. Utilization estimates from 24 studies in the literature of IP for healthcare services ranged from 9% to 90% of all healthcare interactions, depending on the country, the disease in question, and methods of measurement. IPs operate in a variety of health areas, although baseline information on quality is notably incomplete and poor quality of care is generally assumed. There was a wide variation in how quality of care is measured. The review found that IPs reported inadequate drug provision, poor adherence to clinical national guidelines, and that there were gaps in knowledge and provider practice; however, studies also found that the formal sector also reported poor provider practices. Reasons for using IPs included convenience, affordability, and social and cultural effects. Recommendations from the literature amount to a call for more engagement with the IP sector. IPs are a large component of nearly all developing country health systems. Research and policies of engagement are needed. PMID:23405101

  4. Healthcare professionals' organisational barriers to health information technologies-a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluch, Maria

    2011-12-01

    This literature review identifies and categorises, from an organisational management perspective, barriers to the use of HIT or ICT for health. Based on the review, it offers policy interventions. This systematic literature review was carried out during December 2009 and January 2010. Additional on-going reviews of updates through automated system alerts took place up until this paper was submitted. A total of thirty-one sources were searched including nine software platforms/databases, fifteen specialised websites/targeted databases, Google Scholar, ISI Science Citation Index and five journals hand-searched. The study covers seventy-nine articles on organisational barriers to ICT adoption by healthcare professionals. These are categorised under five main headings - (I) Structure of healthcare organisations; (II) Tasks; (III) People policies; (IV) Incentives; and (V) Information and decision processes. A total of ten subcategories are also identified. By adopting an organisational management approach, some recommendations to remove organisational management barriers are made. Despite their apparent promise, health information technologies (HIT) have proved difficult to implement. This systematic review reveals the implementation barriers associated to organisational management and their interrelations. Several important future directions in the field are also suggested: (1) there is a need for further research providing evidence of HIT cost-effectiveness as well as the development of optimal HIT applications; (2) more information is needed regarding organisational change, incentives, liability issues, end-users HIT competences and skills, structure and work process issues involved in realising the benefits from HIT. Future policy interventions should consider the five dimensions identified when addressing the impact of HIT in healthcare organisational systems, and how the impact of an intervention aimed at a particular dimension would interrelate with others. 2011

  5. The healthcare experiences of Arab Israeli women in a reformed healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnekave, Eldad; Gross, Revital

    2004-07-01

    Arab Israeli women are subject to unique social stresses deriving from their status as part of an ethno-political minority and from their position as women in a patriarchal community. Collectively, their health profiles rate poorly in comparison to Jewish Israeli women or to women in the vast majority of developed countries. To examine the experiences of Arab Israeli women in the contemporary Israeli healthcare system, following implementation of the National Health Insurance Law (NHIL). The study combined quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. A telephone survey utilizing a structured questionnaire was conducted during August-September 1998 among a random national sample of 849 women, with a response rate of 83%. Between the months of January and July of 2000, qualitative data was attained via participant-observation, long and short semi-structured interviews, and focus groups in one large Muslim Arab Israeli village. Arab Israeli women in the national survey reported poorer self-assessed health, lower rates of care by a woman primary care physician, lower satisfaction ratings for primary care physicians and more frequently foregoing medical care than did native or immigrant Jewish Israeli women. Three major factors contributing to Arab Israeli women's healthcare experiences were elucidated by the qualitative study: (1) the threat of physical and social exposure (2) difficulties in communicating with male physicians and (3) the stifling effect of family politics and surveillance on healthcare. We discuss our findings in relation to structural changes associated with the recent reform of the Israeli health care system. We conclude by suggesting policy measures for better adapting primary care services to the needs of Arab Israeli women, and note the relevance to other systems that aim to provide service to cultural and ethno-political minorities, in which healthcare delivery is shaped by unique local circumstances.

  6. [Awareness survey of Healthcare Number System pros and cons according to medical doctors in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Uryuhara, Yoko; Inoue, Machiko; Okamoto, Shigeru; Kashihara, Hidenori; Kito, Kumiko; Shinohara, Keiko; Mandai, Marie; Morioka, Miho; Tanaka, Shiro; Kawakami, Koji; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    After bills to launch the Social Security and Tax Number System were enacted in 2013, health and political officials have considered the Healthcare Number System (the System). However, little is known about doctors' awareness and concerns about the System. This study aimed to measure how many doctors disagree with the System, examine the doctors' characteristics, and analyze the benefits and harms of the System that they identified. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of doctors via the Internet. The participants were selected from a convenience sample of a panel of doctors based on stratified sampling including four groups: working at a hospital and content analysis. There were 562 respondents (68%). By group, 16/143 (11%), 25/138 (18%), 31/132 (23%), and 43/149 (29%) doctors, respectively, thought that the System was unnecessary. The variables that correlated with the main outcome were age (per 5 years; odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.14 [1.01-1.29]) and type of medical facility (working at a clinic; 1.99 [1.30-3.08]). The doctors identified that unifying information could decrease administrative duties, facilitate inter-facility collaboration, and prevent inappropriate medical consultations. This could result in decreased healthcare costs and personalized healthcare. However, the doctors also identified that integrating information and dealing with big data could increase information leakage and information management, cause over-monitoring of doctors, and enable the inappropriate use of integrated information. This could result in deteriorating healthcare. Since some information should not be integrated, the System raises ethical considerations about privacy. Among the doctors surveyed here, 10-30% thought the System was unnecessary. These respondents tended to be older and work at a clinic. The System could decrease the cost of healthcare and enable personalized healthcare but could also increase information leakage and information management, cause

  7. Personal information documents for people with dementia: Healthcare staff 's perceptions and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Lesley; Thomas, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    Person-centred care is internationally recognised as best practice for the care of people with dementia. Personal information documents for people with dementia are proposed as a way to support person-centred care in healthcare settings. However, there is little research about how they are used in practice. The aim of this study was to analyse healthcare staff 's perceptions and experiences of using personal information documents, mainly Alzheimer's Society's 'This is me', for people with dementia in healthcare settings. The method comprised a secondary thematic analysis of data from a qualitative study, of how a dementia awareness initiative affected care for people with dementia in one healthcare organisation. The data were collected through 12 focus groups (n = 58 participants) and 1 individual interview, conducted with a range of healthcare staff, both clinical and non-clinical. There are four themes presented: understanding the rationale for personal information documents; completing personal information documents; location for personal information documents and transfer between settings; impact of personal information documents in practice. The findings illuminated how healthcare staff use personal information documents in practice in ways that support person-centred care. Practical issues about the use of personal information documents were revealed and these may affect the optimal use of the documents in practice. The study indicated the need to complete personal information documents at an early stage following diagnosis of dementia, and the importance of embedding their use across care settings, to support communication and integrated care.

  8. [The quality of the German health-care system in an international comparison - a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauerer, M; Emmert, M; Schöffski, O

    2013-08-01

    Studies assessing the quality of the German health-care system in an international comparison come to different results. Therefore, this review aims to investigate how the German health-care system is evaluated in comparison to other health-care systems by reviewing international publications. Results show starting points for ways to improve the German health-care system, to maintain and expand its strengths as well as to derive strategies for solving identified problems. A systematic review searching different databases [library catalogues, WorldCat (including MEDLINE and OAIster-search), German National Library, Google Scholar and others]. Search requests were addressed to English or German language publications for the time period 2000-2010 (an informal search was conducted in October 2011 for an update). Results of the identified studies were aggregated and main statements derived. In total, 13 publications assessing the German health-care system in an international comparison were identified. These comparisons are based on 377 measures. After aggregation, 244 substantially different indicators remained, which were dedicated to 14 categories. It became apparent that the German health-care system can be characterised by a high level of expenses, a well-developed health-care infrastructure as well as a high availability of personal and material resources. Outcome measures demonstrate heterogeneous results. It can be stated that, particularly in this field, there is potential for further improvement. The utilisation of health-care services is high, the access is mostly not regulated and out of pocket payments can pose a barrier for patients. Waiting times are not regarded as a major weakness. Although civic satisfaction seems to be acceptable, a large portion of the citizens calls for elementary modifications. Especially, more patient-centred health-care delivery should be addressed as well as management of information and the adoption of meaningful electronic

  9. [Interpretation in the Danish health-care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund Hansen, Marianne Taulo; Nielsen, Signe Smith

    2013-03-04

    Communication between health professional and patient is central for treatment and patient safety in the health-care system. This systematic review examines the last ten years of specialist literature concerning interpretation in the Danish health-care system. Structural search in two databases, screening of references and recommended literature from two scientists led to identification of seven relevant articles. The review showed that professional interpreters were not used consistently when needed. Family members were also used as interpreters. These results were supported by international investigations.

  10. [Current legislation in the healthcare system 2015/2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martenstein, I; Wienke, A

    2016-05-01

    The energy of the legislator in the healthcare system was barely stoppable in 2015. Many new laws have been brought into force and legal initiatives have also been implemented. The Hospital Structure Act, the Treatment Enhancement Act, amendments of the official medical fee schedules for physicians, the Prevention Act, the E-Health Act, the Anti-corruption Act, the hospital admission guidelines and amendments of the model specialty training regulations are just some of the essential alterations that lie ahead of the medical community. This article gives a review of the most important new legislative regulations in the healthcare system and presents the fundamental consequences for the practice.

  11. INFORMATION SOCIETY AND FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY OF THE ROMANIAN HEALTH SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATIANA BOGDAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The financial sustainability of the health systems often reveals the ability of policy makers to finance healthcare in the face of growing cost pressures, with populations ageing, new technologies and increased patient expectations for healthcare coverage and quality. Thus, the healthcare systems need to reinvent themselves by using innovative financing mechanisms coupled with electronic information and communication systems, while offering greater transparency, flexibility and choice and increasing access to the services available. The paper analyses the healthcare financing models: the national health system, the social insurance or the private insurance model so that the Romanian health care reform should preserve the best elements of its existing system while selectively adapt techniques and processes that seemed to have been successful in other countries. Moreover, the application of information and communication technologies – eHealth offers new possibilities for improving almost every aspect of healthcare, from making medical systems more powerful and responsive to providing better health information to all.

  12. Preanalytical errors in primary healthcare: a questionnaire study of information search procedures, test request management and test tube labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Johan; Brulin, Christine; Grankvist, Kjell; Wallin, Olof

    2009-01-01

    Most errors in laboratory medicine occur in the preanalytical phase and are the result of human mistakes. This study investigated information search procedures, test request management and test tube labelling in primary healthcare compared to the same procedures amongst clinical laboratory staff. A questionnaire was completed by 317 venous blood sampling staff in 70 primary healthcare centres and in two clinical laboratories (response rate = 94%). Correct procedures were not always followed. Only 60% of the primary healthcare staff reported that they always sought information in the updated, online laboratory manual. Only 12% reported that they always labelled the test tubes prior to drawing blood samples. No major differences between primary healthcare centres and clinical laboratories were found, except for test tube labelling, whereby the laboratory staff reported better practices. Re-education and access to documented routines were not clearly associated with better practices. The preanalytical procedure in the surveyed primary healthcare centres was associated with a risk of errors which could affect patient safety. To improve patient safety in laboratory testing, all healthcare providers should survey their preanalytical procedures and improve the total testing process with a systems perspective.

  13. Natural Information Processing Systems

    OpenAIRE

    John Sweller; Susan Sweller

    2006-01-01

    Natural information processing systems such as biological evolution and human cognition organize information used to govern the activities of natural entities. When dealing with biologically secondary information, these systems can be specified by five common principles that we propose underlie natural information processing systems. The principles equate: (1) human long-term memory with a genome; (2) learning from other humans with biological reproduction; (3) problem solving through random ...

  14. CMOS Enabled Microfluidic Systems for Healthcare Based Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sherjeel M; Gumus, Abdurrahman; Nassar, Joanna M; Hussain, Muhammad M

    2018-04-01

    With the increased global population, it is more important than ever to expand accessibility to affordable personalized healthcare. In this context, a seamless integration of microfluidic technology for bioanalysis and drug delivery and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology enabled data-management circuitry is critical. Therefore, here, the fundamentals, integration aspects, and applications of CMOS-enabled microfluidic systems for affordable personalized healthcare systems are presented. Critical components, like sensors, actuators, and their fabrication and packaging, are discussed and reviewed in detail. With the emergence of the Internet-of-Things and the upcoming Internet-of-Everything for a people-process-data-device connected world, now is the time to take CMOS-enabled microfluidics technology to as many people as possible. There is enormous potential for microfluidic technologies in affordable healthcare for everyone, and CMOS technology will play a major role in making that happen. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. CMOS Enabled Microfluidic Systems for Healthcare Based Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Sherjeel M.; Gumus, Abdurrahman; Nassar, Joanna M.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    With the increased global population, it is more important than ever to expand accessibility to affordable personalized healthcare. In this context, a seamless integration of microfluidic technology for bioanalysis and drug delivery and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology enabled data-management circuitry is critical. Therefore, here, the fundamentals, integration aspects, and applications of CMOS-enabled microfluidic systems for affordable personalized healthcare systems are presented. Critical components, like sensors, actuators, and their fabrication and packaging, are discussed and reviewed in detail. With the emergence of the Internet-of-Things and the upcoming Internet-of-Everything for a people-process-data-device connected world, now is the time to take CMOS-enabled microfluidics technology to as many people as possible. There is enormous potential for microfluidic technologies in affordable healthcare for everyone, and CMOS technology will play a major role in making that happen.

  16. CMOS Enabled Microfluidic Systems for Healthcare Based Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Sherjeel M.

    2018-02-27

    With the increased global population, it is more important than ever to expand accessibility to affordable personalized healthcare. In this context, a seamless integration of microfluidic technology for bioanalysis and drug delivery and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology enabled data-management circuitry is critical. Therefore, here, the fundamentals, integration aspects, and applications of CMOS-enabled microfluidic systems for affordable personalized healthcare systems are presented. Critical components, like sensors, actuators, and their fabrication and packaging, are discussed and reviewed in detail. With the emergence of the Internet-of-Things and the upcoming Internet-of-Everything for a people-process-data-device connected world, now is the time to take CMOS-enabled microfluidics technology to as many people as possible. There is enormous potential for microfluidic technologies in affordable healthcare for everyone, and CMOS technology will play a major role in making that happen.

  17. Implications of climate change (global warming) for the healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, R B; Eltoukhy, N S; Raffa, K F

    2012-10-01

    Temperature-sensitive pathogenic species and their vectors and hosts are emerging in previously colder regions as a consequence of several factors, including global warming. As a result, an increasing number of people will be exposed to pathogens against which they have not previously needed defences. We illustrate this with a specific example of recent emergence of Cryptococcus gattii infections in more temperate climates. The outbreaks in more temperate climates of the highly virulent--but usually tropically restricted--C. gattii is illustrative of an anticipated growing challenge for the healthcare system. There is a need for preparedness by healthcare professionals in anticipation and for management of such outbreaks, including other infections whose recent increased prevalence in temperate climates can be at least partly associated with global warming. (Re)emergence of temperature-sensitive pathogenic species in more temperate climates will present new challenges for healthcare systems. Preparation for outbreaks should precede their occurrence. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Career management in the healthcare system

    OpenAIRE

    Pusa Tania Tapliga; Roxana Nicoleta Matei

    2014-01-01

    Career management is a specialized activity that provides the relation between HRM and the individual and organizational career planning. The health system is changing, more than any other field. Career Management in the health care system involves a complex process of analysis and human resource planning at both the organizational and the individual level.

  19. International cooperative information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Developing countries need mechanisms by which the information they generate themselves and development information from the rest of the world can be retrieved. The international cooperative information system is such a mechanism. Delegates to the Seminar on International Cooperative Information Systems were informed about various existing systems (INIS, AGRIS, INFOTERRA, TCDC/INRES, POPIN, DEVSIS, and INPADROC), some specialized information systems and services (CDS/ISIS and the Cassava Information Centre), and computer programs for information processing (INIS/AGRIS, CDS/ISIS, and MINISIS). The participants suggested some changes that should be made on both the national and the international levels to ensure that these systems meet the needs of developing countries more effectively. (LL)

  20. IAEA safeguards information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, J.

    1984-01-01

    The basic concepts, structure, and operation of the Agency Safeguards Information System is discussed with respect to its role in accomplishing the overall objectives of safeguards. The basis and purposes of the Agency's information system, the structure and flow of information within the Agency's system, the relationship of the components is the Agency system, the requirements of Member States in respect of their reporting to the Agency, and the relationship of accounting data vis-a-vis facility and inspection data are described

  1. Community Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Andrew

    Information is provided on technological and social trends as background for a workshop designed to heighten the consciousness of workers in community information systems. Initially, the basic terminology is considered in its implications for an integrated perspective of community information systems, with particular attention given to the meaning…

  2. Mobile Student Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  3. Information system metaphors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, H.W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Metaphors are useful because they are efficient: they transfer a complex of meaning in a few words. Information systems are social constructs. Therefore, metaphors seem to be especially useful for explaining the space of possible meaning complexes or designs of information systems. Three information

  4. Micro Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulslev Pedersen, Rasmus; Kühn Pedersen, Mogens

    2014-01-01

    such as medical and manufacturing. These new sensor applications have implications for information systems (IS) and, the authors visualize this new class of information systems as fractals growing from an established class of systems; namely that of information systems (IS). The identified applications...... and implications are used as an empirical basis for creating a model for these small new information systems. Such sensor systems are called embedded systems in the technical sciences, and the authors want to couple it with general IS. They call the merger of these two important research areas (IS and embedded...... systems) for micro information systems (micro-IS). It is intended as a new research field within IS research. An initial framework model is established, which seeks to capture both the possibilities and constraints of this new paradigm, while looking simultaneously at the fundamental IS and ICT aspects...

  5. Healthcare waste generation and its management system: the case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Healthcare waste generation and its management system: the case of health ... of an environmental risk to health care workers, the public and the environment at large. ... Only four out of ten health centers used local type of incinerators, while ...

  6. Integrated inventory information system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarupria, J.S.; Kunte, P.D.

    The nature of oceanographic data and the management of inventory level information are described in Integrated Inventory Information System (IIIS). It is shown how a ROSCOPO (report on observations/samples collected during oceanographic programme...

  7. Healthcare Utilization and Costs of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Medicaid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong J. Kan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Healthcare utilization and costs associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in a US Medicaid population were examined. Methods. Patients ≥ 18 years old with SLE diagnosis (ICD-9-CM 710.0x were extracted from a large Medicaid database 2002–2009. Index date was date of the first SLE diagnosis. Patients with and without SLE were matched. All patients had a variable length of followup with a minimum of 12 months. Annualized healthcare utilization and costs associated with SLE and costs of SLE flares were assessed during the followup period. Multivariate regressions were conducted to estimate incremental healthcare utilization and costs associated with SLE. Results. A total of 14,777 SLE patients met the study criteria, and 14,262 were matched to non-SLE patients. SLE patients had significantly higher healthcare utilization per year than their matched controls. The estimated incremental annual cost associated with SLE was $10,984, with the highest increase in inpatient costs (P<0.001. Cost per flare was $11,716 for severe flares, $562 for moderate flares, and $129 for mild flares. Annual total costs for patients with severe flares were $49,754. Conclusions. SLE patients had significantly higher healthcare resource utilization and costs than non-SLE patients. Patients with severe flares had the highest costs.

  8. Evaluating Complex Healthcare Systems: A Critique of Four Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Boon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to bring clarity to the emerging conceptual and methodological literature that focuses on understanding and evaluating complex or ‘whole’ systems of healthcare. An international working group reviewed literature from interdisciplinary or interprofessional groups describing approaches to the evaluation of complex systems of healthcare. The following four key approaches were identified: a framework from the MRC (UK, whole systems research, whole medical systems research described by NCCAM (USA and a model from NAFKAM (Norway. Main areas of congruence include acknowledgment of the inherent complexity of many healthcare interventions and the need to find new ways to evaluate these; the need to describe and understand the components of complex interventions in context (as they are actually practiced; the necessity of using mixed methods including randomized clinical trials (RCTs (explanatory and pragmatic and qualitative approaches; the perceived benefits of a multidisciplinary team approach to research; and the understanding that methodological developments in this field can be applied to both complementary and alternative medicine (CAM as well as conventional therapies. In contrast, the approaches differ in the following ways: terminology used, the extent to which the approach attempts to be applicable to both CAM and conventional medical interventions; the prioritization of research questions (in order of what should be done first especially with respect to how the ‘definitive’ RCT fits into the process of assessing complex healthcare systems; and the need for a staged approach. There appears to be a growing international understanding of the need for a new perspective on assessing complex healthcare systems.

  9. Information extraction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmond, Tracy D; Hanley, William G; Guensche, Joseph Wendell; Perry, Nathan C; Nitao, John J; Kidwell, Paul Brandon; Boakye, Kofi Agyeman; Glaser, Ron E; Prenger, Ryan James

    2014-05-13

    An information extraction system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, an information extraction system for performing meta-extraction of named entities of people, organizations, and locations as well as relationships and events from text documents are described herein.

  10. Competencies Required for Healthcare Information Technology to Be an Effective Strategic Business Change Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davalos, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    One of the core strategies to transform the United States national healthcare system is the implementation of key technologies such as the electronic patient medical record. Such key technologies improve patient care and help the organization gain competitive advantage. With a high demand for strategic and operational change, healthcare providers…

  11. Understanding healthcare innovation systems: the Stockholm region case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larisch, Lisa-Marie; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis; Hidefjäll, Patrik

    2016-11-21

    Purpose There is an increasing interest in understanding how innovation processes can address current challenges in healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the wider socio-economic context and conditions for such innovation processes in the Stockholm region, using the functional dynamics approach to innovation systems (ISs). Design/methodology/approach The analysis is based on triangulation using data from 16 in-depth interviews, two workshops, and additional documents. Using the functional dynamics approach, critical structural and functional components of the healthcare IS were analyzed. Findings The analysis revealed several mechanisms blocking innovation processes such as fragmentation, lack of clear leadership, as well as insufficient involvement of patients and healthcare professionals. Furthermore, innovation is expected to occur linearly as a result of research. Restrictive rules for collaboration with industry, reimbursement, and procurement mechanisms limit entrepreneurial experimentation, commercialization, and spread of innovations. Research limitations/implications In this study, the authors analyzed how certain functions of the functional dynamics approach to ISs related to each other. The authors grouped knowledge creation, resource mobilization, and legitimacy as they jointly constitute conditions for needs articulation and entrepreneurial experimentation. The economic effects of entrepreneurial experimentation and needs articulation are mainly determined by the stage of market formation and existence of positive externalities. Social implications Stronger user involvement; a joint innovation strategy for healthcare, academia, and industry; and institutional reform are necessary to remove blocking mechanisms that today prevent innovation from occurring. Originality/value This study is the first to provide an analysis of the system of innovation in healthcare using a functional dynamics approach, which has evolved as a tool for public

  12. Healthcare systems, the State, and innovation in the pharmaceutical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio José Godinho Delgado

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article discusses the relations between healthcare systems and the pharmaceutical industry, focusing on state support for pharmaceutical innovation. The study highlights the experiences of the United States, United Kingdom, and Germany, developed countries and paradigms of modern health systems (liberal, universal, and corporatist, in addition to Japan, a case of successful catching up. The study also emphasizes the experiences of China, India, and Brazil, large developing countries that have tried different catching up strategies, with diverse histories and profiles in their healthcare systems and pharmaceutical industries. Finally, with a focus on state forms of support for health research, the article addresses the mechanisms for linkage between health systems and the pharmaceutical industry, evaluating the possibilities of Brazil strengthening a virtuous interaction, favoring the expansion and consolidation of the Brazilian health system - universal but segmented ‒ and the affirmation of the innovative national pharmaceutical industry.

  13. Designing a Safer Interactive Healthcare System - The Impact of Authentic User Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Went, Kathryn L.; Gregor, Peter; Ricketts, Ian W.

    Information technology has been widely promoted in the healthcare sector to improve current practice and patient safety. However, end users are seldom involved extensively in the design and development of healthcare systems, with lip service often paid to the idea of true user involvement. In this case study the impact of sustained authentic user participation was explored using an interdisciplinary team, consisting of experts both in interaction and healthcare design and consultant anaesthetists, nurses, and pharmacists, to create an electronic prescribing and administration system. This paper details the interface that was created and provides examples of the way in which the design evolved in response to the sustained authentic user participation methods. The working prototype both reduced the opportunity for user error and was preferred by its users to the existing manual system.

  14. Management Information Systems Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research on management information systems is illusive in many respects. Part of the basic research problem in MIS stems from the absence of standard...decision making. But the transition from these results to the realization of ’satisfactory’ management information systems remains difficult indeed. The...paper discusses several aspects of research on management information systems and reviews a selection of efforts that appear significant for future progress. (Author)

  15. Examining Informal Learning Using Mobile Devices in the Healthcare Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlman, Dorothy

    2013-01-01

    The study of workplace learning and informal learning are not new to adult education and pedagogy. However, the use of mobile devices as learning tools for informal learning in the workplace is an understudied area. Using theories on informal learning and constructivism as a framework, this paper explores informal learning of registered nurses…

  16. Healthcare systems--an international review: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameire, N; Joffe, P; Wiedemann, M

    1999-01-01

    Based on the source of their funding, three main models of healthcare can be distinguished. The first is the Beveridge model, which is based on taxation and has many public providers. The second is the Bismarck 'mixed' model, funded by a premium-financed social insurance system and with a mixture of public and private providers. Finally, the 'Private Insurance model' is only in existence in the US. The present report explores the impact of these healthcare models on the access to, quality and cost of healthcare in selected European countries. Access is nearly 100% in countries with a public provider system, while in most of the 'mixed' countries, the difference from 100% is made up by supplementary private insurance. No differences are seen between public and mixed provider systems in terms of quality of care, despite the fact that the countries with the former model spend, in general, less of their Gross National Product on healthcare. The Private Insurance/private provider model of the US produces the highest costs, but is lowest in access and is close to lowest ranking in quality parameters.

  17. Strategic information technology alliances for effective health-care supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Stephen C; Rivers, Patrick A; Hsu, H Y Sonya

    2009-08-01

    To gain and sustain competitive advantage, health-care providers have to continuously review and renovate their operational and information technology (IT) strategies through collaborative and cooperative endeavour with their supply chain channel members. This paper explores new ways of enhancing a health-care organization's responsiveness to changes and increasing its competitiveness through implementing strategic information technology alliances among channel members in a health-care supply chain network. An overview of issues and problems (e.g. bullwhip effect, negative externalities and free-riding phenomenon in multichannel supply chains) presented in the health-care supply chains is first delineated. This paper further goes over the issues of health-care supply chain coordination and integration for strategic IT alliances, followed by the discussion of the spillover effect of IT investments. A number of viable IT practices (such as information sharing and Internet-enabled supply chain portal) for effective health-care supply chain collaboration and coordination are then examined in this research. Finally, the paper discusses how strategic IT alliances can help improve the effectiveness of health-care supply chain management.

  18. Do It Yourself solution of Internet of Things Healthcare System: Measuring body parameters and environmental parameters affecting health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Maksimović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid advancements in information and communications technologies (ICT and the increasing number of smart things shift an old-fashioned healthcare system to a model better suited for a population of the 21st century. New healthcare approaches based on Internet of Things (IoT/Internet of Medical Things (IoMT powered systems make health monitoring, diagnostics and treatment more personalized, timely and convenient, enabling a global approach to the healthcare system infrastructure development. Commercial systems in this area exist in various forms but usually do not fit the general patient needs, and those that do are usually economically unacceptable due to the high operational and development costs. Do It Yourself (DIY healthcare, including mobile applications and consumer medical devices, nowadays is the top healthcare trend. Therefore, this paper, based on well-known low-cost technologies, presents a DIY IoMT solution for observing human vital parameter as well as environmental factors affecting health.

  19. Health information technology and physicians' perceptions of healthcare quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hai; Peifer, Karen L; Chen, Jie; Rizzo, John A

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between the use of health information technology (HIT) and physician perceptions of providing high-quality care and to determine whether this relationship has changed over time. We used 2 waves of longitudinal data from the Community Tracking Study Physician Surveys, 2000-2001 and 2004-2005. Three measures of HIT were examined: a binary variable measuring the use of at least 1 type of HIT, a continuous variable measuring the total number of HIT types, and a binary variable measuring use of all 5 HIT types related to "meaningful use" of HIT as defined by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Three multivariate models were estimated to study the effect of each HIT measure on physicians' perception of providing high-quality care. Individual fixed-effects estimation also was used to control for individual time-invariant factors. Using at least 1 type of HIT significantly enhanced physicians' perception of providing high-quality care in 2000-2001, but not in 2004-2005. The marginal effect of adding 1 extra HIT type was positive and statistically significant in both periods. The association between using all 5 HIT types related to meaningful use and perceived quality was statistically significant in 2000-2001, but not in 2004-2005. Health information technology has become a multifunctional system and appears to have enhanced physicians' perception of providing high-quality care. Physicians' perceptions of medical care quality improved as the number of HIT types used increased. This study supports more extensive use of HIT in physician practices.

  20. Information retrieval system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, R. F.; Holcomb, J. E.; Kelroy, E. A.; Levine, D. A.; Mee, C., III

    1970-01-01

    Generalized information storage and retrieval system capable of generating and maintaining a file, gathering statistics, sorting output, and generating final reports for output is reviewed. File generation and file maintenance programs written for the system are general purpose routines.

  1. Integrated Reporting Information System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Integrated Reporting Information System (IRIS) is a flexible and scalable web-based system that supports post operational analysis and evaluation of the National...

  2. National Emission Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajtakova, E.; Spisakova, K.

    2005-01-01

    In this presentation the Slovak National Emission Information System (NEIS) is presented. The NEIS represents hierarchical oriented modular system of acquisition, verification, saving and reporting of data about annual emissions and payments for pollution of atmosphere

  3. EPPS: Efficient and Privacy-Preserving Personal Health Information Sharing in Mobile Healthcare Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunrong Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile healthcare social networks (MHSNs have emerged as a promising next-generation healthcare system, which will significantly improve the quality of life. However, there are many security and privacy concerns before personal health information (PHI is shared with other parities. To ensure patients’ full control over their PHI, we propose a fine-grained and scalable data access control scheme based on attribute-based encryption (ABE. Besides, policies themselves for PHI sharing may be sensitive and may reveal information about underlying PHI or about data owners or recipients. In our scheme, we let each attribute contain an attribute name and its value and adopt the Bloom filter to efficiently check attributes before decryption. Thus, the data privacy and policy privacy can be preserved in our proposed scheme. Moreover, considering the fact that the computational cost grows with the complexity of the access policy and the limitation of the resource and energy in a smart phone, we outsource ABE decryption to the cloud while preventing the cloud from learning anything about the content and access policy. The security and performance analysis is carried out to demonstrate that our proposed scheme can achieve fine-grained access policies for PHI sharing in MHSNs.

  4. EPPS: Efficient and Privacy-Preserving Personal Health Information Sharing in Mobile Healthcare Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shunrong; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Liangmin

    2015-01-01

    Mobile healthcare social networks (MHSNs) have emerged as a promising next-generation healthcare system, which will significantly improve the quality of life. However, there are many security and privacy concerns before personal health information (PHI) is shared with other parities. To ensure patients’ full control over their PHI, we propose a fine-grained and scalable data access control scheme based on attribute-based encryption (ABE). Besides, policies themselves for PHI sharing may be sensitive and may reveal information about underlying PHI or about data owners or recipients. In our scheme, we let each attribute contain an attribute name and its value and adopt the Bloom filter to efficiently check attributes before decryption. Thus, the data privacy and policy privacy can be preserved in our proposed scheme. Moreover, considering the fact that the computational cost grows with the complexity of the access policy and the limitation of the resource and energy in a smart phone, we outsource ABE decryption to the cloud while preventing the cloud from learning anything about the content and access policy. The security and performance analysis is carried out to demonstrate that our proposed scheme can achieve fine-grained access policies for PHI sharing in MHSNs. PMID:26404300

  5. The Electronic Healthcare Record for Clinical Research (EHR4CR) information model and terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouagne, David; Hussain, Sajjad; Sadou, Eric; Jaulent, Marie-Christine; Daniel, Christel

    2012-01-01

    A major barrier to repurposing routinely collected data for clinical research is the heterogeneity of healthcare information systems. Electronic Healthcare Record for Clinical Research (EHR4CR) is a European platform designed to improve the efficiency of conducting clinical trials. In this paper, we propose an initial architecture of the EHR4CR Semantic Interoperability Framework. We used a model-driven engineering approach to build a reference HL7-based multidimensional model bound to a set of reference clinical terminologies acting as a global as view model. We then conducted an evaluation of its expressiveness for patient eligibility. The EHR4CR information model consists in one fact table dedicated to clinical statement and 4 dimensions. The EHR4CR terminology integrates reference terminologies used in patient care (e.g LOINC, ICD-10, SNOMED CT, etc). We used the Object Constraint Language (OCL) to represent patterns of eligibility criteria as constraints on the EHR4CR model to be further transformed in SQL statements executed on different clinical data warehouses.

  6. EPPS: Efficient and Privacy-Preserving Personal Health Information Sharing in Mobile Healthcare Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shunrong; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Liangmin

    2015-09-03

    Mobile healthcare social networks (MHSNs) have emerged as a promising next-generation healthcare system, which will significantly improve the quality of life. However, there are many security and privacy concerns before personal health information (PHI) is shared with other parities. To ensure patients' full control over their PHI, we propose a fine-grained and scalable data access control scheme based on attribute-based encryption (ABE). Besides, policies themselves for PHI sharing may be sensitive and may reveal information about underlying PHI or about data owners or recipients. In our scheme, we let each attribute contain an attribute name and its value and adopt the Bloom filter to efficiently check attributes before decryption. Thus, the data privacy and policy privacy can be preserved in our proposed scheme. Moreover, considering the fact that the computational cost grows with the complexity of the access policy and the limitation of the resource and energy in a smart phone, we outsource ABE decryption to the cloud while preventing the cloud from learning anything about the content and access policy. The security and performance analysis is carried out to demonstrate that our proposed scheme can achieve fine-grained access policies for PHI sharing in MHSNs.

  7. [Data coding in the Israeli healthcare system - do choices provide the answers to our system's needs?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelingher, Julian; Ash, Nachman

    2013-05-01

    The IsraeLi healthcare system has undergone major processes for the adoption of health information technologies (HIT), and enjoys high Levels of utilization in hospital and ambulatory care. Coding is an essential infrastructure component of HIT, and ts purpose is to represent data in a simplified and common format, enhancing its manipulation by digital systems. Proper coding of data enables efficient identification, storage, retrieval and communication of data. UtiLization of uniform coding systems by different organizations enables data interoperability between them, facilitating communication and integrating data elements originating in different information systems from various organizations. Current needs in Israel for heaLth data coding include recording and reporting of diagnoses for hospitalized patients, outpatients and visitors of the Emergency Department, coding of procedures and operations, coding of pathology findings, reporting of discharge diagnoses and causes of death, billing codes, organizational data warehouses and national registries. New national projects for cLinicaL data integration, obligatory reporting of quality indicators and new Ministry of Health (MOH) requirements for HIT necessitate a high Level of interoperability that can be achieved only through the adoption of uniform coding. Additional pressures were introduced by the USA decision to stop the maintenance of the ICD-9-CM codes that are also used by Israeli healthcare, and the adoption of ICD-10-C and ICD-10-PCS as the main coding system for billing purpose. The USA has also mandated utilization of SNOMED-CT as the coding terminology for the ELectronic Health Record problem list, and for reporting quality indicators to the CMS. Hence, the Israeli MOH has recently decided that discharge diagnoses will be reported using ICD-10-CM codes, and SNOMED-CT will be used to code the cLinical information in the EHR. We reviewed the characteristics, strengths and weaknesses of these two coding

  8. Bringing Big Data to the Forefront of Healthcare Delivery: The Experience of Carolinas HealthCare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulin, Michael F; Lovin, Carol A; Wright, Jean A

    2017-01-01

    The use of big data to transform care delivery is rapidly becoming a reality. To deliver on the promise of value-based care, providers must know the key drivers of wellness at the patient and community levels, as well as understand resource constraints and opportunities to improve efficiency in the health-care system itself. Data are the linchpin. By gathering the right data and finding innovative ways to glean knowledge, we can improve clinical care, advance the health of our communities, improve the lives of our patients, and operate more efficiently. At Carolinas HealthCare System-one of the nation's largest health-care systems, with nearly 12 million patient encounters annually at more than 900 care locations-we have made substantial investments to establish a centralized data and analytics infrastructure that is transforming the way we deliver care across the continuum. Although the impetus and vision for our program have evolved over the past decade, our efforts coalesced into a strategic, centralized initiative with the launch of the Dickson Advanced Analytics (DA) group in 2012. DA has yielded significant gains in our ability to use data, not only for reporting purposes and understanding our business but also for predicting outcomes and informing action.While these efforts have been successful, the path has not been easy. Effectively harnessing big data requires navigating myriad technological, cultural, operational, and other hurdles. Building a program that is feasible, effective, and sustainable takes concerted effort and a rigorous process of continuous self-evaluation and strategic adaptation.

  9. Bringing Big Data to the Forefront of Healthcare Delivery: The Experience of Carolinas HealthCare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulin, Michael F; Lovin, Carol A; Wright, Jean A

    2016-01-01

    The use of big data to transform care delivery is rapidly becoming a reality. To deliver on the promise of value-based care, providers must know the key drivers of wellness at the patient and community levels, as well as understand resource constraints and opportunities to improve efficiency in the healthcare system itself. Data are the linchpin. By gathering the right data and finding innovative ways to glean knowledge, we can improve clinical care, advance the health of our communities, improve the lives of our patients, and operate more efficiently. At Carolinas HealthCare System-one of the nation's largest healthcare systems, with nearly 12 million patient encounters annually at more than 900 care locations-we have made substantial investments to establish a centralized data and analytics infrastructure that is transforming the way we deliver care across the continuum. Although the impetus and vision for our program have evolved over the past decade, our efforts coalesced into a strategic, centralized initiative with the launch of the Dickson Advanced Analytics (DA2) group in 2012. DA2 has yielded significant gains in our ability to use data, not only for reporting purposes and understanding our business but also for predicting outcomes and informing action.While these efforts have been successful, the path has not been easy. Effectively harnessing big data requires navigating myriad technological, cultural, operational, and other hurdles. Building a program that is feasible, effective, and sustainable takes concerted effort and a rigorous process of continuous self-evaluation and strategic adaptation.

  10. Archival Information Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-01

    management system named Archival Information Management System (AIMS), designed to meet the audit trail requirement for studies completed under the...are to be archived to the extent that future reproducibility and interrogation of results will exist. This report presents a prototype information

  11. Evolution of information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    This article offers a dynamic view of continuously changes in a specific informational system illustrated through a case study in a small network company. Central aspects of the evolutionary process will be identified and framed in relation to the informational system change. It will be argued th...

  12. Medical Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  13. Management Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Furduescu Bogdan-Alexandru

    2017-01-01

    Technology is the science that studies processes, methods and operations run or applied onto raw materials, matters or data, in order to obtain a certain product. Information is the material signal able to launch a material reaction of a dynamic auto-tuning system for which the system is conditioned and finalized. Information Technology is the technology needed for handling (procuring, processing, storing converting and transmitting) information, in particular, with the use of computers [Long...

  14. The Healthcare Improvement Scotland evidence note rapid review process: providing timely, reliable evidence to inform imperative decisions on healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Heather M; Calvert, Julie; Macpherson, Karen J; Thompson, Lorna

    2016-06-01

    Rapid review has become widely adopted by health technology assessment agencies in response to demand for evidence-based information to support imperative decisions. Concern about the credibility of rapid reviews and the reliability of their findings has prompted a call for wider publication of their methods. In publishing this overview of the accredited rapid review process developed by Healthcare Improvement Scotland, we aim to raise awareness of our methods and advance the discourse on best practice. Healthcare Improvement Scotland produces rapid reviews called evidence notes using a process that has achieved external accreditation through the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Key components include a structured approach to topic selection, initial scoping, considered stakeholder involvement, streamlined systematic review, internal quality assurance, external peer review and updating. The process was introduced in 2010 and continues to be refined over time in response to user feedback and operational experience. Decision-makers value the responsiveness of the process and perceive it as being a credible source of unbiased evidence-based information supporting advice for NHSScotland. Many agencies undertaking rapid reviews are striving to balance efficiency with methodological rigour. We agree that there is a need for methodological guidance and that it should be informed by better understanding of current approaches and the consequences of different approaches to streamlining systematic review methods. Greater transparency in the reporting of rapid review methods is essential to enable that to happen.

  15. Computer information systems framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahabuddin, S.

    1989-01-01

    Management information systems (MIS) is a commonly used term in computer profession. The new information technology has caused management to expect more from computer. The process of supplying information follows a well defined procedure. MIS should be capable for providing usable information to the various areas and levels of organization. MIS is different from data processing. MIS and business hierarchy provides a good framework for many organization which are using computers. (A.B.)

  16. Computerised decision support systems for healthcare professionals: an interpretative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Cresswell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Computerised decision support systems are designed to support clinicians in making decisions and thereby enhance the quality and safety of care. We aimed to undertake an interpretative review of the empirical evidence on computerised decision support systems, their contexts of use, and summarise evidence on the effectiveness of these tools and insights into how these can be successfully implemented and adopted.Methods We systematically searched the empirical literature to identify systematic literature reviews on computerised decision support applications and their impact on the quality and safety of healthcare delivery over a 13-year period (1997–2010. The databases searched included: MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Methodology Register, The Health Technology Assessment Database, and The National Health Service (NHS Economic Evaluation Database. To be eligible for inclusion, systematic reviews needed to address computerised decision support systems, and at least one of the following: impact on safety; quality; or organisational, implementation or adoption considerations.Results Our searches yielded 121 systematic reviews relating to eHealth, of which we identified 41 as investigating computerised decision support systems. These indicated that, whilst there was a lack of investigating potential risks, such tools can result in improvements in practitioner performance in the promotion of preventive care and guideline adherence, particularly if specific information is available in real time and systems are effectively integrated into clinical workflows. However, the evidence regarding impact on patient outcomes was less clear-cut with reviews finding either no, inconsistent or modest benefits.Conclusions Whilst the potential of clinical decision support systems in improving, in particular

  17. CALINX (California Information Exchange): a multi-stakeholder statewide initiative to improve healthcare information flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, D S; Oswald, N; McCaffrey, K; Bressler, S; Davidson, N; Vela, L

    2000-01-01

    Given the diffusion of responsibilities for gathering and reporting healthcare information in a managed care environment, California stakeholders are taking concrete steps to break the deadlock on data and information flows that has characterized the industry for some time. The California Information Exchange (CALINX) was established to facilitate the implementation of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) standards in California and to create trust for data exchange between trading partners, without which data exchange still will not occur. Strategic directions are set by the chief executives of key associations and organizations representing purchasers, plans, providers, and consumers. Multi-stakeholder workgroups have produced detailed data guidelines for the HIPAA standards along with rules for exchange of key data sets between trading partners. These rules address frequency, timeliness, and accuracy of data submission. Both the data guidelines and the rules have been tested in live demonstration projects, and the results of these projects have been reported to substantiate the business case for implementation. Further incentives are being built into contracts between purchasers and plans, and between plans and providers. CALINX is currently promoting widespread adoption of the data guidelines and rules for exchange with all members of the industry.

  18. Social Media as Source of Medical Information for Healthcare Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ariana Anamaria CORDOȘ; Sorana D. BOLBOACĂ; Tudor C. DRUGAN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The scope of the research was a more detailed understanding of the influence of social media and the importance of student’s usage of social media context in relation to medical information. The research aimed to increase the understanding of social media and the impact on medical information use, informing policy and practice while highlighting gaps in the literature and areas for further research. Methods: The search of PubMed database was performed in October 2015, using term...

  19. Designing an architectural style for Pervasive Healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafe, Vahid; Hajvali, Masoumeh

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, the Pervasive Healthcare (PH) systems are considered as an important research area. These systems have a dynamic structure and configuration. Therefore, an appropriate method for designing such systems is necessary. The Publish/Subscribe Architecture (pub/sub) is one of the convenient architectures to support such systems. PH systems are safety critical; hence, errors can bring disastrous results. To prevent such problems, a powerful analytical tool is required. So using a proper formal language like graph transformation systems for developing of these systems seems necessary. But even if software engineers use such high level methodologies, errors may occur in the system under design. Hence, it should be investigated automatically and formally that whether this model of system satisfies all their requirements or not. In this paper, a dynamic architectural style for developing PH systems is presented. Then, the behavior of these systems is modeled and evaluated using GROOVE toolset. The results of the analysis show its high reliability.

  20. Next generation information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limback, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Medina, Melanie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Silva, Michelle E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Information Systems Analysis and Development (ISAD) Team of the Safeguards Systems Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been developing web based information and knowledge management systems for sixteen years. Our vision is to rapidly and cost effectively provide knowledge management solutions in the form of interactive information systems that help customers organize, archive, post and retrieve nonproliferation and safeguards knowledge and information vital to their success. The team has developed several comprehensive information systems that assist users in the betterment and growth of their organizations and programs. Through our information systems, users are able to streamline operations, increase productivity, and share and access information from diverse geographic locations. The ISAD team is also producing interactive visual models. Interactive visual models provide many benefits to customers beyond the scope of traditional full-scale modeling. We have the ability to simulate a vision that a customer may propose, without the time constraints of traditional engineering modeling tools. Our interactive visual models can be used to access specialized training areas, controlled areas, and highly radioactive areas, as well as review site-specific training for complex facilities, and asset management. Like the information systems that the ISAD team develops, these models can be shared and accessed from any location with access to the internet. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the capabilities of information systems and interactive visual models as well as consider the possibility of combining the two capabilities to provide the next generation of infonnation systems. The collection, processing, and integration of data in new ways can contribute to the security of the nation by providing indicators and information for timely action to decrease the traditional and new nuclear threats. Modeling and simulation tied to comprehensive

  1. Tourism information system

    OpenAIRE

    Ulevičius, Žygimantas

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this project is to create responsive design portal with the tools for its administration which lets users to access tourist relevant information. In order to achieve the goal certain tasks were formulated, few technical analysis were done and similar systems which already exist were reviewed. The result is creation of information system with administrative tools, which can be used by several user types which have rights to take adequate actions. The system has account control modu...

  2. Gifts or bribes? Attitudes on informal payments in Romanian Healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Moldovan; S.G.J. Van de Walle (Steven)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Informal payments are quite common in public services in many – especially developing- countries to facilitate access to and quality of services. Health care is one sector where informal payments are often used. Patients give doctors, nurses and hospital staff gifts

  3. Toward a Nationwide Mobile-Based Public Healthcare Service System with Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-wen Shen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a nationwide public healthcare service system with the integration of cloud technology, wireless sensor networks, and mobile technology to provide citizens with convenient and professional healthcare services. The basic framework of the system includes the architectures for the user end of wireless physiological examinations, for the regional healthcare cloud, and for national public healthcare service system. Citizens with chronic conditions or elderly people who are living alone can use the wireless physiological sensing devices to keep track of their health conditions and get warning if the system detects abnormal signals. Through mobile devices, citizens are able to get real-time health advice, prompt warning, health information, feedback, personalized support, and intervention ubiquitously. With the long-term tracking data for physiological sensing, reliable prediction models for epidemic diseases and chronic diseases can be developed for the government to respond to and control diseases immediately. Besides, such a nationwide approach enables government to have a holistic understanding of the public health information in real time, which is helpful to establish effective policies or strategies to prevent epidemic diseases or chronic diseases.

  4. Health Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Artz, David R

    2015-06-01

    This article provides surgical pathologists an overview of health information systems (HISs): what they are, what they do, and how such systems relate to the practice of surgical pathology. Much of this article is dedicated to the electronic medical record. Information, in how it is captured, transmitted, and conveyed, drives the effectiveness of such electronic medical record functionalities. So critical is information from pathology in integrated clinical care that surgical pathologists are becoming gatekeepers of not only tissue but also information. Better understanding of HISs can empower surgical pathologists to become stakeholders who have an impact on the future direction of quality integrated clinical care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Car monitoring information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alica KALAŠOVÁ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this contribution is to characterize alternatives of information systems used for managing, processing and evaluation of information related to company vehicles. Especially we focus on logging, transferring and processing of on-road vehicle movement information in inland and international transportation. This segment of company information system has to monitor the car movement – actively or passively – according to demand of the company and after the processing it has to evaluate and give the complex monitoring of a situation of all the company vehicles to the controller.

  6. Medical data transmission system for remote healthcare centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, E A; Cagnolo, F J; Olmos, C E; Centeno, C A; Riva, G G; Zerbini, C A

    2007-01-01

    The main motivation of this project is to improve the healthcare centres equipment and human resources efficiency, enabling those centres for transmission of parameters of medical interest. This system facilitates remote consultation, in particular between specialists and remote healthcare centres. Likewise it contributes to the qualification of professionals. The electrocardiographic (ECG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) signals are acquired, processed and then sent, fulfilling the effective norms, for application in the hospital network of Cordoba Province, which has nodes interconnected by phone line. As innovative aspects we emphasized the low cost of development and maintenance, great versatility and handling simplicity with a modular design for interconnection with diverse data transmission media (Wi-Fi, GPRS, etc.). Successfully experiences were obtained during the acquisition of the signals and transmissions on wired LAN networks. As improvements, we can mention: energy consumption optimization and mobile communication systems usage, in order to offer more autonomy

  7. Transitioning from learning healthcare systems to learning health care communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, C Daniel; Wingate, La'Marcus T; Edwards, Hillary A; Tofade, Toyin; Wutoh, Anthony

    2018-02-26

    The learning healthcare system (LHS) model framework has three core, foundational components. These include an infrastructure for health-related data capture, care improvement targets and a supportive policy environment. Despite progress in advancing and implementing LHS approaches, low levels of participation from patients and the public have hampered the transformational potential of the LHS model. An enhanced vision of a community-engaged LHS redesign would focus on the provision of health care from the patient and community perspective to complement the healthcare system as the entity that provides the environment for care. Addressing the LHS framework implementation challenges and utilizing community levers are requisite components of a learning health care community model, version two of the LHS archetype.

  8. Improving Healthcare through Lean Management: Experiences from the Danish healthcare system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    still is in its infancy and it is just a matter of letting sufficient time pass in order have a successful implementation of lean in all areas of healthcare. The second hypothesis states that a major barrier to lean management in healthcare simply is lacking understanding of the lean concepts leading......The ideas and principles from lean management are now widely being adopted within the healthcare sector. The analysis in this paper shows that organizations within healthcare most often only implement a limited set of tools and methods from the lean tool-box. Departing from a theoretical analysis...... of the well-known and universal lean management principles in the context of the healthcare this paper will attempt to formulate and test four hypotheses about possible barriers to the successful implementation of lean management in healthcare. The first hypothesis states that lean management in healthcare...

  9. Air System Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  10. Applying e-procurement system in the healthcare: the EPOS paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketikidis, Panayiotis H.; Kontogeorgis, Apostolos; Stalidis, George; Kaggelides, Kostis

    2010-03-01

    One of the goals of procurement is to establish a competitive price, while e-procurement utilises electronic commerce to identify potential sources of supply, to purchase goods and services, to exchange contractual information and to interact with suppliers. Extensive academic work has been extensively devoted to e-procurement in diverse industries. However, applying e-procurement in the healthcare sector remains unexplored. It lacks an efficient e-procurement mechanism that will enable hospitals and healthcare suppliers to electronically exchange contractual information, aided by the technologies of optimisation and business rules. The development and deployment of e-procurement requires a major effort in the coordination of complex interorganisational business process. This article presents an e-procurement optimised system (EPOS) for the healthcare marketplace, a complete methodological approach for deploying and operating such system, as piloted in public and private hospitals in three European countries (Greece, Spain and Belgium) and suppliers of healthcare items in the fourth country (Italy). The efficient e-procurement mechanism that EPOS suggests enables hospitals and pharmaceutical and medical equipment suppliers to electronically exchange contractual information.

  11. Teaching at primary healthcare services within the Brazilian national health system (SUS in Brazilian healthcare professionals' training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Fernanda Ceriotti Toassi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the role of teaching at primary healthcare services within the Brazilian National Health System (SUS in dentists' training, at a public university in the south of Brazil. A qualitative methodological approach (case study was used. Interviews were conducted with 12 dentistry students, six dentists who were preceptors working in public primary healthcare services and three teachers connected with this curricular training. Our findings showed that the curricular training in SUS primary healthcare services had an impact on the dentists' education through establishment of bonds, autonomy in problem-solving and multiprofessional teamwork. It was seen that they learned about how healthcare services function, about healthcare and about development of cultural competence. There is a need to maintain constant questioning regarding these practices, and to ensure the presence of infrastructure and qualified professionals for teaching at these services.

  12. Recognizing nurse stakeholder dissonance as a critical determinant of patient safety in new healthcare information technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, Elizabeth A; Real, Sara D; Curtis, Amber M; Meunier, Tessa S

    2012-01-01

    Proper identification of all stakeholders and the comprehensive assessment of their evolving and often conflicting Needs, Wants, and Desires (NWDs) is a fundamental principle of human factors science and human-centered systems engineering; it is not yet a consistent element in development and deployment of new health information technologies (HIT). As the single largest group of healthcare professionals, nurses are critical stakeholders for these new technologies. Careful analysis can reveal nurse stakeholder dissonance (NSD) when integrating new technologies into the healthcare environment. Stakeholder dissonance is a term that describes the conflict between the NWDs of different stakeholders which, if left unresolved, can result in dissatisfaction, workarounds, errors, and threats to patient safety. Three case studies drawn from the authors' experience in a variety of acute-care settings where new HITs have been recently deployed are examined to illustrate the concept of NSD. Conflicting NWDs, other stakeholders, and possible root causes of the NSD are analyzed and mapped to threats to patient safety. Lessons learned, practical guidance for anticipating, identifying, and mitigating NSD, future research and implications for HFE and nursing practice are discussed.

  13. Productivity changes in OECD healthcare systems: bias-corrected Malmquist productivity approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younhee; Oh, Dong-Hyun; Kang, Minah

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluates productivity changes in the healthcare systems of 30 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries over the 2002-2012 periods. The bootstrapped Malmquist approach is used to estimate bias-corrected indices of healthcare performance in productivity, efficiency and technology by modifying the original distance functions. Two inputs (health expenditure and school life expectancy) and two outputs (life expectancy at birth and infant mortality rate) are used to calculate productivity growth. There are no perceptible trends in productivity changes over the 2002-2012 periods, but positive productivity improvement has been noticed for most OECD countries. The result also informs considerable variations in annual productivity scores across the countries. Average annual productivity growth is evenly yielded by efficiency and technical changes, but both changes run somewhat differently across the years. The results of this study assert that policy reforms in OECD countries have improved productivity growth in healthcare systems over the past decade. Countries that lag behind in productivity growth should benchmark peer countries' practices to increase performance by prioritizing an achievable trajectory based on socioeconomic conditions. For example, relatively inefficient countries in this study indicate higher income inequality, corresponding to inequality and health outcomes studies. Although income inequality and globalization are not direct measures to estimate healthcare productivity in this study, these issues could be latent factors to explain cross-country healthcare productivity for future research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Informal workers and access to healthcare: a qualitative study of facilitators and barriers to accessing healthcare for beer promoters in the Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychareun, Vanphanom; Vongxay, Viengnakhone; Thammavongsa, Vassana; Thongmyxay, Souksamone; Phummavongsa, Phouthong; Durham, Jo

    2016-04-18

    Informal workers often face considerable risks and vulnerabilities as a consequence of their work and employment conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the interplay between the experience of informal work and access to health, using as an example, female beer promoters employed in the informal economy, in the Lao People's Democratic Republic. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 24 female beer promoters working in beer shops, restaurants and entertainment venues in Vientiane City. The recruitment strategy of snowball sampling was used. Interviews explored the beer promoter's experience of the organization of work, perceived healthcare needs, access to healthcare and insurance, and health seeking practices. The data was analysed thematically and subsequently using Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, capital and field. Most of the beer promoters included in the study were 18 years of age, single, had worked as beer promoters for more than one year and just over half were working to support their higher education. The beer promoters demonstrated a holistic view of health, also viewing good health as contributing to being beautiful - an important attribute in their work. Many reported that their work conditions, including the noisy environment, exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke, long hours on their feet and sexual harassment negatively affected their physical and mental health. Only four participants had any form of health insurance with access to healthcare constrained by individual characteristics, health system factors and the conditions of their informal employment. Drawing on the work of Bourdieu, the study shows how both employment and illness are linked to habitus embodied in everyday practices, access to capital and the position the female beer promoters hold in the social hierarchy in the field of employment.

  15. The Integration of It Governance, Information Security Leadership and Strategic Alignment in Healthcare: A Correlational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Tiffany H.

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of the relationship between Information Technology Governance (ITG), information security leadership, and strategic alignment within a healthcare organization. Strong organizational leadership and adherence to the process are vital to the formulation and management of performance and implementation of key directives.…

  16. HOPE information system review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Nishiyama, Kenji; Ono, Shuuji; Fukuda, Kouin

    1992-08-01

    An overview of the review conducted on H-2 Orbiting Plane (HOPE) is presented. A prototype model was constructed by inputting various technical information proposed by related laboratories. Especially operation flow which enables understanding of correlation between various analysis items, judgement criteria, technical data, and interfaces with others was constructed. Technical information data base and retrieval systems were studied. A Macintosh personal computer was selected for information shaping because of its excellent function, performance, operability, and software completeness.

  17. Energy Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home > Building Energy Information Systems and Performance Monitoring (EIS-PM) Building Energy evaluate and improve performance monitoring tools for energy savings in commercial buildings. Within the and visualization capabilities to energy and facility managers. As an increasing number of

  18. Matter Tracking Information System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Matter Tracking Information System (MTIS) principle function is to streamline and integrate the workload and work activity generated or addressed by our 300 plus...

  19. Audit Information Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID/OIG has initiated its new Audit Information Management System (AIMS) to track OIG's audit recommendations and USAID's management decisions. OIG's in-house...

  20. Enforcement Information System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — EIS is an automated management information system that tracks the FAA’s enforcement actions on a nationwide basis. EIS is the FAA’s primary database for tracking...

  1. Stroke survivors' and informal caregivers' experiences of primary care and community healthcare services - A systematic review and meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindus, Dominika M; Mullis, Ricky; Lim, Lisa; Wellwood, Ian; Rundell, A Viona; Abd Aziz, Noor Azah; Mant, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    To describe and explain stroke survivors and informal caregivers' experiences of primary care and community healthcare services. To offer potential solutions for how negative experiences could be addressed by healthcare services. Systematic review and meta-ethnography. Medline, CINAHL, Embase and PsycINFO databases (literature searched until May 2015, published studies ranged from 1996 to 2015). Primary qualitative studies focused on adult community-dwelling stroke survivors' and/or informal caregivers' experiences of primary care and/or community healthcare services. A set of common second order constructs (original authors' interpretations of participants' experiences) were identified across the studies and used to develop a novel integrative account of the data (third order constructs). Study quality was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklist. Relevance was assessed using Dixon-Woods' criteria. 51 studies (including 168 stroke survivors and 328 caregivers) were synthesised. We developed three inter-dependent third order constructs: (1) marginalisation of stroke survivors and caregivers by healthcare services, (2) passivity versus proactivity in the relationship between health services and the patient/caregiver dyad, and (3) fluidity of stroke related needs for both patient and caregiver. Issues of continuity of care, limitations in access to services and inadequate information provision drove perceptions of marginalisation and passivity of services for both patients and caregivers. Fluidity was apparent through changing information needs and psychological adaptation to living with long-term consequences of stroke. Potential limitations of qualitative research such as limited generalisability and inability to provide firm answers are offset by the consistency of the findings across a range of countries and healthcare systems. Stroke survivors and caregivers feel abandoned because they have become marginalised by services and they do not

  2. DISEASE MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Bens Pardamean; Anindito; Anjela Djoeang; Nana Tobing

    2013-01-01

    The study designed an information system model for Disease Management (DisMan) that met the specifications and needs of a consumer electronics manufacturer. The diseases monitored by this study were diabetes, hypertension and tuberculosis. Data were collected through interviews with the companyâs human resources department and occupational health provider. As for the model, literature and online research were conducted to collect health standards and information system standards on existing D...

  3. Association between medication supplies and healthcare costs in older adults from an urban healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroupe, K T; Murray, M D; Stump, T E; Callahan, C M

    2000-07-01

    The amount of medication dispensed to older adults for the treatment of chronic disease must be balanced carefully. Insufficient medication supplies lead to inadequate treatment of chronic disease, whereas excessive supplies represent wasted resources and the potential for toxicity. We used an electronic medical record system to determine the distribution of medications supplied to older urban adults and to examine the correlations of these distributions with healthcare costs and use. A cross-sectional study using data acquired over 3 years (1994-1996). A tax-supported urban public healthcare system consisting of a 300-bed hospital, an emergency department, and a network of community-based ambulatory care centers. Patients were >60 years of age and had at least one prescription refill and at least two ambulatory visits or one hospitalization during the 3-year period. Focusing on 12 major categories of drugs used to treat chronic diseases, we determined the amounts and direct costs of these medications dispensed to older adult patients. Amounts of medications that were needed by patients to medicate themselves adequately were compared with the medication supply actually dispensed considering all sources of care (primary, emergency, and inpatient). We calculated the excess drug costs attributable to oversupply of medication (>120% of the amount needed) and the drug cost reduction caused by undersupply of medication (120% of the supply needed. The total direct cost of targeted medications for 3 years was $1.96 million or, on average, $654,000 annually. During the 3-year period, patients receiving >120% of their needed medications had excess direct medication costs of $279,084 or $144 per patient, whereas patients receiving <80% of drugs needed had reduced medication costs of $423,438 or $634 per patient. Multivariable analyses revealed that both under- and over-supplies of medication were associated with a greater likelihood of emergency department visits and hospital

  4. Healthcare Analytics: Creating a Prioritized Improvement System with Performance Benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Eugene; Kolker, Evelyne

    2014-03-01

    The importance of healthcare improvement is difficult to overstate. This article describes our collaborative work with experts at Seattle Children's to create a prioritized improvement system using performance benchmarking. We applied analytics and modeling approaches to compare and assess performance metrics derived from U.S. News and World Report benchmarking data. We then compared a wide range of departmental performance metrics, including patient outcomes, structural and process metrics, survival rates, clinical practices, and subspecialist quality. By applying empirically simulated transformations and imputation methods, we built a predictive model that achieves departments' average rank correlation of 0.98 and average score correlation of 0.99. The results are then translated into prioritized departmental and enterprise-wide improvements, following a data to knowledge to outcomes paradigm. These approaches, which translate data into sustainable outcomes, are essential to solving a wide array of healthcare issues, improving patient care, and reducing costs.

  5. Information contracting tools in a cancer specialist unit:the role of Healthcare Resource Groups (HRGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Marlow

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for high quality management information within the contracting process has driven many of the major developments in health service computing. These have often merged clinical and financial requirements, usually along patient-centred lines. In order to identify a common currency for a range of clinical activities that are inherently variable, price tariffs have been drawn up on the basis of 'episodes of care' within specialties. Healthcare Resource Groups (HRGs were designed to meet the need for a common information currency. However, they were designed for acute care. The study on which this paper is based aims to examine their applicability to chronic care in a cancer specialist unit. The data were drawn from the patient information system within a major cancer unit. The focus of the investigation is encapsulated in the following questions: a Do HRGs really work as a grouping and costing methodology? b How relevant are HRG classifications for long-term patient care? The investigation demonstrated that not all HRGs are iso-resource within this environment. The findings from the data analysis are echoed by the NHS Executive's own evaluation . This does not negate advantages in their use. Furthermore, the development of Health Benefit Groups as information management tools, through a focus on health conditions and interventions rather than on purely on treatments, offers potential for greater validity within a chronic care situation.

  6. A new architecture for enterprise information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covvey, H D; Stumpf, J J

    1999-01-01

    Irresistible economic and technical forces are forcing healthcare institutions to develop regionalized services such as consolidated or virtual laboratories. Technical realities, such as the lack of an enabling enterprise-level information technology (IT) integration infrastructure, the existence of legacy systems, and non-existent or embryonic enterprise-level IT services organizations, are delaying or frustrating the achievement of the desired configuration of shared services. On attempting to address this matter, we discover that the state-of-the-art in integration technology is not wholly adequate, and itself becomes a barrier to the full realization of shared healthcare services. In this paper we report new work from the field of Co-operative Information Systems that proposes a new architecture of systems that are intrinsically cooperation-enabled, and we extend this architecture to both the regional and national scales.

  7. Management Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furduescu Bogdan-Alexandru

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology is the science that studies processes, methods and operations run or applied onto raw materials, matters or data, in order to obtain a certain product. Information is the material signal able to launch a material reaction of a dynamic auto-tuning system for which the system is conditioned and finalized. Information Technology is the technology needed for handling (procuring, processing, storing converting and transmitting information, in particular, with the use of computers [Longley, D. & Shain, M. (1985, p. 164]. The importance of IT in the economic growth and development is widely known, taking into account the impact that technology can have on the success and survival, or the failure of the economic activity of enterprises/organizations, IT offering various management information systems (MIS, executive and feedback segments, which all have important and beneficial implications in management and control.

  8. Advanced fire information system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Frost, PE

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The South African Advanced Fire Information System (AFIS) is the first near real-time satellite-based fire monitoring system in Africa. It was originally developed for, and funded by, the electrical power utility Eskom, to reduce the impact of wild...

  9. Management information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crump, K.

    1978-01-01

    An Australian university architect studying management information systems programs at academic institutions in the United States visited 26 universities and colleges and nine educational and professional associations, including extended visits at the University of Wisconsin and the National Center of Higher Education Management Systems. During these visits, he investigated university and college space utilization programs, gained operational and developmental experience at institutions with education philosophies similar to those in Australia, and examined trends in low cost student housing. This report of his observations focusses on management information systems projects throughout the academic community, resource accountability, energy conservation, facilities planning for the handicapped, student housing, and interdisciplinary approaches to education.

  10. Industrialized Information Systems Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havn, Erling; Bansler, Jørgen P.

    1996-01-01

    The production of application software is rapidly being industrialized. Computer manufacturers and software houses produce a rapidly growing number of generic software applications and systems, and more and more user companies choose to build their computer-based information systems...... with such generic products, instead of custom made software. We discuss how the move away from traditional in-house development and the increasing use of generic software is likely to transform IS development in the near future. We conclude that these developments will make new demands on the information systems...

  11. The Influence of Organizational Subculture on Information Technology Project Success in the Healthcare Sector: A Qualitative, Multi-Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Richard Kofi

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers face high demands for technology based healthcare services due to global population increases and adapting information technology (IT) to achieve quality patient care. IT has become center stage in the operations and management of healthcare organizations. IT requirements emerge from the visions, values, and beliefs of…

  12. A Review on Methods of Risk Adjustment and their Use in Integrated Healthcare Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhnke, Christin; Bethge, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Effective risk adjustment is an aspect that is more and more given weight on the background of competitive health insurance systems and vital healthcare systems. The objective of this review was to obtain an overview of existing models of risk adjustment as well as on crucial weights in risk adjustment. Moreover, the predictive performance of selected methods in international healthcare systems should be analysed. Theory and methods: A comprehensive, systematic literature review on methods of risk adjustment was conducted in terms of an encompassing, interdisciplinary examination of the related disciplines. Results: In general, several distinctions can be made: in terms of risk horizons, in terms of risk factors or in terms of the combination of indicators included. Within these, another differentiation by three levels seems reasonable: methods based on mortality risks, methods based on morbidity risks as well as those based on information on (self-reported) health status. Conclusions and discussion: After the final examination of different methods of risk adjustment it was shown that the methodology used to adjust risks varies. The models differ greatly in terms of their included morbidity indicators. The findings of this review can be used in the evaluation of integrated healthcare delivery systems and can be integrated into quality- and patient-oriented reimbursement of care providers in the design of healthcare contracts. PMID:28316544

  13. JINR information retrieval system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaudov, D.D.; Govorun, N.N.

    1975-01-01

    The organization of the main files of the JINR Information Retrieval System is described. There are four main files in the System. They are as follows: MD file that consists of abstracts of documents; OMPOD file where the index records of documents are gathered; MZD file that consists of list heads, and OMD file- the file of descriptors. The last three files are considered in some detail. The System is realized in the COBOL language on the CDC computer

  14. Anesthesia information management systems

    OpenAIRE

    Feri Štivan; Janez Benedik; Tomaž Lužar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The use of anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) is on the increase. This is particularly true for academic anesthesia departments. The main reasons for slow adoption of these systems in the past are financial barriers associated with implementation of these systems and their not so traditionally obvious potential to improve patient care. In addition, a major obstacle to acceptance of this technology is the concern of users over the impact of the electronic anesthesia...

  15. A path analysis study of retention of healthcare professionals in urban India using health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Indrajit; Ramachandran, Anandhi

    2015-07-31

    Healthcare information technology (HIT) applications are being ubiquitously adopted globally and have been indicated to have effects on certain dimensions of recruitment and retention of healthcare professionals. Retention of healthcare professionals is affected by their job satisfaction (JS), commitment to the organization and intention to stay (ITS) that are interlinked with each other and influenced by many factors related to job, personal, organization, etc. The objectives of the current study were to determine if HIT was one among the factors and, if so, propose a probable retention model that incorporates implementation and use of HIT as a strategy. This was a cross-sectional survey study covering 20 hospitals from urban areas of India. The sample (n = 586) consisted of doctors, nurses, paramedics and hospital administrators. Data was collected through a structured questionnaire. Factors affecting job satisfaction were determined. Technology acceptance by the healthcare professionals was also determined. Interactions between the factors were predicted using a path analysis model. The overall satisfaction rate of the respondents was 51 %. Based on factor analysis method, 10 factors were identified for JS and 9 factors for ITS. Availability and use of information technology was one factor that affected JS. The need for implementing technology influenced ITS through work environment and career growth. Also, the study indicated that nearly 70 % of the respondents had awareness of HIT, but only 40 % used them. The importance of providing training for HIT applications was stressed by many respondents. The results are in agreement with literature studies exploring job satisfaction and retention among healthcare professionals. Our study documented a relatively medium level of job satisfaction among the healthcare professionals in the urban area. Information technology was found to be one among the factors that can plausibly influence their job satisfaction and

  16. Health-care quality and information failure: Evidence from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David K; Welander Tärneberg, Anna

    2018-03-01

    Low-quality health services are a problem across low- and middle-income countries. Information failure may contribute, as patients may have insufficient knowledge to discern the quality of health services. That decreases the likelihood that patients will sort into higher quality facilities, increasing demand for better health services. This paper presents results from a health survey in Nigeria to investigate whether patients can evaluate health service quality effectively. Specifically, this paper demonstrates that although more than 90% of patients agree with any positive statement about the quality of their local health services, satisfaction is significantly associated with the diagnostic ability of health workers at the facility. Satisfaction is not associated with more superficial characteristics such as infrastructure quality or prescriptions of medicines. This suggests that patients may have sufficient information to discern some of the most important elements of quality, but that alternative measures are crucial for gauging the overall quality of care. Copyright © The World Bank Health Economics © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. PALLIATIVE CARE – ITS ROLE IN HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Lunder

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. In the last decades a palliative care has been well established in the majority of West European countries. However, majority of these countries are not able to follow needs for palliative care because of demographic changes (older population, changes of morbidity pattern (increase of chronic progressive diseases and social changes (disability of families to care for their relatives at their homes. Research is showing evidence on palliative care effectiveness at end of life and in bereavement. There is still a great need for healthcare professionals’ change in their attitudes, knowledge and skills. In many National strategic plans (United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden, Australia, New Zealand and Canada palliative care becomes a priority in the national public health. New organizational planning supports establishement of palliative care departments in hospitals and other healthcare settings and consultant teams at all levels of healthcare system. Hospices, caritative and independent organizations, will remain as a source of good clinical practice and philosophy of care at the end of life also in the future.

  18. Improving Transgender Healthcare in the New York City Correctional System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Mohamed; Ayad, John; Tungol, Jose Gabriel; MacDonald, Ross; Dickey, Nathaniel; Venters, Homer

    2016-04-01

    Correctional settings create unique challenges for patients with special needs, including transgender patients, who have an increased rate of overall discrimination, sexual abuse, healthcare disparities, and improper housing. As part of our correctional health quality improvement process, we sought to review and evaluate the adequacy of care for transgender patients in the New York City jail system. Using correctional pharmacy records, transgender patients receiving hormonal treatment were identified. A brief in-person survey was conducted to evaluate their care in the community before incarceration, medical care in jail, and experience in the jail environment. Survey findings and analysis of transgender patient healthcare-related complaints revealed opportunities for improvements in the provision of care and staff understanding of this population. Utilizing these findings, we conducted lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) trainings in all 12 jail clinics for medical, nursing, and mental health staff. Three months after LGBT training, patient complaints dropped by over 50%. After the development and implementation of a newly revised transgender healthcare policy, complaints dropped to zero within 6 months. Our efforts to assess the quality of care provided to transgender patients revealed significant areas for improvement. Although we have made important gains in providing quality care through the implementation of policies and procedures rooted in community standards and the express wishes of our patients, we continue to engage this patient population to identify other issues that impact their health and well-being in the jail environment.

  19. Advanced radiology information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolovou, L; Vatousi, M; Lymperopoulos, D; Koukias, M

    2005-01-01

    The innovative features of an advanced Radiology Information System (RIS) are presented in this paper. The interoperability of RIS with the other Intra-hospital Information Systems that interacts with, dealing with the compatibility and open architecture issues, are accomplished by two novel mechanisms [1]. The first one is the particular message handling system that is applied for the exchange of information, according to the Health Level Seven (HL7) protocol's specifications and serves the transfer of medical and administrative data among the RIS applications and data store unit. The same mechanism allows the secure and HL7-compatible interactions with the Hospital Information System (HIS) too. The second one implements the translation of information between the formats that HL7 and Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) protocols specify, providing the communication between RIS and Picture and Archive Communication System (PACS). The whole structure ensures the automation of the every-day procedures that the ;medical protocol' specifies and provides its services through a friendly and easy to manage graphical user interface.

  20. Cyber-Security Issues in Healthcare Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Steve G

    2017-02-01

    In 1999-2003, SIIM (then SCAR) sponsored the creation of several special topic Primers, one of which was concerned with computer security. About the same time, a multi-society collaboration authored an ACR Guideline with a similar plot; the latter has recently been updated. The motivation for these efforts was the launch of Health Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). That legislation directed care providers to enable the portability of patient medical records across authorized medical centers, while simultaneously protecting patient confidentiality among unauthorized agents. These policy requirements resulted in the creation of numerous technical solutions which the above documents described. While the mathematical concepts and algorithms in those papers are as valid today as they were then, recent increases in the complexity of computer criminal applications (and defensive countermeasures) and the pervasiveness of Internet connected devices have raised the bar. This work examines how a medical center can adapt to these evolving threats.

  1. Information system INIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyncl, J.

    1979-01-01

    INIS is the abbreviation for the International Nuclear Information System operated by IAEA in cooperation with its member countries. The function of the INIS system whose aim is to provide the member countries with information on nuclear literature is based on the decentralized input data preparation, centralized checking and on the creation of a unified data base and on the decentralized output materials processing. Czechoslovakia is represented in INIS by the Nuclear Information Centre which has been taking active part in the building and development of INIS since its very beginning. It provides for the use of output INIS materials by users in Czechoslovakia, this by means of a computerized network. The Czechoslovak Nuclear Information Centre has since 1978 been using a teleprocessing terminal connected to the IAEA central processor by means of a telephone line, which allows direct access to the INIS data base. (Ha)

  2. Developing patient portals in a fragmented healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte-Trojel, Terese; de Bont, Antoinette; Aspria, Marcello; Adams, Samantha; Rundall, Thomas G; van de Klundert, Joris; de Mul, Marleen

    2015-10-01

    Use of patient portals may contribute to improved patient health and experiences and better organizational performance. In the Netherlands, patient portals have gained considerable attention in recent years, as evidenced by various policy initiatives and practical efforts directed at developing portals. Due to the fragmented setup of the Dutch healthcare system patient portals that give patients access to information and services from across their providers are developed in inter-organizational collaboration. The objective of this paper is to identify and describe the types of collaborations, or networks, that have been established to develop patient portals in the Netherlands. Understanding the characteristics of these networks as well as the development of their respective portals enables us to assess the enabling and constraining effects of different network types on patient portal initiatives. We used qualitative methods including interview and documents analysis. In a first step, we interviewed eighteen experts and reviewed relevant national policy and strategy documents. Based on this orientation, we selected three networks we deemed to be representative of inter-organizational efforts to develop Dutch patient portals in 2012. In a second step, we interviewed twelve representatives of these patient portal networks and collected documents related to the portals. We applied content analytic techniques to analyze data from the three cases. The three studied networks differed in their number and diversity of actors, the degree to which these actors were mutually dependent, the degree to which network governance was decentralized, and the dynamics of the network structures. We observed that the portals developed in networks displaying the highest degree of these characteristics experienced most difficulties associated with developing patient portals - such as achieving interoperability, successful implementation, regulatory complaisance, and financial

  3. Demand for private healthcare in a universal public healthcare system: empirical evidence from Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallegedara, Asankha; Grimm, Michael

    2017-11-01

    This paper examines healthcare utilization behaviour in Sri Lanka with special emphasis on the choice between costly private and free public healthcare services. We use a data set that combines nationwide household survey data and district level healthcare supply data. Our findings suggest that even with universal public healthcare policy, richer people tend to use private sector healthcare services rather than public services. We also find significant regional and ethnic discrepancies in healthcare access bearing the risk of social tensions if these are further amplified. Latent class analysis shows in addition that the choice between private and public sector healthcare significantly differs between people with and without chronic diseases. We find in particular that chronically ill people rely for their day-to-day care on the public sector, but for their inpatient care they turn more often than non-chronically ill people to the private sector, implying an additional financial burden for the chronically ill. If the observed trend continues it may not only increase further the health-income gradient in Sri Lanka but also undermine the willingness of the middle class to pay taxes to finance public healthcare. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

  5. Informed consent to healthcare interventions in people with learning disabilities--an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Lesley; Skirton, Heather; Webb, Christine

    2008-12-01

    This paper is a report of an integrative review of informed consent to healthcare interventions in people with learning disabilities. Consent to treatment lies at the heart of the relationship between patient and healthcare professional. In order for people with learning disabilities to have equity of access to health care, they need to be able to give informed consent to health interventions--or be assessed as incompetent to give consent. The British Nursing Index (BNI), CINAHL, MEDLINE, Social Care Online, ERIC and ASSIA and PsycINFO databases were searched using the search terms: Consent or informed choice or capacity or consent to treat* or consent to examin* AND Learning disab* or intellectual* disab* or mental* retard* or learning difficult* or mental* handicap*. The search was limited to papers published in English from January 1990 to March 2007. An integrative review was conducted and the data analysed thematically. Twenty-two studies were reviewed. The main themes identified were: life experience, interaction between healthcare professionals and participants, ability to consent, and psychometric variables. A consensus seemed to emerge that capacity to consent is greater in people with higher cognitive ability and verbal skills, but that the attitudes and behaviour of healthcare professionals was also a crucial factor. The findings support use of the functional approach to assessing mental capacity for the purpose of obtaining informed consent. Future research into informed consent in people with learning disabilities is needed using real life situations rather than hypothetical vignettes.

  6. Healthcare Lean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, John C

    2003-01-01

    Lean Thinking is an integrated approach to designing, doing and improving the work of people that have come together to produce and deliver goods, services and information. Healthcare Lean is based on the Toyota production system and applies concepts and techniques of Lean Thinking to hospitals and physician practices.

  7. COMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dănuţ ŢIGĂNUŞ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay assesses the communications and information systems (CIS in support of the civilian and military structures deployed in the European Union led crises management operations and missions. The article emphasizes the specific structure and function of CIS taking in consideration the particularities of EU led missions. The integration of the EU institutional networks and systems with the national systems provided by the EU member states is considered a key element. The analysis-part of this paper starts with the specific EU command and control system for crises management missions based on two autonomous solutions and one relying on NATO capabilities. Further, it continues with the challenges of the classifi ed information exchange at the operational theatre level. The most important contribution of this article is based on the long term vision implementation measures for the CIS structure, roles, functions and services provided and the information management infrastructure. CIS deployment mechanisms are described with references to the practical situation of the CIS deployed in support of crises management operations and missions. Two important defi nitions are provided regarding the CIS for crisis management and their roles in the specific EU operational environment. The system view of the operational CIS is depicted and analysed also, with a focus on the integration aspects of the infrastructure as the information transport layer for the information exchange flow. The last part of the article focuses on the CIS functions for the deployed systems which are detailed alongside with the C2 and Information Exchange Requirements in the EU operational environment. The variety of the theoretical approaches to determine the CIS infrastructure for EU-led civilian and military missions triggers the conclusion that the planning and implementation process is extremely complex especially in the context of the new security environment and requires

  8. The healthcare system and the provision of oral healthcare in European Union member states. Part 8: Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindi, M; Paganelli, C; Eaton, K A; Widström, E

    2017-05-26

    In Italy healthcare is provided for all Italian citizens and residents and it is delivered mainly by public providers, with some private or private-public entities. Italy's public healthcare system - the Servizio Sanitario Nazionale (SSN) - is organised by the Ministry of Health and administered on a devolved regional basis. It is financed by general taxation that provides universal coverage, largely free of charge at the point of service. The central government establishes the basic national health benefits package, which must be uniformly provided throughout the country, through services guaranteed under the NHS provision called LEA - (Livelli Essenziali di Assistenza [Essential Level of Assistance]) and allocates national funds to the regions. The regions, through their regional health departments, are responsible for organising, administering and delivering primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare services as well as preventive and health promotion services. Regions are allowed a large degree of autonomy in how they perform this role and regarding decisions about the local structure of the system. Complementary and supplementary private health insurance is also available. However, as in most other Mediterranean European countries, in Italy oral healthcare is mainly provided under private arrangements. The public healthcare system provides only 5-8% of oral healthcare services and this percentage varies from region to region. Oral healthcare is included in the Legislation on Essential levels of care (LEAs) for specific populations such as children, vulnerable people (medically compromised and those on low income) and individuals who need oral healthcare in some urgent/emergency cases. For other people, oral healthcare is generally not covered. Apart from the national benefits package, regions may also carry out their own initiatives autonomously, but must finance these themselves. The number of dentists working in Italy has grown rapidly in the last few years

  9. Examining quality and efficiency of the U.S. healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sameer; Ghildayal, Neha S; Shah, Ronak N

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental concern of this research study is to learn the quality and efficiency of U.S. healthcare services. It seeks to examine the impact of quality and efficiency on various stakeholders to achieve the best value for each dollar spent for healthcare. The study aims to offer insights on quality reformation efforts, contemporary healthcare policy and a forthcoming change shaped by the Federal healthcare fiscal policy and to recommend the improvement objective by comparing the U.S. healthcare system with those of other developed nations. The US healthcare system is examined utilizing various data on recent trends in: spending, budgetary implications, economic indicators, i.e., GDP, inflation, wage and population growth. Process maps, cause and effect diagrams and descriptive data statistics are utilized to understand the various drivers that influence the rising healthcare cost. A proposed cause and effect diagram is presented to offer potential solutions, for significant improvement in U.S. healthcare. At present, the US healthcare system is of vital interest to the nation's economy and government policy (spending). The U.S. healthcare system is characterized as the world's most expensive yet least effective compared with other nations. Growing healthcare costs have made millions of citizens vulnerable. Major drivers of the healthcare costs are institutionalized medical practices and reimbursement policies, technology-induced costs and consumer behavior. Reviewing many articles, congressional reports, internet websites and related material, a simplified process map of the US healthcare system is presented. The financial process map is also created to further understand the overall process that connects the stakeholders in the healthcare system. Factors impacting healthcare are presented by a cause and effect diagram to further simplify the complexities of healthcare. This tool can also be used as a guide to improve efficiency by removing the "waste" from the

  10. Health information systems: challenges for the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, M J; Lillis, J C

    2000-08-01

    No longer focused on mere automation of manual processes, healthcare technology is poised to transform practice. Healthcare information systems can extend and enhance the memory; streamline administrative processes; provide access to information where, when, and how it is needed; and manage the cost of care while protecting and improving clinical quality and customer satisfaction. To reap the benefits of information systems, healthcare professionals must take stock of the industry's current position on the road to transformation and determine how to manage the journey ahead. This article explores healthcare information technology trends, discusses emerging technologies such as the Internet and the computerized patient record, and offers future recommendations for achieving technology integration and acceptance. Key to this discussion is the belief that people-based skills such as cooperation, leadership, and creative thinking are just as important as--if not more important than--the actual technology.

  11. Safety Information System Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, M.G.

    1977-03-01

    This Guide provides guidelines for the design and evaluation of a working safety information system. For the relatively few safety professionals who have already adopted computer-based programs, this Guide may aid them in the evaluation of their present system. To those who intend to develop an information system, it will, hopefully, inspire new thinking and encourage steps towards systems safety management. For the line manager who is working where the action is, this Guide may provide insight on the importance of accident facts as a tool for moving ideas up the communication ladder where they will be heard and acted upon; where what he has to say will influence beneficial changes among those who plan and control his operations. In the design of a safety information system, it is suggested that the safety manager make friends with a computer expert or someone on the management team who has some feeling for, and understanding of, the art of information storage and retrieval as a new and better means for communication

  12. Using geographic information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winsor, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    A true Geographic Information System (GIS) is a computer mapping system with spatial analysis ability and cartographic accuracy that will offer many different projections. GIS has evolved to become an everyday tool for a wide range of users including oil companies, worldwide. Other systems are designed to allow oil and gas companies to keep their upstream data in the same format. Among these are the Public Petroleum Data Model developed by Gulf Canada, Digitech and Applied Terravision Systems of Calgary, the system developed and marketed by the Petrotechnical Open Software Corporation in the United States, and the Mercury projects by IBM. These have been developed in an effort to define an industry standard. The advantages and disadvantages of open and closed systems were discussed. Factors to consider when choosing a GIS system such as overall performance, area of use and query complexity, were reviewed. 3 figs

  13. Health Information Technology in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety: Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Sue S; Buchalter, Scott; Hayes, Leslie W

    2018-06-04

    The area of healthcare quality and patient safety is starting to use health information technology to prevent reportable events, identify them before they become issues, and act on events that are thought to be unavoidable. As healthcare organizations begin to explore the use of health information technology in this realm, it is often unclear where fiscal and human efforts should be focused. The purpose of this study was to provide a foundation for understanding where to focus health information technology fiscal and human resources as well as expectations for the use of health information technology in healthcare quality and patient safety. A literature review was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications reporting on the actual use of health information technology in healthcare quality and patient safety. Inductive thematic analysis with open coding was used to categorize a total of 41 studies. Three pre-set categories were used: prevention, identification, and action. Three additional categories were formed through coding: challenges, outcomes, and location. This study identifies five main categories across seven study settings. A majority of the studies used health IT for identification and prevention of healthcare quality and patient safety issues. In this realm, alerts, clinical decision support, and customized health IT solutions were most often implemented. Implementation, interface design, and culture were most often noted as challenges. This study provides valuable information as organizations determine where they stand to get the most "bang for their buck" relative to health IT for quality and patient safety. Knowing what implementations are being effectivity used by other organizations helps with fiscal and human resource planning as well as managing expectations relative to cost, scope, and outcomes. The findings from this scan of the literature suggest that having organizational champion leaders that can shepherd implementation, impact culture

  14. Geographic variation in Medicare and the military healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesoye, Taiwo; Kimsey, Linda G; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Nguyen, Louis L; Goodney, Philip; Olaiya, Samuel; Weissman, Joel S

    2017-08-01

    To compare geographic variation in healthcare spending and utilization between the Military Health System (MHS) and Medicare across hospital referral regions (HRRs). Retrospective analysis. Data on age-, sex-, and race-adjusted Medicare per capita expenditure and utilization measures by HRR were obtained from the Dartmouth Atlas for 2007 to 2010. Similarly, adjusted data from 2007 and 2010 were obtained from the MHS Data Repository and patients assigned to HRRs. We compared high- and low-spending regions, and computed coefficient of variation (CoV) and correlation coefficients for healthcare spending, hospital inpatient days, hip surgery, and back surgery between MHS and Medicare patients. We found significant variation in spending and utilization across HRRs in both the MHS and Medicare. CoV for spending was higher in the MHS compared with Medicare, (0.24 vs 0.15, respectively) and CoV for inpatient days was 0.36 in the MHS versus 0.19 in Medicare. The CoV for back surgery was also greater in the MHS compared with Medicare (0.47 vs 0.29, respectively). Per capita Medicare spending per HRR was significantly correlated to adjusted MHS spending (r = 0.3; P spending markets in both systems were not comparable; lower spending markets were located mostly in the Midwest. In comparing 2 systems with similar pricing schemes, differences in spending likely reflect variation in utilization and the influence of local provider culture.

  15. The chief nurse executive role in large healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englebright, Jane; Perlin, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Community hospitals are most frequently led by nonclinicians. Although some may have employed physician leaders, most often clinical leadership is provided by a chief nurse executive (CNE) or chief nursing officer. Clinical leadership of community hospital and health systems may similarly be provided by a system-level nursing executive or, often, by a council of facility CNEs. The increasingly competitive healthcare environment in which value-based purchasing of healthcare and pay-for-performance programs demand improved clinical performance for financial success has led to reconsideration of whether a council model can provide either the leadership or adequate attention to clinical (and operational) improvement. In turn, community hospitals and health systems look to CNE or chief nursing officer roles at the highest level of the organization as resources that are able to segue between the clinical and operational domains, translating clinical performance demands into operating strategies and tactics. This article explores CNE characteristics required for success in these increasingly responsible and visible roles.

  16. MEDICARE PAYMENTS AND SYSTEM-LEVEL HEALTH-CARE USE

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROBBINS, JACOB A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid growth of Medicare managed care over the past decade has the potential to increase the efficiency of health-care delivery. Improvements in care management for some may improve efficiency system-wide, with implications for optimal payment policy in public insurance programs. These system-level effects may depend on local health-care market structure and vary based on patient characteristics. We use exogenous variation in the Medicare payment schedule to isolate the effects of market-level managed care enrollment on the quantity and quality of care delivered. We find that in areas with greater enrollment of Medicare beneficiaries in managed care, the non–managed care beneficiaries have fewer days in the hospital but more outpatient visits, consistent with a substitution of less expensive outpatient care for more expensive inpatient care, particularly at high levels of managed care. We find no evidence that care is of lower quality. Optimal payment policies for Medicare managed care enrollees that account for system-level spillovers may thus be higher than those that do not. PMID:27042687

  17. Human factors information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.; DiPalo, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power plant safety is dependent upon human performance related to plant operations. To provide improvements in human performance, data collection and assessment play key roles. This paper reports on the Human factors Information System (HFIS) which is designed to meet the needs of the human factors specialists of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These specialists identify personnel errors and provide guidance designed to prevent such errors. HFIS is a simple and modular system designed for use on a personal computer. It is designed to contain four separate modules that provide information indicative of program or function effectiveness as well as safety-related human performance based on programmatic and performance data. These modules include the Human Factors Status module; the Regulatory Programs module; the Licensee Event Report module; and the Operator Requalification Performance module. Information form these modules can either be used separately or can be combined due to the integrated nature of the system. HFIS has the capability, therefore, to provide insights into those areas of human factors that can reduce the probability of events caused by personnel error at nuclear power plants and promote the health and safety of the public. This information system concept can be applied to other industries as well as the nuclear industry

  18. Outage information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svengren, Haakan; Meyer, Brita Diskerud

    2005-09-01

    Today's control room systems are designed to operate during power operation, and there is clearly a need for a system to support control room personnel in automatically supervising the status of the plant during the outage period. In order to improve the supervision of Nuclear Power Plants during outages, three prototypes of the Outage Information system have been designed by the Halden Project, one for PWR and two for BWR. The Outage Information System is presented on a large screen, centrally placed in the control room. There will be a PC connected to manage the system. By using signals from the process as input to logic diagrams reflecting the plant's Safety Technical Specifications, the system automatically is supervising that requirements in Safety Technical Specifications are fulfilled during all plant states of the outage period. The system also automatically gives an overview of the status of safety systems and electrical bus bars. Alarm will occur if a requirement in the Safety Technical Specifications is not fulfilled or if a component planned to be ready for operation, is inoperable. In addition, selected measurements being important during the outage period are presented on the large screen. Which measurements and in which way the values will be presented, depends on the plant's control room design and work practice. (Author)

  19. Insect barcode information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratheepa, Maria; Jalali, Sushil Kumar; Arokiaraj, Robinson Silvester; Venkatesan, Thiruvengadam; Nagesh, Mandadi; Panda, Madhusmita; Pattar, Sharath

    2014-01-01

    Insect Barcode Information System called as Insect Barcode Informática (IBIn) is an online database resource developed by the National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Insects, Bangalore. This database provides acquisition, storage, analysis and publication of DNA barcode records of agriculturally important insects, for researchers specifically in India and other countries. It bridges a gap in bioinformatics by integrating molecular, morphological and distribution details of agriculturally important insects. IBIn was developed using PHP/My SQL by using relational database management concept. This database is based on the client- server architecture, where many clients can access data simultaneously. IBIn is freely available on-line and is user-friendly. IBIn allows the registered users to input new information, search and view information related to DNA barcode of agriculturally important insects.This paper provides a current status of insect barcode in India and brief introduction about the database IBIn. http://www.nabg-nbaii.res.in/barcode.

  20. Tailoring Healthy Workplace Interventions to Local Healthcare Settings: A Complexity Theory-Informed Workplace of Well-Being Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Sarah L; Fleming, Lora E; Wyatt, Katrina M

    2015-01-01

    Many healthy workplace interventions have been developed for healthcare settings to address the consistently low scores of healthcare professionals on assessments of mental and physical well-being. Complex healthcare settings present challenges for the scale-up and spread of successful interventions from one setting to another. Despite general agreement regarding the importance of the local setting in affecting intervention success across different settings, there is no consensus on what it is about a local setting that needs to be taken into account to design healthy workplace interventions appropriate for different local settings. Complexity theory principles were used to understand a workplace as a complex adaptive system and to create a framework of eight domains (system characteristics) that affect the emergence of system-level behaviour. This Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework is responsive and adaptive to local settings and allows a shared understanding of the enablers and barriers to behaviour change by capturing local information for each of the eight domains. We use the results of applying the WoW framework to one workplace, a UK National Health Service ward, to describe the utility of this approach in informing design of setting-appropriate healthy workplace interventions that create workplaces conducive to healthy behaviour change.

  1. Tailoring Healthy Workplace Interventions to Local Healthcare Settings: A Complexity Theory-Informed Workplace of Well-Being Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Brand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many healthy workplace interventions have been developed for healthcare settings to address the consistently low scores of healthcare professionals on assessments of mental and physical well-being. Complex healthcare settings present challenges for the scale-up and spread of successful interventions from one setting to another. Despite general agreement regarding the importance of the local setting in affecting intervention success across different settings, there is no consensus on what it is about a local setting that needs to be taken into account to design healthy workplace interventions appropriate for different local settings. Complexity theory principles were used to understand a workplace as a complex adaptive system and to create a framework of eight domains (system characteristics that affect the emergence of system-level behaviour. This Workplace of Well-being (WoW framework is responsive and adaptive to local settings and allows a shared understanding of the enablers and barriers to behaviour change by capturing local information for each of the eight domains. We use the results of applying the WoW framework to one workplace, a UK National Health Service ward, to describe the utility of this approach in informing design of setting-appropriate healthy workplace interventions that create workplaces conducive to healthy behaviour change.

  2. Tailoring Healthy Workplace Interventions to Local Healthcare Settings: A Complexity Theory-Informed Workplace of Well-Being Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Sarah L.; Fleming, Lora E.; Wyatt, Katrina M.

    2015-01-01

    Many healthy workplace interventions have been developed for healthcare settings to address the consistently low scores of healthcare professionals on assessments of mental and physical well-being. Complex healthcare settings present challenges for the scale-up and spread of successful interventions from one setting to another. Despite general agreement regarding the importance of the local setting in affecting intervention success across different settings, there is no consensus on what it is about a local setting that needs to be taken into account to design healthy workplace interventions appropriate for different local settings. Complexity theory principles were used to understand a workplace as a complex adaptive system and to create a framework of eight domains (system characteristics) that affect the emergence of system-level behaviour. This Workplace of Well-being (WoW) framework is responsive and adaptive to local settings and allows a shared understanding of the enablers and barriers to behaviour change by capturing local information for each of the eight domains. We use the results of applying the WoW framework to one workplace, a UK National Health Service ward, to describe the utility of this approach in informing design of setting-appropriate healthy workplace interventions that create workplaces conducive to healthy behaviour change. PMID:26380358

  3. Information technology for competitive advantage: the case of learning and innovation in behavioural healthcare service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chang-tseh; Lin, Binshan

    2011-01-01

    The utilisation of IS/IT could offer a substantial competitive advantage to healthcare service providers through the realisation of improved clinical, financial, and administrative outcomes. In this study, 42 journal articles were reviewed and summarised with respect to identified benefits and challenges of the development and implementation of electronic medical records, tele-health, and electronic appointment reminders. Results of this study help pave the knowledge foundation for management of the behavioural healthcare to learn how to apply state-of-the-art information technology to offer higher quality, clinically proven effective services at lower costs than those of their competitors.

  4. [The five commandments for preparing the Israeli healthcare system for emergencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adini, Bruria; Laor, Danny; Cohen, Robert; Lev, Boaz; Israeli, Avi

    2010-07-01

    In the last decade, the Israeli healthcare system dealt with many casualties that resulted from terrorist actions and at the same time maintained preparedness for other potential hazards such as natural disasters, toxicological, chemical, radiological and biological events. There are various models for emergency preparedness that are utilized in different countries. The aim of the article is to present the structure and the methodology of the Israeli healthcare system for emergencies. Assuring emergency preparedness for the different scenarios is based on 5 major components that include: comprehensive contingency planning; control and command of operations; central control of readiness; capacity building; coordination and collaboration among the numerous emergency agencies. CLose working relationships between the military and civilian systems characterize the operations of the emergency system. There is a mutual sharing of information, coordinated operations to achieve risk assessment and determine priorities, and consensual allocation of resources. The ability of the medical system to operate in optimal coordination with interface bodies, including the Israel Defense Forces, is derived from three main elements: the shortage of resources necessitate that all agencies work together to develop an effective response to emergencies; the Israeli society is characterized by transition of personnel from the military to the civilian system which promotes joint operations, whereas in most other countries these systems are completely separated; and also developing mechanisms for continuous and coordinated operation in routine and emergency times, such as the Supreme Health Authority. The Israeli healthcare system was put to the test several times in the Last decade, during the terror wave that occurred between 2001-2006, the 2nd Lebanon War and in operation "Cast Lead". An extensive process of learning lessons, conducted during and following each of these periods, and the

  5. The invisible hands made visible: recognizing the value of informal care in healthcare decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Exel, Job; Bobinac, Ana; Koopmanschap, Marc; Brouwer, Werner

    2008-12-01

    The healthcare sector depends heavily on the informal care provided by families and friends of those who are ill. Informal caregivers may experience significant burden as well as health and well-being effects. Resource allocation decisions, in particular from a societal perspective, should account explicitly for these effects in the social environment of patients. This is not only important to make a complete welfare economic assessment of treatments, but also to ensure the lasting involvement of informal caregivers in the care-giving process. Measurement and valuation techniques for the costs and effects of informal care have been developed and their use is becoming more common. Decision-makers in healthcare - and eventually families and patients - would be helped by more uniformity in methods.

  6. Systems Medicine: The Future of Medical Genomics, Healthcare, and Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqi, Mansoor; Pellet, Johann; Roznovat, Irina; Mazein, Alexander; Ballereau, Stéphane; De Meulder, Bertrand; Auffray, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genomics have led to the rapid and relatively inexpensive collection of patient molecular data including multiple types of omics data. The integration of these data with clinical measurements has the potential to impact on our understanding of the molecular basis of disease and on disease management. Systems medicine is an approach to understanding disease through an integration of large patient datasets. It offers the possibility for personalized strategies for healthcare through the development of a new taxonomy of disease. Advanced computing will be an important component in effectively implementing systems medicine. In this chapter we describe three computational challenges associated with systems medicine: disease subtype discovery using integrated datasets, obtaining a mechanistic understanding of disease, and the development of an informatics platform for the mining, analysis, and visualization of data emerging from translational medicine studies.

  7. Educating patients about warfarin therapy using information technology: A survey on healthcare professionals’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullan J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore healthcare professionals’ views about the benefits and challenges of using information technology (IT resources for educating patients about their warfarin therapy.Methods: A cross-sectional survey of both community and hospital-based healthcare professionals (e.g., doctors, pharmacists and nurses involved using a purpose-designed questionnaire. The questionnaires were distributed using a multi-modal approach to maximise response rates.Results: Of the total 300 questionnaires distributed, 109 completed surveys were received (43.3% response rate. Over half (53.2% of the healthcare participants were aged between 40-59 years, the majority (59.5% of whom were female. Fifty nine (54.1% participants reported having had no access to warfarin-specific IT-based patient education resources, and a further 19 (38.0% of the participants who had IT-access reported that they never used such resources. According to the healthcare participants, the main challenges associated with educating their patients about warfarin therapy included: patient-related factors, such as older age, language barriers, cognitive impairments and/or ethnic backgrounds or healthcare professional factors, such as time constraints. The healthcare professionals reported that there were several aspects about warfarin therapy which they found difficult to educate their patients about which is why they identified computers and interactive touch screen kiosks as preferred IT devices to deliver warfarin education resources in general practices, hospital-based clinics and community pharmacies. At the same time, the healthcare professionals also identified a number of facilitators (e.g., to reinforce warfarin education, to offer reliable and easily comprehensible information and barriers (e.g., time and costs of using IT resources, difficulty in operating the resources that could impact on the effective implementation of these devices in educating patients about their

  8. Computing handbook information systems and information technology

    CERN Document Server

    Topi, Heikki

    2014-01-01

    Disciplinary Foundations and Global ImpactEvolving Discipline of Information Systems Heikki TopiDiscipline of Information Technology Barry M. Lunt and Han ReichgeltInformation Systems as a Practical Discipline Juhani IivariInformation Technology Han Reichgelt, Joseph J. Ekstrom, Art Gowan, and Barry M. LuntSociotechnical Approaches to the Study of Information Systems Steve Sawyer and Mohammad Hossein JarrahiIT and Global Development Erkki SutinenUsing ICT for Development, Societal Transformation, and Beyond Sherif KamelTechnical Foundations of Data and Database ManagementData Models Avi Silber

  9. Challenges of information security incident learning: An industrial case study in a Chinese healthcare organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Johnson, Chris

    2017-12-01

    Security incidents can have negative impacts on healthcare organizations, and the security of medical records has become a primary concern of the public. However, previous studies showed that organizations had not effectively learned lessons from security incidents. Incident learning as an essential activity in the "follow-up" phase of security incident response lifecycle has long been addressed but not given enough attention. This paper conducted a case study in a healthcare organization in China to explore their current obstacles in the practice of incident learning. We interviewed both IT professionals and healthcare professionals. The results showed that the organization did not have a structured way to gather and redistribute incident knowledge. Incident response was ineffective in cycling incident knowledge back to inform security management. Incident reporting to multiple stakeholders faced a great challenge. In response to this case study, we suggest the security assurance modeling framework to address those obstacles.

  10. Nuclear criticality information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear criticality safety program at LLNL began in the 1950's with a critical measurements program which produced benchmark data until the late 1960's. This same time period saw the rapid development of computer technology useful for both computer modeling of fissile systems and for computer-aided management and display of the computational benchmark data. Database management grew in importance as the amount of information increased and as experimental programs were terminated. Within the criticality safety program at LLNL we began at that time to develop a computer library of benchmark data for validation of computer codes and cross sections. As part of this effort, we prepared a computer-based bibliography of criticality measurements on relatively simple systems. However, it is only now that some of these computer-based resources can be made available to the nuclear criticality safety community at large. This technology transfer is being accomplished by the DOE Technology Information System (TIS), a dedicated, advanced information system. The NCIS database is described

  11. Multiple sclerosis patients need and want information on exercise promotion from healthcare providers: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learmonth, Yvonne C; Adamson, Brynn C; Balto, Julia M; Chiu, Chung-Yi; Molina-Guzman, Isabel; Finlayson, Marcia; Riskin, Barry J; Motl, Robert W

    2017-08-01

    There is growing recognition of the benefits and safety of exercise and its importance in the comprehensive care of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), yet uptake is low. We explored the needs and wants of patients with MS regarding exercise promotion through healthcare providers. Participants were adults with MS who had mild-or-moderate disability and a range of exercise levels. All participants lived in the Midwest of the United States. Fifty semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using thematic analysis. Two themes emerged, namely interactions between patients and healthcare providers and needs and wants of patients. Analysis of participant accounts illustrate that current exercise promotion by healthcare providers does not meet patient needs and wants. The identified needs and wants of persons with MS involved (i) information and knowledge on the benefits of exercise and exercise prescription, (ii) materials to allow home and community exercise and (iii) tools for initiating and maintaining exercise behaviour. Patients with MS frequently interact with healthcare providers and are generally unsatisfied with exercise promotion during interactions. Healthcare providers can address the low uptake of exercise among persons with MS by acting upon the identified unmet needs involving materials, knowledge and behaviour change strategies for exercise. © 2016 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Learning to navigate the healthcare system in a new country: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straiton, Melanie L; Myhre, Sonja

    2017-12-01

    Learning to navigate a healthcare system in a new country is a barrier to health care. Understanding more about the specific navigation challenges immigrants experience may be the first step towards improving health information and thus access to care. This study considers the challenges that Thai and Filipino immigrant women encounter when learning to navigate the Norwegian primary healthcare system and the strategies they use. A qualitative interview study using thematic analysis. Norway. Fifteen Thai and 15 Filipino immigrant women over the age of 18 who had been living in Norway at least one year. The women took time to understand the role of the general practitioner and some were unaware of their right to an interpreter during consultations. In addition to reliance on family members and friends in their social networks, voluntary and cultural organisations provided valuable tips and advice on how to navigate the Norwegian health system. While some women actively engaged in learning more about the system, they noted a lack of information available in multiple languages. Informal sources play an important role in learning about the health care system. Formal information should be available in different languages in order to better empower immigrant women.

  13. Learning to navigate the healthcare system in a new country: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straiton, Melanie L.; Myhre, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    Objective Learning to navigate a healthcare system in a new country is a barrier to health care. Understanding more about the specific navigation challenges immigrants experience may be the first step towards improving health information and thus access to care. This study considers the challenges that Thai and Filipino immigrant women encounter when learning to navigate the Norwegian primary healthcare system and the strategies they use. Design A qualitative interview study using thematic analysis. Setting Norway. Participants Fifteen Thai and 15 Filipino immigrant women over the age of 18 who had been living in Norway at least one year. Results The women took time to understand the role of the general practitioner and some were unaware of their right to an interpreter during consultations. In addition to reliance on family members and friends in their social networks, voluntary and cultural organisations provided valuable tips and advice on how to navigate the Norwegian health system. While some women actively engaged in learning more about the system, they noted a lack of information available in multiple languages. Conclusions Informal sources play an important role in learning about the health care system. Formal information should be available in different languages in order to better empower immigrant women. PMID:29087232

  14. Information security governance: a risk assessment approach to health information systems protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Patricia A H

    2013-01-01

    It is no small task to manage the protection of healthcare data and healthcare information systems. In an environment that is demanding adaptation to change for all information collection, storage and retrieval systems, including those for of e-health and information systems, it is imperative that good information security governance is in place. This includes understanding and meeting legislative and regulatory requirements. This chapter provides three models to educate and guide organisations in this complex area, and to simplify the process of information security governance and ensure appropriate and effective measures are put in place. The approach is risk based, adapted and contextualized for healthcare. In addition, specific considerations of the impact of cloud services, secondary use of data, big data and mobile health are discussed.

  15. What role does performance information play in securing improvement in healthcare? a conceptual framework for levers of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Sutherland, Kim

    2017-08-28

    Across healthcare systems, there is consensus on the need for independent and impartial assessment of performance. There is less agreement about how measurement and reporting performance improves healthcare. This paper draws on academic theories to develop a conceptual framework-one that classifies in an integrated manner the ways in which change can be leveraged by healthcare performance information. A synthesis of published frameworks. The framework identifies eight levers for change enabled by performance information, spanning internal and external drivers, and emergent and planned processes: (1) cognitive levers provide awareness and understanding; (2) mimetic levers inform about the performance of others to encourage emulation; (3) supportive levers provide facilitation, implementation tools or models of care to actively support change; (4) formative levers develop capabilities and skills through teaching, mentoring and feedback; (5) normative levers set performance against guidelines, standards, certification and accreditation processes; (6) coercive levers use policies, regulations incentives and disincentives to force change; (7) structural levers modify the physical environment or professional cultures and routines; (8) competitive levers attract patients or funders. This framework highlights how performance measurement and reporting can contribute to eight different levers for change. It provides guidance into how to align performance measurement and reporting into quality improvement programme. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. The threat nets approach to information system security risk analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirembe, Drake

    2015-01-01

    The growing demand for healthcare services is motivating hospitals to strengthen outpatient case management using information systems in order to serve more patients using the available resources. Though the use of information systems in outpatient case management raises patient data security

  17. Enterprise Information Systems Outsourcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Pries.Heje, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Outsourcing is now a feasible mean for Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) cost savings, but do however increase the complexity substantially when many organizations are involved. We set out to study EIS outsourcing with many interorganizational partners in a large Scandinavian high-tech organiz......Outsourcing is now a feasible mean for Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) cost savings, but do however increase the complexity substantially when many organizations are involved. We set out to study EIS outsourcing with many interorganizational partners in a large Scandinavian high...... the rational cost saving explanation; but then with a more careful analysis focusing on institutional factors, other explanations "behind the curtain" were revealed, such as management consultants with a "best practice" agenda, people promoting outsourcing thereby being promoted themselves, and outside...

  18. Enterprise Information Systems Outsourcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Svejvig, Per

    2009-01-01

      Outsourcing is now a feasible mean for Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) cost savings, but do however increase the complexity substantially when many organizations are involved. We set out to study EIS outsourcing with many interorganizational partners in a large Scandinavian high-tech organ......  Outsourcing is now a feasible mean for Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) cost savings, but do however increase the complexity substantially when many organizations are involved. We set out to study EIS outsourcing with many interorganizational partners in a large Scandinavian high...... the rational cost saving explanation; but then with a more careful analysis focusing on institutional factors, other explanations "behind the curtain" were revealed, such as management consultants with a "best practice" agenda, people promoting outsourcing thereby being promoted themselves, and outside...

  19. Appropriation of Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Annemette Leonhardt; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the use of cognitive mapping for eliciting users' sensemaking during information system (IS) appropriation. Despite the potential usefulness of sensemaking, few studies in IS research use it as a theoretical lens to address IS appropriation. A possible reason for this may...... be that sensemaking does not easily lend itself to be used in practice. We introduce cognitive mapping as a way to elicit users' sensemaking and illustrate its value by reporting on findings from an empirical study of the introduction of an Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system. The contribution of the paper...

  20. Management information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This contract was for the development of a new range of colliery information computer systems (CIS) using a VAX 11/730 computer. The report details the selection of the system and the set-up of the hardware and software. The first application of these systems was to monitor production and delays from longwall faces. A trial installation was implemented at Shirebrook Colliery and this proved so successful that British Coal are now installing many similar systems. The key features of the production monitoring application are that delays are automatically detected in real time and the operator is prompted for the root cause of the delay. This is done through a linked series of questions and answere from a linked set of possible delay causes. Ad hoc and regular reports are produced giving local colliery management visibility of coal face performance, thus enabling informed decisions and corrective action to be taken. Following the successful application to production monitoring, the system was extended to heading/drivages, coal clearance/conveyors, mine air environment and fixed plant. Those applications were operational during the contract but have since been extended.

  1. Engineering Review Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grems, III, Edward G. (Inventor); Henze, James E. (Inventor); Bixby, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Roberts, Mark (Inventor); Mann, Thomas (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A disciplinal engineering review computer information system and method by defining a database of disciplinal engineering review process entities for an enterprise engineering program, opening a computer supported engineering item based upon the defined disciplinal engineering review process entities, managing a review of the opened engineering item according to the defined disciplinal engineering review process entities, and closing the opened engineering item according to the opened engineering item review.

  2. An advanced rehabilitation robotic system for augmenting healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, John; Lim, Yi-Je; Ding, Ye; Paluska, Daniel; Solochek, Aaron; Laffery, David; Bonato, Paolo; Marchessault, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Emerging technologies such as rehabilitation robots (RehaBot) for retraining upper and lower limb functions have shown to carry tremendous potential to improve rehabilitation outcomes. Hstar Technologies is developing a revolutionary rehabilitation robot system enhancing healthcare quality for patients with neurological and muscular injuries or functional impairments. The design of RehaBot is a safe and robust system that can be run at a rehabilitation hospital under the direct monitoring and interactive supervision control and at a remote site via telepresence operation control. RehaBot has a wearable robotic structure design like exoskeleton, which employs a unique robotic actuation--Series Elastic Actuator. These electric actuators provide robotic structural compliance, safety, flexibility, and required strength for upper extremity dexterous manipulation rehabilitation training. RehaBot also features a novel non-treadmill paddle platform capable of haptics feedback locomotion rehabilitation training. In this paper, we concern mainly about the motor incomplete patient and rehabilitation applications.

  3. The Indiana University Center for Healthcare Innovation and Implementation Science: Bridging healthcare research and delivery to build a learning healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Jose; Adams, Nadia; Boustani, Malaz

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, it is estimated that 75,000 deaths every year could be averted if the healthcare system implemented high quality care more effectively and efficiently. Patient harm in the hospital occurs as a consequence of inadequate procedures, medications and other therapies, nosocomial infections, diagnostic evaluations and patient falls. Implementation science, a new emerging field in healthcare, is the development and study of methods and tools aimed at enhancing the implementation of new discoveries and evidence into daily healthcare delivery. The Indiana University Center for Healthcare Innovation and Implementation Science (IU-CHIIS) was launched in September 2013 with the mission to use implementation science and innovation to produce great-quality, patient-centered and cost-efficient healthcare delivery solutions for the United States of America. Within the first 24 months of its initiation, the IU-CHIIS successfully scaled up an evidence-based collaborative care model for people with dementia and/or depression, successfully expanded the Accountable Care Unit model positively impacting the efficiency and quality of care, created the first Certificate in Innovation and Implementation Science in the US and secured funding from National Institutes of Health to investigate innovations in dementia care. This article summarizes the establishment of the IU-CHIIS, its impact and outcomes and the lessons learned during the journey. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. Social Influence on Information Technology Adoption and Sustained Use in Healthcare: A Hierarchical Bayesian Learning Method Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haijing

    2013-01-01

    Information technology adoption and diffusion is currently a significant challenge in the healthcare delivery setting. This thesis includes three papers that explore social influence on information technology adoption and sustained use in the healthcare delivery environment using conventional regression models and novel hierarchical Bayesian…

  5. Wearable nanosensor systems and their applications in healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2017-04-01

    The development of intelligent miniaturized nano-bio-and info-tech based sensors capable of wireless communication will fundamentally change the way we monitor and treat patients with chronic disease and after surgery. These new sensors will allow the monitoring of the patients as they maintain their normal daily activities, and provide warning to healthcare workers when critical events arise. This will facilitate early discharge of patients from hospitals as well as providing reassurance to patients and family that potential problems will be detected at an early stage. The use of continuous monitoring allows both transient and progressive abnormalities to be reliably detected thus avoiding the problems of conventional diagnosis and monitoring methods where by data is captured only for a brief period during hospital/clinic visits. We have been working with a printable organic semiconductor and thin film transistor, and have fabricated and tested various biosensors that can measure important physiological signs before and after surgery. Integrated into "smart" fabrics - garments with wireless technology - and independent e-bandaid sensors, nanosensors in tattoos and socks, minimally invasive implantable devices, the sensor systems will be able to monitor a patient's condition in real time and thus provide point-of-care diagnostics to health-care professionals and greater freedom for patients.

  6. Informal care, employment and quality of life: Barriers and facilitators to combining informal care and work participation for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitink, Eveline; Heerkens, Yvonne; Engels, Josephine

    2017-01-01

    In The Netherlands, one out of six Dutch employees has informal care tasks; in the hospital and healthcare sector, this ratio is one out of four workers. Informal carers experience problems with the combination of work and informal care. In particular, they have problems with the burden of responsibility, a lack of independence and their health. These problems can reveal themselves in a variety of mental and physical symptoms that can result in absenteeism, reduction or loss of (work) participation, reduction of income, and even social isolation. The aim of the study was to describe the factors that informal carers who are employed in healthcare organizations identify as affecting their quality of life, labour participation and health. We conducted an exploratory study in 2013-2014 that included desk research and a qualitative study. Sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with healthcare employees who combine work and informal care. Data were analyzed with Atlas-TI. We identified five themes: 1. Fear and responsibility; 2. Sense that one's own needs are not being met; 3. Work as an escape from home; 4. Health: a lack of balance; and 5. The role of colleagues and managers: giving support and understanding. Respondents combine work and informal care because they have no other solution. The top three reasons for working are: income, escape from home and satisfaction. The biggest problems informal carers experience are a lack of time and energy. They are all tired and are often or always exhausted at the end of the day. They give up activities for themselves, their social networks become smaller and they have less interest in social activities. Their managers are usually aware of the situation, but informal care is not a topic of informal conversation or in performance appraisals. Respondents solve their problems with colleagues and expect little from the organization.

  7. Primary care training and the evolving healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccoralo, Lauren A; Callahan, Kathryn; Stark, Rachel; DeCherrie, Linda V

    2012-01-01

    With growing numbers of patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations, and the potential implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the provision of primary care in the United States is expanding and changing. Therefore, there is an urgent need to create more primary-care physicians and to train physicians to practice in this environment. In this article, we review the impact that the changing US healthcare system has on trainees, strategies to recruit and retain medical students and residents into primary-care internal medicine, and the preparation of trainees to work in the changing healthcare system. Recruitment methods for medical students include early preclinical exposure to patients in the primary-care setting, enhanced longitudinal patient experiences in clinical clerkships, and primary-care tracks. Recruitment methods for residents include enhanced ambulatory-care training and primary-care programs. Financial-incentive programs such as loan forgiveness may encourage trainees to enter primary care. Retaining residents in primary-care careers may be encouraged via focused postgraduate fellowships or continuing medical education to prepare primary-care physicians as both teachers and practitioners in the changing environment. Finally, to prepare primary-care trainees to effectively and efficiently practice within the changing system, educators should consider shifting ambulatory training to community-based practices, encouraging resident participation in team-based care, providing interprofessional educational experiences, and involving trainees in quality-improvement initiatives. Medical educators in primary care must think innovatively and collaboratively to effectively recruit and train the future generation of primary-care physicians. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  8. PARTICIPATORY GOVERNANCE IN THE PUBLIC HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS OF THE SCANDINAVIAN AND BALTIC COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanescu Aurelia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diminished trust of citizens in the public sector, the increased complexity of policy issues and the reforms in accordance with the new public management principles generate the need of focusing more extensively on participatory governance. Participatory governance can be defined as the genuine engagement of citizens and other organizations in the formulation of policies and strategies, in the decision-making process from the public sector and in the implementation of the decisions. The present paper's objectives are to define the concept of participatory governance, to argue in favor of implementing it in the public sector and to find to what extent public healthcare institutions from Scandinavian and Baltic countries publish information on participatory governance and how they perceive community engagement. The research findings are that the information on participatory governance disclosed on the websites of relevant institutions from within the Scandinavian and Baltic public healthcare systems is scarce. The countries with the greatest concern for community engagement are Denmark and Sweden. It is argued that there should be a shift in focus within the public sector in general and within the healthcare system in particular, so that citizens are genuinely involved in the relevant processes and their satisfaction is indeed at an adequate level.

  9. A telemedicine system for wireless home healthcare based on Bluetooth and the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoming; Fei, Ding-Yu; Doarn, Charles R; Harnett, Brett; Merrell, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    The VitalPoll Telemedicine System (VTS) was designed and developed for wireless home healthcare. The aims of this study were: to design the architecture and communication methods for a telemedicine system; to implement a physiologic routing hub to collect data from different medical devices and sensors; and to evaluate the feasibility of this system for applications in wireless home healthcare. The VTS was built using Bluetooth wireless and Internet technologies with client/server architecture. Several medical devices, which acquire vital signs, such as real-time electrocardiogram signals, heart rate, body temperature, and activity (physical motion), were integrated into the VTS. Medical information and data were transmitted over short-range interface (USB, RS232), wireless communication, and the Internet. The medical results were stored in a database and presented using a web browser. The patient's vital signals can be collected, transmitted, and displayed in real time by the VTS. The experiments verified no data loss during Bluetooth and Internet communication. Bluetooth and the Internet provide enough bandwidth channels to tranmit these vital signs. The experimental results show that VTS may be suitable for a practical telemedicine system in home healthcare.

  10. Strengthening Rehabilitation in Health Systems Worldwide by Integrating Information on Functioning in National Health Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, Gerold; Bickenbach, Jerome; Melvin, John

    2017-09-01

    A complete understanding of the experience of health requires information relevant not merely to the health indicators of mortality and morbidity but also to functioning-that is, information about what it means to live in a health state, "the lived experience of health." Not only is functioning information relevant to healthcare and the overall objectives of person-centered healthcare but to the successful operation of all components of health systems.In light of population aging and major epidemiological trends, the health strategy of rehabilitation, whose aim has always been to optimize functioning and minimize disability, will become a key health strategy. The increasing prominence of the rehabilitative strategy within the health system drives the argument for the integration of functioning information as an essential component in national health information systems.Rehabilitation professionals and researchers have long recognized in WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health the best prospect for an internationally recognized, sufficiently complete and powerful information reference for the documentation of functioning information. This paper opens the discussion of the promise of integrating the ICF as an essential component in national health systems to secure access to functioning information for rehabilitation, across health systems and countries.

  11. Reception of nutrition information by adult and older adult users of Primary Healthcare: Occurrence, associated factors, and sources of information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Loraine LINDEMANN

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate reception of nutrition information (outcome, associated factors, and types of sources. Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted in 2013, included 1,246 adult and older adult users of the Primary Healthcare network of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The sample was characterized by reception of nutrition information, its sources, and demographic, socioeconomic, health, knowledge, and life habit variables. Prevalence ratios and their respective 95% confidence intervals investigated associations between reception of nutrition information and independent variables. Results: More than one-third of the sample (37.6% received nutrition information (95%CI=34.9-40.3. Older adults, individuals with positive self-perceived diet, those who received health information, and those who were physically active were more likely to receive nutrition information, and normal weight individuals were less likely. The outcome differed by income strata, being highest in the highest quintile. There was a linear trend for education level and for following the Ten Steps to Healthy Eating: the outcome was more likely in individuals with at least higher education and those who followed at least four steps. The most cited sources of nutrition information were television shows (56.2%, other (46.2%, physician (41.2%, Internet (25.1%, and family members (20.9%, which did not differ by sex. Conclusion: Primary healthcare users received little nutrition information, and television could be a useful tool for the institutions responsible for the sector to disseminate the official nutritional recommendations.

  12. Nuclear information access system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, C. H.; Yang, M. H.; Yoon, S. W.

    1998-01-01

    The energy supply in the countries, which have abundant energy resources, may not be affected by accepting the assertion of anti-nuclear and environment groups. Anti-nuclear movements in the countries which have little energy resources may cause serious problem in securing energy supply. Especially, it is distinct in Korea because she heavily depends on nuclear energy in electricity supply(nuclear share in total electricity supply is about 40%).The cause of social trouble surrounding nuclear energy is being involved with various circumstances. However, it is very important that we are not aware of the importance of information access and prepared for such a situation from the early stage of nuclear energy's development. In those matter, this paper analyzes the contents of nuclear information access system in France and Japan which have dynamic nuclear development program and presents the direction of the nuclear access regime through comparing Korean status and referring to progresses of the regime

  13. Leveraging health information technology to achieve the "triple aim" of healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Aziz; Sood, Harpreet S; Bates, David W

    2015-07-01

    To investigate experiences with leveraging health information technology (HIT) to improve patient care and population health, and reduce healthcare expenditures. In-depth qualitative interviews with federal government employees, health policy, HIT and medico-legal experts, health providers, physicians, purchasers, payers, patient advocates, and vendors from across the United States. The authors undertook 47 interviews. There was a widely shared belief that Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) had catalyzed the creation of a digital infrastructure, which was being used in innovative ways to improve quality of care and curtail costs. There were however major concerns about the poor usability of electronic health records (EHRs), their limited ability to support multi-disciplinary care, and major difficulties with health information exchange, which undermined efforts to deliver integrated patient-centered care. Proposed strategies for enhancing the benefits of HIT included federal stimulation of competition by mandating vendors to open-up their application program interfaces, incenting development of low-cost consumer informatics tools, and promoting Congressional review of the The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) to optimize the balance between data privacy and reuse. Many underscored the need to "kick the legs from underneath the fee-for-service model" and replace it with a data-driven reimbursement system that rewards high quality care. The HITECH Act has stimulated unprecedented, multi-stakeholder interest in HIT. Early experiences indicate that the resulting digital infrastructure is being used to improve quality of care and curtail costs. Reform efforts are however severely limited by problems with usability, limited interoperability and the persistence of the fee-for-service paradigm-addressing these issues therefore needs to be the federal government's main policy target. © The Author 2015

  14. Exploring the Barriers: A Qualitative Study about the Experiences of Mid-SES Roma Navigating the Spanish Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Emilia; Flecha, Ainhoa; Serradell, Olga

    2018-02-22

    Whereas the topic of the 'cultural sensitivity' of healthcare systems has been addressed extensively in the US and the UK, literature on the subject in most European countries, specifically looking at the situation of Roma, is still scarce. Drawing on qualitative research conducted mainly in the city of Barcelona under the communicative approach with Roma subjects who have stable socioeconomic positions and higher cultural capitals (end-users, professionals of the healthcare system, and key informants of a regional policy oriented to the improvement of Roma living conditions), the present study aims to fill this gap. We explore the barriers that the Roma face in accessing the healthcare system, reflecting on how these barriers are accentuated by the existing anti-Roma prejudices and institutional arrangements that do not account for minority cultures. Our results point out a series of obstacles at two levels, in the interaction with healthcare professionals, and in relation to existing institutional arrangements, which prevent Roma families from having equal access to the healthcare system. Education stands up as a mechanism to contest anti-Roma sentiments among healthcare professionals.

  15. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse...... migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry......, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups...

  16. Justifying an information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, T

    1993-03-01

    A four-step model for the hospital pharmacist to use in justifying a computerized information system is described. In the first step, costs are identified and analyzed. Both the costs and the advantages of the existing system are evaluated. A request for information and a request for proposal are prepared and sent to vendors, who return estimates of hardware, software, and support costs. Costs can then be merged and analyzed as one-time costs, recurring annual costs, and total costs annualized over five years. In step 2, benefits are identified and analyzed. Tangible economic benefits are those that directly reduce or avoid costs or directly enhance revenues and can be measured in dollars. Intangible economic benefits are realized through a reduction in overhead and reallocation of labor and are less easily measured in dollars. Noneconomic benefits, some involving quality-of-care issues, can also be used in the justification. Step 3 consists of a formal risk assessment in which the project is broken into categories for which specific questions are answered by assigning a risk factor. In step 4, both costs and benefits are subjected to a financial analysis, the object of which is to maximize the return on investment to the institution from the capital being requested. Calculations include return on investment based on the net present value of money, internal rate of return, payback period, and profitability index. A well-designed justification for an information system not only identifies the costs, risks, and benefits but also presents a plan of action for realizing the benefits.

  17. [For the Establishment of an Informative Support Framework in Pharmacies: Informative Support System for Diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Michiko; Doi, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    According to the Japanese revitalization strategy endorsed by the government in June, 2013, pharmacies are expected to play an active role as the hub of health information. But this is not sufficiently organized: an infrastructure for providing neutral information which becomes the basis of such health information is not yet established for healthcare professionals, patients and consumers. As for drug information available subsequent to the marketing of pharmaceutical products, information from the pharmaceutical companies including Package Inserts and Interview-forms are often found. However, though such information from companies is important, it is necessary for healthcare professionals and patients to have access to the information evaluated by a trustworthy third party. With overseas distribution, the dissemination of drug information is provided by third parties, which are independent of regulatory agencies. For example, National Health Service (NHS) Evidence in the UK offers wide-ranging information based on evidence from a disease to pharmaceutical products, and is a widely available information source for healthcare professionals, patients and consumers. With regard to therapeutic medications, drug information and health foods in the Japanese community, it is necessary for patients and healthcare professionals that we establish neutral and common systematic information based on the research evidence. By providing information on the Internet, which enables people to access the information easily and to assess a product's usefulness objectively, we hope to eventually develop a system that ensures a patient's safety in the use of drugs.

  18. Planning for information systems

    CERN Document Server

    King, William R

    2015-01-01

    Edited by one of the best-known and most widely respected figures in the field, ""Planning for Information Systems"" is a comprehensive, single source overview of the myriad ideas and processes that are identified with IS planning. While many chapters deal with high level strategic planning, the book gives equal attention to on-the-ground planning issues.Part I, 'Key Concepts of IS Planning', focuses on how IS planning has evolved over the years; business-IS strategic alignment; and the role of dynamic organizational capabilities in leveraging IS competencies. Part II, 'The Organizational IS P

  19. Billboard advertising: an avenue for communicating healthcare information and opportunities to disadvantaged populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, James K; Fortenberry, John L

    2017-12-13

    Healthcare communications directed toward the disadvantaged have the potential to elevate the health status of these underprivileged and highly-challenged individuals. From conveying advice which encourages healthy lifestyles to communicating the location and availability of various medical resources, healthier lives and communities can be realized. Success on this front first requires establishing an effective communications link, something that is made more difficult as communications options available to the disadvantaged are more limited than those available to advantaged populations. One avenue which shows exceptional promise for successfully engaging the disadvantaged is that of billboard advertising. Willis-Knighton Health System's experiences and insights indicate that the characteristics and qualities of billboards, paired with the environmental circumstances typically faced by the less fortunate, create unique combinations which amplify consumption of billboard advertising content. Further, research suggests that the less privileged place greater reliance on the medium than do their more privileged counterparts, escalating the value and impact potential of billboard advertising directed toward the disadvantaged. Given the value afforded by health and wellness information successfully reaching the disadvantaged, opportunities to better distribute content to targeted audiences could very well improve community health. Billboard advertising appears to be well suited to engage the less fortunate, providing a productive pathway for the conveyance of helpful, supportive details, yielding healthier populations, enhanced opportunities, and better communities.

  20. Advanced information processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Design and performance details of the advanced information processing system (AIPS) for fault and damage tolerant data processing on aircraft and spacecraft are presented. AIPS comprises several computers distributed throughout the vehicle and linked by a damage tolerant data bus. Most I/O functions are available to all the computers, which run in a TDMA mode. Each computer performs separate specific tasks in normal operation and assumes other tasks in degraded modes. Redundant software assures that all fault monitoring, logging and reporting are automated, together with control functions. Redundant duplex links and damage-spread limitation provide the fault tolerance. Details of an advanced design of a laboratory-scale proof-of-concept system are described, including functional operations.

  1. The Effects of Public Concern for Information Privacy on the Adoption of Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) by Healthcare Entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Pouyan

    2018-05-08

    The implementation of Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) by healthcare organizations may not achieve the desired outcomes as consumers may request that their health information remains unshared because of information privacy concerns. Drawing on the insights of concern for information privacy (CFIP) literature, this work extends the application of CFIP to the HIE domain. This study attempts to develop and test a model centered on the four dimensions of CFIP construct (collection, errors, unauthorized access, and secondary use) and their antecedents to predict consumers' opt-in behavioral intention toward HIE in the presence of the perceived health status' effects. We conducted an online survey in the United States using 826 samples. The results demonstrate that the perceived health information sensitivity and computer anxiety meaningfully contribute to information privacy concerns and CFIP construct significantly impedes consumers' opt-in decision to HIEs. Interestingly, contrary to our expectation, perceived poor health status considerably attenuates the negative effects exerted by CFIP on opt-in intention. The model proposed by this study can be used as a useful conceptual tool by both further studies and practitioners to examine the complex nature of patients' reactions to information privacy threats associated with the use of HIE technology in the healthcare industry.

  2. The AMMA information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Laurence; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Cloché, Sophie; Mière, Arnaud; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim; Favot, Florence; Boulanger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) programme, several tools have been developed in order to boost the data and information exchange between researchers from different disciplines. The AMMA information system includes (i) a user-friendly data management and dissemination system, (ii) quasi real-time display websites and (iii) a scientific paper exchange collaborative tool. The AMMA information system is enriched by past and ongoing projects (IMPETUS, FENNEC, ESCAPE, QweCI, ACASIS, DACCIWA...) addressing meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, extreme events, health, adaptation of human societies... It is becoming a reference information system on environmental issues in West Africa. (i) The projects include airborne, ground-based and ocean measurements, social science surveys, satellite data use, modelling studies and value-added product development. Therefore, the AMMA data portal enables to access a great amount and a large variety of data: - 250 local observation datasets, that cover many geophysical components (atmosphere, ocean, soil, vegetation) and human activities (agronomy, health). They have been collected by operational networks since 1850, long term monitoring research networks (CATCH, IDAF, PIRATA...) and intensive scientific campaigns; - 1350 outputs of a socio-economics questionnaire; - 60 operational satellite products and several research products; - 10 output sets of meteorological and ocean operational models and 15 of research simulations. Data documentation complies with metadata international standards, and data are delivered into standard formats. The data request interface takes full advantage of the database relational structure and enables users to elaborate multicriteria requests (period, area, property, property value…). The AMMA data portal counts about 900 registered users, and 50 data requests every month. The AMMA databases and data portal have been developed and are operated jointly by SEDOO and

  3. The AMMA information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Laurence; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Cloché, Sophie; Eymard, Laurence; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim; Favot, Florence; Roussot, Odile

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) programme, several tools have been developed in order to facilitate and speed up data and information exchange between researchers from different disciplines. The AMMA information system includes (i) a multidisciplinary user-friendly data management and dissemination system, (ii) report and chart archives associated with display websites and (iii) a scientific paper exchange system. The AMMA information system is enriched by several previous (IMPETUS...) and following projects (FENNEC, ESCAPE, QweCI, DACCIWA…) and is becoming a reference information system about West Africa monsoon. (i) The AMMA project includes airborne, ground-based and ocean measurements, satellite data use, modelling studies and value-added product development. Therefore, the AMMA database user interface enables to access a great amount and a large variety of data: - 250 local observation datasets, that cover many geophysical components (atmosphere, ocean, soil, vegetation) and human activities (agronomy, health). They have been collected by operational networks from 1850 to present, long term monitoring research networks (CATCH, IDAF, PIRATA...) or scientific campaigns; - 1350 outputs of a socio-economics questionnaire; - 60 operational satellite products and several research products; - 10 output sets of meteorological and ocean operational models and 15 of research simulations. All the data are documented in compliance with metadata international standards, and delivered into standard formats. The data request user interface takes full advantage of the data and metadata base relational structure and enables users to elaborate easily multicriteria data requests (period, area, property, property value…). The AMMA data portal counts around 800 registered users and process about 50 data requests every month. The AMMA databases and data portal have been developed and are operated jointly by SEDOO and ESPRI in France

  4. PACS/information systems interoperability using Enterprise Communication Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    alSafadi, Y; Lord, W P; Mankovich, N J

    1998-06-01

    Interoperability among healthcare applications goes beyond connectivity to allow components to exchange structured information and work together in a predictable, coordinated fashion. To facilitate building an interoperability infrastructure, an Enterprise Communication Framework (ECF) was developed by the members of the Andover Working Group for Healthcare Interoperability (AWG-OHI). The ECF consists of four models: 1) Use Case Model, 2) Domain Information Model (DIM), 3) Interaction Model, and 4) Message Model. To realize this framework, a software component called the Enterprise Communicator (EC) is used. In this paper, we will demonstrate the use of the framework in interoperating a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) with a radiology information system (RIS).

  5. Cost-Effective Mobile-Based Healthcare System for Managing Total Joint Arthroplasty Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsaki, Marina; Koutras, George; Heep, Hansjoerg; Koutras, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Long-term follow-up care after total joint arthroplasty is essential to evaluate hip and knee arthroplasty outcomes, to provide information to physicians and improve arthroplasty performance, and to improve patients' health condition. In this paper, we aim to improve the communication between arthroplasty patients and physicians and to reduce the cost of follow-up controls based on mobile application technologies and cloud computing. We propose a mobile-based healthcare system that provides cost-effective follow-up controls for primary arthroplasty patients through questions about symptoms in the replaced joint, questionnaires (WOMAC and SF-36v2) and the radiological examination of knee or hip joint. We also perform a cost analysis for a set of 423 patients that were treated in the University Clinic for Orthopedics in Essen-Werden. The estimation of healthcare costs shows significant cost savings (a reduction of 63.67% for readmission rate 5%) in both the University Clinic for Orthopedics in Essen-Werden and the state of North Rhine-Westphalia when the mobile-based healthcare system is applied. We propose a mHealth system to reduce the cost of follow-up assessments of arthroplasty patients through evaluation of diagnosis, self-monitoring, and regular review of their health status.

  6. An integrated healthcare system for personalized chronic disease care in home-hospital environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sangjin; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Shim, Eun Bo; Kim, Moonjung; Cho, Young Min; Peng, Limei

    2012-07-01

    Facing the increasing demands and challenges in the area of chronic disease care, various studies on the healthcare system which can, whenever and wherever, extract and process patient data have been conducted. Chronic diseases are the long-term diseases and require the processes of the real-time monitoring, multidimensional quantitative analysis, and the classification of patients' diagnostic information. A healthcare system for chronic diseases is characterized as an at-hospital and at-home service according to a targeted environment. Both services basically aim to provide patients with accurate diagnoses of disease by monitoring a variety of physical states with a number of monitoring methods, but there are differences between home and hospital environments, and the different characteristics should be considered in order to provide more accurate diagnoses for patients, especially, patients having chronic diseases. In this paper, we propose a patient status classification method for effectively identifying and classifying chronic diseases and show the validity of the proposed method. Furthermore, we present a new healthcare system architecture that integrates the at-home and at-hospital environment and discuss the applicability of the architecture using practical target services.

  7. Wireless biopotential acquisition system for portable healthcare monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W-S; Huang, H-Y; Wu, Z-C; Chen, S-C; Wang, W-F; Wu, C-F; Luo, C-H

    2011-07-01

    A complete biopotential acquisition system with an analogue front-end (AFE) chip is proposed for portable healthcare monitoring. A graphical user interface (GUI) is also implemented to display the extracted biopotential signals in real-time on a computer for patients or in a hospital via the internet for doctors. The AFE circuit defines the quality of the acquired biosignals. Thus, an AFE chip with low power consumption and a high common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) was implemented in the TSMC 0.18-μm CMOS process. The measurement results show that the proposed AFE, with a core area of 0.1 mm(2), has a CMRR of 90 dB, and power consumption of 21.6 μW. Biopotential signals of electroencephalogram (EEG), electrocardiogram (ECG) and electromyogram (EMG) were measured to verify the proposed system. The board size of the proposed system is 6 cm × 2.5 cm and the weight is 30 g. The total power consumption of the proposed system is 66 mW. Copyright © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  8. A conceptual data model for a primary health care patient-centric electronic medical record system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kotzé, P

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available regarding continuity of care, typical healthcare protocols, a study of public healthcare district hospital information systems and both public and private primary healthcare information systems....

  9. Iowa Flood Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, I.; Krajewski, W. F.; Goska, R.; Mantilla, R.; Weber, L. J.; Young, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Iowa Flood Information System (IFIS) is a web-based platform developed by the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) to provide access to flood inundation maps, real-time flood conditions, flood forecasts both short-term and seasonal, flood-related data, information and interactive visualizations for communities in Iowa. The key element of the system's architecture is the notion of community. Locations of the communities, those near streams and rivers, define basin boundaries. The IFIS provides community-centric watershed and river characteristics, weather (rainfall) conditions, and streamflow data and visualization tools. Interactive interfaces allow access to inundation maps for different stage and return period values, and flooding scenarios with contributions from multiple rivers. Real-time and historical data of water levels, gauge heights, and rainfall conditions are available in the IFIS by streaming data from automated IFC bridge sensors, USGS stream gauges, NEXRAD radars, and NWS forecasts. Simple 2D and 3D interactive visualizations in the IFIS make the data more understandable to general public. Users are able to filter data sources for their communities and selected rivers. The data and information on IFIS is also accessible through web services and mobile applications. The IFIS is optimized for various browsers and screen sizes to provide access through multiple platforms including tablets and mobile devices. The IFIS includes a rainfall-runoff forecast model to provide a five-day flood risk estimate for around 500 communities in Iowa. Multiple view modes in the IFIS accommodate different user types from general public to researchers and decision makers by providing different level of tools and details. River view mode allows users to visualize data from multiple IFC bridge sensors and USGS stream gauges to follow flooding condition along a river. The IFIS will help communities make better-informed decisions on the occurrence of floods, and will alert communities

  10. The Internet as a source of health information: experiences of cancer survivors and caregivers with healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, Maria C

    2011-05-01

    To describe the experiences of cancer survivors and caregivers with healthcare providers in the context of the Internet as a source of health information. Qualitative description. Online cancer communities hosted by the Association of Cancer Online Resources. Purposive sample of 488 cancer survivors, with varying cancer types and survivorship stages, and caregivers. Secondary data analysis using Krippendorff's thematic clustering technique of qualitative content analysis. Survivorship, healthcare relationships, and the Internet. Disenchantment with healthcare relationships was associated with failed expectations related to evidence-based practice, clinical expertise, informational support, and therapeutic interpersonal communication. Survivors and caregivers exercised power in healthcare relationships through collaboration, direct confrontation, becoming expert, and endorsement to influence and control care decisions. Disenchantment propelled cancer survivors and caregivers to search the Internet for health information and resources. Conversely, Internet information-seeking precipitated the experience of disenchantment. Through online health information and resources, concealed failures in healthcare relationships were revealed and cancer survivors and caregivers were empowered to influence and control care decisions. The findings highlight failures in cancer survivorship care and underscore the importance of novel interdisciplinary programs and models of care that support evidence-informed decision making, self-management, and improved quality of life. Healthcare professionals need to receive education on survivors' use of the Internet as a source of health information and its impact on healthcare relationships. Future research should include studies examining the relationship between disenchantment and survivorship outcomes.

  11. Transition from paediatric to adult healthcare for young people with cystic fibrosis: Parents' information needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Imelda; Malone, Helen; Chubb, Emma; While, Alison E

    2018-01-01

    Parents of young people with cystic fibrosis (YPWCF) play an important role during the transition from paediatric to adult health services. There is limited evidence on parental information needs and the extent to which they are met. An online survey was conducted targeting a finite population of 190 parents of YPWCF in Ireland. Fifty-nine parents responded (31% response rate). Parents reported the need for more general preparation and timing of the transfer, more information regarding the differences between adult and child health services and how their child will self-manage his/her illness in the future. Most parents received information on the timing of transfer and new healthcare providers but reported being insufficiently informed about their legal status relating to medical confidentiality for their adult child and community resources available for their child after transition to adult health services. The findings highlight the importance of information and preparation for caregivers as well as young people to promote successful transition to adult healthcare. Providing parents with clear information and anticipatory guidance are simple changes in practice that may lead to improvements in transition experiences.

  12. Leveraging the Experiences of Informal Caregivers to Create Future Healthcare Workforce Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sara S; Ragas, Daiva M; Hajjar, Nadia; Tom, Laura S; Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was gather pilot data from informal caregivers regarding the potential for a training program to assist current or past caregivers in reentering the job market, and thus offering a pathway to economic resilience. In an effort that could foster a sustainable and competent caregiving market to help meet the needs of an aging America, whether training informal caregivers might help them transition into a paid caregiving or other health service role was explored. Caregivers (N=55) of a chronically or terminally ill family member or friend in a suburban county near Chicago were interviewed. The interview guide addressed household economic effect of illness, emotional burden, and training program interest. Fifty-six percent of caregivers were interested in training to work outside the home, caring for people in other households, 84% indicated a desire to learn more about health care, and 68% reported a desire to explore job possibilities in health care. Eighty-two percent were experienced in working with an individual aged 50 and older. Informal caregivers' interest in a training program to bolster their qualifications for a role in the healthcare workforce, including the option of a formal caregiver position, supports the demand for such a program. Considering the need for healthcare workers to serve the growing elderly population and the desire of informal caregivers to find gainful employment, these informal caregivers could provide the impetus to invest in informal caregiver training. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. LIBRARY MANAGEMNT INFORMATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnolia Tilca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The focus of any educational institution is the content and services of the university library. The mission of the library is to obtain, organize, preserve and update the information with the greatest possible accuracy, minimum effort and time. This requires automation of the library’s operations. This paper presents a software application for managing the activity of the territorial "Vasile Goldiş" West University library. The application is developed using Visual Basic for Application programming language and using the database management system Microsoft Access 2010. The goal of this application is to optimize the inner workings of local library and to meet the requests of the institution and of the readers.

  14. Developing Tacit Knowledge of Complex Systems: The Value of Early Empirical Inquiry in Healthcare Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Trudel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Infection prevention and control has been the subject of much study in medical and epidemiological research and a variety of best practice guidelines have been developed to support healthcare workers and related stakeholders. Yet, despite the availability of information, managing healthcare-associated infections remains a challenge because the relevant explicit knowledge is not being adequately developed and mobilized as tacit knowledge for use "on the front lines". Some researchers have called for a human factors perspective to help address challenges in designing for infection prevention and control, but relatively few studies have been conducted to date. Researchers also suggest that empirical inquiry is needed to better inform the design process, and particularly the design of complex systems where attention to detailed processes and interactions can support the success of an intervention. A human factors approach can help designers develop a deeper understanding of work processes, technology considerations, as well as physiological, psychological, cultural, and organizational factors. The need is particularly pressing in low-resource healthcare environments where funds, time, and human resources may be scarce and strategic design decisions based on evidence are needed to support meaningful and effective changes. With this in mind, a human factors study was conducted in an existing neonatal intensive care unit to identify the influence of product and environment design on infection prevention and control and to inform recommendations for improvement. In this case study, we illustrate how the application of an empirical, methodical approach can help design professionals and stakeholders develop tacit knowledge of complex systems – knowledge that can be used to better inform design priorities, the design process, decision making, and the allocation of resources to help maximize improvements.

  15. Task-role-based Access Control Model in Smart Health-care System

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Peng; Jiang Lingyun

    2015-01-01

    As the development of computer science and smart health-care technology, there is a trend for patients to enjoy medical care at home. Taking enormous users in the Smart Health-care System into consideration, access control is an important issue. Traditional access control models, discretionary access control, mandatory access control, and role-based access control, do not properly reflect the characteristics of Smart Health-care System. This paper proposes an advanced access control model for...

  16. 45 CFR 61.15 - How to dispute the accuracy of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How to dispute the accuracy of Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank information. 61.15 Section 61.15 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE...

  17. Labor Agreement Information System (LAIRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Labor Agreement Information Retrieval System (LAIRS) is a database containing historical information on labor-management relations in the Federal Government. It...

  18. Pesticide Product Information System (PPIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Information System contains information concerning all pesticide products registered in the United States. It includes registrant name and...

  19. Transforming healthcare with information technology in Japan: a review of policy, people, and progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Chon; Nishihara, Eitaro; Akiyama, Miki

    2011-03-01

    Healthcare reform as part of the economic recovery plan in Japan is placing emphasis on the use of healthcare information technology (HIT). This research mainly focuses on the HIT efforts in Japan with reference to the US for context. The purpose is to: (a) provide detail on governmental policy impacting promotion of HIT adoption to provide services to the people of Japan, (b) describe the outcomes of past and present policy impacting progress based on a case study of HIT use in the Kyoto Yamashina area, and (c) discuss issues for refinement of current policy. The method is case study, and data collection techniques include: (a) interviews of people involved in policy making for HIT in Japan (Japanese healthcare professionals, government officials, and academics involved in HIT research in Japan) and use in the medical community of HIT in the Kyoto Yamashina area, (b) archived document analysis of reports regarding government policy for HIT policy and user assessment for HIT mainly in the case study site, and (c) the literature review about HIT progression and effectiveness assessments to explore and describe issues concerning the transformation with HIT in Japan. This study reveals the aspects of governmental policy that have been effective in promoting successful HIT initiatives as well as some that have been detriments in Japan to help solve pressing social issues regarding healthcare delivery. For example, Japan has stipulated some standardized protocols and formats for HIT but does not mandate exactly how to engage in inter-organizational or intra-organizational health information exchange. This provides some desired autonomy for healthcare organizations and or governments in medical communities and allows for more advanced organizations to leverage current resources while providing a basis for lesser equipped organizations to use in planning the initiative. The insights gained from the Kyoto Yamashina area initiative reflect the success of past governmental

  20. Patient Relationship Management: What the U.S. Healthcare System Can Learn from Other Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poku, Michael K; Behkami, Nima A; Bates, David W

    2017-01-01

    As the U.S. healthcare system moves to value-based care, the importance of engaging patients and families continues to intensify. However, simply engaging patients and families to improve their subjective satisfaction will not be enough for providers who want to maximize value. True optimization entails developing deep and long-term relationships with patients. We suggest that healthcare organizations must build such a discipline of "patient relationship management" (PRM) just as companies in non-healthcare industries have done with the concept of customer relationship management (CRM). Some providers have already made strides in this area, but overall it has been underemphasized or ignored by most healthcare systems to date. As healthcare providers work to develop their dedicated PRM systems, tools, and processes, we suggest they may benefit from emulating companies in other industries who have been able to engage their customers in innovative ways while acknowledging the differences between healthcare and other industries.

  1. Sociology, systems and (patient) safety: knowledge translations in healthcare policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Casper Bruun

    2008-03-01

    In 2000 the American Institute of Medicine, adviser to the federal government on policy matters relating to the health of the public, published the report To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System, which was to become a call to arms for improving patient safety across the Western world. By re-conceiving healthcare as a system, it was argued that it was possible to transform the current culture of blame, which made individuals take defensive precautions against being assigned responsibility for error - notably by not reporting adverse events, into a culture of safety. The IOM report draws on several prominent social scientists in accomplishing this re-conceptualisation. But the analyses of these authors are not immediately relevant for health policy. It requires knowledge translation to make them so. This paper analyses the process of translation. The discussion is especially pertinent due to a certain looping effect between social science research and policy concerns. The case here presented is thus doubly illustrative: exemplifying first how social science is translated into health policy and secondly how the transformation required for this to function is taken as an analytical improvement that can in turn be redeployed in social research.

  2. Healthcare Information Technology (HIT) in an Anti-Access (A2) and Area Denial (AD) Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    point for multiple sites to connect to each other so radiologists can read diagnostic images by managing firewall connections. The idea of multiple...learn from them.41 Although IBM’s Watson isn’t living up to the hype just yet, the artificial intelligent ( AI ) computer system is a precursor for a...on the ground can control a UAV with two passengers in it; one technician and one AI healthcare machine (Medical IBM Watson). Once the UAV lands

  3. Overcoming barriers to electronic medical record (EMR) implementation in the US healthcare system: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sameer; Aldrich, Krista

    2010-12-01

    An EMR system implementation would significantly reduce clinician workload and medical errors while saving the US healthcare system major expense. Yet, compared to other developed nations, the US lags behind. This article examines EMR system efforts, benefits, and barriers, as well as steps needed to move the US closer to a nationwide EMR system. The analysis includes a blueprint for implementation of EMR, industry comparisons to highlight the differences between successful and non-successful EMR ventures, references to costs and benefit information, and identification of root causes. 'Poka-yokes' (avoid (yokeru) mistakes (poka)) will be inserted to provide insight into how to systematically overcome challenges. Implementation will require upfront costs including patient privacy that must be addressed early in the development process. Government structure, incentives and mandates are required for nationwide EMR system in the US.

  4. Usability evaluation of Laboratory and Radiology Information Systems integrated into a hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabovati, Ehsan; Vakili-Arki, Hasan; Eslami, Saeid; Khajouei, Reza

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the usability of widely used laboratory and radiology information systems. Three usability experts independently evaluated the user interfaces of Laboratory and Radiology Information Systems using heuristic evaluation method. They applied Nielsen's heuristics to identify and classify usability problems and Nielsen's severity rating to judge their severity. Overall, 116 unique heuristic violations were identified as usability problems. In terms of severity, 67 % of problems were rated as major and catastrophic. Among 10 heuristics, "consistency and standards" was violated most frequently. Moreover, mean severity of problems concerning "error prevention" and "help and documentation" heuristics was higher than of the others. Despite widespread use of specific healthcare information systems, they suffer from usability problems. Improving the usability of systems by following existing design standards and principles from the early phased of system development life cycle is recommended. Especially, it is recommended that the designers design systems that inhibit the initiation of erroneous actions and provide sufficient guidance to users.

  5. Geographic information systems: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calistri, Paolo; Conte, Annamaria; Freier, Jerome E; Ward, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    The recent exponential growth of the science and technology of geographic information systems (GIS) has made a tremendous contribution to epidemiological analysis and has led to the development of new powerful tools for the surveillance of animal diseases. GIS, spatial analysis and remote sensing provide valuable methods to collect and manage information for epidemiological surveys. Spatial patterns and trends of disease can be correlated with climatic and environmental information, thus contributing to a better understanding of the links between disease processes and explanatory spatial variables. Until recently, these tools were underexploited in the field of veterinary public health, due to the prohibitive cost of hardware and the complexity of GIS software that required a high level of expertise. The revolutionary developments in computer performance of the last decade have not only reduced the costs of equipment but have made available easy-to-use Web-based software which in turn have meant that GIS are more widely accessible by veterinary services at all levels. At the same time, the increased awareness of the possibilities offered by these tools has created new opportunities for decision-makers to enhance their planning, analysis and monitoring capabilities. These technologies offer a new way of sharing and accessing spatial and non-spatial data across groups and institutions. The series of papers included in this compilation aim to: - define the state of the art in the use of GIS in veterinary activities - identify priority needs in the development of new GIS tools at the international level for the surveillance of animal diseases and zoonoses - define practical proposals for their implementation. The topics addressed are presented in the following order in this book: - importance of GIS for the monitoring of animal diseases and zoonoses - GIS application in surveillance activities - spatial analysis in veterinary epidemiology - data collection and remote

  6. A system dynamics approach for healthcare waste management: a case study in Istanbul Metropolitan City, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciplak, Nesli; Barton, John R

    2012-06-01

    Healthcare waste consists of various types of waste materials generated at hospitals, medical research centres, clinics and laboratories. Although 75-90% of this waste is classified as 'domestic' in nature, 20-25% is deemed to be hazardous, which if not disposed of appropriately, poses a risk to healthcare workers, patients, the environment and even the whole community. As long as healthcare waste is mixed with municipal waste and not segregated prior to disposal, costs will increase substantially. In this study, healthcare waste increases along with the potential to decrease the amounts by implementing effective segregation at healthcare facilities are projected to 2040. Our long-term aim is to develop a system to support selection and planning of the future treatment capacity. Istanbul in Turkey was used as the case study area. In order to identify the factors affecting healthcare waste generation in Istanbul, observations were made and interviews conducted in Istanbul over a 3 month period. A system dynamics approach was adopted to build a healthcare waste management model using a software package, Vensim Ple Plus. Based on reported analysis, the non-hazardous municipal fraction co-disposed with healthcare waste is around 65%. Using the projected waste generation flows, reducing a municipal fraction to 30% has the potential to avoid some 8000 t year(-1) of healthcare waste by 2025 and almost 10 000 t year(-1) by 2035. Furthermore, if segregation practices ensured healthcare waste requiring incineration was also selectively managed, 77% of healthcare waste could be diverted to alternative treatment technologies. As the throughput capacity of the only existing healthcare waste treatment facility in Istanbul, Kemerburgaz Incinerator, has already been exceeded, it is evident that improved management could not only reduce overall flows and costs but also permit alternative and cheaper treatment systems (e.g. autoclaving) to be adopted for the healthcare waste.

  7. Information systems process and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Urquhart, Christine; Tbaishat, Dina; Yeoman, Alison

    2017-01-01

    This book adopts a holistic interpretation of information architecture, to offer a variety of methods, tools, and techniques that may be used when designing websites and information systems that support workflows and what people require when 'managing information'.

  8. Audit for Information Systems Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria SUDUC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The information and communication technologies advances made available enormous and vast amounts of information. This availability generates also significant risks to computer systems, information and to the critical operations and infrastructures they support. In spite of significant advances in the information security area many information systems are still vulnerable to inside or outside attacks. The existence of an internal audit for information system security increases the probability of adopting adequate security measures and preventing these attacks or lowering the negative consequences. The paper presents an exploratory study on informatics audit for information systems security.

  9. Pilot Implementation of Health Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2009-01-01

    Pilot implementation is a powerful and widely used approach in identifying design flaws and implementation issues before the full-scale deployment of new health information systems. However, pilot implementations often fail in the sense that they say little about the usability and usefulness...... of the proposed system designs. This calls for studies that seek to uncover and analyze the reasons for failure, so that guidelines for conducting such pilots can be developed. In this paper, we present a qualitative field study of an ambitious, but unsuccessful pilot implementation of a Danish healthcare...... information system. Based on the findings from this study, we identify three main challenges: (1) defining an appropriate scope for pilot implementation, (2) managing the implementation process, and (3) ensuring commitment to the pilot. Finally, recommendations for future research and implications...

  10. Protocole of a controlled before-after evaluation of a national health information technology-based program to improve healthcare coordination and access to information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillour-Glénisson, Florence; Duhamel, Sylvie; Fourneyron, Emmanuelle; Huiart, Laetitia; Joseph, Jean Philippe; Langlois, Emmanuel; Pincemail, Stephane; Ramel, Viviane; Renaud, Thomas; Roberts, Tamara; Sibé, Matthieu; Thiessard, Frantz; Wittwer, Jerome; Salmi, Louis Rachid

    2017-04-21

    Improvement of coordination of all health and social care actors in the patient pathways is an important issue in many countries. Health Information (HI) technology has been considered as a potentially effective answer to this issue. The French Health Ministry first funded the development of five TSN ("Territoire de Soins Numérique"/Digital health territories) projects, aiming at improving healthcare coordination and access to information for healthcare providers, patients and the population, and at improving healthcare professionals work organization. The French Health Ministry then launched a call for grant to fund one research project consisting in evaluating the TSN projects implementation and impact and in developing a model for HI technology evaluation. EvaTSN is mainly based on a controlled before-after study design. Data collection covers three periods: before TSN program implementation, during early TSN program implementation and at late TSN program implementation, in the five TSN projects' territories and in five comparison territories. Three populations will be considered: "TSN-targeted people" (healthcare system users and people having characteristics targeted by the TSN projects), "TSN patient users" (people included in TSN experimentations or using particular services) and "TSN professional users" (healthcare professionals involved in TSN projects). Several samples will be made in each population depending on the objective, axis and stage of the study. Four types of data sources are considered: 1) extractions from the French National Heath Insurance Database (SNIIRAM) and the French Autonomy Personalized Allowance database, 2) Ad hoc surveys collecting information on knowledge of TSN projects, TSN program use, ease of use, satisfaction and understanding, TSN pathway experience and appropriateness of hospital admissions, 3) qualitative analyses using semi-directive interviews and focus groups and document analyses and 4) extractions of TSN

  11. Measuring the efficiency of a healthcare waste management system in Serbia with data envelopment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratkovic, Branislava; Andrejic, Milan; Vidovic, Milorad

    2012-06-01

    In 2007, the Serbian Ministry of Health initiated specific activities towards establishing a workable model based on the existing administrative framework, which corresponds to the needs of healthcare waste management throughout Serbia. The objective of this research was to identify the reforms carried out and their outcomes by estimating the efficiencies of a sample of 35 healthcare facilities engaged in the process of collection and treatment of healthcare waste, using data envelopment analysis. Twenty-one (60%) of the 35 healthcare facilities analysed were found to be technically inefficient, with an average level of inefficiency of 13%. This fact indicates deficiencies in the process of collection and treatment of healthcare waste and the information obtained and presented in this paper could be used for further improvement and development of healthcare waste management in Serbia.

  12. Information Integration Platform for Patient-Centric Healthcare Services: Design, Prototype and Dependability Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohanes Baptista Dafferianto Trinugroho

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Technology innovations have pushed today’s healthcare sector to an unprecedented new level. Various portable and wearable medical and fitness devices are being sold in the consumer market to provide the self-empowerment of a healthier lifestyle to society. Many vendors provide additional cloud-based services for devices they manufacture, enabling the users to visualize, store and share the gathered information through the Internet. However, most of these services are integrated with the devices in a closed “silo” manner, where the devices can only be used with the provided services. To tackle this issue, an information integration platform (IIP has been developed to support communications between devices and Internet-based services in an event-driven fashion by adopting service-oriented architecture (SOA principles and a publish/subscribe messaging pattern. It follows the “Internet of Things” (IoT idea of connecting everyday objects to various networks and to enable the dissemination of the gathered information to the global information space through the Internet. A patient-centric healthcare service environment is chosen as the target scenario for the deployment of the platform, as this is a domain where IoT can have a direct positive impact on quality of life enhancement. This paper describes the developed platform, with emphasis on dependability aspects, including availability, scalability and security.

  13. Measuring mobile patient safety information system success: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Wen-Yuan; Chao, Chia-Cheng

    2008-10-01

    The Health Risk Reminders and Surveillance (HRRS) system was designed to deliver critical abnormal test results of severely ill patients from Laboratory, Radiology, and Pathology departments to physicians within 5 min using cell phone text messages. This paper explores the success of the HRRS system. This study employed an augmented version of the DeLone and McLean IS success model. Seven variables (system quality, information quality, system use, user satisfaction, mobile healthcare anxiety, impact on the individual and impact on the organization) were used to evaluate the success of the HRRS system. The interrelationships between the seven variables were hypothesized and the hypotheses were empirically tested. The results indicate that the information quality of the HRRS system is positively associated with both system use and user satisfaction. In addition, system use is positively associated with user satisfaction, which is also positively associated with mobile healthcare anxiety. Moreover, results indicate that impact on the individual is positively associated with both user satisfaction and mobile healthcare anxiety. Finally, the impact of the organization is positively associated with impact on the individual. The results of the study provide an expanded understanding of the factors that contribute to mobile patient safety information system (IS) success. Implications of the relationship between system use and physician mobile healthcare anxiety are discussed.

  14. Return Migrants’ Experience of Access to Care in Corrupt Healthcare Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Olwig, Karen Fog; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2016-01-01

    unstudied, even though return migrants may be particularly vulnerable to problems related to corruption due to their period of absence from their country of origin. This article investigates how corruption in the healthcare sector affects access to healthcare for refugees who repatriated to Bosnia......Equal and universal access to healthcare services is a core priority for a just health system. A key societal determinant seen to create inequality in access to healthcare is corruption in the healthcare system. How return migrants’ access to healthcare is affected by corruption is largely......, a country with a high level of corruption, from Denmark, a country with a low level of corruption. The study is based on 18 semi-structured interviews with 33 refugees who returned after long-term residence in Denmark. We found that the returned refugees faced greater problems with corruption than...

  15. The role of pharmacoeconomics in current Indian healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Akram; Patel, Isha; Parimilakrishnan, Sundararajan; Mohanta, Guru Prasad; Chung, HaeChung; Chang, Jongwha

    2013-01-01

    Phamacoeconomics can aid the policy makers and the healthcare providers in decision making in evaluating the affordability of and access to rational drug use. Efficiency is a key concept of pharmacoeconomics, and various strategies are suggested for buying the greatest amount of benefits for a given resource use. Phamacoeconomic evaluation techniques such as cost minimization analysis, cost effectiveness analysis, cost benefit analysis, and cost utilization analysis, which support identification and quantification of cost of drugs, are conducted in a similar way, but vary in measurement of value of health benefits and outcomes. This article provides a brief overview about pharmacoeconomics, its utility with respect to the Indian pharmaceutical industry, and the expanding insurance system in India. Pharmacoeconomic evidences can be utilized to support decisions on licensing, pricing, reimbursement, and maintenance of formulary procedure of pharmaceuticals. For the insurance companies to give better facility at minimum cost, India must develop the platform for pharmacoeconomics with a validating methodology and appropriate training. The role of clinical pharmacists including PharmD graduates are expected to be more beneficial than the conventional pharmacists, as they will be able to apply the principles of economics in daily basis practice in community and hospital pharmacy.

  16. Do reviews of healthcare interventions teach us how to improve healthcare systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawson, Ray; Greenhalgh, Joanne; Brennan, Cathy; Glidewell, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    Planners, managers and policy makers in modern health services are not without ingenuity - they will always try, try and try again. They face deep-seated or 'wicked' problems, which have complex roots in the labyrinthine structures though which healthcare is delivered. Accordingly, the interventions devised to deal with such stubborn problems usually come in the plural. Many different reforms are devised to deal with a particular stumbling block, which may be implemented sequentially, simultaneously or whenever policy fashion or funding dictates. This paper examines this predicament from the perspective of evidence based policy. How might researchers go about reviewing the evidence when they are faced with multiple or indeed competing interventions addressing the same problem? In the face of this plight a rather unheralded form of research synthesis has emerged, namely the 'typological review'. We critically review the fortunes of this strategy. Separating the putative reforms into series of subtypes and producing a scorecard of their outcomes has the unintended effect of divorcing them all from an understanding of how organisations change. A more fruitful approach may lie in a 'theory-driven review' underpinned by an understanding of dynamics of social change in complex organisations. We test this thesis by examining the primary and secondary research on the many interventions designed to tackle a particularly wicked problem, namely the inexorable rise in demand for healthcare. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. A Secure Dynamic Identity and Chaotic Maps Based User Authentication and Key Agreement Scheme for e-Healthcare Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Ta; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Weng, Chi-Yao; Chen, Song-Jhih

    2016-11-01

    Secure user authentication schemes in many e-Healthcare applications try to prevent unauthorized users from intruding the e-Healthcare systems and a remote user and a medical server can establish session keys for securing the subsequent communications. However, many schemes does not mask the users' identity information while constructing a login session between two or more parties, even though personal privacy of users is a significant topic for e-Healthcare systems. In order to preserve personal privacy of users, dynamic identity based authentication schemes are hiding user's real identity during the process of network communications and only the medical server knows login user's identity. In addition, most of the existing dynamic identity based authentication schemes ignore the inputs verification during login condition and this flaw may subject to inefficiency in the case of incorrect inputs in the login phase. Regarding the use of secure authentication mechanisms for e-Healthcare systems, this paper presents a new dynamic identity and chaotic maps based authentication scheme and a secure data protection approach is employed in every session to prevent illegal intrusions. The proposed scheme can not only quickly detect incorrect inputs during the phases of login and password change but also can invalidate the future use of a lost/stolen smart card. Compared the functionality and efficiency with other authentication schemes recently, the proposed scheme satisfies desirable security attributes and maintains acceptable efficiency in terms of the computational overheads for e-Healthcare systems.

  18. Cadeia de valor da saúde: um modelo para o sistema de saúde brasileiro Healthcare value chain: a model for the Brazilian healthcare system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Caldeira Pedroso

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta um modelo de cadeia de valor da saúde que representa, de maneira esquemática, o sistema de saúde do Brasil. O modelo proposto tem como intuito apresentar uma adequação à realidade brasileira, bem como abrangência e flexibilidade para utilização em atividades acadêmicas e análises do setor de saúde do Brasil. O modelo coloca ênfase em três componentes: principais atividades dessa cadeia, agrupadas em elos verticais e horizontais; missão de cada um desses elos; e principais fluxos da cadeia. A cadeia proposta é formada por seis elos verticais e três horizontais, perfazendo um total de nove: desenvolvimento de conhecimento em saúde; fornecimento de produtos e tecnologias; serviços de saúde; intermediação financeira; financiamento da saúde; consumo de saúde; regulação; distribuição de produtos de saúde; e serviços de apoio e complementares. A análise da cadeia proposta pode ser realizada por meio de quatro fluxos: inovação e conhecimento; produtos e serviços; financeiro; e de informação.This article presents a model of the healthcare value chain which consists of a schematic representation of the Brazilian healthcare system. The proposed model is adapted for the Brazilian reality and has the scope and flexibility for use in academic activities and analysis of the healthcare sector in Brazil. It places emphasis on three components: the main activities of the value chain, grouped in vertical and horizontal links; the mission of each link and the main value chain flows. The proposed model consists of six vertical and three horizontal links, amounting to nine. These are: knowledge development; supply of products and technologies; healthcare services; financial intermediation; healthcare financing; healthcare consumption; regulation; distribution of healthcare products; and complementary and support services. Four flows can be used to analyze the value chain: knowledge and innovation; products and

  19. Reasonable Accommodation Information Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Reasonable Accommodation Information Tracking System (RAITS) is a case management system that allows the National Reasonable Accommodation Coordinator (NRAC) and...

  20. Security Information System Digital Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Kuang; Shanhong Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The study built a simulation model for the study of food security information system relay protection. MATLAB-based simulation technology can support the analysis and design of food security information systems. As an example, the food security information system fault simulation, zero-sequence current protection simulation and transformer differential protection simulation are presented in this study. The case studies show that the simulation of food security information system relay protect...

  1. The Relationship between Environmental Turbulence, Management Support, Organizational Collaboration, Information Technology Solution Realization, and Process Performance, in Healthcare Provider Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglia, Victor O.

    2010-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental turbulence, management support, organizational collaboration, information technology solution realization, and process performance in healthcare provider organizations. Method: A descriptive/correlational study of Hospital medical services process…

  2. A home healthcare system in the cloud - Addressing security and privacy challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Deng M.; Petkovic M.; Nalin M.; Baroni I.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is an emerging technology that is expected to support Internet scale critical applications which could be essential to the healthcare sector. Its scalability, resilience, adaptability, connectivity, cost reduction, and high performance features have high potential to lift the efficiency and quality of healthcare. However,it is also important to understand specific risks related to security and privacy that this technology brings. This paper focuses on a home healthcare system ...

  3. Involving private healthcare practitioners in an urban NCD sentinel surveillance system: lessons learned from Pune, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Mareike; Phalkey, Revati; Dutta, Sayani; Shukla, Sharvari; Butsch, Carsten; Bharucha, Erach; Kraas, Frauke

    2016-01-01

    Despite the rising impact of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) on public health in India, lack of quality data and routine surveillance hampers the planning process for NCD prevention and control. Current surveillance programs focus largely on communicable diseases and do not adequately include the private healthcare sector as a major source of care in cities. The objective of the study was to conceptualize, implement, and evaluate a prototype for an urban NCD sentinel surveillance system among private healthcare practitioners providing primary care in Pune, India. We mapped all private healthcare providers in three selected areas of the city, conducted a knowledge, attitude, and practice survey with regard to surveillance among 258 consenting practitioners, and assessed their willingness to participate in a routine NCD surveillance system. In total, 127 practitioners agreed and were included in a 6-month surveillance study. Data on first-time diagnoses of 10 selected NCDs alongside basic demographic and socioeconomic patient information were collected onsite on a monthly basis using a paper-based register. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. In total, 1,532 incident cases were recorded that mainly included hypertension ( n =622, 41%) and diabetes ( n =460, 30%). Dropout rate was 10% ( n =13). The monthly reporting consistency was quite constant, with the majority ( n =63, 50%) submitting 1-10 cases in 6 months. Average number of submitted cases was highest among allopathic practitioners (17.4). A majority of the participants ( n =104, 91%) agreed that the surveillance design could be scaled up to cover the entire city. The study indicates that private primary healthcare providers (allopathic and alternate medicine practitioners) play an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of NCDs and can be involved in NCD surveillance, if certain barriers are addressed. Main barriers observed were lack of regulation of the private sector, cross

  4. Cyber threats to health information systems: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Raul; Rhine, Emily; Myhra, Matthew; Sullivan, Ross; Kruse, Clemens Scott

    2016-01-01

    Recent legislation empowering providers to embrace the electronic exchange of health information leaves the healthcare industry increasingly vulnerable to cybercrime. The objective of this systematic review is to identify the biggest threats to healthcare via cybercrime. The rationale behind this systematic review is to provide a framework for future research by identifying themes and trends of cybercrime in the healthcare industry. The authors conducted a systematic search through the CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, PubMed, and ScienceDirect databases to gather literature relative to cyber threats in healthcare. All authors reviewed the articles collected and excluded literature that did not focus on the objective. Researchers selected and examined 19 articles for common themes. The most prevalent cyber-criminal activity in healthcare is identity theft through data breach. Other concepts identified are internal threats, external threats, cyber-squatting, and cyberterrorism. The industry has now come to rely heavily on digital technologies, which increase risks such as denial of service and data breaches. Current healthcare cyber-security systems do not rival the capabilities of cyber criminals. Security of information is a costly resource and therefore many HCOs may hesitate to invest what is required to protect sensitive information.

  5. Evaluation and implementation of QR Code Identity Tag system for Healthcare in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Vassilya; Bilgin, Sami

    2016-01-01

    For this study, we designed a QR Code Identity Tag system to integrate into the Turkish healthcare system. This system provides QR code-based medical identification alerts and an in-hospital patient identification system. Every member of the medical system is assigned a unique QR Code Tag; to facilitate medical identification alerts, the QR Code Identity Tag can be worn as a bracelet or necklace or carried as an ID card. Patients must always possess the QR Code Identity bracelets within hospital grounds. These QR code bracelets link to the QR Code Identity website, where detailed information is stored; a smartphone or standalone QR code scanner can be used to scan the code. The design of this system allows authorized personnel (e.g., paramedics, firefighters, or police) to access more detailed patient information than the average smartphone user: emergency service professionals are authorized to access patient medical histories to improve the accuracy of medical treatment. In Istanbul, we tested the self-designed system with 174 participants. To analyze the QR Code Identity Tag system's usability, the participants completed the System Usability Scale questionnaire after using the system.

  6. Healing or harming? Healthcare provider interactions with injured workers and insurers in workers' compensation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Elizabeth; Kosny, Agnieszka; McKenzie, Donna; Collie, Alex

    2015-03-01

    Healthcare providers (HCPs) are influential in the injured worker's recovery process and fulfil many roles in the delivery of health services. Interactions between HCPs and insurers can also affect injured workers' engagement in rehabilitation and subsequently their recovery and return to work. Consideration of the injured workers' perceptions and experiences as consumers of medical and compensation services can provide vital information about the quality, efficacy and impact of such systems. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and synthesize published qualitative research that focused on the interactions between injured workers, HCPs and insurers in workers' compensation systems in order to identify processes or interactions which impact injured worker recovery. A search of six electronic databases for literature published between 1985 and 2012 revealed 1,006 articles. Screening for relevance identified 27 studies which were assessed for quality against set criteria. A final 13 articles of medium and high quality were retained for data extraction. Findings were synthesized using a meta-ethnographic approach. Injured workers reported that HCPs could play both healing and harming roles in their recovery. Supportive patient-centred interaction with HCPs is important for injured workers. Difficult interactions between HCPs and insurers were highlighted in themes of adversarial relations and organisational pressures. Insurer and compensation system processes exerted an influence on the therapeutic relationship. Recommendations to improve relationships included streamlining administrative demands and increasing education and communication between the parties. Injured workers with long term complex injuries experience difficulties with healthcare in the workers' compensation context. Changes in insurer administrative demands and compensation processes could increase HCP participation and job satisfaction. This in turn may improve injured worker recovery

  7. CEFR information management system solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Fei; Zhao Jia'ning

    2011-01-01

    Based on finished information resources planning scheme for China sodium cooled experimental fast breeder reactor and the advanced information resources management solution concepts were applied, we got the building solution of CEFR information management systems. At the same time, the technical solutions of systems structures, logic structures, physical structures, development platforms and operation platforms for information resources management system in fast breeder reactors were developed, which provided programmatic introductions for development works in future. (authors)

  8. Lean healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Donna

    2008-01-01

    As healthcare organizations look for new and improved ways to reduce costs and still offer quality healthcare, many are turning to the Toyota Production System of doing business. Rather than focusing on cutting personnel and assets, "lean healthcare" looks to improve patient satisfaction through improved actions and processes.

  9. Information systems for the materials management department: stand-alone and enterprise resource planning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Materials management information systems (MMISs) incorporate information tools that hospitals can use to automate certain business processes, increase staff compliance with these processes, and identify opportunities for cost savings. Recently, there has been a push by hospital administration to purchase enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, information systems that promise to integrate many more facets of healthcare business. We offer this article to help materials managers, administrators, and others involved with information system selection understand the changes that have taken place in materials management information systems, decide whether they need a new system and, if so, whether a stand-alone MMIS or an ERP system will be the best choice.

  10. Informational system. Documents management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladut Iacob

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Productivity growing, as well as reducing of operational costs in a company can be achieved by adopting a document management solutions. Such application will allow management and structured and efficient transmission of information within the organization.

  11. National oceanographic information system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, B.N.; Kunte, P.D.; Bhargava, R.M.S.

    Ocean study is inherently interdisciplinary and therefore calls for a controlled and integrated approach for information generation, processing and decision making. In this context, Indian National Oceanographic Data Centre (INODC) of National...

  12. It is time to talk about people: a human-centered healthcare system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borgi Lea

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Examining vulnerabilities within our current healthcare system we propose borrowing two tools from the fields of engineering and design: a Reason's system approach 1 and b User-centered design 23. Both approaches are human-centered in that they consider common patterns of human behavior when analyzing systems to identify problems and generate solutions. This paper examines these two human-centered approaches in the context of healthcare. We argue that maintaining a human-centered orientation in clinical care, research, training, and governance is critical to the evolution of an effective and sustainable healthcare system.

  13. Integrating Social impacts on Health and Health-Care Systems in Systemic Seismic Vulnerability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz-Plapp, T.; Khazai, B.; Daniell, J. E.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a new method for modeling health impacts caused by earthquake damage which allows for integrating key social impacts on individual health and health-care systems and for implementing these impacts in quantitative systemic seismic vulnerability analysis. In current earthquake casualty estimation models, demand on health-care systems is estimated by quantifying the number of fatalities and severity of injuries based on empirical data correlating building damage with casualties. The expected number of injured people (sorted by priorities of emergency treatment) is combined together with post-earthquake reduction of functionality of health-care facilities such as hospitals to estimate the impact on healthcare systems. The aim here is to extend these models by developing a combined engineering and social science approach. Although social vulnerability is recognized as a key component for the consequences of disasters, social vulnerability as such, is seldom linked to common formal and quantitative seismic loss estimates of injured people which provide direct impact on emergency health care services. Yet, there is a consensus that factors which affect vulnerability and post-earthquake health of at-risk populations include demographic characteristics such as age, education, occupation and employment and that these factors can aggravate health impacts further. Similarly, there are different social influences on the performance of health care systems after an earthquake both on an individual as well as on an institutional level. To link social impacts of health and health-care services to a systemic seismic vulnerability analysis, a conceptual model of social impacts of earthquakes on health and the health care systems has been developed. We identified and tested appropriate social indicators for individual health impacts and for health care impacts based on literature research, using available European statistical data. The results will be used to

  14. Effects of an incinerator project on a healthcare-waste management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khammaneechan, Patthanasak; Okanurak, Kamolnetr; Sithisarankul, Pornchai; Tantrakarnapa, Kraichat; Norramit, Poonsup

    2011-10-01

    This evaluative research study aimed to assess the effects of the central healthcare incinerator project on waste management in Yala Province. The study data were collected twice: at baseline and during the operational phase. A combination of structured interview and observation were used during data collection. The study covered 127 healthcare facilities: government hospitals, healthcare centres, and private clinics. The results showed 63% of healthcare risk waste (HCRW) handlers attended the HCRW management training. Improvements in each stage of the HCRW management system were observed in all groups of facilities. The total cost of the HCRW management system did not change, however; the costs for hospitals decreased, whereas those for clinics increased significantly. It was concluded that the central healthcare waste incinerator project positively affected HCRW management in the area, although the costs of management might increase for a particular group. However, the benefits of changing to a more appropriately managed HCRW system will outweigh the increased costs.

  15. The Erasure of Sex and Gender Minorities in the Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne LeBreton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Socio-cultural notions of gender and sex influence the structuring of healthcare systems. This case study exemplifies how the Western gender binary, and cisnormativity in particular, can create barriers to accessing healthcare services for transgender populations and lead to erasure.

  16. Car insurance information management system

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yu

    2015-01-01

    A customer information system is a typical information management system. It involves three aspects, the backstage database establishment, the application development and the system maintenance. A car insurance information management system is based on browser/server structure. Microsoft SQL Server establishes the backstage database. Active Server Pages, from Microsoft as well is used as the interface layer. The objective of this thesis was to apply ASP to the dynamic storage of a web page...

  17. Creating value-focused healthcare delivery systems: Part three--Core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, R N

    1997-01-01

    Value is created through the delivery of high-quality, cost--effective healthcare services. The ability to create value from the providers' perspective is facilitated through the development and implementation of essential, customer-focused core competencies. These core competencies include customer relationship management, payer/provider relationship management, disease management, outcomes management, financial/cost management, and information management. Customer relationship management is the foundation upon which all core competencies must be built. All of the core competencies must focus on the needs of the customers, both internal and external. Structuring all processes involved in the core competencies from the perspective of the customer will ensure that value is created throughout the system. Payer/provider relationship management will become a crucial pillar for healthcare providers in the future. As more vertical integration among providers occurs, the management of the relationships among providers and with payers will become more important. Many of the integration strategies being implemented across the country involve the integration of hospitals, physicians, and payers to form accountable health plans. The relationships must be organized to form "win/win" situations, where all parties are focused on a shared vision of creating value and none of the parties benefits at the expense of the others. Disease management in creating value requires that we begin examining the disease process along the entire continuum. Not only must providers be able to provide high-quality acute and chronic care, but they must also begin to focus more heavily on programs of prevention. Value is created throughout the system through reducing the prevalence and incidence of disease. Only through managing the full continuum of health will value be created throughout the healthcare delivery system. Outcomes management ensures that the outcomes are the highest quality at a cost

  18. Is Canadian Healthcare Affordable? A Comparative Analysis of the Canadian Healthcare System from 2004 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soril, Lesley J J; Adams, Ted; Phipps-Taylor, Madeleine; Winblad, Ulrika; Clement, Fiona

    2017-08-01

    To compare cost-related non-adherence (CRNA), serious problems paying medical bills and average annual out-of-pocket cost over time in five countries. Repeated cross-sectional analysis of the Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy survey from 2004 to 2014. Responses were compared between Canada, the UK, Australia, New Zealand and the US. Compared to the UK, respondents in Canada, Australia and New Zealand were two to three times and respondents in the US were eight times more likely to experience CRNA; these odds remained stable over time. From 2004 to 2014, Canadian respondents paid US $852-1,767 out-of-pocket for care. The US reported the largest risks of serious problems paying for care (13-18.5%), highest out-of-pocket costs (US $2,060-3,319) and greatest rise in expenditures. Over the 10-year period, financial barriers to care were identified in Canada and internationally. Such persistent challenges are of great concern to countries striving for equitable access to healthcare. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  19. [Geographical coverage of the Mexican Healthcare System and a spatial analysis of utilization of its General Hospitals in 1998].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Avila, Juan E; Rodríguez, Mario H; Rodríguez, Norma E; Santos, René; Morales, Evangelina; Cruz, Carlos; Sepúlveda-Amor, Jaime

    2002-01-01

    To describe the geographical coverage of the Mexican Healthcare System (MHS) services and to assess the utilization of its General Hospitals. A Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to include sociodemographic data by locality, the geographical location of all MHS healthcare services, and data on hospital discharge records. A maximum likelihood estimation model was developed to assess the utilization levels of 217 MHS General Hospitals. The model included data on human resources, additional infrastructure, and the population within a 25 km radius. In 1998, 10,806 localities with 72 million inhabitants had at least one public healthcare unit, and 97.2% of the population lived within 50 km of a healthcare unit; however, over 18 million people lived in rural localities without a healthcare unit. The mean annual hospital occupation rate was 48.5 +/- 28.5 per 100 bed/years, with high variability within and between states. Hospital occupation was significantly associated with the number of physicians in the unit, and in the Mexican Institute of Social Security units utilization was associated with additional health infrastructure, and with the population's poverty index. GIS analysis allows improved estimation of the coverage and utilization of MHS hospitals.

  20. Development of online diary and self-management system on e-Healthcare for asthmatic children in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsueh-Chun; Chiang, Li-Chi; Wen, Tzu-Ning; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Huang, Jing-Long

    2014-10-01

    Many regional programs of the countries educate asthmatic children and their families to manage healthcare data. This study aims to establish a Web-based self-management system, eAsthmaCare, to promote the electronic healthcare (e-Healthcare) services for the asthmatic children in Taiwan. The platform can perform real time online functionality based upon a five-tier infrastructure with mutually supportive components to acquire asthma diaries, quality of life assessments and health educations. We have designed five multi-disciplinary portions on the interactive interface functioned with the analytical diagrams: (1) online asthma diary, (2) remote asthma assessment, (3) instantaneous asthma alert, (4) diagrammatical clinic support, and (5) asthma health education. The Internet-based asthma diary and assessment program was developed for patients to process self-management healthcare at home. In addition, the online analytical charts can help healthcare professionals to evaluate multi-domain health information of patients immediately. eAsthmaCare was developed by Java™ Servlet/JSP technology upon Apache Tomcat™ web server and Oracle™ database. Forty-one voluntary asthmatic children (and their parents) were intervened to examine the proposed system. Seven domains of satisfiability assessment by using the system were applied for approving the development. The average scores were scaled in the acceptable range for each domain to ensure feasibility of the proposed system. The study revealed the details of system infrastructure and developed functions that can help asthmatic children in self-management for healthcare to enhance communications between patients and hospital professionals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparative study of contemporary user involvement within healthcare systems across England, Poland and Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichon, Mateusz; Kavcic, Matic; Masterson, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how healthcare-users' engagement is perceived, how it occurs and how these perceptions differ between three European countries: England, Poland and Slovenia, using the concepts of voice, choice and coproduction. This comparative, qualitative study is based on a review of legal documents, academic literature and semi-structured interviews conducted in October and November 2011. A research sample consisted of 21 interviewees representing various stakeholders including healthcare-users, doctors and managers. Primary and secondary data were analysed using theoretical thematic analysis. Emerging themes were identified from the interviews and related to the indicators describing healthcare-users' involvement in the voice, choice and coproduction model. Results of the comparative qualitative research suggest that the healthcare-users' influence is strongly grounded in England where the healthcare system and professionals are prepared to include healthcare-users in the decision-making process. In Slovenia, cultural development of healthcare-users' involvement seems to proceed the institutional development. In Poland, institutions are ready to involve healthcare-users in decision-making process although the cultural desirability of involving users among doctors and patients is lacking. The notion of user involvement is increasingly gaining importance and research attention, yet there is still little known about the way cultural, political, historical differences between various European countries influence it. This paper explores this little known area using the original approach of user involvement (Dent et al., 2011) with input from various stakeholders including patients, healthcare representatives and academics.

  2. Employee Information Management System (EIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The EIMS is the Office of Human Resources' web-based employee information system. Direct-hire employees can access and review their USAID personnel information, such...

  3. JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) brings together satellite and in situ data sets from various sources to help you find information for a particular...

  4. Views of the United States healthcare system: Findings from documentary analysis of an interprofessional education course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultas, Margaret W; Ruebling, Irma; Breitbach, Anthony; Carlson, Judy

    2016-11-01

    As the healthcare system of the United States becomes more complex, collaboration among health professionals is becoming an essential aspect in improving the health of individuals and populations. An interprofessional education course entitled "Health Care System and Health Promotion" was developed to allow health profession students to work and learn together about issues related to healthcare delivery, health promotion, and the effect of policy issues on key stakeholders in the system. A qualitative document analysis research design was used to evaluate the effect of this interprofessional course on students' views of the current healthcare system of the United States. Fifty-nine student articles were analysed using document analysis. Health professions represented in the sample included occupational therapy, physical therapy, athletic training, nursing, and radiation therapy, nuclear medicine technology, and magnetic resonance imaging. Eight themes were identified including: increased personal awareness, the need for a system change, concern for access, affordability of healthcare, vision for future practice role, need for quality care, the value of interprofessional collaboration (IPC), and the importance of disease prevention. The results of the study suggest that healthcare education can benefit from the integration of Interprofessional Education (IPE) courses into their curriculum especially when teaching content common to all healthcare professions such as healthcare systems and health promotion.

  5. Intelligent scheduling of execution for customized physical fitness and healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Liu, Hsiao-Man; Huang, Chung-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Physical fitness and health of white collar business person is getting worse and worse in recent years. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a system which can enhance physical fitness and health for people. Although the exercise prescription can be generated after diagnosing for customized physical fitness and healthcare. It is hard to meet individual execution needs for general scheduling of physical fitness and healthcare system. So the main purpose of this research is to develop an intelligent scheduling of execution for customized physical fitness and healthcare system. The results of diagnosis and prescription for customized physical fitness and healthcare system will be generated by fuzzy logic Inference. Then the results of diagnosis and prescription for customized physical fitness and healthcare system will be scheduled and executed by intelligent computing. The scheduling of execution is generated by using genetic algorithm method. It will improve traditional scheduling of exercise prescription for physical fitness and healthcare. Finally, we will demonstrate the advantages of the intelligent scheduling of execution for customized physical fitness and healthcare system.

  6. Information Systems for University Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Robert J.

    This paper proposes construction of a separate data base environment for university planning information, distinct from data bases and systems supporting operational functioning and management. The data base would receive some of its input from the management information systems (MIS)/transactional data bases and systems through a process of…

  7. A lung function information system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F.M. Verbraak (Anton); E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); J. de Vries (Julius); J.M. Bogaard (Jan); A. Versprille (Adrian)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract A lung function information system (LFIS) was developed for the data analysis of pulmonary function tests at different locations. This system was connected to the hospital information system (HIS) for the retrieval of patient data and the storage of the lung function

  8. A Review of the Factors Associated with the Adoption of Accounting Information Systems in Gulf Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammour, Hadal; Househ, Mowafa; Razzak, Hira Abdul

    2017-01-01

    This review attempts to elucidate the significance of accounting information systems within healthcare settings in the Gulf regions. Information and communication technologies (ICT) has provided accounting system the ability to help an organization use and develop computerized systems to record and track financial transactions. Accounting information systems, if well implemented, can permit healthcare sectors in the Gulf regions to produce reports that can support the decision making process. Additional abilities of an accounting information systems include faster processing, enriched accuracy, amplified functionality, and improved external reporting. Training of hospital staff can help in enhancing the use of accounting information systems in gulf hospitals.

  9. Strengthening Health Information Systems to Support Post-Disaster ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Strengthening Health Information Systems to Support Post-Disaster Healthcare in Haiti. The occurrence of a natural disaster may seem to carry repercussions that are indiscriminate in nature; however, it is the vulnerable populations that suffer most during such events, and in the days, months and years that follow. In Haiti ...

  10. Household of care in electronic health information exchange systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sibiya, Mhlupheki G

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available by the organisation have presented the protocols and message profiles that can be used for communication among the systems within Electronic Health Information Exchange (HIE)[17, 6]. HIE “allows doctors, nurses, pharmacists, other healthcare providers and patients...

  11. The Role of Corruption and Healthcare Expenditure in Healthcare Systems of the Persian Gulf Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Asghari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: More than a third of the world’s population lack access to essential medicines, despite the presence of several international agreements that proclaim health as a human right. Corruption, in its many forms, such as bribery and embezzlement, causes several detrimental effects on the health sector and access to medicines including economic, health, and government image and trust issues. Global health corruption remains a serious, ongoing, and under-recognized threat to global health progress. This paper aim is examination how global corruption and health-care expenditure (HE affect health statue in the Persian Gulf countries over 1980-2014 and what can be done to combat corruption in the health sector. Materials and Methods: This study is an experimental and applied research. To verify the consistency of the results of the model, this study used the appropriate panel data analysis methods such as feasible general least square method for the nine Persian Gulf countries over 1980-2014. I employ different panel data procedures to avoid estimation problems, namely, autocorrelation and heteroskedasticity. The used package id Stata version 14. Results: The level of gross domestic product per capita, the level of corruption in the country, per capita HE, the quality of air and water, population density levels have negative effect on region people’s life expectancy, but the index of environmental policy and the education, measured as years of education obtained, have positive effect on region people’s life expectancy over 1980-2014. Conclusion: The results indicate that corruption and HE have negative effect on the Persian Gulf region people‘s life expectancy.

  12. Internet uses for health information seeking : Internet uses and healthcare information

    OpenAIRE

    Renahy , Emilie; Chauvin , Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Background: With the widespread dissemination of the Internet throughout the world of health, it would be relevant to report on current knowledge about health information search on the Internet from the consumers' standpoint. Methods: We conducted a bibliographical research over the past five years and distinguished between international and French studies. Results: For a long time, the (mostly US) studies have been merely descriptive. The studies highlight that the factors associated with he...

  13. Security And Privacy Issues in Healthcare Monitoring Systems: A Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handler, Daniel Tolboe; Hauge, Lotte; Spognardi, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Security and privacy issues are rarely taken into account in automated systems for monitoring elderly people in their home, exposing inhabitants to a number of threats they are usually not aware of. As a case study to expose the major vulnerabilities these systems are exposed to, this paper reviews...... a generic example of automated healthcare monitoring system. The security and privacy issues identified in this case study can be easily generalised and regarded as alarm bells for all the pervasive healthcare professionals....

  14. Engineering Information System (EIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-31

    be availabe and usefu for creating powerful tailored contro and mangeen functions. Mode and Framwork Wirth further elaboration of the EIS portio of...control data and activities of the engineering process. The EIM is a conceptual model of administrative and electroic design information. It records...of the access opeations are derived from the instance variable name and type. An attribute conceptually holds one or more instances of a basic type

  15. Information systems in Nuclenor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Sanchez, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the 1989s in Nuclenor a large number of application programs were developed, this spread of software was based on the use of the new incoming machine in those years: the PC. The most severe consequences of having such an amount of isolated programs was the breaking up of corporate data and the loss of coherence between applications. The objective since then has been to unify and consolidate the stored information to increase its quality. (Author)

  16. Intelligent Information Systems Institute

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gomes, Carla

    2004-01-01

    ...) at Cornell during the first three years of operation. IISI's mandate is threefold: To perform and stimulate research in computational and data-intensive methods for intelligent decision making systems...

  17. Implementing Student Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Laurie; Porter, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    Implementing an enterprise resource planning system is a complex undertaking. Careful planning, management, communication, and staffing can make the difference between a successful and unsuccessful implementation. (Contains 3 tables.)

  18. Information System Quality Assessment Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Korn, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores challenging topic of information system quality assessment and mainly process assessment. In this work the term Information System Quality is defined as well as different approaches in a quality definition for different domains of information systems are outlined. Main methods of process assessment are overviewed and their relationships are described. Process assessment methods are divided into two categories: ISO standards and best practices. The main objective of this w...

  19. Information systems for risk management

    OpenAIRE

    Michael S. Gibson

    1997-01-01

    Risk management information systems are designed to overcome the problem of aggregating data across diverse trading units. The design of an information system depends on the risk measurement methodology that a firm chooses. Inherent in the design of both a risk management information system and a risk measurement methodology is a tradeoff between the accuracy of the resulting measures of risk and the burden of computing them. Technical progress will make this tradeoff more favorable over time...

  20. A COMPARISON OF PATIENT AND HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL VIEWS WHEN ASSESSING QUALITY OF INFORMATION ON PITUITARY ADENOMA AVAILABLE ON THE INTERNET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Irena; Williams, Chantal; Baggoo, Carolyn; Keely, Erin; Malcolm, Janine

    2017-10-01

    Patients are increasingly turning to the internet to seek reliable sources of health information and desire guidance in assessing the quality of information as healthcare becomes progressively more complex. Pituitary adenomas are a rare, diverse group of tumors associated with increased mortality and morbidity whose management requires a multidisciplinary approach. As such, patients with this disorder are often searching for additional sources of healthcare information. We undertook a study to assess the quality of information available on the internet for patients with pituitary adenoma. After exclusion, 42 websites were identified based on a search engine query with various search terms. Each website was assessed in triplicate: once by a health professional, once by a simulated patient, and once by a patient who had a pituitary adenoma and underwent medical and surgical treatment. The assessment tools included a content-specific questionnaire, the DISCERN tool, and the Ensuring Quality Information for Patients tool. The readability of the information was assessed with the Flesch-Kincaid grade level. We found that the overall quality of information on pituitary adenoma on the internet was variable and written at a high grade level. Correlation between the different assessors was poor, indicating that there may be differences in how healthcare professionals and patients view healthcare information. Our findings highlight the importance of assessment of the health information by groups of the intended user to ensure the needs of that population are met. Abbreviation: EQIP = Ensuring Quality Information for Patients.