WorldWideScience

Sample records for health social care

  1. HEALTH CARE MODELS AND SOCIAL CONTROL STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Vieira Simões

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the context of health care models and the social control strategies. It is a bibliographic review of critical and reflexive nature based of the references by technical texts, scientific publications and official documents related to public health policies, assisting in the preparation of candidates in the exam for knowledge. It has been selected eleven books and five articles. The material was categorized into three approaches: Historical Context of Public Health Policies, Health Care Models and Social Control Strategies. The results analysis and discussion subsidized the understanding of public health policies, since the implementation of SUS, and regulates health care; however a large country like Brazil, a single model of health care would not be able to meet the demands of health services, which justifies the implementation of various proposals. And, for social control it was possible to understand its influence on public policy changes, where we have identified the health councils and conferences as social control strategies, involving social actors in a critical and constructive role in the process of changing models of care.

  2. Managing complaints in health and social care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Bonney, Kathy

    2010-04-01

    An important aspect of allowing patients to take control of their health care is the introduction of new procedures for dealing with complaints. This article examines the concepts that underpin the new Department of Health regulations on complaints management and what they will mean for health and social care professionals. It also explains why these regulations focus on restorative justice rather than blame when adverse events occur.

  3. Social media in public health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Normann; Medaglia, Rony; Henriksen, Helle Zinner

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the impacts of social media use in Danish public health care with respect to capabilities, interactions, orientations, and value distribution. Taking an exploratory approach, the paper draws on an array of quantitative and qualitative data, and puts forward four propositions......: social media transform the access to health-related information for patients and general practitioners, the uptake of social media can be a cost driver rather than a cost saver, social media provide empowerment to patients, and the uptake of social media is hindered by legal and privacy concerns...

  4. Medicine, morality and health care social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timimi, Farris K

    2012-08-02

    Social media includes many different forms of technology including online forums, blogs, microblogs (i.e. Twitter), wikipedias, video blogs, social networks and podcasting. The use of social media has grown exponentially and time spent on social media sites now represents one in five minutes spent online. Concomitant with this online growth, there has been an inverse trajectory in direct face-to-face patient-provider moments, which continue to become scarcer across the spectrum of health care. In contrast to standard forms of engagement and education, social media has advantages to include profound reach, immediate availability, an archived presence and broad accessibility. Our opportunity as health care providers to partner with our patients has never been greater, yet all too often we allow risk averse fears to limit our ability to truly leverage our good content effectively to the online community. This risk averse behavior truly limits our capacity to effectively engage our patients where they are--online.

  5. Social networks in improvement of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Sivic, Suad; Toromanovic, Selim; Borojevic, Tea; Pandza, Haris

    2012-01-01

    Social network is a social structure made of individuals or organizations associated with one or more types of interdependence (friendship, common interests, work, knowledge, prestige, etc.) which are the "nodes" of the network. Networks can be organized to exchange information, knowledge or financial assistance under the various interest groups in universities, workplaces and associations of citizens. Today the most popular and widely used networks are based on application of the Internet as the main ICT. Depending on the method of connection, their field of activity and expertise of those who participate in certain networks, the network can be classified into the following groups: a) Social Networks with personal physical connectivity (the citizens' associations, transplant networks, etc.), b) Global social internet network (Facebook, Twitter, Skype), c) specific health internet social network (forums, Health Care Forums, Healthcare Industry Forum), d) The health community internet network of non professionals (DailyStrength, CaringBridge, CarePages, MyFamilyHealth), e) Scientific social internet network (BiomedExperts, ResearchGate, iMedExchange), f) Social internet network which supported professionals (HealthBoards, Spas and Hope Association of Disabled and diabetic Enurgi), g) Scientific medical internet network databases in the system of scientific and technical information (CC, Pubmed/Medline, Excerpta Medica/EMBASE, ISI Web Knowledge, EBSCO, Index Copernicus, Social Science Index, etc.). The information in the network are exchanged in real time and in a way that has until recently been impossible in real life of people in the community. Networks allow tens of thousands of specific groups of people performing a series of social, professional and educational activities in the place of living and housing, place of work or other locations where individuals are. Network provides access to information related to education, health, nutrition, drugs, procedures

  6. [Contribution of Health Care Research to Establishing Social Equality in Health and Health Care Opportunities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, H; Pförtner, T-K

    2016-02-01

    Social inequalities in health and health care services represent issues of major concern. Findings in this area reveal inequalities in health and health care indicating disadvantages for individuals with a low socioeconomic background. Although the health care system plays a marginal role in the explanation of inequalities in health, health services research can be an important part in the development of equal health opportunities. The current article describes the causal associations between social inequalities, health inequalities and the health care service. Health services research can make a contribution to increasing equal opportunities in health and health care service. Against this background, we discuss the existing potential and need of research in the area of health services. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Medicine, morality and health care social media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timimi Farris K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Social media includes many different forms of technology including online forums, blogs, microblogs (i.e. Twitter, wikipedias, video blogs, social networks and podcasting. The use of social media has grown exponentially and time spent on social media sites now represents one in five minutes spent online. Concomitant with this online growth, there has been an inverse trajectory in direct face-to-face patient-provider moments, which continue to become scarcer across the spectrum of health care. In contrast to standard forms of engagement and education, social media has advantages to include profound reach, immediate availability, an archived presence and broad accessibility. Our opportunity as health care providers to partner with our patients has never been greater, yet all too often we allow risk averse fears to limit our ability to truly leverage our good content effectively to the online community. This risk averse behavior truly limits our capacity to effectively engage our patients where they are -- online.

  8. Strategies on Reducing Social Inequalitiesin Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga; Vasilios Kanellopoulos; Helen Bakola

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Health was and will always be the supreme good for human kind. From this scope, people should have equal opportunities for health and all healthcare systems must be build around the term of equity. The aim of this review article is to present, through extensive literature and relevant articles review from Internet, the main aspects of todays inequalities in healthcare provision and the strategies that must be followed so as different social-economical groups have the same access in health care. Also special credit is given on how the political systems must design their healthcare policies according to the facts (social-economical layers and status of their citizens (diseases.

  9. Effect of social media in health care and orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Jenine; Robinson, Brooke S; Kugler, Nathan W; Illingworth, Kenneth D; Patel, Pranay; Saleh, Khaled J

    2012-04-01

    With the growth of social media platforms, their potential to affect health care, and orthopedics specifically, continues to expand. We reviewed the literature to obtain all pertinent information on social media in health care and examined its strengths and weaknesses from patient and physician perspectives. Health care professionals have slowly begun to use social media to stay connected with patients. The recent use of networking sites aims to improve education, provide a forum to discuss relevant medical topics, and allow for improved patient care. The use of social media, with the understanding of its limitations, may help promote patient happiness and safety and serve as an educational platform. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Centre for medical, health and social care education overseas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The University of Winchester in the UK has recently established a Centre for Medical, Health and Social Care Education overseas. The Centre is located in the Faculty of Education, Health and Social Care but has no physical presence at the University and works 'virtually' through establishing contacts with others working ...

  11. [Social inequalities in health, challenges for nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Anne; Potvin, Louise

    The main factors of social inequalities in health lie outside the healthcare system. In a context centred on curative care, the influence of social determinants on people's health is a challenge facing nursing care and highlights the need to reinforce cross-sector action. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Social media usage among health care providers

    OpenAIRE

    Surani, Zoya; Hirani, Rahim; Elias, Anita; Quisenberry, Lauren; Varon, Joseph; Surani, Sara; Surani, Salim

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of social media among healthcare workers in an attempt to identify how it affects the quality of patient care. Results An anonymous survey of 35 questions was conducted in South Texas, on 366 healthcare workers. Of the 97% of people who reported owning electronic devices, 87.9% indicated that they used social media. These healthcare workers indicated that they spent approximately 1 h on social media every day. The healthcare worker...

  13. The shape of digital engagement: health care and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timimi, Farris K

    2013-01-01

    Health care lags behind other industries in engaging with customers via social networking. In part, this reflects concerns regarding health information privacy concerns, organizational fears regarding employee time mismanagement, and the real challenge that health care providers face with multiple and competing demands on time. Despite these fears and concerns, our patients are spending more and more of their time online seeking health care information, more often in social networks. Our greatest capacity for health care change management at present may well center on our strategic capacity to meet our patients where they spend the majority of their time online.

  14. Social media usage among health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surani, Zoya; Hirani, Rahim; Elias, Anita; Quisenberry, Lauren; Varon, Joseph; Surani, Sara; Surani, Salim

    2017-11-29

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of social media among healthcare workers in an attempt to identify how it affects the quality of patient care. An anonymous survey of 35 questions was conducted in South Texas, on 366 healthcare workers. Of the 97% of people who reported owning electronic devices, 87.9% indicated that they used social media. These healthcare workers indicated that they spent approximately 1 h on social media every day. The healthcare workers below the age of 40 were more involved in social media compared to those above 40 (p media among physicians and nurses was noted to be identical (88% for each group), and both groups encouraged their patients to research their clinical conditions on social media (p media policy in their hospital compared to nurses (p < 0.05). However, a large proportion of healthcare workers (40%) were unaware of their workplace policy, which could potentially cause a privacy breach of confidential medical information. Further studies are required to evaluate specific effects of these findings on the quality of patient care.

  15. Health care social media: engagement and health care in the digital era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aase, Lee; Timimi, Farris K

    2013-09-01

    Health care as an industry continues in reluctant participation with consumers through social networks. Factors behind health care's laggard position range from providers' concerns about patient privacy and lack of personal psychic bandwidth to organizational anxiety about employee time management and liability for online behavior. Despite these concerns, our patients are spending increasing amounts of their time online, often looking for information regarding their diagnosis, treatment, care providers, and hospitals, with much of that time spent in social networks. Our real opportunity for meaningful engagement in the future may depend on our capacity to meet our patients where they are, online, utilizing the tools that they use, that is, social media.

  16. Social capital and maternal health care use in rural Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheabo Dessalegn, S.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the effect of social capital on maternal health care use in rural Ethiopia. Reports show that in Ethiopia, despite the huge investment in health infrastructure and the deployment of health professionals to provide maternal health services free of charge, utilization remains low.

  17. Strengthening Primary Health Care and Social Protection: Universal ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Strengthening Primary Health Care and Social Protection: Universal Coverage in Pakistan through Heartfile Health Financing. One of the poorest countries ... Renforcement des soins de santé primaires et de la protection sociale : couverture universelle au Pakistan grâce au modèle de Heartfile. Depuis dix ans, le Pakistan, ...

  18. The right to access health care: health care according to European social security law instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoukens, Paul

    2008-09-01

    In this contribution we will look at how the traditional European social security conventions shape the fundamental right to health care. As to the instruments under investigation we focus upon the regional agreements that have been enacted within the framework of the Council of Europe. More specifically we will discuss how the (Revised) Social Charter and the minimum standard setting instrument (Code) give expression to the right to access to health care. This overview is then complemented by an analysis of recent case law of the European Court of Human Rights. The latter Court is indeed increasingly screening the national social security rules on their compatibility with the fundamental rights, as they are enshrined in the European Convention on Human Rights. Hence we will dwell upon the potential impact of this case law on the right to access health care. In the conclusions we will compare the three instruments regarding their legal interpretation of the right to health care.

  19. [Citizen constitution and social representations: reflecting about health care models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sílvio Eder Dias; Ramos, Flávia Regina Souza; Martins, Cleusa Rios; Padilha, Maria Itayra; Vasconcelos, Esleane Vilela

    2010-12-01

    This article presents a reflection on the meaning of the terms citizenship and health, addressing the Theory of Social Representations as a strategy for implementing and evaluating health care models in Brazil. First, a brief history about the concept of citizenship is presented; then the article addresses the principles of freedom and equality according to Kant; the third section of the article shows that health is as a right of the citizen and a duty of the state. Finally, the Theory of Social Representations is emphasized as a strategy to evaluate and implement the health services provided to citizens by the current health care models in Brazil.

  20. Conceptualising body work in health and social care

    OpenAIRE

    Twigg, J; Wolkowitz, C.; COHEN, R.L.; Nettleton, S

    2011-01-01

    Body work is a central activity in the practice of many workers in the field of health and social care. This article provides an introduction to the concept of body work--paid work on the bodies of others--and demonstrates its importance for understanding the activities of health and social care workers. Providing an overview of existing research on body work, it shows the manifold ways in which this can inform the sociology of health and illness--whether through a micro-social focus on the i...

  1. Health Care Reform and Social Movements in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Beatrix

    2003-01-01

    Because of the importance of grassroots social movements, or “change from below,” in the history of US reform, the relationship between social movements and demands for universal health care is a critical one. National health reform campaigns in the 20th century were initiated and run by elites more concerned with defending against attacks from interest groups than with popular mobilization, and grassroots reformers in the labor, civil rights, feminist, and AIDS activist movements have concentrated more on immediate and incremental changes than on transforming the health care system itself. However, grassroots health care demands have also contained the seeds of a wider critique of the American health care system, leading some movements to adopt calls for universal coverage. PMID:12511390

  2. Frailty and Organization of Health and Social Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Andrew; Young, John

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we consider how health and social care can best be organized for older people with frailty. We will consider the merits of routine frailty identification, including risk stratification methods, to inform the provision of evidence-based treatment and holistic, goal-oriented care. We will also consider how best to place older people with frailty at the heart of health and social care systems so that the complex challenges associated with this vulnerable group are addressed. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Medicine, morality and health care social media

    OpenAIRE

    Timimi Farris K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Social media includes many different forms of technology including online forums, blogs, microblogs (i.e. Twitter), wikipedias, video blogs, social networks and podcasting. The use of social media has grown exponentially and time spent on social media sites now represents one in five minutes spent online. Concomitant with this online growth, there has been an inverse trajectory in direct face-to-face patient-provider moments, which continue to become scarcer across the spectrum of he...

  4. Social Security Disability Insurance Enrollment and Health Care Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Lawrence C; Geissler, Kimberley H

    2017-09-21

    To examine the relationship between Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) enrollment and health care employment. State-year level data from government and other publicly available sources for all states (2000-2014). Population-weighted linear regression analyses model associations between each health care employment measure and each SSDI enrollment measure (i.e., SSDI overall, physical, or mental health enrollment rates), controlling for factors associated with health care employment, state fixed effects, and secular time trends. Data are gathered from publicly available sources. A one standard deviation increase in SSDI enrollment per 100,000 population is associated with a statistically significant 2.6 and 4.5 percent increase in the mean employment rate per 100,000 population for health care practitioner and technical occupations and health care support occupations, respectively. The size of this relationship varies by the type of disabling condition for SSDI enrollment (physical versus mental health). Social Security Disability Insurance enrollment is significantly associated with health care employment at the state level. Quantifying the magnitude of this relationship is important given high SSDI enrollment rates as well as evolving policy and demographic shifts related to the SSDI program. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  5. [Social inequality, health and nursing care in old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Andreas; Schmitt, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Health and care services are an important aspect of public services as a basic obligation of the welfare state. Particularly in old-age, social inclusion, relatedness and integrity become the aims of health and care services beyond independence and autonomy. Provide an overview of inequalities related to socio-economic status, gender, and immigrant background in the context of health and care services. Analysis of differences in risks and problem situations, access to prevention measures, ambulatory and in-patient treatment, availability of social support, and care services in middle and older adulthood. Thereby, the contribution proceeds from our own contributions to prevention and rehabilitation research as well as from representative surveys. People with lower socio-economic status, women, and migrants more often suffer from risks and problem situations and have less access to prevention measures and medical specialist care. Regarding in-patient treatment, people with private health insurance have a higher probability of being admitted to hospital. Migrants more often visit emergency rooms and less often get rehabilitation measures. The availability of social support depends on age, gender, and education; applicants from higher status groups more often receive services from nursing care insurance. The results point to the necessity of status-, milieu- and culture-sensitive counselling, particularly focusing on patient rights and usefulness of optional health and nursing care services. Qualified professionals could take responsibility for respective tasks.

  6. Social work management in emerging health care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, J J

    1990-02-01

    An overview of the health care industry's trend toward multihealth systems is presented and specific adaptive strategies for social work managers in health care are suggested. The challenges to social work leaders during this transition from largely free-standing, privately owned health care institutions to corporately owned, horizontally and vertically integrated delivery systems are discussed in terms of identity, style, and substance. Directors of social work departments in multihealth corporations will need to resolve issues of institutional versus corporate identity as well as those of corporate versus professional identity. A multioptional management style that incorporates networking and political expertise should be cultivated. Substantive demands in the areas of management information systems, productivity, quality assurance, and budgeting also must be addressed. The emergence of multihealth systems poses major challenges and unique opportunities to the social work profession. Awareness of managerial strategies and critical content areas can help social work leaders enhance the role and contribution of social work in these exciting and complex health care delivery systems.

  7. Overcoming social segregation in health care in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotlear, Daniel; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio; Knaul, Felicia; Atun, Rifat; Barreto, Ivana C H C; Cetrángolo, Oscar; Cueto, Marcos; Francke, Pedro; Frenz, Patricia; Guerrero, Ramiro; Lozano, Rafael; Marten, Robert; Sáenz, Rocío

    2015-03-28

    Latin America continues to segregate different social groups into separate health-system segments, including two separate public sector blocks: a well resourced social security for salaried workers and their families and a Ministry of Health serving poor and vulnerable people with low standards of quality and needing a frequently impoverishing payment at point of service. This segregation shows Latin America's longstanding economic and social inequality, cemented by an economic framework that predicted that economic growth would lead to rapid formalisation of the economy. Today, the institutional setup that organises the social segregation in health care is perceived, despite improved life expectancy and other advances, as a barrier to fulfilling the right to health, embodied in the legislation of many Latin American countries. This Series paper outlines four phases in the history of Latin American countries that explain the roots of segmentation in health care and describe three paths taken by countries seeking to overcome it: unification of the funds used to finance both social security and Ministry of Health services (one public payer); free choice of provider or insurer; and expansion of services to poor people and the non-salaried population by making explicit the health-care benefits to which all citizens are entitled. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Corporate social responsibility and the future health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K

    2010-01-01

    The decisions and actions of health care managers are oftentimes heavily scrutinized by the public. Given the current economic climate, managers may feel intense pressure to produce higher results with fewer resources. This could inadvertently test their moral fortitude and their social consciousness. A study was conducted to determine what corporate social responsibility orientation and viewpoint future health care managers may hold. The results of the study indicate that future health care managers may hold patient care in high regard as opposed to profit maximization. However, the results of the study also show that future managers within the industry may continue to need rules, laws, regulations, and legal sanctions to guide their actions and behavior.

  9. UK Health and Social Care Case Studies: Iterative Technology Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Adie; Gilbert, Laura; Dawson, Tom

    2017-01-01

    As a result of increasing demand in the face of reducing resources, technology has been implemented in many social and health care services to improve service efficiency. This paper outlines the experiences of deploying a 'Software as a Service' application in the UK social and health care sectors. The case studies demonstrate that every implementation is different, and unique to each organisation. Technology design and integration can be facilitated by ongoing engagement and collaboration with all stakeholders, flexible design, and attention to interoperability to suit services and their workflows.

  10. The Internet of Things in Health, Social Care, and Wellbeing

    OpenAIRE

    Laya, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) enables opportunities to remotely sense and control objects via communication networks. We study services based on connected devices and the collaboration they generate between the ICT and the Health, Social Care and Wellbeing (HSCWB) industries. In HSCWB, IoT can support a change from episodic treatments of illness to preventive care and wellbeing solutions. The IoT can be a supporter in cost efficient and high quality health care. The objective is to achieve hea...

  11. Collecting and applying data on social determinants of health in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Laura; Sandel, Megan; Adler, Nancy E

    2013-06-10

    Despite strong evidence linking patients' social circumstances to their health, little guidance exists for health care practitioners and institutions on addressing social needs in clinical settings. Current approaches to social determinants generally focus on population-level and policy interventions; these overlook individual and clinical innovations within health care that can address patients' social circumstances. This article proposes a framework for how social determinants interventions in the health care system can be construed across 3 tiers-patient, institution, and broader population-and describes ways to collect data and target interventions at these levels.

  12. Enhancing Health and Social Care Placement Learning through Mobile Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Susan; Callaghan, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Health and social care students spend up to 50% of their course in practice. Placements are distributed across a wide geographical area and have varying degrees of IT access and support. Consequently, students may feel isolated from peers, academic staff, and resources required for effective learning. Mobile technology has considerable potential…

  13. The health care system of Kuwait: the social paradoxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleis, A I

    1979-11-01

    Because of its oil resources, Kuwait today has one of the highest per capita incomes in the world. In the last 6 years, its population has increased by 25%, including immigrants and temporary workers. More than 1/2 of the population is non-Kuwaiti, leading to rigid segregation and extreme nationalism. 60% of the population is under 20 years of age. With the achievement of independence and the great increase in wealth from oil, the Kuwaiti government embarked on a plan to distribute the wealth among its citizens in various ways. A substantial amount has been spent on health, education, and public works, with the health ministries accounting for about 20% of the budget. The health care system has been organized around provision of primary health care, and the primary health care clinic is the main point of entry into the health care system, designed to reach all sectors of the population. Combined clinics offer primary care and specialty clinics. The number of hospitals has increased more than 2-fold over the last 10 years. The emphasis is on curative care. Western medicine is much valued, and campaigns for immunization and vaccination were highly successful. The concept of the "evil eye" is widespread, causing difficulties in interviewing patients, but also creating a demand for curative medicine when the effects of the "eye" reach the body. Injections are especially desirable, preferred over oral medications. The large percentage of health professionals from foreign countries has created communications problems, even within the health profession itself. The interplay between certain social qualities in the country and the health care system has created a series of paradoxes which must be recognized if they are to be dealt with, a necessary step to improve the quality of health care in Kuwait.

  14. Health Care Access among Latinos: Implications for Social and Health Care Reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine, health care access is defined as "the degree to which people are able to obtain appropriate care from the health care system in a timely manner." Two key components of health care access are medical insurance and having access to a usual source of health care. Recent national data show that 34% of Latino…

  15. Patients' and health professionals' use of social media in health care: Motives, barriers and expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; Tates, K.; Nieboer, T.E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate patients' and health professionals' (a) motives and use of social media for health-related reasons, and (b) barriers and expectations for health-related social media use. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive online survey among 139 patients and 153 health care professionals

  16. Health benefits of primary care social work for adults with complex health and social needs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Jules; Mercer, Stewart W; Harris, Fiona M

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of complex health and social needs in primary care patients is growing. Furthermore, recent research suggests that the impact of psychosocial distress on the significantly poorer health outcomes in this population may have been underestimated. The potential of social work in primary care settings has been extensively discussed in both health and social work literature and there is evidence that social work interventions in other settings are particularly effective in addressing psychosocial needs. However, the evidence base for specific improved health outcomes related to primary care social work is minimal. This review aimed to identify and synthesise the available evidence on the health benefits of social work interventions in primary care settings. Nine electronic databases were searched from 1990 to 2015 and seven primary research studies were retrieved. Due to the heterogeneity of studies, a narrative synthesis was conducted. Although there is no definitive evidence for effectiveness, results suggest a promising role for primary care social work interventions in improving health outcomes. These include subjective health measures and self-management of long-term conditions, reducing psychosocial morbidity and barriers to treatment and health maintenance. Although few rigorous study designs were found, the contextual detail and clinical settings of studies provide evidence of the practice applicability of social work intervention. Emerging policy on the integration of health and social care may provide an opportunity to develop this model of care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Health and Social Care Interventions Which Promote Social Participation for Adults with Learning Disabilities: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Sharon; Morris, David; Newlin, Meredith; Webber, Martin

    2016-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are among the most socially excluded in society. There is a significant gap in research evidence showing how health and social care workers can intervene to improve the social participation of adults with learning disabilities. A systematic review and modified narrative synthesis was used to appraise the quality…

  18. Barriers to collaboration between health care, social services and schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Widmark

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is essential for professionals from different organizations to collaborate when handling matters concerning children, adolescents, and their families in order to enable society to provide holistic health care and social services.   Objective: This paper reports perceptions of obstacles to collaboration among professionals in health care (county council, social services (municipality, and schools in an administrative district of the city of Stockholm, Sweden.   Methods: Data were collected in focus group interviews with unit managers and employees.   Results and discussion: Our results show that the responsibility for collaboration fell largely on the professionals. Also, there was a lack of clarity' regarding differences in mission and regulations, allocation of responsibilities, competence, explanatory models, and working approach. We conclude that a holding environment' and a committed management' would support these professionals in their efforts to collaborate.

  19. Barriers to collaboration between health care, social services and schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Widmark

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is essential for professionals from different organizations to collaborate when handling matters concerning children, adolescents, and their families in order to enable society to provide holistic health care and social services.  Objective: This paper reports perceptions of obstacles to collaboration among professionals in health care (county council, social services (municipality, and schools in an administrative district of the city of Stockholm, Sweden.  Methods: Data were collected in focus group interviews with unit managers and employees.  Results and discussion: Our results show that the responsibility for collaboration fell largely on the professionals. Also, there was a lack of clarity regarding differences in mission and regulations, allocation of responsibilities, competence, explanatory models, and working approach. We conclude that a holding environment and a committed management would support these professionals in their efforts to collaborate.

  20. How to integrate social care services into primary health care? An experience from Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Ali; Riazi-Isfahani, Sahand; Damari, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Social issues have prominent effects on the peoples' physical and mental health and on the health risk factors. In Iran, many organizations provide social care services to their target population. This study aimed to explore the roles and functions of Primary Health Care (PHC) system in providing social care services in Iran. Methods: This was a qualitative study, for which data were collected via three sources: A review of the literature, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with experts and stakeholders. The main objective was to find a way to integrate social care into the Iranian PHC system. A conventional content analysis was performed to explore the data. Results: Overall, 20 experts were interviewed and the acquired data were classified into four major categories including priorities, implementation, requirements and stewardship. The main challenges were the existing controversies in the definition of social care, social service unit disintegration, multiple stewards for social care services, weaknesses of rules and regulations and low financing of the public budget. Social care services can be divided into two categories: Basic and advanced. Urban and rural health centers, as the first level of PHC, could potentially provide basic social care services for their defined population and catchment areas such as detecting social harms in high risk individuals and families and providing counseling for people in need. They can also refer the individuals to receive advanced services. Conclusion: Iran has a successful history of establishing the PHC System especially in rural areas. This network has an invaluable capacity to provide social health services. Establishing these services needs some prerequisites such as a reform PHC structure, macro support and technical intersectoral collaboration. They should also be piloted and evaluated before they could be implemented in the whole country. PMID:27683649

  1. How to integrate social care services into primary health care? An experience from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Ali; Riazi-Isfahani, Sahand; Damari, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Social issues have prominent effects on the peoples' physical and mental health and on the health risk factors. In Iran, many organizations provide social care services to their target population. This study aimed to explore the roles and functions of Primary Health Care (PHC) system in providing social care services in Iran. This was a qualitative study, for which data were collected via three sources: A review of the literature, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with experts and stakeholders. The main objective was to find a way to integrate social care into the Iranian PHC system. A conventional content analysis was performed to explore the data. Overall, 20 experts were interviewed and the acquired data were classified into four major categories including priorities, implementation, requirements and stewardship. The main challenges were the existing controversies in the definition of social care, social service unit disintegration, multiple stewards for social care services, weaknesses of rules and regulations and low financing of the public budget. Social care services can be divided into two categories: Basic and advanced. Urban and rural health centers, as the first level of PHC, could potentially provide basic social care services for their defined population and catchment areas such as detecting social harms in high risk individuals and families and providing counseling for people in need. They can also refer the individuals to receive advanced services. Iran has a successful history of establishing the PHC System especially in rural areas. This network has an invaluable capacity to provide social health services. Establishing these services needs some prerequisites such as a reform PHC structure, macro support and technical intersectoral collaboration. They should also be piloted and evaluated before they could be implemented in the whole country.

  2. A community-based model for health care social work

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    D.Litt. et Phil. Health and social issues have a reciprocal relation and this is evident in the South African context. Poverty that includes poor living conditions, unemployment and the consequent low income results in disease and malnutrition. A vicious circle exists between poverty and disease. The HIV/Aids pandemic results in people being in need of care, not being able to work nor provide for their next of kin, children being orphaned and taking over the parental role, without emotiona...

  3. Smart home technologies for health and social care support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Suzanne; Kelly, Greg; Kernohan, W George; McCreight, Bernadette; Nugent, Christopher

    2008-10-08

    The integration of smart home technology to support health and social care is acquiring an increasing global significance. Provision is framed within the context of a rapidly changing population profile, which is impacting on the number of people requiring health and social care, workforce availability and the funding of healthcare systems. To explore the effectiveness of smart home technologies as an intervention for people with physical disability, cognitive impairment or learning disability, who are living at home, and to consider the impact on the individual's health status and on the financial resources of health care. We searched the following databases for primary studies: (a) the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Register, (b) the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), (The Cochrane Library, issue 1, 2007), and (c) bibliographic databases, including MEDLINE (1966 to March 2007), EMBASE (1980 to March 2007) and CINAHL (1982 to March 2007). We also searched the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE). We searched the electronic databases using a strategy developed by the EPOC Trials Search Co-ordinator. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental studies, controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series analyses (ITS). Participants included adults over the age of 18, living in their home in a community setting. Participants with a physical disability, dementia or a learning disability were included. The included interventions were social alarms, electronic assistive devices, telecare social alert platforms, environmental control systems, automated home environments and 'ubiquitous homes'. Outcome measures included any objective measure that records an impact on a participant's quality of life, healthcare professional workload, economic outcomes, costs to healthcare provider or costs to participant. We included measures of service satisfaction

  4. Social engagement and health and social care use and medication use among older people

    OpenAIRE

    Bath, Peter A.; Gardiner, Alison

    2005-01-01

    Social engagement has been associated with improved health outcomes in older people, although the precise mechanisms by which this is mediated are not clear. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between social engagement and health and social care use and medication use in older people. Data were derived from the 1985, 1989 and 1993 waves of the Nottingham Longitudinal Study of Activity and Ageing, a nationally representative sample of people aged 65 and over. Logistic regres...

  5. Boundaries and e-health implementation in health and social care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Gerry

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major problem facing health and social care systems globally today is the growing challenge of an elderly population with complex health and social care needs. A longstanding challenge to the provision of high quality, effectively coordinated care for those with complex needs has been the historical separation of health and social care. Access to timely and accurate data about patients and their treatments has the potential to deliver better care at less cost. Methods To explore the way in which structural, professional and geographical boundaries have affected e-health implementation in health and social care, through an empirical study of the implementation of an electronic version of Single Shared Assessment (SSA in Scotland, using three retrospective, qualitative case studies in three different health board locations. Results Progress in effectively sharing electronic data had been slow and uneven. One cause was the presence of established structural boundaries, which lead to competing priorities, incompatible IT systems and infrastructure, and poor cooperation. A second cause was the presence of established professional boundaries, which affect staffs’ understanding and acceptance of data sharing and their information requirements. Geographical boundaries featured but less prominently and contrasting perspectives were found with regard to issues such as co-location of health and social care professionals. Conclusions To provide holistic care to those with complex health and social care needs, it is essential that we develop integrated approaches to care delivery. Successful integration needs practices such as good project management and governance, ensuring system interoperability, leadership, good training and support, together with clear efforts to improve working relations across professional boundaries and communication of a clear project vision. This study shows that while technological developments make

  6. Collaboration process for integrated social and health care strategy implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Korpela

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective:  To present collaboration process for creating a roadmap for the implementation of a strategy for integrated health and social care. The developed collaboration process includes multiple phases and uses electronic group decision support system technology (GDSS.Method: A case study done in the South Karelia District of Social and Health Services in Finland during 2010 - 2011. An expert panel of 13 participants was used in the planning process of the strategy implementation. The participants were interviewed and observed during the case study.Results: As a practical result, a roadmap for integrated health and social care strategy implementation has been developed. The strategic roadmap includes detailed plans of several projects which are needed for successful integration strategy implementation. As an academic result, a collaboration process to create such a roadmap has been developed.Conclusions: The collaboration process and technology seem to suit the planning process well. The participants of the meetings were satisfied with the collaboration process and the GDSS technology. The strategic roadmap was accepted by the participants, which indicates satisfaction with the developed process.

  7. Collaboration process for integrated social and health care strategy implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Korpela

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective:  To present collaboration process for creating a roadmap for the implementation of a strategy for integrated health and social care. The developed collaboration process includes multiple phases and uses electronic group decision support system technology (GDSS. Method: A case study done in the South Karelia District of Social and Health Services in Finland during 2010 - 2011. An expert panel of 13 participants was used in the planning process of the strategy implementation. The participants were interviewed and observed during the case study. Results: As a practical result, a roadmap for integrated health and social care strategy implementation has been developed. The strategic roadmap includes detailed plans of several projects which are needed for successful integration strategy implementation. As an academic result, a collaboration process to create such a roadmap has been developed. Conclusions: The collaboration process and technology seem to suit the planning process well. The participants of the meetings were satisfied with the collaboration process and the GDSS technology. The strategic roadmap was accepted by the participants, which indicates satisfaction with the developed process.

  8. Health literacy: critical opportunities for social work leadership in health care and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Janet M

    2011-05-01

    One-third of U.S. adults do not have adequate health literacy to manage their health care needs; and low health literacy is a major concern due to its association with poor health outcomes, high health care costs, and health communication problems. Low health literacy is a potential driver of health disparities, and its alleviation is central to the values and concerns of the social work profession. Despite the extensive knowledge and skills that social workers can bring to bear to assist patients with low health literacy, the concept of health literacy is underused in social work scholarship.This gap reflects missed opportunities for social workers to contribute their expertise to the evolving field of health literacy and to strategically align their work with organizational and national priorities.To address this gap, this article provides an overview of health literacy, its relevance to social work, and its representation in disciplinary literature; and it outlines opportunities for health social workers to systematically incorporate health literacy concepts and tools into their practices with patients and families. Implications for a social work research and practice agenda in health literacy are discussed.

  9. Health care agreements as a tool for coordinating health and social services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Andreas; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin; Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2007, a substantial reform changed the administrative boundaries of the Danish health care system and introduced health care agreements to be signed between municipal and regional authorities. To assess the health care agreements as a tool for coordinating health and social servi...... a useful tool for the coordination of health and social services. CONCLUSION: There are substantial improvements with the new health agreements in terms of formalising a better coordination of the health care system.......INTRODUCTION: In 2007, a substantial reform changed the administrative boundaries of the Danish health care system and introduced health care agreements to be signed between municipal and regional authorities. To assess the health care agreements as a tool for coordinating health and social...... services, a survey was conducted before (2005-2006) and after the reform (2011). THEORY AND METHODS: The study was designed on the basis of a modified version of Alter and Hage's framework for conceptualising coordination. Both surveys addressed all municipal level units (n = 271/98) and a random sample...

  10. Integrating Social impacts on Health and Health-Care Systems in Systemic Seismic Vulnerability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz-Plapp, T.; Khazai, B.; Daniell, J. E.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a new method for modeling health impacts caused by earthquake damage which allows for integrating key social impacts on individual health and health-care systems and for implementing these impacts in quantitative systemic seismic vulnerability analysis. In current earthquake casualty estimation models, demand on health-care systems is estimated by quantifying the number of fatalities and severity of injuries based on empirical data correlating building damage with casualties. The expected number of injured people (sorted by priorities of emergency treatment) is combined together with post-earthquake reduction of functionality of health-care facilities such as hospitals to estimate the impact on healthcare systems. The aim here is to extend these models by developing a combined engineering and social science approach. Although social vulnerability is recognized as a key component for the consequences of disasters, social vulnerability as such, is seldom linked to common formal and quantitative seismic loss estimates of injured people which provide direct impact on emergency health care services. Yet, there is a consensus that factors which affect vulnerability and post-earthquake health of at-risk populations include demographic characteristics such as age, education, occupation and employment and that these factors can aggravate health impacts further. Similarly, there are different social influences on the performance of health care systems after an earthquake both on an individual as well as on an institutional level. To link social impacts of health and health-care services to a systemic seismic vulnerability analysis, a conceptual model of social impacts of earthquakes on health and the health care systems has been developed. We identified and tested appropriate social indicators for individual health impacts and for health care impacts based on literature research, using available European statistical data. The results will be used to

  11. Patients' and health professionals' use of social media in health care: motives, barriers and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antheunis, Marjolijn L; Tates, Kiek; Nieboer, Theodoor E

    2013-09-01

    To investigate patients' and health professionals' (a) motives and use of social media for health-related reasons, and (b) barriers and expectations for health-related social media use. We conducted a descriptive online survey among 139 patients and 153 health care professionals in obstetrics and gynecology. In this survey, we asked the respondents about their motives and use of social network sites (SNS: Facebook and Hyves), Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Results showed that patients primarily used Twitter (59.9%), especially for increasing knowledge and exchanging advice and Facebook (52.3%), particularly for social support and exchanging advice. Professionals primarily used LinkedIn (70.7%) and Twitter (51.2%), for communication with their colleagues and marketing reasons. Patients' main barriers for social media use were privacy concerns and unreliability of the information. Professionals' main barriers were inefficiency and lack of skills. Both patients and professionals expected future social media use, provided that they can choose their time of social media usage. The results indicate disconcordance in patients' and professionals' motives and use of social media in health care. Future studies on social media use in health care should not disregard participants' underlying motives, barriers and expectations regarding the (non)use of social media. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reducing Racial Health Care Disparities: A Social Psychological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Louis A; Blair, Irene V; Albrecht, Terrance L; Dovidio, John F

    2014-10-01

    Large health disparities persist between Black and White Americans. The social psychology of intergroup relations suggests some solutions to health care disparities due to racial bias. Three paths can lead from racial bias to poorer health among Black Americans. First is the already well-documented physical and psychological toll of being a target of persistent discrimination. Second, implicit bias can affect physicians' perceptions and decisions, creating racial disparities in medical treatments, although evidence is mixed. The third path describes a less direct route: Physicians' implicit racial bias negatively affects communication and the patient-provider relationship, resulting in racial disparities in the outcomes of medical interactions. Strong evidence shows that physician implicit bias negatively affects Black patients' reactions to medical interactions, and there is good circumstantial evidence that these reactions affect health outcomes of the interactions. Solutions focused on the physician, the patient, and the health care delivery system; all agree that trying to ignore patients' race or to change physicians' implicit racial attitudes will not be effective and may actually be counterproductive. Instead, solutions can minimize the impact of racial bias on medical decisions and on patient-provider relationships.

  13. Health care agreements as a tool for coordinating health and social services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Rudkjøbing

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2007, a substantial reform changed the administrative boundaries of the Danish health care system and introduced health care agreements to be signed between municipal and regional authorities. To assess the health care agreements as a tool for coordinating health and social services, a survey was conducted before (2005–2006 and after the reform (2011.Theory and methods: The study was designed on the basis of a modified version of Alter and Hage's framework for conceptualising coordination. Both surveys addressed all municipal level units (n = 271/98 and a random sample of general practitioners (n = 700/853.Results: The health care agreements were considered more useful for coordinating care than the previous health plans. The power relationship between the regional and municipal authorities in drawing up the agreements was described as more equal. Familiarity with the agreements among general practitioners was higher, as was the perceived influence of the health care agreements on their work.Discussion: Health care agreements with specific content and with regular follow-up and systematic mechanisms for organising feedback between collaborative partners exemplify a useful tool for the coordination of health and social services.Conclusion: There are substantial improvements with the new health agreements in terms of formalising a better coordination of the health care system.

  14. Personnel management in Finnish social and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinen, Lauri; Konu, Anne; Viitanen, Elina

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine components of good personnel management and how they come true in accounts of social and health care managers. The data were obtained by means of a postal survey sent to middle-line managers in positions above the first-line management level in the responsibility area of Tampere University Hospital. The questionnaire was sent to 703 managers; 433 sent in responses indicating a response rate of 62 percent. Middle-line managers considered themselves as interactive, responsibility-sharing and understanding leaders, but found shortcomings in the leadership style of their superiors. Only 18 percent of the middle-line managers received feedback and only 42 percent received support from their superiors when needed. There were significant differences between genders, activity sectors and professional backgrounds in the responders' accounts concerning personnel management practices. The results of this study reliably describe how middle-line managers consider things to be, not necessarily how things are in reality. The findings confirm the assumption that the importance of personnel management is still not perfectly understood in the upper management levels of the social and health care sector. At the same time the self-evaluations of middle-line managers implied an ambition towards better personnel management. This study identifies components of good personnel management from literature and uses them as the basis for analysing the data.

  15. Standard of Care in Pediatrics: Integrating Family-Centred Care and Social Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Karen; Shaul, Randi Zlotnik; Chapman, Lee Ann; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth Lee

    2016-01-01

    In pediatric healthcare, there is a recognized need to address social determinants of health (SDOH) to positively influence child health and development. In addition, family-centred care (FCC) recognizes the value of the family unit in affecting individual patient experiences of illness and care. However, pediatric healthcare that incorporates principles of FCC and SDOH may be interpreted as calling on clinicians to deviate from or add to practices that form an accepted standard of care. This paper explores the legal and ethical considerations of doing so and describes practical responses to these challenging situations.

  16. Social representations of postpartum women on prenatal care in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eryjosy Marculino Guerreiro

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aimed at capturing the social representations of postpartum women on prenatal care in primary health care. This is a descriptive, qualitative study, guided by the Theory of Social Representations, developed in nine Family Health Centers, in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, from May to July, 2012. 31 women on postpartum were interviewed through semi-structured interviews. The interviews were recorded, fully transcribed and processed through ALCESTE software - 2010 version. The results observed in the lexical analysis of the interviews revealed the distribution of contents in four classes. Classes 4 and 1 dealing with prenatal care were explored in this study. Social representations of users about the prenatal are anchored in the protocol dimension and socio-educational dimension. The implantation and the maintenance of activities are necessary in order to share knowledge and interaction among the users

  17. Social care informatics as an essential part of holistic health care: a call for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Michael; Hill, Penny; Koch, Sabine; Keeling, Debbie

    2011-08-01

    The authors identified the need for a cross-disciplinary research view of issues to ensure an integrated citizen-centric support to achieve optimal health of individual citizens and, in particular, the role of informatics to inform and coordinate support towards integrated and holistic care. An Exploratory Workshop was approved and sponsored by the European Science Foundation. Twenty-three participants from 15 countries attended, covering a full range of health, social care and informatics professions and disciplines. The participants found strong common ground in identifying key issues to be addressed if citizens with compromised health are to receive integrated and coordinated support to a common set of objectives, while also ensuring appropriate choice and support for citizen, family and other informal carers. At the same time, optimal health was identified as a fundamental human right, and that achieving this is a necessary priority of a caring society. Moreover, Europe has a commitment to researching and developing health informatics (e-health), though not yet giving a priority to this integration of health and social care. Specifically the following main informatics challenges to be addressed were identified: (1) to identify available information and communication needs related to different scenarios of use in the intersection between health and social care, (2) to develop and map shared ontologies, and standards for integration and/or brokerage, (3) to enable planned information access and sharing, shaping a system of trust where the patient is an active partner and policies are established considering all partners/interests, (4) to investigate the use of automatic/intelligent knowledge based and context-relevant services, and (5) empowering the citizen (or their selected agent) as co-producer through modern informatics tools, while carefully avoiding selective disempowerment of the most vulnerable. The Exploratory Workshop resulted in a unanimous

  18. Using patient experiences on Dutch social media to supervise health care services: exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, T.H. van de; Engelen, L.J.L.P.G.; Verhoef, L.M.; Weide, M.J. van der; Schoonhoven, L.; Kool, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Social media has become mainstream and a growing number of people use it to share health care-related experiences, for example on health care rating sites. These users' experiences and ratings on social media seem to be associated with quality of care. Therefore, information shared by

  19. Best interests decisions: professional practices in health and social care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Val; Boyle, Geraldine; Jepson, Marcus; Swift, Paul; Williamson, Toby; Heslop, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on data collected in 2011 from a national study about the operation of the best interests principle, a key feature of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 for England and Wales. The objective was to provide a picture of current professional practices in best interests decision-making. Four contrasting sample sites were selected, in which National Health Service trusts, social care and other organisations were recruited to participate. A multimethod design was followed, including an online survey with 385 participants, followed by qualitative research through a telephone survey of 68 participants, and face-to-face semi-structured interviews following up 25 best interests cases, with different perspectives on the process in 12 of those cases. The current paper reports only on the qualitative findings. The findings indicate that the MCA was successful in providing a structure for these practitioners, and that the five principles of the MCA were in general adhered to. A variety of perceived risks led to best interests processes being undertaken, and a typical scenario was for a period of hospitalisation or ill health to trigger a best interests decision process about a social care and or a life decision. The study supported previous research in finding the notion of capacity the most difficult aspect of the MCA, and it provides evidence of some specific capacity assessment practices, including problematic ones relating to 'insight'. Best interests decisions were often made by consensus, with practitioners taking on different roles within the process. Meetings played a key part, but other ways of involving people lacking capacity and significant others were also important. It was recommended that the issues highlighted in this research could be clarified further in the Code of Practice, or within risk guidance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. NICE's social value judgements about equity in health and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Koonal K; Cookson, Richard; Culyer, Anthony J; Littlejohns, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) routinely publishes details of the evidence and reasoning underpinning its recommendations, including its social value judgements (SVJs). To date, however, NICE's SVJs relating to equity in the distribution of health and health care have been less specific and systematic than those relating to cost-effectiveness in the pursuit of improved total population health. NICE takes a pragmatic, case-based approach to developing its principles of SVJ, drawing on the cumulative experience of its advisory bodies in making decisions that command respect among its broad range of stakeholders. This paper aims to describe the SVJs about equity in health and health care that NICE has hitherto used to guide its decision making. To do this, we review both the general SVJs reported in NICE guidance on methodology and the case-specific SVJs reported in NICE guidance about particular health care technologies and public health interventions.

  1. [The economic-industrial health care complex and the social and economic dimension of development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, Carlos Augusto Grabois; Costa, Laís Silveira; Maldonado, José

    2012-12-01

    The strategic role of health care in the national development agenda has been increasingly recognized and institutionalized. In addition to its importance as a structuring element of the Social Welfare State, health care plays a leading role in the generation of innovation - an essential element for competitiveness in knowledge society. However, health care's productive basis is still fragile, and this negatively affects both the universal provision of health care services and Brazil's competitive inclusion in the globalized environment. This situation suggests the need of a more systematic analysis of the complex relationships among productive, technological and social interests in the scope of health care. Consequently, it is necessary to produce further knowledge about the Economic-Industrial Health Care Complex due to its potential for contributing to a socially inclusive development model. This means reversing the hierarchy between economic and social interests in the sanitary field, thus minimizing the vulnerability of the Brazilian health care policy.

  2. Preparing Social Work Students for Integrated Health Care: Results from a National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Mary Lehman; Mallory, Kim Crane; Cummings, Sherry

    2017-01-01

    Integrated health care serves a vital role in addressing interrelated physical and behavioral health conditions, but social work graduates often lack sufficient training to work on integrated teams. We surveyed 94 deans of master's of social work programs to assess the current and planned integrated health care curricula and the aptitude of…

  3. Health care and social media: What patients really understand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoedebecke, Kyle; Beaman, Lindsey; Mugambi, Joy; Shah, Sanam; Mohasseb, Marwa; Vetter, Cheyanne; Yu, Kim; Gergianaki, Irini; Couvillon, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Background: Low health literacy is associated with decreased patient compliance and worse outcomes - with clinicians increasingly relying on printed materials to lower such risks. Yet, many of these documents exceed recommended comprehension levels. Furthermore, patients look increasingly to social media (SoMe) to answer healthcare questions. The character limits built into Twitter encourage users to publish small quantities of text, which are more accessible to patients with low health literacy. The present authors hypothesize that SoMe posts are written at lower grade levels than traditional medical sources, improving patient health literacy. Methods: The data sample consisted of the first 100 original tweets from three trending medical hashtags, leading to a total of 300 tweets. The Flesch-Kincaid Readability Formula (FKRF) was used to derive grade level of the tweets. Data was analyzed via descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: The readability scores for the data sample had a mean grade level of 9.45. A notable 47.6% of tweets were above ninth grade reading level. An independent-sample t-test comparing FKRF mean scores of different hashtags found differences between the means of the following: #hearthealth versus #diabetes (t = 3.15, p = 0.002); #hearthealth versus #migraine (t = 0.09, p = 0.9); and #diabetes versus #migraine (t = 3.4, p = 0.001). Conclusions: Tweets from this data sample were written at a mean grade level of 9.45, signifying a level between the ninth and tenth grades. This is higher than desired, yet still better than traditional sources, which have been previously analyzed. Ultimately, those responsible for health care SoMe posts must continue to improve efforts to reach the recommended reading level (between the sixth and eighth grade), so as to ensure optimal comprehension of patients.

  4. Social participation and quality of health care: the experience of citizens' health representatives in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigenda-López, Gustavo H; Juárez-Ramírez, Clara; Ruiz-Larios, José A; Herrera, Cristina M

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the experience of the aval ciudadano "Citizens' Representative" (CR) in improving the Mexican health care system. This is a qualitative study which took place in eight Mexican states in 2008. It evaluates different aspects of a nationwide program to increase the quality of health care services (National Crusade for Quality in Health Services). The Mexican strategy is compared with experiences in other Latin American countries. In this paper, there is the description of achievements and problems encountered by the CR in promoting social participation in the health of the population. The CR has great influence when representing health service users and passing on their demands for improvements to health care quality.

  5. Catalogue of National Health and Social Care Data Collections

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sinnott, Sarah-Jo

    2017-08-17

    Administrative health data, such as pharmacy claims data, present a valuable resource for conducting pharmacoepidemiological and health services research. Often, data are available for whole populations allowing population level analyses. Moreover, their routine collection ensures that the data reflect health care utilisation in the real-world setting compared to data collected in clinical trials.

  6. Perceived support from a caregiver's social ties predicts subsequent care-recipient health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Dannielle E; Lewis, Megan A; Southwell, Brian G

    2017-12-01

    Most social support research has examined support from an individual patient perspective and does not model the broader social context of support felt by caregivers. Understanding how social support networks may complement healthcare services is critical, considering the aging population, as social support networks may be a valuable resource to offset some of the demands placed on the healthcare system. We sought to identify how caregivers' perceived organizational and interpersonal support from their social support network influences care-recipient health. We created a dyadic dataset of care-recipient and caregivers from the first two rounds of the National Health and Aging Trends survey (2011, 2012) and the first round of the associated National Study of Caregivers survey (2011). Using structural equation modeling, we explored how caregivers' perceived social support is associated with caregiver confidence to provide care, and is associated with care-recipient health outcomes at two time points. All data were analyzed in 2016. Social engagement with members from caregivers' social support networks was positively associated with caregiver confidence, and social engagement and confidence were positively associated with care-recipient health at time 1. Social engagement positively predicted patient health at time 2 controlling for time 1. Conversely, use of organizational support negatively predicted care-recipient health at time 2. Care-recipients experience better health outcomes when caregivers are able to be more engaged with members of their social support network.

  7. Using a social entrepreneurial approach to enhance the financial and social value of health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sandra S; Lu, Jui-Fen Rachel; Guo, Kristina L

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a conceptual framework was developed to show that social entrepreneurial practices can be effectively translated to meet the social needs in health care. We used a theory-in-use case study approach that encompasses postulation of a working taxonomy from literature scanning and a deliberation of the taxonomy through triangulation of multilevel data of a case study conducted in a Taiwan-based hospital system. Specifically, we demonstrated that a nonprofit organization can adopt business principles that emphasize both financial and social value. We tested our model and found comprehensive accountability across departments throughout the case hospital system, and this led to sustainable and continual growth of the organization. Through social entrepreneurial practices, we established that both financial value creation and fulfilling the social mission for the case hospital system can be achieved.

  8. Primary health and social care services in the UK: progress towards partnership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummery, Kirstein; Coleman, Anna

    2003-04-01

    There has been a shift in the theoretical debates around the ways in which organisations deliver the state's objectives of providing health and social care services for its citizens, focusing on issues of welfare governance and the encouragement of partnership working between organisations. This article develops these theories by focusing on developments in primary health and social care policy in the UK, which have undergone a radical change recently. Responsibility for commissioning health care services now falls to primary care groups and trusts (PCG/Ts), run by general practitioners, other primary care practitioners, managers and lay members, and there is some pressure on primary care groups and primary care trusts to engage in partnership working with social services, for example, to cut hospital waiting lists or provide intermediate care services. One policy option is for these organisations to form Care Trusts, integrating the commissioning of health and social care for older people and ending the historical organisational divisions between health and social care in the UK. This paper examines evidence from the first stage of a 3-year longitudinal quantitative and qualitative study of the development of partnership working between PCG/Ts and social services departments in England. It examines whether the evidence suggests that the integration of health and social care is feasible or desirable in older people's services.

  9. Health care development: integrating transaction cost theory with social support theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajli, M Nick; Shanmugam, Mohana; Hajli, Ali; Khani, Amir Hossein; Wang, Yichuan

    2014-07-28

    The emergence of Web 2.0 technologies has already been influential in many industries, and Web 2.0 applications are now beginning to have an impact on health care. These new technologies offer a promising approach for shaping the future of modern health care, with the potential for opening up new opportunities for the health care industry as it struggles to deal with challenges including the need to cut costs, the increasing demand for health services and the increasing cost of medical technology. Social media such as social networking sites are attracting more individuals to online health communities, contributing to an increase in the productivity of modern health care and reducing transaction costs. This study therefore examines the potential effect of social technologies, particularly social media, on health care development by adopting a social support/transaction cost perspective. Viewed through the lens of Information Systems, social support and transaction cost theories indicate that social media, particularly online health communities, positively support health care development. The results show that individuals join online health communities to share and receive social support, and these social interactions provide both informational and emotional support.

  10. Knowledge of Alzheimer's Disease among Norwegian Undergraduate Health and Social Care Students: A Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kada, Sundaran

    2015-01-01

    With an aging general population and a concurrent increase in the prevalence of dementia, health and social care professional students are increasingly exposed to this group of patients during their clinical placements and after graduation. A sound dementia-related knowledge base among health and social care students is important in providing…

  11. Postpolio Survivors: Needs for and Access to Social and Health Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Larry W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Needs assessment survey of 268 polio survivors explored incidence of postpolio syndrome and perceived need for and access to social and health care services. Large proportion of respondents reported experiencing postpolio syndrome. Most perceived that they had no access to knowledgeable physicians or social and health care services, and most were…

  12. 77 FR 58755 - Small Business Size Standards: Health Care and Social Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 121 RIN 3245-AG30 Small Business Size Standards: Health Care and Social Assistance..., Health Care and Social Assistance, reflect the changes in economic characteristics of small businesses... small. The Small Business Act delegates to SBA's Administrator the responsibility for establishing small...

  13. National health insurance, social influence and antenatal care use in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Owoo, Nkechi S.; Lambon-Quayefio, Monica P.

    2013-01-01

    The study explores the importance of social influence and the availability of health insurance on maternal care utilization in Ghana through the use of antenatal care services. A number of studies have found that access to health insurance plays a critical role in women?s decision to utilize antenatal care services. However, little is known about the role that social forces play in this decision. This study uses village-level data from the 2008 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey to investiga...

  14. Engagement with health and social care services: perceptions of homeless young people with mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, Philip; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; Fereday, Jennifer; Jureidini, Jon; Drummond, Andrew

    2006-11-01

    The present qualitative study describes and discusses the perspectives and experiences of young homeless people with mental health problems in relation to their interactions with health and social care services. Working in partnership with Streetlink, a supported accommodation assistance programme in Adelaide, Australia, the authors interviewed 10 homeless young people, aged from 16 to 24 years of age, who had experienced mental health problems. In-depth interviews elicited accounts of the best and worst of the participants' experiences of health and social care services. Access to services was not identified as being a significant problem in comparison with the participants' concerns regarding the quality of the services encountered. The central findings stress the importance of a respectful and supportive climate in relation to the qualities of service provision that the young people identified as valuable for their continuing treatment or consultation.

  15. [Health-care utilization in elderly (Spain 2006-2012): Influence of health status and social class].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Palacio, Isabel; Carrera-Lasfuentes, Patricia; Solsona, Sofía; Sartolo, M Teresa; Rabanaque, M José

    2016-04-01

    to explore health-care utilization (primary and specialized health-care, hospitalizations, day hospital and emergency services) and overuse in elderly in Spain, considering the influence of health status, sex, social class and its temporal trend. cross sectional study in two phases. Spain. people surveyed in the National Health Surveys 2006 and 2011-12. Health status was measured using self-rated and diagnosed health (number and diagnoses). Social class was obtained from the last occupation of the main supporter (manual and non-manual workers). Logistic regression analyses were conducted adjusting by sex, age, health status, social class and year, obtaining its predictive capacity. the percentage of elderly population with health-care utilization decreased during the period analyzed. Women who belonged to the manual workers category presented the highest prevalence of low health (low self-rated health in 2006: 70.6%). Low health status was associated with a higher utilization of health-care services. Self-rated health was a better predictor of health-care utilization and overuse than diagnosed health, getting the highest predictive capacity for specialized health-care (C = 0.676). Old people from low social class used with higher frequency primary health-care and emergency services. On the other hand, specialized health-care and day hospital were more used by high social classes. inequalities in health and health-care utilization have been observed in elderly according social class. It is necessary to consider self-rated health as a health-care utilization predictor and to review our health-care services accessibility and equity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Using Social Determinants of Health to Link Health Workforce Diversity, Care Quality and Access, and Health Disparities to Achieve Health Equity in Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Shanita D.; Hansen, Kristen; Smithey, Marian; Burnley, Josepha; Koplitz, Michelle; Koyama, Kirk; Young, Janice; Bakos, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that diversifying the nation's health-care workforce is a necessary strategy to increase access to quality health care for all populations, reduce health disparities, and achieve health equity. In this article, we present a conceptual model that utilizes the social determinants of health framework to link nursing workforce diversity and care quality and access to two critical population health indicators—health disparities and health equity. Our proposed model suggests t...

  17. Impact of extreme weather events and climate change for health and social care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Sarah; Fair, Alistair; Wistow, Jonathan; Val, Dimitri V; Oven, Katie

    2017-12-05

    This review, commissioned by the Research Councils UK Living With Environmental Change (LWEC) programme, concerns research on the impacts on health and social care systems in the United Kingdom of extreme weather events, under conditions of climate change. Extreme weather events considered include heatwaves, coldwaves and flooding. Using a structured review method, we consider evidence regarding the currently observed and anticipated future impacts of extreme weather on health and social care systems and the potential of preparedness and adaptation measures that may enhance resilience. We highlight a number of general conclusions which are likely to be of international relevance, although the review focussed on the situation in the UK. Extreme weather events impact the operation of health services through the effects on built, social and institutional infrastructures which support health and health care, and also because of changes in service demand as extreme weather impacts on human health. Strategic planning for extreme weather and impacts on the care system should be sensitive to within country variations. Adaptation will require changes to built infrastructure systems (including transport and utilities as well as individual care facilities) and also to institutional and social infrastructure supporting the health care system. Care sector organisations, communities and individuals need to adapt their practices to improve resilience of health and health care to extreme weather. Preparedness and emergency response strategies call for action extending beyond the emergency response services, to include health and social care providers more generally.

  18. Professionalism in a digital age: opportunities and considerations for using social media in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Kendra; Sabus, Carla

    2015-03-01

    Since the beginning of the millennium, there has been a remarkable change in how people access and share information. Much of this information is user-generated content found on social media sites. As digital technologies and social media continue to expand, health care providers must adapt their professional communication to meet the expectations and needs of consumers. This adaptation may include communication on social media sites. However, many health care providers express concerns that professional social media use, particularly interactions with patients, is ethically problematic. Social media engagement does not create ethical dissonance if best practices are observed and online communication adheres to terms of service, professional standards, and organizational policy. A well-executed social media presence provides health care providers, including physical therapists, the opportunity-and perhaps a professional obligation-to use social media sites to share or create credible health care information, filling a consumer void for high-quality online information on fitness, wellness, and rehabilitation. This perspective article provides a broad review of the emergence of social media in society and health care, explores policy implications of organizational adoption of health care social media, and proposes individual opportunities and guidelines for social media use by the physical therapy professional. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  19. FAMILY EVALUATION: NETWORK OF SOCIAL SUPPORT IN MENTAL HEALTH CARE

    OpenAIRE

    Lavall, Eliane; UFRGS; Olschowsky, Agnes; UFRGS; Prado Kantorski, Luciane; Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPEL)

    2009-01-01

    This study aims at identifying the network of social support of a user and family upon a follow-up in a Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS). It consists of a subproject of the research named Evaluation of Psychosocial Care Centers from the southern region of Brazil, carried out in a CAPS of Porto Alegre having as subjects a user and a relative. It is a qualitative research of case study type that utilizes the Calgary Model of Family Evaluation. The collection of data provided the construction of ...

  20. Disabled older people's use of health and social care services and their unmet care needs in six European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Barbara; McKee, Kevin J; Döhner, Hanneli; Triantafillou, Judith; Lamura, Giovanni; Doroszkiewicz, Halina; Krevers, Barbro; Kofahl, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    The national health and social care systems in Europe remain poorly integrated with regard to the care needs of older persons. The present study examined the range of health and social care services used by older people and their unmet care needs, across six European countries. Family carers of older people were recruited in six countries via a standard protocol. Those providing care for disabled older people (n = 2629) provided data on the older person's service use over a 6-month period, and their current unmet care needs. An inventory of 21 services common to all six countries was developed. Analyses considered the relationship between older people's service use and unmet care needs across countries. Older people in Greece, Italy and Poland used mostly health-oriented services, used fewer services overall and also demonstrated a higher level of unmet care needs when compared with the other countries. Older people in the United Kingdom, Germany and Sweden used a more balanced profile of socio-medical services. A negative relationship was found between the number of different services used and the number of different areas of unmet care needs across countries. Unmet care needs in older people are particularly high in European countries where social service use is low, and where there is a lack of balance in the use of health and social care services. An expansion of social care services in these countries might be the most effective strategy for reducing unmet needs in disabled older people.

  1. Strengthening Primary Health Care and Social Protection: Universal ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    One of the poorest countries in the world, Pakistan has been afflicted by both societal turmoil and natural disasters during the past decade. The resulting decline of an already-frail economy has made inequalities even more prominent. This development has acutely affected the health sector, which bears the burden of care ...

  2. Health care and social media platforms in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, Michele L; Armbruster, Shannon D; Chung, Jae Eun; Kim, Junghyun; McKenzie, Alissa; von Gruenigen, Vivian E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to illustrate user characteristics of a hospital's social media structure using analytics and user surveys. A 1-year retrospective analysis was conducted along with an Internet survey of users of the hospital's Facebook, Twitter, and blog. Of the survey respondents (n = 163), 95.7% are female and 4.3% are male; most are ages 50-59 years (31.5%) and 40-49 years (27.8%); and 93.2% are Caucasian. However, the hospital system database revealed 55% female and 37% minority population, respectively. Of the survey respondents, 61.4% reported having a bachelor's degree or higher, whereas only 11.7% reported having a high school degree/equivalent or lower. However, within the hospital patient databases, 93% of patients have a high school degree/equivalent or lower and only 3% have a bachelor's degree or higher in our women's services population. Social media were used to seek personal health information 68.7% (n = 112), to learn about hospital programming 27.6% (n = 45), and to seek family health information 25.2% (n = 41). Respondents younger than 49 years of age were more likely to seek personal health information using social media compared to those 50 years of age and older (p = .02). Respondents with a bachelor's degree or higher education were statistically less likely to search for physician information compared to those less educated individuals (p = .04). We conclude that social media may play an important role in personal health information, especially for young female respondents; however, the survey provides strong evidence that further research is needed to ensure that social network sites provided by hospitals are reaching the full spectrum of health system patients.

  3. Social capital and preventive care use among the elderly under Taiwan's National Health Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu-I; Lin, Tsui-Fang

    The National Health Insurance (NHI) system in Taiwan provides free annual preventive care services and other disease-specific preventive care services under low copayments to people aged 65 and older, yet their utilization rates remain low ever since implementation. This study investigates whether social capital is associated with preventive care use among people aged 65 and older. Using the 2009 National Health Interview Study, this study measures social capital by the elderly's social network and social participation, and employs the logistic regressions to estimate the association between social capital and the odds of using a variety of preventive care services. The results show that social capital in terms of social network and social participation is significantly associated with the use of NHI general preventive care services. For disease-specific preventive care, it is social participation, rather than social network, that is related to the utilization rate. The associations between social capital and different types of preventive care use found in our study could be considered as an important factor when making policies to promote the utilization of preventive care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nursing shaping and influencing health and social care policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyffe, Theresa

    2009-09-01

    This paper seeks to consider how nursing as a profession in the United Kingdom is developing its role in shaping and influencing policy using lessons learnt from a policy study tour undertaken in the United States of America and extensive experience as a senior nurse within the government, the health service and more recently within a Professional Organization. The nursing profession faces major changes in health and health care and nurses need to be visible in the public debate about future models of health and health care. This paper critically reviews recent UK and USA literature and policy with relevance to nursing. Strategies that support nurses and nursing to influence policy are in place but more needs to be done to address all levels of nursing in order to find creative solutions that promote and increase the participation of nurses in the political process and health policy. There are lessons to be learnt in the UK from the US nursing experience. These need to be considered in the context of the UK and devolution. Although much has been achieved in positioning nurses and nursing as an influencer in the arena of policy and political decision-making, there is a need for greater co-ordination of action to ensure that nursing is actively supported in influencing and shaping health and health care policy. All leaders and other stakeholders require to play their part in considering how the actions set out in this article can be taken forward and how gaps such as education, fellowship experience and media engagement can be addressed in the future.

  5. Conceptions of authority within contemporary social work practice in managed mental health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bransford, Cassandra L

    2005-07-01

    This article examines how social workers may use their authority to create managed mental health care organizations that support the principles and values of professional social work practice. By exploring research and theoretical contributions from a multidisciplinary perspective, the author suggests ways that social workers may incorporate empowerment strategies into their organizational practices to create more socially responsible and humane mental health organizations. (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Health care social media: expectations of users in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrita; Biswas, Dhrubes

    2013-01-01

    Affordability, acceptability, accommodation, availability, and accessibility are the five most important dimensions of access to health services. Seventy two percent of the Indian population lives in semi-urban and rural areas. The strong mismatched ratio of hospitals to patients, rising costs of health care, rapidly changing demographics, increasing population, and heightened demands in pricing for technological health care usage in emerging economies necessitate a unique health delivery solution model using social media. A greater disease burden lies in the health care delivery in developing country like India. This is due to the lack of health care infrastructure in the majority of semi-urban and rural regions. New techniques need to be introduced in these regions to overcome these issues. In the present scenario, people use social media from business, automobiles, arts, book marking, cooking, entertainment, and general networking. Developed and advanced countries like the United States have developed their communication system for many years now. They have already established social media in a number of domains including health care. Similar practice incidences can be used to provide a new dimension to health care in the semi-urban regions of India. This paper describes an extended study of a previous empirical study on the expectations of social media users for health care. The paper discusses what the users of social media expect from a health care social media site. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the significance of the affect of four factors (privacy, immediacy, usability, and communication) on the usage of health care social media. Privacy, immediacy, usability, and communication were the independent variables and health care social media was the dependant variable. There were 103 respondents who used the online questionnaire tool to generate their responses. The results from the multiple regression analysis using SPSS 20 showed that

  7. Leaving foster or residential care: a participatory study of care leavers' experiences of health and social care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liabo, K; McKenna, C; Ingold, A; Roberts, H

    2017-03-01

    Young people in residential or foster care experience multiple transitions around their 18th birthday without the long term and consistent support from their family of origin that most of their peers can expect. We report a mixed methods qualitative study of transitions across health and social care services for children leaving care, providing narratives of what young people described as positive, and what they and professionals think might be improved. Data were collected in participatory meetings and individual interviews between young people and researchers (n = 24) and individual interviews with practitioners (n = 11). In addition to discussion and interview techniques, we used pictorial and other participatory methods. Interviews were coded by three members of the team and differences resolved with a fourth. Our analysis draws on thematic and framework approaches. Health was rarely at the top of any young person's agenda, although gaps in health care and exceptional care were both described. Housing, financial support and education took priority. Young people and professionals alike emphasized the importance of workers prepared to go the extra mile; of young people being able to contact professionals; and professionals being able to contact one another. Policy and practice aspirations for care leavers recommend gradual change but transfer rather than transition continues to be described by care leavers. Our data support the need for transition as a long-term process, with children and young people having early opportunities to prepare for citizenship. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Health Literacy: Critical Opportunities for Social Work Leadership in Health Care and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Janet M.

    2011-01-01

    One-third of U. S. adults do not have adequate health literacy to manage their health care needs; and low health literacy is a major concern due to its association with poor health outcomes, high health care costs, and health communication problems. Low health literacy is a potential driver of health disparities, and its alleviation is central to…

  9. "The View from Inside": Understanding Service User Involvement in Health and Social Care Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Service users are increasingly involved in health and social care education, whilst the government is committed to increasing access to employment for people with mental health needs. The benefits of involving service users in social work education have been identified, including increasing skills, confidence, and building capacity; yet there is…

  10. Social justice, health disparities, and culture in the care of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth-Anderson, Peggye; Pierre, Geraldine; Hilliard, Tandrea S

    2012-01-01

    Older minority Americans experience worse health outcomes than their white counterparts, exhibiting the need for social justice in all areas of their health care. Justice, fairness, and equity are crucial to minimizing conditions that adversely affect the health of individuals and communities. In this paper, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is used as an example of a health care disparity among elderly Americans that requires social justice interventions. Cultural factors play a crucial role in AD screening, diagnosis, and access to care, and are often a barrier to support and equality for minority communities. The "conundrum of health disparities" refers to the interplay between disparity, social justice, and cultural interpretation, and encourages researchers to understand both (1) disparity caused by economic and structural barriers to access, treatment, and diagnosis, and (2) disparity due to cultural interpretation of disease, in order to effectively address health care issues and concerns among elderly Americans. © 2012 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  11. Changes in Emotional-Social Intelligence, Caring, Leadership and Moral Judgment during Health Science Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Helene; Benson, Gerry; Wessel, Jean; Martin, Lynn; Ploeg, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    In addition to having academic knowledge and clinical skills, health professionals need to be caring, ethical practitioners able to understand the emotional concerns of their patients and to effect change. The purpose of this study was to determine whether emotional-social intelligence, caring, leadership and moral judgment of health science…

  12. Health care provider social network analysis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sung-Heui; Nikolaev, Alexander; Seo, Jin Young; Castner, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in understanding networks, their structure, and their development, little has been known about their effectiveness in the health care setting and their contributions to quality of care and patient safety.The purpose of this study was to examine studies using social network analysis (SNA) in the health care workforce and assess factors contributing to social network and their relationships with care processes and patient outcomes. We identified all published peer-reviewed SNA articles in CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, JSTOR, Medline (OVID), and Web of Science databases up to April 2013. Twenty-nine published articles met the inclusion criteria. Current evidence of the health care workforce's social networks reveals the nature of social ties are related to personal characteristics, practice setting, and types of patients. A few studies also revealed the social network effects adoption and the use of a health information system, patient outcomes, and coordination. Current studies on the social ties of health care workforce professionals include several assessments of inefficiencies. The level of technical sophistication in these studies tended to be low. Future study using enhanced sophistication in study design, analysis, and patient outcome testing are warranted to fully leverage the potential of SNA in health care studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Birth cohort testing for hepatitis C virus: implications for clinical social workers in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Omar T; Whalen, Christopher C; Nackerud, Larry G; Bride, Brian E

    2013-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends one-time hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing for baby boomers born between 1945-1965 in the United States. This public health initiative is known as birth cohort (baby boomer) testing for HCV. The intent of birth cohort testing is to identify and mobilize undiagnosed HCV-infected persons into care and treatment. Subsequently, clinical social workers in health care settings can anticipate a substantial increase in the number of HCV-infected persons presenting for care and treatment. The purpose of this article is to inform clinical social workers in health care settings of HCV, the standard of care and treatment for HCV, and clinical dilemmas associated with HCV patient care. Epidemiology and natural history of HCV, the standard of care and treatment for HCV, and etiology and management of neuropsychiatric adverse effects associated with patient care are discussed.

  14. Health and social care workers: don't risk flu infection

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2015-01-01

    This leaflet explains why health and social care workers should receive the new flu vaccine. It provides a range of information, including how to get vaccinated, how the vaccine works, how effective it is and possible side effects.

  15. Social Media and Health Care Professionals: Benefits, Risks, and Best Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Ventola, C. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Health care professionals can use a variety of social media tools to improve or enhance networking, education, and other activities. However, these tools also present some potential risks, such as unreliable information and violations of patients’ privacy rights.

  16. Social media and health care professionals: benefits, risks, and best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventola, C Lee

    2014-07-01

    Health care professionals can use a variety of social media tools to improve or enhance networking, education, and other activities. However, these tools also present some potential risks, such as unreliable information and violations of patients' privacy rights.

  17. Co-Leadership ? A Management Solution for Integrated Health and Social Care

    OpenAIRE

    Klinga, Charlotte; Hansson, Johan; Hasson, Henna; Sachs, Magna Andreen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Co-leadership has been identified as one approach to meet the managerial challenges of integrated services, but research on the topic is limited. In the present study, co-leadership, practised by pairs of managers – each manager representing one of the two principal organizations in integrated health and social care services – was explored. Aim: To investigate co-leadership in integrated health and social care, identify essential preconditions in fulfilling the management assign...

  18. National health insurance, social influence and antenatal care use in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoo, Nkechi S; Lambon-Quayefio, Monica P

    2013-08-06

    The study explores the importance of social influence and the availability of health insurance on maternal care utilization in Ghana through the use of antenatal care services. A number of studies have found that access to health insurance plays a critical role in women's decision to utilize antenatal care services. However, little is known about the role that social forces play in this decision. This study uses village-level data from the 2008 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey to investigate the effects of health insurance and social influences on the intensity of antenatal care utilization by Ghanaian women. Using GIS information at the village level, we employ a spatial lag regression model in this study. Results indicate that, controlling for a host of socioeconomic and geographical factors, women who have health insurance appear to use more antenatal services than women who do not. In addition, the intensity of antenatal visits appears to be spatially correlated among the survey villages, implying that there may be some social influences that affect a woman's decision to utilize antenatal care. A reason for this may be that women who benefit from antenatal care through positive pregnancy outcomes may pass this information along to their peers who also increase their use of these services in response. Traditional/Cultural leaders as "gate-keepers" may be useful in the dissemination of maternal health care information. Public health officials may also explore the possibility of disseminating information relating to maternal care services via the mass media.

  19. Entrepreneurs ' perspective on public-private partnership in health care and social services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinisammal, Janne; Leviäkangas, Pekka; Autio, Tommi; Hyrkäs, Elina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to probe experiences of entrepreneurs in the social and health care service provision. Information was collected regarding entrepreneurs' views on the factors affecting the collaboration between public and private sectors. A sample of social and health care entrepreneurs was interviewed using open-ended questions. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using inductive content analysis. Three main categories of factors affecting the success of partnership were identified: the nature of partnership, business aspects and tension builders. Research LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: The research was undertaken in rural Finland and the sample consisted 13 entrepreneurs. The results must be considered as observations with more generalised conclusions. PRACTICAL implications - The results of this study support municipalities in their social and health care service strategy work and especially in consideration of how to also facilitate a fruitful public-private partnership (PPP)-framework, which will largely depend on mutual understanding and consensus. The reform of the social and health care system has raised intensive public debate throughout Europe. Key issues include the reorganising of social and health care processes as well as PPPs in provision of services. This study observes the views and experiences of private entrepreneurs and points out where some potential problems and solutions of social and health care PPPs are.

  20. Using patient experiences on Dutch social media to supervise health care services: exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Belt, Tom H; Engelen, Lucien J L P G; Verhoef, Lise M; van der Weide, Marian J A; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Kool, Rudolf B

    2015-01-15

    Social media has become mainstream and a growing number of people use it to share health care-related experiences, for example on health care rating sites. These users' experiences and ratings on social media seem to be associated with quality of care. Therefore, information shared by citizens on social media could be of additional value for supervising the quality and safety of health care services by regulatory bodies, thereby stimulating participation by consumers. The objective of the study was to identify the added value of social media for two types of supervision by the Dutch Healthcare Inspectorate (DHI), which is the regulatory body charged with supervising the quality and safety of health care services in the Netherlands. These were (1) supervision in response to incidents reported by individuals, and (2) risk-based supervision. We performed an exploratory study in cooperation with the DHI and searched different social media sources such as Twitter, Facebook, and healthcare rating sites to find additional information for these incidents and topics, from five different sectors. Supervision experts determined the added value for each individual result found, making use of pre-developed scales. Searches in social media resulted in relevant information for six of 40 incidents studied and provided relevant additional information in 72 of 116 cases in risk-based supervision of long-term elderly care. The results showed that social media could be used to include the patient's perspective in supervision. However, it appeared that the rating site ZorgkaartNederland was the only source that provided information that was of additional value for the DHI, while other sources such as forums and social networks like Twitter and Facebook did not result in additional information. This information could be of importance for health care inspectorates, particularly for its enforcement by risk-based supervision in care of the elderly. Further research is needed to determine

  1. Using Patient Experiences on Dutch Social Media to Supervise Health Care Services: Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Lucien JLPG; Verhoef, Lise M; van der Weide, Marian JA; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Kool, Rudolf B

    2015-01-01

    Background Social media has become mainstream and a growing number of people use it to share health care-related experiences, for example on health care rating sites. These users’ experiences and ratings on social media seem to be associated with quality of care. Therefore, information shared by citizens on social media could be of additional value for supervising the quality and safety of health care services by regulatory bodies, thereby stimulating participation by consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify the added value of social media for two types of supervision by the Dutch Healthcare Inspectorate (DHI), which is the regulatory body charged with supervising the quality and safety of health care services in the Netherlands. These were (1) supervision in response to incidents reported by individuals, and (2) risk-based supervision. Methods We performed an exploratory study in cooperation with the DHI and searched different social media sources such as Twitter, Facebook, and healthcare rating sites to find additional information for these incidents and topics, from five different sectors. Supervision experts determined the added value for each individual result found, making use of pre-developed scales. Results Searches in social media resulted in relevant information for six of 40 incidents studied and provided relevant additional information in 72 of 116 cases in risk-based supervision of long-term elderly care. Conclusions The results showed that social media could be used to include the patient’s perspective in supervision. However, it appeared that the rating site ZorgkaartNederland was the only source that provided information that was of additional value for the DHI, while other sources such as forums and social networks like Twitter and Facebook did not result in additional information. This information could be of importance for health care inspectorates, particularly for its enforcement by risk-based supervision in care of

  2. Smart Telecare Technology in Health and Social Primary Care Management for Personalized Approach in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandri, Danae; Tsirintani, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The paper studies the smart telecare utility in health & social care fields for the satisfactory increase of external and internal user through personalized approach and the capability proof of continuing management improvement through quality indicators. Primary survey studies of aged people's satisfaction through smart telecare in Greece - maybe in good health or patients or socially isolated - interviewing four types involved - aged, caregivers, health or social care providers and smart technology providers or producers. The sample seems positive to smart telecare for prevention, protection, safety and security. To sum up, they believe there are organizational problems in Greece due to lack of information.

  3. Developing a palliative care competence framework for health and social care professionals: the experience in the Republic of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Michael; Ryan, Karen; Charnley, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Competence-based education in health and social care has been promoted through the Tuning Process in Europe. This papers reports on the process of developing a Palliative Care Competence Framework for health and social care professionals working in the Republic of Ireland. A Palliative Care Competence Framework Steering Group, comprising a range of health and social care professionals, was established to oversee and drive the development of the framework, through identification of core competences and related indicators and supporting the work of 10 working groups to develop discipline specific competences. The Palliative Care Competence Framework identifies six domains of competence with core indicators which all health and social care professionals should be able to demonstrate on completion of initial academic programme for professional registration or in the context of their current job. Discipline-specific competences supplement the core competences and describe additional skill-specific competences acquired during training in that discipline. Discipline-specific competences are organised in three ascending levels of expertise of palliative care practice. The framework describes universal core competences in palliative care while also detailing individual competences for each health and social care discipline. It is envisioned that the framework will inform academic curricula and professional development programmes, and so will enhance the care of people with life-limiting illness, fostering greater interprofessional and interorganisational collaboration in palliative care provision. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Social Media Channels in Health Care Research and Rising Ethical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Samy A

    2017-11-01

    Social media channels such as Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn have been used as tools in health care research, opening new horizons for research on health-related topics (e.g., the use of mobile social networking in weight loss programs). While there have been efforts to develop ethical guidelines for internet-related research, researchers still face unresolved ethical challenges. This article investigates some of the risks inherent in social media research and discusses how researchers should handle challenges related to confidentiality, privacy, and consent when social media tools are used in health-related research. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Development of the ITHACA Toolkit for monitoring human rights and general health care in psychiatric and social care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, J; Thornicroft, G; Burti, L; Katschnig, H; Lewis, O; Russo, J; Shaw, T; Wahlbeck, K; Rose, D

    2013-09-01

    Background. Human rights violations are commonly experienced by people in psychiatric and social care institutions. States and private organizations providing such health and social services must comply with international human rights law. Monitoring of such compliance is increasingly recognized as a vital component in ensuring that rights are respected and violations are brought out in the open, remedied and prevented. Aims. The Institutional Treatment, Human Rights and Care Assessment (ITHACA) project produced a method to document violations and good practice with the aim of preventing human rights violations and improving general health care practice in psychiatric and social care institutions (www.ithacastudy.eu). Methods. A methodological and implementation study conducted across 15 European countries developed and assessed the ITHACA Toolkit in monitoring visits to 87 mental health organizations. Results. The toolkit is available in 13 European languages and has demonstrated applicability in a range of contexts and conditions. The information gathered through monitoring visits can document both good practice and areas for improvement. Conclusions. The ITHACA Toolkit is an acceptable and feasible method for the systematic monitoring of human rights and general health care in psychiatric and social care institutions that explicitly calls for the participation of service users in the monitoring of human rights violations and general health care practice.

  6. Family functioning, health and social support assessed by aged home care clients and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautsalo, Katja; Rantanen, Anja; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe aged home care clients' and their family members' experiences of their family functioning, family health and social support received. An additional purpose was to determine which factors are connected with social support. Increasing life expectancy and ageing of the population require consideration of the adequacy of home care services and the role of family members as care providers. The older population is a very heterogeneous group because of their variable needs and several disabilities. To ensure the quality of home care, experimental information is needed from clients and their family members. A survey design with convenience sampling. The home care client and a family member of his/her answered a questionnaire together, including background questions, the Family Functioning, Health and Social Support instrument and an open question about support received from home care. Statistical methods were used to describe quantitative data, and content analysis was used in analysing the replies to the open question. Family health was noted as good, and family functioning and overall social support fairly good. An older person's higher basic education, higher age of the family member, better family health and male gender were connected with better social support received. The relationship of the older person and the family member as well as the duration of home care service use had an effect on social support received. The content analysis raised expectations related to time, planning of service, organisational factors and caring practise. Home care clients' and families' needs for support vary, and therefore, the assessment of needs, care planning and updating are important. The variable support needs of older people and their family members require flexible and adaptable home services. Cooperation between all participants involved in care would promote the well-being of the older person and the entire family. © 2012 Blackwell

  7. The impact of changes in health and social care on enteral feeding in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Omorogieva

    2012-11-13

    This paper examines the impact of the changes to health and social care on enteral feeding in the community, outlines implications for practice and offers recommendations to ameliorate the challenges. It is now clear that there have been significant changes especially in the last 10 years in health and social care provisions in the UK with an overarching effect on enteral nutrition in the community. Advances in technology, increasing demand and treatment costs, the need for improvement in quality, economic challenges, market forces, political influences and more choices for patients are some of the factors driving the change. Government’s vision of a modern system of health and social care is based on initiatives such as clinically led commissioning, establishment of Monitor, shifting care from acute hospitals to community settings, integrating health and social care provisions, Quality, Innovation, Productivity and Prevention (QIPP) program and the concept of “Big Society”. These strategies which are encapsulated in various guidelines, policies and legislation, including the health and social care Act, 2012 are clarified. The future challenges and opportunities brought on by these changes for healthcare professionals and patients who access enteral nutrition in the community are discussed and recommendations to improve practice are outlined.

  8. Functional interactivity in social media: an examination of Chinese health care organizations' microblog profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaohai

    2017-09-08

    Social media hold enormous potentials as a communication tool for health care due to its interactive nature. However, prior research mainly focused on contingency interactivity of social media, by examining messages sent from health care organizations to audiences, while little is known about functional interactivity, which refers to social media's presence of functions for facilitating communication between users and its interface. That is, how health care organizations use interactive features on social media to communicate with the public. Thus, with a general basis of the functional interactivity framework proposed by Waters et al. (Engaging stakeholders through social networking: how nonprofit organizations are using Facebook. Pub Relat Rev 2009;35:102-106), the current study investigated three aspects of functional interactivity in microblogging, and its subsequent effects. Specifically, this study analyzed 500 Chinese hospitals' profiles on Sina Weibo, the most popular microblogging platform in China. The results showed that the most common functional interactivity feature was organization disclosure, followed by information dissemination, and audience involvement. These interactive features all positively predicted the number of followers. Also, Chinese private hospitals scored significantly higher than public hospitals to use interactive features offered by social media. The findings of this study provide important implications for health care organizations to understand new communicative functions available on social media, incorporate more functions into their profiles and thus provide audiences with greater opportunity to interact with them via social media. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Blogs and tweets, texting and friending social media and online professionalism in health care

    CERN Document Server

    DeJong, Sandra M

    2013-01-01

    Blogs and Tweets, Texting and Friending: Social Media and Online Professionalism in Health Care summarizes the most common mistakes - and their legal and ethical ramifications -made in social media by busy health care professionals. It gives best practices for using social media while maintaining online professionalism. The book goes on to identify categories of caution, from confidentiality of patient information and maintaining the professional's privacy to general netiquette in tweeting, texting, blogging, and friending. And it guides you in setting up a faculty page (or choosing

  10. Powerless positions, silenced voices? - critical views on health and social care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujala, Anneli; Laulainen, Sanna; Lindberg, Kajsa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide background to this special issue and consider how critically oriented research can be applied to health and social care management. Basic principles of critical management studies are introduced briefly to frame subsequent papers in this issue. In order to identify the wicked problems and darker sides of the care field, there is a need to study things in alternative ways through critical lenses. Giving a voice to those in less powerful positions may result in redefinition and redesign of conventional roles and agency of patients, volunteers and professionals and call into question the taken-for-granted understanding of health and social care management. The special issue as a whole was designed to enhance critical approaches to the discussion in the field of health and social care. This editorial hopefully raises awareness of CMS and serves as an opening for further discussion on critical views in the research on management and organization in this field.

  11. A qualitative study of perceived social barriers to care for eating disorders: perspectives from ethnically diverse health care consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Anne E; Hadley Arrindell, Adrienne; Perloe, Alexandra; Fay, Kristen; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H

    2010-11-01

    The study aim was to identify and describe health consumer perspectives on social barriers to care for eating disorders in an ethnically diverse sample. We conducted an exploratory secondary analysis of qualitative data comprising transcripts from semi-structured interviews with past and prospective consumers of eating disorder treatment (n = 32). Transcripts were inputted into NVivo 8 for coding, sorting, and quantifying thematic content of interest within strata defined by ethnic minority and non-minority participants. We then examined the influence of key social barriers-including stigma and social stereotypes-on perceived impact on care. The majority of respondents (78%) endorsed at least one social barrier to care for an eating or weight concern. Perceived stigma (or shame) and social stereotyping-identified both within social networks and among clinicians-had adversely impacted care for 59% and 19% of respondents, respectively. Social barriers to care for eating and weight related concerns may be prevalent in the U.S. and impact both ethnic minority and non-minority health care consumers. © 2009 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Developing integrated health and social care services for older persons in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Leichsenring

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is to distribute first results of the EU Fifth Framework Project ‘Providing integrated health and social care for older persons—issues, problems and solutions’ (PROCARE—http://www.euro.centre.org/procare/). The project's first phase was to identify different approaches to integration as well as structural, organisational, economic and social-cultural factors and actors that constitute integrated and sustainable care systems. It also served to retrieve a number of experienc...

  13. The Role of Social Work Leadership: Mount Sinai Care, the Accountable Care Organization, and Population Health Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenakis, Nancy

    2015-10-01

    In July 2012, The Mount Sinai Medical Center was selected by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid to join the first cohort of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) in this country under its Medicare Shared Savings Program. A critical component of an ACO is care coordination of patients, which is a complex concept, intertwined with other concepts related to quality, delivery and organization of health care. This article provides an overview of the development, structure and functionality of Mount Sinai Care, the ACO of The Mount Sinai Health System, and how it was the beginning of its work in population health management. It describes the important role of social work leadership in the development and operation of its care coordination model. The model's successes and challenges and recommendations for future development of care coordination and population health management are outlined.

  14. Communicating risk in dementia care: Survey of health and social care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Brian J; Stevenson, Mabel; McDowell, Michelle

    2017-12-11

    Supporting people to live at home in line with community care policies requires increasing attention to assessing, communicating and managing risks. There is a challenge in supporting client choices that include risk-taking while demonstrating professional accountability. Risk communication becomes increasingly important with the need to engage clients and families in meaningful shared decision-making. This presents particular challenges in dementia services. This survey of risk communication in dementia care was administered to all health and social care professionals in community dementia services in Northern Ireland: June-September 2016. Of 270 professionals, 70 questionnaires were fully completed, with 55 partial completions. Scores on the Berlin Numeracy Test plus Schwartz items was low-moderate (mean 2.79 out of 7). This study did not find a significant association between numeracy and accurate perceptions of risk likelihoods in practice-based scenarios. Although 86% reported using numeric information in practice (mostly from assessment tools), respondents rarely communicated themselves using numbers. As in other domains, participants' responses were widely variable on numeric estimates of verbal terms for likelihood. In relation to medication side effects, few participants provided responses that were concordant with those in the guidance of the European Union. The risks most commonly encountered in practice were (in rank order): falls, depression, poor personal hygiene, medicines mismanagement, leaving home unsupervised, financial mismanagement, malnutrition, swallowing difficulties, abuse from others, risks to others, home appliance accidents and refusing equipment. Respondents generally overestimated the likelihood of serious harmful events by approximately 10-fold (having a missing person's report filed with the police; having a fall resulting in hospitalisation) and by approximately double (being involved in a car accident; causing a home fire), and

  15. Beyond UHC: monitoring health and social protection coverage in the context of tuberculosis care and prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Lönnroth

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a major global public health problem. In all societies, the disease affects the poorest individuals the worst. A new post-2015 global TB strategy has been developed by WHO, which explicitly highlights the key role of universal health coverage (UHC and social protection. One of the proposed targets is that "No TB affected families experience catastrophic costs due to TB." High direct and indirect costs of care hamper access, increase the risk of poor TB treatment outcomes, exacerbate poverty, and contribute to sustaining TB transmission. UHC, conventionally defined as access to health care without risk of financial hardship due to out-of-pocket health care expenditures, is essential but not sufficient for effective and equitable TB care and prevention. Social protection interventions that prevent or mitigate other financial risks associated with TB, including income losses and non-medical expenditures such as on transport and food, are also important. We propose a framework for monitoring both health and social protection coverage, and their impact on TB epidemiology. We describe key indicators and review methodological considerations. We show that while monitoring of general health care access will be important to track the health system environment within which TB services are delivered, specific indicators on TB access, quality, and financial risk protection can also serve as equity-sensitive tracers for progress towards and achievement of overall access and social protection.

  16. Using social determinants of health to link health workforce diversity, care quality and access, and health disparities to achieve health equity in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shanita D; Hansen, Kristen; Smithey, Marian; Burnley, Josepha; Koplitz, Michelle; Koyama, Kirk; Young, Janice; Bakos, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that diversifying the nation's health-care workforce is a necessary strategy to increase access to quality health care for all populations, reduce health disparities, and achieve health equity. In this article, we present a conceptual model that utilizes the social determinants of health framework to link nursing workforce diversity and care quality and access to two critical population health indicators-health disparities and health equity. Our proposed model suggests that a diverse nursing workforce can provide increased access to quality health care and health resources for all populations, and is a necessary precursor to reduce health disparities and achieve health equity. With this conceptual model as a foundation, we aim to stimulate the conceptual and analytical work-both within and outside the nursing field-that is necessary to answer these important but largely unanswered questions.

  17. Social contacts of lonely seniors and seniors living alone as a resource for organization of health and social care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Moroz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Social contacts of 623 lonely and living alone 60-and- older seniors were studied. A considerable part of respondents indicated the existence of social contacts with relatives (71.9 % and neighbors, friends, acquaintances (94.2 %. The majority of respondents preferred health and social care though only 69.5 % of respondents could rely on relatives (67.7 % of lonely seniors and 71.4 % living alone seniors.

  18. Educating Social Workers for Practice in Integrated Health Care: A Model Implemented in a Graduate Social Work Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattison, Debra; Weaver, Addie; Zebrack, Brad; Fischer, Dan; Dubin, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces a curricular innovation, the Integrated Health Scholars Program (IHSP), developed to prepare master's-level social work students for practice in integrated health care settings, and presents preliminary findings related to students' self-reported program competencies and perceptions. IHSP, implemented in a…

  19. [A social-health care coordination reference in the fields of mental health and child abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Panal, Leticia; García-Panal, Javier; Delgado-Mata, Eulalia

    2016-01-01

    The intervention in families with children at risk of abuse stays as a clear example of the need for intersectional coordination mechanisms within the socio-health care framework. Different health services (such as primary care, paediatrics, mental health, community and social services, family support teams and schools) create a network in order to link their main goals in the interest of ensuring children's welfare and improving familieś situation. This essay aims at describing a performance based on the mentioned guidelines, even though there is no accepted and widespread protocol in this regard. We start our research with a one parent family with two children. The mother suffers from a mental health disorder and she fails to adhere to treatment. Both the father of the two children and his family took advantage of this situation to discredit the mother's capability of taking care of her children. This perception had a great impact in her self-esteem and therefore in her willingness and strength to recover. Meetings were held to share relevant information about both the family's general situation, the children's quality of life and the mother's health. Based on this information, the main goals were set in each professional field in order to develop the intervention project. This example of intersectional coordination shows the importance of its standardization for the sake of ensuring a comprehensive attention towards situations that involve initially individuals but that ends up affecting the whole family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Collaborative family health care, civil rights, and social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauksch, Larry B; Fogarty, Colleen T

    2017-03-01

    Social and economic disadvantage and civil rights infringement, worsens overall health (Adler, Glymour, & Fielding, 2016; McGowan, Lee, Meneses, Perkins, & Youdelman, 2016; Teitelbaum, 2005). While addressing these challenges is not new, there is reason to believe that the administration of Donald Trump and a republican majority in congress will exacerbate these challenges and their effects. How can collaborative family health care (CFHC) practitioners and our field help? The editors pondered this question and also asked a selection of leaders in the field. The editors will first share their ideas about the potential of CFHC to make a difference in daily interactions with patients. Next, they will identify key areas of risk and vulnerability. Finally, using the contributions of respected colleagues, they will propose a partial agenda for CFHC clinicians and the field. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Contextualizing integration: a critical social science approach to integrative health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jon; Hollenberg, Daniel; Lui, Chi-Wai; Broom, Alex

    2009-01-01

    This article argues for the importance of examining the phenomenon of integrative health care in broader social and historical contexts. The authors examine mainstream approaches to identify patterns of integrative medicine and criticize them for their neglect of clashes among different philosophical paradigms and the wider social contexts that govern health care in practice. The authors outline a framework and highlight the values of a critical social science perspective in deepening our understanding of recent transformations in health care practice and issues surrounding biomedicine and complementary/alternative medicine (including chiropractic, naturopathy, massage, acupuncture/oriental medicine, etc) and traditional medicine. A critical social science perspective pays special attention to complex power relations, inclusionary/exclusionary strategies, and interprofessional dynamics in medicine. Drawing upon recent research findings, the authors illustrate how such a perspective reveals the intricacies and tensions that surround the integration of different paradigms of health care practice. The authors summarize the importance of situating integrative health care in structural contexts and affirm their commitment to a critical social science approach.

  2. Co-Leadership – A Management Solution for Integrated Health and Social Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Johan; Hasson, Henna; Sachs, Magna Andreen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Co-leadership has been identified as one approach to meet the managerial challenges of integrated services, but research on the topic is limited. In the present study, co-leadership, practised by pairs of managers – each manager representing one of the two principal organizations in integrated health and social care services – was explored. Aim: To investigate co-leadership in integrated health and social care, identify essential preconditions in fulfilling the management assignment, its operationalization and impact on provision of sustainable integration of health and social care. Method: Interviews with eight managers exercising co-leadership were analysed using directed content analysis. Respondent validation was conducted through additional interviews with the same managers. Results: Key contextual preconditions were an organization-wide model supporting co-leadership and co-location of services. Perception of the management role as a collective activity, continuous communication and lack of prestige were essential personal and interpersonal preconditions. In daily practice, office sharing, being able to give and take and support each other contributed to provision of sustainable integration of health and social care. Conclusion and discussion: Co-leadership promoted robust management by providing broader competence, continuous learning and joint responsibility for services. Integrated health and social care services should consider employing co-leadership as a managerial solution to achieve sustainability. PMID:27616963

  3. Co-Leadership - A Management Solution for Integrated Health and Social Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinga, Charlotte; Hansson, Johan; Hasson, Henna; Sachs, Magna Andreen

    2016-05-23

    Co-leadership has been identified as one approach to meet the managerial challenges of integrated services, but research on the topic is limited. In the present study, co-leadership, practised by pairs of managers - each manager representing one of the two principal organizations in integrated health and social care services - was explored. To investigate co-leadership in integrated health and social care, identify essential preconditions in fulfilling the management assignment, its operationalization and impact on provision of sustainable integration of health and social care. Interviews with eight managers exercising co-leadership were analysed using directed content analysis. Respondent validation was conducted through additional interviews with the same managers. Key contextual preconditions were an organization-wide model supporting co-leadership and co-location of services. Perception of the management role as a collective activity, continuous communication and lack of prestige were essential personal and interpersonal preconditions. In daily practice, office sharing, being able to give and take and support each other contributed to provision of sustainable integration of health and social care. Co-leadership promoted robust management by providing broader competence, continuous learning and joint responsibility for services. Integrated health and social care services should consider employing co-leadership as a managerial solution to achieve sustainability.

  4. Co-Leadership – A Management Solution for Integrated Health and Social Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Klinga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Co-leadership has been identified as one approach to meet the managerial challenges of integrated services, but research on the topic is limited. In the present study, co-leadership, practised by pairs of managers – each manager representing one of the two principal organizations in integrated health and social care services – was explored. Aim: To investigate co-leadership in integrated health and social care, identify essential preconditions in fulfilling the management assignment, its operationalization and impact on provision of sustainable integration of health and social care. Method: Interviews with eight managers exercising co-leadership were analysed using directed content analysis. Respondent validation was conducted through additional interviews with the same managers. Results: Key contextual preconditions were an organization-wide model supporting co-leadership and co-location of services. Perception of the management role as a collective activity, continuous communication and lack of prestige were essential personal and interpersonal preconditions. In daily practice, office sharing, being able to give and take and support each other contributed to provision of sustainable integration of health and social care.  Conclusion and discussion: Co-leadership promoted robust management by providing broader competence, continuous learning and joint responsibility for services. Integrated health and social care services should consider employing co-leadership as a managerial solution to achieve sustainability.

  5. Applying social marketing in health care: communicating evidence to change consumer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Douglas; McCormack, Lauren

    2008-01-01

    Social marketing uses commercial marketing strategies to change individual and organizational behavior and policies. It has been effective on a population level across a wide range of public health and health care domains. There is limited evidence of the effectiveness of social marketing in changing health care consumer behavior through its impact on patient-provider interaction or provider behavior. Social marketers need to identify translatable strategies (e.g., competition analysis, branding, and tailored messages) that can be applied to health care provider and consumer behavior. Three case studies from social marketing illustrate potential strategies to change provider and consumer behavior. Countermarketing is a rapidly growing social marketing strategy that has been effective in tobacco control and may be effective in countering pharmaceutical marketing using specific message strategies. Informed decision making is a useful strategy when there is medical uncertainty, such as in prostate cancer screening and treatment. Pharmaceutical industry marketing practices offer valuable lessons for developing competing messages to reach providers and consumers. Social marketing is an effective population-based behavior change strategy that can be applied in individual clinical settings and as a complement to reinforce messages communicated on a population level. There is a need for more research on message strategies that work in health care and population-level effectiveness studies.

  6. The ethics of everyday practice in primary medical care: responding to social health inequities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Victoria J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social and structural inequities shape health and illness; they are an everyday presence within the doctor-patient encounter yet, there is limited ethical guidance on what individual physicians should do. This paper draws on a study that explored how doctors and their professional associations ought to respond to the issue of social health inequities. Results Some see doctors as bound by a notion of care that is blind to a patient's social position, while others respond to this issue through invoking notions of justice and human rights where access to care is a prime focus. Both care and justice orientations however conceal important tensions linked to the presence of bioethical principles underpinning these. Other normative ethical theories like deontology, virtue ethics and utilitarianism do not provide adequate guidance on the problem of social health inequities either. Conclusion This paper explores if Bauman's notion of "forms of togetherness" provides the basis of a relational ethical theory that can help to develop a response to social health inequities of relevance to individual physicians. This theory goes beyond silence on the influence of social position of health and avoids amoral regulatory approaches to monitoring equity of care provision.

  7. The ethics of everyday practice in primary medical care: responding to social health inequities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Social and structural inequities shape health and illness; they are an everyday presence within the doctor-patient encounter yet, there is limited ethical guidance on what individual physicians should do. This paper draws on a study that explored how doctors and their professional associations ought to respond to the issue of social health inequities. Results Some see doctors as bound by a notion of care that is blind to a patient's social position, while others respond to this issue through invoking notions of justice and human rights where access to care is a prime focus. Both care and justice orientations however conceal important tensions linked to the presence of bioethical principles underpinning these. Other normative ethical theories like deontology, virtue ethics and utilitarianism do not provide adequate guidance on the problem of social health inequities either. Conclusion This paper explores if Bauman's notion of "forms of togetherness" provides the basis of a relational ethical theory that can help to develop a response to social health inequities of relevance to individual physicians. This theory goes beyond silence on the influence of social position of health and avoids amoral regulatory approaches to monitoring equity of care provision. PMID:20438627

  8. Online social network use by health care providers in a high traffic patient care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Erik; Light, Jennifer; Paradise Black, Nicole; Thompson, Lindsay

    2013-05-17

    The majority of workers, regardless of age or occupational status, report engaging in personal Internet use in the workplace. There is little understanding of the impact that personal Internet use may have on patient care in acute clinical settings. The objective of this study was to investigate the volume of one form of personal Internet use-online social networking (Facebook)-generated by workstations in the emergency department (ED) in contrast to measures of clinical volume and severity. The research team analyzed anonymous network utilization records for 68 workstations located in the emergency medicine department within one academic medical center for 15 consecutive days (12/29/2009 to 1/12/2010). This data was compared to ED work index (EDWIN) data derived by the hospital information systems. Health care workers spent an accumulated 4349 minutes (72.5 hours) browsing Facebook, staff cumulatively visited Facebook 9369 times and spent, on average, 12.0 minutes per hour browsing Facebook. There was a statistically significant difference in the time spent on Facebook according to time of day (19.8 minutes per hour versus 4.3 minutes per hour, P<.001). There was a significant, positive correlation between EDWIN scores and time spent on Facebook (r=.266, P<.001). Facebook use constituted a substantive percentage of staff time during the 15-day observation period. Facebook use increased with increased patient volume and severity within the ED.

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease involves substantial health-care service and social benefit costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Bach; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Fonager, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    of disability pensions. CONCLUSION: Health care-related costs and costs for social benefits and transfer payments were higher for participants with COPD than for non-COPD participants and nonresponders. FUNDING: This study was supported by The Obel Family Foundation, The Danish Lung Association and The Health...

  10. Social Determinants of Health, the Chronic Care Model, and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith M. Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease that disproportionately affects African Americans and other minorities in the USA. Public health attention to SLE has been predominantly epidemiological. To better understand the effects of this cumulative disadvantage and ultimately improve the delivery of care, specifically in the context of SLE, we propose that more research attention to the social determinants of SLE is warranted and more transdisciplinary approaches are necessary to appropriately address identified social determinants of SLE. Further, we suggest drawing from the chronic care model (CCM for an understanding of how community-level factors may exacerbate disparities explored within social determinant frameworks or facilitate better delivery of care for SLE patients. Grounded in social determinants of health (SDH frameworks and the CCM, this paper presents issues relative to accessibility to suggest that more transdisciplinary research focused on the role of place could improve care for SLE patients, particularly the most vulnerable patients. It is our hope that this paper will serve as a springboard for future studies to more effectively connect social determinants of health with the chronic care model and thus more comprehensively address adverse health trajectories in SLE and other chronic conditions.

  11. Silos and Social Identity: The Social Identity Approach as a Framework for Understanding and Overcoming Divisions in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreindler, Sara A; Dowd, Damien A; Dana Star, Noah; Gottschalk, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Context One of health care's foremost challenges is the achievement of integration and collaboration among the groups providing care. Yet this fundamentally group-related issue is typically discussed in terms of interpersonal relations or operational issues, not group processes. Methods We conducted a systematic search for literature offering a group-based analysis and examined it through the lens of the social identity approach (SIA). Founded in the insight that group memberships form an important part of the self-concept, the SIA encompasses five dimensions: social identity, social structure, identity content, strength of identification, and context. Findings Our search yielded 348 reports, 114 of which cited social identity. However, SIA-citing reports varied in both compatibility with the SIA's metatheoretical paradigm and applied relevance to health care; conversely, some non-SIA-citers offered SIA-congruent analyses. We analyzed the various combinations and interpretations of the five SIA dimensions, identifying ten major conceptual currents. Examining these in the light of the SIA yielded a cohesive, multifaceted picture of (inter)group relations in health care. Conclusions The SIA offers a coherent framework for integrating a diverse, far-flung literature on health care groups. Further research should take advantage of the full depth and complexity of the approach, remain sensitive to the unique features of the health care context, and devote particular attention to identity mobilization and context change as key drivers of system transformation. Our article concludes with a set of “guiding questions” to help health care leaders recognize the group dimension of organizational problems, identify mechanisms for change, and move forward by working with and through social identities, not against them. PMID:22709391

  12. Interdisciplinary collaboration between medical and non-medical professions in health and social care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielová, Jana; Veleminsky, Milos

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of interdisciplinary collaboration between medical and non-medical professions in health and social care. The introduction defines basic terms such as interdisciplinary cooperation, interdisciplinary team, and health and social care. Additionally, it highlights the significance and contribution of interdisciplinary collaboration in the care of the patient/client in health and social care. The aim of the paper is to identify factors influencing the process of interdisciplinary collaboration between, in particular, social workers and physicians. In compliance with the main goal of the research, the following partial goals were included: 1) to identify factors that limit the process of interdisciplinary collaboration between social workers and physicians, and 2) to identify factors which support the process of interdisciplinary collaboration between social workers and physicians. Based on the research goals, a systematic review was selected as the research method for the paper. The research dataset consisted of articles obtained from the following databases: EBSO, PUBMED/MEDLINE, SCIENCE DIRECT and SCOPUS. The databases were search using the following keywords: interprofessional cooperation, interdisciplinary, collaboration, social work, and physicians/doctors. Using the results, the following factors supporting interdisciplinary collaboration were identified: acknowledgement of colleagues' expertise, recognition of roles, positive level of communication, and mutual respect. Factors that limit interdisciplinary processes included the following: varying professional perspectives, theoretical differences, lack of knowledge, and poor communication.

  13. Ethical, legal, and social issues in the translation of genomics into health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badzek, Laurie; Henaghan, Mark; Turner, Martha; Monsen, Rita

    2013-03-01

    The rapid continuous feed of new information from scientific discoveries related to the human genome makes translation and incorporation of information into the clinical setting difficult and creates ethical, legal, and social challenges for providers. This article overviews some of the legal and ethical foundations that guide our response to current complex issues in health care associated with the impact of scientific discoveries related to the human genome. Overlapping ethical, legal, and social implications impact nurses and other healthcare professionals as they seek to identify and translate into practice important information related to new genomic scientific knowledge. Ethical and legal foundations such as professional codes, human dignity, and human rights provide the framework for understanding highly complex genomic issues. Ethical, legal, and social concerns of the health provider in the translation of genomic knowledge into practice including minimizing harms, maximizing benefits, transparency, confidentiality, and informed consent are described. Additionally, nursing professional competencies related to ethical, legal, and social issues in the translation of genomics into health care are discussed. Ethical, legal, and social considerations in new genomic discovery necessitate that healthcare professionals have knowledge and competence to respond to complex genomic issues and provide appropriate information and care to patients, families, and communities. Understanding the ethical, legal, and social issues in the translation of genomic information into practice is essential to provide patients, families, and communities with competent, safe, effective health care. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. Innovation – inside out. Change and stability in social and health care education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to scrutinize and challenge the call for innovation in welfare domains. The study asks how social practices across boundaries unfold in the field of social and health care educations under innovation imperatives. Methodology: The design is a multi-sited field...... study of collaborative practices in social and health care educations in Denmark, and it explores activities and interactions among people, the work tasks and the artifacts with which they engage. The multi-sited design is based on the theoretically informed hypothesis that crossing boundaries between...... and health care education. The empirical practice is thus understood to be cross-organizational. The study was carried out on three levels, macro, meso and micro: Policy requirements for change (macro level), managerial strategies and collaboration (meso level) and the daily work tasks in educators...

  15. [The coordination betwen health and social services in the care of people with severe mental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Alvarez, Marcelino; Laviana Cuetos, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Coordination between health and social services is a key point in caring for an increasing number of people affected by different types of health problems. The change in demographic and epidemiological patterns in our societies evidences the need of this coordination, usually not covered by our care systems. A sector in which the coordination is particularly important is the care of people with disabilities related to the suffering from severe mental disorders. This is a field that has been too long on the sidelines of the general health and social care systems as a result of the social stigma and traditional psychiatric institutions, setting in motion a vicious circle that must be broken in order to identify and to respond to the needs of such persons. In fact, the processes of change towards community care, with targets for recovery and not mere palliative or marginalizing care, necessarily incorporate this coordination as a cornerstone strategy for social inclusion and citizenship. Although there are still significant gaps in this regard, especially in Spain. However, there are experiences of change, such as that of Andalusia, which set the tone for the development of a strategy for integrated care, whose foundations and main elements we try to summarize in the present article. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of the effect of co-financing on collaboration between health care, social services and social insurance in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Lisa Hultberg

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an ongoing research project aimed to determine the impact of co-financing on collaboration around patients with musculoskeletal disorders. A trial legislation that allows the social insurance, social services and health care services to unite in co-financing under joint political steering has been tested in different areas in Sweden. In a series of studies, we compare collaboration processes and health outcome for patients with musculoskeletal disorders between health centres with co-financing projects and control health centres without co-financing projects. In this paper the studies are described and some preliminary results are discussed.

  17. The Social Implications of Health Care Reform: Reducing Access Barriers to Health Care Services for Uninsured Hispanic and Latino Americans in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Mitchell A.; Inguanzo, Marian M.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is currently facing one of its most significant social challenges in decades in terms of its ability to provide access to primary care services to the millions of Americans who have lost their health insurance coverage in the recent economic recession. National statistics compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau for 2009…

  18. Introspection as intra-professionalism in social and health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Dybbroe, Betina

    2017-01-01

    framing and complex exchanges of loss and confirmation, and of denial and displacement take place between a group of social workers and their supervisor. In the second case, it becomes apparent how the research interview opens up an opportunity for processing the emotions and socially critical experiences...... involved in hospital work....

  19. "I'm Home(screen)!": Social Media in Health Care Has Arrived.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housman, Laura T

    2017-11-01

    In more than a decade, the adoption and use of some type of social media among American adults has risen from 5% in 2005 to nearly 70% in 2016. The reigning social media platform by usage, Facebook, has 142% more American adult users than the second most utilized social media platform, Instagram, which was purchased by Facebook in March 2012. Of the 68% of American adult Facebook users, more than three quarters visit the site daily. Although social media applications (apps) such as Facebook and Instagram are the clear draw among users, health care apps are beginning to gain traction as well. In 2017, 32% of consumers now have at least 1 health app on their smartphones or tablets, doubling over the past 4 years. Although having an app should not be confused with using an app, having an app downloaded and available for use is a step closer to ongoing adoption. Mobile apps in health care are being used for ordering and scheduling health care services, as well as tracking and managing aspects of health and wellness. An incredible opportunity now exists to connect and leverage social media to enhance the impact of health care, particularly in the areas of drug development, clinical trial recruitment, and therapy administration and adherence, in which dose reminders, sharing of side effects and response, and the accessibility of patients to one another has both a context and a platform. This commentary serves as an introduction to the ways that social media and mobile health care apps are being used in real-world settings as tools to advance the development and effectiveness of clinical therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bereavement and Bereavement Care in Health and Social Care: Provision and Practice in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Audrey I.; Wimpenny, Peter; Unwin, Rachel; Work, Fiona; Dempster, Paul; MacDuff, Colin; Wilcock, Sylvia E.; Brown, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The interview study described here aimed to explore current views of and practice in bereavement care and identify priorities for service development in Scotland. Fifty-nine participants who worked with the bereaved in some way, or whose interest was in bereavement or bereavement care, were interviewed. They represented National Health Service…

  1. Care and consumption: A Latin American social medicine's conceptual framework to comprehend oral health inequalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadía-Barrero, César Ernesto; Martínez-Parra, Adriana Gisela

    2017-10-01

    This article offers a conceptual framework that arises out of the Latin American Social Medicine/Collective Health (LASM/CH) tradition to comprehend inequalities in oral health. We conducted a dialogue between the LASM/CH proposal called social determination of health (in particular one of its nuclear categories 'ways of living together') and studies that address social inequalities and oral health. This dialogue allowed us to redefine oral health-disease-treatment as a process that either promotes or harms well-being and is modulated by different ways of living together where not only patients and professionals, but also governments, supranational bodies, and national and international markets represented by food, pharmaceutical, insurance, personal care, and cosmetic companies interact. The article proposes the cycle particular-consumption care/institutional-consumption care as the construct that allows investigators to think about how ways of living together relate to oral health inequalities. 'Particular-consumption care' includes ways and possibilities to access healthy foods and practice protective hygienic measures. 'Institutional-consumption care' refers to institutional responses related to supply, access to services, capabilities for resolution, and pedagogical practices.

  2. Knowledge Management System in Health & Social Care: Review on 20 Practiced Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saiful Ridhwan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of managing medical information has become very critical in the healthcare delivery system. Medical information nowadays are optimized towards serving different areas such as; diagnosing of diseases, planning and administration, treatment and monitoring of patient outcomes, services and costs. This article provides a review into various Health and Social Care systems which encompasses the Knowledge Management value. For analysis, more than 30 systems that are related to Health and Social Care were gathered via Internet research, only 20 of these systems were finally selected based on recent system development and popularity of the system.Keywords: Health Care, Knowledge, Knowledge Management, Social Care, systemdoi:10.12695/ajtm.2013.6.2.4 How to cite this article:Ridhwan, M.S., and Oyefolahan, I.O. (2013. Knowledge Management System in Health & Social Care: Review on 20 Practiced Knowledge Management. The Asian Journal of Technology Management 6 (2: 92-101. Print ISSN: 1978-6956; Online ISSN: 2089-791X. doi:10.12695/ajtm.2013.6.2.4

  3. Framework for building primary care capacity to address the social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Andrew D; Bloch, Gary

    2017-11-01

    Family physicians have long understood that social factors influence the health of individuals and communities; however, most primary care organizations have yet to develop the capacity to specifically address these social determinants of health (SDOH). To support SDOH interventions and foster an organizational culture in which addressing SDOH is considered part of high-quality primary care. An academic family health team in Toronto, Ont, established a committee comprising a diverse group of health professionals focused on the SDOH. The committee analyzes how social factors affect patients and supports the development and implementation of interventions. The committee's current interventions include the following: collecting and analyzing detailed sociodemographic data to identify health inequities; launching an income security health promotion service; establishing a medical-legal partnership; implementing a child literacy program in its clinics; and developing an advocacy and service program to improve access to decent work. Each intervention includes a rigorous evaluation plan to assess implementation and effect. Next steps include developing tools to enable organizations to "move upstream" and adopt a health equity approach to all work, including joining in advocacy. Primary care providers are well situated to address SDOH. This article provides a framework that can assist every large primary care organization in establishing a similar committee dedicated to SDOH, which could help build a network across Canada to share lessons learned and support joint advocacy. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  4. [The Development of Social Innovations in Health Care and the Role of Science and Research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Stefanie

    2017-05-24

    In the course of demographic, epidemiological and social changes, various challenges arise concerning the organization of health care and health promotion for the population. Innovative approaches are needed to face these challenges. The focus in the theoretical work is on the analysis of the development of social innovations and on the role of science and research to solve social problems. First of all, the notion of innovation based on technologies will be expanded by social innovations. 2 approaches to promote social innovations are discussed: the systematic discovery and development of solutions in practice as well as the co-productive development in the terms of transdisciplinary research. It will be demonstrated that a cooperative and co-productive research and development process brings new requirements regarding scientific practice so that a discussion about the organisation and general conditions of transdisciplinary research and development in the health (service) research has to be strengthened. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Health and social care management for older adults with multimorbidity: a multiperspective approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meranius, Martina Summer; Josefsson, Karin

    2017-03-01

    Multimorbidity, a condition common among older adults, may be regarded as a failure of a complex system. The aim of this study was to describe the core components in health and social care management for older adults with multimorbidity. A cross-sectional design included two methods: individual interviews and group discussions. A total of 105 participants included older adults with multimorbidity and their relatives, care staff and healthcare policymakers. Data were analysed using content analysis. The results show that seven core components comprise a multiperspective view of health and social care management for older adults with multimorbidity: political steering, leadership, cooperation, competence, support for relatives, availability and continuity. Steps should be taken to ensure that every older adult with multimorbidity has a treatment plan according to a multiperspective view to prevent fragmentation of their health care. This study provides relevant evidence developing a multiperspective model of health and social care management for older adults with multimorbidity. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. Teaching and addressing health disparities through the family medicine social and community context of care project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jordan; Heney, Jessica; Esquibel, Angela Y; Dimock, Camia; Goldman, Roberta; Anthony, David

    2014-09-02

    By training future physicians to care for patients with backgrounds different from their own, medical schools can help reduce health disparities. To address the need for education in this area, the leaders of the Family Medicine Clerkship at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University developed the Social and Community Context of Care project, required of all medical students rotating through this clerkship. Students develop a hypothetical intervention addressing a health issue seen at their preceptor site, and are assessed on their grasp of the social and contextual issues affecting that health issue in their particular community. Some interventions are actualized in later clerkships or independent study projects; one example, a health class for pregnant and parenting teens at Central Falls High School, is described here. If made a routine part of medical education, projects such as these may help medical students address the health disparities they will encounter in future practice.

  7. The Strategic Imperative for the Use of Social Media in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsenas, Amy L; Arce, Makala; Aase, Lee; Timimi, Farris K; Young, Colleen; Wald, John T

    2017-11-09

    Although health care lags behind many other industries in adopting social media as part of a business strategy, the Mayo Clinic recognized the importance of these applications more than a decade ago. In addition to typical media relations and marketing tactics, the Mayo Clinic has successfully used social media as part of an overall program to support the strategic imperatives of the institution. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gender Policies Meet VET Practices--The Case of Health and Social Care in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høst, Håkon; Seland, Idunn; Skålholt, Asgeir

    2015-01-01

    Could the labour market gender balance be improved by introducing new types of apprenticeship-trained workers? This article investigates what happened in the wake of the Norwegian VET programme for health and social care, a new approach introduced via the 1994 educational reform. By upgrading this traditionally female-dominated area of education,…

  9. Social Work and Interprofessional Education in Health Care: A Call for Continued Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barbara; Phillips, Farya

    2016-01-01

    A report from the Interprofessional Education Collaborative and another from the Institute of Medicine cite working as part of interdisciplinary teams as a core proficiency area for improving health care. This article discusses the core competencies of interprofessional education and the essential role for social workers as leaders and…

  10. Developing a Mobile Learning Solution for Health and Social Care Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. D.; Dearnley, C. A.; Laxton, J. C.; Coates, C. A.; Treasure-Jones, T.; Campbell, R.; Hall, I.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we share our experiences of a large-scale five-year innovative programme to introduce mobile learning into health and social care (H&SC) practice placement learning and assessment that bridges the divide between the university classroom and the practice setting in which these students learn. The outputs are from the Assessment &…

  11. [Inequity in the use of health and social care services for disabled individuals in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Quevedo, Cristina; Jiménez Rubio, Dolores

    2011-12-01

    The objective of "equal access for equal need" is part of the policy agenda of most European countries. Several studies have provided evidence of equity in the use of healthcare services by the adult population in Spain. However, less attention has been paid to equity in access to health and social care services among the disabled population. In this study, we present an analysis of the distribution of unmet need for a set of economic, health and social care services by the disabled population in Spain. Horizontal inequity in unmet need for various socioeconomic services was measured by using data from the EDAD2008 survey conducted in the disabled population in Spain and methods based on the Concentration Index. In Spain the distribution of unmet need among disabled individuals is not equitable. The greatest proportion of unmet needs is concentrated among individuals at the bottom of the income distribution. In addition, the level of horizontal inequity differs depending on the individual's gender and age, together with the specific service analyzed and the reasons giving rise to this unmet need. Socioeconomic status is important in access to health and social care services by the disabled. These results will allow policymakers to design policies aimed at reducing barriers to health and social care services among the disabled population in Spain. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Physical and mental health aspects of elderly in social care in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyn-Matusiak, Dorota; Marcisz, Czesław; Bąk, Ewelina; Kulik, Halina; Marcisz, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate health aspects in elderly individuals in social, institutional, and home care in Poland. A total of 300 elderly individuals in care in Poland were included in the study. The subjects were divided into three groups: residents of long-term care institutions (group I), residents of adult day-care homes (group II), and community-dwelling subjects (group III). Each group consisted of 100 subjects. Questionnaires evaluating the following physical and mental dimensions of health were used: SF-36 Health Survey, basic activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, Geriatric Depression Scale, and Mini-mental state examination. It was found that the health aspects of the elderly varied depending on whether care was provided in an institutionalized or a home environment, and the lowest health status was found in the elderly receiving in-home care. Furthermore, home-based elderly indicated significant limitations in performing basic activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, as well as a higher prevalence of depression and cognitive impairment. The elderly in long-term institutionalized care, both in a residential home and adult day-care homes, were characterized by a better physical and mental health status than those receiving in-home care. It seemed that worse health status, including the more frequent depression occurrence and cognitive function disorders in the elderly using the nursing care at their homes, was related to their multimorbidity, loneliness, and too-short duration of the care during the day.

  13. Social Media: A Review and Tutorial of Applications in Medicine and Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheps, Samuel; Ho, Kendall; Novak-Lauscher, Helen; Eysenbach, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Background Social media are dynamic and interactive computer-mediated communication tools that have high penetration rates in the general population in high-income and middle-income countries. However, in medicine and health care, a large number of stakeholders (eg, clinicians, administrators, professional colleges, academic institutions, ministries of health, among others) are unaware of social media’s relevance, potential applications in their day-to-day activities, as well as the inherent risks and how these may be attenuated and mitigated. Objective We conducted a narrative review with the aim to present case studies that illustrate how, where, and why social media are being used in the medical and health care sectors. Methods Using a critical-interpretivist framework, we used qualitative methods to synthesize the impact and illustrate, explain, and provide contextual knowledge of the applications and potential implementations of social media in medicine and health care. Both traditional (eg, peer-reviewed) and nontraditional (eg, policies, case studies, and social media content) sources were used, in addition to an environmental scan (using Google and Bing Web searches) of resources. Results We reviewed, evaluated, and synthesized 76 articles, 44 websites, and 11 policies/reports. Results and case studies are presented according to 10 different categories of social media: (1) blogs (eg, WordPress), (2) microblogs (eg, Twitter), (3) social networking sites (eg, Facebook), (4) professional networking sites (eg, LinkedIn, Sermo), (5) thematic networking sites (eg, 23andMe), (6) wikis (eg, Wikipedia), (7) mashups (eg, HealthMap), (8) collaborative filtering sites (eg, Digg), (9) media sharing sites (eg, YouTube, Slideshare), and others (eg, SecondLife). Four recommendations are provided and explained for stakeholders wishing to engage with social media while attenuating risk: (1) maintain professionalism at all times, (2) be authentic, have fun, and do not be

  14. Social media: a review and tutorial of applications in medicine and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajales, Francisco Jose; Sheps, Samuel; Ho, Kendall; Novak-Lauscher, Helen; Eysenbach, Gunther

    2014-02-11

    Social media are dynamic and interactive computer-mediated communication tools that have high penetration rates in the general population in high-income and middle-income countries. However, in medicine and health care, a large number of stakeholders (eg, clinicians, administrators, professional colleges, academic institutions, ministries of health, among others) are unaware of social media's relevance, potential applications in their day-to-day activities, as well as the inherent risks and how these may be attenuated and mitigated. We conducted a narrative review with the aim to present case studies that illustrate how, where, and why social media are being used in the medical and health care sectors. Using a critical-interpretivist framework, we used qualitative methods to synthesize the impact and illustrate, explain, and provide contextual knowledge of the applications and potential implementations of social media in medicine and health care. Both traditional (eg, peer-reviewed) and nontraditional (eg, policies, case studies, and social media content) sources were used, in addition to an environmental scan (using Google and Bing Web searches) of resources. We reviewed, evaluated, and synthesized 76 articles, 44 websites, and 11 policies/reports. Results and case studies are presented according to 10 different categories of social media: (1) blogs (eg, WordPress), (2) microblogs (eg, Twitter), (3) social networking sites (eg, Facebook), (4) professional networking sites (eg, LinkedIn, Sermo), (5) thematic networking sites (eg, 23andMe), (6) wikis (eg, Wikipedia), (7) mashups (eg, HealthMap), (8) collaborative filtering sites (eg, Digg), (9) media sharing sites (eg, YouTube, Slideshare), and others (eg, SecondLife). Four recommendations are provided and explained for stakeholders wishing to engage with social media while attenuating risk: (1) maintain professionalism at all times, (2) be authentic, have fun, and do not be afraid, (3) ask for help, and (4) focus

  15. A new dimension of health care: systematic review of the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media for health communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, S Anne; Hazlett, Diane E; Harrison, Laura; Carroll, Jennifer K; Irwin, Anthea; Hoving, Ciska

    2013-04-23

    There is currently a lack of information about the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media for health communication among the general public, patients, and health professionals from primary research. To review the current published literature to identify the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media for health communication among the general public, patients, and health professionals, and identify current gaps in the literature to provide recommendations for future health communication research. This paper is a review using a systematic approach. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using nine electronic databases and manual searches to locate peer-reviewed studies published between January 2002 and February 2012. The search identified 98 original research studies that included the uses, benefits, and/or limitations of social media for health communication among the general public, patients, and health professionals. The methodological quality of the studies assessed using the Downs and Black instrument was low; this was mainly due to the fact that the vast majority of the studies in this review included limited methodologies and was mainly exploratory and descriptive in nature. Seven main uses of social media for health communication were identified, including focusing on increasing interactions with others, and facilitating, sharing, and obtaining health messages. The six key overarching benefits were identified as (1) increased interactions with others, (2) more available, shared, and tailored information, (3) increased accessibility and widening access to health information, (4) peer/social/emotional support, (5) public health surveillance, and (6) potential to influence health policy. Twelve limitations were identified, primarily consisting of quality concerns and lack of reliability, confidentiality, and privacy. Social media brings a new dimension to health care as it offers a medium to be used by the public, patients, and health

  16. Social and cultural dimensions of hygiene in Cambodian health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancart-Petitet, Pascale; Dumas, Céline; Faurand-Tournaire, Anne-Laure; Desclaux, Alice; Vong, Sirenda

    2011-02-07

    The frequency of bloodborne pathogen healthcare-associated infections is thought to be high in developing Southeast Asian countries. The underlying social-cultural logics contributing to the risks of transmission are rarely studied. This report provides some insights on the social and cultural factors that shape hygiene practices in Cambodian health care settings. We conducted qualitative surveys in various public and private health facilities in Phnom Penh, the capital city and in provinces. We observed and interviewed 319 participants, health care workers and patients, regarding hygiene practices and social relationships amongst the health care staff and with patients. We also examined the local perceptions of hygiene, their impact on the relationships between the health care staff and patients, and perceptions of transmission risks. Data collection stem from face to face semi-structured and open-ended interviews and focus group discussions with various health care staffs (i.e. cleaners, nurses, midwives and medical doctors) and with patients who attended the study health facilities. Overall responses and observations indicated that hygiene practices were burdened by the lack of adequate materials and equipment. In addition, many other factors were identified to influence and distort hygiene practices which include (1) informal and formal social rapports in hospitals, (2) major infection control roles played by the cleaners in absence of professional acknowledgment. Moreover, hygiene practices are commonly seen as an unessential matter to be devoted to low-ranking staff. Our anthropological findings illustrate the importance of comprehensive understanding of hygiene practices; they need to be considered when designing interventions to improve infection control practices in a Cambodian medical setting.

  17. Social and cultural dimensions of hygiene in Cambodian health care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faurand-Tournaire Anne-Laure

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of bloodborne pathogen healthcare-associated infections is thought to be high in developing Southeast Asian Countries. The underlying social-cultural logics contributing to the risks of transmission are rarely studied. This report provides some insights on the social and cultural factors that shape hygiene practices in Cambodian health care settings. Methods We conducted qualitative surveys in various public and private health facilities in Phnom Penh, the capital city and in provinces. We observed and interviewed 319 participants, health care workers and patients, regarding hygiene practices and social relationships amongst the health care staff and with patients. We also examined the local perceptions of hygiene, their impact on the relationships between the health care staff and patients, and perceptions of transmission risks. Data collection stem from face to face semi-structured and open-ended interviews and focus group discussions with various health care staffs (i.e. cleaners, nurses, midwives and medical doctors and with patients who attended the study health facilities. Results Overall responses and observations indicated that hygiene practices were burdened by the lack of adequate materials and equipements. In addition, many other factors were identified to influence and distort hygiene practices which include (1 informal and formal social rapports in hospitals, (2 major infection control roles played by the cleaners in absence of professional acknowledgment. Moreover, hygiene practices are commonly seen as an unessential matter to be devoted to low-ranking staff. Conclusion Our anthropological findings illustrate the importance of comprehensive understanding of hygiene practices; they need to be considered when designing interventions to improve infection control practices in a Cambodian medical setting.

  18. Developing integrated health and social care services for older persons in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Kai

    2004-01-01

    This paper is to distribute first results of the EU Fifth Framework Project 'Providing integrated health and social care for older persons-issues, problems and solutions' (PROCARE-http://www.euro.centre.org/procare/). The project's first phase was to identify different approaches to integration as well as structural, organisational, economic and social-cultural factors and actors that constitute integrated and sustainable care systems. It also served to retrieve a number of experiences, model ways of working and demonstration projects in the participating countries which are currently being analysed in order to learn from success-or failure-and to develop policy recommendations for the local, national and European level. The paper draws on existing definitions of integrated care in various countries and by various scholars. Given the context of an international comparative study it tries to avoid providing a single, ready-made definition but underlines the role of social care as part and parcel of this type of integrated care in the participating countries. The paper is based on national reports from researchers representing ten organisations (university institutes, consultancy firms, research institutes, the public and the NGO sector) from 9 European countries: Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, and the UK. Literature reviews made intensive use of grey literature and evaluation studies in the context of at least five model ways of working in each country. As a result of the cross-national overview an attempt to classify different approaches and definitions is made and indicators of relative importance of the different instruments used in integrating health and social care services are provided. The cross-national overview shows that issues concerning co-ordination and integration of services are high on the agenda in most countries. Depending on the state of service development, various approaches and instruments can be

  19. Physical and mental health aspects of elderly in social care in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzyn-Matusiak D

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dorota Dobrzyn-Matusiak,1 Czeslaw Marcisz,2 Ewelina Bąk,3 Halina Kulik,1 Ewa Marcisz4 1Department of Nursing Propaedeutics, 2Department of Gerontology and Geriatric Nursing, School of Health Care, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland; 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Bielsko-Biała, Bielsko-Biała, Poland; 4Department of Anxiety Disorders, Hospital of Ministry of Internal Affairs, Katowice, Poland Background: The objective of the study was to evaluate health aspects in elderly individuals in social, institutional, and home care in Poland.Methods: A total of 300 elderly individuals in care in Poland were included in the study. The subjects were divided into three groups: residents of long-term care institutions (group I, residents of adult day-care homes (group II, and community-dwelling subjects (group III. Each group consisted of 100 subjects. Questionnaires evaluating the following physical and mental dimensions of health were used: SF-36 Health Survey, basic activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, Geriatric Depression Scale, and Mini–mental state examination.Results: It was found that the health aspects of the elderly varied depending on whether care was provided in an institutionalized or a home environment, and the lowest health status was found in the elderly receiving in-home care. Furthermore, home-based elderly indicated significant limitations in performing basic activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, as well as a higher prevalence of depression and cognitive impairment.Conclusion: The elderly in long-term institutionalized care, both in a residential home and adult day-care homes, were characterized by a better physical and mental health status than those receiving in-home care. It seemed that worse health status, including the more frequent depression occurrence and cognitive function disorders in the elderly using the nursing care at their homes

  20. Creating roles for social work in changing health care organizations: organizational development perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, R; Ginsberg, N

    1997-01-01

    Social work has historically been influenced by and influential in periods of social change. The current health care environment poses challenges to the profession whose function is to maximize adaptation. In addition to helping patients and families adapt to a rapidly changing health delivery system, social workers can develop roles that affect the direction and impact of organizational change, substantively if not fundamentally. This includes assisting staff to work professionally and maintain client-focus during organizational stress and chaos. This article develops one example of how social work expanded its role during a time of transition through staff education of another discipline at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, USA. The authors conceptualize the need for such practice, describe and analyze the program, and extrapolate practice principles for expanding social work roles in a changing work organization.

  1. The provision of health and social care services for older people by respite providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David

    2013-10-01

    Respite services have been established to support family carers by providing a break from the responsibilities of caregiving. However the literature and anecdotal evidence suggests that respite services offer carers much more than just providing a period of rest. This study was initiated to identify and describe the health and social care services that are offered to family carers and care-recipients by respite services in South Australia. The findings show that respite providers offer a service to both the family carer and care-recipient. Both groups are offered socialisation and engagement opportunities, and care-recipients have access to a diverse range of health care services. The description of respite that emerges from this study is that of a complex service offering much more than just a period of rest from caregiving duties.

  2. [Clinic management of public social protection policy in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos-Griffiths, Estela; Muñoz-González, Luz Angélica; Vollrath-Ramírez, Antonia; Sánchez-Segura, Ximena

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the effectiveness of clinical management of primary care health in the field of Integral Protection System for Children "Chile Crece Contigo" and "Red Protege". Observational, descriptive, with information available from secondary sources of Chile Crece Contigo system in the district of Pudahuel, Santiago de Chile. The population was 1,656 pregnant women assigned to Chile Crece Contigo system in 2009. Social vulnerability was measured with the Social Protection Record. Sociodemographic and Chile Crece Contigo system performance variables were selected. It featured a raw and refined database. Processing and analysis of data was performed using the statistical program Statistical Package for Social Sciences and Excel. Descriptive statistics for frequency, position and dispersion were calculated. Certification of Scientific Ethics Committee of the School of Nursing was granted. A 91.4% of institutional social vulnerability detected by screening social protection record was observed. Psychosocial risk was higher in women with social vulnerability (42.0 vs. 28.2%) more often recognized as inadequate family support, depressive symptoms, domestic violence, substance abuse and conflicts with motherhood. In the universal, specific and integrated performance it was not met with 100% access to benefits. The invisibility of the social vulnerability and low effectiveness of the transfer of benefits to socially vulnerable women/children deserves skills development of contextualized and integrated clinical management professionals in primary health care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. ADOLESCENTS WITH BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS: PERSONALITY, QUALITY OF LIFE AND SOCIAL HEALTH CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ya. Volgina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deviant behavior of adolescents is a serious social problem in today's society because of the significant prevalence of this phenomenon. Authors present the results of the study of adolescents with behavioral problems. Aim: optimization of medical and social care for adolescents with behavioral problems. Patients and methods: the authors studied the incidence of this condition among children aged from 15 to 17 years using the software package «SOC/PEDIATRIA-2». The features of the personality structure of adolescents with deviant behavior were revealed using the adopted Russian short version of MMPI-MINI-MULT. Demographic and social characteristics of the families of adolescents were assessed. SF-36 questionnaire was applied for the quality of life assessment of the studied category. Results: increasing morbidity among adolescents was revealed due to various reasons: economic, medical and social. The study allowed to develop personal characteristics of the criteria in order to timely identify adolescents with accentuated and psychopathological features. The characteristics of quality of life were used as criteria of health care for adolescents with behavioral problems. The measures for the prevention and correction of deviant behavior among adolescents were proposed, including intersectoral integration and active participation of family in the process of rehabilitation. Conclusions: it is necessary to identify adolescents with deviant behavior timely, followed by a set of measures to provide them with health and social care to protect their health.

  4. Social media use by health care professionals and trainees: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Michele P; Chisholm, Annabritt; Shulhan, Jocelyn; Milne, Andrea; Scott, Shannon D; Klassen, Terry P; Hartling, Lisa

    2013-09-01

    To conduct a scoping review of the literature on social media use by health care professionals and trainees. The authors searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, ERIC, PubMed, CINAHL Plus Full Text, Academic Search Complete, Alt Health Watch, Health Source, Communication and Mass Media Complete, Web of Knowledge, and ProQuest for studies published between 2000 and 2012. They included those reporting primary research on social media use by health care professionals or trainees. Two reviewers screened studies for eligibility; one reviewer extracted data and a second verified a 10% sample. They analyzed data descriptively to determine which social media tools were used, by whom, for what purposes, and how they were evaluated. The authors included 96 studies in their review. Discussion forums were the most commonly studied tools (43/96; 44.8%). Researchers more often studied social media in educational than practice settings. Of common specialties, administration, critical appraisal, and research appeared most often (11/96; 11.5%), followed by public health (9/96; 9.4%). The objective of most tools was to facilitate communication (59/96; 61.5%) or improve knowledge (41/96; 42.7%). Thirteen studies evaluated effectiveness (13.5%), and 41 (42.7%) used a cross-sectional design. These findings provide a map of the current literature on social media use in health care, identify gaps in that literature, and provide direction for future research. Social media use is widespread, particularly in education settings. The versatility of these tools suggests their suitability for use in a wide range of professional activities. Studies of their effectiveness could inform future practice.

  5. Tailoring Care to Vulnerable Populations by Incorporating Social Determinants of Health: the Veterans Health Administration’s “Homeless Patient Aligned Care Team” Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erin E.; Aiello, Riccardo; Kane, Vincent; Pape, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although the clinical consequences of homelessness are well described, less is known about the role for health care systems in improving clinical and social outcomes for the homeless. We described the national implementation of a “homeless medical home” initiative in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and correlated patient health outcomes with characteristics of high-performing sites. Methods We conducted an observational study of 33 VHA facilities with homeless medical homes and patient- aligned care teams that served more than 14,000 patients. We correlated site-specific health care performance data for the 3,543 homeless veterans enrolled in the program from October 2013 through March 2014, including those receiving ambulatory or acute health care services during the 6 months prior to enrollment in our study and 6 months post-enrollment with corresponding survey data on the Homeless Patient Aligned Care Team (H-PACT) program implementation. We defined high performance as high rates of ambulatory care and reduced use of acute care services. Results More than 96% of VHA patients enrolled in these programs were concurrently receiving VHA homeless services. Of the 33 sites studied, 82% provided hygiene care (on-site showers, hygiene kits, and laundry), 76% provided transportation, and 55% had an on-site clothes pantry; 42% had a food pantry and provided on-site meals or other food assistance. Six-month patterns of acute-care use pre-enrollment and post-enrollment for 3,543 consecutively enrolled patients showed a 19.0% reduction in emergency department use and a 34.7% reduction in hospitalizations. Three features were significantly associated with high performance: 1) higher staffing ratios than other sites, 1) integration of social supports and social services into clinical care, and 3) outreach to and integration with community agencies. Conclusion Integrating social determinants of health into clinical care can be effective for high

  6. Tailoring Care to Vulnerable Populations by Incorporating Social Determinants of Health: the Veterans Health Administration's "Homeless Patient Aligned Care Team" Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Thomas P; Johnson, Erin E; Aiello, Riccardo; Kane, Vincent; Pape, Lisa

    2016-03-31

    Although the clinical consequences of homelessness are well described, less is known about the role for health care systems in improving clinical and social outcomes for the homeless. We described the national implementation of a "homeless medical home" initiative in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and correlated patient health outcomes with characteristics of high-performing sites. We conducted an observational study of 33 VHA facilities with homeless medical homes and patient- aligned care teams that served more than 14,000 patients. We correlated site-specific health care performance data for the 3,543 homeless veterans enrolled in the program from October 2013 through March 2014, including those receiving ambulatory or acute health care services during the 6 months prior to enrollment in our study and 6 months post-enrollment with corresponding survey data on the Homeless Patient Aligned Care Team (H-PACT) program implementation. We defined high performance as high rates of ambulatory care and reduced use of acute care services. More than 96% of VHA patients enrolled in these programs were concurrently receiving VHA homeless services. Of the 33 sites studied, 82% provided hygiene care (on-site showers, hygiene kits, and laundry), 76% provided transportation, and 55% had an on-site clothes pantry; 42% had a food pantry and provided on-site meals or other food assistance. Six-month patterns of acute-care use pre-enrollment and post-enrollment for 3,543 consecutively enrolled patients showed a 19.0% reduction in emergency department use and a 34.7% reduction in hospitalizations. Three features were significantly associated with high performance: 1) higher staffing ratios than other sites, 1) integration of social supports and social services into clinical care, and 3) outreach to and integration with community agencies. Integrating social determinants of health into clinical care can be effective for high-risk homeless veterans.

  7. The social relations of health care and household resource allocation in neoliberal Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesler Laura E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the transition to neoliberalism, Nicaragua's once-critically acclaimed health care services have substantially diminished. Local level social formations have been under pressure to try to bridge gaps as the state's role in the provision of health care and other vital social services has decreased. This paper presents a case study of how global and national health policies reverberated in the social relations of an extended network of female kin in a rural community during late 2002 - 2003. Methods The qualitative methods used in this ethnographic study included semi-structured interviews completed during bi-weekly visits to 51 households, background interviews with 20 lay and professional health practitioners working in the public and private sectors, and participant-observation conducted in the region's government health centers. Interviews and observational field notes were manually coded and iteratively reviewed to identify and conceptually organize emergent themes. Three households of extended kin were selected from the larger sample to examine as a case study. Results The ongoing erosion of vital services formerly provided by the public sector generated considerable frustration and tension among households, networks of extended kin, and neighbors. As resource allocations for health care seeking and other needs were negotiated within and across households, longstanding ideals of reciprocal exchange persisted, but in conditions of poverty, expectations were often unfulfilled, exposing the tension between the need for social support, versus the increasingly oppositional positioning of social network members as sources of competition for limited resources. Conclusions In compliance with neoliberal structural adjustment policies mandated by multilateral and bilateral agencies, government-provided health care services have been severely restricted in Nicaragua. As the national safety net for health care has been eroded

  8. Social and economic value of Portuguese community pharmacies in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Jorge; Ferreira, Diana; Afonso-Silva, Marta; Gomes, Marta Vargas; Ferreira, César; Vandewalle, Björn; Marques, Sara; Mota, Melina; Costa, Suzete; Cary, Maria; Teixeira, Inês; Paulino, Ema; Macedo, Bruno; Barbosa, Carlos Maurício

    2017-08-29

    Community pharmacies are major contributors to health care systems across the world. Several studies have been conducted to evaluate community pharmacies services in health care. The purpose of this study was to estimate the social and economic benefits of current and potential future community pharmacies services provided by pharmacists in health care in Portugal. The social and economic value of community pharmacies services was estimated through a decision-model. Model inputs included effectiveness data, quality of life (QoL) and health resource consumption, obtained though literature review and adapted to Portuguese reality by an expert panel. The estimated economic value was the result of non-remunerated pharmaceutical services plus health resource consumption potentially avoided. Social and economic value of community pharmacies services derives from the comparison of two scenarios: "with service" versus "without service". It is estimated that current community pharmacies services in Portugal provide a gain in QoL of 8.3% and an economic value of 879.6 million euros (M€), including 342.1 M€ in non-remunerated pharmaceutical services and 448.1 M€ in avoided expense with health resource consumption. Potential future community pharmacies services may provide an additional increase of 6.9% in QoL and be associated with an economic value of 144.8 M€: 120.3 M€ in non-remunerated services and 24.5 M€ in potential savings with health resource consumption. Community pharmacies services provide considerable benefit in QoL and economic value. An increase range of services including a greater integration in primary and secondary care, among other transversal services, may add further social and economic value to the society.

  9. Internet and social media for health-related information and communication in health care: preferences of the Dutch general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Belt, Tom H; Engelen, Lucien J L P G; Berben, Sivera A A; Teerenstra, Steven; Samsom, Melvin; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2013-10-02

    Health care is increasingly featured by the use of Web 2.0 communication and collaborative technologies that are reshaping the way patients and professionals interact. These technologies or tools can be used for a variety of purposes: to instantly debate issues, discover news, analyze research, network with peers, crowd-source information, seek support, and provide advice. Not all tools are implemented successfully; in many cases, the nonusage attrition rates are high. Little is known about the preferences of the Dutch general population regarding the use of the Internet and social media in health care. To determine the preferences of the general population in the Netherlands regarding the use of the Internet and social media in health care. A cross-sectional survey was disseminated via a popular Dutch online social network. Respondents were asked where they searched for health-related information, how they qualified the value of different sources, and their preferences regarding online communication with health care providers. Results were weighed for the Dutch population based on gender, age, and level of education using official statistics. Numbers and percentages or means and standard deviations were presented for different subgroups. One-way ANOVA was used to test for statistical differences. The survey was completed by 635 respondents. The Internet was found to be the number one source for health-related information (82.7%), closely followed by information provided by health care professionals (71.1%). Approximately one-third (32.3%) of the Dutch population search for ratings of health care providers. The most popular information topics were side effects of medication (62.5%) and symptoms (59.7%). Approximately one-quarter of the Dutch population prefer to communicate with a health care provider via social media (25.4%), and 21.2% would like to communicate via a webcam. The Internet is the main source of health-related information for the Dutch population

  10. Health promotion viewed as processes of subjectification in the education of Danish social and health care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehn-Christiansen, Sine

    2011-01-01

    problems of both a social and moral character. It is shown how health promotion has a thorough impact on the students’ possibilities of coming into being as (professional) subjects. The article points to the conclusion that in this particular educational setting, health promotion constitutes......This article explores how health promotion is practiced within a specific educational setting: the Danish Social and Health Education Programme. Here, health promotion is formally conceived as a strategy aimed at citizens - not at the students themselves. However, the students are generally...... perceived as being incapable of taking care of their own health and therefore also as being too far from the role model figure inherent in the discourse of professional health promotion work. Practices targeting students’ physical health are induced both in- and outside the curriculum. Based on empirical...

  11. Social representations of the health care of the Mbyá-Guarani indigenous population by health workers 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, Mirian Benites; Shimizu, Helena Eri; Bermudez, Ximena Pamela Díaz

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the social representations of health care of the Mbyá-Guarani ethnic group by multidisciplinary teams from the Special Indigenous Health District in the south coast of Rio Grande do Sul state (Distrito Sanitário Especial Indígena Litoral Sul do Rio Grande do Sul), Brazil. Method: a qualitative method based on the theory of social representations was used. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews with 20 health workers and by participant observation. The interviews were analyzed with ALCESTE software, which conducts a lexical content analysis using quantitative techniques for the treatment of textual data. Results: there were disagreements in the health care concepts and practices between traditional medicine and biomedicine; however, some progress has been achieved in the area of intermedicality. The ethnic boundaries established between health workers and indigenous peoples based on their representations of culture and family, together with the lack of infrastructure and organization of health actions, are perceived as factors that hinder health care in an intercultural context. Conclusion: a new basis for the process of indigenous health care needs to be established by understanding the needs identified and by agreement among individuals, groups, and health professionals via intercultural exchange. PMID:28177056

  12. Coordinating medical education and health care systems: the power of the social accountability approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, Charles

    2017-09-07

    As the purpose of medical education is to produce graduates able to most effectively address people's health concerns, there is general agreement that coordination with the health care system is essential. For too long, coordination has been dealt with in a subjective manner with only few landmarks to ensure objective and measurable achievements. Over the last 30 years, since the Edinburgh Declaration on medical education, progress has been made, namely with the concept of social accountability. The social accountability approach provides a way to plan, deliver and assess medical education with the explicit aim to contribute to effective, equitable and sustainable health system development. It is based on a system-wide scope exploring issues from identification of people's and society's health needs to verification of the effects of medical education in meeting those needs. A wide international consultation among medical education leaders led to the adoption of the Global Consensus on Social Accountability of Medical Schools. Benchmarks of social accountability are in the process of being conceived and tested, enabling medical schools to steer medical education in a more purposeful way in relation to determinants of health. A sample of schools using the social accountability approach claims to have had a positive influence on health care system performance and people's health status. Improved coordination of medical education and other key stakeholders in the health system is an important challenge for medical schools as well as for countries confronted with an urgent need for optimal use of their health workforce. There is growing interest worldwide in defining policies and strategies and supporting experiences in this regard. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  13. Social inequalities in the use of health care services after 8 years of health care reforms - a comparative study of the Baltic countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habicht, Jarno; Kiivet, Raul-Allan; Habicht, Triin; Kunst, Anton E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In nineties, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania have implemented a wide range of changes to health systems. The objective of this paper was to assess social inequalities in utilisation of, and access to, health care services in the late nineties. METHODS: The comparative NORBALT Survey

  14. Global Health Care Justice, Delivery Doctors and Assisted Reproduction: Taking a Note From Catholic Social Teachings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    This article will examine the Catholic concept of global justice within a health care framework as it relates to women's needs for delivery doctors in the developing world and women's demands for assisted reproduction in the developed world. I will first discuss justice as a theory, situating it within Catholic social teachings. The Catholic perspective on global justice in health care demands that everyone have access to basic needs before elective treatments are offered to the wealthy. After exploring specific discrepancies in global health care justice, I will point to the need for delivery doctors in the developing world to provide basic assistance to women who hazard many pregnancies as a priority before offering assisted reproduction to women in the developed world. The wide disparities between maternal health in the developing world and elective fertility treatments in the developed world are clearly unjust within Catholic social teachings. I conclude this article by offering policy suggestions for moving closer to health care justice via doctor distribution. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Double jeopardy: what social risk adds to biomedical risk in understanding child health and health care utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Ruth E K; Siegel, Michele J; Bauman, Laurie J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that children with both social and biomedical risk factors are more likely to be in poorer health and utilize more health services than those with either type of risk alone. Variables were identified using the 1998 National Health Interview Survey and tested here on 2002 data. Dependent variables were health (poorer health rating) and service use (hospitalization or greater than 2 emergency services). High social risk was defined as greater than 2 risk factors (parental education less than high school, family income family). High biomedical risk was defined as having a chronic condition or birth weight <2500 grams. Children with either high social or biomedical risk were significantly more likely to be in poorer health (odds ratio [OR] 3.1-3.4) and to have higher utilization (OR 1.7-2.1) than children at low risk on both dimensions. Children with high risk on both dimensions were significantly more likely to be in poorer health (OR 7.8-7.9) and have higher utilization (OR 3.5-3.7) on both social and biomedical risks and those children rated high risk on either dimension alone. Overall, social risk was as powerful as biomedical risk in these models and added substantially to biomedical risk. Findings were stable using different cut points for social risk and health ratings, and different definitions of chronic condition. These findings have implications for health care planners and insurers in estimating the burdens on clinicians and potential costs of delivering care to those with high social risks. Copyright 2010 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adapting an Interprofessional Training Model for Social Work Field Placements: An Answer for Better Mental Health Care Outreach for Older Adults in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Avani; Wharton, Tracy; Scogin, Forrest

    2017-01-01

    Professional shortages of geriatrically trained social workers pose a barrier to mental health care for older adults. Integrating graduate social work interns into primary care settings may increase the availability of trained social workers. However, few studies provide guidance on how to develop an interprofessional healthcare placement focused…

  17. Values associated with public involvement in health and social care research: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradinger, Felix; Britten, Nicky; Wyatt, Katrina; Froggatt, Katherine; Gibson, Andy; Jacoby, Ann; Lobban, Fiona; Mayes, Debbie; Snape, Dee; Rawcliffe, Tim; Popay, Jennie

    2015-10-01

    Much has been written about public involvement (PI) in health and social care research, but underpinning values are rarely made explicit despite the potential for these to have significant influence on the practice and assessment of PI. The narrative review reported here is part of a larger MRC-funded study which is producing a framework and related guidance on assessing the impact of PI in health and social care research. The review aimed to identify and characterize the range of values associated with PI that are central elements of the framework. We undertook a review and narrative synthesis of diverse literatures of PI in health and social care research, including twenty existing reviews and twenty-four chapters in sixteen textbooks. Three overarching value systems were identified, each containing five value clusters. (i) A system concerned with ethical and/or political issues including value clusters associated with empowerment; change/action; accountability/transparency; rights; and ethics (normative values). (ii). A system concerned with the consequences of public involvement in research including value clusters associated with effectiveness; quality/relevance; validity/reliability; representativeness/objectivity/generalizability; and evidence (substantive values). (iii) A system concerned with the conduct of public involvement in including value clusters associated with Partnership/equality; respect/trust; openness and honesty; independence; and clarity (process values). Our review identified three systems associated with PI in health and social care research focused on normative, substantive and process values. The findings suggest that research teams should consider and make explicit the values they attach to PI in research and discuss ways in which potential tensions may be managed in order to maximize the benefits of PI for researchers, lay experts and the research. © 2013 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Using Technology to Improve Cancer Care: Social Media, Wearables, and Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Michael J; Chung, Arlene E; Accordino, Melissa K

    2016-01-01

    Digital engagement has become pervasive in the delivery of cancer care. Internet- and cellular phone-based tools and systems are allowing large groups of people to engage with each other and share information. Health systems and individual health professionals are adapting to this revolution in consumer and patient behavior by developing ways to incorporate the benefits of technology for the purpose of improving the quality of medical care. One example is the use of social media platforms by oncologists to foster interaction with each other and to participate with the lay public in dialogue about science, medicine, and cancer care. In addition, consumer devices and sensors (wearables) have provided a new, growing dimension of digital engagement and another layer of patient-generated health data to foster better care and research. Finally, electronic health records have become the new standard for oncology care delivery, bringing new opportunities to measure quality in real time and follow practice patterns, as well as new challenges as providers and patients seek ways to integrate this technology along with other forms of digital engagement to produce more satisfaction in the process of care along with measurably better outcomes.

  19. [Case management as a methodology for connecting the health and social care systems in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, Jorge; Ródenas, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the assessment of a case management project, implemented with chronic patients in Valencia, for the integration of health and social care. This project is linked with the 'Sustainable Socio-Health Model'. Health department 06 in Valencia. The target groups were chronic patients of 65 years and over. A non-randomized non-blinded comparative study with an intervention and control group. The intervention consisted in the creation of an interdisciplinary case management team, the use of a common portfolio of resources, and its application to a pilot sample with an intervention period of 6-9 months. Diseases (ICD-9), functional capacity, use of health and social resources, satisfaction, unit cost services. There was an increase in the combined use of health and social resources in the intervention group, which included social day centers (21.8% in the intervention group compared to 9.8% in the control group), in coordination with primary care (suggested as the only health resource in 55.4% of cases). There was a decrease in the number of medical visits in the intervention group (43.6% versus 74.5% in the control group). Increased patient satisfaction (55.5% in the intervention group compared to 29.4% in the control group) was observed. At least an extra 4.4% of patients were treated using hospital resources without increasing costs. Case management using a common unique portfolio of health and social resources can improve the coordination of resources, increases patient satisfaction and increases the capacity of using of hospital resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. The influence of social challenges when implementing information systems in a Swedish health-care organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Lina; Eriksén, Sara; Borg, Christel

    2016-09-01

    To describe and obtain a deeper understanding of social challenges and their influence on the implementation process when implementing Information systems in a Swedish health-care organisation. Despite positive effects when implementing Information systems in health-care organisations, there are difficulties in the implementation process. Nurses' experiences of being neglected have been dismissed as reasons for setbacks in implementation. An Institutional Ethnography design was used. A deductive content analysis was made influenced by empirically identified social challenges of power, professional identity and encounters. An abstraction was made of the analysis. Nineteen nurses at macro, meso and micro levels were interviewed in focus groups. Organisational levels are lost in different ways in how to control the reformation, how to introduce Information systems as reformation strategies and in how to translate new tools and assumptions that do not fit traditional ways of working in shaping professional identities. Different focus may affect the reformation of health-care organisations and implementation and knowledge processes. An implementation climate is needed where the system standards fit the values of the users. Nursing management needs to be visionary, engaged and work with risk factors in order to reform the hierarchical health-care organisation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Dental care utilization by accredited social health activist and anganwadi workers in Chintamani Taluk, Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Shwetha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA and anganwadi workers form a strong link between the healthcare delivery system and rural community. The utilization of the dental care facilities by ASHA and anganwadi workers can be an indicator of oral health awareness among them. Aim: To assess the dental care utilization among ASHA and anganwadi workers and their oral diseases status. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the community health center, Chintamani, Karnataka. All the ASHA, anganwadi workers present on the day of the study were included in the study. A proforma was used to record demographic details, oral health care utilization during the previous year, reasons for last dental visit, and oral health status. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square test were performed using SPSS version 16 (SPSS IBM, Chicago, IL, USA. Results: The study participants were 321 in number. Among them, 141 (43.9% were ASHA workers and 180 (56.1% were anganwadi workers and 28.3% utilized dental services. However, 309 (96.7% of the participants had oral diseases. There was a significant difference (P = 0.002 in the proportion of the dental care utilization and oral diseases among the participants. Conclusions: The dental care utilization was low and is not proportional to the disease present in the study population.

  2. Emerging patient-driven health care models: an examination of health social networks, consumer personalized medicine and quantified self-tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Melanie

    2009-02-01

    A new class of patient-driven health care services is emerging to supplement and extend traditional health care delivery models and empower patient self-care. Patient-driven health care can be characterized as having an increased level of information flow, transparency, customization, collaboration and patient choice and responsibility-taking, as well as quantitative, predictive and preventive aspects. The potential exists to both improve traditional health care systems and expand the concept of health care though new services. This paper examines three categories of novel health services: health social networks, consumer personalized medicine and quantified self-tracking.

  3. How Health Care Professionals Use Social Media to Create Virtual Communities: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Prevailing health care structures and cultures restrict intraprofessional communication, inhibiting knowledge dissemination and impacting the translation of research into practice. Virtual communities may facilitate professional networking and knowledge sharing in and between health care disciplines. Objectives This study aimed to review the literature on the use of social media by health care professionals in developing virtual communities that facilitate professional networking, knowledge sharing, and evidence-informed practice. Methods An integrative literature review was conducted to identify research published between 1990 and 2015. Search strategies sourced electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL), snowball references, and tables of contents of 3 journals. Papers that evaluated social media use by health care professionals (unless within an education framework) using any research design (except for research protocols or narrative reviews) were included. Standardized data extraction and quality assessment tools were used. Results Overall, 72 studies were included: 44 qualitative (including 2 ethnographies, 26 qualitative descriptive, and 1 Q-sort) and 20 mixed-methods studies, and 8 literature reviews. The most common methods of data collection were Web-based observation (n=39), surveys (n=23), interviews (n=11), focus groups (n=2), and diaries (n=1). Study quality was mixed. Social media studied included Listservs (n=22), Twitter (n=18), general social media (n=17), discussion forums (n=7), Web 2.0 (n=3), virtual community of practice (n=3), wiki (n=1), and Facebook (n=1). A range of health care professionals were sampled in the studies, including physicians (n=24), nurses (n=15), allied health professionals (n=14), followed by health care professionals in general (n=8), a multidisciplinary clinical specialty area (n=9), and midwives (n=2). Of 36 virtual communities, 31 were monodiscipline for a discrete clinical specialty. Population uptake by the

  4. How Health Care Professionals Use Social Media to Create Virtual Communities: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Kaye; Hansen, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Elliott, Doug

    2016-06-16

    Prevailing health care structures and cultures restrict intraprofessional communication, inhibiting knowledge dissemination and impacting the translation of research into practice. Virtual communities may facilitate professional networking and knowledge sharing in and between health care disciplines. This study aimed to review the literature on the use of social media by health care professionals in developing virtual communities that facilitate professional networking, knowledge sharing, and evidence-informed practice. An integrative literature review was conducted to identify research published between 1990 and 2015. Search strategies sourced electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL), snowball references, and tables of contents of 3 journals. Papers that evaluated social media use by health care professionals (unless within an education framework) using any research design (except for research protocols or narrative reviews) were included. Standardized data extraction and quality assessment tools were used. Overall, 72 studies were included: 44 qualitative (including 2 ethnographies, 26 qualitative descriptive, and 1 Q-sort) and 20 mixed-methods studies, and 8 literature reviews. The most common methods of data collection were Web-based observation (n=39), surveys (n=23), interviews (n=11), focus groups (n=2), and diaries (n=1). Study quality was mixed. Social media studied included Listservs (n=22), Twitter (n=18), general social media (n=17), discussion forums (n=7), Web 2.0 (n=3), virtual community of practice (n=3), wiki (n=1), and Facebook (n=1). A range of health care professionals were sampled in the studies, including physicians (n=24), nurses (n=15), allied health professionals (n=14), followed by health care professionals in general (n=8), a multidisciplinary clinical specialty area (n=9), and midwives (n=2). Of 36 virtual communities, 31 were monodiscipline for a discrete clinical specialty. Population uptake by the target group ranged from 1.6% to 29% (n

  5. The Health and Social Care Bill: value for money or service improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstadt, Lyn

    Over the past couple of weeks, I have found myself yet again examining the proposed new Health and Social Care Bill. Although the Bill has cleared the House of Commons for now, it is being scrutinized in the House of Lords, who have had plenty of critical and uncomplimentary things to say. My concern regarding the progress of the Bill and the negative response surrounding it prompted me to revisit the legislation.

  6. Sense of community and job satisfaction among social and health care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampinen, Mai-Stiina; Viitanen, Elina Annikki; Konu, Anne Irmeli

    2015-07-06

    The purpose of this paper is to identify how the factors associated with sense of community at work are connected with job satisfaction among the front-line managers and middle managers in social and health-care services in Finland. A questionnaire prepared for this study was sent to 241 social and health-care managers (front line and middle managers) in Finland. A total of 136 of managers responded to the survey (response rate was 56 per cent). Data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, exploratory factor analysis and multiple linear regression analysis. Alongside job meaningfulness, open communication and good flow of information within the organization, sense of security provided by close relationships at work and managers' own superiors' appreciation of their leadership skills all are related to managers' job satisfaction. The study adds to our understanding of factors which are connected to the job satisfaction among social and health-care managers'. The findings of this study can be used in the development of leadership to support managers in coping at work.

  7. Health and social care professionals' attitudes to interprofessional working and interprofessional education: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Veronica; McSwiggan, Linda; Campbell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The healthcare setting is a rich learning environment for students to experience interprofessional working (IPW) and interprofessional education (IPE). However, opportunities for IPE are limited, and student experiences of effective IPW are varied. This raises the question of how IPW and IPE are valued by health or social care professionals. A search of the literature was carried out to identify studies of health and social care staff attitudes to IPW and IPE. This review provides a summary of the main factors found to influence attitudes and the strengths and limitations of these studies. Professional background and prior IPE experience were identified as the influencing factors for which there is most evidence. The main limitations of the studies accessed included a focus on the value of IPE for staff, as opposed to students, and a limited number of studies considering the relationship between attitudes to IPW and the value placed on IPE. It is important that health and social care professionals lead by example by working collaboratively and providing students with opportunities for IPE. Identifying the variables influencing attitudes to IPW and IPE may assist in improving IPW and experiences of IPE for students learning in the healthcare setting.

  8. Social networks, information and health care utilization: evidence from undocumented immigrants in Milan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillanova, Carlo

    2008-03-01

    This paper uses a novel dataset and research design to examine the effects of information networks on immigrants' access to health care. The dataset consists of an unusually large sample of undocumented immigrants and contains a direct indicator of information networks-whether an immigrant was referred to health care opportunities by a strong social tie (relative or friend). This measure allows to overcome some of the major identification issues that afflict most of the existing literature on network effects and to concentrate on one of the channels through which social contacts might operate. The analysis focuses on the time spent in Italy before an immigrant first receives medical assistance. Estimates indicate that networks significantly foster health care utilization: after controlling for all available individual characteristics and for ethnic heterogeneity, I find that relying on a strong social tie reduces the time to visit by 30%. The effect of information networks is stable across specifications and it is relatively large. Further investigation seems to confirm the quantitative importance of networks as an information device.

  9. Open Source Paradigm: A Synopsis of The Cathedral and the Bazaar for Health and Social Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Tim

    2016-07-04

    Open source software (OSS) is becoming more fashionable in health and social care, although the ideas are not new. However progress has been slower than many had expected. The purpose is to summarise the Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) paradigm in terms of what it is, how it impacts users and software engineers and how it can work as a business model in health and social care sectors. Much of this paper is a synopsis of Eric Raymond's seminal book The Cathedral and the Bazaar, which was the first comprehensive description of the open source ecosystem, set out in three long essays. Direct quotes from the book are used liberally, without reference to specific passages. The first part contrasts open and closed source approaches to software development and support. The second part describes the culture and practices of the open source movement. The third part considers business models. A key benefit of open source is that users can access and collaborate on improving the software if they wish. Closed source code may be regarded as a strategic business risk that that may be unacceptable if there is an open source alternative. The sharing culture of the open source movement fits well with that of health and social care.

  10. Understanding India, globalisation and health care systems: a mapping of research in the social sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisht Ramila

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract National and transnational health care systems are rapidly evolving with current processes of globalisation. What is the contribution of the social sciences to an understanding of this field? A structured scoping exercise was conducted to identify relevant literature using the lens of India – a ‘rising power’ with a rapidly expanding healthcare economy. A five step search and analysis method was employed in order to capture as wide a range of material as possible. Documents published in English that met criteria for a social science contribution were included for review. Via electronic bibliographic databases, websites and hand searches conducted in India, 113 relevant articles, books and reports were identified. These were classified according to topic area, publication date, disciplinary perspective, genre, and theoretical and methodological approaches. Topic areas were identified initially through an inductive approach, then rationalised into seven broad themes. Transnational consumption of health services; the transnational healthcare workforce; the production, consumption and trade in specific health-related commodities, and transnational diffusion of ideas and knowledge have all received attention from social scientists in work related to India. Other themes with smaller volumes of work include new global health governance issues and structures; transnational delivery of health services and the transnational movement of capital. Thirteen disciplines were found represented in our review, with social policy being a clear leader, followed by economics and management studies. Overall this survey of India-related work suggests a young and expanding literature, although hampered by inadequacies in global comparative data, and by difficulties in accessing commercially sensitive information. The field would benefit from further cross-fertilisation between disciplines and greater application of explanatory theory. Literatures around

  11. Understanding India, globalisation and health care systems: a mapping of research in the social sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    National and transnational health care systems are rapidly evolving with current processes of globalisation. What is the contribution of the social sciences to an understanding of this field? A structured scoping exercise was conducted to identify relevant literature using the lens of India – a ‘rising power’ with a rapidly expanding healthcare economy. A five step search and analysis method was employed in order to capture as wide a range of material as possible. Documents published in English that met criteria for a social science contribution were included for review. Via electronic bibliographic databases, websites and hand searches conducted in India, 113 relevant articles, books and reports were identified. These were classified according to topic area, publication date, disciplinary perspective, genre, and theoretical and methodological approaches. Topic areas were identified initially through an inductive approach, then rationalised into seven broad themes. Transnational consumption of health services; the transnational healthcare workforce; the production, consumption and trade in specific health-related commodities, and transnational diffusion of ideas and knowledge have all received attention from social scientists in work related to India. Other themes with smaller volumes of work include new global health governance issues and structures; transnational delivery of health services and the transnational movement of capital. Thirteen disciplines were found represented in our review, with social policy being a clear leader, followed by economics and management studies. Overall this survey of India-related work suggests a young and expanding literature, although hampered by inadequacies in global comparative data, and by difficulties in accessing commercially sensitive information. The field would benefit from further cross-fertilisation between disciplines and greater application of explanatory theory. Literatures around stem cell research and health

  12. Understanding India, globalisation and health care systems: a mapping of research in the social sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Ramila; Pitchforth, Emma; Murray, Susan F

    2012-09-10

    National and transnational health care systems are rapidly evolving with current processes of globalisation. What is the contribution of the social sciences to an understanding of this field? A structured scoping exercise was conducted to identify relevant literature using the lens of India - a 'rising power' with a rapidly expanding healthcare economy. A five step search and analysis method was employed in order to capture as wide a range of material as possible. Documents published in English that met criteria for a social science contribution were included for review. Via electronic bibliographic databases, websites and hand searches conducted in India, 113 relevant articles, books and reports were identified. These were classified according to topic area, publication date, disciplinary perspective, genre, and theoretical and methodological approaches. Topic areas were identified initially through an inductive approach, then rationalised into seven broad themes. Transnational consumption of health services; the transnational healthcare workforce; the production, consumption and trade in specific health-related commodities, and transnational diffusion of ideas and knowledge have all received attention from social scientists in work related to India. Other themes with smaller volumes of work include new global health governance issues and structures; transnational delivery of health services and the transnational movement of capital. Thirteen disciplines were found represented in our review, with social policy being a clear leader, followed by economics and management studies. Overall this survey of India-related work suggests a young and expanding literature, although hampered by inadequacies in global comparative data, and by difficulties in accessing commercially sensitive information. The field would benefit from further cross-fertilisation between disciplines and greater application of explanatory theory. Literatures around stem cell research and health

  13. Tailoring Care to Vulnerable Populations by Incorporating Social Determinants of Health: the Veterans Health Administration?s ?Homeless Patient Aligned Care Team? Program

    OpenAIRE

    O?Toole, Thomas P.; Johnson, Erin E.; Aiello, Riccardo; Kane, Vincent; Pape, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although the clinical consequences of homelessness are well described, less is known about the role for health care systems in improving clinical and social outcomes for the homeless. We described the national implementation of a ?homeless medical home? initiative in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and correlated patient health outcomes with characteristics of high-performing sites. Methods We conducted an observational study of 33 VHA facilities with homeless medical ho...

  14. Towards a new welfare state: the social sustainability principle and health care strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, Jorge; Ródenas, Francisco; Sanjosé, Vicente

    2003-09-01

    In this paper we propose a social and health care model that offers alternatives to three problems arising in converging European welfare states, particularly in the southern nations: the rise in demand for services and features linked to the ageing process, the increase in dependency and the crisis of informal support. Development of the principles of social sustainability implies re-formulation of the regulatory, care, economic, administrative, cultural, and axiological framework enabling a response to the needs of long term care without compromising the welfare of future generations. Together with this principle, quality of life elevated to a subjective right directs attention towards the sphere closest to citizens, eliminating all barriers, which hamper exercise of this right. All of the above produces economic and social costs which must be accepted from a viewpoint of social co-responsibility, which brings with it the supply of welfare individually, without detriment to the exercise of state responsibility in guaranteeing a social protection system of a universal nature.

  15. Health and social care costs of managing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): an Irish perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Sheelah; Heslin, Chloe; Mays, Iain; Corr, Bernie; Normand, Charles; Hardiman, Orla

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the health and social care costs associated with managing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in Ireland. Resource use of a representative group of deceased ALS patients attending a multidisciplinary ALS clinic was identified from a retrospective chart review and telephone interview with the main caregiver. Unit cost estimates were applied to each resource to identify the cost per patient. Cost drivers were identified using multivariate linear regression. Results showed that from time of diagnosis to death, the cost per month was €1795, 21% of which was attributable to costs associated with the multidisciplinary clinic, 72% to community based care and 7% to aids and appliances. Higher monthly cost was associated with shorter survival and use of gastrostomy and non-invasive ventilation. In conclusion, ALS imposes a significant cost burden on the health services. More work is required to quantify the costs in other sectors, including informal care and productivity losses.

  16. Inclusion of the equity focus and social determinants of health in health care education programmes in Colombia: a qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rincón, Erwin H; Pimentel-González, Juan P; Orozco-Beltrán, Domingo; Carratalá-Munuera, Concepción

    2016-06-01

    The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Colombian Ministry of Health and Social Protection have determined a need for an approach to include Equity Focus (EF) and Social Determinants of Health (SDH) in health training programmes in Colombia. We studied the incorporation of EF and SDH in the curricula of several universities in Colombia to identify opportunities to strengthen their inclusion. Qualitative methodology was performed in two stages: (i) initial exploration (self-administered questionnaires and review of curricula) and (ii) validation of the information (semi-structured interviews). The inclusion of the EF and SDH in university curricula is regarded as an opportunity to address social problems. This approach addresses a broad cross-section of the curriculum, especially in the subjects of public health and Primary Health Care (PHC), where community outreach generates greater internalization by students. The dominance of the biomedical model of study plans and practice scenarios focusing on disease and little emphasis on community outreach are factors that limit the inclusion of the approach. The inclusion of EF and SDH in university curricula in Colombia has primarily focused on increasing the knowledge of various subjects oriented towards understanding the social dynamics or comprehensiveness of health and disease and, in some programmes, through practical courses in community health and PHC. Increased integration of EF and SDH in subjects or modules with clinical orientation is recommended. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Lack of access to health care for African indigents: a social exclusion perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soors, Werner; Dkhimi, Fahdi; Criel, Bart

    2013-11-15

    Lack of access to health care is a persistent condition for most African indigents, to which the common technical approach of targeting initiatives is an insufficient antidote. To overcome the standstill, an integrated technical and political approach is needed. Such policy shift is dependent on political support, and on alignment of international and national actors. We explore if the analytical framework of social exclusion can contribute to the latter. We produce a critical and evaluative account of the literature on three themes: social exclusion, development policy, and indigence in Africa-and their interface. First, we trace the concept of social exclusion as it evolved over time and space in policy circles. We then discuss the relevance of a social exclusion perspective in developing countries. Finally, we apply this perspective to Africa, its indigents, and their lack of access to health care. The concept of social exclusion as an underlying process of structural inequalities has needed two decades to find acceptance in international policy circles. Initial scepticism about the relevance of the concept in developing countries is now giving way to recognition of its universality. For a variety of reasons however, the uptake of a social exclusion perspective in Africa has been limited. Nevertheless, social exclusion as a driver of poverty and inequity in Africa is evident, and manifestly so in the case of the African indigents. The concept of social exclusion provides a useful framework for improved understanding of origins and persistence of the access problem that African indigents face, and for generating political space for an integrated approach.

  18. Collecting and Analyzing Patient Experiences of Health Care From Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Ye, Zhan; Wall, Daniel; Murali, Narayana; Lin, Simon

    2015-07-02

    Social Media, such as Yelp, provides rich information of consumer experience. Previous studies suggest that Yelp can serve as a new source to study patient experience. However, the lack of a corpus of patient reviews causes a major bottleneck for applying computational techniques. The objective of this study is to create a corpus of patient experience (COPE) and report descriptive statistics to characterize COPE. Yelp reviews about health care-related businesses were extracted from the Yelp Academic Dataset. Natural language processing (NLP) tools were used to split reviews into sentences, extract noun phrases and adjectives from each sentence, and generate parse trees and dependency trees for each sentence. Sentiment analysis techniques and Hadoop were used to calculate a sentiment score of each sentence and for parallel processing, respectively. COPE contains 79,173 sentences from 6914 patient reviews of 985 health care facilities near 30 universities in the United States. We found that patients wrote longer reviews when they rated the facility poorly (1 or 2 stars). We demonstrated that the computed sentiment scores correlated well with consumer-generated ratings. A consumer vocabulary to describe their health care experience was constructed by a statistical analysis of word counts and co-occurrences in COPE. A corpus called COPE was built as an initial step to utilize social media to understand patient experiences at health care facilities. The corpus is available to download and COPE can be used in future studies to extract knowledge of patients' experiences from their perspectives. Such information can subsequently inform and provide opportunity to improve the quality of health care.

  19. SOCIAL AND SOCIETAL BARRIERS IN UTILIZATION OF MATERNAL HEALTH CARE SERVICES IN RURAL PUNJAB, PAKISTAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfraz, Mariyam; Tariq, Saira; Hamid, Saima; Iqbal, Nafeesa

    2015-01-01

    The health status of pregnant women depends largely on the quality of the antenatal and delivery services available to them. Maternal mortality remains a major public health problem with antenatal and delivery care utilization remaining low in Pakistan. This study explores the perspectives of rural community members about the antenatal and delivery care services' utilization by the community. A qualitative study was undertaken in the rural community of District Attock. Focus Group Discussions (FGD) were conducted with husbands, married women of child-bearing age with young children and mothers-in-law. Data was analysed manually using content analysis techniques. Majority of the respondents sought antenatal care (ANC) after 3-4 months. They further reported that home was the preferred place of delivery followed by the local "rural health centre". The preferred attendant for delivery was the local Dai (traditional birth attendant). Major limitations to accessing ANC and delivery services were lack of knowledge about ANC, long distance and high transport costs to health care facilities. People had strong beliefs on faith healers (Pirs) and insufficient knowledge about danger signs. Traditional and customary practice as taweez dhaga, saya, purdah, non-availability of health care providers, and lack of trust on young community midwives led to people favouring the home based package of services provided by traditional birth attendants (Dais). The findings of this study indicate that demand side barriers such as lack of knowledge regarding home based care, social barriers, financial constraint and non-acceptability of community midwives (CMW) because services offered by traditional birth attendants (TBA) were more accessible in terms of distance and cost are a major challenge affecting utilization. Efforts towards ensuring the utilization of ANC and delivery services should be targeted towards rural areas and the importance of skilled care should be emphasized. Women

  20. Facilitating LGBT Medical, Health and Social Care Content in Higher Education Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zowie Davy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT health care is becoming an important quality assurance feature of primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare in Britain. While acknowledging these very positive developments, teaching LGBT curricula content is contingent upon having educators understand the complexity of LGBT lives. The study adopted a qualitative mixed method approach. The study investigated how and in what ways barriers and facilitators of providing LGBT medical, health and social care curricula content figure in the accreditation policies and within undergraduate and postgraduate medical and healthcare teaching. This paper illustrates opposing views about curricula inclusion. The evidence presented suggests that LGBT content teaching is often challenged at various points in its delivery. In this respect, we will focus on a number of resistances that sometimes prevents teachers from engaging with and providing the complexities of LGBT curricula content. These include the lack of collegiate, colleague and student cooperation. By investing some time on these often neglected areas of resistance, the difficulties and good practice met by educators will be explored. This focus will make visible how to support medical, health and social care students become aware and confident in tackling contemporaneous health issues for LGBT patients.

  1. Enhancing social networks: a qualitative study of health and social care practice in UK mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Martin; Reidy, Hannah; Ansari, David; Stevens, Martin; Morris, David

    2015-03-01

    People with severe mental health problems such as psychosis have access to less social capital, defined as resources within social networks, than members of the general population. However, a lack of theoretically and empirically informed models hampers the development of social interventions which seek to enhance an individual's social networks. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study, which used ethnographic field methods in six sites in England to investigate how workers helped people recovering from psychosis to enhance their social networks. This study drew upon practice wisdom and lived experience to provide data for intervention modelling. Data were collected from 73 practitioners and 51 people who used their services in two phases. Data were selected and coded using a grounded theory approach to depict the key themes that appeared to underpin the generation of social capital within networks. Findings are presented in four over-arching themes - worker skills, attitudes and roles; connecting people processes; role of the agency; and barriers to network development. The sub-themes which were identified included worker attitudes; person-centred approach; equality of worker-individual relationship; goal setting; creating new networks and relationships; engagement through activities; practical support; existing relationships; the individual taking responsibility; identifying and overcoming barriers; and moving on. Themes were consistent with recovery models used within mental health services and will provide the basis for the development of an intervention model to enhance individuals' access to social capital within networks. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Linking communities to formal health care providers through village health teams in rural Uganda: lessons from linking social capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musinguzi, Laban Kashaija; Turinawe, Emmanueil Benon; Rwemisisi, Jude T; de Vries, Daniel H; Mafigiri, David K; Muhangi, Denis; de Groot, Marije; Katamba, Achilles; Pool, Robert

    2017-01-11

    Community-based programmes, particularly community health workers (CHWs), have been portrayed as a cost-effective alternative to the shortage of health workers in low-income countries. Usually, literature emphasises how easily CHWs link and connect communities to formal health care services. There is little evidence in Uganda to support or dispute such claims. Drawing from linking social capital framework, this paper examines the claim that village health teams (VHTs), as an example of CHWs, link and connect communities with formal health care services. Data were collected through ethnographic fieldwork undertaken as part of a larger research program in Luwero District, Uganda, between 2012 and 2014. The main methods of data collection were participant observation in events organised by VHTs. In addition, a total of 91 in-depth interviews and 42 focus group discussions (FGD) were conducted with adult community members as part of the larger project. After preliminary analysis of the data, we conducted an additional six in-depth interviews and three FGD with VHTs and four FGD with community members on the role of VHTs. Key informant interviews were conducted with local government staff, health workers, local leaders, and NGO staff with health programs in Luwero. Thematic analysis was used during data analysis. The ability of VHTs to link communities with formal health care was affected by the stakeholders' perception of their roles. Community members perceive VHTs as working for and under instructions of "others", which makes them powerless in the formal health care system. One of the challenges associated with VHTs' linking roles is support from the government and formal health care providers. Formal health care providers perceived VHTs as interested in special recognition for their services yet they are not "experts". For some health workers, the introduction of VHTs is seen as a ploy by the government to control people and hide its inability to provide health

  3. The Patient Centered Assessment Method (PCAM: integrating the social dimensions of health into primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Pratt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social dimensions of health are known to contribute to what is often termed “patient complexity”, which is particularly common among patients with multimorbidity. Health-care professionals require tools to help them identify and manage these aspects of patient needs. Objectives: To examine: (i the Patient Centered Assessment Method (PCAM, a tool for assessing patient complexity in ways that are sensitive to the biopsychosocial dimensions of health, in primary care settings in Scotland; (ii the impact of the PCAM on referral patterns and its perceived value; and (iii the PCAM’s perceived applicability for use in a complex patient population. Design: Two studies are described: (i a mixed-methods prospective cohort study of the implementation of the PCAM in primary care clinics; and (ii a qualitative exploratory study that evaluated the value of the PCAM in a complex patient population. Results: Use of the PCAM did not impact patient satisfaction or perception of practitioners’ empathy, but it did increase both the number of onward referrals per referred patient (9–12% and the proportion of referrals to non-medical services addressing psychological, social, and lifestyle needs. Nurses valued the PCAM, particularly its ability to help them address psychological and social domains of patients’ lives, and found it to be highly relevant for use in populations with known high complexity. Conclusions: The PCAM represents a feasible approach for assessing patient needs with consideration to the social dimensions of health, and allows practitioners to refer patients to a broader range of services to address patient complexity.

  4. Primary-care-based social prescribing for mental health: an analysis of financial and environmental sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Daniel L; Patel, Alisha; Parveen, Tahmina; Braithwaite, Isobel; Cook, Jonathan; Lillywhite, Rob; Cooke, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Aim To assess the effects of a social prescribing service development on healthcare use and the subsequent economic and environmental costs. Social prescribing services for mental healthcare create links with support in the community for people using primary care. Social prescribing services may reduce future healthcare use, and therefore reduce the financial and environmental costs of healthcare, by providing structured psychosocial support. The National Health Service (NHS) is required to reduce its carbon footprint by 80% by 2050 according to the Climate Change Act (2008). This study is the first of its kind to analyse both the financial and environmental impacts associated with healthcare use following social prescribing. The value of this observational study lies in its novel methodology of analysing the carbon footprint of a service at the primary-care level. An observational study was carried out to assess the impact of the service on the financial and environmental impacts of healthcare use. GP appointments, psychotropic medications and secondary-care referrals were measured. Findings Results demonstrate no statistical difference in the financial and carbon costs of healthcare use between groups. Social prescribing showed a trend towards reduced healthcare use, mainly due to a reduction in secondary-care referrals compared with controls. The associations found did not achieve significance due to the small sample size leading to a large degree of uncertainty regarding differences. This study demonstrates that these services are potentially able to pay for themselves through reducing future healthcare costs and are effective, low-carbon interventions, when compared with cognitive behavioral therapy or antidepressants. This is an important finding in light of Government targets for the NHS to reduce its carbon footprint by 80% by 2050. Larger studies are required to investigate the potentials of social prescribing services further.

  5. Developing integrated health and social care services for older persons in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Leichsenring

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper is to distribute first results of the EU Fifth Framework Project ‘Providing integrated health and social care for older persons—issues, problems and solutions’ (PROCARE—http://www.euro.centre.org/procare/. The project's first phase was to identify different approaches to integration as well as structural, organisational, economic and social-cultural factors and actors that constitute integrated and sustainable care systems. It also served to retrieve a number of experiences, model ways of working and demonstration projects in the participating countries which are currently being analysed in order to learn from success—or failure—and to develop policy recommendations for the local, national and European level. Theory: The paper draws on existing definitions of integrated care in various countries and by various scholars. Given the context of an international comparative study it tries to avoid providing a single, ready-made definition but underlines the role of social care as part and parcel of this type of integrated care in the participating countries. Methods: The paper is based on national reports from researchers representing ten organisations (university institutes, consultancy firms, research institutes, the public and the NGO sector from 9 European countries: Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, and the UK. Literature reviews made intensive use of grey literature and evaluation studies in the context of at least five model ways of working in each country. Results: As a result of the cross-national overview an attempt to classify different approaches and definitions is made and indicators of relative importance of the different instruments used in integrating health and social care services are provided. Conclusions: The cross-national overview shows that issues concerning co-ordination and integration of services are high on the agenda in most countries. Depending on

  6. Shared decision making in health care settings: a role for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, K Jean

    2012-01-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) is a process integral to social work practice, one where the provider/professional and the consumer/patient discuss treatment alternatives based on patient values and life circumstances and make a shared decision about whether and how to proceed with treatment. Evidence-based medicine suggests that for many health conditions, having the choice of several effective treatment options is not uncommon. In these cases treatment should be based on what is best for the individual, since many factors influence an individual's treatment preference, including the psychological, social, cultural, and spiritual history she/he brings to the medical encounter; a history that has long been ignored in somatic health care. This article develops the argument that medical social workers possess the professional knowledge and skill base to provide decisional coaching, and implementing SDM in primary care settings. Of particular importance are the values that guide professional social work practice, including client self-determination, which is the basis of SDM, and the ability to maintain neutrality.

  7. A New Dimension of Health Care: Systematic Review of the Uses, Benefits, and Limitations of Social Media for Health Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlett, Diane E; Harrison, Laura; Carroll, Jennifer K; Irwin, Anthea; Hoving, Ciska

    2013-01-01

    Background There is currently a lack of information about the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media for health communication among the general public, patients, and health professionals from primary research. Objective To review the current published literature to identify the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media for health communication among the general public, patients, and health professionals, and identify current gaps in the literature to provide recommendations for future health communication research. Methods This paper is a review using a systematic approach. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using nine electronic databases and manual searches to locate peer-reviewed studies published between January 2002 and February 2012. Results The search identified 98 original research studies that included the uses, benefits, and/or limitations of social media for health communication among the general public, patients, and health professionals. The methodological quality of the studies assessed using the Downs and Black instrument was low; this was mainly due to the fact that the vast majority of the studies in this review included limited methodologies and was mainly exploratory and descriptive in nature. Seven main uses of social media for health communication were identified, including focusing on increasing interactions with others, and facilitating, sharing, and obtaining health messages. The six key overarching benefits were identified as (1) increased interactions with others, (2) more available, shared, and tailored information, (3) increased accessibility and widening access to health information, (4) peer/social/emotional support, (5) public health surveillance, and (6) potential to influence health policy. Twelve limitations were identified, primarily consisting of quality concerns and lack of reliability, confidentiality, and privacy. Conclusions Social media brings a new dimension to health care as it offers a

  8. Take two aspirin and tweet me in the morning: how Twitter, Facebook, and other social media are reshaping health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawn, Carleen

    2009-01-01

    If you want a glimpse of what health care could look like a few years from now, consider "Hello Health," the Brooklyn-based primary care practice that is fast becoming an emblem of modern medicine. A paperless, concierge practice that eschews the limitations of insurance-based medicine, Hello Health is popular and successful, largely because of the powerful and cost-effective communication tools it employs: Web-based social media. Indeed, across the health care industry, from large hospital networks to patient support groups, new media tools like weblogs, instant messaging platforms, video chat, and social networks are reengineering the way doctors and patients interact.

  9. Social factors associated with mental disorders with risk situations in the primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Bruno Lopes da Costa; Radicchi, Antônio Leite Alves; Gontijo, Eliane Costa Dias

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate patients with mental disorders, with or without risk situations, treated at primary health care (PHC) units. A cross-sectional study was performed in samples of 240 patients living in a region of high social vulnerability in Belo Horizonte. The response variable was mental disorders with risk situations (MD-WR). The explanatory variables were gender, age, marital status, literacy, education, employment, social benefits and per capita income. Instruments from Berkman and Syme (social network), Sherbourne and Stewart (social support), adapted for Brazil, were applied. Pearson's χ2 test and binary logistic regression were used for the adjusted analyzes. The factors associated with MD-WR were being male (OR = 3.62; 95%CI 1.84-7.09); having "up to one confident relative" only (OR = 2.53; 95%CI 1.18-5.42); being "not able to return home" when away from their living area (OR = 3.49; 95%CI 1.40-8.71). The reduction in the affective dimension of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) scale increases the chance of MD-WR. The availability and access to social and support networks are lower for patients with MD-WR and need to be strengthened to promote autonomy and citizenship among its users. We conclude that there is the need of public policies to increase the availability of social networking equipment and social support projects, encouraging the participation of families.

  10. Social factors associated with mental disorders with risk situations in the primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lopes da Costa Drummond

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate patients with mental disorders, with or without risk situations, treated at primary health care (PHC units. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was performed in samples of 240 patients living in a region of high social vulnerability in Belo Horizonte. The response variable was mental disorders with risk situations (MD-WR. The explanatory variables were gender, age, marital status, literacy, education, employment, social benefits and per capita income. Instruments from Berkman and Syme (social network, Sherbourne and Stewart (social support, adapted for Brazil, were applied. Pearson's χ2 test and binary logistic regression were used for the adjusted analyzes. RESULTS: The factors associated with MD-WR were being male (OR = 3.62; 95%CI 1.84 - 7.09; having "up to one confident relative" only (OR = 2.53; 95%CI 1.18 - 5.42; being "not able to return home" when away from their living area (OR = 3.49; 95%CI 1.40 - 8.71. The reduction in the affective dimension of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS scale increases the chance of MD-WR. Conclusion: The availability and access to social and support networks are lower for patients with MD-WR and need to be strengthened to promote autonomy and citizenship among its users. We conclude that there is the need of public policies to increase the availability of social networking equipment and social support projects, encouraging the participation of families.

  11. Understanding Health Care Social Media Use From Different Stakeholder Perspectives: A Content Analysis of an Online Health Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingjie; Wu, Yang; Liu, Jingfang; Li, Jia; Zhang, Pengzhu

    2017-04-07

    Health care social media used for health information exchange and emotional communication involves different types of users, including patients, caregivers, and health professionals. However, it is difficult to identify different stakeholders because user identification data are lacking due to privacy protection and proprietary interests. Therefore, identifying the concerns of different stakeholders and how they use health care social media when confronted with huge amounts of health-related messages posted by users is a critical problem. We aimed to develop a new content analysis method using text mining techniques applied in health care social media to (1) identify different health care stakeholders, (2) determine hot topics of concern, and (3) measure sentiment expression by different stakeholders. We collected 138,161 messages posted by 39,606 members in lung cancer, diabetes, and breast cancer forums in the online community MedHelp.org over 10 years (January 2007 to October 2016) as experimental data. We used text mining techniques to process text data to identify different stakeholders and determine health-related hot topics, and then analyzed sentiment expression. We identified 3 significantly different stakeholder groups using expectation maximization clustering (3 performance metrics: Rand=0.802, Jaccard=0.393, Fowlkes-Mallows=0.537; Psentiment intensity score (2.46) was lower than those of caregivers (4.66) and specialists (5.14). In particular, for caregivers, negative sentiment scores were higher than positive scores (2.56 vs 2.18), with the opposite among specialists (2.62 vs 2.46). Overall, the proportion of negative messages was greater than that of positive messages related to symptom, complication, and examination. The pattern was opposite for drug and procedure topics. A trend analysis showed that patients and caregivers gradually changed their emotional state in a positive direction. The hot topics of interest and sentiment expression differed

  12. Support network and social support for children with special health care need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Araújo Barbosa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand and identify the support network and social support from the perspective of families of children with chronic conditions. Methods: a qualitative study, with content analysis of 134 records, followed by ten semi-structured interviews. Results: the analysis has revealed that the primary caregiver, the mother, participates in a network of limited support, only with the help of her husband, children, grandparents and the child´s godparents. They also have a social network through a multidisciplinary team, which in some cases is not effective. Conclusion: families have a deficient and limited support network and the demand for care rely only on the support of the husband, grandparents, children, and godparents. Social networking refers to the philanthropic institutions, while the aid of public service, basic health unit is basic.

  13. Linking Emotional Labor, Public Service Motivation, and Job Satisfaction: Social Workers in Health Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Chul-Young; Moon, M Jae; Yang, Seung-Bum; Jung, Kwangho

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the determinants of emotional laborers'--social workers in health care organizations--job satisfaction and their public service motivation in using a structural equation model and provides empirical evidence regarding what contributes to job satisfaction or burnout in these workers. Among several latent variables, this study confirmed that false face significantly decreases the job satisfaction of social worker and is positively associated with burnout. In addition, commitment to public interest increases social workers' job satisfaction significantly. This study has implications for the management of emotional labor. By educating emotional laborers to reappraise situations to increase their job satisfaction and avoid burnout, reappraisal training and education are expected to result in increases in positive emotions and decreases in negative emotions, and to improve employees' performance in their organizations.

  14. Understanding the information and resource needs of UK health and social care placement students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Lynne; Doherty, Alan; Lea, Susan J; Webster, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    Students on health and social care degree programmes spend 50% of their time on practice placements. Because of the diversity of settings and the need to evidence their work, it is vital to understand the information and resource needs of placement students. The aim of this investigation was to understand the needs of placement students in terms of accessing resources whilst they are in the field in order to inform a guide to meet these needs. Focus groups were conducted with students on midwifery, social work and post-registration health professions degree programmes on three different sites across the region. Data were analysed using Thematic Content Analysis. Three themes emerged from the data: inequality, user education needs and students' solutions and strategies. It is essential to speak to placement students in order to understand their needs in terms of accessing and using library resources. The timing and content of information skills training is key to meeting student needs while on placement.

  15. Developing a framework for gathering and using service user experiences to improve integrated health and social care: the SUFFICE framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Vicky; Pinkney, Lisa; Fry, Gary

    2016-09-08

    More people than ever receive care and support from health and social care services. Initiatives to integrate the work of health and social care staff have increased rapidly across the UK but relatively little has been done to chart and improve their impact on service users. Our aim was to develop a framework for gathering and using service user feedback to improve integrated health and social care in one locality in the North of England. We used published literature and interviews with health and social care managers to determine the expected service user experiences of local community-based integrated teams and the ways in which team members were expected to work together. We used the results to devise qualitative data collection and analysis tools for gathering and analyzing service user feedback. We used developmental evaluation and service improvement methodologies to devise a procedure for developing service improvement plans. We identified six expected service user experiences of integrated care and 15 activities that health and social care teams were expected to undertake. We used these to develop logic models and tools for collecting and analysing service user experiences. These include a narrative interview schedule, a plan for analyzing data, and a method for synthesizing the results into a composite 'story'. We devised a structured service improvement procedure which involves teams of health and social care staff listening to a composite service user story, identifying how their actions as a team may have contributed to the story and developing a service improvement plan. This framework aims to put service user experiences at the heart of efforts to improve integration. It has been developed in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) and Social Care managers. We expect it to be useful for evaluating and improving integrated care initiatives elsewhere.

  16. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 729: Importance of Social Determinants of Health and Cultural Awareness in the Delivery of Reproductive Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Awareness of the broader contexts that influence health supports respectful, patient-centered care that incorporates lived experiences, optimizes health outcomes, improves communication, and can help reduce health and health care inequities. Although there is little doubt that genetics and lifestyle play an important role in shaping the overall health of individuals, interdisciplinary researchers have demonstrated how the conditions in the environment in which people are born, live, work, and age, play equally as important a role in shaping health outcomes. These factors, referred to as social determinants of health, are shaped by historical, social, political, and economic forces and help explain the relationship between environmental conditions and individual health. Recognizing the importance of social determinants of health can help obstetrician-gynecologists and other health care providers better understand patients, effectively communicate about health-related conditions and behavior, and improve health outcomes.

  17. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 729 Summary: Importance Of Social Determinants Of Health And Cultural Awareness In The Delivery Of Reproductive Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Awareness of the broader contexts that influence health supports respectful, patient-centered care that incorporates lived experiences, optimizes health outcomes, improves communication, and can help reduce health and health care inequities. Although there is little doubt that genetics and lifestyle play an important role in shaping the overall health of individuals, interdisciplinary researchers have demonstrated how the conditions in the environment in which people are born, live, work, and age, play equally as important a role in shaping health outcomes. These factors, referred to as social determinants of health, are shaped by historical, social, political, and economic forces and help explain the relationship between environmental conditions and individual health. Recognizing the importance of social determinants of health can help obstetrician-gynecologists and other health care providers better understand patients, effectively communicate about health-related conditions and behavior, and improve health outcomes.

  18. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. Methods A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A link to the survey was posted on the investigator’s personal social media accounts including Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp. Results A total of 231 health care professionals, who are generally social media users, participated in the study. Of these professionals, 70.6% (163/231) use social media for their professional development. The social media applications most frequently used, in the descending order, for professional development were Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. The majority of respondents used social media for professional development irrespective of their age group, with the highest proportion seen in those aged 20-30 years. Social media were perceived as being most beneficial for professional development in terms of their impact on the domains of knowledge and problem solving and least helpful for enhancing clinical skills. Twitter was perceived as the most helpful type of social media for all domains listed. Respondents most frequently reported that social media were useful for professional development for the reasons of knowledge exchange and networking. Conclusions Social media are frequently used by health care professionals in Saudi Arabia for the purposes of professional development, with Twitter most frequently used for this purpose. These findings suggest that social media networks can be powerful tools for engaging health care professionals in their professional development. PMID:27731855

  19. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsobayel, Hana

    2016-09-12

    Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A link to the survey was posted on the investigator's personal social media accounts including Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp. A total of 231 health care professionals, who are generally social media users, participated in the study. Of these professionals, 70.6% (163/231) use social media for their professional development. The social media applications most frequently used, in the descending order, for professional development were Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. The majority of respondents used social media for professional development irrespective of their age group, with the highest proportion seen in those aged 20-30 years. Social media were perceived as being most beneficial for professional development in terms of their impact on the domains of knowledge and problem solving and least helpful for enhancing clinical skills. Twitter was perceived as the most helpful type of social media for all domains listed. Respondents most frequently reported that social media were useful for professional development for the reasons of knowledge exchange and networking. Social media are frequently used by health care professionals in Saudi Arabia for the purposes of professional development, with Twitter most frequently used for this purpose. These findings suggest that social media networks can be powerful tools for engaging health care professionals in their professional development.

  20. [Social media and medical apps: how they can change health communication, education and care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Eugenio

    2013-05-01

    Social media and medical apps for smartphones and tablets are changing health communication, education and care. This change involves physicians and other health care professionals which for their education, training and updating have started to follow public pages and profiles opened by medical journals and professional societies on the online social networking sites (such as Facebook, Twitter and Google+), to access scientific content (videos, images, slides) available on user-generated contents sites (such as SlideShare, Pinterest and YouTube) or on health professional online communities such as Sermo, and to use medical and health apps on their smartphones and tablets. As shown by a number of experiences conducted in US by health institutions such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of Atlanta and hospitals such a the Mayo Clinic, these tools are also transforming the way to make health promotion activities and communication, promote healthy habits and lifestyles, and prevent chronic diseases. Finally this change involves patients which are starting to use medical and health apps on their smartphones and tablets to monitor their diseases, and tools such as Patients Like Me (an online patients' community), Facebook and Twitter to share with others the same disease experience, to learn about the disease and treatments, and to find opinions on physicians, hospitals and medical centers. These new communication tools allow users to move to a kind of collaborative education and updating where news and contents (such as public health recommendations, results of the most recent clinical researches or medical guidelines) may be shared and discussed.

  1. Embedding a Social Work-Led Behavioral Health Program in a Primary Care System: A 2012-2018 Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehner, Tim; Brazeal, Michelle; Doty, Stephanie T

    The focus of this case study was the implementation of a fully integrated system of care that brought mental health into a federally qualified health center's primary care activities. The Mississippi Integrated Health and Disaster Program aimed to increase the federally qualified health center's capacity for providing mental health services and in so doing increase patients' access to mental and behavioral health services in primary care. Included are the historical origins of the program and the context in which these clinics operate, as well as successful processes that reduced barriers between medical providers and social workers and ultimately resulted in improved patient outcomes. Data indicated that the Mississippi Integrated Health and Disaster Program's integrated health model significantly improved depression, anxiety, and self-care among chronic care patients. This integrated health approach transformed the treatment culture of patient care in primary care clinics and improved patient outcomes. This study highlights the benefits possible when behavioral health provided by social workers is fully integrated into primary care. This case study illustrates the importance of developing a care model that meets the patient populations' specific and varied needs while concurrently establishing an integrated service delivery culture within local clinics and within the organization's administrative structures.

  2. Exploring the differences in general practitioner and health care specialist utilization according to education, occupation, income and social networks across Europe: findings from the European social survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjær, Erlend L; Balaj, Mirza; Stornes, Per; Todd, Adam; McNamara, Courtney L; Eikemo, Terje A

    2017-02-01

    Low socioeconomic position (SEP) tends to be linked to higher use of general practitioners (GPs), while the use of health care specialists is more common in higher SEPs. Despite extensive literature in this area, previous studies have, however, only studied health care use by income or education. The aim of this study is, therefore, to examine inequalities in GP and health care specialist use by four social markers that may be linked to health care utilization (educational level, occupational status, level of financial strain and size and frequency of social networks) across 20 European countries and Israel. Logistic regression models were employed using data from the seventh round of the European Social Survey; this study focused upon people aged 25–75 years, across 21 countries. Health care utilization was measured according to self-reported use of GP or specialist care within 12 months. Analyses tested four social markers: income (financial strain), occupational status, education and social networks. We observed a cross-national tendency that countries with higher or equal probability of GP utilization by lower SEP groups had a more consistent probability of specialist use among high SEP groups. Moreover, countries with inequalities in GP use in favour of high SEP groups had comparable levels of inequalities in specialist care utilization. This was the case for three social markers (education, occupational class and social networks), while the pattern was less pronounced for income (financial strain). There are significant inequalities associated with GP and specialist health care use across Europe—with higher SEP groups more likely to use health care specialists, compared with lower SEP groups. In the context of health care specialist use, education and occupation appear to be particularly important factors.

  3. Social and functional health of home care clients with different levels of cognitive impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garms-Homolová, Vjenka; Notthoff, Nanna; Declercq, Anja; van der Roest, Henriette G; Onder, Graziano; Jónsson, Pálmi; van Hout, Hein

    2017-01-01

    The ability to manage one's life with some degree of independence, to fulfill basic obligations, and to participate in social activities are social functions that delineate the core of 'social health'. We examine to what extent clients of community care in Europe (n = 2884) complete such activities despite their cognitive problems. We focus on mildly and moderately impaired people, aged 65+ years. Data were collected using the interRAI HC-Assessment in IBenC-project. We tested the association between participants' capacity and performance in three LADLs (instrumental activities of daily living) and their cognitive performance and specific memory problems. About 30% of home care clients in Europe suffer from mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment. Their relatively independent coping with requirements of routine activities is strongly determined by overall cognitive performance. Specific memory functions seem unimportant, except for procedural memory. It is striking that all clients, and particularly those with mild-to-moderate cognitive impairment, interact mostly with close relatives and friends. Mild-to-moderate cognitive limitations do not hinder clients from coping semi-independently with routine requirements. When considering the influence of cognitive function on clients' capacity and performance in everyday activities and social relations, a comprehensive construct of cognitive function has to be applied.

  4. The future of mental health care: peer-to-peer support and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslund, J A; Aschbrenner, K A; Marsch, L A; Bartels, S J

    2016-04-01

    People with serious mental illness are increasingly turning to popular social media, including Facebook, Twitter or YouTube, to share their illness experiences or seek advice from others with similar health conditions. This emerging form of unsolicited communication among self-forming online communities of patients and individuals with diverse health concerns is referred to as peer-to-peer support. We offer a perspective on how online peer-to-peer connections among people with serious mental illness could advance efforts to promote mental and physical wellbeing in this group. In this commentary, we take the perspective that when an individual with serious mental illness decides to connect with similar others online it represents a critical point in their illness experience. We propose a conceptual model to illustrate how online peer-to-peer connections may afford opportunities for individuals with serious mental illness to challenge stigma, increase consumer activation and access online interventions for mental and physical wellbeing. People with serious mental illness report benefits from interacting with peers online from greater social connectedness, feelings of group belonging and by sharing personal stories and strategies for coping with day-to-day challenges of living with a mental illness. Within online communities, individuals with serious mental illness could challenge stigma through personal empowerment and providing hope. By learning from peers online, these individuals may gain insight about important health care decisions, which could promote mental health care seeking behaviours. These individuals could also access interventions for mental and physical wellbeing delivered through social media that could incorporate mutual support between peers, help promote treatment engagement and reach a wider demographic. Unforeseen risks may include exposure to misleading information, facing hostile or derogatory comments from others, or feeling more uncertain

  5. Using Social Determinants of Health to Link Health Workforce Diversity, Care Quality and Access, and Health Disparities to Achieve Health Equity in Nursing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shanita D. Williams; Kristen Hansen; Marian Smithey; Josepha Burnley; Michelle Koplitz; Kirk Koyama; Janice Young; Alexis Bakos

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that diversifying the nation's health-care workforce is a necessary strategy to increase access to quality health care for all populations, reduce health disparities, and achieve health equity...

  6. Sex trafficking and health care in Metro Manila: identifying social determinants to inform an effective health system response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Timothy P; Alpert, Elaine J; Ahn, Roy; Cafferty, Elizabeth; Konstantopoulos, Wendy Macias; Wolferstan, Nadya; Castor, Judith Palmer; McGahan, Anita M; Burke, Thomas F

    2010-12-15

    This social science case study examines the sex trafficking of women and girls in Metro Manila through a public health lens. Through key informant interviews with 51 health care and anti-trafficking stakeholders in Metro Manila, this study reports on observations about sex trafficking in Metro Manila that provide insight into understanding of risk factors for sex trafficking at multiple levels of the social environment: individual (for example, childhood abuse), socio-cultural (for example, gender inequality and a "culture of migration"), and macro (for example, profound poverty caused, inter alia, by environmental degradation disrupting traditional forms of labor). It describes how local health systems currently assist sex-trafficking victims, and provides a series of recommendations, ranging from prevention to policy, for how health care might play a larger role in promoting the health and human rights of this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2010 Williams, Alpert, Ahn, Cafferty, Konstantopoulos, Wolferstan, Castor, McGahan, and Burke. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  7. Effects of health and social care spending constraints on mortality in England: a time trend analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Johnathan; Wulaningsih, Wahyu; Da Zhou, Charlie; Marshall, Dominic C; Sylianteng, Guia D C; Dela Rosa, Phyllis G; Miguel, Viveka A; Raine, Rosalind; King, Lawrence P; Maruthappu, Mahiben

    2017-11-15

    Since 2010, England has experienced relative constraints in public expenditure on healthcare (PEH) and social care (PES). We sought to determine whether these constraints have affected mortality rates. We collected data on health and social care resources and finances for England from 2001 to 2014. Time trend analyses were conducted to compare the actual mortality rates in 2011-2014 with the counterfactual rates expected based on trends before spending constraints. Fixed-effects regression analyses were conducted using annual data on PES and PEH with mortality as the outcome, with further adjustments for macroeconomic factors and resources. Analyses were stratified by age group, place of death and lower-tier local authority (n=325). Mortality rates to 2020 were projected based on recent trends. Spending constraints between 2010 and 2014 were associated with an estimated 45 368 (95% CI 34 530 to 56 206) higher than expected number of deaths compared with pre-2010 trends. Deaths in those aged ≥60 and in care homes accounted for the majority. PES was more strongly linked with care home and home mortality than PEH, with each £10 per capita decline in real PES associated with an increase of 5.10 (3.65-6.54) (pconstraints, especially PES, are associated with a substantial mortality gap. We suggest that spending should be targeted on improving care delivered in care homes and at home; and maintaining or increasing nurse numbers. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Supervisory communication, burnout, and turnover intention among social workers in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hansung; Lee, Sun Young

    2009-01-01

    The current study tests the effects of different types of supervisory communication on burnout and turnover intention among health social workers. The study proposed a conceptual model of supervisory communication and tested it empirically using structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques with a random sample of 211 California state-registered social workers working in health or mental health care settings. The results of the present study provide empirical evidence of the unique roles that different types of supervisory communication play as antecedents of burnout and turnover intention. Specifically, supportive relationship communication had an indirect effect on burnout and turnover intention through its effect on perceived stress, whereas job-relevant communication had not only an indirect effect on burnout and turnover intention through its effect on stress, but also a direct effect on turnover intention. In addition, the results showed that upward communication moderated the relationship between stress and burnout. Implications for social work administration and possible elaboration of the theoretical framework are discussed.

  9. Paying for performance and the social relations of health care provision: an anthropological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrath, Priscilla; Nichter, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, the use of financial incentive schemes has become a popular form of intervention to boost performance in the health sector. Often termed "paying for performance" or P4P, they involve "…the transfer of money or material goods conditional upon taking a measurable action or achieving a predetermined performance target" (Eldridge & Palmer, 2009, p.160). P4P appear to bring about rapid improvements in some measured indicators of provider performance, at least over the short term. However, evidence for the impact of these schemes on the wider health system remains limited, and even where evaluations have been positive, unintended effects have been identified. These have included: "gaming" the system; crowding out of "intrinsic motivation"; a drop in morale where schemes are viewed as unfair; and the undermining of social relations and teamwork through competition, envy or ill feeling. Less information is available concerning how these processes occur, and how they vary across social and cultural contexts. While recognizing the potential of P4P, the authors argue for greater care in adapting schemes to particular local contexts. We suggest that insights from social science theory coupled with the focused ethnographic methods of anthropology can contribute to the critical assessment of P4P schemes and to their adaptation to particular social environments and reward systems. We highlight the need for monitoring P4P schemes in relation to worker motivation and the quality of social relations, since these have implications both for health sector performance over the long term and for the success and sustainability of a P4P scheme. Suggestions are made for ethnographies, undertaken in collaboration with local stakeholders, to assess readiness for P4P; package rewards in ways that minimize perverse responses; identify process variables for monitoring and evaluation; and build sustainability into program design through linkage with complementary reforms

  10. Evaluation design of Urban Health Centres Europe (UHCE): preventive integrated health and social care for community-dwelling older persons in five European cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.J. Voorham; R. van Staveren; E. Koppelaar; L.F.J. Martijn; E. Valía-Cotanda; T. Alhambra-Borrás; T. Rentoumis; L. Bilajac; V. Vasiljev Marchesi; T. Rukavina; A. Verma; G. Williams; G. Clough; J. Garcés-Ferrer; F. Mattace Raso; H. Raat; C.B. Franse

    2017-01-01

    Older persons often have interacting physical and social problems and complex care needs. An integrated care approach in the local context with collaborations between community-, social-, and health-focused organisations can contribute to the promotion of independent living and quality of life. In

  11. Evaluation design of Urban Health Centres Europe (UHCE): Preventive integrated health and social care for community-dwelling older persons in five European cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franse, C.B. (Carmen B.); A.J. Voorham; Van Staveren, R. (Rob); E. Koppelaar (Elin); Martijn, R. (Rens); Valía-Cotanda, E. (Elisa); Alhambra-Borrás, T. (Tamara); Rentoumis, T. (Tasos); Bilajac, L. (Lovorka); Marchesi, V.V. (Vanja Vasiljev); Rukavina, T. (Tomislav); Verma, A. (Arpana); Williams, G. (Greg); Clough, G. (Gary); Garcés-Ferrer, J. (Jorge); F.M. Raso; H. Raat (Hein)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Older persons often have interacting physical and social problems and complex care needs. An integrated care approach in the local context with collaborations between community-, social-, and health-focused organisations can contribute to the promotion of independent living

  12. The process of social participation in primary health care: the case of Palencia, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Ana L; Sebastián, Miguel S; Hurtig, Anna-Karin

    2014-02-01

    In 2008, the World Health Organization issued a callback to the principles of primary health care, which renewed interests in social participation in health. In Guatemala, social participation has been the main policy for the decentralization process since the late 1990s and the social development council scheme has been the main means for participation for the country's population since 2002. The aim of this study was to explore the process of social participation at a municipal-level health commission in the municipality of Palencia, Guatemala. Analysis of legal and policy documents and in-depth interviews with institutional and community-level stakeholders of the commission. The lack of clear guidelines and regulations means that the stakeholders own motivations, agendas and power resources play an important part in defining the roles of the participants. Institutional stakeholders have the human and financial power to make policies. The community-level stakeholders are token participants with little power resources. Their main role is to identify the needs of their communities and seek help from the authorities. Satisfaction and the perceived benefits that the stakeholders obtain from the process play an important part in maintaining the commission's dynamic, which is unlikely to change unless the stakeholders perceive that the benefit they obtain does not outweigh the effort their role entails. Without more uniformed mechanisms and incentives for municipalities to work towards the national goal of equitable involvement in the development process, the achievements will be fragmented and will depend on the individual stakeholder's good will. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Impact of health-care accessibility and social deprivation on diabetes related foot disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leese, G P; Feng, Z; Leese, R M; Dibben, C; Emslie-Smith, A

    2013-04-01

    To determine whether geography and/or social deprivation influences the occurrence of foot ulcers or amputations in patients with diabetes. A population-based cohort of people with diabetes (n = 15 983) were identified between 2004 and 2006. Community and hospital data on diabetes care, podiatry care and onset of ulceration and amputation was linked using a unique patient identifier, which is used for all patient contacts with health-care professionals. Postcode was used to calculate social deprivation and distances to general practice and hospital care. Over 3 years' follow-up 670 patients with diabetes developed new foot ulcers (42 per 1000) and 99 proceeded to amputation (6 per 1000). The most deprived quintile had a 1.7-fold (95% CI 1.2-2.3) increased risk of developing a foot ulcer. Distance from general practitioner or hospital clinic and lack of attendance at community retinal screening did not predict foot ulceration or amputation. Previous ulcer (OR 15.1, 95% CI 11.6-19.6), insulin use (OR 2.7, 95% CI 2.1-3.5), absent foot pulses (5.9: 4.7-7.5) and impaired monofilament sensation (OR 6.5, 95% CI 5.0-8.4) all predicted foot ulceration. Previous foot ulcer, absent pulses and impaired monofilaments also predicted amputation. Social deprivation is an important factor, especially for the development of foot ulcers. Geographical aspects such as accessibility to the general practitioner or hospital clinic are not associated with foot ulceration or amputation in this large UK cohort study. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  14. Adolescents leaving mental health or social care services: predictors of mental health and psychosocial outcomes one year later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarzia, Jessica; St Clair, Michelle C; Owens, Matt; Goodyer, Ian M; Dunn, Valerie J

    2015-05-02

    UK service structure necessitates a transition out of youth services at a time of increased risk for the development and onset of mental disorders. Little is currently known about the mental health and psychosocial outcomes of leaving services at this time. The aim of this study was to determine predictors of mental health and social adjustment in adolescents leaving mental health or social care services. A cohort (n = 53) of 17 year olds were interviewed and assessed when preparing to leave adolescent services and again 12 months later. Their mental health and psychosocial characteristics were compared to a same-age community sample group (n = 1074). At discharge 34 (64%) met DSM IV criteria for a current psychiatric diagnosis and only 3 (6%) participants met operational criteria for successful outcomes at follow-up. Impairments in mental health, lack of employment, education or training and low preparedness were associated with poor outcomes. The findings suggest the current organisation of mental health and care services may not be fit for purpose and even unwittingly contribute to persistent mental illness and poor psychosocial outcomes. A redesign of services should consider a model where the timing of transition does not fall at the most hazardous time for young people, but is sufficiently flexible to allow young people to move on when they are personally, socially and psychologically most able to succeed. Assessment of a young person's readiness to transition might also be useful. A youth focused service across the adolescent and early adult years may be better placed to avoid young people falling through the service gap created by poor transitional management.

  15. Leadership of interprofessional health and social care teams: a socio-historical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Scott; Macmillan, Kathleen; van Soeren, Mary

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore some of the key socio-historical issues related to the leadership of interprofessional teams. Over the past quarter of a century, there have been repeated calls for collaboration to help improve the delivery of care. Interprofessional teamwork is regarded as a key approach to delivering high-quality, safe care. We draw upon historical documents to understand how modern health and social care professions emerged from 16th-century crafts guilds. We employ sociological theories to help analyse the nature of these professional developments for team leadership. As the forerunners of professions, crafts guilds were established on the basis of protection and promotion of their members. Such traits have been emphasized during the evolution of professions, which have resulted in strains for teamwork and leadership. Understanding a problem through a socio-historical analysis can assist management to understand the barriers to collaboration and team leadership. Nursing management is in a unique role to observe and broker team conflict. It is rare to examine these phenomena through a humanities/social sciences lens. This paper provides a rare perspective to foster understanding - an essential precursor to effective change management.

  16. Prospects and problems of transferring quality-improvement methods from health care to social services: two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, Truls; Elg, Mattias; Schneider, Thomas; Andersson-Gäre, Boel

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the use of quality-improvement (QI) methods in social services. Particularly the key aspects-generalizable knowledge, interprofessional teamwork, and measurements-are studied in projects from the QI program Forum for Values in Sweden. This is a mixed-method case study. Two projects using standard QI methods and tools as used in health care were chosen as critical cases to highlight some problems and prospects with the use of QI in social services. The cases were analyzed through documented results and qualitative interviews with participants one year after the QI projects ended. The social service QI projects led to measurable improvements when they used standard methods and tools for QI in health care. One year after the projects, the improvements were either not continuously measured or not reported in any infrastructure for measurements. The study reveals that social services differ from health care regarding the availability and use of evidence, the role of professional expertise, and infrastructure for measurements. We argue that QI methods as used in health care are applicable in social services and can lead to measurable improvements. The study gives valuable insights for QI, not only in social services but also in health care, on how to assess and sustain improvements when infrastructures for measurements are lacking. In addition, when one forms QI teams, the focus should be on functions instead of professions, and QI methods can be used to support implementation of evidence-based practice.

  17. Thinking big, supporting families and enabling coping: the value of social work in patient and family centered health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Shelley L; Betancourt, Itanni; Muskat, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Patient and family-centered care has become a focus in health services. Social work has a rich history of providing responsive patient care. This study identified the contribution and value of social work to PFCC from the key stakeholder perspectives of health social workers (n = 65). Utilizing interpretive description, four themes emerged: (1) Thinking big and holistically, (2) Intervening with families, (3) Enabling patient and family coping, and (4) Maximizing hospital and community resources. Barriers included a lack of power, professional isolation and role creep. Implications for research and practice are provided.

  18. The significance of age and duration of effect in social evaluation of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, E; Street, A; Richardson, J; Kuhse, H; Singer, P

    1996-05-01

    To give priority to the young over the elderly has been labelled 'ageism'. People who express 'ageist' preferences may feel that, all else equal, an individual has greater right to enjoy additional life years the fewer life years he or she has already had. We shall refer to this as egalitarian ageism. They may also emphasise the greater expected duration of health benefits in young people that derives from their greater life expectancy. We may call this utilitarian ageism. Both these forms of ageism were observed in an empirical study of social preferences in Australia. The study lends some support to the assumptions in the QALY approach that duration of benefits and hence old age, should count in prioritising at the budget level in health care.

  19. Implementation of the care programme approach across health and social services for dual diagnosis clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael; Humphrey, Charlotte

    2013-12-01

    Care for clients with mental health problems and concurrent intellectual disability (dual diagnosis) is currently expected to be provided through the care programme approach (CPA), an approach to provide care to people with mental health problems in secondary mental health services. When CPA was originally introduced into UK mental health services in the 1990s, its implementation was slow and problematic, being hampered in part by problems occurring at a strategic level as health and social service organizations attempted to integrate complex systems. This article reports on a study of a more recent attempt to implement CPA for dual diagnosis clients in one mental health foundation trust, aiming to gauge progress and identify factors at the strategic level that were helping or hindering progress this time round. The study took place in a mental health National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust in a large English city, which was implementing a joint mental health and intellectual disability CPA policy across five of its constituent boroughs. Semi-structured interviews with key informants at Trust and borough levels focused on the Trust's overall strategy for implementing CPA and on how it was being put into practice at the front line. Documentary analysis and the administration of the Partnership Assessment Tool were also undertaken. Data were analysed using a framework approach. Progress in implementing CPA varied but overall was extremely limited in all the boroughs. The study identified six key contextual challenges that significantly hindered the implementation progress. These included organizational complexity; arrangements for governance and accountability; competing priorities; financial constraints; high staff turnover and complex information and IT systems. The only element of policy linked to CPA that had been widely taken up was the Greenlight Framework and Audit Toolkit (GLTK). The fact that the toolkit had targets and penalties associated with its

  20. Female genital mutilation/cutting: risk management and strategies for social workers and health care professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costello S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Susan Costello School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C is a traditional practice originating in Africa. Its worst forms cause irreparable harm to girls and women and have no medical justification. Based on a literature review of global responses to FGM/C and conversations with Australian women who migrated from FGM/C practicing countries, this paper provides some background on FGM/C and its epidemiology, outlining its prevalence, types, and health risks and complications for women and girls. It discusses risk-prevention strategies, first, for health practitioners in identifying, screening, and supporting women affected by FGM/C and, second, for welfare and social workers and health care professionals to identify, work with, and prevent girls from being cut. Consistent with international trends in addressing the risks of FGM/C, the paper suggests practice responses for coordinated responses between professionals, communities from practicing countries, and governments of different countries. Keywords: female genital mutilation, female genital cutting, female circumcision, child protection, risk management 

  1. Changing healthcare practitioners’ and teachers’ views about lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) medical, health and social care

    OpenAIRE

    Davy, Zowie

    2013-01-01

    In the UK there is a crisis in the provision of healthcare for LGBT people. This is due, in part, by the lack of focused medical, health and social care curricula content about LGBT healthcare generally. Teaching has tended to position heterosexuality and gender normativity—people conforming to social standards of what is ‘appropriate’ feminine and masculine behavior—as the primary context in which health and illness is viewed. Models of health care that promote these views of sexuality and g...

  2. Health Care among the Kumiai Indians of Baja California, Mexico: Structural and Social Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleuriet, K. Jill

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author documents the illness and health care problems facing indigenous communities in Baja California, Mexico, by using ethnographic data from research she conducted from 1999 to 2001 with rural, indigenous Kumiai and with their primary health care providers in urban Ensenada. The author contends that barriers to care are…

  3. Can clinical use of Social Media improve quality of care in mental Health? A Health Technology Assessment approach in an Italian mental health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Wilma Angela; Nollo, Giandomenico; Pace, Nicola; Torri, Emanuele

    2015-09-01

    Clinical use of modern Information and Communication Technologies such as Social Media (SM) can easily reach and empower groups of population at risk or affected by chronic diseases, and promote improvement of quality of care. In the paper we present an assessment of SM (i.e. e-mails, websites, on line social networks, apps) in the management of mental disorders, carried out in the Mental Health Service of Trento (Italy) according to Health Technology Assessment criteria. A systematic review of literature was performed to evaluate technical features, safety and effectiveness of SM. To understand usage rate and attitude towards new social technologies of patients and professionals, we performed a context analysis by a survey conducted over a group of 88 psychiatric patients and a group of 35 professionals. At last, we made recommendations for decision makers in order to promote SM for the management of mental disorders in a context of prioritization of investments in health care.

  4. A pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reygan, Finn C G

    2012-05-09

    OBJECTIVE: The international literature points to the specific cancer risks and palliative care needs of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) populations. However, with the exception of a programme in the USA, there is a lack of training internationally for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. In Ireland, a training project funded by the Irish Cancer Society, the Irish Hospice Foundation and the Health Service Executive developed a training pilot programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. METHODS: Over 200 (N = 201) oncology and palliative care staff participated in 17 brief, 50-min trainings in pilot sites. Evaluation of the training included self-report questionnaires at the end of each training and an evaluation interview with one participant from each of the four sites. RESULTS: The majority of participants reported that they would recommend the training to their colleagues, were interested in further training in the area and found the training useful for their practice. They also reported becoming more familiar with LGB-related language and terminology, became more knowledgeable of LGB health issues and reported becoming more confident in providing care to LGB patients. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations are that the training be made available across the health services in Ireland and included in postgraduate courses for trainee health and social care professionals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The potential for multi-disciplinary primary health care services to take action on the social determinants of health: actions and constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Frances E; Legge, David G; Freeman, Toby; Lawless, Angela; Labonté, Ronald; Jolley, Gwyneth M

    2013-05-10

    The Commission on the Social Determinants of Health and the World Health Organization have called for action to address the social determinants of health. This paper considers the extent to which primary health care services in Australia are able to respond to this call. We report on interview data from an empirical study of primary health care centres in Adelaide and Alice Springs, Australia. Sixty-eight interviews were held with staff and managers at six case study primary health care services, regional health executives, and departmental funders to explore how their work responded to the social determinants of health and the dilemmas in doing so. The six case study sites included an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation, a sexual health non-government organisation, and four services funded and managed by the South Australian government. While respondents varied in the extent to which they exhibited an understanding of social determinants most were reflexive about the constraints on their ability to take action. Services' responses to social determinants included delivering services in a way that takes account of the limitations individuals face from their life circumstances, and physical spaces in the primary health care services being designed to do more than simply deliver services to individuals. The services also undertake advocacy for policies that create healthier communities but note barriers to them doing this work. Our findings suggest that primary health care workers are required to transverse "dilemmatic space" in their work. The absence of systematic supportive policy, frameworks and structure means that it is hard for PHC services to act on the Commission on the Social Determinants of Health's recommendations. Our study does, however, provide evidence of the potential for PHC services to be more responsive to social determinants given more support and by building alliances with communities and social movements. Further research on the value

  6. The health, social care and housing needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender older people: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Samia; Davies, Myfanwy; Greene, Giles; Macbride-Stewart, Sara; Shepherd, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This paper reports the findings of a literature review of the health, social care and housing needs of older lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) adults undertaken in 2006 for the Welsh Assembly Government. Peer-reviewed literature was identified through database searches of BNI, PubMed, CINAHL, DARE, ASSIA and PsychInfo. Follow-up searches were conducted using references to key papers and journals as well as specific authors who had published key papers. A total of 187 papers or chapters were retrieved, of which 66 were included in the study; major themes were identified and the findings synthesised using a meta-narrative approach. The main themes that emerged from the review were isolation, health behaviours, mental health and sexual health behaviours. The literature indicates that the health, social care and housing needs of LGBT older people is influenced by a number of forms of discrimination which may impact upon the provision of, access to and take up of health, social care and housing services. Understanding of the health, social care and housing needs of older LGBT people is limited and research in this area is scarce. The research which exists has been criticised for using small samples and for tending to exclude participants from less affluent backgrounds. The focus of research tends to be on gay men and lesbians; consequently, the needs of bisexual and transgender people remain largely unknown. Additionally, research which does exist tends to focus on a narrow range of health issues, often related to the health needs of younger LGBT people. Discrimination in various forms has a major impact on needs and experiences, leading to marginalisation of LGBT people both in the provision of health and social care services and neglect of these groups in public health research.

  7. Socialist government health policy reforms in Bolivia and Ecuador: The underrated potential of integrated care to tackle the social determinants of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Unger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Selective vertical programs prevailed over comprehensive primary health care in Latin America. In Bolivia and Ecuador, socialist governments intend to redirect health policy. We outline both countries’ health system’s features after reform, explore their efforts to rebuild primary health care, identify and explain policy gaps, and offer considerations for improvement. Methods Qualitative document analysis. Findings Earlier reform left Bolivia’s and Ecuador’s population in bad health, with limited access to a fragmented health system. Today, both countries focus their policy on household and community-based promotion and prevention. The negative effects on access to care of decentralization, dual employment, vertical programming and targeting are largely left unattended. Neglecting care is understandable in the light of particular interpretations of social medicine and social determinants, international policy pressures, reliance on external funding and institutional inertia. Current policy choices preserve key elements of selective care and consolidate commodification. It might not improve health and worsen poverty. Interpretation Care can be considered as a social determinant on its own. Key to the accomplishment of primary care is an integrated application of family medicine, taking advantage of individual care as one of the ways to act on social determinants. It deserves a central place on the policy-makers’ priority list, in Bolivia and Ecuador as elsewhere.

  8. A systematic review of digital interactive television systems and their applications in the health and social care fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Steven; Brownsell, Simon; Hawley, Mark S

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review of the applications and technical features of digital interactive television (DITV) in the health and social care fields. The Web of Knowledge and IEEE Xplore databases were searched for articles published between January 2000 and March 2010 which related to DITV systems facilitating the communication of information to/from an individual's home with either a health or social care application. Out of 1679 articles retrieved, 42 met the inclusion criteria and were selected for review. An additional 20 articles were obtained from online grey literature sources. Twenty-five DITV systems operating in health and social care were identified, including seven commercial systems. The most common applications were related to health care, such as vital signs monitoring (68% of systems) and health information or advice (56% of systems). The most common technical features of DITV systems were two-way communication (88%), medical peripherals (68%), on-screen messaging (48%) and video communication (36%). Digital interactive television has the potential to deliver health and social care to people in their own homes. However, the requirement for a high-bandwidth communications infrastructure, the usability of the systems, their level of personalisation and the lack of evidence regarding clinical and cost-effectiveness will all need to be addressed if this approach is to flourish.

  9. Cigarette Smoking Prevalence Among Adults Working in the Health Care and Social Assistance Sector, 2008 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamlal, Girija; Mazurek, Jacek M; Storey, Eileen; Dube, Shanta R

    2015-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate current smoking among workers in the health care and social assistance sector. We analyzed the 2008 to 2012 National Health Interview Survey data for adults (age 18 years or more) working in health care and social assistance sector who reported current cigarette smoking. Of the approximately 18.9 million health care and social assistance workers, 16.0% were current cigarette smokers. Smoking prevalence was highest in women (16.9%) and among workers: age 25 to 44 years (17.7%); with a high school education or less (24.4%); with income less than $35,000 (19.5%); with no health insurance (28.5%); in the nursing and residential care facilities (26.9%) industry; and in the material recording, scheduling, dispatching, and distributing (34.7%) occupations. These findings suggest that specific group of workers in the health care and social assistance sector might particularly benefit from cessation programs and incentives to quit smoking.

  10. Social networks of experientially similar others: formation, activation, and consequences of network ties on the health care experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Elizabeth A

    2013-10-01

    Research documents that interactions among experientially similar others (individuals facing a common stressor) shape health care behavior and ultimately health outcomes. However, we have little understanding of how ties among experientially similar others are formed, what resources and information flows through these networks, and how network embeddedness shapes health care behavior. This paper uses in-depth interviews with 76 parents of pediatric cancer patients to examine network ties among experientially similar others after a serious medical diagnosis. Interviews were conducted between August 2009 and May 2011. Findings demonstrate that many parents formed ties with other families experiencing pediatric cancer, and that information and resources were exchanged during the everyday activities associated with their child's care. Network flows contained emotional support, caregiving strategies, information about second opinions, health-related knowledge, and strategies for navigating the health care system. Diffusion of information, resources, and support occurred through explicit processes (direct information and support exchanges) and implicit processes (parents learning through observing other families). Network flows among parents shaped parents' perceptions of the health care experience and their role in their child's care. These findings contribute to the social networks and social support literatures by elucidating the mechanisms through which network ties among experientially similar others influence health care behavior and experiences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Community Care for People with Chronic Conditions: An Analysis of Nine Studies of Health and Social Service Utilization in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Susan; Browne, Gina; Gafni, Amiram; Roberts, Jacqueline; Byrne, Carolyn

    1999-01-01

    A series of studies conducted in the same region found that programmatic, community-based health and social service interventions have a positive impact on client well-being. These proactive interventions, designed to address the full range of health and social needs, were usually provided at the same–or even lower–costs as uncoordinated, illness-focused care. The results of this series suggest that across-the-board health care reduction, atleast in a system of national health insurance, will produce poorer results, at higher cost, for people with chronic conditions living in the community. Policy planners need more research that concentrates on comparisons of outcomes between and within different models of health and social service delivery. The studies should be designed to help them determine who benefits from different serviceconfigurations carried out within a range of policy environments at various costs. PMID:10526549

  12. [The health care costs of breast cancer: the case of the Mexican Social Security Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Arreola-Ornelas, Héctor; Velázquez, Enrique; Dorantes, Javier; Méndez, Oscar; Avila-Burgos, Leticia

    2009-01-01

    We studied the cost of health care for women with breast cancer treated at the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS, per its abbreviation in Spanish). Using the Medical and Operative Information Systems of the IMSS, we constructed a cohort of patients diagnosed in 2002 and followed these patients to the end of 2006, identifying the use of resources and imputing the IMSS-specific cost structure. Only 14% of women were diagnosed in stage 1 and 48% were diagnosed in stages III-IV. The average cost of their medical care per patient-year was $MX110,459. Costs for stage 1 were $MX74,522 compared to $102,042 for stage II, and were $MX154,018 for stage III and $MX199,274 for stage IV. Breast cancer accounts for a significant part of the IMSS health budget. Later stage at diagnosis is associated with higher economic costs per patient-year of treatment and lower probability of five-year survival.

  13. Power, technology and social studies of health care: an infrastructural inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Casper Bruun

    2008-12-01

    Power, dominance, and hierarchy are prevalent analytical terms in social studies of health care. Power is often seen as residing in medical structures, institutions, discourses, or ideologies. While studies of medical power often draw on Michel Foucault, this understanding is quite different from his proposal to study in detail the "strategies, the networks, the mechanisms, all those techniques by which a decision is accepted" [Foucault, M. (1988). In Politics, philosophy, culture: Interviews and other writings 1977-84 (pp. 96-109). New York: Routledge]. This suggestion turns power into a topic worth investigating in its own right rather than a basic analytical resource. It also suggests that technologies form an integral part of the networks and mechanisms, which produce and redistribute power in medical practice. The paper first engages critically with a number of recent discussions of technology and power in health care analysis. It then formulates an alternative conception of this relationship by drawing on Foucault and historian of science and technology Geoffrey C. Bowker's notions of infrastructural inversion and information mythology. Illustration is provided through a case study of a wireless nursing call system in a Canadian hospital.

  14. Parents' experiences of family functioning, health and social support provided by nurses--a pilot study in paediatric intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakio, Nora; Rantanen, Anja; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe parents' experiences of family functioning, health and social support provided by nursing personnel, while their child was in intensive care, and to determine how social support was associated with family functioning and family health. Cross-sectional study. The data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire from 31 parents of critically ill children from 2010 to 2011. The data were analysed statistically. The parents considered their family functioning, health and social support provided by the nursing personnel to be good. The sub-area of family functioning that rated the lowest was strengths of family, whereas the lowest rated sub-area of family health was ill-being. Child's previous hospital treatments were associated with family health. Parents, whose child had already been in hospital care, reported more well-being and less ill-being than parents with children hospitalised for the first time. Parents' education was associated with family functioning, family health and social support given by the nurses. Weak positive correlation was also found between social support given by nurses and family health experienced by parents. There is a need to discuss how nursing care can further support parental resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Evaluation of the nurse working environment in health and social care intermediate care units in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullich-Marín, Ingrid; Miralles Basseda, Ramón; Torres Egea, Pilar; Planas-Campmany, Carme; Juvé-Udina, María Eulalia

    A favourable work environment contributes to greater job satisfaction and improved working conditions for nurses, a fact that could influence the quality of patient outcomes. The aim of the study is two-fold: Identifying types of centres, according to the working environment assessment made by nurses in intermediate care units, and describing the individual characteristics of nurses related to this assessment. An observational, descriptive, prospective, cross-sectional, and multicentre study was conducted in the last quarter of 2014. Nurses in intermediate care units were given a questionnaire containing the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) which assesses five factors of the work environment using 31 items. Sociodemographic, employment conditions, professional and educational variables were also collected. From a sample of 501 nurses from 14 centres, 388 nurses participated (77% response). The mean score on the PES-NWI was 84.75. Nine centres scored a "favourable" working environment and five "mixed". The best valued factor was "work relations" and the worst was "resource provision/adaptation". Rotating shift work, working in several units at the same time, having management responsibilities, and having a master degree were the characteristics related to a better perception of the nursing work environment. In most centres, the working environment was perceived as favourable. Some employment conditions, professional, and educational characteristics of nurses were related to the work environment assessment. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Contemporary issues in the training of UK health and social care professionals--Looking after people with a learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClimens, Alex; Bosworth, Dave; Brewster, Jacqui; Nutting, Charlotte

    2012-10-01

    The health and social care of people labelled with 'learning disability' has historically been a disputed territory for those individuals working within the nursing and allied health professions. In recent times this situation has seen public debate as instances of poor care and avoidable deaths have received a high profile in the popular and professional presses. Here we report on a local initiative where students can study for a joint honours award which allows them to practise as a generic social worker and a learning disability nurse. We believe that the inter-professional perspective improves their ability to manage the increasingly complex aspects of health and social care that this client group demands. Furthermore, we suggest that if a similar model were to be applied at a foundation module level to the training of ALL health and social care professionals, then the results would be a win/win situation for all parties. This would also go some way to meeting the recommendations of Sir Jonathan Michael's report, Health Care for All (DH, 2008). Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Work ability of employees in changing social services and health care organizations in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinen, Lauri; Konu, Anne

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we examined the connection between organizational changes and employees own evaluations of their work ability. In early 2010, we asked employees (n = 2429) working in the Finnish social services and health care industry to identify all the organizational changes that had occurred at their workplaces over the previous two years, and to evaluate their own work ability and whether different statements related to the elements of work ability were true or false at the time of the survey. For our method of analysis, we used logistical regression analysis. In models adjusted for gender, age, marital status, professional education and managerial position, the respondents who had encountered organizational changes were at a higher risk of feeling that their work ability had decreased (OR = 1.49) than the respondents whose workplaces had not been affected by changes. Those respondents who had encountered organizational changes were also at a higher risk of feeling that several elements related to work ability had deteriorated. The risk of having decreased self-evaluated work ability was in turn higher among the respondents who stated they could not understand the changes than among those respondents who understood the changes (OR = 1.99). This was also the case among respondents who felt that their opportunities to be involved in the changes had been poor in comparison to those who felt that they had had good opportunities to be involved in the process (OR = 2.16). Our findings suggest that the organizational changes in social and health care may entail, especially when poorly executed, costs to which little attention has been paid until now. When implementing organizational changes, it is vital to ensure that the employees understand why the changes are being made, and that they are given the opportunity to take part in the implementation of these changes.

  18. Health and social care regulation in Wales: an integrated system of political, corporate and professional governance for improving public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Tony; Wilkinson, Jane

    2008-11-01

    Wales is developing a unique integrated system of governance to improve public health, which is diverging from some recent developments in the rest of the UK but shares many common features. There is a focus on strengthening collaborative working and co-ordination between bodies inspecting, regulating and auditing health and social care. Systems are being developed that are proportionate to the level of risk, eliminate unnecessary burdens of external review and support the improvement of services for patients, service users and carers. This is consistent with the Assembly Government's aim to improve the way that public services are delivered in Wales, including strengthening input from the public in the planning, delivery and reporting of regulation and inspection work. The test in the future will be how far we can demonstrate quantitatively and qualitatively the added value from our uniquely Welsh approach, built as it is on devolution and the aspirations for small-country governance.

  19. Occupational therapy and action in social vulnerability contexts: proximities and distinctions between the social field and the primary health care area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Serrata Malfitano

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the scenario of the Brazilian social reality urban centers are characterized by high socioeconomic inequality, this fact makes social/health professionals of many areas, including occupational therapists, take part in social vulnerability contexts. Thus, the objective of this study was to approach and identify interventions in social occupational therapy and primary health care in order to verify the proximities and distinctions between the actions, when performed in social vulnerability contexts. This research was carried out in São Carlos, state of São Paulo, based on semi-structured interviews with all occupational therapists working in the selected areas: six therapists working in the social field and five from the primary health care area. We have also observed in situ the activities of occupational therapists in the social and primary health care areas. Based on the observation of the occupational therapists’ practices and on the thematic analysis of their speech, we found a significant difference between the objectives and resources used, even when performed in the same territory of social vulnerability. It was possible to conclude that there are clear specificities in each field, and that it is necessary to identify the differences and objectives of each intervention. The understanding of the practices performed allows us to approach the identity of the professionals and their major viable contributions to different sectors.

  20. Systematic evaluation of implementation fidelity of complex interventions in health and social care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasson Henna

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of an implementation process and its fidelity can give insight into the 'black box' of interventions. However, a lack of standardized methods for studying fidelity and implementation process have been reported, which might be one reason for the fact that few prior studies in the field of health service research have systematically evaluated interventions' implementation processes. The aim of this project is to systematically evaluate implementation fidelity and possible factors influencing fidelity of complex interventions in health and social care. Methods A modified version of The Conceptual Framework for Implementation Fidelity will be used as a conceptual model for the evaluation. The modification implies two additional moderating factors: context and recruitment. A systematic evaluation process was developed. Multiple case study method is used to investigate implementation of three complex health service interventions. Each case will be investigated in depth and longitudinally, using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Discussion This study is the first attempt to empirically test The Conceptual Framework for Implementation Fidelity. The study can highlight mechanism and factors of importance when implementing complex interventions. Especially the role of the moderating factors on implementation fidelity can be clarified. Trial Registration Supported Employment, SE, among people with severe mental illness -- a randomized controlled trial: NCT00960024.

  1. 2 CFR 376.147 - Does an exclusion from participation in Federal health care programs under Title XI of the Social...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Federal health care programs under Title XI of the Social Security Act affect a person's eligibility to..., Medicaid, and other Federal health care programs under Title XI of the Social Security Act, 42 U.S.C. 1320a... Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  2. The teenager as a medical patient: The influence of social factors on the health care activity of teenagers in the field of reproductive health

    OpenAIRE

    Surmach, M.

    2012-01-01

    teenagers, medical activity, social factors, reproductive health Background: Teenagers tend to abandon the programs of preventive and therapeutic medical care established for them in infancy by their pediatricians and parents. Purpose: To assess the influence of social factors on the health behaviours of Belarusian teenagers in the field of reproductive health. Material and methods: We analyzed the medical activity of Belarusian teenagers ages 15 to 18 during (March through June 201...

  3. "Macho Men" and Preventive Health Care: Implications for Older Men in Different Social Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kristen W.; Mouzon, Dawne M.

    2011-01-01

    The gender paradox in mortality--where men die earlier than women despite having more socioeconomic resources--may be partly explained by men's lower levels of preventive health care. Stereotypical notions of masculinity reduce preventive health care; however, the relationship between masculinity, socioeconomic status (SES), and preventive health…

  4. How nurses can use social enterprise to improve services in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, David

    This article describes the concept of social enterprise in nursing, and outlines how this model can help to improve care delivered to patients. It provides advice for nurses interested in pursuing this entrepreneurial route and also offers case studies demonstrating how the social enterprise model has been implemented in practice.

  5. Assessment of the Relationship between Spiritual and Social Health and the Self-Care Ability of Elderly People Referred to Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mahboobeh; Alavi, Mousa; Bahrami, Masoud; Zandieh, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Promotion of self-care ability among older people is an essential means to help maintain and improve their health. However, the role of spiritual and social health has not yet been considered in detail in the context of self-care ability among elderly. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between spiritual and social health and self-care ability of older people referred to community health centers in Isfahan. In this cross-sectional correlation study, 200 people, aged 60 years and older, referred to healthcare centers in 2016 were recruited through convenience sampling method. Data were collected by four-part tool comprising of: (a) demographics, (b) Ellison and Palotzin's spiritual well-being scale, (c) Kees's "social health" scale, and (d) self-care ability scale for the elderly by Soderhamn's; data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential (independent t-test, analysis of variance - ANOVA, Pearson's coefficient tests, and multiple regression analysis) statistics by SPSS16 software. Findings showed that the entered predictor variables were accounted for 41% of total variance (R2 ) of the two self-care ability in the model (p < 0.001, F3, 199 = 46.02). Two out of the three predictor variables including religious well-being and social health, significantly predicted the self-care ability of older people. The results of this study emphasized on the relationship between spiritual and social health of the elderly people and their ability to self-care. Therefore, it would be recommended to keep the focus of the service resources towards improving social and spiritual health to improve self-care ability in elderly people.

  6. Exploring opportunities to support mental health care using social media: A survey of social media users with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslund, John A; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; McHugo, Gregory J; Unützer, Jürgen; Marsch, Lisa A; Bartels, Stephen J

    2017-10-20

    Social media holds promise for expanding the reach of mental health services, especially for young people who frequently use these popular platforms. We surveyed social media users who self-identified as having a mental illness to learn about their use of social media for mental health and to identify opportunities to augment existing mental health services. We asked 240 Twitter users who self-identified in their profile as having a mental illness to participate in an online survey. The survey was in English and inquired about participants' mental health condition, use of social media for mental health and interest in accessing mental health programs delivered through social media. Respondents from 10 countries completed 135 surveys. Most respondents were from the United States (54%), Canada (22%) and the United Kingdom (17%) and reported a psychiatric diagnosis of either schizophrenia spectrum disorder (27%), bipolar disorder (25%), major depressive disorder (16%) or depression (20%). Young adults age ≤35 (46%) were more likely to use Instagram (P = .002), Snapchat (P < .001) and their mobile phone for accessing social media (P < .001) compared to adults age 36 and older (53%). Most participants (85%) expressed interest in mental health programs delivered through social media, especially to promote overall health and wellbeing (72%) and for coping with mental health symptoms (90%). This exploratory study demonstrates the feasibility of reaching social media users with mental illness and can inform efforts to leverage social media to make evidence-based mental health services more widely available to those in need. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Economic evaluation of integrated new technologies for health and social care: Suggestions for policy makers, users and evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildman, John; McMeekin, Peter; Grieve, Eleanor; Briggs, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    With an ageing population there is a move towards the use of assisted living technologies (ALTs) to provide social care and health care services, and to improve service processes. These technologies are at the forefront of the integration of health and social care. However, economic evaluations of ALTs, and indeed economic evaluations of any interventions providing both health benefits and benefits beyond health are complex. This paper considers the challenges faced by evaluators and presents a method of economic evaluation for use with interventions where traditional methods may not be suitable for informing funders and decision makers. We propose a method, combining economic evaluation techniques, that can accommodate health outcomes and outcomes beyond health through the use of a common numeraire. Such economic evaluations can benefit both the public and private sector, firstly by ensuring the efficient allocation of resources. And secondly, by providing information for individuals who, in the market for ALTs, face consumption decisions that are infrequent and for which there may be no other sources of information. We consider these issues in the welfarist, extra-welfarist and capabilities frameworks, which we link to attributes in an individual production model. This approach allows for the valuation of the health component of any such intervention and the valuation of key social care attributes and processes. Finally, we present a set of considerations for evaluators highlighting the key issues that need to be considered in this type of economic evaluation. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Social media in the health-care setting: benefits but also a minefield of compliance and other legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Richard E; McNeese, Libra G; Feld, Lauren D; Feld, Andrew D

    2014-08-01

    Throughout the past 20 years, the rising use of social media has revolutionized health care as well as other businesses. It allows large groups of people to create and share information, ideas, and experiences through online communications, and develop social and professional contacts easily and inexpensively. Our Gastroenterology organizations, among others, have embraced this technology. Although the health-care benefits may be many, social media must be viewed through a legal lens, recognizing the accompanying burdens of compliance, ethical, and litigation issues. Theories of liability and risk continue to evolve as does the technology. Social media usage within the medical community is fraught with potential legal issues, requiring remedial responses to meet patients' needs and comply with current laws, while not exposing physicians to medical malpractice and other tort risks.

  9. Classroom-based and distance learning education and training courses in end-of-life care for health and social care staff: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsford, David; Jackson, Georgina; O'Brien, Terri; Yates, Sue; Duxbury, Joy

    2013-03-01

    Staff from a range of health and social care professions report deficits in their knowledge and skills when providing end-of-life and palliative care, and education and training has been advocated at a range of levels. To review the literature related to classroom-based and distance learning education and training initiatives for health and social care staff in end-of-life and palliative care, in terms of their target audience, extent, modes of delivery, content and teaching and learning strategies, and to identify the most effective educational strategies for enhancing care. A systematic review of the literature evaluating classroom-based and distance learning education and training courses for health and social care staff in end-of-life and palliative care. Online databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PSYCHINFO between January 2000 and July 2010. Studies were selected that discussed specific education and training initiatives and included pre-and post-test evaluation of participants' learning. 30 studies met eligibility criteria. The majority reported successful outcomes, though there were some exceptions. Level of prior experience and availability of practice reinforcement influenced learning. Participative and interactive learning strategies were predominantly used along with discussion of case scenarios. Multi-professional learning was infrequently reported and service user and carer input to curriculum development and delivery was reported in only one study. Classroom-based education and training is useful for enhancing professionals' skills and perceived preparedness for delivering end-of-life care but should be reinforced by actual practice experience.

  10. Health care and social media: What patients really understand [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Hoedebecke

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low health literacy is associated with decreased patient compliance and worse outcomes - with clinicians increasingly relying on printed materials to lower such risks. Yet, many of these documents exceed recommended comprehension levels. Furthermore, patients look increasingly to social media (SoMe to answer healthcare questions. The character limits built into Twitter encourage users to publish small quantities of text, which are more accessible to patients with low health literacy. The present authors hypothesize that SoMe posts are written at lower grade levels than traditional medical sources, improving patient health literacy. Methods: The data sample consisted of the first 100 original tweets from three trending medical hashtags, leading to a total of 300 tweets. The Flesch-Kincaid Readability Formula (FKRF was used to derive grade level of the tweets. Data was analyzed via descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: The readability scores for the data sample had a mean grade level of 9.45. A notable 47.6% of tweets were above ninth grade reading level. An independent-sample t-test comparing FKRF mean scores of different hashtags found differences between the means of the following: #hearthealth versus #diabetes (t = 3.15, p = 0.002; #hearthealth versus #migraine (t = 0.09, p = 0.9; and #diabetes versus #migraine (t = 3.4, p = 0.001. Conclusions: Tweets from this data sample were written at a mean grade level of 9.45, signifying a level between the ninth and tenth grades. This is higher than desired, yet still better than traditional sources, which have been previously analyzed. Ultimately, those responsible for health care SoMe posts must continue to improve efforts to reach the recommended reading level (between the sixth and eighth grade, so as to ensure optimal comprehension of patients.

  11. The communication of information about older people between health and social care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Sheila; Kerr, Chris; Hawker, Sheila; Hardey, Michael; Powell, Jackie

    2002-03-01

    to provide an evidence base for strategies, and effectiveness of the transfer of patient information between hospital and community for older people with physical illness. a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative literature. literature from medical, health-related and social science databases as well as work in progress from national databases, the Internet, British PhD theses and other grey literature and policy documents. literature relating to similar healthcare systems published between January 1994 and June 2000 on hospital discharge planning. Empirical studies from peer reviewed sources; theoretical papers from non-peer reviewed sources; research papers from non-peer reviewed sources and professional documents. extracted data from empirical studies under the headings of location, sector, research questions and study design and duration. We made structured summaries of all other data sources and used them to supply context and background. We categorized literature and analysed it in terms of method and analysis, quality and strength of evidence and its relevance to the research questions. We synthesized the results and presented them in terms of answers to our research questions. a database of 373 potentially relevant studies and of these, 53 were accepted for further analysis. Thirty-one were empirical studies, most of which were qualitative or a combination of qualitative and quantitative in design. The most effective strategy for transferring information is the appointment of a 'key worker', who can provide a point of contact for workers from hospital and community. Nevertheless, problems have arisen because both settings are under pressure and pursuing different goals. Neither setting is fully aware of the needs, limitations and pressures of the other. raised awareness and the establishment of common goals are the first steps needed to bridge the divide between health and social care staff in hospital and the community.

  12. Consumer-Driven Health Care: Answer to Global Competition or Threat to Social Justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Carol L.

    2009-01-01

    Health planning in the United States is rapidly approaching a fork in the policy road, with one direction leading the nation toward a universal plan with strong government involvement and the other direction strengthening existing market-based reforms and preserving a commercial health insurance industry. "Consumer-driven health care," a slogan…

  13. The social network around influenza vaccination in health care workers: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Llupià

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza vaccination coverage remains low among health care workers (HCWs in many health facilities. This study describes the social network defined by HCWs’ conversations around an influenza vaccination campaign in order to describe the role played by vaccination behavior and other HCW characteristics in the configuration of the links among subjects. Methods This study used cross-sectional data from 235 HCWs interviewed after the 2010/2011 influenza vaccination campaign at the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona (HCB, Spain. The study asked: “Who did you talk to or share some activity with respect to the seasonal vaccination campaign?” Variables studied included sociodemographic characteristics and reported conversations among HCWs during the influenza campaign. Exponential random graph models (ERGM were used to assess the role of shared characteristics (homophily and individual characteristics in the social network around the influenza vaccination campaign. Results Links were more likely between HCWs who shared the same professional category (OR 3.13, 95% CI = 2.61–3.75, sex (OR 1.34, 95% CI = 1.09–1.62, age (OR 0.7, 95% CI = 0.63–0.78 per decade of difference, and department (OR 11.35, 95% CI = 8.17–15.64, but not between HCWs who shared the same vaccination behavior (OR 1.02, 95% CI = 0.86–1.22. Older (OR 1.26, 95% CI = 1.14–1.39 per extra decade of HCW and vaccinated (OR 1.32, 95% CI = 1.09–1.62 HCWs were more likely to be named. Conclusions This study finds that there is no homophily by vaccination status in whom HCWs speak to or interact with about a workplace vaccination promotion campaign. This result highlights the relevance of social network analysis in the planning of health promotion interventions.

  14. The role of autonomy and social support in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havermans, B.M.; Boot, C.R.L.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Anema, J.R.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health care workers are exposed to psychosocial work factors. Autonomy and social support are psychosocial work factors that are related to stress, and are argued to largely result from the psychosocial safety climate within organisations. This study aimed to assess to what extent the

  15. The role of autonomy and social support in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havermans, B.M.; Boot, C.R.L.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Anema, J.R.; van der Beek, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Health care workers are exposed to psychosocial work factors. Autonomy and social support are psychosocial work factors that are related to stress, and are argued to largely result from the psychosocial safety climate within organisations. This study aimed to assess to what extent the

  16. How to Sustain Interprofessional Learning and Practice: Messages for Higher Education and Health and Social Care Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meads, Geoffrey; Jones, Isabel; Harrison, Rachel; Forman, Dawn; Turner, Warren

    2009-01-01

    The principal aim of this article is to promote the more effective integration of interprofessional learning with practice developments in health and social care. Ten specific recommendations are offered for the successful management of recent central policies for collaboration at the interface of the higher education and service sectors.…

  17. Australian Children with Special Health Care Needs: Social-Emotional and Learning Competencies in the Early Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteford, Chrystal; Walker, Sue; Berthelsen, Donna

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between special health care needs and social-emotional and learning competence in the early years, reporting on two waves of data from the Kindergarten Cohort of "Growing up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children" (LSAC). Six hundred and fifty children were identified through the…

  18. Linking research to practice: the organisation and implementation of The Netherlands health and social care improvement programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovretveit, John; Klazinga, Niek

    2013-01-01

    Both public and private health and social care services are facing increased and changing demands to improve quality and reduce costs. To enable local services to respond to these demands, governments and other organisations have established large scale improvement programmes. These usually seek to

  19. SOCIAL MARGINALIZATION AND HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjana Bogdanović

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The 20th century was characterized by special improvement in health. The aim of WHO’s policy EQUITY IN HEALTH is to enable equal accessibility and equal high quality of health care for all citizens. More or less some social groups have stayed out of many social systems even out of health care system in the condition of social marginalization. Phenomenon of social marginalization is characterized by dynamics. Marginalized persons have lack of control over their life and available resources. Social marginalization stands for a stroke on health and makes the health status worse. Low socio-economic level dramatically influences people’s health status, therefore, poverty and illness work together. Characteristic marginalized groups are: Roma people, people with AIDS, prisoners, persons with development disorders, persons with mental health disorders, refugees, homosexual people, delinquents, prostitutes, drug consumers, homeless…There is a mutual responsibility of community and marginalized individuals in trying to resolve the problem. Health and other problems could be solved only by multisector approach to well-designed programs.

  20. A New Dimension of Health Care: Systematic Review of the Uses, Benefits, and Limitations of Social Media for Health Communication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moorhead, S. Anne; Hazlett, Diane E; Harrison, Laura; Carroll, Jennifer K; Irwin, Anthea; Hoving, Ciska

    2013-01-01

    There is currently a lack of information about the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media for health communication among the general public, patients, and health professionals from primary research...

  1. Social support needs for equity in health and social care: a thematic analysis of experiences of people with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Leite, Jose C; de L Drachler, Maria; Killett, Anne; Kale, Swati; Nacul, Luis; McArthur, Maggie; Hong, Chia Swee; O'Driscoll, Lucy; Pheby, Derek; Campion, Peter; Lacerda, Eliana; Poland, Fiona

    2011-11-02

    Needs-based resource allocation is fundamental to equitable care provision, which can meet the often-complex, fluctuating needs of people with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME). This has posed challenges both for those providing and those seeking support providers, in building shared understanding of the condition and of actions to address it. This qualitative study reports on needs for equity in health and social care expressed by adults living with CFS/ME. The participants were 35 adults with CFS/ME in England, purposively selected to provide variation in clinical presentations, social backgrounds and illness experiences. Accounts of experienced needs and needs-related encounters with health and social services were obtained through a focus group (n = 6) and semi-structured interviews (n = 35). These were transcribed and needs related topics identified through data-led thematic analysis. Participants emphasised needs for personalised, timely and sustained support to alleviate CFS/ME impacts and regain life control, in three thematic areas: (1) Illness symptoms, functional limitations and illness management; (2) practical support and social care; (3) financial support. Access of people with CFS/ME to support from health and social services was seen to be constrained by barriers stemming from social, cultural, organisational and professional norms and practices, further heightened for disadvantaged groups including some ethnic minorities. These reduced opportunities for their illness to be explained or associated functional limitations and social disadvantages to be addressed through social support. Participants sought more understanding of bio-psycho-social aspects of CFS/ME, of felt needs of people with CFS/ME and of human rights and disability rights, for providing person-centred, equitable care. Changes in attitudes of health practitioners, policy makers and general public and more flexibly organised health and social care provision

  2. The Adolescent "Expanded Medical Home": School-Based Health Centers Partner with a Primary Care Clinic to Improve Population Health and Mitigate Social Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Margaret; Laurie, Anna R; Plegue, Melissa A; Richarson, Caroline R

    2016-01-01

    Access to high-quality health care is a crucial social determinant of health. We describe the implementation of an "expanded medical home" partnering a primary care practice (the Ypsilanti Health Center [YHC]) with local school-based health centers (the Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools [RAHS]), and to assess whether this model improves access to and quality of care for shared patients. Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, we define the steps in, barriers to, and facilitating factors in implementing the expanded medical home model. Visits and quality measures were assessed for patients seen by YHC only versus YHC/RAHS at baseline and during the intervention. At baseline, patients seen at YHC/RAHS had higher compliance with most quality metrics compared with those seen at YHC only. The proportion of shared patients significantly increased because of the intervention (P < .001). Overall, patients seen in the expanded medical home had a higher likelihood of receiving quality metric services than patients in YHC only (odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.57-2.05) across all measures. Thoughtful and intentional implementation of an expanded medical home partnership between primary care physicians and school-based health centers increases the number of shared high-risk adolescent patients. Shared patients have improved compliance with quality measures, which may lead to long-term improved health equity. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  3. Disclosure of confidential patient information and the duty to consult: the role of the health and social care information centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Jamie; Taylor, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Before disclosing confidential patient information for purposes not directly related to his or her care and treatment, there is currently a responsibility upon health professionals to consult with a patient wherever practicable. The Health and Social Care Act 2012 has diluted that responsibility to consult, at least in relation to any information that the Health and Social Care Information Centre requires health professionals to disclose. This is at odds with other moves to support an individual's involvement in decisions that affect them. Moreover, a responsibility to consult can be shown to be a procedural aspect of the fundamental right to respect for private and family life as guaranteed by Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The scope and nature of a procedural requirement for consultation can be revealed, at least in part, by considering the case law concerning disclosure in the field of criminality information sharing. If the Health and Social Care Act 2012 is to be adequately protected from a challenge for incompatibility with the ECHR, then practicable opportunities to provide information about the intended purposes of processing, and respect for any reasonable objection to disclosure, must be recognised beyond those explicitly provided for by the 2012 Act. The Code of Practice that the Information Centre is responsible for producing represents an opportunity to guarantee adequate levels of consultation will be preserved, consistent with proposed changes to the NHS Constitution.

  4. El otro discurso de las ciencias sociales en salud The social sciences’ other health-care discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Wanzo

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available No final da década de 1960 e na década seguinte, o olhar que abordava as deficientes condições sociais, que eram e continuam sendo as verdadeiras causas a dificultarem o desenvolvimento humano, nos alertava a prestarmos atenção no crescimento com eqüidade. Se desenvolvimento humano é aumento continuado das opções oferecidas às pessoas, que lugar ocupa este enunciado no discurso do senhor que é o das ciências sociais e o da política, sendo o seu principal produto hoje maior pobreza, superpopulação e menores opções para as pessoas? O que fazer para reverter tal quadro e conseguir que o povo tenha acesso a uma vida longa e sadia, a educação e a recursos necessários para que disponha de mais opções de vida do que de morte? Qual o lugar que ocupam ou deveriam ocupar as ciências sociais para nos aproximarmos de um discurso ético sobre a saúde? Quais objetos teremos de retomar para não continuarmos a validar as desigualdades sociais injustas do discurso do poder e do discurso do senhor?Since the late 1960s and early 1970s, concern over inadequate social conditions - which is what has truly hampered human development - has been focused on growth together with equity. If human development is a process which should steadily broaden human options, what place does this concept play in the discourse of the social sciences and politics as ‘master’ - whose major product today is greater poverty, overpopulation, and less options for people? How can this situation be reverted, so that people can enjoy a long, healthy life, receive an education, and have access to the resources that are needed if their life chances are to be greater than their death chances? What role does or should the social sciences play in devising an ethical discourse on health care? To what objectives will we need to return, if we are to refrain from using scientific knowledge to validate the unjust social inequalities espoused in the discourses of power and

  5. Influencing Self-Reported Health among Rural Low-Income Women through Health Care and Social Service Utilization: A Structural Equation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bice-Wigington, Tiffany; Huddleston-Casas, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Using structural equation modeling, this study examined the mesosystemic processes among rural low-income women, and how these processes subsequently influenced self-reported health. Acknowledging the behavioral processes inherent in utilization of health care and formal social support services, this study moved beyond a behavioral focus by…

  6. ?Friending? Teens: Systematic Review of Social Media in Adolescent and Young Adult Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Yonker, Lael M.; Zan, Shiyi; Scirica, Christina V; Jethwani, Kamal; Kinane, T. Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background Social media has emerged as a potentially powerful medium for communication with adolescents and young adults around their health choices. Objective The goal of this systematic review is to identify research on the use of social media for interacting with adolescents and young adults in order to achieve positive health outcomes. Methods A MEDLINE/PubMed electronic database search was performed between January 1, 2002 and October 1, 2013, using terms to identify peer-reviewed resear...

  7. 77 FR 11001 - Small Business Size Standards: Health Care and Social Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... (Nursing and Residential Care Facilities) were part of SIC Major Industry Group 80, Health Services, while... changes, growth trends, SBA financial assistance, other program factors, etc.). SBA also considers the....0 $1,708.4 $35.5 $34.5 Substance Abuse) Hospitals $35.5 $30.0 $35.5 ] 623110--Nursing Care...

  8. Does participation in preventive child health care at the general practitioner minimise social differences in the use of specialist care outside the hospital system?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mårtensson, Solvej; Hansen, Kristine Halling; Olsen, Kim Rose

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The primary purposes of preventive child health care in Denmark are to help ensure a healthy childhood and to create preconditions for a healthy adult life. The aim of this study is to examine whether participation in age-appropriate preventative child health care affects the associ...... with a specialist than children from more affluent families. CONCLUSIONS: Ensuring participation in preventive child health care at the GP may reduce the social gap in utilisation of specialised health care that exists between children from families of different income levels.......INTRODUCTION: The primary purposes of preventive child health care in Denmark are to help ensure a healthy childhood and to create preconditions for a healthy adult life. The aim of this study is to examine whether participation in age-appropriate preventative child health care affects...... the number of contacts with a specialist in 2006 was related to participation in preventive child health care between 2002 and 2005. To control for the potential effect of difference in GP behaviour the data were analysed using a multilevel Poisson model linking each child to the GP with whom he or she...

  9. Bridging miles to achieve milestones: Corporate social responsibility for primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Ruchie

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable Developmental Goals aim to provide "Good health for all". The task though immense ,requires equitable and efficient distribution of health resources to the community, reached predominantly by the Primary Health Centres. Strengthening these centres is essential to attain the goal. Adequate health financing is one of the important determinants for utilizing the optimal potential of these centres . Pooling funds from alternate financing strategies as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) funds may give impetus and facilitate healthcare affordability to the underserved population. This convergence of vision of corporate funding for "basic health services" may bridge the gap arising out of inadequate funding and facilitate "Good Health for all" in India.

  10. “Friending” Teens: Systematic Review of Social Media in Adolescent and Young Adult Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scirica, Christina V; Jethwani, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background Social media has emerged as a potentially powerful medium for communication with adolescents and young adults around their health choices. Objective The goal of this systematic review is to identify research on the use of social media for interacting with adolescents and young adults in order to achieve positive health outcomes. Methods A MEDLINE/PubMed electronic database search was performed between January 1, 2002 and October 1, 2013, using terms to identify peer-reviewed research in which social media and other Web 2.0 technologies were an important feature. We used a systematic approach to retrieve papers and extract relevant data. Results We identified 288 studies involving social media, of which 87 met criteria for inclusion; 75 studies were purely observational and 12 were interventional. The ways in which social media was leveraged by these studies included (1) observing adolescent and young adult behavior (n=77), (2) providing health information (n=13), (3) engaging the adolescent and young adult community (n=17), and (4) recruiting research participants (n=23). Common health topics addressed included high-risk sexual behaviors (n=23), alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use (n=19), Internet safety (n=8), mental health issues (n=18), medical conditions (n=11), or other specified issues (n=12). Several studies used more than one social media platform and addressed more than one health-related topic. Conclusions Social media technologies offer an exciting new means for engaging and communicating with adolescents and young adults; it has been successfully used to engage this age group, identify behaviors, and provide appropriate intervention and education. Nevertheless, the majority of studies to date have been preliminary and limited in their methodologies, and mostly center around evaluating how adolescents and young adults use social media and the resulting implications on their health. Although these explorations are essential, further

  11. "Friending" teens: systematic review of social media in adolescent and young adult health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonker, Lael M; Zan, Shiyi; Scirica, Christina V; Jethwani, Kamal; Kinane, T Bernard

    2015-01-05

    Social media has emerged as a potentially powerful medium for communication with adolescents and young adults around their health choices. The goal of this systematic review is to identify research on the use of social media for interacting with adolescents and young adults in order to achieve positive health outcomes. A MEDLINE/PubMed electronic database search was performed between January 1, 2002 and October 1, 2013, using terms to identify peer-reviewed research in which social media and other Web 2.0 technologies were an important feature. We used a systematic approach to retrieve papers and extract relevant data. We identified 288 studies involving social media, of which 87 met criteria for inclusion; 75 studies were purely observational and 12 were interventional. The ways in which social media was leveraged by these studies included (1) observing adolescent and young adult behavior (n=77), (2) providing health information (n=13), (3) engaging the adolescent and young adult community (n=17), and (4) recruiting research participants (n=23). Common health topics addressed included high-risk sexual behaviors (n=23), alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use (n=19), Internet safety (n=8), mental health issues (n=18), medical conditions (n=11), or other specified issues (n=12). Several studies used more than one social media platform and addressed more than one health-related topic. Social media technologies offer an exciting new means for engaging and communicating with adolescents and young adults; it has been successfully used to engage this age group, identify behaviors, and provide appropriate intervention and education. Nevertheless, the majority of studies to date have been preliminary and limited in their methodologies, and mostly center around evaluating how adolescents and young adults use social media and the resulting implications on their health. Although these explorations are essential, further exploration and development of these strategies into

  12. Predicting health-promoting self-care behaviors in people with pre-diabetes by applying Bandura social learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Hung, Shu-Ling

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to apply Bandura social learning theory in a model for identifying personal and environmental factors that predict health-promoting self-care behaviors in people with pre-diabetes. The theoretical basis of health-promoting self-care behaviors must be examined to obtain evidence-based knowledge that can help improve the effectiveness of pre-diabetes care. However, such behaviors are rarely studied in people with pre-diabetes. This quantitative, cross-sectional survey study was performed in a convenience sample of two hospitals in southern Taiwan. Two hundred people diagnosed with pre-diabetes at a single health examination center were recruited. A questionnaire survey was performed to collect data regarding personal factors (i.e., participant characteristics, pre-diabetes knowledge, and self-efficacy) and data regarding environmental factors (i.e., social support and perceptions of empowerment process) that may have associations with health-promoting self-care behaviors in people with pre-diabetes. Multiple linear regression showed that the factors that had the largest influence on the practice of health-promoting self-care behaviors were self-efficacy, diabetes history, perceptions of empowerment process, and pre-diabetes knowledge. These factors explained 59.3% of the variance in health-promoting self-care behaviors. To prevent the development of diabetes in people with pre-diabetes, healthcare professionals should consider both the personal and the environmental factors identified in this study when assessing health promoting self-care behaviors in patients with pre-diabetes and when selecting the appropriate interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimation of health-care costs for work-related injuries in the Mexican Institute of Social Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos-Rivera, Fernando; Aguilar-Madrid, Guadalupe; Gómez-Montenegro, Pablo Anaya; Juárez-Pérez, Cuauhtémoc A; Sánchez-Román, Francisco Raúl; Durcudoy Montandon, Jaqueline E A; Borja-Aburto, Víctor Hugo

    2009-03-01

    Data on the economic consequences of occupational injuries is scarce in developing countries which prevents the recognition of their economic and social consequences. This study assess the direct heath care costs of work-related accidents in the Mexican Institute of Social Security, the largest health care institution in Latin America, which covered 12,735,856 workers and their families in 2005. We estimated the cost of treatment for 295,594 officially reported occupational injuries nation wide. A group of medical experts devised treatment algorithms to quantify resource utilization for occupational injuries to which unit costs were applied. Total costs were estimated as the product of the cost per illness and the severity weighted incidence of occupational accidents. Occupational injury rate was 2.9 per 100 workers. Average medical care cost per case was $2,059 USD. The total cost of the health care of officially recognized injured workers was $753,420,222 USD. If injury rate is corrected for underreporting, the cost for formal injured workers is 791,216,460. If the same costs are applied for informal workers, approximately half of the working population in Mexico, the cost of healthcare for occupational injuries is about 1% of the gross domestic product. Health care costs of occupational accidents are similar to the economic direct expenditures to compensate death and disability in the social security system in Mexico. However, indirect costs might be as important as direct costs.

  14. Health and social care teachers’ descriptions of challenges in their teaching at upper secondary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Eliasson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since vocational teachers not only mediate theoretical and practical knowledge, but also ideals concerning the professionals’ personalities and actions, the aim of this study is to analyse if and how these ideals influence the highlighted challenges of teaching. The study is drawing on a social constructionist perspective; the method used involves 17 qualitative interviews. The challenges mentioned were as follows: lack of motivation, language and cultural factors, low status of the occupation and plagiarism. Underlying ideals rooted in the health care sector were that students should become a carer because of an inner desire. Moral and ethical values were other ideals that underpinned themes such as dealing with plagiarism and the problems experienced with non-native Swedes. An underlying fact is also the low traditional status of the nursing assistants, a challenge the teachers try to handle without effective tools. In the order to understand the challenges and handle them, the teachers construct categories of differences. This is visible when the categorisation of students is made based on motivation and ethnicity. The findings highlight the importance of courses

  15. New partnerships in health and social care for an era of public spending cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Mary; Richardson, Emma-Louise; Tabreman, Julia

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses a research partnership framework based on a collaborative relationship that was initially established between a carers' organisation and a university with the aim of maximising the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of health and social care research in an era of public spending cuts. As each partner gradually formed several similar partnerships, it was developed into a framework for research partnerships between third sector organisations and academic institutions. The framework is contextualised within the concepts of collaboration and partnership working more generally and then within the development of third sector and university partnerships specifically. This is followed by a description and discussion of the framework together with a critical reflection on how it operated in practice. The ways in which it enhances research conducted by third sector organisations and universities and facilitates the best use of more limited research funds are also explored. Suggestions are then made as to how it can be used and adapted to generate new thinking about other similar partnerships at both a national and international level during the next few years of considerably reduced public sector expenditure. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Widening Access; Developing an eLearning Resource for Health and Social Care Professionals Caring for Children and Young People with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInally, Wendy; Pouso Lista, Maria J; McLaren, Natalia; Willis, Diane S

    2017-09-29

    Cancer is a key priority worldwide, and caring for children and young people with cancer requires a range of specific knowledge, skills and experience in order to deliver the complex care regimes both within the hospital or community environment. The aim of this paper is to disseminate work undertaken to design and develop pedagogical practice and innovation through an eLearning resource for health care professionals caring for children and young people with cancer across the globe. The work undertaken evaluated an existing cancer course (which has been withdrawn) that was developed and delivered through the Paediatric Oncology Nurses Forum, Royal College Nursing (Nurse Educators) and Warwick University. The evaluation consisted of 26 open and closed questions relating to the previous resource and was circulated to all health and social care professionals involved directly within specialist oncology services through the Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group. Questionnaires were sent out to a convenience sample of 773 health care professionals and the response rate was 14%. The findings identified that the course was predominantly accessed by nurses, but other health care professionals also found it useful. Participants highlighted several areas where they believed content could be developed or was lacking. This included areas such as palliative and end of life care, nutrition, sepsis and teenagers and young people. This feedback was then used to develop a site dedicated to the care of children and young people with cancer.

  17. The Social Stratification of Older Adults' Preparations for End-of-Life Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    I use data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (n = 4,971) to evaluate the extent to which socioeconomic status affects three health-related (living will, durable power of attorney for health care, and discussions) and one financial (will) component of end-of-life planning. Net worth is positively associated with all four types of planning,…

  18. Disseminating educational innovations in health care practice : Training versus social networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, Erik; Achterkamp, Marjolein C.; Brand, Paul L. P.; Kiewiet, Derk Jan; Pols, Jan; van Engelen, Jo M. L.

    Improvements and innovation in health service organization and delivery have become more and more important due to the gap between knowledge and practice, rising costs, medical errors, and the organization of health care systems. Since training and education is widely used to convey and distribute

  19. Professional health care use and subjective unmet need for social or emotional problems: a cross-sectional survey of the married and divorced population of Flanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colman Elien

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high mental health care consumption rates of divorced singles may constitute a heavy burden on the public health care system. This raises the question of whether their higher health care use stems from a greater need, or whether there are other factors contributing to these high consumption rates. We examine both health care use and subjective unmet need (perceiving a need for care without seeking it because of social or emotional problems of the divorced singles, the repartnered divorcees, and the married. Moreover, we investigate how health care use and subjective unmet need relate to each other. Methods We conduct several gender specific logistic regressions employing data from the Divorce in Flanders Survey (N men = 2884; N women = 3317. Results Results show that the divorced singles have more contact with professional health care providers (general practitioners, psychiatrists, and psychologists because of social or emotional problems, and more often perceive unmet needs. The higher health care use rates and greater subjective unmet needs can largely be attributed to higher levels of depressive symptoms. Surprisingly, we find that non-frequent health care users more often perceive a subjective unmet need than frequent health care users and those who have not contacted any health care provider. Conclusion The single divorced consult health care providers more often because of social or emotional problems and they also perceive unmet needs more often.

  20. Social representations of the health care of the Mbyá-Guarani indigenous population by health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, Mirian Benites; Shimizu, Helena Eri; Bermudez, Ximena Pamela Díaz

    2017-02-06

    to analyze the social representations of health care of the Mbyá-Guarani ethnic group by multidisciplinary teams from the Special Indigenous Health District in the south coast of Rio Grande do Sul state (Distrito Sanitário Especial Indígena Litoral Sul do Rio Grande do Sul), Brazil. a qualitative method based on the theory of social representations was used. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews with 20 health workers and by participant observation. The interviews were analyzed with ALCESTE software, which conducts a lexical content analysis using quantitative techniques for the treatment of textual data. there were disagreements in the health care concepts and practices between traditional medicine and biomedicine; however, some progress has been achieved in the area of intermedicality. The ethnic boundaries established between health workers and indigenous peoples based on their representations of culture and family, together with the lack of infrastructure and organization of health actions, are perceived as factors that hinder health care in an intercultural context. a new basis for the process of indigenous health care needs to be established by understanding the needs identified and by agreement among individuals, groups, and health professionals via intercultural exchange. analisar as representações sociais do cuidado em saúde entre trabalhadores que atuam em equipes multidisciplinares no Distrito Sanitário Especial Indígena Litoral Sul do Rio Grande do Sul, junto à etnia Mbyá-Guarani. utilizou-se método qualitativo, fundamentado na teoria das Representações Sociais. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevistas semiestruturadas com 20 trabalhadores e da observação participante. As entrevistas analisadas com o software ALCESTE, o qual realiza a análise lexical de conteúdo por meio de técnicas quantitativas de tratamento de dados textuais. verificou-se que existe tensão entre as concepções e práticas de cuidado da

  1. Types of social media (Web 2.0) used by Australian allied health professionals to deliver early twenty-first-century practice promotion and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Types of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major allied health professions (AHPs, n = 935) were examined. Australian AHPs are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies for personal use but are failing to implement such technologies throughout their health professions to deliver health care. Australian AHPs are willing to undertake online educational courses designed to up skill them about how Web 2.0 may be used for practice promotion and health care delivery in the early twenty-first century. Participants in this study indicated that educational courses that were offered online would be the preferred mode of delivery.

  2. Estimating The Effects Of Health Insurance And Other Social Programs On Poverty Under The Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remler, Dahlia K; Korenman, Sanders D; Hyson, Rosemary T

    2017-10-01

    The effects of health insurance on poverty have been difficult to ascertain because US poverty measures have not taken into account the need for health care and the value of health benefits. We developed the first US poverty measure to include the need for health insurance and to count health insurance benefits as resources available to meet that need-in other words, a health-inclusive poverty measure. We estimated the direct effects of health insurance benefits on health-inclusive poverty for people younger than age sixty-five, comparing the impacts of different health insurance programs and of nonhealth means-tested cash and in-kind benefits, refundable tax credits, and nonhealth social insurance programs. Private health insurance benefits reduced poverty by 3.7 percentage points. Public health insurance benefits (from Medicare, Medicaid, and Affordable Care Act premium subsidies) accounted for nearly one-third of the overall poverty reduction from public benefits. Poor adults with neither children nor a disability experienced little poverty relief from public programs, and what relief they did receive came mostly from premium subsidies and other public health insurance benefits. Medicaid had a larger effect on child poverty than all nonhealth means-tested benefits combined. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  3. The role of autonomy and social support in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermans, Bo M; Boot, Cécile R L; Houtman, Irene L D; Brouwers, Evelien P M; Anema, Johannes R; van der Beek, Allard J

    2017-06-08

    Health care workers are exposed to psychosocial work factors. Autonomy and social support are psychosocial work factors that are related to stress, and are argued to largely result from the psychosocial safety climate within organisations. This study aimed to assess to what extent the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers can be explained by autonomy and social support. In a cross-sectional study, psychosocial safety climate, stress, autonomy, co-worker support, and supervisor support were assessed using questionnaires, in a sample of health care workers (N = 277). Linear mixed models analyses were performed to assess to what extent social support and autonomy explained the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress. A lower psychosocial safety climate score was associated with significantly higher stress (B = -0.21, 95% CI = -0.27 - -0.14). Neither co-worker support, supervisor support, nor autonomy explained the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress. Taken together, autonomy and both social support measures diminished the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress by 12% (full model: B = -0.18, 95% CI = -0.25 - -0.11). Autonomy and social support together seemed to bring about a small decrease in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers. Future research should discern whether other psychosocial work factors explain a larger portion of this relation. This study was registered in the Netherlands National Trial Register, trial code: NTR5527 .

  4. Support networks for Chinese older immigrants accessing English health and social care services: the concept of Bridge People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiayang; Cook, Glenda; Cattan, Mima

    2017-03-01

    As Chinese immigrants in the United Kingdom age, they experience an increasing need to access health and care services. It has, however, been reported that older Chinese immigrants have difficulties in accessing these services. This study explored the experiences of this population in using health and care services and the strategies that they adopted to address their difficulties. A grounded theory method with a two-staged research design was used. Stage 1 explored the participants' experiences of ageing and use of health and social care services through focus group interviews. Stage 2 investigated the strategies individuals used to support access to and use of services through individual interviews. Forty-four older Chinese people and 15 supporters participated in interviews during August 2011 and May 2013. These older Chinese immigrants were challenged in knowing about and in accessing services. Their difficulties were attributed to language barriers, lack of information and instrumental support, and emotional and cultural issues regarding use of health and care services. Their supporters facilitated access to services and acted as a bridge between the service and the user; therefore, they were given the title 'Bridge People'. Bridge People have different backgrounds: family and friends, public sector workers and staff from community-based Chinese organisations. The defining attributes of these supporters were: bilinguality, bicultural, multifunctionality and accessibility. There is no charge for this support; and the relationship between the Bridge Person and recipient involves trust and influence over decisions regarding use of health and care services. Bridge People should be recognised and identified by health, social care and housing services to promote engagement and use of services by older immigrant Chinese people. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Breaking barriers and building bridges: understanding the pervasive needs of older LGBT adults and the value of social work in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdley, Shiloh D; Anklam, Donald D; Reardon, Christina C

    2014-01-01

    Given the rise in the aging population and the increased use of health care services, there is a demand for awareness and training that targets underserved populations such as older lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adults. Older LGBT adults are 5 times less likely to access health care and social services (King, 2009). Ethically responsible health service delivery is needed to capitalize on the strengths and capabilities of older LGBT adults and is vital for combating existing health disparities. Social workers aim to prevent ongoing gaps in care for older LGBT adults that can lead to negative individual and social consequences.

  6. Social and health-related factors associated with refraining from seeking dental care: A cross-sectional population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Erik; Westerling, Ragnar; Lytsy, Per

    2017-06-01

    Social inequities are considered to affect healthcare utilization, whereas less is known about the factors associated with refraining from seeking dental care. This study aimed to investigate whether people with no social support, long-term illness, caregiver burden and low socioeconomic status (SES) refrained from seeking dental care in higher proportion than the general Swedish population. This study used cross-sectional questionnaire data from repeated nationwide health surveys during 2004-2013 of a total of 90 845 people. The questionnaire included questions on demographic characteristics, social support, long-term illness, caregiving burden, SES and dental care-seeking behaviour. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, correlation analyses and logistic regressions were used to investigate associations between independent variables and dental care-seeking behaviour. In the total sample, 15.1% of respondents reported refraining from seeking dental care. Having no emotional social support or having no instrumental social support was separately associated with reporting refraining from seeking dental care in adjusted multivariate models (odds ratio [OR] 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-1.34 and OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.67-2.13, respectively). Having a long-term illness was associated with refraining from seeking dental care in adjusted models (adjusted OR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.35-1.51). Furthermore, being an informal caregiver was associated with refraining from seeking dental care (adjusted OR: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.07-1.23). Low SES was associated with higher refraining from seeking dental care; the strongest association was with having financial problems (adjusted OR: 3.57, 95% CI: 3.19-4.00). Interaction effects were found between education level and SES, and between social support and long-term illness, and the outcome. The findings in this study imply that having no social support, having long-term illness, being informal caregiver or having financial problems are

  7. Sex Trafficking and Health Care in Metro Manila: Identifying Social Determinants to Inform an Effective Health System Response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Timothy P; Alpert, Elaine J; Ahn, Roy; Cafferty, Elizabeth; Konstantopoulos, Wendy Macias; Wolferstan, Nadya; Castor, Judith Palmer; McGahan, Anita M; Burke, Thomas F

    2010-01-01

    .... Through key informant interviews with 51 health care and anti-trafficking stakeholders in Metro Manila, this study reports on observations about sex trafficking in Metro Manila that provide insight...

  8. Changes in awareness and utilization of social participation mechanisms of the Colombian health care system in the last 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Gallego, María Eugenia; Vázquez, María Luisa

    2012-01-01

    This article seeks to analyze changes in awareness and utilization of social participation mechanisms of the Colombian health care system in the last 10 years by comparing two cross-sectional studies based on surveys among health care users in 2000 and 2010. The results show that while in 2000, the level of awareness and utilization of the mechanisms were low, in 2010 researchers identified a significant tendency toward further diminishing of awareness and utilization. In both surveys, the best-known and most-used participation mechanisms were the market mechanisms. Also in both surveys, individuals from the rural zone were aware of and used the mechanisms. In the first survey, men were more aware of the mechanisms and used them more frequently, but it was women in the second survey who presented higher rates of awareness and use; these differences, however, were not statistically significant. The results herein indicate that effective social participation in the General Social Security System in Health is far from being achieved. The policy has failed to materialize, as evidenced by the lack of balance in the participation of one of the main actors of the General Social Security System in Health: the users.

  9. Social conditions and self-management are more powerful determinants of health than access to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, T; Esther, R; DeWalt, D A; Callahan, L F

    1998-09-01

    Professional organizations advocate universal access to medical care as a primary approach to improving health in the population. Access to medical services is critical to outcomes of acute processes managed in an inpatient hospital, the setting of most medical education, research, and training, but seems to be limited in its capacity to affect outcomes of outpatient care, the setting of most medical activities. Persistent and widening disparities in health according to socioeconomic status provide evidence of limitations of access to care. First, job classification, a measure of socioeconomic status, was a better predictor of cardiovascular death than cholesterol level, blood pressure, and smoking combined in employed London civil servants with universal access to the National Health Service. Second, disparities in health according to socioeconomic status widened between 1970 and 1980 in the United Kingdom despite universal access (similar trends were seen in the United States). Third, in the United States, noncompletion of high school is a greater risk factor than biological factors for development of many diseases, an association that is explained only in part by age, ethnicity, sex, or smoking status. Fourth, level of formal education predicted cardiovascular mortality better than random assignment to active drug or placebo over 3 years in a clinical trial that provides optimal access to care. Increased recognition of limitations of universal access by physicians and their professional societies may enhance efforts to improve the health of the population.

  10. Integration of health and social care: a case of learning and knowledge management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul M

    2012-09-01

    This paper considers integration of health and social care as an exercise in learning and knowledge management (KM). Integration assembles diverse actors and organisations in a collective effort to design and deliver new service models underpinned by multidisciplinary working and generic practice. Learning and KM are integral to this process. A critical review of the literature is undertaken to identify theoretical insights and models in this field, albeit grounded mainly in a private sector context. The findings from a research study involving two integrated services are then used to explore the role of, and approach to, learning and KM. This case study research was qualitative in nature and involved an interrogation of relevant documentary material, together with 25 in-depth interviews with a cross-section of strategic managers and professionals undertaken between March and May 2011. The evidence emerging indicated no planned strategies for learning and KM, but rather, interventions and mechanisms at different levels to support integration processes. These included formal activities, particularly around training and appraisal, but also informal ones within communities of practice and networking. Although structural enablers such as a co-location of facilities and joint appointments were important, the value of trust and inter-personal relationships was highlighted especially for tacit knowledge exchange. The infrastructure for learning and KM was constructed around a collaborative culture characterised by a coherent strategic framework; clarity of purpose based on new models of service; a collaborative leadership approach that was facilitative and distributed; and, a focus on team working to exploit the potential of multidisciplinary practice, generic working and integrated management. The discussion and conclusion use Nonaka's knowledge conversation model to reflect on the research findings, to comment on the absence of an explicit approach to learning and KM

  11. Referral to health and social services for intimate partner violence in health care settings: a realist scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, Maritt; Zhang, Yu Janice; Young, Aynsley; Marshall, Alena; O'Campo, Patricia; Ahmad, Farah

    2012-10-01

    Efficient and coordinated health care responses to intimate partner violence (IPV) are essential, given that health care settings are a major entry point for abused women who seek professional services. However, there is a lack of evidence on how IPV referrals are effectively made within health care settings. In order to help program planners and providers across sectors to address the complex and chronic issue of IPV, a greater understanding of the post-IPV identification referral process is essential. A scoping review of the evidence on IPV referral programs and processes in health care settings was undertaken to provide an overview of the state of evidence and identify pertinent gaps in existing research. The scoping review identified 13 evaluative studies and 6 qualitative, primarily nonevaluative studies that examined IPV referral programs and processes. Evaluative studies involved a variety of designs and IPV referral outcomes. Rich descriptions of barriers and facilitators to seeking referrals by victims and making referrals by health care providers emerged from the evaluative and qualitative studies, but were explored more in depth in the qualitative studies. This scoping review provides guidance on what is currently known about IPV referral programs in health care settings and provides a starting point for further research on effectiveness of referral processes.

  12. "This Is How We Work Here": Informal Logic and Social Order in Primary Health Care Services in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Nayelhi Itandehui; Berenzon, Shoshana; Galván, Jorge

    2017-07-01

    People who work in health care facilities participate in a shared set of tacit agreements, attitudes, habits, and behaviors that contribute to the functioning of those institutions, but that can also cause conflict. This phenomenon has been addressed tangentially in the study of bureaucratic practices in governmental agencies, but it has not been carefully explored in the specific context of public health care centers. To this end, we analyzed a series of encounters among staff and patients, as well as the situations surrounding the services offered, in public primary care health centers in Mexico City, based on Erving Goffman's concepts of social order, encounter, and situation, and on the concepts of formal and informal logic. In a descriptive study over the course of 2 years, we carried out systematic observations in 19 health centers and conducted interviews with medical, technical, and administrative staff, and psychologists, social workers, and patients. We recorded these observations in field notes and performed reflexive analysis with readings on three different levels. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed through identification of thematic categories and subcategories. Information related to encounters and situations from field notes and interviews was selected to triangulate the materials. We found the social order prevailing among staff to be based on a combination of status markers, such as educational level, seniority, and employee versus contractor status, which define the distribution of workloads, material resources, and space. Although this system generates conflicts, it also contributes to the smooth functioning of the health centers. The daily encounters and situations in all of these health centers allow for a set of informal practices that provide a temporary resolution of the contradictions posed by the institution for its workers.

  13. Proceedings of the National Conference on the assessment of Older People's Health and Social Care Needs and Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health

    2002-01-01

    The Conference took place on May 30th, 2002 in the Royal Marine Hotel, Dun Laoigaire. It attracted over 250 delegates from across the statutory, voluntary and private sectors and the interest that was expressed in the Conference was indicative of the growing recognition of the importance of establishing a more co-ordinated way of conducting health and social care assessments for older people. The Conference provided the opportunity to both discuss the necessity for a standardised approach to ...

  14. Can two established information models explain the information behaviour of visually impaired people seeking health and social care information?

    OpenAIRE

    Beverley, C.A.; Bath, P.A.; Barber, R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which two existing models of information behaviour could explain the information behaviour of visually impaired people seeking health and social care information.\\ud \\ud Design/methodology/approach – The research was conducted within a constructivist paradigm. A total of 28 semi-structured interviews (face-to-face or telephone) with 31 visually impaired people were conducted. Framework analysis was used to analyse the results.\\...

  15. Postdeployment health care for returning OEF/OIF military personnel and their social networks: a qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Erin P; Zeber, John E; Pugh, Mary Jo V; Cantu, Gabriela; Copeland, Laurel A; Parchman, Michael L; Noel, Polly H

    2010-12-01

    Little is known regarding the health care needs of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) deployed veterans seeking care outside of Veterans Affairs facilities. Responding to this gap, we conducted a mixed methods study of postdeployment health among veterans and members of their social networks in six community-based primary care clinics. A total of 347 patients completed a survey dealing with deployment to Iraq/Afghanistan (whether their own or that of a family member, friend, or coworker), and subsequent psychosocial and health problems. A subset of 52 participants responded to an open-ended question requesting additional information about experiences during and postdeployment. Content analysis of these responses revealed five overarching themes: connectedness, perceptions of conflict, consequences of deployment, health and treatment concerns, and respect and concern for service members/veterans. These data point to significant deployment-related disruptions in the well-being of service members and those in their broader social networks, with implications for defining service needs in community health settings.

  16. Hierarchies and cliques in the social networks of health care professionals: implications for the design of dissemination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, E; Barron, D N; Dowsett, J; Newton, J N

    1999-03-01

    Interest in how best to influence the behaviour of clinicians in the interests of both clinical and cost effectiveness has rekindled concern with the social networks of health care professionals. Ever since the seminal work of Coleman et al. [Coleman, J.S., Katz, E., Menzel, H., 1966. Medical Innovation: A Diffusion Study. Bobbs-Merrill, Indianapolis.], networks have been seen as important in the process by which clinicians adopt (or fail to adopt) new innovations in clinical practice. Yet very little is actually known about the social networks of clinicians in modern health care settings. This paper describes the professional social networks of two groups of health care professionals, clinical directors of medicine and directors of nursing, in hospitals in England. We focus on network density, centrality and centralisation because these characteristics have been linked to access to information, social influence and social control processes. The results show that directors of nursing are more central to their networks than clinical directors of medicine and that their networks are more hierarchical. Clinical directors of medicine tend to be embedded in much more densely connected networks which we describe as cliques. The hypotheses that the networks of directors of nursing are better adapted to gathering and disseminating information than clinical directors of medicine, but that the latter could be more potent instruments for changing, or resisting changes, in clinical behaviour, follow from a number of sociological theories. We conclude that professional socialisation and structural location are important determinants of social networks and that these factors could usefully be considered in the design of strategies to inform and influence clinicians.

  17. Facilitating LGBT Medical, Health and Social Care Content in Higher Education Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Zowie; Amsler, Sarah; Duncombe, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) health care is becoming an important quality assurance feature of primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare in Britain. While acknowledging these very positive developments, teaching LGBT curricula content is contingent upon having educators understand the complexity of LGBT lives. The…

  18. Professional monopoly, social covenant, and access to oral health care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Douglas K

    2003-10-01

    Lack of access to oral care is a severe problem in the United States with over one-third of the population lacking dental insurance. In this group, 32 million people lack dental insurance and access to public dental services (Medicaid or Medicare), and 7 million of them need dental care. In some high-risk populations, such as Native Americans, two-thirds have unmet dental needs. Only 1 percent of Medicaid-eligible babies have a dental examination before twelve months of age. In this paper the social covenant of the dental profession is examined and suggestions made for improving access to care through improved efficiency. It is proposed that 1) private dentists should accept 5 percent per annum of their patients for indigent care funded by improved efficiency from utilizing allied dental providers (ADP) in new roles, and 2) ADP should have their own independent state boards. If dentists refuse to honor their social covenant, then ADP should be allowed to practice independently, breaking the professional monopoly.

  19. Racial Differences in Associations of Perceived Health and Social and Physical Activities With Advance Care Planning, End-of-Life Concerns, and Hospice Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hyunjin; Kim, Junghyun; Sims, Omar T; Ji, Shaonin; Sawyer, Patricia

    2018-01-01

    Associations of perceived health and social and physical activities with end-of-life (EOL) issues have been rarely studied, not to mention racial disparities in such associations. To address this gap, this study examined racial differences in the associations of perceived health and levels of social and physical activities with advance care planning, EOL concerns, and knowledge of hospice care among community-dwelling older adults in Alabama. Data from a statewide survey of 1044 community-dwelling older adults on their long-term care needs were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic and linear regressions. Results showed that black older adults were less likely to know about or document advance care planning and to have accurate knowledge of hospice care; however, despite their poorer perceived health, black older adults reported fewer EOL concerns. Higher levels of perceived health and social and physical activities were associated with knowledge about advance care planning among white older adults but not among black older adults. Both black and white older adults with poorer perceived health and lower levels of social and physical activities tended to have more EOL concerns and less knowledge of hospice care. These findings suggest that interventions to address suboptimal levels of perceived health and social and physical activities among black older adults may increase knowledge of advance care planning. Also, supportive services to address EOL concerns should be targeted at older adults with poorer perceived health and limited participation in social and physical activities.

  20. Certification for vision impairment: researching perceptions, processes and practicalities in health and social care professionals and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, T; Leamon, Shaun; Slade, J; Simkiss, P; Rughani, S; Ghanchi, Faruque

    2014-04-08

    To explore the patient experience, and the role of ophthalmologists and other health and social care professionals in the certification and registration processes and examine the main barriers to the timely certification of patients. Qualitative study. Telephone interviews with health and social care professionals and patients in three areas in England. 43 health and social care professionals who are part of the certification or registration process. 46 patients certified as severely sight impaired (blind) or sight impaired (partially sighted) within the previous 12 months. Certification and registration are life changing for patients and the help they receive can substantially improve their lives. Despite this, ophthalmologists often found it difficult to ascertain when it is appropriate to certify patients, particularly for people with long-term conditions. Ophthalmologists varied in their comprehension of the certification process and many regarded certification as the 'final stage' in treatment. Administrative procedures meant the process of certification and registration could vary from a few weeks to many months. The avoidable delays in completing certification can be helped by Eye Clinic Liaison Officers (ECLO). A better understanding of the certification and registration processes can help improve standards of support and service provision for people who are severely sighted impaired or sight impaired. Better education and support are required for ophthalmologists in recognising the importance of timely referral for rehabilitative support through certification and registration. ECLOs can improve the process of certification and registration. Finally, better education is needed for patients on the benefits of certification and registration.

  1. Developing standards for an integrated approach to workplace facilitation for interprofessional teams in health and social care contexts: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anne; Manley, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Integration of health and social care forms part of health and social care policy in many countries worldwide in response to changing health and social care needs. The World Health Organization's appeal for systems to manage the global epidemiologic transition advocates for provision of care that crosses boundaries between primary, community, hospital, and social care. However, the focus on structural and process changes has not yielded the full benefit of expected advances in care delivery. Facilitating practice in the workplace is a widely recognised cornerstone for developments in the delivery of health and social care as collaborative and inclusive relationships enable frontline staff to develop effective workplace cultures that influence whether transformational change is achieved and maintained. Workplace facilitation embraces a number of different purposes which may not independently lead to better quality of care or improved patient outcomes. Holistic workplace facilitation of learning, development, and improvement supports the integration remit across health and social care systems and avoids duplication of effort and waste of valuable resources. To date, no standards to guide the quality and effectiveness of integrated facilitation have been published. This study aimed to identify key elements constitute standards for an integrated approach to facilitating work-based learning, development, improvement, inquiry, knowledge translation, and innovation in health and social care contexts using a three rounds Delphi survey of facilitation experts from 10 countries. Consensus about priority elements was determined in the final round, following an iteration process that involved modifications to validate content. The findings helped to identify key qualities and skills facilitators need to support interprofessional teams to flourish and optimise performance. Further research could evaluate the impact of skilled integrated facilitation on health and social care

  2. Social inequalities in causes of death amenable to health care in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Hem

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Investigate if there are educational inequalities in causes of death considered amenable to health care in Norway and compare this with non-amenable causes. Methods: The study used the concept of “amenable mortality”, which here includes 34 specific causes of death. A linked data file, with information from the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry and the Educational Registry was analyzed. The study population included the whole Norwegian population in two age groups of interest (25-49 and 50-74 years. Information on deaths was from the period 1990-2001. Education was recorded in 1990 and it was grouped in four categories as: basic, lower secondary, higher secondary and higher. In the study men and women were analysed seperately. The analysis was conducted for all amenable causes pooled with and without ischemic heart disease. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was fitted to estimate hazard rate ratios. Results: The study showed educational differences in mortality from causes of death considered amenable to health care, in both age groups and sexes. This was seen both when including and excluding ischemic heart disease. The effect sizes were comparable for amenable and non-amenable causes in both age groups and sexes. Conclusions: This study revealed systematic higher risk of death in lower educational groups in causes of death considered amenable to health care. This indicates potential weaknesses in equitable provision of health care for the Norwegian population. Additional research is needed to identify domains within the health care system of particular concern.

  3. Social class inequalities in the utilization of health care and preventive services in Spain, a country with a national health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Cumbrera, Marco; Borrell, Carme; Palència, Laia; Espelt, Albert; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Pasarín, M Isabel; Kunst, Anton

    2010-01-01

    In Spain, despite the existence of a National Health System (NHS), the utilization of some curative health services is related to social class. This study assesses (1) whether these inequalities are also observed for preventive health services and (2) the role of additional private health insurance for people of advantaged social classes. Using data from the Spanish National Health Survey of 2006, the authors analyze the relationships between social class and use of health services by means of Poisson regression models with robust variance, controlling for self-assessed health. Similar analyses were performed for waiting times for visits to a general practitioner (GP) and specialist. After controlling for self-perceived health, men and women from social classes IV-V had a higher probability of visiting the GP than other social classes, but a lower probability of visiting a specialist or dentist. No large class differences were observed in frequency of hospitalization or emergency services use, or in breast cancer screening or influenza vaccination; cervical cancer screening frequency was lower among women from social classes IV-V. The inequalities in specialist visits, dentist visits, and cervical cancer screening were larger among people with only NHS insurance than those with double health insurance. Social class differences in waiting times were observed for specialist visits, but not for GP visits. Men and women from social classes IV-V had longer waits for a specialist; this was most marked among people with only NHS insurance. Clearly, within the NHS, social class inequalities are still evident for some curative and preventive services. Further research is needed to identify the factors driving these inequalities and to tackle these factors from within the NHS. Priority areas include specialist services, dental care, and cervical cancer screening.

  4. A non-participant observational study of health and social care waste disposal behaviour in the South West of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzi, Sean; Nichols, Andrew; Richardson, Janet

    2014-10-01

    The National Health Service in England has a large carbon footprint. Waste production and disposal contributes to this carbon footprint and costs the National Health Service England over £82 million per annum. This study builds on existing work regarding health care waste management in the United Kingdom where the potential for recycling has begun to be studied. The study focuses on a private hospital and social care organizations, and provides a more detailed study of the behaviour of individuals across a variety of waste management systems. The study was an overt observational study at four health and social care sites in the South West of England. Systematic observations were made of the waste disposed of by employees in which the observer recorded: a description of the waste item; the bin into which the waste was placed; the type of employee who disposed of the waste; the material the waste comprised and the appropriateness of the disposal behaviour. The domestic waste bin was found to be most commonly used by employees to dispose of waste (51%), and the materials observed being disposed of most often were paper (26%), organic wastes (19%) and plastic (19%). There were significant differences between the four sites indicating that the activities performed at each site may have been influencing the waste being disposed of. It was concluded that the transfer of waste from the domestic waste stream to the recycling waste stream should be a central focus for the design of new health and social care waste management systems. Employees will require guidance and training in identifying and classifying waste materials for recycling. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Health care technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  6. Advancing Social Work Education for Health Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Robert H.; Ruth, Betty J.; Cox, Harold; Maramaldi, Peter; Rishel, Carrie; Rountree, Michele; Zlotnik, Joan; Marshall, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Social work education plays a critical role in preparing social workers to lead efforts that improve health. Because of the dynamic health care landscape, schools of social work must educate students to facilitate health care system improvements, enhance population health, and reduce medical costs. We reviewed the existing contributions of social work education and provided recommendations for improving the education of social workers in 6 key areas: aging, behavioral health, community health, global health, health reform, and health policy. We argue for systemic improvement in the curriculum at every level of education, including substantive increases in content in health, health care, health care ethics, and evaluating practice outcomes in health settings. Schools of social work can further increase the impact of the profession by enhancing the curricular focus on broad content areas such as prevention, health equity, population and community health, and health advocacy. PMID:29236540

  7. MEDNET: Telemedicine via Satellite Combining Improved Access to Health-Care Services with Enhanced Social Cohesion in Rural Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panopoulos, Dimitrios; Sachpazidis, Ilias; Rizou, Despoina; Menary, Wayne; Cardenas, Jose; Psarras, John

    Peru, officially classified as a middle-income country, has benefited from sustained economic growth in recent years. However, the benefits have not been seen by the vast majority of the population, particularly Peru's rural population. Virtually all of the nation's rural health-care centres are cut off from the rest of the country, so access to care for most people is not only difficult but also costly. MEDNET attempts to redress this issue by developing a medical health network with the help of the collaboration medical application based on TeleConsult & @HOME medical database for vital signs. The expected benefits include improved support for medics in the field, reduction of patient referrals, reduction in number of emergency interventions and improved times for medical diagnosis. An important caveat is the emphasis on exploiting the proposed infrastructure for education and social enterprise initiatives. The project has the full support of regional political and health authorities and, importantly, full local community support.

  8. Integrated homecare to bridge transition from health care to social services in EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    U), Sweden Correspondence to: T. Larsen, E-mail: tla@cast.sdu.dk Abstract  Purpose: The fragmented delivery of health and social services for large groups of patients with chronic conditions was put on the research agenda in 2002 by WHO. The FP7-IHC-project ( http://www.integratedhomecare.eu/) aims...... pressure declines 5-7 mm in your own home compared to a hospital environment which benefits limbic activity. 2) Stroke, COPD and congestive heart failure (HF) are selected as examples of IHC. Complementary trials and surveys are scheduled to consolidate a preliminary hypothesis of IHC as a health economic...

  9. Assistants' in nursing perceptions of their social place within mental health-care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Darrin; Frame, Nicholas; Brunero, Scott; Lamont, Scott; Joyce, Mark

    2015-10-01

    An international nurse shortage, tightening fiscal constraints, and increased service demands have seen health systems increasingly turn to employing assistants in nursing (AIN) as a cost-effective means to meet demand. This paper describes social positioning from the perspective of 11 AIN who were employed to work in specialist mental health settings in a metropolitan health service in Sydney. Data was collected by means of semistructured interviews. Interview questions encouraged AIN to explore their experience with reference to positioning within the service, role perception, role development, staff relationship, and role satisfaction. Thematic analysis was utilized to generate themes and explore meaning within the data. The following themes emerged: role definition and clarity; socialization and adaptation; and enhancing education. Analysis suggests that whilst AIN were integrated into mainstream service, the scope of activities or role remains geographically variable and inconsistent. Encouragingly, as AIN became familiar with their work environments and teams, they considered themselves to be of value and were able to play a meaningful role. A desire for learning and a need for continuing education also emerged as a primary theme. Findings from the data suggest that AIN in the mental health setting remain a novel and, to some extent, poorly utilized resource. © 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  10. The social stratification of older adults' preparations for end-of-life health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Deborah

    2012-09-01

    I use data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (n = 4,971) to evaluate the extent to which socioeconomic status affects three health-related (living will, durable power of attorney for health care, and discussions) and one financial (will) component of end-of-life planning. Net worth is positively associated with all four types of planning, after demographic, health, and psychological characteristics are controlled. Low rates of health-related planning among persons with low or negative assets are largely accounted for by the fact that they are less likely to execute a will, an action that triggers health-related preparations. Rates of health-related planning alone are higher among recently hospitalized persons, whereas financial planning only is more commonly done by homeowners and those with richer assets. The results suggest that economically advantaged persons engage in end-of-life planning as a two-pronged strategy entailing financial and health-related preparations. Implications for health policy, practice, and theory are discussed.

  11. [State of dental health of the population according to social status and satisfaction with medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymenko, V I; Smirnova, I V

    2014-01-01

    In the article is conducted assessment of the dental health of adults of Zaporozhye on the basis of epidemiological investigation. It is established that despite of the diversity of all diseases that were revealed during examination, adult population seeks dental help in the event of acute pain. It is shown, that there is dependence of level negotiability for dental help from social status, education and income.

  12. Facilitating LGBT medical, health and social care content in higher education teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Zowie Davy; Sarah Amsler; Karen Duncombe

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) health care is becoming an important quality assurance feature of primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare in Britain. While acknowledging these very positive developments, teaching LGBT curricula content is contingent upon having educators understand the complexity of LGBT lives. The study adopted a qualitative mixed method approach. The study investigated how and in what ways barriers and facilitators of providing LGBT medical, ...

  13. Facilitating LGBT medical, health and social care content in higher education teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Zowie Davy; Sarah Amsler; Karen Duncombe

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) health care is becoming an important quality assurance feature of primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare in Britain. While acknowledging these very positive developments, teaching LGBT curricula content is contingent upon having educators understand the complexity of LGBT lives. The study adopted a qualitative mixed method approach. The study investigated how and in what ways barriers and facilitators of providing LGBT medica...

  14. Useful tool for general practitioners, home health care nurses and social workers in assessing determinants of the health status and treatment of patients visited in their homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Brodziak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The necessity is emphasized to distinguish between the traditional model of data acquisition reported by a patient in doctor’s office and the more valuable and desired model to become acquainted with the core of the problem by going to a patient’s domicile. In the desired model it is possible to come across various determinants of health during home visits. Family members can be approached and there is a possibility to evaluate the relationships between the patient and his loved ones. One can visually assess one’s living conditions and predictable environmental hazard. For several years, the desired model has been put into practice by general practitioners and home health care nurses. Recently this model is also promoted by “health care therapists” who are members of “teams of home health care”. The authors, being convinced of the merits of “home and environmental model” of practical medicine, have developed a method of recording and illustrating data collected during visits in patient’s home. The elaborated tool helps to communicate and exchange information among general practitioners, home health care nurses, social workers of primary health care centers and specialists. The method improves the formulation of the plan of further therapeutic steps and remedial interventions in psycho-social relations and living conditions of patients.

  15. Locally Based Research and Development Units as Knowledge Brokers and Change Facilitators in Health and Social Care of Older People in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Monica Elisabeth; Hansson, Johan; Garvare, Rickard; Andersson-Bäck, Monica

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the role of locally based research and development units (R&Ds) focusing on health and social services. Nearly 300 local R&Ds are funded by the Swedish government with the intention to facilitate knowledge transfer and development of high quality and effective health and social care organisations. Based on…

  16. Social responsibility, politics, and fiscal viability: strategic issues in the development of a regional health care system for children in South Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K R; Stefl, M E

    1994-01-01

    A case study of the proposed development of a regional children's health care system in South Texas is described. Strategic plans for the system are overviewed and the community response to plans are presented. The political, social responsibility and fiscal viability issues raised are reviewed and the research literature base relevant to the health care needs of a key (Hispanic) market is summarized.

  17. Good practice in mental health care for socially marginalised groups in Europe: a qualitative study of expert views in 14 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priebe, Stefan; Matanov, Aleksandra; Schor, Ruth; Straßmayr, Christa; Barros, Henrique; Barry, Margaret M.; Díaz-Olalla, José Manuel; Gabor, Edina; Greacen, Tim; Holcnerová, Petra; Kluge, Ulrike; Lorant, Vincent; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Schene, Aart H.; Macassa, Gloria; Gaddini, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Background: Socially marginalised groups tend to have higher rates of mental disorders than the general population and can be difficult to engage in health care. Providing mental health care for these groups represents a particular challenge, and evidence on good practice is required. This study

  18. The health care system as a social determinant of health: qualitative insights from South Australian maternity consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Lareen A

    2009-02-01

    Health systems and policies are important determinants of health because they influence the type and quality of health care available to a population. This study included semi-structured qualitative interviews and a questionnaire to collect demographic data and household details for a purposeful sample of 38 mothers and 24 fathers from four socioeconomic areas of metropolitan South Australia who had at least one child aged between 1 and 6 years of age. The participants reported that birth experiences within the predominantly medicalised maternity system were at odds with the expectations of a significant proportion of contemporary consumers that maternity care will leave them not only with a healthy mother and baby, but also with no undue adverse impacts on their physical, mental and relationship health. There appears to be no formal mechanism in place for regular consumer feedback of experiences into system and service planning.

  19. Specialty, political affiliation, and perceived social responsibility are associated with U.S. physician reactions to health care reform legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiel, Ryan M; James, Katherine M; Egginton, Jason S; Sheeler, Robert D; Liebow, Mark; Goold, Susan Dorr; Tilburt, Jon C

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about how U.S. physicians’ political affiliations, specialties, or sense of social responsibility relate to their reactions to health care reform legislation. To assess U.S. physicians’ impressions about the direction of U.S. health care under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), whether that legislation will make reimbursement more or less fair, and examine how those judgments relate to political affiliation and perceived social responsibility. A cross-sectional, mailed, self-reported survey. Simple random sample of 3,897 U.S.physicians. Views on the ACA in general, reimbursement under the ACA in particular, and perceived social responsibility. Among 2,556 physicians who responded (RR2: 65 %), approximately two out of five (41 %) believed that the ACA will turn U.S. health care in the right direction and make physician reimbursement less fair (44 %). Seventy-two percent of physicians endorsed a general professional obligation to address societal health policy issues, 65 % agreed that every physician is professionally obligated to care for the uninsured or underinsured, and half (55 %) were willing to accept limits on coverage for expensive drugs and procedures for the sake of expanding access to basic health care. In multivariable analyses, liberals and independents were both substantially more likely to endorse the ACA (OR 33.0 [95 % CI, 23.6–46.2]; OR 5.0 [95 % CI, 3.7–6.8], respectively), as were physicians reporting a salary (OR 1.7 [95 % CI, 1.2–2.5])or salary plus bonus (OR 1.4 [95 % CI, 1.1–1.9)compensation type. In the same multivariate models, those who agreed that addressing societal health policy issues are within the scope of their professional obligations (OR 1.5 [95 % CI, 1.0–2.0]), who believe physicians are professionally obligated to care for the uninsured / under-insured (OR 1.7 [95 % CI,1.3–2.4]), and who agreed with limiting coverage for expensive drugs and procedures to expand insurance coverage (OR 2.3 [95 % CI, 1.8

  20. Importance of Health and Social Care Research into Gender and Sexual Minority Populations in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Pramod R; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2015-11-01

    Despite progressive legislative developments and increased visibility of sexual and gender minority populations in the general population, mass media often report that this population face a wide range of discrimination and inequalities. LGBT (lesbian, gay, and bisexual, and transgender) populations have not been considered as priority research populations in Nepal. Research in other geographical settings has shown an increased risk of poor mental health, violence, and suicide and higher rates of smoking, as well as alcohol and drugs use among LGBT populations. They are also risk for lifestyle-related illness such as cancer, diabetes, and heart diseases. Currently, in Nepal, there is a lack of understanding of health and well-being, social exclusion, stigma, and discrimination as experienced by these populations. Good-quality public health research can help design and implement targeted interventions to the sexual and gender minority populations of Nepal. © 2015 APJPH.

  1. Perception and fulfillment of cancer patients' nursing professional social support needs: from the health care personnel point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jingfang; Song, Yongxia; Liu, Jingjing; Wang, Weili; Wang, Wenru

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to (1) explore the needs of cancer patients regarding common nursing professional social support from the perspective of physicians and nurses, (2) identify what type of needs clinical nurses actually fulfill and what remains to be improved, and (3) analyze the potential reasons for the gap between the identified needs and those that are fulfilled. A qualitative approach using focus group interviews was adopted to explore the perception and provision of cancer patients' needs regarding nursing professional social support. A purposive sample of 32 health care professionals was recruited from two teaching hospitals in Anhui province, China. Five focus group interviews were conducted and all interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. A content analysis was performed with the data. The healthcare professionals perceived various nursing professional support needs of cancer patients; these include informational, emotional/psychological, and technical support needs; the mobilization of social resources; and palliative care during certain stages. The findings also indicated that there are still many unmet needs, especially needs related to the mobilization of social resources and palliative care. The reasons for the deficiencies in the fulfillment of these needs varied and included both subjective and objective aspects, such as the patients' lack of awareness of how to search for professional support, a shortage of professional staff, and the lack of a culturally appropriate assessment tool. Cancer patients' supportive care needs were not always fully provided by nurses, even when these needs were identified by healthcare professionals. Nursing professional social support needs should be assessed quickly and effectively so that the appropriate interventions can be offered to cancer patients.

  2. The Association of Workplace Social Capital With Work Engagement of Employees in Health Care Settings: A Multilevel Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Sumiko; Kawakami, Norito; Ando, Emiko; Inoue, Akiomi; Tsuno, Kanami; Kurioka, Sumiko; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the cross-sectional multilevel association between unit-level workplace social capital and individual-level work engagement among employees in health care settings. The data were collected from employees of a Japanese health care corporation using a questionnaire. The analyses were limited to 440 respondents from 35 units comprising five or more respondents per unit. Unit-level workplace social capital was calculated as an average score of the Workplace Social Capital Scale for each unit. Multilevel regression analysis with a random intercept model was conducted. After adjusting for demographic variables, unit-level workplace social capital was significantly and positively associated with respondents' work engagement (P social capital (P social capital might exert a positive contextual effect on work engagement of employees in health care settings.

  3. Tailoring Care to Vulnerable Populations by Incorporating Social Determinants of Health: the Veterans Health Administration's "Homeless Patient Aligned Care Team" Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Toole, Thomas P; Johnson, Erin E; Aiello, Riccardo; Kane, Vincent; Pape, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    .... We correlated site-specific health care performance data for the 3,543 homeless veterans enrolled in the program from October 2013 through March 2014, including those receiving ambulatory or acute...

  4. A Disproportionate Burden of Care: Gender Differences in Mental Health, Health-Related Quality of Life, and Social Support in Mexican Multiple Sclerosis Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Paul B; Panyavin, Ivan; Morlett Paredes, Alejandra; Aguayo, Adriana; Macias, Miguel Angel; Rabago, Brenda; Picot, Sandra J Fulton; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) rates in Latin America are increasing, and caregivers there experience reduced mental and physical health. Based on rigid gender roles in Latin America, women more often assume caregiving duties, yet the differential impact on women of these duties is unknown. This study examined gender differences in mental health (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Zarit Burden Inventory), health-related quality of life (HRQOL; Short Form-36), and social support (Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-12) in 81 (66.7% women) Mexican MS caregivers. As compared to men caregivers, women had lower mental health (p = 0.006), HRQOL (p social support (p America influence women to assume more substantial caregiving duties, MS caregiver interventions in Latin America-particularly for women caregivers-should address the influence of gender-role conformity on care and psychosocial functioning.

  5. Internet and Social Media For Health-Related Information and Communication in Health Care: Preferences of the Dutch General Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, T.H. van de; Engelen, L.J.; Berben, S.A.A.; Teerenstra, S.; Samsom, M.; Schoonhoven, L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health care is increasingly featured by the use of Web 2.0 communication and collaborative technologies that are reshaping the way patients and professionals interact. These technologies or tools can be used for a variety of purposes: to instantly debate issues, discover news, analyze

  6. [The Hospital, patients, health and territories Act and the recentralisation of the social and long term care sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, Alain; Muñoz, Jorge; Hudebine, Hervé

    2017-07-10

    Hypothesis: The 2009 Hospital, Patients, Health and Territories Act crystallises a central government attempt to regain control over the social and long term care sector, which involves the utilisation of policy instruments borrowed from the hospital sector: capped budgets, agreements on targets and resources, competitive tendering or quasi-market mechanisms involving hospitals and services, etc. This paper is therefore based on the hypothesis of a recentralisation and healthicization of the social and long term care sector, with a key role for the regional health authorities. Method and data: 27 semi-structured interviews were conducted with actors operating within and outside the regional health agencies and thereafter analysed using Alceste. The aim was to describe and to analyse the positioning of the RHAs in relation to key actors of the social and long-term care sector in 2 regions in 2011. Results: Key issues for public organisations include the style of planning and knowhow transfer, while the professionals were chiefly concerned with the intensity of the ambulatory turn and needs analysis methodology. The compromises forged were related to types of democratic legitimacy, namely representative or participatory democracy. Conclusion: There is little evidence to support the initial hypothesis, namely the existence of a link between the creation of RHAs and a recentralisation of health policy between 2009 and 2013. One may rather suggest that a reconfiguration of the activities and resources of the actors operating at the centre (RHAs and conseils départementaux) and at the periphery (territorial units of the RHAs and third sector umbrella organisations) has occurred.

  7. The Role of Social Work in Providing Mental Health Services and Care Coordination in an Urban Trauma Center Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Megan; Whiteside, Lauren K; Dotolo, Danae; Wang, Jin; Ho, Leyna; Conley, Bonnie; Forrester, Mollie; Fouts, Susan O; Vavilala, Monica S; Zatzick, Douglas F

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the role of emergency department (ED) social workers and identified predictors of receipt of social work services and length of ED stay. Comprehensive reviews were conducted of medical records of all patients (N=49,354) treated in a level 1 trauma center ED from January 1, 2012, to March 31, 2013. Content analysis of chart notes was used to categorize the types of social work services provided. Poisson regression was used to assess associations between demographic and clinical characteristics, receipt of social work services, and length of ED stay. Social work services were provided to 18,532 (38%) patients. Most were mental health services (54%), followed by care coordination (31%) and material support or other referrals (15%). Patients seen by social workers had complex presentations, involving mental disorder diagnoses (18%), substance use disorder diagnoses (29%), comorbid diagnoses (32%), and injuries (51%); a quarter of patients had multiple ED visits (26%). In adjusted regression analysis, females (relative risk [RR]=1.15), patients not discharged home (RR=1.44), and those with two or more comorbid diagnoses (RR=1.80), injuries due to assault (RR=1.37), and traumatic brain injury (RR=1.20) were more likely to receive social work services. Such services were associated with an increased length of ED stay (RR=1.34). Social workers provided services to patients with multifaceted needs resulting from complex presentations. Provision of social work services modestly increased length of ED stay. Triage algorithms are needed to target efficiencies, systematize provision of ED social work services, and improve access to services for all patients.

  8. Social support network, mental health and quality of life: a cross-sectional study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugal, Flávia Batista; Campos, Mônica Rodrigues; Correia, Celina Ragoni; Gonçalves, Daniel Almeida; Ballester, Dinarte; Tófoli, Luis Fernando; Mari, Jair de Jesus; Gask, Linda; Dowrick, Christopher; Bower, Peter; Fortes, Sandra

    2016-12-22

    The objective of this study was to identify the association between emotional distress and social support networks with quality of life in primary care patients. This was a cross-sectional study involving 1,466 patients in the cities of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2009/2010. The General Health Questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the brief version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument were used. The Social Support Network Index classified patients with the highest and lowest index as socially integrated or isolated. A bivariate analysis and four multiple linear regressions were conducted for each quality of life outcome. The means scores for the physical, psychological, social relations, and environment domains were, respectively, 64.7; 64.2; 68.5 and 49.1. In the multivariate analysis, the psychological domain was negatively associated with isolation, whereas the social relations and environment domains were positively associated with integration. Integration and isolation proved to be important factors for those in emotional distress as they minimize or maximize negative effects on quality of life.

  9. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vaccine for their children. journal of. COMMUNITY HEALTH. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26(2) 46-58. Correspondence to: Ijadunola M.Y. Department of Community Health, Faculty of Clinical Sciences,. College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University,.

  10. Social representations elaborated by nurses about climacteric women in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smithanny Barros da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : to understand the social representations elaborated by nurses from the family health strategy concerning the assistance to climacteric women. Methods : qualitative research conducted with 28 nurses. One adopted the reference of procedural approach of the theory of social representations. The interviews were recorded and transcribed completely and processed by the Software of Lexical Analysis of co-occurrence in simple statements of a text, version 4.7. Results: nurses recognize the menopause as a phase of women’s life that needs to be assisted in its entirety, however, they showed difficulty in helping them, as they just carry out the cytological examination collection, request laboratory tests and forward them to a doctor. Conclusion: the climacteric period is a multifaceted phenomenon and the assistance to those people should be systematized from a qualified listening, in an approach that respects its uniqueness and autonomy.

  11. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  12. Independent effects of socioeconomic and psychological social determinants of health on self-care and outcomes in Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rebekah J; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Egede, Leonard E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the independent effects of socioeconomic and psychological social determinants of health on diabetes knowledge, self-care, diabetes outcomes and quality of life. Cross-sectional sample of 615 adults from two adult primary care clinics in the southeastern United States. Primary outcome variables were diabetes knowledge, self-care behaviors (diet, exercise, medication adherence, blood sugar testing, foot care) and diabetes outcomes (HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein, blood pressure, physical component summary score of SF12 quality of life, mental component summary score of SF12 quality of life). Covariates included age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, health literacy and comorbidity. Linear regression models were used to assess independent associations controlling for covariates. In final adjusted models, significant associations for HbA1c included education [β = -0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): -1.36 to -0.08], income (β = -0.66, CI: -1.30 to -0.16), self-efficacy (β = -0.12, CI: -0.15 to -0.08) and diabetes distress (β = 0.43, CI: 0.14 to 0.72). Significant associations for self-care included medication adherence with diabetes distress (β = -0.58, CI: -0.91 to -0.25) and perceived stress (β = -0.12, CI: -0.18 to -0.05) and exercise with depression (β = -0.06, CI: -0.10 to -0.01) and self-efficacy (β = 0.06, CI: 0.01 to 0.10). Significant associations for quality of life included depression (β = -0.08, CI: -0.12 to -0.03), serious psychological distress (β = -0.09, CI: -0.12 to -0.05), social support (β = 0.01, CI: 0.001 to 0.02) and perceived stress (β = -0.12, CI: -0.19 to -0.06). Social determinants of health were significantly associated with diabetes self-care and outcomes with socioeconomic factors being most often associated with diabetes outcomes and psychological factors, specifically self-efficacy and perceived stress being most often associated with self-care and quality of life. Copyright

  13. Health and legal literacy for migrants: twinned strands woven in the cloth of social justice and the human right to health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissandjée, Bilkis; Short, Wendy E; Bates, Karine

    2017-04-13

    Based on an analysis of published literature, this paper provides an over-view of the challenges associated with delivering on the right to access quality health care for international migrants to industrialized countries, and asks which group of professionals is best equipped to provide services that increase health and legal literacy. Both rights and challenges are approached from a social justice perspective with the aim of identifying opportunities to promote greater health equity. That is, to go beyond the legal dictates enshrined in principles of equality, and target as an ethical imperative a situation where all migrants receive the particular assistance they need to overcome the barriers that inhibit their equitable access to health care. This assistance is especially important for migrant groups that are further disadvantaged by differing cultural constructions of gender. Viewing the topic from this perspective makes evident a gap in both research literature and policy. The review has found that while health literacy is debated and enshrined as a policy objective, and consideration is given to improving legal literacy as a means of challenging social injustice in developing nations, however, no discussion has been identified that considers assisting migrants to gain legal literacy as a step toward achieving not only health literacy and improved health outcomes, but critical participation as members of their adoptive society. Increasing migrant health literacy, amalgamated with legal literacy, aids migrants to better access their human right to appropriate care, which in turn demonstrably assists in increasing social engagement, citizenship and productivity. However what is not evident in the literature, is which bureaucratic or societal group holds responsibility for assisting migrants to develop critical citizenship literacy skills. This paper proposes that a debate is required to determine both who is best placed to provide services that increase health

  14. Ethnic health care advisors: a good strategy to improve the access to health care and social welfare services for ethnic minorities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, Arlette E; Verhoeff, Arnoud P; Stronks, Karien

    2009-10-01

    Empirical studies indicate that ethnic minorities have limited access to health care and welfare services compared with the host population. To improve this access, ethnic health care (HC) advisors were introduced in four districts in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. HC advisors work for all health care and welfare services and their main task is to provide information on health care and welfare to individuals and groups and refer individuals to services. Action research was carried out over a period of 2 years to find out whether and how this function can contribute to improve access to services for ethnic minorities. Information was gathered by semi-structured interviews, analysing registration forms and reports, and attending meetings. The function's implementation and characteristics differed per district. The ethnicity of the health care advisors corresponded to the main ethnic groups in the district: Moroccan and Turkish (three districts) and sub-Sahara African and Surinamese (one district). HC advisors reached many ethnic inhabitants (n = 2,224) through individual contacts. Half of them were referred to health care and welfare services. In total, 576 group classes were given. These were mostly attended by Moroccan and Turkish females. Outreach activities and office hours at popular locations appeared to be important characteristics for actually reaching ethnic minorities. Furthermore, direct contact with a well-organized back office seems to be important. HC advisors were able to reach many ethnic minorities, provide information about the health care and welfare system, and refer them to services. Besides adapting the function to the local situation, some general aspects for success can be indicated: the ethnic background of the HC advisor should correspond to the main ethnic minority groups in the district, HC advisors need to conduct outreach work, there must be a well-organized back office to refer clients to, and there needs to be enough commitment among

  15. ‘Making every contact count’: evaluation of the impact of an intervention to train health and social care practitioners in skills to support health behaviour change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christina; Tinati, Tannaze; Cradock, Sue; Begum, Rufia; Jarman, Megan; Pease, Anna; Margetts, Barrie; Davies, Jenny; Inskip, Hazel; Cooper, Cyrus; Baird, Janis; Barker, Mary

    2015-01-01

    A total of 148 health and social care practitioners were trained in skills to support behaviour change: creating opportunities to discuss health behaviours, using open discovery questions, listening, reflecting and goal-setting. At three time points post-training, use of the skills was evaluated and compared with use of skills by untrained practitioners. Trained practitioners demonstrated significantly greater use of these client-centred skills to support behaviour change compared to their untrained peers up to one year post-training. Because it uses existing services to deliver support for behaviour change, this training intervention has the potential to improve public health at relatively low cost. PMID:24713156

  16. [Social support and cardiovascular health: Adaptation of a social support scale for hypertensive and diabetic patients in primary care, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, Fernando; Glasinovic, Andrés; Sapag, Jaime; Barticevic, Nicolás; Arenas, Artzy; Padilla, Oslando

    2015-10-01

    Validate an instrument to measure the Perceived Social Support in outpatients who are in treatment to hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus ii. Observational and exploratory design with mixed methods, qualitative and quantitative. Two community health centers from the municipality of Puente Alto (Santiago, Chile). Hypertensive and/or diabetic patients between 18 and 65 years old. A purposive sample was undertaken for the qualitative study, and a random sample for the final survey. Focus groups and semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore the constructs of social support as perceived by patients. According to expert opinion and literature review, a scale of social support was selected and a pilot study was conducted in 40 patients, then we interviewed in depth to some of those participants. The instrument was modified according the results of this process. The final version was applied to 250 participants. The construct existence was verified in the population. In the adaptation, one item was eliminated. The alpha of Cronbach was 0.89 and the factorial analysis had the same four factors from the original study. Nine new items obtained from the focal groups were added to the instrument, obtaining an alpha of Cronbach of 0.92. The final instrument has good psychometric proprieties, and is applicable in our population. The additional items from the qualitative study improve its internal consistency, but don't add new information about Perceived Social Support. This is consistent with other studies, and suggests the application of the original version of the instrument. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Perspectives on enhancing international practical training of students in health and social care study programs - A qualitative descriptive case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvalič-Touzery, Simona; Hopia, Hanna; Sihvonen, Sanna; Diwan, Sadhna; Sen, Soma; Skela-Savič, Brigita

    2017-01-01

    Internationalization of practical training in health and social care study programs is an important aspect of higher education. However, field mentors' and classroom teachers' competence in guiding culturally diverse students varies widely in European countries, and the majority does not have enough training in guiding foreign students. This study aimed to examine which factors enhance the efficacy of international practical placement experiences in health and social care study programs. A qualitative descriptive case study design was used. The study was conducted at six higher education institutions-two in Finland and one in Croatia, Estonia, the Netherlands and Slovenia. A convenience sample of 14 mentors, 15 teachers and 14 students with international experiences from six higher education institutions which are part of the Bologna Process was recruited. The data were collected from six focus groups using a semi-structured questionnaire based on a literature review. Each higher education institution conducted one group interview that was tape-recorded, transcribed and analysed for themes. Participants made several recommendations for enhancing the practical placement experience of students, teachers, and mentors. Most recommendations dealt with practical supervision of students. Three major themes noted were: 'Attitudes towards internationalization of practical placements', 'Factors impacting the international placement experience', and 'Pedagogical methods used and structural support available for internationalization.' The study highlights the need for strengthening the multicultural knowledge and skills of mentors and teachers. The findings provide practical guidelines for improving the international placement experience across health and social care fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. VIRTEx project aims to promote long term health and improve social care. Virtual extra care project develops the potential of telehealthcare to provide community-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Steve

    2009-03-01

    Funded by the Technology Strategy Boards Assisted Living Innovation Platform, the VIRTEx project aims to develop the potential of telehealthcare to provide community-based care and increased social activity, inclusion and support for the growing number of people with long-term needs.

  19. Trends in social class inequalities in the use of health care services within the Spanish National Health System, 1993-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palència, Laia; Espelt, Albert; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Rocha, Katia B; Pasarín, M Isabel; Borrell, Carme

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the trends and socio-economic inequalities in the use of health care services in Spain between 1993 and 2006. A study of trends was performed using data from six Spanish National Health Surveys (1993, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2003 and 2006). Sample sizes were 21,061; 6,396; 6,396; 21,066; 21,650 and 29,478, respectively. The following dependent variables were analysed: having visited a general practitioner (GP) or specialist in the previous 2 weeks, having visited a dentist within the previous 3 months and having visited a gynaecologist, having used the emergency services or having been hospitalised in the previous year. The main independent variable was social class, classified as manual or non-manual occupation. For each service, age-standardised proportions of use were calculated by survey year, sex and social class, and indices of relative (RII) and absolute (SII) inequality were computed. Trend tests were applied. An increase in the proportion of use was observed for all services, particularly emergency services. Individuals from manual classes were more likely to visit the GP and emergency services than those from non-manual classes. Conversely, those from non-manual classes were more likely to use specialised services. This trend was most notable for dentist visits. Social inequalities did not change significantly during the study period. Despite the increase in the use of health care services, the relationship between social class and the use of these services has remained stable throughout the study period. Achieving equity in the use of specialised care services is still a challenge for universal health care systems.

  20. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COMMUNITY HEALTH. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. KEYWORDS ABSTRACT. Correspondence to: Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26 (2) 1-6. Facility User's Preference between the Free and the Bamako. Initiative (Drug Revolving Fund-Based) Health Services in Iwajowa Local Government, Oyo ...

  1. Oral health: equity and social determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwan, Stella; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter discusses the social determinants of oral health, and identifies interventions that have been, or can be, used in addressing oral health inequities (e.g. oral health promotion, education programmes, improving access to oral health care)....

  2. [Health care systems and aspects of health care economics. Sector ophthalmology - part 1: development of the German health care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, T; Kohnen, T

    2010-11-01

    Although many health care reforms have been enacted in the last few years in Germany, many of the key points in the current social health care system have been retained from former times. All those introductions for an effective health care system from the last 150 years beginning with mandatory guild membership via Bismarck's social laws to the modern health care systems in Germany with the current problems of financing the heavy burden in the German budget are reported. Data and facts on the current health care system are provided. In the following two articles of this series ambulatory and inpatient treatment in the light of economic aspects of health care are reported.

  3. Recommendations for improving the end-of-life care system for homeless populations: A qualitative study of the views of Canadian health and social services professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeil Ryan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeless populations have complex and diverse end-of-life care needs. However, they typically die outside of the end-of-life care system. To date, few studies have explored barriers to the end-of-life care system for homeless populations. This qualitative study involving health and social services professionals from across Canada sought to identify barriers to the end-of-life care system for homeless populations and generate recommendations to improve their access to end-of-life care. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 54 health and social services professionals involved in end-of-life care services delivery to homeless persons in six Canadian cities (Halifax, Hamilton, Ottawa, Thunder Bay, Toronto and Winnipeg. Participants included health administrators, physicians, nurses, social workers, harm reduction specialists, and outreach workers. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Results Participants identified key barriers to end-of-life care services for homeless persons, including: (1 insufficient availability of end-of-life care services; (2 exclusionary operating procedures; and, (3 poor continuity of care. Participants identified recommendations that they felt had the potential to minimize these barriers, including: (1 adopting low-threshold strategies (e.g. flexible behavioural policies and harm reduction strategies; (2 linking with population-specific health and social care providers (e.g. emergency shelters; and, (3 strengthening population-specific training. Conclusions Homeless persons may be underserved by the end-of-life care system as a result of barriers that they face to accessing end-of-life care services. Changes in the rules and regulations that reflect the health needs and circumstances of homeless persons and measures to improve continuity of care have the potential to increase equity in the end-of-life care system for this

  4. From E-Learning to Social Learning--A Health Care Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajli, Mahmood; Bugshan, Hatem; Lin, Xiaolin; Featherman, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The emergence of Web 2.0 opened a new route for education to use the values derived from this development. The future of e-learning is social learning, where individuals can learn online due to the facility of social media. Social media such as online communities are places for social interactions between users. These social interactions…

  5. Health care operations management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, M.W.; Hans, Elias W.; Kolisch, R.

    2012-01-01

    Health care operations management has become a major topic for health care service providers and society. Operations research already has and further will make considerable contributions for the effective and efficient delivery of health care services. This special issue collects seven carefully

  6. Do income effects mask social and behavioural factors when looking at universal health care provision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabates, Ricardo; Feinstein, Leon

    2008-01-01

    To investigate whether permanent and transitory income effects mask the impact of unobservable factors on the uptake of health check-ups in Britain. We used a secondary data representative of the British population, the British Household Panel Survey. Outcome variables included uptake of dental health check-ups, eyesight tests, blood pressure checks, cholesterol tests, mammograms and cervical smear tests. Transitory income was measured as monthly household income and permanent income as average income over 13 years. Estimation method applied dynamic random effect probit model. Results showed the absence of permanent and transitory effects on the uptake of eyesight tests, cholesterol tests, mammograms and cervical smear tests. Permanent income was associated with dental check-ups and transitory income with uptake of blood pressure tests. The presence of income effects on the uptake of blood pressure checks may be due to factors associated with income, such as stress or lifestyles, rather than income per se. A permanent income effect on dental health care in Britain, which is not free of charge, could indicate the possibility of economic constraints to service uptake, but it does not guarantee that income is the only factor that matters as there may important cultural and behavioural barriers.

  7. Public Perceptions Regarding Use of Virtual Reality in Health Care: A Social Media Content Analysis Using Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hannah J; Cunningham, Maria Elena; Fouladian, Joshua Eleazar; Chen, Michelle; Spiegel, Brennan Mason Ross

    2017-01-01

    Background Virtual reality (VR) technology provides an immersive environment that enables users to have modified experiences of reality. VR is increasingly used to manage patients with pain, disability, obesity, neurologic dysfunction, anxiety, and depression. However, public opinion regarding the use of VR in health care has not been explored. Understanding public opinion of VR is critical to ensuring effective implementation of this emerging technology. Objective This study aimed to examine public opinion about health care VR using social listening, a method that allows for the exploration of unfiltered views of topics discussed on social media and online forums. Methods In March 2016, NBC News produced a video depicting the use of VR for patient care. The video was repackaged by NowThis, a social media news website, and distributed on Facebook by Upworthy, a news aggregator, yielding 4.3 million views and 2401 comments. We used Microsoft Excel Power Query and ATLAS.ti software (version 7.5, Scientific Software Development) to analyze the comments using content analysis and categorized the comments around first-, second-, and third-order concepts. We determined self-identified gender from the user’s Facebook page and performed sentiment analysis of the language to analyze whether the perception of VR differed by gender using a Pearson’s chi-square test. Results Out of the 1614 analyzable comments, 1021 (63.26%) were attributed to female Facebook users, 572 (35.44%) to male users, and 21 (1.30%) to users of unknown gender. There were 1197 comments coded as expressing a positive perception about VR (74.16%), 251 coded as expressing a negative perception and/or concern (15.56%), and 560 coded as neutral (34.70%). Informants identified 20 use cases for VR in health care, including the use of VR for pain and stress reduction; bed-bound individuals; women during labor; and patients undergoing chemotherapy, dialysis, radiation, or imaging procedures. Negative

  8. Public Perceptions Regarding Use of Virtual Reality in Health Care: A Social Media Content Analysis Using Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Michelle Sophie; Park, Hannah J; Cunningham, Maria Elena; Fouladian, Joshua Eleazar; Chen, Michelle; Spiegel, Brennan Mason Ross

    2017-12-19

    Virtual reality (VR) technology provides an immersive environment that enables users to have modified experiences of reality. VR is increasingly used to manage patients with pain, disability, obesity, neurologic dysfunction, anxiety, and depression. However, public opinion regarding the use of VR in health care has not been explored. Understanding public opinion of VR is critical to ensuring effective implementation of this emerging technology. This study aimed to examine public opinion about health care VR using social listening, a method that allows for the exploration of unfiltered views of topics discussed on social media and online forums. In March 2016, NBC News produced a video depicting the use of VR for patient care. The video was repackaged by NowThis, a social media news website, and distributed on Facebook by Upworthy, a news aggregator, yielding 4.3 million views and 2401 comments. We used Microsoft Excel Power Query and ATLAS.ti software (version 7.5, Scientific Software Development) to analyze the comments using content analysis and categorized the comments around first-, second-, and third-order concepts. We determined self-identified gender from the user's Facebook page and performed sentiment analysis of the language to analyze whether the perception of VR differed by gender using a Pearson's chi-square test. Out of the 1614 analyzable comments, 1021 (63.26%) were attributed to female Facebook users, 572 (35.44%) to male users, and 21 (1.30%) to users of unknown gender. There were 1197 comments coded as expressing a positive perception about VR (74.16%), 251 coded as expressing a negative perception and/or concern (15.56%), and 560 coded as neutral (34.70%). Informants identified 20 use cases for VR in health care, including the use of VR for pain and stress reduction; bed-bound individuals; women during labor; and patients undergoing chemotherapy, dialysis, radiation, or imaging procedures. Negative comments expressed concerns about radiation

  9. Representación social de los prestadores de servicios de salud sobre la discapacidad motriz Social representation of health care providers on motor disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Díaz Llanes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El conocimiento de las representaciones sociales de los prestadores de servicios de salud constituye un insumo básico para la comprensión de la relación que éstos establecen con sus pacientes. Objetivo: caracterizar la representación social de los prestadores de servicios de salud sobre los individuos en situación de discapacidad motriz. Métodos: se realizó un estudio de caso en el que participaron 33 informantes clave del policlínico "Hermanos Ruíz Aboy", del municipio Sal Miguel del Padrón, en el período de enero a junio de 2012, escogidos por muestreo intencional. Se emplearon como técnicas de indagación la asociación libre de palabras y la entrevista a profundidad. Resultados: la representación de los prestadores de servicio sobre la discapacidad motriz estuvo influenciada por sus conocimientos generales, su estado afectivo, su formación profesional, sus vivencias personales y su entorno inmediato. Conclusiones: el estudio reveló la existencia en los prestadores de servicios de salud de una representación esperanzadora que emerge de la configuración de elementos provenientes de referentes experienciales, componentes afectivos e insumos informacionales relacionados con las personas en situación de discapacidad motriz.Background: the knowledge by social representations about the service that health care providers give in different health services constitutes a basic aid for the comprehension of the relation that they establish with their patients. Objective: to characterize the social representation of health care providers on individuals presenting motor disability. Methods: a case study with the participation of 33 key informants of "Hermanos Ruíz Aboy" Polyclinic in San Miguel del Padrón Municipality was performed during the time period from January to June 2012. The informants were selected by intentional sampling. The research techniques applied were the free word association and the deep interview

  10. Global Health Policy and Access to Care: Investigating Patient Choice on an International Level Using Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovsky, Peter; Ruggeri, Kai; Garcia-Garzon, Eduardo; Plakolm, Sara; Haller, Elisa; Petrova, Dafina; Mahalingam, Vaishali; Menezes, Igor G

    2015-01-01

    Increased access to transportation and information has led to the emergence of more diverse patient choice and new forms of health care consumption, such as medical travel. In order for health care providers to effectively attract patients, more knowledge is needed on the mechanisms underlying decision-making of potential travelers from different countries. A particularly promising method of studying the travelers' motives is collecting data on social media. The aim of this study was to test what factors influence decision-making of potential medical travelers and how these factors interact. Based on existing literature, the factors analyzed included quality, cost, and waiting time for 2 procedures varying in invasiveness across 12 different destination countries. Decision-making patterns were examined using a pilot questionnaire that generated a large amount of data from over 800 participants in 40 countries. Participants indicated their willingness to travel given different scenarios. Each scenario consisted of a combination of several factors. Additionally, participants were asked to indicate the reasons for their choice. Individuals display high willingness to travel for medical care when combining all participants and scenarios, travel for care was chosen 66.9% of the time. Among the factors influencing their decisions, quality of the medical procedure abroad was considered most important, and cost was least important as shown by chi-square tests and corresponding odds ratios. Log-linear analyses revealed an interaction between time waiting in the local health care system and type of procedure, whereby time pressure increased the odds of agreeing to travel for the more invasive procedure. The odds of traveling to Europe and the USA were by far the highest, although participants indicated that under certain conditions they might be willing to travel to other medical destinations, such as Asia. Our measurements yielded several reliable insights into the factors

  11. Australian health professionals' social media (Web 2.0) adoption trends: early 21st century health care delivery and practice promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Wayne T

    2012-01-01

    This study was concerned with identifying reasons behind patterns of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major health professions. Attention was given to uncovering some of the more significant motivations for the resistance or adoption of Web 2.0 technologies for health care delivery and practice promotion by Australian health professionals. Surveys were developed from a common set of questions with specific variations between professions negotiated with professional health societies. Survey questions were constructed in an attempt to identify Web 2.0 adoption trends. An online survey (www.limesurvey.org) was used to collect data. Initial data preparation involved the development of one integrated SPSS file to incorporate all responses from the eight surveys undertaken. Initial data analysis applied Frequencies and Crosstabs to the identified groups and provided a profile of respondents by key business and demographic characteristics. Of the 935 respondents, 9.5% of participants indicated that they used Web 2.0 for their professional work, 19.1% of them did not use it for work but used it for their personal needs and 71.3% of them did not use Web 2.0 at all. Participants have indicated that the main reason for 'choosing not to adopt' Web 2.0 applications as a way of delivering health care to their patients is due to the health professionals' lack of understanding of Web 2.0 (83.3%), while the main reason for 'choosing to adopt' Web 2.0 applications is the perception of Web 2.0 as a quick and effective method of communication (73.0%). This study has indicated that Australian health professionals 'choose not to adopt' Web 2.0 usage as a way of delivering health care primarily due to 'a lack of understanding as to how social media would be used in health care' (83.3%). This study identifies that Australian health professionals are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies in their private lives but are failing to see how such technologies

  12. Cross-sector Service Provision in Health and Social Care: An Umbrella Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Winters

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Meeting the complex health needs of people often requires interaction among numerous different sectors. No one service can adequately respond to the diverse care needs of consumers. Providers working more effectively together is frequently touted as the solution. Cross-sector service provision is defined as independent, yet interconnected sectors working together to better meet the needs of consumers and improve the quality and effectiveness of service provision. Cross-sector service provision is expected, yet much remains unknown about how it is conceptualised or its impact on health status. This umbrella review aims to clarify the critical attributes that shape cross-sector service provision by presenting the current state of the literature and building on the findings of the 2004 review by Sloper. Methods: Literature related to cross-sector service provision is immense, which poses a challenge for decision makers wishing to make evidence-informed decisions. An umbrella review was conducted to articulate the overall state of cross-sector service provision literature and examine the evidence to allow for the discovery of consistencies and discrepancies across the published knowledge base. Findings: Sixteen reviews met the inclusion criteria. Seven themes emerged: Focusing on the consumer, developing a shared vision of care, leadership involvement, service provision across the boundaries, adequately resourcing the arrangement, developing novel arrangements or aligning with existing relationships, and strengthening connections between sectors. Future research from a cross-organisational, rather than individual provider, perspective is needed to better understand what shapes cross-sector service provision at the boundaries. Conclusion: Findings aligned closely with the work done by Sloper and raise red flags related to reinventing what is already known. Future researchers should look to explore novel areas rather than looking into

  13. Health care and social service professionals' perceptions of a home-visit program for young, first-time mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-A. Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known about health care and social service professionals' perspective on the acceptability of long-term home-visit programs serving low-income, first-time mothers. This study describes the experiences and perspectives of these community care providers involved with program referrals or service delivery to mothers who participated in the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP, a targeted nurse home-visit program. Methods: The study included two phases. Phase I was a secondary qualitative data analysis used to analyze a purposeful sample of 24 individual interviews of community care providers. This was part of a larger case study examining adaptations required to increase acceptability of the NFP in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. In Phase II (n = 4, themes identified from Phase I were further explored through individual, semi-structured interviews with community health care and social service providers, giving qualitative description. Results: Overall, the NFP was viewed as addressing an important service gap for first-time mothers. Providers suggested that frequent communication between the NFP and community agencies serving these mothers could help improve the referral process, avoid service duplication, and streamline the flow of service access. The findings can help determine key components required to enhance the success of integrating a home-visit program into an existing network of community services. Conclusion: The function of home-visit programs should not be viewed in isolation. Rather, their potential can be maximized when they collaborate and share information with other agencies to provide better services for first-time mothers.

  14. Language barriers in health and social care consultations in the community: a comparative study of responses in Ireland and England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Anne; Singleton, Carrie; Green, Eileen

    2009-10-01

    This paper focuses on the implications of migration for host health and social care systems in terms of linguistic diversity, language barriers and language supports. The objective is to compare Ireland, as a context responding to the new challenge of language barriers in healthcare, and England, as a context in which the management of language barriers is being re-assessed. Empirical data from two action research studies in Ireland and England are compared. The combined data set is 146 data collection episodes with service users with limited English and their health and social care providers. Key findings are that the same range of formal and informal responses to language barriers occurs in practice in both contexts but proportions of knowledge and use of these responses differ. English service providers have more awareness about the use of formal responses than Irish service providers but uptake of formal responses remains low in both contexts. Data from service users confirms these findings. There is a need for more attention to the implementation of policies for language barriers in both Ireland and England, further research about the normalization processes associated with these consultations and knowledge transfer networks to facilitate on-going dialogue between all key stakeholders with an emphasis on supporting service users' involvement and participation.

  15. Health Law as Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Lindsay F

    2014-01-01

    Health law is in the midst of a dramatic transformation. From a relatively narrow discipline focused on regulating relationships among individual patients, health care providers, and third-party payers, it is expanding into a far broader field with a burgeoning commitment to access to health care and assurance of healthy living conditions as matters of social justice. Through a series of incremental reform efforts stretching back decades before the Affordable Care Act and encompassing public health law as well as the law of health care financing and delivery, reducing health disparities has become a central focus of American health law and policy. This Article labels, describes, and furthers a nascent "health justice" movement by examining what it means to view health law as an instrument of social justice. Drawing on the experiences of the reproductive justice, environmental justice, and food justice movements, and on the writings of political philosophers and ethicists on health justice, I propose that health justice offers an alternative to the market competition and patient rights paradigms that currently dominate health law scholarship, advocacy, and reform. I then examine the role of law in reducing health disparities through the health justice lens. I argue that the nascent health justice framework suggests three commitments for the use of law to reduce health disparities. First, to a broader inquiry that views access to health care as one among many social determinants of health deserving of public attention and resources. Second, to probing inquiry into the effects of class, racial, and other forms of social and cultural bias on the design and implementation of measures to reduce health disparities. And third, to collective action grounded in community engagement and participatory parity. In exploring these commitments, I highlight tensions within the social justice framework and between the social justice framework and the nascent health justice movement

  16. The role of social networks in the governance of health systems: the case of eye care systems in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Karl; James, Philip

    2013-03-01

    Efforts have been increasingly invested to improve local health systems' capacities in developing countries. We describe the application of innovative methods based on a social network analysis approach. The findings presented refer to a study carried out between July 2008 and January 2010 in the Brong Ahafo region of Ghana. Social network analysis methods were applied in five different districts using the software package Ucinet to calculate the various properties of the social network of eye care providers. The study focused on the managerial decisions made by Ghanaian district hospital managers about the governance of the health system. The study showed that the health system in the Brong Ahafo region experienced significant changes specifically after a key shock, the departure of an international organization. Several other actors at different levels of the network disappeared, the positions of nurses and hospital managers changed, creating new relationships and power balances that resulted in a change in the general structure of the network. The system shifted from a centralized and dense hierarchical network towards an enclaved network composed of five sub-networks. The new structure was less able to respond to shocks, circulate information and knowledge across scales and implement multi-scale solutions than that which it replaced. Although the network became less resilient, it responded better to the management needs of the hospital managers who now had better access to information, even if this information was partial. The change of the network over time also showed the influence of the international organization on generating links and creating connections between actors from different levels. The findings of the study reveal the importance of creating international health connections between actors working in different spatial scales of the health system.

  17. Teens, technology, and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanza, Francesco; Hauser, Diane

    2014-09-01

    Teens are avid users of new technologies and social media. Nearly 95% of US adolescents are online at least occasionally. Health care professionals and organizations that work with teens should identify online health information that is both accurate and teen friendly. Early studies indicate that some of the new health technology tools are acceptable to teens, particularly texting, computer-based psychosocial screening, and online interventions. Technology is being used to provide sexual health education, medication reminders for contraception, and information on locally available health care services. This article reviews early and emerging studies of technology use to promote teen health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An in-depth mixed-methods approach to Ryan White HIV/AIDS care program comprehensive needs assessment from the Northeast Georgia Public Health District: the significance of patient privacy, psychological health, and social stigma to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Amber; Chumbler, Neale; Cherry, Colleen O'Brien; Hill, Miranda; Veguilla, Vic

    2015-04-01

    We apply a social-ecological interpretive framework to understanding relationships among patient privacy, psychological health, social stigma, and continuity in care in the HIV treatment cascade in the rural southeastern US. This research was conducted as part of the 2013 comprehensive needs assessment for the Northeast Georgia Ryan White Consortium using an anthropologically informed mixed-methods design, and a deductive-inductive approach to thematic analysis of qualitative data obtained in interviews and focus groups with service providers and service utilizers. Our comprehensive needs assessment yielded two key components. First, we identified salient phenomena influencing introduction to, retention among, and satisfaction of patients in the Ryan White-coordinated treatment cascade in NE-GA. Second, we formulated actionable recommendations around leverage points identified in the current district-wide system of care. Results highlight spatial, institutional, and interpersonal aspects of the system of care that intersect around issues of patient privacy, psychological health, and social stigma. These intersections constitute pathways by which persons living with HIV are exposed to stigma and other negative social signals regarding their health status without sufficient access to behavioral health services. These negative issues, in turn, can erect significant barriers to long-term continuity in care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The definition and deployment of differential core professional competencies and characteristics in multiprofessional health and social care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ray; Bhanbhro, Sadiq M; Grant, Robert; Hood, Rick

    2013-01-01

    There has been an increasing focus on delivering health and social care services through multiprofessional and inter-agency teams. This study, undertaken in 2011, explores how different professionals within multiprofessional teams define their own and other professions' core professional competencies, characteristics and contributions. It then compares these definitions with how different professionals deploy their time and what tasks they undertake. Sixty-four workers in four multiprofessional teams in England, within four different health and local authority areas, participated in the study. Using role repertory grids to generate constructs, which were then converted into Likert scales, and with diaries recording activities undertaken, the study compares the deployment of time and task with the views about the differential core competencies and characteristics of each profession. The study highlights important issues for consideration by multidisciplinary teams, the managers and commissioners of these teams, and by professional associations. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    healthcare providers in south-east Nigerian. Malaria. National population commission and ORC Macro. Journal.2009;8:22. 6. Amaghionyeodiwe LA. Determinants of the. 15. World Health Organisation. The African choice of health care provider in Nigeria. Health malaria report 2003. Available at. Care Management Science.

  1. Innovative patient care practices using social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, T Joseph

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the literature on social media applications used to deliver patient care. A search of the literature was conducted on June 11, 2014, using PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Communication Abstracts databases for clinical studies between 2004 and 2014. A combination of the search terms "social media" or "Web 2.0" or "online social networking" or "Facebook" or "Twitter" AND "patient care" or "health care" was used. In addition, 42 additional abstracts were retrieved from www.patientslikeme.com for review. Only published, peer-reviewed journal articles were considered and only publications in English were included. The abstracts from this search were reviewed for relevance to Web-based social media platforms being used in patient care activities. A total of 35 articles were included in the review. A majority of the studies published on social media and patient care used cross-sectional designs and were conducted in the United States. Multiple social media applications were studied, but Facebook was the predominant social media tool found. Patient care opportunities for various diseases with social media have been studied. Recurring themes included overcoming barriers, engaging and empowering patients, enhancing research, providing information for health promotion, scratching the surface, and potential pitfalls. Social media have the potential to help patients and practitioners overcome multiple barriers in the delivery of health care. Maintaining patient privacy, security of information shared in the platform, and integrity of information shared are all concerns when using this type of Web application.

  2. Class, Social Suffering, and Health Consumerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrild, Camilla Hoffmann; Risør, Mette Bech; Vedsted, Peter; Andersen, Rikke Sand

    2016-01-01

    In recent years an extensive social gradient in cancer outcome has attracted much attention, with late diagnosis proposed as one important reason for this. Whereas earlier research has investigated health care seeking among cancer patients, these social differences may be better understood by looking at health care seeking practices among people who are not diagnosed with cancer. Drawing on long-term ethnographic fieldwork among two different social classes in Denmark, our aim in this article is to explore the relevance of class to health care seeking practices and illness concerns. In the higher middle class, we predominantly encountered health care seeking resembling notions of health consumerism, practices sanctioned and encouraged by the health care system. However, among people in the lower working class, health care seeking was often shaped by the inseparability of physical, political, and social dimensions of discomfort, making these practices difficult for the health care system to accommodate.

  3. Preventive child health care findings on early childhood predict peer-group social status in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Merlijne; de Winter, Andrea F; Veenstra, René; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2012-12-01

    A disputed social status among peers puts children and adolescents at risk for developing a wide range of problems, such as being bullied. However, there is a lack of knowledge about which early predictors could be used to identify (young) adolescents at risk for a disputed social status. The aim of this study was to assess whether preventive child health care (PCH) findings on early childhood predict neglected and rejected status in early adolescence in a large longitudinal community-based sample. Data came from 898 participants who participated in TRAILS, a longitudinal study. Information on early childhood factors was extracted from the charts of routine PCH visits registered between infancy and age of 4 years. To assess social status, peer nominations were used at age of 10-12 years. Multinomial logistic regression showed that children who had a low birth weight, motor problems, and sleep problems; children of parents with a low educational level (odds ratios [ORs] between 1.71 and 2.90); and those with fewer attention hyperactivity problems (ORs = .43) were more likely to have a neglected status in early adolescence. Boys, children of parents with a low educational level, and children with early externalizing problems were more likely to have a rejected status in early adolescence (ORs between 1.69 and 2.56). PCH findings on early childhood-on motor and social development-are predictive of a neglected and a rejected status in early adolescence. PCH is a good setting to monitor risk factors that predict the social status of young adolescents. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Health care need

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Andreas; Hope, Tony; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    2006-01-01

    The argument that scarce health care resources should be distributed so that patients in 'need' are given priority for treatment is rarely contested. In this paper, we argue that if need is to play a significant role in distributive decisions it is crucial that what is meant by need can be precis......, the three interpretations provide a starting-point for further debate of what the concept means in its specific application. We discuss combined interpretations, the meaning of grading needs, and compare needs-based priority setting to social welfare maximisation...

  5. A Disproportionate Burden of Care: Gender Differences in Mental Health, Health-Related Quality of Life, and Social Support in Mexican Multiple Sclerosis Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Perrin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS rates in Latin America are increasing, and caregivers there experience reduced mental and physical health. Based on rigid gender roles in Latin America, women more often assume caregiving duties, yet the differential impact on women of these duties is unknown. Methods. This study examined gender differences in mental health (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Zarit Burden Inventory, health-related quality of life (HRQOL; Short Form-36, and social support (Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-12 in 81 (66.7% women Mexican MS caregivers. Results. As compared to men caregivers, women had lower mental health (p=0.006, HRQOL (p<0.001, and social support (p<0.001. This was partially explained by women caregivers providing care for nearly twice as many hours/week as men (79.28 versus 48.48, p=0.018 and for nearly three times as many months (66.31 versus 24.30, p=0.002. Conclusions. Because gender roles in Latin America influence women to assume more substantial caregiving duties, MS caregiver interventions in Latin America—particularly for women caregivers—should address the influence of gender-role conformity on care and psychosocial functioning.

  6. Social and health care needs of elderly people living in the countryside in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziechciaż, Małgorzata; Guty, Edyta; Wojtowicz, Agata; Filip, Rafał

    2012-01-01

    The needs of elderly people living in the countryside constitute serious health, social, financial and organizational problems. To define the needs of elderly people living in the countryside regarding complex living actions. DATA COLLECTED AND METHODOLOGY: The study was carried out among 89 village citizens from the Podkarpackie Voivodeship (N=55; 61.8% women; N=34; 38.2% men) aged 61-2. Average age in the group was 76.3 (+/ -7.9 years). Research methods were 3 different questionnaires, applied to evaluate: socio-demographic data, occurrence of diseases and rehabilitation usage, mental and intellectual status, as well as the Lawton scale (IADL) assessing complex life activities. 18 subjects (20.2%) were fully functional in the scope of complex everyday activities. The highest number were independent in their financial affairs (N=52; 58.4%), preparation and taking of medicine (N=45; 50.6%), and using the telephone (N=39; 43.8%). Lack of self-reliance was most commonly observed with difficult housework (N=62; 69.7%), shopping (N=55; 61.8%), and walking distances exceeding regular walks (N=46; 51.7%). No relation was observed between gender, usage of social welfare, and self-reliance in complex everyday activities. Deterioration in efficiency in the scope of complex everyday activities was observed which progressed with age, and was worse among the unmarried subjects. A relation between material situation and independence, based on the IADL scale, was confirmed, with the exception of using the telephone. 1). People of old age living in the countryside most often need help with complex everyday housework, shopping, and walking distances exceeding regular walks. 2). With the advancement of age, the subjects need help with all IADL activities increased.

  7. Vacation health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Vacation health care URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001937.htm Vacation health care To use the ...

  8. National Health Care Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  9. Creonization of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulger, R J

    1990-01-01

    As prefigured in the Greek tragedy Antigone, one of the primary conflicts in contemporary health care is that between humane concern for the individual and concern for society at large and administrative rules. The computerization of the health care system and development of large data bases will create new forms of this conflict that will challenge the self-definition of health care and health care professionals.

  10. Participants' use of enacted scenes in research interviews: A method for reflexive analysis in health and social care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Deborah Michelle; Pilnick, Alison; Hall, Alex; Collins, Luke

    2016-02-01

    In our study of a workforce intervention within a health and social care context we found that participants who took part in longitudinal research interviews were commonly enacting scenes from their work during one-to-one interviews. Scenes were defined as portions of the interviews in which participants directly quoted the speech of at least two actors. Our analysis in this paper focuses on these enacted scenes, and compares the content of them before and after the intervention. We found that, whilst the tensions between consistency and change, and change management, were common topics for scene enactment in both pre and post-intervention data, following the intervention participants were much more likely to present themselves as active agents in that change. Post-intervention enacted scenes also showed participants' reports of taking a service user perspective, and a focus on their interactions with service users that had been absent from pre-intervention data. In addition, descriptions of positive feeling and emotions were present in the post-intervention enacted scenes. We suggest that this analysis confirms the importance of enacted scenes as an analytic resource, and that this importance goes beyond their utility in identifying the impact of this specific intervention. Given the congruence between the themes prominent in enacted scenes, and those which emerged from a more extensive qualitative analysis of these data, we argue that enacted scenes may also be of wider methodological importance. The possibility of using scene enactment as an approach to the validation of inductive analysis in health and social care settings could provide a useful methodological resource in settings where longitudinal ethnographic observation of frontline care staff is impossible or impractical. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Social media in health care: benefits, concerns, and guidelines for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suby, ChrysMarie

    2013-01-01

    The use of social media and other electronic communication has exploded as the number of social media outlets and applications continue to increase. These are exciting and valuable tools when used wisely, but pose risks when inappropriately used. The purpose of this article is to consider what comprises social media, its benefits and concerns, and guidelines for use that protect patients, employees, and organizations.

  12. Knowledge of Normal and Pathological Memory Aging in College Students, Social Workers, and Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Katie E.; Allen, Priscilla D.; Jackson, Erin M.; Hawley, Karri S.; Brigman, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire (KMAQ) measures laypersons' knowledge of normal memory changes and pathological memory deficits in adulthood. In Experiment 1, undergraduate and graduate social work students and social work practitioners completed the KMAQ. Social workers and graduate students were more accurate on the pathological than…

  13. Academic health centers and health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, S H; Lurie, N; Fisher, E S; Haugen, D

    1993-09-01

    There is increasing support for the proposition that academic health centers have a duty to accept broad responsibility for the health of their communities. The Health of the Public program has proposed that centers become directly involved in the social-political process as advocates for reform of the health care system. Such engagement raises important issues about the roles and responsibilities of centers and their faculties. To address these issues, the authors draw upon the available literature and their experiences in recent health care reform efforts in Minnesota and Vermont in which academic health center faculty participated. The authors discuss (1) the problematic balance between academic objectivity and social advocacy that faculty must attempt when they engage in the health care reform process; (2) the management of the sometimes divergent interests of academic health centers, some of their faculty, and society (including giving faculty permission to engage in reform efforts and developing a tacit understanding that distinguishes faculty positions on reform issues from the center's position on such issues); and (3) the challenge for centers to develop infrastructure support for health reform activities. The authors maintain that academic health centers' participation in the process of health care reform helps them fulfill the trust of the public that they are obligated to and ultimately depend on.

  14. Does optimal access to dental care counteract the oral health-related quality of life social gradient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocombe, L A; Mahoney, G D

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if an oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) social gradient existed when Australian Defence Force (ADF) members have universal and optimal access to dental care. A nominal roll included 4089 individuals who were deployed to the Solomon Islands as part of Operation ANODE and a comparison group of 4092 ADF personnel frequency matched to the deployed group on gender, age group and service type, from which 500 deployed and 500 comparison individuals were randomly selected. The dependent variables were the OHIP-14 summary measures. Rank was used to determine socioeconomic status. The demographic variables selected were: gender and age. The response rate was 44%. Of the individual OHIP-14 items, being self-conscious, painful aching and having discomfort when eating were the most common problems. Mean OHIP-14 severity was 2.8. In bivariate analysis, there was not a significant difference in mean OHIP-14 severity (p = 0.52) or frequency of OHIP-14 impacts (p = 0.57) by military rank. There was a significant increasing OHIP-14 extent score from commissioned officer to non-commissioned officer to other ranks (0.07, 0.19, 0.40, p = 0.03). Even with optimal access to dental care, there was an OHRQoL social gradient between military ranks in the ADF. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  15. Searching for Real-World Effectiveness of Health Care Innovations: Scoping Study of Social Prescribing for Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, Karen; Loef, Martin; Polley, Marie

    2017-02-02

    Social prescribing is a process whereby primary care patients are linked or referred to nonmedical sources of support in the community and voluntary sector. It is a concept that has arisen in practice and implemented widely in the United Kingdom and has been evaluated by various organizations. The aim of our study was to characterize, collate, and analyze the evidence from evaluation of social prescribing for type 2 diabetes in the United Kingdom and Ireland, comparing information available on publicly available websites with the published literature. We used a broad, pragmatic definition of social prescribing and conducted Web-based searches for websites of organizations providing potentially relevant services. We also explored linked information. In parallel, we searched Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and reference lists for relevant studies published in peer-reviewed journals. We extracted the data systematically on the characteristics, any reported evaluation, outcomes measured and results, and terminology used to describe each service. We identified 40 UK- or Ireland-based projects that referred people with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes to nonmedical interventions or services provided in the community. We located evaluations of 24 projects; 11 as published papers, 12 as Web-based reports, and 1 as both a paper and a Web-based report. The interventions and services identified included structured group educational programs, exercise referral schemes, and individualized advice and support with signposting of health-related activities in the community. Although specific interventions such as community-based group educational programs and exercise referral have been evaluated in randomized controlled trials, evaluation of individualized social prescribing services involving people with type 2 diabetes has, in most cases, used pre-post and mixed methods approaches. These evaluations report generic improvement in a broad range of outcomes and

  16. Searching for Real-World Effectiveness of Health Care Innovations: Scoping Study of Social Prescribing for Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loef, Martin; Polley, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background Social prescribing is a process whereby primary care patients are linked or referred to nonmedical sources of support in the community and voluntary sector. It is a concept that has arisen in practice and implemented widely in the United Kingdom and has been evaluated by various organizations. Objective The aim of our study was to characterize, collate, and analyze the evidence from evaluation of social prescribing for type 2 diabetes in the United Kingdom and Ireland, comparing information available on publicly available websites with the published literature. Methods We used a broad, pragmatic definition of social prescribing and conducted Web-based searches for websites of organizations providing potentially relevant services. We also explored linked information. In parallel, we searched Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and reference lists for relevant studies published in peer-reviewed journals. We extracted the data systematically on the characteristics, any reported evaluation, outcomes measured and results, and terminology used to describe each service. Results We identified 40 UK- or Ireland-based projects that referred people with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes to nonmedical interventions or services provided in the community. We located evaluations of 24 projects; 11 as published papers, 12 as Web-based reports, and 1 as both a paper and a Web-based report. The interventions and services identified included structured group educational programs, exercise referral schemes, and individualized advice and support with signposting of health-related activities in the community. Although specific interventions such as community-based group educational programs and exercise referral have been evaluated in randomized controlled trials, evaluation of individualized social prescribing services involving people with type 2 diabetes has, in most cases, used pre-post and mixed methods approaches. These evaluations report generic

  17. Role of GIS in social sector planning: can developing countries benefit from the examples of primary health care (PHC) planning in Britain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishfaq, Mohammad; Lodhi, Bilal Khan

    2012-04-01

    Social sector planning requires rational approaches where community needs are identified by referring to relative deprivation among localities and resources are allocated to address inequalities. Geographical information system (GIS) has been widely argued and used as a base for rational planning for equal resource allocation in social sectors around the globe. Devolution of primary health care is global strategy that needs pains taking efforts to implement it. GIS is one of the most important tools used around the world in decentralization process of primary health care. This paper examines the scope of GIS in social sector planning by concentration on primary health care delivery system in Pakistan. The work is based on example of the UK's decentralization process and further evidence from US. This paper argues that to achieve benefits of well informed decision making to meet the communities' needs GIS is an essential tool to support social sector planning and can be used without any difficulty in any environment. There is increasing trend in the use of Health Management Information System (HMIS) in Pakistan with ample internet connectivity which provides well established infrastructure in Pakistan to implement GIS for health care, however there is need for change in attitude towards empowering localities especially with reference to decentralization of decision making. This paper provides GIS as a tool for primary health care planning in Pakistan as a starting point in defining localities and preparing locality profiles for need identification that could help developing countries in implementing the change.

  18. Correlation of Internet Use for Health Care Engagement Purposes and HIV Clinical Outcomes Among HIV-Positive Individuals Using Online Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Parya; Johnson, Mallory O

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to describe cell phone and Internet use and assess the correlation of Internet use for health care engagement purposes and HIV clinical outcomes among HIV-positive individuals. The authors conducted a national survey using online social media to examine cell phone and Internet use, self-reported HIV viral load (detectable vs. undetectable), and antiretroviral adherence rating (excellent vs. less than excellent). Participants (N = 1,494) were asked about their Internet use for health care engagement purposes (including e-mailing health care providers, refilling medications online, and making medical appointments online). Approximately 95% of participants accessed the Internet nearly daily or daily in the past month (mean hours on Internet use per day = 5.2) and 55.5% used the Internet for health care engagement purposes. Those who used the Internet for any health care engagement purposes had a 1.52-fold odds of reporting an undetectable viral load (p = .009) and a 1.49-fold odds of reporting excellent adherence (p = .001). Although Internet access and use were similar across racial/ethnic, educational, and socioeconomic groups, disparities existed with the use of the Internet for health care engagement purposes among racial/ethnic minorities, those with low to moderate financial stability, lower education, and history of incarceration. The authors' data reveal that among HIV-positive users of online social media, use of the Internet for health care engagement purposes is associated with better self-reported virologic and adherence outcomes.

  19. Training of Residential Social Care Staff to Meet the Needs of Older People with Intellectual Disabilities who Develop Age-Related Health Problems: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northway, Ruth; Jenkins, Robert; Holland-Hart, Daniella

    2017-09-01

    Despite awareness of the age related health needs of people with intellectual disabilities little is known regarding how residential social care staff are prepared to meet such needs. Data were gathered via semi-structured interviews from 14 managers of supported living settings. Transcripts were thematically analysed. Staff may work in supported living settings with no prior experience of care work, and previous knowledge/experience of supporting people in relation to their health is not required. Whilst health related training is provided there is a lack of specific training regarding healthy ageing, and training seems to be reactive to changing needs of tenants meaning that proactive monitoring for changes in health status may not occur. Whilst some training is provided for residential social care staff in relation to health and ageing a more proactive approach is required which should include a focus on healthy ageing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Impact of asthma on educational attainment in a socioeconomically deprived population: a study linking health, education and social care datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdy, Pat; Bremner, Stephen; Harper, Gill; Mayhew, Les; Eldridge, Sandra; Eversley, John; Sheikh, Aziz; Hunter, Susan; Boomla, Kambiz; Feder, Gene; Prescott, Keith; Griffiths, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Asthma has the potential to adversely affect children's school examination performance, and hence longer term life chances. Asthma morbidity is especially high amongst UK ethnic minority children and those experiencing social adversity, populations which also have poor educational outcomes. We tested the hypothesis that asthma adversely affects performance in national school examinations in a large cohort from an area of ethnic diversity and social deprivation. With a novel method (using patient and address-matching algorithms) we linked administrative and clinical data for 2002-2005 for children in east London aged 5-14 years to contemporaneous education and social care datasets. We modelled children's performance in school examinations in relation to socio-demographic and clinical variables. The dataset captured examination performance for 12,136 children who sat at least one national examination at Key Stages 1-3. For illustration, estimates are presented as percentage changes in Key Stage 2 results. Having asthma was associated with a 1.1% increase in examination scores (95%CI 0.4 to 1.7)%,p = 0.02. Worse scores were associated with Bangladeshi ethnicity -1.3%(-2.5 to -0.1)%,p = 0.03; special educational need -14.6%(-15.7 to -13.5)%,p = 0.02; mental health problems -2.5%(-4.1 to -0.9)%,p = 0.003, and social adversity: living in a smoking household -1.2(-1.7 to -0.6)%,pschool meals -0.8%(-1.5 to -0.1)%,pschool examinations. Policies to improve educational attainment in socially deprived areas should focus on these factors.

  1. The Role of Health Care Professionals in Breaking Bad News about Death: the Perspectives of Doctors, Nurses and Social Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Rassin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The way a death is notified to family members has a long-term effect on their coping with their loss. The words caregivers use and the sentiments they express can stay with their hearers for the rest of theirlife. Aims: To study the views of three caregivers groups—doctors, nurses and social workers—as to their role in breaking a death news in an ED.Methods: One hundred and fifteen health care professionals participated in the research (51 nurses, 38 doctors and 26 social workers. They completed a 72-item questionnaire comprising behaviour descriptions, attitudes and statements. Content validation of the questionnaire was conducted by the help of experts group, and the internal reliability, measures in all its parts was 0.78 on average (α = 0.78.Results: Doctors gave a higher score than the other groups to their responsibility for breaking bad news (p<0.005 and to the content of the information they provide. Social workers scored the mental support given the family significantly higher than doctors and nurses did (p<0.000. Nurses scored the instrumental support given(tissues, water to drink significantly higher than doctors and social workers (p<0.000. Breaking bad news caused social workers more mental distress than it did either doctors or nurses. All three groups gave a high score to the emotional exhaustion, sadness and identification this task caused them. Nurses felt more fear at theprospect of a notifying a death and made more effort to escape the task.Conclusions: The findings of the study will help develop performance guidelines for notifying a death and provide input for simulation and other training workshops.

  2. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    debut (20.8%), 40.8% had multiple sexual partners, 23.3% had sex under the influence of alcohol while. 34.2% didn't use ... PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26(2) 97-106. KEYWORDS. Risky sexual behaviour, young people, ..... 2010;15(1): Art. #505[cited consistent with ...

  3. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    Up to 11 (7.2%) respondents in the non-BI LGA were not satisfied with the drug services in the health centers, compared ... improvement in primary health care services,. 8 ..... Naves J O, Silver LD. Evaluation of pharmaceutical assistance in public primary care in Brasilia, Brazil. Rev. Saude Publica. 2005; 39(2): 223-30. 21.

  4. Health Care in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    China has recently emerged as an important global partner. However, like other developing nations, China has experienced dramatic demographic and epidemiologic changes in the past few decades. Population discontent with the health care system has led to major reforms. China's distinctive health care system, including its unique history, vast infrastructure, the speed of health reform, and economic capacity to make important advances in health care, nonetheless, has incomplete insurance coverage for urban and rural dwellers, uneven access, mixed quality of health care, increasing costs, and risk of catastrophic health expenditures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Health Care in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    Although a stated right for all Indians, equal access to health care in India is impeded by socioeconomic barriers. With its 3-tier system of public health care centers in villages, district hospitals, and tertiary care hospitals, government expenditure in India is inordinately low, with a disproportionate emphasis on private health spending. Accordingly, the poorest receive a minority of the available subsidies, whereas the richest obtain more than a third, fostering a divide in health care infrastructure across the rich and poor in urban and rural settings. This paradigm has implications for domestic Indian public health and global public health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Teaching Health Care in Introductory Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Health care is one of the economy's biggest industries, so it is natural that the health care industry should play some role in the teaching of introductory economics. There are many ways that health care can appear in such a context: in the teaching of microeconomics, as a macroeconomic issue, to learn about social welfare, and even to learn how…

  7. Service user perspectives on palliative care education for health and social care professionals supporting people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Dorry; Barr, Owen; McIlfatrick, Sonja; McConkey, Roy

    2015-12-01

    Evidence from European and American studies indicates limited referrals of people with learning (intellectual) disabilities to palliative care services. Although professionals' perceptions of their training needs in this area have been studied, the perceptions of people with learning disabilities and family carers are not known. This study aimed to elicit the views of people with learning disabilities, and their family carers concerning palliative care, to inform healthcare professional education and training. A qualitative, exploratory design was used. A total of 17 people with learning disabilities were recruited to two focus groups which took place within an advocacy network. Additionally, three family carers of someone with a learning disability, requiring palliative care, and two family carers who had been bereaved recently were also interviewed. Combined data identified the perceived learning needs for healthcare professionals. Three subthemes emerged: 'information and preparation', 'provision of care' and 'family-centred care'. This study shows that people with learning disabilities can have conversations about death and dying, and their preferred end-of-life care, but require information that they can understand. They also need to have people around familiar to them and with them. Healthcare professionals require skills and knowledge to effectively provide palliative care for people with learning disabilities and should also work in partnership with their family carers who have expertise from their long-term caring role. These findings have implications for educators and clinicians. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Development of evidence based practice in academic service partnerships: Experiences of working life representatives from social and health care sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melender, Hanna-Leena

    2017-03-01

    Learning about how to develop and lead the implementation of evidence based practice (EBP) in services is an important part of the education of developers and managers for the social and health care sectors. In order to develop this teaching and to support the development of EBP in services, a Teaching Development Effort (TDE) was conducted by establishing academic service partnerships (ASPs) and connecting Master's students' assignments with them. The TDE was conducted as a part of a larger project whose main aims were to strengthen, develop and renew transfers of knowledge and competence between higher education institutions and workplaces, and to strive for a more multidisciplinary quality in workplace innovations. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences of working life representatives regarding the development of EBP in ASPs within the social and health care sectors. The data were collected by email interviews. Eight working life representatives' participated in the study. The informants were asked to describe the usefulness of the plan that had been prepared by the students regarding the implementation of EBP, and to describe the significance of this ASP for the development of working life. A qualitative content analysis method was used when analyzing the data. Virtually all the informants stated that the plan prepared by the students, for the implementation of EBP, was entirely ready to be taken into use in the form they had finished it. The significance of the ASP was described in terms of the ASP assisting in improving the quality of the service. Furthermore, the workplace-based student assignment topics, external views to support the development of EBP, and the theoretical approach used by the students were valuable. The ASP provided opportunities for the practitioners to learn new things, inspiration to look to the future, and assistance in the implementation of time management practices. ASPs have potential to support EBP in

  9. Managing Cancer Care - Finding Health Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical ... Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs ...

  10. Good practice in mental health care for socially marginalised groups in Europe: a qualitative study of expert views in 14 countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priebe Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Socially marginalised groups tend to have higher rates of mental disorders than the general population and can be difficult to engage in health care. Providing mental health care for these groups represents a particular challenge, and evidence on good practice is required. This study explored the experiences and views of experts in 14 European countries regarding mental health care for six socially marginalised groups: long-term unemployed; street sex workers; homeless; refugees/asylum seekers; irregular migrants and members of the travelling communities. Methods Two highly deprived areas were selected in the capital cities of 14 countries, and experts were interviewed for each of the six marginalised groups. Semi-structured interviews with case vignettes were conducted to explore experiences of good practice and analysed using thematic analysis. Results In a total of 154 interviews, four components of good practice were identified across all six groups: a establishing outreach programmes to identify and engage with individuals with mental disorders; b facilitating access to services that provide different aspects of health care, including mental health care, and thus reducing the need for further referrals; c strengthening the collaboration and co-ordination between different services; and d disseminating information on services both to marginalised groups and to practitioners in the area. Conclusions Experts across Europe hold similar views on what constitutes good practice in mental health care for marginalised groups. Care may be improved through better service organisation, coordination and information.

  11. Targeting Health Care Through Preventive Work - A study of the impact of social distance on professionals’ judgments of children and families’ need of health improvements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Østergaard

    2013-01-01

    and teachers interact with children and their families. A study shows that frontline workers think differently about whom to prevent from what, when and why. The degree of social distance as well as professional norms explain part of the variation in worries towards children and families, but the impact...... care access. The political response has been to target health services to ‘those in need of special care’ through a more intense focus on prevention. The idea is to prevent illness instead of curing it. I study the impact of these new rules on the frontline level where home nurses, pedagogues...

  12. Relationship between national mental health expenditure and quality of care in longer-term psychiatric and social care facilities in Europe: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Tatiana Taylor; Killaspy, Helen; King, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Background It is not known whether increased mental health expenditure is associated with better outcomes. Aims To estimate the association between national mental health expenditure and (a) quality of longer-term mental healthcare, (b) service users' ratings of that care in eight European countries. Method National mental health expenditure (per cent of health budget spent on mental health) was calculated from international sources. Multilevel models were developed to assess associations with quality of care and service user experiences of care using ratings of 171 facility managers and 1429 service users. Results Significant positive associations were found between mental health spend and (a) six of seven quality of care domains; and (b) service user autonomy and experiences of care. Conclusions Greater national mental health expenditure was associated with higher quality of care and better service user experience. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  13. 'Making every contact count': Evaluation of the impact of an intervention to train health and social care practitioners in skills to support health behaviour change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Wendy; Black, Christina; Tinati, Tannaze; Cradock, Sue; Begum, Rufia; Jarman, Megan; Pease, Anna; Margetts, Barrie; Davies, Jenny; Inskip, Hazel; Cooper, Cyrus; Baird, Janis; Barker, Mary

    2016-02-01

    A total of 148 health and social care practitioners were trained in skills to support behaviour change: creating opportunities to discuss health behaviours, using open discovery questions, listening, reflecting and goal-setting. At three time points post-training, use of the skills was evaluated and compared with use of skills by untrained practitioners. Trained practitioners demonstrated significantly greater use of these client-centred skills to support behaviour change compared to their untrained peers up to 1 year post-training. Because it uses existing services to deliver support for behaviour change, this training intervention has the potential to improve public health at relatively low cost. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Taking Care of Your Behavioral Health: Tips for Social Distancing, Quarantine, and Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to face” with friends and loved ones using Skype or FaceTime. ƒ If approved by health authorities and ... would be possible to schedule remote appointments via Skype or FaceTime for mental health, substance use, or ...

  15. Comparing the performance of the public, social security and private health subsystems in Argentina by core dimensions of primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavich, Natalia; Báscolo, Ernesto Pablo; Haggerty, Jeannie

    2016-06-01

    Most Latin American health systems are comprised of public (PubS), social security (SSS) and private (PrS) subsystems. These subsystems coexist, causing health care fragmentation and population segmentation. To estimate the extent of subsystem cross-coverage in a geographically bounded population (Rosario city) and to compare the subsystems' performance on primary health care (PHC) dimensions. Through a cross-sectional, interviewer-administered survey to a representative sample (n = 822) of the Rosario population, we measured the percentage of cross-coverage (people with usual source of care in one subsystem but also covered by another subsystem) and the health services' performance by core PHC dimensions, as reported by each subsystem's usual users. We compared the subsystems' performance using chi-square analysis and one-way analysis of variance testing. We analyzed whether the observed differences were coherent with the predominant institutional and organizational features of each subsystem. Overall, 39.3% of the population was affiliated with the PubS, 44.8% with the SSS and 15.9% with the PrS. Cross-coverage was reported by 40.6% of respondents. The performance of the PubS was weak on accessibility but strong on person-and-community-oriented care, the opposite of the PrS. The SSS combined the strengths of the other two subsystems. Rosario's health system has a high percentage of cross-coverage, contributing to issues of fragmentation, segmentation, financial inequity and inefficiency. The overall performance of the SSS was better than that of the PrS and PubS, though each subsystem had a particular performance pattern with areas of strength and weakness that were consistent with their institutional and organizational profiles. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The Social Media DNA of Mayo Clinic-and Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsenas, Amy L; Aase, Lee; Arce, Makala; Timimi, Farris K; Dacy, Matthew; Young, Colleen; Wald, John T

    2017-11-08

    Hippocrates' admonition and the medical community's aversion to risk have caused many physicians and institutions to resist participation in modern social media sites such as Facebook (Facebook, Inc, Menlo Park, California, USA), Twitter (Twitter Inc, San Francisco, California, USA), and YouTube (San Mateo, California, USA). However, because Mayo Clinic's founders were champions of analog social networking, it was among the earliest hospitals worldwide to create official accounts on these digital platforms. A proper understanding of the traditional mechanisms of knowledge diffusion in medicine and of the nature of social media sites should help professionals see and embrace the opportunities for positive engagement in social media. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prospects for a genuine revival of primary health care--through the visible hand of social justice rather than the invisible hand of the market: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alison Rosamund

    2009-01-01

    In a two-part article (the first part in this Journal issue), the author explores the prospects for a genuine revival of the social justice project of "Health for All by the Year 2000", launched by the WHO and UNICEF in 1978 at Alma-Ata in the former Soviet Union, with reference (in Part I) to the World Health Report 2008, Primary Health Care: Now More than Ever, and the report of the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health, also published in 2008; and (in Part II) to Global Health Watch 2: An Alternative World Health Report and the perspectives of anti-capitalist, real socialist, environmental, and people's movements for economic and social justice. The reports are reviewed in terms of the original values and principles of Alma-Ata (social justice and human rights) and the structural foundations of the primary health care (PHC) project (a new international economic order and emancipatory development of decolonized countries). A genuine revival of the PHC project and of Health for All, which is its implicit objective, will not be possible unless the multiple crises that we are confronting today-in energy, water, food, finance, the environment, science, information, and democracy-are recognized as capitalist crises and addressed in these terms. In short, the invisible hand of the market must be replaced by the visible hand of social justice.

  18. The lived experiences and social support needs of first-time mothers at health care facilities in the City of Tshwane, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E.T. Masala-Chokwe

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social support refers to the assistance people receive from others, and it is divided into four types of support. Given the increasing mortality and morbidity rates of mothers and neonates postpartum, this study intended to determine whether the social support needs of the first-time mothers were met after early discharge from health care facilities.Objectives: The objective of the study was to explore the lived experiences and social support needs of the first-time mothers after an early discharge from health care facilities in the City of Tshwane, Gauteng.Method: A qualitative explorative study was conducted to explore the lived experiences and social support needs of the first-time mothers. The population were first-time mothers who had a vaginal delivery and were discharged within 6–12 hours of delivery from health care facilities. Purposive sampling was performed and 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted, with those mothers who came for the prescribed three postnatal check-ups at the three health care facilities identified according to maternity services provided. Saturation of data for the three health care facilities was reached at the 14th interview. Data analysis was performed using the hermeneutic interpretive approach.Results: Almost all participants had completed grades 11 or 12, but most were unemployed. The needs identified included the need for social support, lack of confidence, knowledge and skill to care for themselves and their newborn babies after early discharge.Conclusion: There is need to identify alternative types of social support for the first-time mothers, to ensure a normal adjustment to motherhood.

  19. The lived experiences and social support needs of first-time mothers at health care facilities in the City of Tshwane, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masala-Chokwe, Mmajapi E T; Ramukumba, Tendani S

    2017-09-22

    Social support refers to the assistance people receive from others, and it is divided into four types of support. Given the increasing mortality and morbidity rates of mothers and neonates postpartum, this study intended to determine whether the social support needs of the first-time mothers were met after early discharge from health care facilities. The objective of the study was to explore the lived experiences and social support needs of the first-time mothers after an early discharge from health care facilities in the City of Tshwane, Gauteng. A qualitative explorative study was conducted to explore the lived experiences and social support needs of the first-time mothers. The population were first-time mothers who had a vaginal delivery and were discharged within 6-12 hours of delivery from health care facilities. Purposive sampling was performed and 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted, with those mothers who came for the prescribed three postnatal check-ups at the three health care facilities identified according to maternity services provided. Saturation of data for the three health care facilities was reached at the 14th interview. Data analysis was performed using the hermeneutic interpretive approach. Almost all participants had completed grades 11 or 12, but most were unemployed. The needs identified included the need for social support, lack of confidence, knowledge and skill to care for themselves and their newborn babies after early discharge. There is need to identify alternative types of social support for the first-time mothers, to ensure a normal adjustment to motherhood.

  20. Health Care Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in medical offices or in the dialysis unit. Nephrology Nurse Nephrology nurses are licensed, registered nurses who ... nutritional intake to ensure the patient's optimal health. Nephrology Social Worker Most nephrology social workers have a ...

  1. PHR in Health and Social Care for Older People--Regional Development through Learning within and across Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämgård, Margareta; Forsgren, Annika; Avery, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The study draws on findings from a series of seven participatory action research projects in community care for older people carried out over a period of eight years in 20 municipalities in southern Sweden. The analysis here looks at social impact across administrative levels and geographical scales. Different professional groups and care workers…

  2. Examining the "liberal media" claim: journalists' views on politics, economic and social policy (including health care), and media coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, D

    1999-01-01

    The conservative critique of the news media rests on two general propositions: journalists hold views that are to the left of the public, and journalists frame news content in a way that accentuates these left perspectives. Previous research has revealed persuasive evidence against the latter claim, but the validity of the former claim has often been taken for granted. This research project examined the supposed left orientation of media personnel by surveying Washington-based journalists who cover national politics and/or economic policy at U.S. outlets. The findings include: (1) On select issues from corporate power and trade to Social Security and Medicare to health care and taxes, journalists are actually more conservative than the general public. (2) Journalists are mostly centrist in their political orientation. (3) The minority of journalists who do not identify with the "center" are more likely to identify with the "right" when it comes to economic issues and to identify with the "left" when it comes to social issues. (4) Journalists report that "business-oriented news outlets" and "major daily newspapers" provide the highest quality coverage of economic policy issues, while "broadcast network TV news" and "cable news services" provide the worst.

  3. Sickness absence in musculoskeletal disorders - patients' experiences of interactions with the Social Insurance Agency and health care. A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvidsson Barbro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sickness absence has represented a growing public health problem in many Western countries over the last decade. In Sweden disorders of the musculoskeletal system cause approximately one third of all sick leave. The Social Insurance Agency (SIA and the health care system are important actors in handling the sickness absence process. The objective was to study how patients with personal experience of sickness absence due to musculoskeletal disorders perceived their contact with these actors and what they considered as obstructing or facilitating factors for recovery and return to work in this situation. Methods In-depth interviews using open-ended questions were conducted with fifteen informants (aged 33-63, 11 women, all with experience of sickness absence due to musculoskeletal disorders and purposefully recruited to represent various backgrounds as regards diagnosis, length of sick leave and return to work. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. Results The informants' perceived the interaction with the SIA and health care as ranging from coherent to fragmented. Being on sick leave was described as going through a process of adjustment in both private and working life. This process of adjustment was interactive and included not only the possibilities to adjust work demands and living conditions but also personal and emotional adjustment. The informants' experiences of fragmented interaction reflected a sense that their entire situation was not being taken into account. Coherent interaction was described as facilitating recovery and return to work, while fragmented interaction was described as obstructing this. The complex division of responsibilities within the Swedish rehabilitation system may hamper sickness absentees' possibilities of taking responsibility for their own rehabilitation. Conclusions This study shows that people on sick leave considered the interaction

  4. From organizational awareness to organizational competency in health care social work: the importance of formulating a "profession-in-environment" fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, William; Silverman, Ed; Allen, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Today's health care environments require organizational competence as well as clinical skill. Economically driven business paradigms and the principles underlying the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 emphasize integrated, collaborative care delivered using transdisciplinary service models. Attention must be focused on achieving patient care goals while demonstrating an appreciation for the mission, priorities and operational constraints of the provider organization. The educational challenge is to cultivate the ability to negotiate "ideology" or ideal practice with the practical realities of health care provider environments without compromising professional ethics. Competently exercising such ability promotes a sound "profession-in-environment" fit and enhances the recognition of social work as a crucial patient care component.

  5. Social and Health Care Access for the Physically Disabled in 19th Century French-Speaking Switzerland : A Double Process of Exclusion and Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaba, Mariama

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available During the 19th century, an unprecedented process of medicalisation and institutionalisation took place in Europe. The parallel development of urbanised and industrialised areas furthered the densification of a network of care institutions such as infirmaries and dispensaries, whilst medical tourism was developed among the upper classes stimulating the founding of new private clinics. A more institutional kind of care structure for people suffering from a disability also emerged. This medical and/or social care structure was part of a process of integration or exclusion, according to whether the disabled person’s state of health was likely to improve or not. This paper will focus on physically disabled persons, who were vaguely referred to as invalids or as “incurable” in 19th century institutional documents. Being mainly interested in French-speaking Switzerland, I will present the access to social and health care in the cantons of Geneva, Vaud and Neuchâtel.

  6. State-level spending on health care and social services for people living with HIV/AIDS in the USA: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbert-Slagle, Kristina; Ahmed, Shirin; Brewster, Amanda; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2015-01-01

    Every year for the past decade, approximately 50,000 people have been diagnosed with HIV or AIDS in the USA, and the incidence of HIV/AIDS varies considerably from state to state. Studies have shown that health care services, most notably treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy, can help people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) live healthier, longer lives, and prevent the spread of HIV from person to person. In addition, social services, such as housing support and provision of meals, have also shown to be important for helping PLWHA adhere to antiretroviral treatment and maintain contact with health care providers for improved health outcomes. Although spending on health care and social services for PLWHA varies across the USA, the relationship between state-level spending on these services and HIV/AIDS-related outcomes is not clear. We therefore conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature to identify studies that explore state-level spending on health care services and/or social services for PLWHA and HIV/AIDS-related health outcomes in the USA.

  7. Defining and understanding the relationship between professional identity and interprofessional responsibility: implications for educating health and social care students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joynes, Viktoria C T

    2018-03-01

    This paper is concerned with exploring the relationship between perceptions of professional identities, interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice. It seeks to introduce the concept of interprofessional responsibility as both a shift in the way in which to conceptualise the professional identity of Health and Social Care (H&SC) staff and as a new set of practices that help to inform the way in which students are prepared for collaborative working. The presented research, undertaken as part of a Ph.D. study, is based upon semi-structured interviews (n = 33) with H&SC staff who were recruited from both the United Kingdom (UK) Health Service and UK universities. Drawing upon thematic analysis of the data, the results of the research identified that previous conceptualisations of professional identity aligned to a whole profession do not relate to the way in which professionals perceive their identities. Senior professionals claimed to be more comfortable with their own professional identity, and with working across professional boundaries, than junior colleagues. Academic staff also identified that much IPE currently taught in universities serves the purpose of box-ticking rather than being delivered in meaningful way. It is proposed that the findings have implications for the way in which IPE is currently taught, and that adoption of the proposed concept of 'interprofessional responsibility' may help address some of the concerns these findings raise.

  8. Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists’ perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from former Canadian medical tourists regarding the use of an information sheet to address this knowledge gap and raise awareness of the safety and ethical concerns related to medical tourism. Results According to feedback provided in interviews with former Canadian medical tourists, the majority of participants responded positively to the information sheet and indicated that this document prompted them to engage in further consideration of these issues. Participants indicated some frustration after reading the information sheet regarding a lack of know-how in terms of learning more about the concerns discussed in the document and changing their decision-making. This frustration was due to participants’ desperation for medical care, a topic which participants frequently discussed regarding ethical concerns related to health care provision. Conclusions The overall perceptions of former medical tourists indicate that an information sheet may promote further consideration of ethical concerns of medical tourism. However, given that these interviews were performed with former medical tourists, it remains unknown whether such a document might impact upon the decision-making of prospective medical tourists. Furthermore, participants indicated a need for an additional tool such as a website for continued discussion about these concerns. As such, along with dissemination of the information sheet

  9. Preventive health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicines or supplements that you are taking WHY PREVENTIVE HEALTH CARE IS IMPORTANT Even if you feel ... want to schedule a visit . Another part of preventive health is learning to recognize changes in your ...

  10. Primary health services in Ecuador: comparative costs, quality, and equity of care in Ministry of Health and rural social security facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, R L; Castro, C E; Gomez, L C; Gwynne, G; Tinajero Baca, C L; Zschock, D K

    1991-01-01

    This study of costs, quality and financial equity of primary health services in Ecuador, based on 1985 data, examines three assumptions, common in international health, concerning Ministry of Health (MOH) and Social Security (SS) programs. The assumptions are that MOH services are less costly than SS services, that they are of lower quality than SS services, and that MOH programs are more equitable in terms of the distribution of funds available for PHC among different population groups. Full costs of a range of primary health services were estimated by standard accounting techniques for 15 typical health care establishments, 8 operated by the MOH and 7 by the rural SS program (RSSP), serving rural and peri-urban populations in the two major geographical regions of Ecuador. Consistent with the conventional premise, MOH average costs were much lower than RSSP costs for several important types of services, especially those provided by physicians. Little difference was found for dental care. The lower MOH physician service costs appeared to be attributable primarily to lower personnel compensation (only partially offset by lesser productivity) and to greater economies of scope. Several measures of the quality of care were applied, with varying results. Based on staff differences and patterns of expenditures on resource inputs, notably drugs, RSSP quality appeared higher, as assumed. However, contrary to expectation, a questionnaire assessment of staff knowledge and procedures favored the MOH for quality. Program equity was judged in terms of per capita budgeted expenditures (additional measures, such as the likelihood of receiving necessary care, would have required household survey data beyond the scope of this program-based study). The results support the assumption of greater MOH financial equity, as its program reveals less variation in budgeted expenditures between different population groups covered. Additional evidence of equity, using other indicators, would

  11. Chiropractic care and public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Claire; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Côté, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this collaborative summary is to document current chiropractic involvement in the public health movement, reflect on social ecological levels of influence as a profession, and summarize the relationship of chiropractic to the current public health topics of: safety, health issues...... through the lifespan, and effective participation in community health issues. The questions that are addressed include: Is spinal manipulative therapy for neck and low-back pain a public health problem? What is the role of chiropractic care in prevention or reduction of musculoskeletal injuries...... of prevention and public health? What role do citizen-doctors of chiropractic have in organizing community action on health-related matters? How can our future chiropractic graduates become socially responsible agents of change?...

  12. Randomized Trial of Social Rehabilitation and Integrated Health Care for Older People with Severe Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueser, Kim T.; Pratt, Sarah I.; Bartels, Stephen J.; Swain, Karin; Forester, Brent; Cather, Corinne; Feldman, James

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The Helping Older People Experience Success (HOPES) program was developed to improve psychosocial functioning and reduce long-term medical burden in older people with severe mental illness (SMI) living in the community. HOPES includes 1 year of intensive skills training and health management, followed by a 1-year maintenance phase.…

  13. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Early detection and treatment of these morbidities could prevent deterioration. The aim of the survey was to determine and compare the prevalence of ..... interventions. Increasing the detection rate of mental morbidity in the community is fundamental. The inclusion of mental health care as a component of primary health ...

  14. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    large extent can reduce financial barriers to options; including government budgetary health care access ..... managers and demand-side factors, such as. International Health Conference. New adverse selection in ... patients in the scheme, and patient demand for. Information Centre. 1995. insured services. Many previous ...

  15. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    mania) and anxiety disorders (General anxiety, agoraphobia, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post traumatic stress disorder). Conclusion: Findings suggest that there is need to consider mental and psychological care of clients with HIV/AIDS to minimise the prevalence of psychiatric disorder among HIV ...

  16. Towards Sustainable Health Care Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro ROMANELLI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Health care organizations have to develop a sustainable path for creating public value by seeking legitimacy for building and maintaining public trust with patients as social and economic institutions creating value and sustaining both health and wealth for people and communities within society. Health care organizations having at disposal decreasing resources and meeting increasing demands of citizens are following an unsustainable path. Designing sustainable health care systems and organizations is emerging as a strategic goal for developing the wealth of people and communities over time. Building sustainable organizations relies on valuing human resources, designing efficient and effective processes, using technology for better managing the relationships within and outside organizations. Sustainable health care organizations tend to rediscover the importance of human resource management and policies for effectively improving communication with patients and building trust-based relationships. While processes of accreditation contribute to legitimizing effectiveness and quality of health care services and efficient processes, introducing and using new information and communication technologies (ICTs and informatics helps communication leading to restore trust-based relationships between health care institutions and patients for value creation within society.

  17. Diarrhea Associated Costs among Children Less Than 5 Years of Age from Health Care Provider and Social Perspectives in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albana Ahmeti

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: The high burden of diarrhea associated costs for the Albanian health care system finances dictates the necessity to assess the costs of a potential rotavirus immunization program in order to prioritize the interventions based on scientific evidence.

  18. The role of autonomy and social support in the relation between psychosocial safety climate and stress in health care workers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Havermans, B.M; Boot, C.R.L; Houtman, I.L.D; Brouwers, E.P.M; Anema, J.R; van der Beek, A.J

    2017-01-01

    .... Methods In a cross-sectional study, psychosocial safety climate, stress, autonomy, co-worker support, and supervisor support were assessed using questionnaires, in a sample of health care workers (N = 277...

  19. Late-stage, primary open-angle glaucoma in Europe: social and health care maintenance costs and quality of life of patients from 4 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, J.; Aagren, M.; Arnavielle, S.

    2008-01-01

    maintenance costs of late-stage glaucoma amounted to euro830 (+/-445) on average. Average home help costs were more than 3 times higher. QoL, on average, was 0.65 (+/-0.28). QoL was positively correlated with the level of visual acuity in the patients' best eye. On the other hand, visual acuity was also...... positively correlated to health care costs, but negatively correlated to costs of home help. CONCLUSIONS: The study was limited by its observational, uncontrolled design. The finding that late-stage glaucoma is associated with higher home help costs than health care maintenance costs suggests that potential...... savings from a better preventive treatment are to be found for social care payers rather than health care payers Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6...

  20. VA Health Care Facilities Locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... map [a-z] More VA More VA Health Health Care Information A-Z Health Topic Finder My Health ... General QUICK LIST Apply for Benefits Apply for Health Care Prescriptions My Health e Vet eBenefits Life Insurance ...

  1. Guidance for health and social care providers, principles of good practice in medication reconciliation

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, Marie

    2017-07-17

    Healthcare organisations have a responsibility for ensuring that the governance of workplace settings creates a culture that supports good professional practice. Encouraging such a culture needs to start from an understanding of the factors that make it difficult for health professionals to raise issues of concern in relation to patient safety. The focus of this study is to determine whether a customised education intervention, developed as part of the study, with interns and senior house officers (SHOs) can imbue a culture of medical professionalism in relation to patient safety and support junior doctors to raise issues of concern, while shaping a culture of responsiveness and learning.

  2. SOCIAL REPRESENTATIONS OF THE HIV/AIDS: PERCEPTION OF THE PRIMARY HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Ayres Navarro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar as representações sociais do HIV/Aids dos profissionais da Atenção Primária à Saúde. Métodos: participaram do estudo 240 profissionais de níveis superior, médio e apoio, em exercício de suas atividades em João Pessoa-PB. Para coleta de dados foram utilizados a entrevista e o Teste de Associação Livre de Palavras (TALP. Os dados foram analisados pelo Microsoft Excel e software Alceste 2010. Resultados: a análise resultou em oito classes semânticas: Disseminação viral e reduação de danos; Educação como prevenção; Sentimentos vivenciados pelo portador; Possibilidades Terapêuticas; Vulnerabilidade ao HIV; Sentimentos diante do diagnóstico; Implicações biopsicossociais da aids e Sexo. Conclusão: o coquetel obteve o maior valor atribuído pelos profissionais, resultante da divulgação por meios de comunicação do advento dos anti-retrovirais. O isolamento do portador também se apresentou com um valor significativo, configurando-se um desafio para as ações dos profissionais ao tentar proporcionar a inserção social das pessoas convivendo com aids.

  3. Sex differences in the relative contribution of social and clinical factors to the Health Utilities Index Mark 2 measure of health-related quality of life in older home care clients

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan David B; Zhang Jenny X; Walker Jennifer D; Kang Jian; Maxwell Colleen J; Feeny David H; Wodchis Walter P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The heterogeneity evident among home care clients highlights the need for greater understanding of the clinical and social determinants of multi-dimensional health-related quality of life (HRQL) indices and of potential sex-differences in these determinants. We examined the relative contribution of social and clinical factors to HRQL among older home care clients and explored whether any of the observed associations varied by sex. Methods The Canadian-US sample included 51...

  4. Benchmarking HIV health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV-patients based on four key indicators. METHODS: Four indicators of health care were...... assessed: Compliance with current guidelines on initiation of 1) combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), 2) chemoprophylaxis, 3) frequency of laboratory monitoring, and 4) virological response to cART (proportion of patients with HIV-RNA 90% of time on cART). RESULTS: 7097 Euro...... to North, patients from other regions had significantly lower odds of virological response; the difference was most pronounced for East and Argentina (adjusted OR 0.16[95%CI 0.11-0.23, p HIV health care utilization...

  5. Health care entrepreneurship: financing innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazier, Kyle L; Metzler, Bridget

    2006-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is often described as the ability to create new ventures from new or existing concepts, ideas and visions. There has been significant entrepreneurial response to the changes in the scientific and social underpinnings of health care services delivery. However, a growing portion of the economic development driving health care industry expansion is threatened further by longstanding use of financing models that are suboptimal for health care ventures. The delayed pace of entrepreneurial activity in this industry is in part a response to the general economy and markets, but also due to the lack of capital for new health care ventures. The recent dearth of entrepreneurial activities in the health services sector may also due to failure to consider new approaches to partnerships and strategic ventures, despite their mutually beneficial organizational and financing potential. As capital becomes more scarce for innovators, it is imperative that those with new and creative ideas for health and health care improvement consider techniques for capital acquisition that have been successful in other industries and at similar stages of development. The capital and added expertise can allow entrepreneurs to leverage resources, dampen business fluctuations, and strengthen long term prospects.

  6. Social Competence in Infants and Toddlers with Special Health Care Needs: The Roles of Parental Knowledge, Expectations, Attunement, and Attitudes toward Child Independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Zand

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Little research has empirically addressed the relationships among parental knowledge of child development, parental attunement, parental expectations, and child independence in predicting the social competence of infants and toddlers with special health care needs. We used baseline data from the Strengthening Families Project, a prevention intervention study that tested Bavolek’s Nurturing Program for Parents and Their Children with Health Challenges to explore the roles of these variables in predicting social competence in infants and toddlers with special health care needs. Bivariate relationships among the study variables were explored and used to develop and test a model for predicting social competence among these children. Study findings pointed to a combination of indirect and direct influences of parent variables in predicting social competence. Results indicated that parents who encouraged healthy behaviors for developing a sense of power/independence were more likely to have children with social competence developing on schedule. Elements related to parental expectations, however, did not have the hypothesized relationships to social competence. The present study provides preliminary data to support the development of knowledge based interventions. Within medical settings, such interventions may indeed maximize benefit while minimizing cost.

  7. Social Competence in Infants and Toddlers with Special Health Care Needs: The Roles of Parental Knowledge, Expectations, Attunement, and Attitudes toward Child Independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zand, Debra; Pierce, Katherine; Thomson, Nicole; Baig, M. Waseem; Teodorescu, Cristiana; Nibras, Sohail; Maxim, Rolanda

    2014-01-01

    Little research has empirically addressed the relationships among parental knowledge of child development, parental attunement, parental expectations, and child independence in predicting the social competence of infants and toddlers with special health care needs. We used baseline data from the Strengthening Families Project, a prevention intervention study that tested Bavolek’s Nurturing Program for Parents and Their Children with Health Challenges to explore the roles of these variables in predicting social competence in infants and toddlers with special health care needs. Bivariate relationships among the study variables were explored and used to develop and test a model for predicting social competence among these children. Study findings pointed to a combination of indirect and direct influences of parent variables in predicting social competence. Results indicated that parents who encouraged healthy behaviors for developing a sense of power/independence were more likely to have children with social competence developing on schedule. Elements related to parental expectations, however, did not have the hypothesized relationships to social competence. The present study provides preliminary data to support the development of knowledge based interventions. Within medical settings, such interventions may indeed maximize benefit while minimizing cost. PMID:27417463

  8. Health-Care Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    The Broad Acres clinic is one of 1,500 school-based health centers nationwide that bring a wide range of medical, nutritional, and mental-health care to millions of students and their families. The centers provide an important safety net for children and adolescents--particularly the more than 10 million today who lack health insurance, according…

  9. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  10. Organizing Rural Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    The liberalization of health care in the course of three decades of ‘reform and opening up’ has given people in rural China access to a diverse range of treatment options, but the health care system has also been marred by accusations of price hikes, fake pharmaceuticals, and medical malpractice...... roads to healing. The recent introduction of new rural cooperative medicine in the township represents an attempt to bring the state back in and address popular concern with the cost and quality of health care. While superficially reminiscent of the traditional socialist system, this new state attempt...

  11. Undermining patient and public engagement and limiting its impact: the consequences of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 on collective patient and public involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritter, Jonathan Q; Koivusalo, Meri

    2013-06-01

    Patient and public involvement has been at the heart of UK health policy for more than two decades. This commitment to putting patients at the heart of the British National Health Service (NHS) has become a central principle helping to ensure equity, patient safety and effectiveness in the health system. The recent Health and Social Care Act 2012 is the most significant reform of the NHS since its foundation in 1948. More radically, this legislation undermines the principle of patient and public involvement, public accountability and returns the power for prioritisation of health services to an unaccountable medical elite. This legislation marks a sea-change in the approach to patient and public involvement in the UK and signals a shift in the commitment of the UK government to patient-centred care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Civil society and the Health and Social Care Act in England and Wales: theory and praxis for the twenty-first century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scambler, Graham; Scambler, Sasha; Speed, Ewen

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we revisit the notion of civil society in the light of recent attempts to privatize health care in England via the passing of the Health and Social Care Act of 2013. This legislation promises a re-commodification of the National Health Service (NHS) in England. The Bill was bitterly contested during its passage through parliament, most vigorously in 2011. Much of the opposition occurred at a time of widespread, global rebellion, most notably in the 'Arab uprisings' and through the 'occupy movement'. Despite a plethora of protests, we argue, a non-porous boundary between what we call the 'protest sector' of civil society and the wider public sphere of the lifeworld has become apparent in England. A good deal of collective action, whether campaign-focused (like opposition to the Health and Social Care Bill) or more generalized (like rejections of corporate greed), has so far proved ineffective, at least in the short-term; no crisis of legitimation is apparent. We highlight a new 'class/command dynamic', leading to oligarchic rule, in the present era of financial capitalism. We use this health care case-study to re-examine the notion of civil society and its changing properties in what Castells calls a 'networked society'. The contribution ends with a discussion of the role of the sociologist re-civil society and the advocacy of both 'action' and 'foresight sociologies'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of Online Social Support in Supporting and Educating Parents of Young Children With Special Health Care Needs in the United States: A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staten, Lisa K; Rodgers, Rylin Christine; Denne, Scott C

    2016-01-01

    Background When parents of young children with special health care needs (CSHCN) receive their child’s diagnosis, they encounter information they may not understand, emotions they may not know how to cope with, and questions about their child’s immediate and long-term future that frequently lack answers. The challenge of health care providers is how to prepare parents for caring for their CSHCN, for coping with any resulting challenges, and for accessing the systems and services that can assist them. Objective The purpose of this work was to review evidence of the information and support needs of parents of young CSHCN and to determine whether online social support can serve as an avenue for learning and empowerment for these parents. Methods A scoping review identified the challenges, coping mechanisms, and support needs among parents of CSHCN, and the reach and effectiveness of digital technologies with these families and health care providers. We also conducted interviews with professionals serving parents of CSHCN. Results The literature review and interviews suggested that parents best learn the information they need, and cope with the emotional challenges of raising a CSHCN, with support from other parents of CSHCN, and that young parents in recent years have most often been finding this parent-to-parent support through digital media, particularly social media, consistent with the theory of online social support. Evidence also shows that social media, particularly Facebook, is used by nearly all women aged 18-29 years across racial and socioeconomic lines in the United States. Conclusions Parents of young CSHCN experience significant stress but gain understanding, receive support, and develop the ability to care for and be advocates for their child through parent-to-parent emotional and informational social support. Online social support is most effective with young adults of childbearing age, with social media and apps being the most useful within the

  14. The Role of Online Social Support in Supporting and Educating Parents of Young Children With Special Health Care Needs in the United States: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHoff, Beth A; Staten, Lisa K; Rodgers, Rylin Christine; Denne, Scott C

    2016-12-22

    When parents of young children with special health care needs (CSHCN) receive their child's diagnosis, they encounter information they may not understand, emotions they may not know how to cope with, and questions about their child's immediate and long-term future that frequently lack answers. The challenge of health care providers is how to prepare parents for caring for their CSHCN, for coping with any resulting challenges, and for accessing the systems and services that can assist them. The purpose of this work was to review evidence of the information and support needs of parents of young CSHCN and to determine whether online social support can serve as an avenue for learning and empowerment for these parents. A scoping review identified the challenges, coping mechanisms, and support needs among parents of CSHCN, and the reach and effectiveness of digital technologies with these families and health care providers. We also conducted interviews with professionals serving parents of CSHCN. The literature review and interviews suggested that parents best learn the information they need, and cope with the emotional challenges of raising a CSHCN, with support from other parents of CSHCN, and that young parents in recent years have most often been finding this parent-to-parent support through digital media, particularly social media, consistent with the theory of online social support. Evidence also shows that social media, particularly Facebook, is used by nearly all women aged 18-29 years across racial and socioeconomic lines in the United States. Parents of young CSHCN experience significant stress but gain understanding, receive support, and develop the ability to care for and be advocates for their child through parent-to-parent emotional and informational social support. Online social support is most effective with young adults of childbearing age, with social media and apps being the most useful within the theoretical framework of social support. This opens new

  15. Social class inequalities in the utilization of health care and preventive services in Spain, a country with a national health system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido-Cumbrera, Marco; Borrell, Carme; Palència, Laia; Espelt, Albert; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Pasarín, M. Isabel; Kunst, Anton

    2010-01-01

    In Spain, despite the existence of a National Health System (NHS), the utilization of some curative health services is related to social class. This study assesses (1) whether these inequalities are also observed for preventive health services and (2) the role of additional private health insurance

  16. Addressing Social Determinants of Health by Integrating Assessment of Caregiver-Child Attachment into Community Based Primary Health Care in Urban Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Racheal Nduku Ndambuki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A principle strategic insight of the Final Report for WHO’s Commission on Social Determinants of Health (SDOH is that the nurturant qualities of the environments where children grow up, live, and learn matter the most for their development. A key determinant of early childhood development is the establishment of a secure attachment between a caregiver and child. We report initial field-tests of the integration of caregiver-child attachment assessment by community health workers (CHWs as a routine component of Primary Health Care (PHC, focusing on households with children under 5 years of age in three slum communities near Nairobi, Kenya. Of the 2,560 children assessed from July–December 2010, 2,391 (90.2% were assessed as having a secure attachment with a parent or other caregiver, while 259 (9.8% were assessed as being at risk for having an insecure attachment. Parent workshops were provided as a primary intervention, with re-enforcement of teachings by CHWs on subsequent home visits. Reassessment of attachment by CHWs showed positive changes. Assessment of caregiver-child attachment in the setting of routine home visits by CHWs in a community-based PHC context is feasible and may yield valuable insights into household-level risks, a critical step for understanding and addressing the SDOH.

  17. A prospective study of leisure-time physical activity and mental health in Swedish health care workers and social insurance officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H; Rödjer, Lars; Hadzibajramovic, Emina; Börjesson, Mats; Ahlborg, Gunnar

    2010-11-01

    This study analyzes longitudinal associations between self-reported leisure-time physical activity (PA) and perceived stress, burnout and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Cohort data collected in 2004 and 2006 from health care and social insurance workers in western Sweden (2694 women; 420 men) were analyzed. Cox regression was conducted to examine associations between baseline levels of PA and mental health (MH) problems 2 years later. Cross-sectional analysis show that individuals reporting either light physical activity (LPA) or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were less likely to report high levels of perceived stress, burnout and symptoms of depression and anxiety, as compared to individuals reporting a sedentary lifestyle. The risks of symptoms of depression, burnout, and high stress levels at follow-up were significantly lower for those reporting LPA or MVPA at baseline. For symptoms of anxiety, an activity level corresponding to MVPA was required. Participation in PA appeared to lower the risk of developing MH problems two years later. This relationship involved LPA and MVPA regarding feelings of depression, burnout and perceived stress, and exclusively MVPA regarding feelings of anxiety. The implications of these findings are important, as preventive strategies for psychosocial stress and mental health problems are needed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Primary Health Care Department, Ikpoba Okha Local Government Area, Benin City, Nigeria. 1. 2. Adam V.Y , Iseh A.E. ABSTRACT. Introduction. The level of accurate knowledge adolescents have about HIV/AIDS, is important to enhance effective preventive actions, which ultimately result in a decrease in the incidence of ...

  19. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterobacter spp. 1. 0.6. Table V: Proportion of Respondent that enter the Ward with Handheld Device. Table VI: Proportion of Respondent that Disinfect Phones and what they Disinfect with. Table VII: Hand Hygiene Practices. JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY HEALTH CARE VOL. 27, NO 1, MARCH ...

  20. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    globally, (Ischaemic heart diseases, Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), which. 5 cerebrovascular diseases, lower ... tract infections, chronic obstructive than 86% of the world's population. Tobacco pulmonary diseases ... and delivery of smoking cessation services among health care workers in Abuja. A cross sectional ...

  1. Resilient health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollnagel, E.; Braithwaite, J.; Wears, R. L.

    Health care is everywhere under tremendous pressure with regard to efficiency, safety, and economic viability - to say nothing of having to meet various political agendas - and has responded by eagerly adopting techniques that have been useful in other industries, such as quality management, lean...... production, and high reliability. This has on the whole been met with limited success because health care as a non-trivial and multifaceted system differs significantly from most traditional industries. In order to allow health care systems to perform as expected and required, it is necessary to have...... engineering's unique approach emphasises the usefulness of performance variability, and that successes and failures have the same aetiology. This book contains contributions from acknowledged international experts in health care, organisational studies and patient safety, as well as resilience engineering...

  2. Health care engineering management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzembski, W B

    1980-01-01

    Today, health care engineering management is merely a concept of dreamers, with most engineering decisions in health care being made by nonengineers. It is the purpose of this paper to present a rationale for an